Science.gov

Sample records for photochemical solar cells

  1. Methods for the photochemical utilization of solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwerzel, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    The paper considers the 'ground rules' which govern the efficiency of photochemical solar energy conversion and then summarizes the most promising approaches in each of three categories: photochemically assisted thermal systems for the heating and/or cooling of structures; photogalvanic systems for the production of electrical power in applications, such as photorechargeable batteries or inexpensive 'solar cells'; and photochemical formation of fuels for combustion and for use as chemical feedstocks or foods. Three concepts for the photochemical utilization of solar energy in space are found to be particularly promising: (1) photochemical trans-cis isomerization of indigold dyes for photoassisted heating or cooling, (2) the redox stabilized photoelectrolysis cell for the production of hydrogen (and/or oxygen or other useful chemicals), and (3) the liquid-junction photovoltaic cell for the production of electrical power.

  2. Improving the light-harvesting of second generation solar cells with photochemical upconversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuen Yap; Fückel, Burkhard; Schulze, Tim; MacQueen, Rowan W.; Tayebjee, Murad J. Y.; Danos, Andrew; Khoury, Tony; Clady, Raphaël. G. C. R.; Ekins-Daukes, N. J.; Crossley, Maxwell J.; Stannowski, Bernd; Lips, Klaus; Schmidt, Timothy W.

    2012-09-01

    Photovoltaics (PV) offer a solution for the development of sustainable energy sources, relying on the sheer abundance of sunlight: More sunlight falls on the Earth's surface in one hour than is required by its inhabitants in a year. However, it is imperative to manage the wide distribution of photon energies available in order to generate more cost efficient PV devices because single threshold PV devices are fundamentally limited to a maximum conversion efficiency, the Shockley-Queisser (SQ) limit. Recent progress has enabled the production of c-Si cells with efficiencies as high as 25%,1 close to the limiting efficiency of ˜30%. But these cells are rather expensive, and ultimately the cost of energy is determined by the ratio of system cost and efficiency of the PV device. A strategy to radically decrease this ratio is to circumvent the SQ limit in cheaper, second generation PV devices. One promising approach is the use of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H), where film thicknesses on the order of several 100nm are sufficient. Unfortunately, the optical threshold of a-Si:H is rather high (1.7-1.8 eV) and the material suffers from light-induced degradation. Thinner absorber layers in a-Si:H devices are generally more stable than thicker films due to the better charge carrier extraction, but at the expense of reduced conversion efficiencies, especially in the red part of the solar spectrum (absorption losses). Hence for higher bandgap materials, which includes a-Si as well as organic and dye-sensitized cells, the major loss mechanism is the inability to harvest low energy photons.

  3. Photochemical conversion of solar energy in the environment. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Zepp, R.G.

    1991-01-01

    Past research on photochemistry in the environment has focused on gas phase reactions in the atmosphere. Recently, however, environmentally significant photoreactions have been discovered in natural waters (i.e., the sea, lakes, and rivers), on soil surfaces, and in atmospheric condensed phases. These new investigations have been stimulated in part by interest in developing a scientific understanding of the role of photochemical processes in the biogeochemical cycles of various elements. In addition, other studies have explored the role of natural photochemical processes in cleansing the environemnt of various waste materials or, in some cases, in converting the wastes to more toxic substances. In the paper, current research results on the photochemical conversion of solar energy in aquatic environments and on soil and metal oxide surfaces are presented. Rate equations and products for selected homogeneous and heterogeneous photoreactions that occur in these systems are described. Data are presented for direct and sensitized photoreactions and for sunlight-initiated free radical reactions. (Copyright (c) 1991 Kluwer Academic Publishers.)

  4. Solar photochemical process engineering for production of fuels and chemicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biddle, J. R.; Peterson, D. B.; Fujita, T.

    1985-01-01

    The engineering costs and performance of a nominal 25,000 scmd (883,000 scfd) photochemical plant to produce dihydrogen from water were studied. Two systems were considered, one based on flat-plate collector/reactors and the other on linear parabolic troughs. Engineering subsystems were specified including the collector/reactor, support hardware, field transport piping, gas compression equipment, and balance-of-plant (BOP) items. Overall plant efficiencies of 10.3 and 11.6 percent are estimated for the flat-plate and trough systems, respectively, based on assumed solar photochemical efficiencies of 12.9 and 14.6 percent. Because of the opposing effects of concentration ratio and operating temperature on efficiency, it was concluded that reactor cooling would be necessary with the trough system. Both active and passive cooling methods were considered. Capital costs and energy costs, for both concentrating and non-concentrating systems, were determined and their sensitivity to efficiency and economic parameters were analyzed. The overall plant efficiency is the single most important factor in determining the cost of the fuel.

  5. Solar photochemical process engineering for production of fuels and chemicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biddle, J. R.; Peterson, D. B.; Fujita, T.

    1984-01-01

    The engineering costs and performance of a nominal 25,000 scmd (883,000 scfd) photochemical plant to produce dihydrogen from water were studied. Two systems were considered, one based on flat-plate collector/reactors and the other on linear parabolic troughs. Engineering subsystems were specified including the collector/reactor, support hardware, field transport piping, gas compression equipment, and balance-of-plant (BOP) items. Overall plant efficiencies of 10.3 and 11.6% are estimated for the flat-plate and trough systems, respectively, based on assumed solar photochemical efficiencies of 12.9 and 14.6%. Because of the opposing effects of concentration ratio and operating temperature on efficiency, it was concluded that reactor cooling would be necessary with the trough system. Both active and passive cooling methods were considered. Capital costs and energy costs, for both concentrating and non-concentrating systems, were determined and their sensitivity to efficiency and economic parameters were analyzed. The overall plant efficiency is the single most important factor in determining the cost of the fuel.

  6. Solar Irradiation of Bilirubin: An Experiment in Photochemical Oxidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillay A. E.; Salih, F. M.

    2006-01-01

    An experiment in photochemical oxidation, which deals with bilirubin, a well-known light-sensitive biological compound that is pedagogically ideal for photochemical experiments at tertiary institutes, is presented. The experiment would benefit students in chemistry who eventually branch out into the health sciences or biochemistry.

  7. Cell microarrays on photochemically modified polytetrafluoroethylene.

    PubMed

    Mikulikova, Regina; Moritz, Sieglinde; Gumpenberger, Thomas; Olbrich, Michael; Romanin, Christoph; Bacakova, Lucie; Svorcik, Vaclav; Heitz, Johannes

    2005-09-01

    We studied the adhesion, proliferation, and viability of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK) on modified spots at polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surfaces. The viability of the cells was assessed using an aqueous non-radioactive cell proliferation assay. Round spots with a diameter of 100 microm were modified by exposure to the ultraviolet (UV) light of a Xe(2)(*)-excimer lamp at a wavelength of 172 nm in an ammonia atmosphere employing a contact mask. The spots were arranged in a quadratic pattern with 300 microm center-to-center spot distances. With optimized degree of modification, the cells adhered to the modified spots with a high degree of selectivity (70-90%). The adhered cells on the spots proliferated. This resulted in a significant increase in the number of adhering HUVECS or HEK cells after seeding and in the formation of confluent cell clusters after 3-4 days. With higher start seeding density, these clusters were not only confined to the modified spots but extended several micrometer to the neighborhood. The high potential of the cell microarrays for gene analysis in living cells was demonstrated with HEK cells transfected by yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). PMID:15860214

  8. Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Heat Exchanger Method (HEM) produces high efficiency crystal ingots in an automated well-insulated furnace offering low equipment, labor and energy costs. The "grown" silicon crystals are used to make solar cells, or photovoltaic cells which convert sunlight directly into electricity. The HEM method is used by Crystal Systems, Inc. and was developed under a NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory contract. The square wafers which are the result of the process are sold to companies manufacturing solar panels.

  9. High-temperature photochemical destruction of toxic organic wastes using concentrated solar radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dellinger, B.; Graham, J.L.; Berman, J.M.; Taylor, P.H.

    1994-05-01

    Application of concentrated solar energy has been proposed to be a viable waste disposal option. Specifically, this concept of solar induced high-temperature photochemistry is based on the synergistic contribution of concentrated infrared (IR) radiation, which acts as an intense heating source, and near ultraviolet and visible (UV-VIS) radiation, which can induce destructive photochemical processes. Some significant advances have been made in the theoretical framework of high-temperature photochemical processes (Section 2) and development of experimental techniques for their study (Section 3). Basic thermal/photolytic studies have addressed the effect of temperature on the photochemical destruction of pure compounds (Section 4). Detailed studies of the destruction of reaction by-products have been conducted on selected waste molecules (Section 5). Some very limited results are available on the destruction of mixtures (Section 6). Fundamental spectroscopic studies have been recently initiated (Section 7). The results to date have been used to conduct some relatively simple scale-up studies of the solar detoxification process. More recent work has focused on destruction of compounds that do not directly absorb solar radiation. Research efforts have focused on homogeneous as well as heterogeneous methods of initiating destructive reaction pathways (Section 9). Although many conclusions at this point must be considered tentative due to lack of basic research, a clearer picture of the overall process is emerging (Section 10). However, much research remains to be performed and most follow several veins, including photochemical, spectroscopic, combustion kinetic, and engineering scale-up (Section 11).

  10. The impact of aerosols on solar ultraviolet radiation an photochemical smog

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, R.R.; Kondragunta, S.; Stenchikov, G.

    1997-10-31

    Photochemical smog, or ground-level ozone, has been the most recalcitrant of air pollution problems, but reductions in emissions of sulfur and hydrocarbons may yield unanticipated benefits in air quality. While sulfate and some organic aerosol particles scatter solar radiation back into space and can cool Earth`s surface, they also change the actinic flux of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Observations and numerical models show that UV-scattering particles in the boundary layer accelerate photochemical reactions and smog production, but UV-absorbing aerosols such as mineral dust and soot inhibit smog production. Results could have major implications for the control of air pollution. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Photochemical hazes in planetary atmospheres: solar system bodies and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanaka, Hiroshi; Cruikshank, Dale P.; McKay, Christopher P.

    2015-11-01

    Recent transit observations of exoplanets have demonstrated the possibility of a wide prevalence of haze/cloud layers at high altitudes. Hydrocarbon photochemical haze could be the candidate for such haze particles on warm sub-Neptunes, but the lack of evidence for methane poses a puzzle for such hydrocarbon photochemical haze. The CH4/CO ratios in planetary atmospheres vary substantially from their temperature and dynamics. An understanding of haze formation rates and plausible optical properties in a wide diversity of planetary atmospheres is required to interpret the current and future observations.Here, we focus on how atmospheric compositions, specifically CH4/CO ratios, affect the haze production rates and their optical properties. We have conducted a series of cold plasma experiments to constrain the haze mass production rates from gas mixtures of various CH4/CO ratios diluted either in H2 or N2 atmosphere. The mass production rates in the N2-CH4-CO system are much greater than those in the H2-CH4-CO system. They are rather insensitive to the CH4/CO ratios larger than at 0.3. Significant formation of solid material is observed both in H2-CO and N2-CO systems without CH4 in the initial gas mixtures. The complex refractive indices were derived for haze samples from N2-CH4, H2-CH4, and H2-CO gas mixtures. These are the model atmospheres for Titan, Saturn, and exoplanets, respectively. The imaginary part of the complex refractive indices in the UV-Vis region are distinct among these samples, which can be utilized for modeling these planetary atmospheres.

  12. Actinometric measurement of solar ultraviolet and development of a weighted solar UV integral. [photochemical reaction rate determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, A.; Coulbert, C.

    1978-01-01

    An actinometer has been developed to measure outdoor irradiance in the range 295-400 nm. Actinometric measurements of radiation are based on determination of photochemical reaction rates for reactions of known quantum efficiency. Actinometers have the advantage of providing irradiance data over surfaces of difficult accessibility; in addition, actinometrically determined irradiance data are wavelength weighted and therefore provide a useful means of assessing the degradation rates of polymers employed in solar energy systems.

  13. Supramolecular solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbaiyan, Navaneetha Krishnan

    Supramolecular chemistry - chemistry of non-covalent bonds including different type of intermolecular interactions viz., ion-pairing, ion-dipole, dipole-dipole, hydrogen bonding, cation-pi and Van der Waals forces. Applications based on supramolecular concepts for developing catalysts, molecular wires, rectifiers, photochemical sensors have been evolved during recent years. Mimicking natural photosynthesis to build energy harvesting devices has become important for generating energy and solar fuels that could be stored for future use. In this dissertation, supramolecular chemistry is being explored for creating light energy harvesting devices. Photosensitization of semiconductor metal oxide nanoparticles, such as titanium dioxide (TiO2) and tin oxide (SnO2,), via host-guest binding approach has been explored. In the first part, self-assembly of different porphyrin macrocyclic compounds on TiO2 layer using axial coordination approach is explored. Supramolecular dye sensitized solar cells built based on this approach exhibited Incident Photon Conversion Efficiency (IPCE) of 36% for a porphyrin-ferrocene dyad. In the second part, surface modification of SnO2 with water soluble porphyrins and phthalocyanine resulted in successful self-assembly of dimers on SnO2 surface. IPCE more than 50% from 400 - 700 nm is achieved for the supramolecular self-assembled heterodimer photocells is achieved. In summary, the axial ligation and ion-pairing method used as supramolecular tools to build photocells, exhibited highest quantum efficiency of light energy conversion with panchromatic spectral coverage. The reported findings could be applied to create interacting molecular systems for next generation of efficient solar energy harvesting devices.

  14. Mars atmosphere loss and isotopic fractionation by solar-wind-induced sputtering and photochemical escape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakosky, B. M.; Pepin, R. O.; Johnson, R. E.; Fox, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of loss of Mars atmospheric constituents by solar-wind-induced sputtering and by photochemical escape during the last 3.8 b.y. were examined. Sputtering is capable of efficiently removing all species from the upper atmosphere, including the light noble gases; N also is removed by photochemical processes. Due to the diffusive separation by mass above the homopause, removal from the top of the atmosphere will fractionate the isotopes of each species, with the lighter mass being preferentially lost. For C and O, this allows us to determine the size of nonatmospheric reservoirs that mix with the atmosphere; these reserviors can be accounted for by exchange with CO2 adsorbed in the regolith and with H2O in the polar ice deposits. Both simple analytical models and time-dependent models of the loss of volatiles from and supply to the Martian atmosphere were constructed. Both Ar and Ne require continued replenishment from outgassing over geologic time.

  15. Optimization of a Solar Simulator for Planetary-photochemical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Es-sebbar, Et-touhami; Bénilan, Yves; Fray, Nicolas; Cottin, Hervé; Jolly, Antoine; Gazeau, Marie-Claire

    2015-06-01

    Low-temperature microwave-powered plasma based on hydrogen and hydrogen with noble gas mixtures are widely used as a continuous vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) source in laboratory experiments carried out to mimic the photochemistry in astrophysical environments. In this work, we present a study dedicated to optimizing such sources in terms of mono-chromaticity at Ly? (H(Ly?) line at 121.6 nm ˜ 10.2 eV) and high spectral irradiance. We report the influence on the emission spectrum of a wide range of experimental conditions including gas composition (pure H2, pure He, and H2/He mixture), gas pressure, flow rates, and microwave power. The absolute spectral irradiance delivered by this VUV light source has been measured. With a microwave input power of 100 W, the best conditions for producing a quasi-monochromatic source are a 1% H2/He gas mixture at a total pressure of 5 mbar and a flow rate of 2 sccm. By changing the microwave input power from 30 to 120 W, H(Ly?) increases by more than one order of magnitude. A comparison between the current measurements and the solar VUV spectral irradiance is reported over 115-170 nm.

  16. The use of the solar energy in photochemical and photocatalytic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuburovic, Natasha D.; Valent, Vladimir J.; Todorovic, Marija S.

    2003-06-01

    The increasing use of the Earth's natural resources has generated increasing disposal of waste products and contamination of the environment. Many of these products are organic chemicals. Characteristic examples of waste products in the atmosphere, hydrosphere and soil are insecticides, herbicides and pesticides used to protect crops, accidental leakages and spills, and the continual discharge of waste by products in effluent streams from petrochemical and essential industries. To purify these contaminated atmospheres, hydrosphere and soil a procedure and process has been developing with minimal specific consumption energy from a renewable energy source. This paper will provide a survey and analysis of the parameters, thermal efficiency and conversion energy in the use of solar energy in the photochemical and photocatalytic degradation processes of organic effluents. As a consequence of the use of solar energy in the degradation of these effluents, a conceptual solution of a technical-technological and photocatalytic process is given for effluents which are located in watercourses and soil in Yugoslavia.

  17. Solar Photovoltaic Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews information on solar radiation as an energy source. Discusses these topics: the key photovoltaic material; the bank theory of solids; conductors, semiconductors, and insulators; impurity semiconductors; solid-state photovoltaic cell operation; limitations on solar cell efficiency; silicon solar cells; cadmium sulfide/copper (I) sulfide…

  18. Mars atmospheric loss and isotopic fractionation by solar-wind-induced sputtering and photochemical escape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.; Pepin, Robert O.; Johnson, Robert E.; Fox, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    We examine the effects of the loss of Mars atmospheric constituents by solar-wind-induced sputtering and by photochemical escape during the past 3.8 billion years. Sputtering is capable of efficiently removing species from the upper atmosphere, including the light noble gases; nitrogen and oxygen are removed by photochemical processes as well. Due to diffusive separation (by mass) above the homopause, removal from the top of the atmosphere will fractionate the isotopes of each species, with the lighter mass being preferentially lost. For carbon and oxygen, this allows us to determine the size of nonatmospheric reservoirs which mix with the atmosphere; these reservoirs can be CO2 adsorbed in the regolith and H2O in the polar ice caps. We have constructed both simple analytical models and time-dependent models of the loss of volatiles from and supply to the martian atmosphere. Both argon and neon require continued replenishment from outgassing over geologic time. For argon, sputtering loss explains the fractionation of (Ar-36)/(Ar-38) without requiring a distinct epoch of hydrodynamic escape (although fractionation of Xe isotopes still requires very early hydrodynamic loss). For neon, the current (Ne-22)/(Ne-20) ratio represents a balance between loss to space and continued resupply from the interior; the similarity of the ratio to the terrestrial value is coincidental. For nitrogen, the loss by both sputtering and photochemical escape would produce a fractionation of (N-15)/(N-14) larger than observed; an early, thicker carbon dioxide atmosphere could mitigate the nitrogen loss and produce the observed fractionation, as could continued outgassing of juvenile nitorgen. Based on the isotopic constraints, the total amount of carbon dioxide lost over geologic time is probably on the order of tens of millibars rather than a substantial fraction of a bar. The total loss from solar-wind-induced sputtering and photochemical escape, therefore, does not seem able to explain the loss of a putative thick, early atmosphere withput requiring formation of extensive surface carbonate deposits or other nonatmospheric reservoirs for CO2.

  19. An influence of solar activity on latitudinal distribution of atmospheric ozone and temperature in 2-D radiative-photochemical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyominov, I. G.

    1989-01-01

    On the basis of the 2-D radiative-photochemical model of the ozone layer at heights 0 to 60 km in the Northern Hemisphere there are revealed and analyzed in detail the characteristic features of the season-altitude-latitude variations of ozone and temperature due to changes of the solar flux during the 11 year cycle, electron and proton precipitations.

  20. Photovoltaic solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Gupta, Vipin P.; Okandan, Murat; Watts, Michael R.

    2015-09-08

    A photovoltaic solar concentrator is disclosed with one or more transverse-junction solar cells (also termed point contact solar cells) and a lens located above each solar cell to concentrate sunlight onto the solar cell to generate electricity. Piezoelectric actuators tilt or translate each lens to track the sun using a feedback-control circuit which senses the electricity generated by one or more of the solar cells. The piezoelectric actuators can be coupled through a displacement-multiplier linkage to provide an increased range of movement of each lens. Each lens in the solar concentrator can be supported on a frame (also termed a tilt plate) having three legs, with the movement of the legs being controlled by the piezoelectric actuators.

  1. Solar cell device

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiura, M.; Haruki, H.; Miyagi, M.; Sakai, H.; Uchida, Y.

    1984-06-26

    A solar cell array is equipped with serially or parallel connected reverse polarity diodes formed simultaneously with the array. The diodes are constituted by one or more solar cells of the array which may be shaded to prevent photoelectric conversion, and which are electrically connected in reverse polarity with respect to the remaining cells.

  2. Heterojunction solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M. (Lakewood, CO)

    1994-01-01

    A high-efficiency single heterojunction solar cell wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga.sub.0.52 In.sub.0.48 P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. The conversion effiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the emitter layer.

  3. Heterojunction solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.

    1994-08-30

    A high-efficiency single heterojunction solar cell is described wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga[sub 0.52]In[sub 0.48]P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the emitter layer. 1 fig.

  4. Atmospheric photochemical transformations enhance 1,3-butadiene-induced inflammatory responses in human epithelial cells: The role of ozone and other photochemical degradation products.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Melanie; Sexton, Kenneth G; Jeffries, Harvey; Jaspers, Ilona

    2007-03-20

    Chemistry of hazardous air pollutants has been studied for many years, yet little is known about how these chemicals, once reacted within urban atmospheres, affect healthy and susceptible individuals. Once released into the atmosphere, 1,3-butadiene (BD) reacts with hydroxyl radicals and ozone (created by photochemical processes), to produce many identified and unidentified products. Once this transformation has occurred, the toxic potential of atmospheric pollutants such as BD in the ambient environment is currently unclear. During this study, environmental irradiation chambers (also called smog chambers), utilizing natural sunlight, were used to create photochemical transformations of BD. The smog chamber/in vitro exposure system was designed to investigate the toxicity of chemicals before and after photochemical reactions and to investigate interactions with the urban atmosphere using representative in vitro samples. In this study, we determined the relative toxicity and inflammatory gene expression induced by coupling smog chamber atmospheres with an in vitro system to expose human respiratory epithelial cells to BD, BDs photochemical degradation products, or the equivalent ozone generated within the photochemical mixture. Exposure to the photochemically generated products of BD (primarily acrolein, acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, furan and ozone) induced significant increases in cytotoxicity, IL-8, and IL-6 gene expression compared to a synthetic mixture of primary products that was created by injecting the correct concentrations of the detected products from the irradiation experiments. Interestingly, exposure to the equivalent levels of ozone generated during the photochemical transformation of BD did not induce the same level of inflammatory cytokine release for either exposure protocol, suggesting that the effects from ozone alone do not account for the entire response in the irradiation experiments. These results indicate that BDs full photochemical product generation and interactions, rather than ozone alone, must be carefully evaluated when investigating the possible adverse health effects to BD exposures. The research presented here takes into account that photochemical transformations of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) does generate a dynamic exposure system and therefore provides a more realistic approach to estimate the toxicity of ambient air pollutants once they are released into the atmosphere. PMID:16860297

  5. Solar cell radiation handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tada, H. Y.; Carter, J. R., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Solar cell theory cells are manufactured, and how they are modeled mathematically is reviewed. The interaction of energetic charged particle radiation with solar cells is discussed in detail and the concept of 1 MeV equivalent electron fluence is introduced. The space radiation environment is described and methods of calculating equivalent fluences for the space environment are developed. A computer program was written to perform the equivalent fluence calculations and a FORTRAN listing of the program is included. Finally, an extensive body of data detailing the degradation of solar cell electrical parameters as a function of 1 MeV electron fluence is presented.

  6. Laser-assisted solar cell metallization processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, S.

    1984-01-01

    Laser-assisted processing techniques utilized to produce the fine line, thin metal grid structures that are required to fabricate high efficiency solar cells are examined. Two basic techniques for metal deposition are investigated; (1) photochemical decomposition of liquid or gas phase organometallic compounds utilizing either a focused, CW ultraviolet laser (System 1) or a mask and ultraviolet flood illumination, such as that provided by a repetitively pulsed, defocused excimer laser (System 2), for pattern definition, and (2) thermal deposition of metals from organometallic solutions or vapors utilizing a focused, CW laser beam as a local heat source to draw the metallization pattern.

  7. Hydrogen as the solar energy translator. [in photochemical and photovoltaic processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    Many concepts are being investigated to convert sunlight to workable energy forms with emphasis on electricity and thermal energy. The electrical alternatives include direct conversion of photons to electricity via photovoltaic solar cells and solar/thermal production of electricity via heat-energy cycles. Solar cells, when commercialized, are expected to have efficiencies of about 12 to 14 percent. The cells would be active about eight hours per day. However, solar-operated water-splitting process research, initiated through JPL, shows promise for direct production of hydrogen from sunlight with efficiencies of up to 35 to 40 percent. The hydrogen, a valuable commodity in itself, can also serve as a storable energy form, easily and efficiently converted to electricity by fuel cells and other advanced-technology devices on a 24-hour basis or on demand with an overall efficiency of 25 to 30 percent. Thus, hydrogen serves as the fundamental translator of energy from its solar form to electrical form more effectively, and possibly more efficiently, than direct conversion. Hydrogen also can produce other chemical energy forms using solar energy.

  8. Solar cell radiation handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tada, H. Y.; Carter, J. R., Jr.; Anspaugh, B. E.; Downing, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    The handbook to predict the degradation of solar cell electrical performance in any given space radiation environment is presented. Solar cell theory, cell manufacturing and how they are modeled mathematically are described. The interaction of energetic charged particles radiation with solar cells is discussed and the concept of 1 MeV equivalent electron fluence is introduced. The space radiation environment is described and methods of calculating equivalent fluences for the space environment are developed. A computer program was written to perform the equivalent fluence calculations and a FORTRAN listing of the program is included. Data detailing the degradation of solar cell electrical parameters as a function of 1 MeV electron fluence are presented.

  9. Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Di

    2010-01-01

    Dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is the only solar cell that can offer both the flexibility and transparency. Its efficiency is comparable to amorphous silicon solar cells but with a much lower cost. This review not only covers the fundamentals of DSSC but also the related cutting-edge research and its development for industrial applications. Most recent research topics on DSSC, for example, applications of nanostructured TiO2, ZnO electrodes, ionic liquid electrolytes, carbon nanotubes, graphene and solid state DSSC have all been included and discussed. PMID:20480003

  10. Lateral superlattice solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mascarenhas, A.; Zhang, Y.; Millunchick, J.M.; Twesten, R.D.; Jones, E.D.

    1997-10-01

    A novel structure which comprises of a lateral superlattice as the active layer of a solar cell is proposed. If the alternating regions A and B of a lateral superlattice ABABAB... are chosen to have a Type-II band offset, it is shown that the performance of the active absorbing region of the solar cell is optimized. In essence, the Type-II lateral superlattice region can satisfy the material requirements for an ideal solar cells active absorbing region, i.e. simultaneously having a very high transition probability for photogeneration and a very long minority carrier recombination lifetime.

  11. Photoelectrochemical Solar Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDevitt, John T.

    1984-01-01

    This introduction to photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells reviews topics pertaining to solar energy conversion and demonstrates the ease with which a working PEC cell can be prepared with n-type silicon as the photoanode and a platinum counter electrode (both immersed in ethanolic ferrocene/ferricenium solutions). Experiments using the cell are…

  12. Screening of solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Appelbaum, J.; Chait, A.; Thompson, D.A.

    1993-07-01

    Because solar cells in a production batch are not identical, screening is performed to obtain similar cells for aggregation into arrays. A common technique for screening is based on a single operating point of the I-V characteristic of the cell, usually the maximum power point. As a result, inferior cell matching may occur at the actual operating points. Screening solar cells based on the entire I-V characteristic will inherently result in more similar cells in the array. An array consisting of more similar cells is likely to have better overall characteristics and more predictable performance. Solar cell screening methods and cell ranking are discussed. The concept of a mean cell is defined as a cell 'best' representing all the cells in the production batch. The screening and ranking of all cells are performed with respect to the mean cell. The comparative results of different screening methods are illustrated on a batch of 50 silicon cells of the Space Station Freedom.

  13. Screening of solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, J.; Chait, A.; Thompson, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    Because solar cells in a production batch are not identical, screening is performed to obtain similar cells for aggregation into arrays. A common technique for screening is based on a single operating point of the I-V characteristic of the cell, usually the maximum power point. As a result, inferior cell matching may occur at the actual operating points. Screening solar cells based on the entire I-V characteristic will inherently result in more similar cells in the array. An array consisting of more similar cells is likely to have better overall characteristics and more predictable performance. Solar cell screening methods and cell ranking are discussed. The concept of a mean cell is defined as a cell 'best' representing all the cells in the production batch. The screening and ranking of all cells are performed with respect to the mean cell. The comparative results of different screening methods are illustrated on a batch of 50 silicon cells of the Space Station Freedom.

  14. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gur, Ilan

    2006-12-15

    This dissertation presents the results of a research agenda aimed at improving integration and stability in nanocrystal-based solar cells through advances in active materials and device architectures. The introduction of 3-dimensional nanocrystals illustrates the potential for improving transport and percolation in hybrid solar cells and enables novel fabrication methods for optimizing integration in these systems. Fabricating cells by sequential deposition allows for solution-based assembly of hybrid composites with controlled and well-characterized dispersion and electrode contact. Hyperbranched nanocrystals emerge as a nearly ideal building block for hybrid cells, allowing the controlled morphologies targeted by templated approaches to be achieved in an easily fabricated solution-cast device. In addition to offering practical benefits to device processing, these approaches offer fundamental insight into the operation of hybrid solar cells, shedding light on key phenomena such as the roles of electrode-contact and percolation behavior in these cells. Finally, all-inorganic nanocrystal solar cells are presented as a wholly new cell concept, illustrating that donor-acceptor charge transfer and directed carrier diffusion can be utilized in a system with no organic components, and that nanocrystals may act as building blocks for efficient, stable, and low-cost thin-film solar cells.

  15. Photovoltaic solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, Gregory N; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Resnick, Paul J

    2013-11-26

    A photovoltaic solar cell for generating electricity from sunlight is disclosed. The photovoltaic solar cell comprises a plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions formed in a semiconductor body to receive the sunlight and generate the electicity therefrom, the plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions having a first plurality of regions having a first doping type and a second plurality of regions having a second doping type. In addition, the photovoltaic solar cell comprises a first electrical contact electrically connected to each of the first plurality of regions and a second electrical contact electrically connected to each of the second plurality of regions, as well as a passivation layer covering major surfaces and sidewalls of the photovoltaic solar cell.

  16. Photovoltaic solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Nielson, Gregory N; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Okandan, Murat; Resnick, Paul J

    2014-05-20

    A photovoltaic solar cell for generating electricity from sunlight is disclosed. The photovoltaic solar cell comprises a plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions formed in a semiconductor body to receive the sunlight and generate the electricity therefrom, the plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions having a first plurality of regions having a first doping type and a second plurality of regions having a second doping type. In addition, the photovoltaic solar cell comprises a first electrical contact electrically connected to each of the first plurality of regions and a second electrical contact electrically connected to each of the second plurality of regions, as well as a passivation layer covering major surfaces and sidewalls of the photovoltaic solar cell.

  17. Solar cell array interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Carey, P.G.; Thompson, J.B.; Colella, N.J.; Williams, K.A.

    1995-11-14

    Electrical interconnects are disclosed for solar cells or other electronic components using a silver-silicone paste or a lead-tin (Pb-Sn) no-clean fluxless solder cream, whereby the high breakage of thin (<6 mil thick) solar cells using conventional solder interconnect is eliminated. The interconnects of this invention employs copper strips which are secured to the solar cells by a silver-silicone conductive paste which can be used at room temperature, or by a Pb-Sn solder cream which eliminates undesired residue on the active surfaces of the solar cells. Electrical testing using the interconnects of this invention has shown that no degradation of the interconnects developed under high current testing, while providing a very low contact resistance value. 4 figs.

  18. Solar cell array interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Carey, Paul G. (Mountain View, CA); Thompson, Jesse B. (Brentwood, CA); Colella, Nicolas J. (Livermore, CA); Williams, Kenneth A. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01

    Electrical interconnects for solar cells or other electronic components using a silver-silicone paste or a lead-tin (Pb-Sn) no-clean fluxless solder cream, whereby the high breakage of thin (<6 mil thick) solar cells using conventional solder interconnect is eliminated. The interconnects of this invention employs copper strips which are secured to the solar cells by a silver-silicone conductive paste which can be used at room temperature, or by a Pb-Sn solder cream which eliminates undesired residue on the active surfaces of the solar cells. Electrical testing using the interconnects of this invention has shown that no degradation of the interconnects developed under high current testing, while providing a very low contact resistance value.

  19. Lightweight solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Hotaling, S.P.

    1993-06-22

    A lightweight solar cell is described comprising: (a) an LD aerogel substrate having a density of between 10-1,000 mg/cc, the surface of the substrate being polished (b) a dielectric planarization layer being applied to the polished surface, and (c) at least one layer of PV material deposited thereon. The solar cell having a plurality of PV layers deposited on the planarization layer.

  20. Thin silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, R.B.; Bacon, C.; DiReda, V.; Ford, D.H.; Ingram, A.E.; Cotter, J.; Hughes-Lampros, T.; Rand, J.A.; Ruffins, T.R.; Barnett, A.M.

    1992-12-01

    The silicon-film design achieves high performance by using a dun silicon layer and incorporating light trapping. Optimally designed thin crystalline solar cells (<50 microns thick) have performance advantages over conventional thick devices. The high-performance silicon-film design employs a metallurgical barrier between the low-cost substrate and the thin silicon layer. Light trapping properties of silicon-film on ceramic solar cells are presented and analyzed. Recent advances in process development are described here.

  1. Integrated solar cell and battery

    SciTech Connect

    Little, R.G.

    1988-04-26

    An integrated solar cell and battery is described comprising: (a) a substrate; and (b) a solar cell and a thin film battery including a solid electrolyte, deposited by thin film deposition techniques on the substrate; (c) the substrate and the solar cell together comprising a bulk type solar cell.

  2. Welded solar cell interconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stofel, E. J.; Browne, E. R.; Meese, R. A.; Vendura, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    The efficiency of the welding of solar-cell interconnects is compared with the efficiency of soldering such interconnects, and the cases in which welding may be superior are examined. Emphasis is placed on ultrasonic welding; attention is given to the solar-cell welding machine, the application of the welding process to different solar-cell configurations, producibility, and long-life performance of welded interconnects. Much of the present work has been directed toward providing increased confidence in the reliability of welding using conditions approximating those that would occur with large-scale array production. It is concluded that there is as yet insufficient data to determine which of three methods (soldering, parallel gap welding, and ultrasonic welding) provides the longest-duration solar panel life.

  3. Parameterization of solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, J.; Chait, A.; Thompson, D.

    1992-01-01

    The aggregation (sorting) of the individual solar cells into an array is commonly based on a single operating point on the current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curve. An alternative approach for cell performance prediction and cell screening is provided by modeling the cell using an equivalent electrical circuit, in which the parameters involved are related to the physical phenomena in the device. These analytical models may be represented by a double exponential I-V characteristic with seven parameters, by a double exponential model with five parameters, or by a single exponential equation with four or five parameters. In this article we address issues concerning methodologies for the determination of solar cell parameters based on measured data points of the I-V characteristic, and introduce a procedure for screening of solar cells for arrays. We show that common curve fitting techniques, e.g., least squares, may produce many combinations of parameter values while maintaining a good fit between the fitted and measured I-V characteristics of the cell. Therefore, techniques relying on curve fitting criteria alone cannot be directly used for cell parameterization. We propose a consistent procedure which takes into account the entire set of parameter values for a batch of cells. This procedure is based on a definition of a mean cell representing the batch, and takes into account the relative contribution of each parameter to the overall goodness of fit. The procedure is demonstrated on a batch of 50 silicon cells for Space Station Freedom.

  4. Adhesion and proliferation of human endothelial cells on photochemically modified polytetrafluoroethylene.

    PubMed

    Gumpenberger, T; Heitz, J; Bäuerle, D; Kahr, H; Graz, I; Romanin, C; Svorcik, V; Leisch, F

    2003-12-01

    We studied the adhesion and proliferation of human endothelial cells on photochemically modified polytetrafluoroethylene samples. The polymer surfaces were modified by exposure to the ultraviolet light of a Xe(2)(*)-excimer lamp at a wavelength of 172 nm in an ammonia atmosphere. Treatment times were between 10 and 20 min. The endothelial cell density was determined 1, 3 and 8 days after seeding by image analysis. Surface modification of the samples resulted in a significant increase in the number of adhering cells and in the formation of a confluent cell layer after 3-8 days. The results were comparable than those obtained on polystyrene Petri dishes, which are used as standard substrates in cell cultivation. Thus modified PTFE appears to be a promising material for the fabrication of artificial vascular prostheses coated with endothelial cells. PMID:14568430

  5. Electron Transfer Dynamics in Efficient Molecular Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Gerald John

    2014-10-01

    This research provided new mechanistic insights into surface mediated photochemical processes relevant to solar energy conversion. In this past three years our research has focused on oxidation photo-redox chemistry and on the role surface electric fields play on basic spectroscopic properties of molecular-semiconductor interfaces. Although this research as purely fundamental science, the results and their interpretation have relevance to applications in dye sensitized and photogalvanic solar cells as well as in the storage of solar energy in the form of chemical bonds.

  6. Broad spectrum solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw (Kensington, CA); Yu, Kin Man (Lafayette, CA); Wu, Junqiao (Richmond, CA); Schaff, William J. (Ithaca, NY)

    2007-05-15

    An alloy having a large band gap range is used in a multijunction solar cell to enhance utilization of the solar energy spectrum. In one embodiment, the alloy is In.sub.1-xGa.sub.xN having an energy bandgap range of approximately 0.7 eV to 3.4 eV, providing a good match to the solar energy spectrum. Multiple junctions having different bandgaps are stacked to form a solar cell. Each junction may have different bandgaps (realized by varying the alloy composition), and therefore be responsive to different parts of the spectrum. The junctions are stacked in such a manner that some bands of light pass through upper junctions to lower junctions that are responsive to such bands.

  7. Welded solar cell interconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Stofel, E.J.; Browne, E.R.; Meese, R.A.; Vendura, G.J.

    1982-09-01

    The welding of solar cell interconnects has received increased attention in recent years. Welding is used routinely in Europe and is being investigated seriously by several solar array fabricators in the United States. Most of this welding has been made using parallel gap resistive heating. Hughes Aircraft Company has chosen to investigate ultrasonic welding as an alternate bonding method. The results of this work and the manner in which ultrasonic welding differs from parallel gap welding or soldering is herein summarized.

  8. Making Ultrathin Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogan, George W.; Christel, Lee A.; Merchant, J. Thomas; Gibbons, James F.

    1991-01-01

    Process produces extremely thin silicon solar cells - only 50 micrometers or less in thickness. Electrons and holes have less opportunity to recombine before collected at cell surfaces. Efficiency higher and because volume of silicon small, less chance of radiation damage in new cells. Initial steps carried out at normal thickness to reduce breakage and avoid extra cost of special handling. Cells then thinned mechanically and chemically. Final cell includes reflective layer on back surface. Layer bounces unabsorbed light back into bulk silicon so it absorbs and produces useful electrical output.

  9. Solar cell radiation handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, J. R., Jr.; Tada, H. Y.

    1973-01-01

    A method is presented for predicting the degradation of a solar array in a space radiation environment. Solar cell technology which emphasizes the cell parameters that degrade in a radiation environment, is discussed along with the experimental techniques used in the evaluation of radiation effects. Other topics discussed include: theoretical aspects of radiation damage, methods for developing relative damage coefficients, nature of the space radiation environment, method of calculating equivalent fluence from electron and proton energy spectrums and relative damage coefficients, and comparison of flight data with estimated degradation.

  10. Flexible Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Solar cell "modules" are plastic strips coated with thin films of photovoltaic silicon that collect solar energy for instant conversion into electricity. Lasers divide the thin film coating into smaller cells to build up voltage. Developed by Iowa Thin Film Technologies under NASA and DOE grants, the modules are used as electrical supply for advertising displays, battery rechargers for recreational vehicles, and to power model airplanes. The company is planning other applications both in consumer goods and as a power source in underdeveloped countries.

  11. Monolithic tandem solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO)

    1991-01-01

    A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, photovoltaic solar cell is described which includes (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first photoactive subcell on the upper surface of the InP substrate, and (c) a second photoactive subcell on the first subcell. The first photoactive subcell is GaInAsP of defined composition. The second subcell is InP. The two subcells are lattice matched. The solar cell can be provided as a two-terminal device or a three-terminal device.

  12. Linking solar induced fluorescence and the photochemical reflectance index to carbon assimilation in a cornfield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y.; Middleton, E.; Zhang, Q.; Corp, L.; Campbell, P. K.; Huemmrich, K. F.; Kustas, W.; Daughtry, C. S.; Dulaney, W. P.; Russ, A.

    2012-12-01

    Determining the health and vigor of vegetation using high spectral resolution remote sensing techniques is a critical component in monitoring productivity from both natural and managed ecosystems and their feedbacks to climate. This presentation summarizes a field campaign conducted in a USDA-ARS experimental cornfield site located in Beltsville, MD, USA over a five-year period. The site is equipped with an instrumented tower which makes continuous eddy covariance measurements of CO2 along with incoming PAR. Hyperspectral reflectance observations were acquired over corn canopies with a USB4000 Miniature Fiber Optic Spectrometer (Ocean Optics Inc., Dunedin, Florida, USA) at multiple times a day at various stages through the growing season. On all field days, supporting plant information and leaf level data were acquired (e.g., CO2 gas exchange) as well as biophysical field data, including leaf area index (LAI), mid-day canopy PAR transmission, soil reflectivity, and soil moisture. The canopy optical measurements enabled retrievals of the photochemical reflectance index (PRI) and solar induced fluorescence (SIF) centered at O2-A and -B bands. These two spectrally based bio-indicators have been widely utilized in studies to assess whether vegetation is performing near-optimally or exhibiting symptoms of environmental stress (e.g., drought or nutrient deficiency, non-optimal temperatures, etc.). Both SIF and PRI expressed diurnal dynamics and seasonal changes that followed environmental conditions and physiological status of the cornfield. We further investigated the correlation between these two retrievals and the flux tower based carbon assimilation observations (i.e. gross ecosystem production, GEP). We were able to successfully model the variation of GEP (r2=0.81; RMSE=0.18 mg CO2/m2/s) by utilizing both SIF and PRI. Several cross-validation algorithms were applied to the model to demonstrate the robustness and consistency of the model. Our results suggest great potential of using SIF and PRI to monitor photosynthetic activities. Further studies are needed at various ecosystems.

  13. Flexible solar cells.

    PubMed

    Pagliaro, Mario; Ciriminna, Rosaria; Palmisano, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    Thin-film flexible photovoltaics are paving the way to low-cost electricity. Organic, inorganic and organic-inorganic solar cells are deposited over flexible substrates by high-throughput (often roll-to-roll printing) technologies to afford lightweight, economic solar modules that can be integrated into, not installed on, various surfaces. Current conversion efficiencies under standard conditions are in the 3-15 % range, but in real applications the overall productivity is high. These new photovoltaic technologies are ready to provide cheap, clean electricity to the 2 billion people who lack access to the grid as well as to energy-eager companies and families in the developed world facing the increasing costs of electricity generated using fossil fuel resources. This Review focuses on recent achievements in the area of flexible solar cells, highlights the principles behind the main technologies, and discusses future challenges in this area. PMID:18979493

  14. NASA Facts, Solar Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The design and function of solar cells as a source of electrical power for unmanned space vehicles is described in this pamphlet written for high school physical science students. The pamphlet is one of the NASA Facts Science Series (each of which consists of four pages) and is designed to fit in the standard size three-ring notebook. Review…

  15. Solar cells for solar power satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oman, H.

    1978-01-01

    The concept of a solar-cell array for a solar power satellite is developed to permit evaluation of its economic feasibility for generating power for delivery to public utilities on earth. Gallium arsenide solar cells were considered but it could not be assured that the world gallium resources could support constructions of two solar power satellites per year. Therefore, for preliminary design an array blanket made from 5 by 10 cm silicon solar cells, 50 microns thick, and electrostatically bonded between borosilicate glass sheets was adopted. In annealing experiments, a radiated 50 microns thick cell was restored to its initial performance in a 500 C. Solar-cell efficiency effects significantly the solar power satellite mass, which varies from 90,000 metric tons for 20 percent cells to 120,000 metric tons for 12 percent cells. The anticipated cost of delivered power, based on 1977 dollars, varies from 4 cents per kWh with 18 percent cells, to 5 cents per kWh for 12 percent efficient cells.

  16. High efficiency solar cell structure

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Blakers, A.W.

    1983-09-13

    The invention relates to a new-type of solar cell structure, and to a method of manufacturing same. The solar cell is designated as an MINP cell (Metal-Insulator-NP junction solar cell). Essentially, the MINP solar cell is an extremely shallow N-P junction cell with a MIS (Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor) type contact made to the top of the cell. Although combining features of the two technologies, no more processing steps are required than for a conventional P-N junction cell. The advantage of the MINP structure is its substantially improved efficiency.

  17. EE580 Solar Cells Todd J. Kaiser

    E-print Network

    Kaiser, Todd J.

    7/21/2010 1 EE580 ­ Solar Cells Todd J. Kaiser · Lecture 08 · Solar Cell Characterization 1Montana State University: Solar Cells Lecture 8: Characterization Solar Cell Operation n Emitter p Base Rear completing the circuit 2Montana State University: Solar Cells Lecture 8: Characterization Solar Cell

  18. The molecular mechanism of photochemical internalization of cell penetrating peptide-cargo-photosensitizer conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsuki, Takashi; Miki, Shunya; Kobayashi, Shouhei; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Nakata, Eiji; Hirakawa, Kazutaka; Sumita, Kensuke; Watanabe, Kazunori; Okazaki, Shigetoshi

    2015-01-01

    In many drug delivery strategies, an inefficient transfer of macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids to the cytosol often occurs because of their endosomal entrapment. One of the methods to overcome this problem is photochemical internalization, which is achieved using a photosensitizer and light to facilitate the endosomal escape of the macromolecule. In this study, we examined the molecular mechanism of photochemical internalization of cell penetrating peptide-cargo (macromolecule)-photosensitizer conjugates. We measured the photophysical properties of eight dyes (photosensitizer candidates) and determined the respective endosomal escape efficiencies using these dyes. Correlation plots between these factors indicated that the photogenerated 1O2 molecules from photosensitizers were highly related to the endosomal escape efficiencies. The contribution of 1O2 was confirmed using 1O2 quenchers. In addition, time-lapse fluorescence imaging showed that the photoinduced endosomal escape occurred at a few seconds to a few minutes after irradiation (much longer than 1O2 lifetime), and that the pH increased in the endosome prior to the endosomal escape of the macromolecule. PMID:26686907

  19. The molecular mechanism of photochemical internalization of cell penetrating peptide-cargo-photosensitizer conjugates.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, Takashi; Miki, Shunya; Kobayashi, Shouhei; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Nakata, Eiji; Hirakawa, Kazutaka; Sumita, Kensuke; Watanabe, Kazunori; Okazaki, Shigetoshi

    2015-01-01

    In many drug delivery strategies, an inefficient transfer of macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids to the cytosol often occurs because of their endosomal entrapment. One of the methods to overcome this problem is photochemical internalization, which is achieved using a photosensitizer and light to facilitate the endosomal escape of the macromolecule. In this study, we examined the molecular mechanism of photochemical internalization of cell penetrating peptide-cargo (macromolecule)-photosensitizer conjugates. We measured the photophysical properties of eight dyes (photosensitizer candidates) and determined the respective endosomal escape efficiencies using these dyes. Correlation plots between these factors indicated that the photogenerated (1)O2 molecules from photosensitizers were highly related to the endosomal escape efficiencies. The contribution of (1)O2 was confirmed using (1)O2 quenchers. In addition, time-lapse fluorescence imaging showed that the photoinduced endosomal escape occurred at a few seconds to a few minutes after irradiation (much longer than (1)O2 lifetime), and that the pH increased in the endosome prior to the endosomal escape of the macromolecule. PMID:26686907

  20. Nighttime solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Parise, R.J.

    1998-07-01

    Currently photovoltaic (PV) cells convert solar energy into electrical energy at an efficiency of about 18%, with the maximum conversion rate taking place around noon on a cloudless day. In many applications, the PV cells are utilized to recharge a stand-by battery pack that provides electrical energy at night or on cloudy days. Increasing the utilization of the panel array area by producing electrical power at night will reduce the amount of required electrical energy storage for a given array size and increase system reliability. Thermoelectric generators (TEG) are solid state devices that convert thermal energy into electrical energy. Using the nighttime sky, or deep space, with an effective temperature of 3.5 K as a cold sink, the TEG presented here can produce electrical power at night. The hot junction is supplied energy by the ambient air temperature or some other warm temperature source. The cold junction of the TEG is insulated from the surroundings by a vacuum cell, improving its overall effectiveness. Combining the TEG with the PV cell, a unique solid state device is developed that converts electromagnetic radiant energy into usable electrical energy. The thermoelectric-photovoltaic (TEPV) cell, or the Nighttime Solar Cell, is a direct energy conversion device that produces electrical energy both at night and during the day.

  1. Novel chlorophyll solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlow, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    A novel solar battery is being developed which uses chlorophyll a for the generation of a voltage. The battery consists of platinum foil electrode, onto which a mixture of chlorophyll a and lipoic acid is deposited, and a platinum current collector. With such a device, voltages greater than 0.35 volts can reproducibly generated. The dependence of the output of the cell as a function of chlorophyll levels and light intensity has been determined. 9 refs.

  2. Thin film solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Klenk, R.; Schock, H.W.

    1994-12-31

    Within a comparatively short time the research on thin film solar cells has led to photovoltaic conversion efficiencies exceeding 16% which makes this technology a viable candidate for widespread applications. The contribution focuses on major issues of the design and implementation of cells based on Cu-III-VI{sub 2} chalcopyrite absorber thin films. The flexibility of this system leads to a large degree of freedom for the preparation as well as the electronic structure of the cell. Characterization of films and cells is not straightforward and there are still several important aspects that are not yet fully understood. Nevertheless, useful models have been derived for growth mechanisms, surface properties, interface formation, recombination paths and photo current collection using a combination of several independent characterization methods and numerical simulations. The substrate and back contact as well as secondary phases, mainly binary copper chalcogenides and copper poor ternaries, are having a significant influence. Different compounds have been investigated for the buffer layer between absorber and TCO (transparent conductive oxide) front contact. The highest efficiencies have been obtained with absorber band gaps less than 1.4 eV using a (very thin) CdS buffer and a ZnO TCO. The performance of various thin film solar cells will be briefly summarized.

  3. Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 91 (2007) 13881391 Bifacial configurations for CdTe solar cells

    E-print Network

    Romeo, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 91 (2007) 1388­1391 Bifacial configurations for CdTe solar in the CdTe device. Reproducible solar cells exceeding 10% efficiency on the front side illumination, a promising efficiency of about 9% and proved stability for these solar cells has been developed [11]. Our Cd

  4. Epitaxial solar cells fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daiello, R. V.; Robinson, P. H.; Kressel, H.

    1975-01-01

    Silicon epitaxy has been studied for the fabrication of solar cell structures, with the intent of optimizing efficiency while maintaining suitability for space applications. SiH2CL2 yielded good quality layers and junctions with reproducible impurity profiles. Diode characteristics and lifetimes in the epitaxial layers were investigated as a function of epitaxial growth conditions and doping profile, as was the effect of substrates and epitaxial post-gettering on lifetime. The pyrolytic decomposition of SiH4 was also used in the epitaxial formation of highly doped junction layers on bulk Si wafers. The effects of junction layer thickness and bulk background doping level on cell performance, in particular, open-circuit voltage, were investigated. The most successful solar cells were fabricated with SiH2 CL2 to grow p/n layers on n(+) substrates. The best performance was obtained from a p(+)/p/n/n(+) structure grown with an exponential grade in the n-base layer.

  5. Monolithic tandem solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO)

    1994-01-01

    A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, photovoltaic solar cell is described which includes (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first photoactive subcell on the upper surface of the InP substrate, (c) a second photoactive subcell on the first subcell; and (d) an optically transparent prismatic cover layer over the second subcell. The first photoactive subcell is GaInAsP of defined composition. The second subcell is InP. The two subcells are lattice matched.

  6. Photoelectric solar cell array

    SciTech Connect

    Lidorenko, N.S.; Afian, V.V.; Martirosian, R.G.; Ryabikov, S.V.; Strebkov, D.S.; Vartanian, A.V.

    1983-11-29

    A photoelectric solar cell device comprises a dispersing element exposed to the sun's radiation and followed in the optical path by photocells having different spectral sensitivities. Each photocell has its working surface so oriented that the light beam with the wavelength corresponding to the maximum spectral sensitivity of that photocell impinges on its working surface. The dispersing element is a hologram representing light sources with different wavelengths. The photocells are positioned in the image planes of the light sources producing the light beams of the corresponding wavelengths.

  7. Floating emitter solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chih, Sah (inventor); Cheng, Li-Jen (inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A front surface contact floating emitter solar cell transistor is provided in a semiconductor body (n-type), in which floating emitter sections (p-type) are diffused or implanted in the front surface. Between the emitter sections, a further section is diffused or implanted in the front surface, but isolated from the floating emitter sections, for use either as a base contact to the n-type semiconductor body, in which case the section is doped n+, or as a collector for the adjacent emitter sections.

  8. Monolithic tandem solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1994-06-21

    A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, photovoltaic solar cell is described which includes (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first photoactive subcell on the upper surface of the InP substrate, (c) a second photoactive subcell on the first subcell; and (d) an optically transparent prismatic cover layer over the second subcell. The first photoactive subcell is GaInAsP of defined composition. The second subcell is InP. The two subcells are lattice matched. 9 figs.

  9. Solar cell module lamination process

    DOEpatents

    Carey, Paul G. (Mountain View, CA); Thompson, Jesse B. (Brentwood, CA); Aceves, Randy C. (Tracy, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A solar cell module lamination process using fluoropolymers to provide protection from adverse environmental conditions and thus enable more extended use of solar cells, particularly in space applications. A laminate of fluoropolymer material provides a hermetically sealed solar cell module structure that is flexible and very durable. The laminate is virtually chemically inert, highly transmissive in the visible spectrum, dimensionally stable at temperatures up to about 200.degree. C. highly abrasion resistant, and exhibits very little ultra-violet degradation.

  10. Carbon Nanotube Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Colin; Patel, Yogeshwari; Postma, Henk W. Ch.

    2012-01-01

    We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabricate using a spray-paint technique. We observe that cells with a lower concentration of carbon nanotubes on the active semiconducting electrode perform better than cells with a higher concentration of nanotubes. This effect is contrary to the expectation that a larger number of nanotubes would lead to more photoconversion and therefore more power generation. We attribute this to the presence of metallic nanotubes that provide a short for photo-excited electrons, bypassing the load. We demonstrate optimization strategies that improve cell efficiency by orders of magnitude. Once it is possible to make semiconducting-only carbon nanotube films, that may provide the greatest efficiency improvement. PMID:22655070

  11. Schottky barrier solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stirn, R. J.; Yeh, Y. C. M. (inventors)

    1981-01-01

    A method of fabricating a Schottky barrier solar cell is described. The cell consists of a thin substrate of low cost material with at least the top surface of the substrate being electrically conductive. A thin layer of heavily doped n-type polycrystalling germanium is deposited on the substrate after a passivation layer is deposited to prevent migration of impurities into the polycrystalline germanium. The polycrystalline germanium is recrystallized to increase the crystal sizes to serve as a base layer on which a thin layer of gallium arsenide is vapor-epitaxilly grown followed by a thermally-grown oxide layer. A metal layer is deposited on the oxide layer and a grid electrode is deposited to be in electrical contact with the top surface of the metal layer.

  12. Nanocystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, J. K.

    2009-07-01

    Nanocrystalline silicon material has made rapid progress in the last several years and at present it can be defined as real device quality as a photoactive layer for solar cells. A number of innovative ideas, such as the deposition at the crystalline to amorphous transition, at high pressure depletion condition, by taming of the ion energy, by grading of the material growth, at reduced unwanted dopant incorporation, have helped to reach an efficiency of 10% for single junction nanocrystalline silicon cells. In situ plasma and gas phase diagnosis have contributed to the fast optimisation of deposition process parameters. Deposition rate, open circuit voltage and light confinement are some of most critical issues that are currently pursued. Materials with a defect density as low as 1015 cm-3 have been made, however, they are still not good enough for n-p junctions; the device structure is still of drift type in a p-i-n or n-i-p configuration.

  13. Systems and methods for solar energy storage, transportation, and conversion utilizing photochemically active organometallic isomeric compounds and solid-state catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Vollhardt, K. Peter C.; Segalman, Rachel A; Majumdar, Arunava; Meier, Steven

    2015-02-10

    A system for converting solar energy to chemical energy, and, subsequently, to thermal energy includes a light-harvesting station, a storage station, and a thermal energy release station. The system may include additional stations for converting the released thermal energy to other energy forms, e.g., to electrical energy and mechanical work. At the light-harvesting station, a photochemically active first organometallic compound, e.g., a fulvalenyl diruthenium complex, is exposed to light and is photochemically converted to a second, higher-energy organometallic compound, which is then transported to a storage station. At the storage station, the high-energy organometallic compound is stored for a desired time and/or is transported to a desired location for thermal energy release. At the thermal energy release station, the high-energy organometallic compound is catalytically converted back to the photochemically active organometallic compound by an exothermic process, while the released thermal energy is captured for subsequent use.

  14. Solar Panel of Photovoltaic Cells

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Solar panels or arrays of photovoltaic cells convert renewable solar radiation into electricity by a clean and environmentally sound means. Collected solar energy can either be used instantly or stored in batteries for later use. These systems can be used as a component of a larger photovoltaic syst...

  15. Inversion layer MOS solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Fat Duen

    1986-01-01

    Inversion layer (IL) Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) solar cells were fabricated. The fabrication technique and problems are discussed. A plan for modeling IL cells is presented. Future work in this area is addressed.

  16. Lunar production of solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Perino, Maria Antonietta

    1989-01-01

    The feasibility of manufacturing of solar cells on the moon for spacecraft applications is examined. Because of the much lower escape velocity, there is a great advantage in lunar manufacture of solar cells compared to Earth manufacture. Silicon is abundant on the moon, and new refining methods allow it to be reduced and purified without extensive reliance on materials unavailable on the moon. Silicon and amorphous silicon solar cells could be manufactured on the moon for use in space. Concepts for the production of a baseline amorphous silicon cell are discussed, and specific power levels are calculated for cells designed for both lunar and Earth manufacture.

  17. Solar-Cell-Manufacturing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, F. G.

    1984-01-01

    Cost of manufacturing solar arrays minimized by using polyimide-ribbed substrates together with silver-plated coils of low-expansion nickel/iron ribbon on solar cells. Polyimide taped to ribbon protects cell from abrasion or from sticking to other tooling.

  18. An Introduction to Solar Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    Most likely, solar cells will play a significant role in this country's strategy to address the two interrelated issues of global warming and dependence on imported oil. The purpose of this paper is to present an explanation of how solar cells work at an introductory high school, college, or university physics course level. The treatment presented…

  19. Commercialization of Novel Organic Solar Cells

    E-print Network

    Kassegne, Samuel Kinde

    Commercialization of Novel Organic Solar Cells Master of Engineering Final Report Shanel C. Miller................................................................................................................... 12 2.1 How do Solar Cells Work?.................................................................................................. 12 2.2 Types of Solar Cells that Exist Today

  20. The challenges of organic polymer solar cells

    E-print Network

    Saif Addin, Burhan K. (Burhan Khalid)

    2011-01-01

    The technical and commercial prospects of polymer solar cells were evaluated. Polymer solar cells are an attractive approach to fabricate and deploy roll-to-roll processed solar cells that are reasonably efficient (total ...

  1. Controlled reflectance solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, H.G.; Lillington, D.R.

    1989-06-13

    A solar cell is described comprising: A semiconductor body having a front layer of a first conductivity type and an adjacent back layer of a second conductivity type opposite of the first conductivity type. The front and back layers form front and back major surfaces, respectively the semiconductor body further having openings through the back major surface and back layer which form recesses extending to the front layer. The recesses having walls which are doped to the first conductivity type; a first electrical contact disposed in the recesses making electrical contact the first conductivity type layer; and a second electrical contact disposed on the back major surface making electrical contact to the second conductivity type layer.

  2. Upconversion in solar cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The possibility to tune chemical and physical properties in nanosized materials has a strong impact on a variety of technologies, including photovoltaics. One of the prominent research areas of nanomaterials for photovoltaics involves spectral conversion. Modification of the spectrum requires down- and/or upconversion or downshifting of the spectrum, meaning that the energy of photons is modified to either lower (down) or higher (up) energy. Nanostructures such as quantum dots, luminescent dye molecules, and lanthanide-doped glasses are capable of absorbing photons at a certain wavelength and emitting photons at a different (shorter or longer) wavelength. We will discuss upconversion by lanthanide compounds in various host materials and will further demonstrate upconversion to work for thin-film silicon solar cells. PMID:23413889

  3. GaAs Solar Cell Radiation Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.

    1996-01-01

    History of GaAs solar cell development is provided. Photovoltaic equations are described along with instrumentation techniques for measuring solar cells. Radiation effects in solar cells, electrical performance, and spacecraft flight data for solar cells are discussed. The space radiation environment and solar array degradation calculations are addressed.

  4. Series Connection of Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keenan, R.

    1985-01-01

    Roll soldering from continuous string of cells. Automatic, continuous process attaches interconnecting strips to series string of silicon solar cells. Manufacturing process attaches each conductor from positive side of one cell to negative side of next. For reliability, 22 contacts are soldered on each side of each cell.

  5. A comparison of stratospheric photochemical response to different reconstructions of solar ultraviolet radiative variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolduc, Cassandra; Bourqui, Michel S.; Charbonneau, Paul

    2015-09-01

    We present calculations of stratospheric chemical abundances variations between different levels of solar activity using a simple photochemistry model in transient chemistry mode. Different models for the reconstruction of the solar spectrum, as well as observations from the SOLar STellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) and Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) on the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) satellite, are used as inputs to the calculations. We put the emphasis on the MOnte CArlo Spectral Solar Irradiance Model (MOCASSIM) reconstructions, which cover the spectral interval from 150 to 400 nm and extend from 1610 to present. We compare our results with those obtained with the Naval Research Laboratory Solar Spectral Irradiance (NRLSSI) model as well as with the Magnesium-Neutron Monitor (MGNM) model over a period of time spanning the ascending phase of Cycle 22. We also perform the calculations using SORCE composite spectra for the descending phase of Cycle 23 and with the reconstructed MOCASSIM, NRLSSI and MGNM spectra for the same period for comparison. Finally, we compare the chemical abundances obtained for the Maunder Minimum with those obtained for the Cycle 23 minimum (in March 2009) and find that stratospheric ozone concentration was slightly higher during the recent minimum, consequent to the small positive variability between the MOCASSIM spectra for both epochs, especially below 260 nm. We find that the response in stratospheric ozone is not only dependent on the variability amplitude in the solar spectrum (especially in the 200-240 nm band), but also significantly on the base level of the minimum solar spectrum.

  6. Multiple Exciton Generation Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luther, J. M.; Semonin, O. E.; Beard, M. C.; Gao, J.; Nozik, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Heat loss is the major factor limiting traditional single junction solar cells to a theoretical efficiency of 32%. Multiple Exciton Generation (MEG) enables efficient use of the solar spectrum yielding a theoretical power conversion efficiency of 44% in solar cells under 1-sun conditions. Quantum-confined semiconductors have demonstrated the ability to generate multiple carriers but present-day materials deliver efficiencies far below the SQ limit of 32%. Semiconductor quantum dots of PbSe and PbS provide an active testbed for developing high-efficiency, inexpensive solar cells benefitting from quantum confinement effects. Here, we will present recent work of solar cells employing MEG to yield external quantum efficiencies exceeding 100%.

  7. Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 90 (2006) 664677 Invited article

    E-print Network

    Romeo, Alessandro

    2006-01-01

    Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 90 (2006) 664­677 Invited article Recent developments in evaporated CdTe solar cells G. Khrypunova , A. Romeob , F. Kurdesauc , D.L. Ba¨ tznerd , H. Zogge , A Abstract Recent developments in the technology of high vacuum evaporated CdTe solar cells are reviewed

  8. Module level solutions to solar cell polarization

    DOEpatents

    Xavier, Grace (Fremont, CA), Li; Bo (San Jose, CA)

    2012-05-29

    A solar cell module includes interconnected solar cells, a transparent cover over the front sides of the solar cells, and a backsheet on the backsides of the solar cells. The solar cell module includes an electrical insulator between the transparent cover and the front sides of the solar cells. An encapsulant protectively packages the solar cells. To prevent polarization, the insulator has resistance suitable to prevent charge from leaking from the front sides of the solar cells to other portions of the solar cell module by way of the transparent cover. The insulator may be attached (e.g., by coating) directly on an underside of the transparent cover or be a separate layer formed between layers of the encapsulant. The solar cells may be back junction solar cells.

  9. Plasma Etching Improves Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunyan, S. M.

    1982-01-01

    Etching front surfaces of screen-printed silicon photovoltaic cells with sulfur hexafluoride plasma found to increase cell performance while maintaining integrity of screen-printed silver contacts. Replacement of evaporated-metal contacts with screen-printed metal contacts proposed as one way to reduce cost of solar cells for terrestrial applications.

  10. Integrating Solar Induced Fluorescence and the Photochemical Reflectance Index for Estimating Gross Primary Production in a Cornfield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Yen-Ben; Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Zhang, Qingyuan; Huemmrich, Karl F.; Campbell, Petya K. E.; Corp, Lawrence A.; Cook, Bruce D.; Kustas, William P.; Daughtry, Criag S.

    2013-01-01

    The utilization of remotely sensed observations for light use efficiency (LUE) and tower-based gross primary production (GPP) estimates was studied in a USDA cornfield. Nadir hyperspectral reflectance measurements were acquired at canopy level during a collaborative field campaign conducted in four growing seasons. The Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI) and solar induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF), were derived. SIF retrievals were accomplished in the two telluric atmospheric oxygen absorption features centered at 688 nm (O2-B) and 760 nm (O2-A). The PRI and SIF were examined in conjunction with GPP and LUE determined by flux tower-based measurements. All of these fluxes, environmental variables, and the PRI and SIF exhibited diurnal as well as day-to-day dynamics across the four growing seasons. Consistent with previous studies, the PRI was shown to be related to LUE (r2 = 0.54 with a logarithm fit), but the relationship varied each year. By combining the PRI and SIF in a linear regression model, stronger performances for GPP estimation were obtained. The strongest relationship (r2 = 0.80, RMSE = 0.186 mg CO2/m2/s) was achieved when using the PRI and SIF retrievals at 688 nm. Cross-validation approaches were utilized to demonstrate the robustness and consistency of the performance. This study highlights a GPP retrieval method based entirely on hyperspectral remote sensing observations.

  11. Terrestrial concentrator solar cell module

    SciTech Connect

    Fraas, L.M.; Mansoori, N.; Kim, N.B.; Avery, J.E.

    1992-06-02

    This patent describes a solar cell module having a plurality of discrete cell units wherein each cell unit constitutes a tandem cell comprising an upper cell of a first semiconductive material and a lower cell of a second semiconductive material. It comprises a housing having a base and an upper portion; primary outer lens elements supported by the housing upper portion; a secondary radiant energy concentrating element associated with each primary lens element for protecting the carrier tape against incident light; each of the solar cell units being thermally coupled to the base; and parallel spaced strips of conductive material carried by the tape with means for separately connecting the strips to predetermined contact surfaces of the upper and lower cells of each cell unit.

  12. The solar flare of 18 August 1979: Incoherent scatter radar data and photochemical model comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Zinn, J.; Sutherland, C.D.; Fenimore, E.E.; Ganguly, S.

    1988-04-01

    Measurements of electron density at seven D-region altidues were made with the Arecibo radar during a Class-X solar flare on 18 August 1979. Measurements of solar x-ray fluxes during the same period were available from the GOES-2 satellite (0.5 to 4 /angstrom/ and 1 to 8 /angstrom/) and from ISEE-3 (in four bands between 26 and 400 keV). From the x-ray flux data we computed ionization rates in the D-region and the associated chemical changes, using a coupled atmospheric chemistry and diffusion model (with 836 chemical reactions and 19 vertical levels). The computed electron densities matched the data fairly well after we had adjusted the rate coefficients of two reactions. We discuss the hierarchies among the many flare-induced chemical reactions in two altitude ranges within the D-region and the effects of adjusting several other rate coefficients. 51 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Photochemical solar energy conversion utilizing semiconductors localized in membrane-mimetic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fendler, J.H.

    1991-08-31

    Extending the frontiers of colloidal photochemistry and colloidal electrochemistry to solar photochemistry research had been the main objective of this research. More specific objectives of this proposal include the examination of semiconductor-particle-mediated photoelectron transfer and photoelectric effects in different membrane mimetic systems. Emphasis had been placed on developing bilayer lipid membranes and Langmuir-Blodgett films as new membrane-mimetic systems, as well as on the characterization and utilization of these systems.

  14. Solar cell with back side contacts

    DOEpatents

    Nielson, Gregory N; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Resnick, Paul J; Wanlass, Mark Woodbury; Clews, Peggy J

    2013-12-24

    A III-V solar cell is described herein that includes all back side contacts. Additionally, the positive and negative electrical contacts contact compoud semiconductor layers of the solar cell other than the absorbing layer of the solar cell. That is, the positive and negative electrical contacts contact passivating layers of the solar cell.

  15. EE580 Solar Cells Todd J. Kaiser

    E-print Network

    Kaiser, Todd J.

    & unlimited potential ­ Long term benefits undeniable Montana State University: Solar Cells Lecture 107/21/2010 1 EE580 ­ Solar Cells Todd J. Kaiser · Lecture 10 · Summary 1Montana State University: Solar Cells Lecture 10: Summary Summer 2010 Class Montana State University: Solar Cells Lecture 10

  16. Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 91 (2007) 15991610 Improving solar cell efficiency using photonic band-gap materials

    E-print Network

    Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2007-01-01

    Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 91 (2007) 1599­1610 Improving solar cell efficiency using efficiency of solar cell devices without using concentrators. r 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved) solar energy conversion systems (or solar cells) are the most widely used power systems. However

  17. Dust Removal from Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A solar panel cleaning device includes a solar panel having a plurality of photovoltaic cells arranged in rows and embedded in the solar panel with space between the rows. A transparent dielectric overlay is affixed to the solar panel. A plurality of electrode pairs each of which includes an upper and a lower electrode are arranged on opposite sides of the transparent dielectric and are affixed thereto. The electrodes may be transparent electrodes which may be arranged without concern for blocking sunlight to the solar panel. The solar panel may be a dielectric and its dielectric properties may be continuously and spatially variable. Alternatively the dielectric used may have dielectric segments which produce different electrical field and which affects the wind "generated."

  18. Dust removal from solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A solar panel cleaning device includes a solar panel having a plurality of photovoltaic cells arranged in rows and embedded in the solar panel with space between the rows. A transparent dielectric overlay is affixed to the solar panel. A plurality of electrode pairs each of which includes an upper and a lower electrode are arranged on opposite sides of the transparent dielectric and are affixed thereto. The electrodes may be transparent electrodes which may be arranged without concern for blocking sunlight to the solar panel. The solar panel may be a dielectric and its dielectric properties may be continuously and spatially variable. Alternatively the dielectric used may have dielectric segments which produce different electrical field and which affects the wind "generated."

  19. Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 90 (2006) 34073415 High-efficiency flexible CdTe solar cells

    E-print Network

    Romeo, Alessandro

    2006-01-01

    Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 90 (2006) 3407­3415 High-efficiency flexible CdTe solar cellsTe/CdS solar cells of 11% efficiency in superstrate and 7.3% efficiency in substrate configurations have been at the beginning and at the end of the cell fabrication process. Solar cells with AM1.5 efficiency of 11

  20. PHOTOCHEMICAL PRODUCTS IN URBAN MIXTURES ENHANCE INFLAMMATORY RESPONSES IN LUNG CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Complex urban air mixtures that realistically mimic urban smog can be generated for investigating adverse health effects. "Smog chambers" have been used for over 30 yr to conduct experiments for developing and testing photochemical models that predict ambient ozone (O(3)) concent...

  1. EE580 Solar Cells Todd J. Kaiser

    E-print Network

    Kaiser, Todd J.

    University: Solar Cells Lecture 9: PV Systems Several types of operating modes · Centralized power plant Cells loose efficiency with the increase in temperature Colder is better Solar Heating Montana State University: Solar Cells Lecture 9: PV Systems 11 Solar heating (70-90%) is more efficient than photovoltaic

  2. Natural variants of photosystem II subunit D1 tune photochemical fitness to solar intensity.

    PubMed

    Vinyard, David J; Gimpel, Javier; Ananyev, Gennady M; Cornejo, Mario A; Golden, Susan S; Mayfield, Stephen P; Dismukes, G Charles

    2013-02-22

    Photosystem II (PSII) is composed of six core polypeptides that make up the minimal unit capable of performing the primary photochemistry of light-driven charge separation and water oxidation in all oxygenic phototrophs. The D1 subunit of this complex contains most of the ligating amino acid residues for the Mn(4)CaO(5) core of the water-oxidizing complex (WOC). Most cyanobacteria have 3-5 copies of the psbA gene coding for at least two isoforms of D1, whereas algae and plants have only one isoform. Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 contains two D1 isoforms; D1:1 is expressed under low light conditions, and D1:2 is up-regulated in high light or stress conditions. Using a heterologous psbA expression system in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we have measured growth rate, WOC cycle efficiency, and O(2) yield as a function of D1:1, D1:2, or the native algal D1 isoform. D1:1-PSII cells outcompete D1:2-PSII cells and accumulate more biomass in light-limiting conditions. However, D1:2-PSII cells easily outcompete D1:1-PSII cells at high light intensities. The native C. reinhardtii-PSII WOC cycles less efficiently at all light intensities and produces less O(2) than either cyanobacterial D1 isoform. D1:2-PSII makes more O(2) per saturating flash than D1:1-PSII, but it exhibits lower WOC cycling efficiency at low light intensities due to a 40% faster charge recombination rate in the S(3) state. These functional advantages of D1:1-PSII and D1:2-PSII at low and high light regimes, respectively, can be explained by differences in predicted redox potentials of PSII electron acceptors that control kinetic performance. PMID:23271739

  3. Photochemical bonding of epithelial cell-seeded collagen lattice to rat muscle layer for esophageal tissue engineering: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Barbara P.; Sato, M.; Vacanti, Joseph P.; Kochevar, Irene E.; Redmond, Robert W.

    2005-04-01

    Bilayered tube structures consist of epithelial cell-seeded collagen lattice and muscle layer have been fabricated for esophageal tissue engineering. Good adhesion between layers in order to facilitate cell infiltration and neovascularization in the collagen lattice is required. Previous efforts include using other bioglues such as fibrin glue and silicone tube as the physical support. However, the former is subjected to chances of transmitting blood-born infectious disease and is time consuming while the latter requires a second surgical procedure. The current project aimed to bond the cell-seeded collagen lattice to muscle layer using photochemical bonding, which has previously been demonstrated a rapid and non-thermal procedure in bonding collagenous tissues. Rat esophageal epithelial cells were seeded on collagen lattice and together with the latissimus dorsi muscle layer, were exposed to a photosensitizer rose Bengal at the bonding surface. An argon laser was used to irradiate the approximated layers. Bonding strength was measured during the peeling test of the collagen layer from the muscle layer. Post-bonding cell viability was assessed using a modified NADH-diaphorase microassay. A pilot in vivo study was conducted by directly bonding the cell-seeded collagen layer onto the muscle flap in rats and the structures were characterized histologically. Photochemical bonding was found to significantly increase the adherence at the bonding interface without compromising the cell viability. This indicates the feasibility of using the technique to fabricate multi-layered structures in the presence of living cells. The pilot animal study demonstrated integration of the collagen lattice with the muscle layer at the bonding interface although the subsequent surgical manipulation disturbed the integration at some region. This means that an additional procedure removing the tube could be avoided if the approximation and thus the bonding are optimized. Cell infiltration and neovascularization were also evident demonstrating that direct bonding of engineered tissue structures in particular those with low processability such as collagen lattice to the host tissue is feasible.

  4. Gap/silicon Tandem Solar Cell with Extended Temperature Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A two-junction solar cell has a bottom solar cell junction of crystalline silicon, and a top solar cell junction of gallium phosphide. A three (or more) junction solar cell has bottom solar cell junctions of silicon, and a top solar cell junction of gallium phosphide. The resulting solar cells exhibit improved extended temperature operation.

  5. PHOTOCHEMICAL BOX MODEL (PBM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This magnetic tape contains the FORTRAN source code, sample input data, and sample output data for the Photochemical Box Model (PBM). The PBM is a simple stationary single-cell model with a variable height lid designed to provide volume-integrated hour averages of O3 and other ph...

  6. Solar cell circuit and method for manufacturing solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, Nick (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The invention is a novel manufacturing method for making multi-junction solar cell circuits that addresses current problems associated with such circuits by allowing the formation of integral diodes in the cells and allows for a large number of circuits to readily be placed on a single silicon wafer substrate. The standard Ge wafer used as the base for multi-junction solar cells is replaced with a thinner layer of Ge or a II-V semiconductor material on a silicon/silicon dioxide substrate. This allows high-voltage cells with multiple multi-junction circuits to be manufactured on a single wafer, resulting in less array assembly mass and simplified power management.

  7. Low cost solar cell arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iles, P. A.; Mclennan, H.

    1975-01-01

    Limitations in both space and terrestial markets for solar cells are described. Based on knowledge of the state-of-the-art, six cell options are discussed; as a result of this discussion, the three most promising options (involving high, medium and low efficiency cells respectively) were selected and analyzed for their probable costs. The results showed that all three cell options gave promise of costs below $10 per watt in the near future. Before further cost reductions can be achieved, more R and D work is required; suggestions for suitable programs are given.

  8. Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E. (Yardley, PA)

    1980-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell incorporates a region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon fabricated by a glow discharge wherein said intrinsic region is compensated by P-type dopants in an amount sufficient to reduce the space charge density of said region under illumination to about zero.

  9. Alining Solder Pads on a Solar Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazzery, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    Mechanism consisting of stylus and hand-operated lever incorporated into screening machine to precisely register front and back solder pads during solar-cell assembly. Technique may interest those assembling solar cells manually for research or prototype work.

  10. Evaluation of solar cell materials for a Solar Power Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, P. E.; Almgren, D. W.; Csigi, K. I.

    1980-01-01

    Alternative solar cell materials being considered for the solar power satellite are described and price, production, and availability projections through the year 2000 are presented. The chief materials considered are silicon and gallium arsenide.

  11. Process of making solar cell module

    DOEpatents

    Packer, M.; Coyle, P.J.

    1981-03-09

    A process is presented for the manufacture of solar cell modules. A solution comprising a highly plasticized polyvinyl butyral is applied to a solar cell array. The coated array is dried and sandwiched between at last two sheets of polyvinyl butyral and at least two sheets of a rigid transparent member. The sandwich is laminated by the application of heat and pressure to cause fusion and bonding of the solar cell array with the rigid transparent members to produce a solar cell module.

  12. EE580 Solar Cells Todd J. Kaiser

    E-print Network

    Kaiser, Todd J.

    7/21/2010 1 EE580 ­ Solar Cells Todd J. Kaiser · Lecture 05 · P-N Junction 1Montana State University: Solar Cells Lecture 5: P-N Junction P-N Junction · Solar Cell is a large area P-N junction electron (hole) positive) 2Montana State University: Solar Cells Lecture 5: P-N Junction p-n Junction p n P

  13. Key Physical Mechanisms in Nanostructured Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dr Stephan Bremner

    2010-07-21

    The objective of the project was to study both theoretically and experimentally the excitation, recombination and transport properties required for nanostructured solar cells to deliver energy conversion efficiencies well in excess of conventional limits. These objectives were met by concentrating on three key areas, namely, investigation of physical mechanisms present in nanostructured solar cells, characterization of loss mechanisms in nanostructured solar cells and determining the properties required of nanostructured solar cells in order to achieve high efficiency and the design implications.

  14. Photochemical internalization of tamoxifens transported by a "Trojan-horse" nanoconjugate into breast-cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Theodossiou, Theodossis A; Gonçalves, A Ricardo; Yannakopoulou, Konstantina; Skarpen, Ellen; Berg, Kristian

    2015-04-13

    Photochemical internalization (PCI) has shown great promise as a therapeutic alternative for targeted drug delivery by light-harnessed activation. However, it has only been applicable to therapeutic macromolecules or medium-sized molecules. Herein we describe the use of an amphiphilic, water-soluble porphyrin-?-cyclodextrin conjugate (mTHPP-?CD) as a "Trojan horse" to facilitate the endocytosis of CD-guest tamoxifens into breast-cancer cells. Upon irradiation, the porphyrin core of mTHPP-?CD expedited endosomal membrane rupture and tamoxifen release into the cytosol, as documented by confocal microscopy. The sustained complexation of mTHPP-?CD with tamoxifen was corroborated by 2D NMR spectroscopy and FRET studies. Following the application of PCI protocols with 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT), estrogen-receptor ?-positive (Er?+, but not ER?-) cell groups exhibited extensive cytotoxicity and/or growth suspension even at 72?h after irradiation. PMID:25663536

  15. 24% efficient silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J.; Wang, A.; Altermatt, P.P.; Wenham, S.R.; Green, M.A.

    1994-12-31

    This paper reports significant progress in silicon solar cell performance, taking confirmed efficiency beyond 24% for the first time. This progress has been achieved by a combination of several mechanisms. One is the reduction of recombination at the cell front surface by improved passivation of the silicon/silicon dioxide interface. Resistive losses in the cell have been reduced by a double-plating process which increases the thickness for the coarse cell metallization features. Finally, reflective losses have been reduced by the application of a double layer anti-reflection (DLAR) coating. Another advantage of DLAR coating is that it will give further 3% higher current density than the SiO{sub 2} single layer anti-reflection (SLAR) coated cells when encapsulated into modules. The cells display a monochromatic light energy conversion efficiency of 46.3% for 1.04 {micro}m wavelength light, also the highest ever for a silicon device.

  16. EE580 Solar Cells Todd J. Kaiser

    E-print Network

    Kaiser, Todd J.

    7/21/2010 1 EE580 ­ Solar Cells Todd J. Kaiser · Lecture 04 · Semiconductor Materials · Chapter 1 1Montana State University: Solar Cells Lecture 4: Semiconductor Materials Semiconductor Bond Model · Bohr electrons interact to form bonds 2Montana State University: Solar Cells Lecture 4: Semiconductor Materials

  17. Detailed balance analysis of nanophotonic solar cells

    E-print Network

    Fan, Shanhui

    Detailed balance analysis of nanophotonic solar cells Sunil Sandhu, Zongfu Yu, and Shanhui Fan-voltage characteristic modeling of nanophotonic solar cells. This approach takes into account the intrinsic material non-idealities, and is useful for determining the theoretical limit of solar cell efficiency for a given structure. Our approach

  18. EE580 Solar Cells Todd J. Kaiser

    E-print Network

    Kaiser, Todd J.

    7/21/2010 1 EE580 ­ Solar Cells Todd J. Kaiser · Lecture 02 Microfabrication ­ A combination · Photolithograpy · Depostion · Etching 1 Montana State University: Solar Cells Lecture 2: Microfabrication Flow Montana State University: Solar Cells Lecture 2: Microfabrication Questions · What is heat? · Heat

  19. Nanostructured Materials for Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila; Raffaelle, Ryne; Castro, Stephanie; Fahey, S.; Gennett, T.; Tin, P.

    2003-01-01

    The use of both inorganic and organic nanostructured materials in producing high efficiency photovoltaics is discussed in this paper. Recent theoretical results indicate that dramatic improvements in device efficiency may be attainable through the use of semiconductor quantum dots in an ordinary p-i-n solar cell. In addition, it has also recently been demonstrated that quantum dots can also be used to improve conversion efficiencies in polymeric thin film solar cells. A similar improvement in these types of cells has also been observed by employing single wall carbon nanotubes. This relatively new carbon allotrope may assist both in the disassociation of excitons as well as carrier transport through the composite material. This paper reviews the efforts that are currently underway to produce and characterize these nanoscale materials and to exploit their unique properties.

  20. A novel chlorophyll solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludlow, J. C.

    The photosynthetic process is reviewed in order to produce a design for a chlorophyll solar cell. In a leaf, antenna chlorophyll absorbs light energy and conducts it to an energy trap composed of a protein and two chlorophyll molecules, which perform the oxidation-reduction chemistry. The redox potential of the trap changes from 0.4 to -0.6 V, which is sufficient to reduce nearby molecules with redox potentials in that range. The reduction occurs by transfer of an electron, and a chlorophyll solar cell would direct the transferred electron to a current carrier. Chlorophyll antenna and traps are placed on a metallic support immersed in an electron acceptor solution, and resulting electrons from exposure to light are gathered by a metallic current collector. Spinach chlorophyll extracted, purified, and applied in a cell featuring a Pt collector and an octane water emulsion resulted in intensity independent voltages.

  1. The photochemical and fluorescence properties of whole cells, spheroplasts and spheroplast particles from the blue-green alga Phormidium luridum.

    PubMed

    Tel-or, E; Malkin, S

    1977-02-01

    The photochemical activities and fluorescence properties of cells, spheroplasts and spheroplast particles from the blue-green alga Phormidium luridum were compared. The photochemical activities were measured in a whole range of wavelengths and expressed as quantum yield spectra (quantum yield vs. wavelength). The following reactions were measured. Photosynthesis (O2 evolution) in whole cells; Hill reaction (O2 evolution) with Fe(CN)63- and NADP as electron acceptors (Photosystem II and photosystem II + Photosystem I reactions); electron transfer from reduced 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol to diquat (Photosystem I reaction). The fluorescence properties were emission spectra, quantum yield spectra and the induction pattern. On the basis of comparison between the quantum yield spectra and the pigments compositions the relative contribution of each pigment to each photosystem was estimated. In normal cells and spheroplasts it was found that Photosystem I (Photosystem II) contains about 90% (10%) of the chlorophyll a, 90% (10%) of the carotenoids and 15% (85%) of the phycocyanin. In spheroplast particles there is a reorganization of the pigments; they loose a certain fraction (about half) of the phycocyanin but the remaining phycocyanin attaches itself exclusively to Photosystem I (!). This is reflected by the loss of Photosystem II activity, a flat quantum yield vs. wavelength dependence and a loss of the fluorescence induction. The fluorescence quantum yield spectra conform qualitatively to the above conclusion. More quantitative estimation shows that only a fraction (20--40%) of the chlorophyll of Photosystem II is fluorescent. Total emission spectrum and the ratio of variable to constant fluorescence are in agreement with this conclusion. The fluorescence emission spectrum shows characteristic differences between the constant and variable components. The variable fluorescence comes exclusively from chlorophyll a; the constant fluorescence is contributed, in addition to chlorophyll a, by phycocyanine and an unidentified long wavelength component. The variable fluorescence does not change in the transition from whole cells to spheroplasts. However, the constant fluorescence increases considerably. This indicates the release of a small fraction of pigments from the photosynthetic photochemical apparatus which then become fluorescent. PMID:402150

  2. Mixed ternary heterojunction solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA); Stewart, John M. (Seattle, WA)

    1992-08-25

    A thin film heterojunction solar cell and a method of making it has a p-type layer of mixed ternary I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor material in contact with an n-type layer of mixed binary II-VI semiconductor material. The p-type semiconductor material includes a low resistivity copper-rich region adjacent the back metal contact of the cell and a composition gradient providing a minority carrier mirror that improves the photovoltaic performance of the cell. The p-type semiconductor material preferably is CuInGaSe.sub.2 or CuIn(SSe).sub.2.

  3. Impurities in silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. R., Jr.; Rohatgi, A.; Hopkins, R. H.; Blais, P. D.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Mccormick, J. R.; Mollenkopf, H. C.

    1980-01-01

    The paper investigates the effects of metallic impurities on the performance of silicon solar cells. Czochralski and polycrystalline ingots were employed with boron and phosphorus as primary dopants and with controlled additions of secondary impurities. The data obtained from over 200 crystals indicate that impurity-induced performance loss is primarily due to a reduction of the base diffusion length. Based on this observation, a model is developed which predicts cell performance as a function of secondary impurity concentrations. The model calculations are in good agreement with experimental values except for Cu, Ni, Fe, and to a lesser degree, carbon, which at higher concentrations degrade the cell by junction defect mechanisms.

  4. Interfaces in perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiangjian; Xu, Xin; Li, Dongmei; Meng, Qingbo

    2015-06-01

    The interfacial atomic and electronic structures, charge transfer processes, and interface engineering in perovskite solar cells are discussed in this review. An effective heterojunction is found to exist at the window/perovskite absorber interface, contributing to the relatively fast extraction of free electrons. Moreover, the high photovoltage in this cell can be attributed to slow interfacial charge recombination due to the outstanding material and interfacial electronic properties. However, some fundamental questions including the interfacial atomic and electronic structures and the interface stability need to be further clarified. Designing and engineering the interfaces are also important for the next-stage development of this cell. PMID:25688549

  5. 22. 8% efficient silicon solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Blakers, A.W.; Wang, A.; Milne, A.M.; Zhao, J.; Green, M.A. )

    1989-09-25

    A new silicon solar cell structure, the passivated emitter and rear cell, is described. The cell structure has yielded independently confirmed efficiencies of up to 22.8%, the highest ever reported for a silicon cell.

  6. Advanced solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Hingorani, N.G.; Mehta, H.

    1993-06-01

    A photovoltaic cell is described comprising: a layered extrinsic semiconductor having a substantially neutral base layer sandwiched between two heavily doped layers having opposite conductivity types to form a P-N junction within the semiconductor; and means for applying an externally generated electric field to the semiconductor to enhance a depletion region formed around the P-N junction to extend into the base layer when photo radiation impinges on the semiconductor.

  7. Nanowire perovskite solar cell.

    PubMed

    Im, Jeong-Hyeok; Luo, Jingshan; Franckevi?ius, Marius; Pellet, Norman; Gao, Peng; Moehl, Thomas; Zakeeruddin, Shaik Mohammed; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja; Grätzel, Michael; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2015-03-11

    Organolead iodide perovskite, CH3NH3PbI3, was prepared in the form of nanowire by means of a small quantity of aprotic solvent in two-step spin-coating procedure. One-dimensional nanowire perovskite with the mean diameter of 100 nm showed faster carrier separation in the presence of hole transporting layer and higher lateral conductivity than the three-dimensional nanocuboid crystal. Reduction in dimensionality resulted in the hypsochromic shift of both absorption and fluorescence spectra, indicative of more localized exciton states in nanowires. The best performing device employing nanowire CH3NH3PbI3 delivered photocurrent density of 19.12 mA/cm(2), voltage of 1.052 V, and fill factor of 0.721, leading to a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 14.71% at standard AM 1.5G solar illumination. A small I-V hysteresis was observed, where a PCE at forward scan was measured to be 85% of the PCE at reverse scan. PMID:25710268

  8. Towards stable silicon nanoarray hybrid solar cells

    PubMed Central

    He, W. W.; Wu, K. J.; Wang, K.; Shi, T. F.; Wu, L.; Li, S. X.; Teng, D. Y.; Ye, C. H.

    2014-01-01

    Silicon nanoarray hybrid solar cells benefit from the ease of fabrication and the cost-effectiveness of the hybrid structure, and represent a new research focus towards the utilization of solar energy. However, hybrid solar cells composed of both inorganic and organic components suffer from the notorious stability issue, which has to be tackled before the hybrid solar cells could become a viable alternative for harvesting solar energy. Here we show that Si nanoarray/PEDOT:PSS hybrid solar cells with improved stability can be fabricated via eliminating the water inclusion in the initial formation of the heterojunction between Si nanoarray and PEDOT:PSS. The Si nanoarray hybrid solar cells are stable against rapid degradation in the atmosphere environment for several months without encapsulation. This finding paves the way towards the real-world applications of Si nanoarray hybrid solar cells. PMID:24430057

  9. GaAs Solar Cell Radiation Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.

    1996-01-01

    The handbook discusses the history of GaAs solar cell development, presents equations useful for working with GaAs solar cells, describes commonly used instrumentation techniques for assessing radiation effects in solar cells and fundamental processes occurring in solar cells exposed to ionizing radiation, and explains why radiation decreases the electrical performance of solar cells. Three basic elements required to perform solar array degradation calculations: degradation data for GaAs solar cells after irradiation with 1 MeV electrons at normal incidence; relative damage coefficients for omnidirectional electron and proton exposure; and the definition of the space radiation environment for the orbit of interest, are developed and used to perform a solar array degradation calculation.

  10. Study of solar cell welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, G. L.

    1978-01-01

    The thermal imaging technique was evaluated for its capabilities in the nondestructive evaluation of solar cell welds. The temperature and spatial resolution of state of the art instrumentation was sufficient for both qualitative and quantitative determination of the quality of solar cell welds. The addition of color digitized thermography enhanced the aspects of the thermographic display and allowed easily computerized testing procedures. For automated testing systems an accurate correlation of weld quality with temperature profiles of the welds needs to be performed. In comparison, the holographic technique was complementary with the thermal imaging technique, except that the holographic analysis appeared to be more quantitative at the present time. However, the thermal imaging approach is much more versatile in overall capabilities.

  11. High Temperature Solar Cell Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Merritt, Danielle

    2004-01-01

    The majority of satellites and near-earth probes developed to date have used photovoltaic arrays for power generation. If future mission to probe environments close to the sun will be able to use photovoltaic power, solar cells that can function at high temperatures, under high light intensity, and high radiation conditions must be developed. In this paper, we derive the optimum bandgap as a function of the operating temperature.

  12. Solar cells Improved Hybrid Solar Cells via in situ UV Polymerization

    E-print Network

    Sibener, Steven

    Solar cells Improved Hybrid Solar Cells via in situ UV Polymerization Sanja Tepavcevic, Seth B-enhanced solar energy conversion. By using this simple in situ UV polymerization method that couples mobility of the photoactive layer can be enhanced. 1. Introduction Hybrid solar cells have been developed

  13. Spectral sensitization of nanocrystalline solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Spitler, Mark T. (Concord, MA); Ehret, Anne (Malden, MA); Stuhl, Louis S. (Bedford, MA)

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to dye sensitized polycrystalline photoelectrochemical solar cells for use in energy transduction from light to electricity. It concerns the utility of highly absorbing organic chromophores as sensitizers in such cells and the degree to which they may be utilized alone and in combination to produce an efficient photoelectrochemical cell, e.g., a regenerative solar cell.

  14. Recent Advances in Solar Cell Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Bailey, Sheila G.; Piszczor, Michael F., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The advances in solar cell efficiency, radiation tolerance, and cost over the last decade are reviewed. Potential performance of thin-film solar cells in space are discussed, and the cost and the historical trends in production capability of the photovoltaics industry are considered with respect to the requirements of space power systems. Concentrator cells with conversion efficiency over 30%, and nonconcentrating solar cells with efficiency over 25% are now available, and advanced radiation-tolerant cells and lightweight, thin-film arrays are both being developed. Nonsolar applications of solar cells, including thermophotovoltaics, alpha- and betavoltaics, and laser power receivers, are also discussed.

  15. Silicon Carbide Solar Cells Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2001-01-01

    The semiconductor silicon carbide (SiC) has long been known for its outstanding resistance to harsh environments (e.g., thermal stability, radiation resistance, and dielectric strength). However, the ability to produce device-quality material is severely limited by the inherent crystalline defects associated with this material and their associated electronic effects. Much progress has been made recently in the understanding and control of these defects and in the improved processing of this material. Because of this work, it may be possible to produce SiC-based solar cells for environments with high temperatures, light intensities, and radiation, such as those experienced by solar probes. Electronics and sensors based on SiC can operate in hostile environments where conventional silicon-based electronics (limited to 350 C) cannot function. Development of this material will enable large performance enhancements and size reductions for a wide variety of systems--such as high-frequency devices, high-power devices, microwave switching devices, and high-temperature electronics. These applications would supply more energy-efficient public electric power distribution and electric vehicles, more powerful microwave electronics for radar and communications, and better sensors and controls for cleaner-burning, more fuel-efficient jet aircraft and automobile engines. The 6H-SiC polytype is a promising wide-bandgap (Eg = 3.0 eV) semiconductor for photovoltaic applications in harsh solar environments that involve high-temperature and high-radiation conditions. The advantages of this material for this application lie in its extremely large breakdown field strength, high thermal conductivity, good electron saturation drift velocity, and stable electrical performance at temperatures as high as 600 C. This behavior makes it an attractive photovoltaic solar cell material for devices that can operate within three solar radii of the Sun.

  16. Extended Temperature Solar Cell Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Jenkins, Phillip; Scheiman, David; Rafaelle, Ryne

    2004-01-01

    Future NASA missions will require solar cells to operate both in regimes closer to the sun, and farther from the sun, where the operating temperatures will be higher and lower than standard operational conditions. NASA Glenn is engaged in testing solar cells under extended temperature ranges, developing theoretical models of cell operation as a function of temperature, and in developing technology for improving the performance of solar cells for both high and low temperature operation.

  17. Method of making encapsulated solar cell modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anagnostou, E.; Forestieri, A. F. (inventors)

    1978-01-01

    Electrical connections to solar cells in a module are made at the same time the cells are encapsulated for protection. The encapsulating material is embossed to facilitate the positioning of the cells during assembly.

  18. Eutectic Contact Inks for Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, B.

    1985-01-01

    Low-resistance electrical contacts formed on solar cells by melting powders of eutectic composition of semiconductor and dopant. Process improves cell performance without subjecting cell to processing temperatures high enough to degrade other characteristics.

  19. A new filter that accurately mimics the solar UV-B spectrum using standard UV lamps: the photochemical properties, stabilization and use of the urate anion liquid filter.

    PubMed

    Sampath-Wiley, Priya; Jahnke, Leland S

    2011-02-01

    The physiological effects unique to solar ultraviolet (UV)-B exposure (280-315 nm) are difficult to accurately replicate in the laboratory. This study evaluates the effectiveness of the sodium urate anion in a liquid filter that yields a spectrum nearly indistinguishable from the solar UV-B spectrum while filtering the emissions of widely used UV-B lamps. The photochemical properties and stability of this filter are examined and weighed against a typical spectrum of ground-level solar UV-B radiation. To test the effectiveness of this filter, light-saturated photosynthetic oxygen evolution rates were measured following exposure to UV-B filtered either by this urate filter or the widely used cellulose acetate (CA) filter. The ubiquitous marine Chlorophyte alga Dunaliella tertiolecta was tested under identical UV-B flux densities coupled with ecologically realistic fluxes of UV-A and visible radiation for 6 and 12 h exposures. These results indicate that the urate-filtered UV-B radiation yields minor photosynthetic inhibition when compared with exposures lacking in UV-B. This is in agreement with published experiments using solar radiation. In sharp contrast, radiation filtered by CA filters produced large inhibition of photosynthesis. PMID:20955223

  20. Search for new solar cell heats up

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, R.

    1990-11-05

    Researchers are in the process of developing an organic solar energy cell with a plasticlike material that simplifies the complicated process of creating a working cell - one that is cheap, easy to produce and has a variety of potential applications. The chemical is polyacetylene and can be painted on anything to become a solar cell.

  1. Monolithic and mechanical multijunction space solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Flood, Dennis J.

    1992-01-01

    High-efficiency, lightweight, radiation-resistant solar cells are essential to meet the large power requirements of future space missions. Single-junction cells are limited in efficiency. Higher cell efficiencies could be realized by developing multijunction, multibandgap solar cells. Monolithic and mechanically stacked tandem solar cells surpassing single-junction cell efficiencies have been fabricated. This article surveys the current status of monolithic and mechanically stacked multibandgap space solar cells, and outlines problems yet to be resolved. The monolithic and mechanically stacked cells each have their own problems related to size, processing, current and voltage matching, weight, and other factors. More information is needed on the effect of temperature and radiation on the cell performance. Proper reference cells and full-spectrum range simulators are also needed to measure efficiencies correctly. Cost issues are not addressed, since the two approaches are still in the developmental stage.

  2. Improved monolithic tandem solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1991-04-23

    A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, photovoltaic solar cell is described which includes (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first photoactive subcell on the upper surf ace of the InP substrate, (c) a second photoactive subcell on the first subcell; and (d) an optically transparent prismatic cover layer over the second subcell. The first photoactive subcell is GaInAsP of defined composition. The second subcell is InP. The two subcells are lattice matched.

  3. Bypass diode for a solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Rim, Seung Bum (Palo Alto, CA); Kim, Taeseok (San Jose, CA); Smith, David D. (Campbell, CA); Cousins, Peter J. (Menlo Park, CA)

    2012-03-13

    Bypass diodes for solar cells are described. In one embodiment, a bypass diode for a solar cell includes a substrate of the solar cell. A first conductive region is disposed above the substrate, the first conductive region of a first conductivity type. A second conductive region is disposed on the first conductive region, the second conductive region of a second conductivity type opposite the first conductivity type.

  4. Solar Cell Modules With Improved Backskin

    DOEpatents

    Gonsiorawski, Ronald C. (Danvers, MA)

    2003-12-09

    A laminated solar cell module comprises a front light transmitting support, a plurality of interconnected solar cells encapsulated by a light-transmitting encapsulant material, and an improved backskin formed of an ionomer/nylon alloy. The improved backskin has a toughness and melting point temperature sufficiently great to avoid any likelihood of it being pierced by any of the components that interconnect the solar cells.

  5. Current and lattice matched tandem solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M. (Lakewood, CO)

    1987-01-01

    A multijunction (cascade) tandem photovoltaic solar cell device is fabricated of a Ga.sub.x In.sub.1-x P (0.505.ltoreq.X.ltoreq.0.515) top cell semiconductor lattice matched to a GaAs bottom cell semiconductor at a low-resistance heterojunction, preferably a p+/n+ heterojunction between the cells. The top and bottom cells are both lattice matched and current matched for high efficiency solar radiation conversion to electrical energy.

  6. Low-temperature photo-activated inorganic electron transport layers for flexible inverted polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Wook; Lee, Soo-Hyoung; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Park, Sung Kyu

    2014-09-01

    A simple and versatile route of forming sol-gel-derived metal oxide n-type electron transport layers (ETLs) for flexible inverted polymer solar cells (PSCs) is proposed using low-temperature photochemical activation process. The photochemical activation, which is induced by deep ultraviolet irradiation on sol-gel films, allows formation of metal oxide n-type ETLs such as zinc oxide (ZnO) and indium gallium zinc oxide films at a low temperature. Compared to poly(3-hexylthiophene)/phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester inverted PSCs with thermally annealed ZnO ETLs (optimized efficiency of 3.26 ± 0.03 %), the inverted PSCs with photo-activated ZnO ETLs showed an improved efficiency of 3.60 ± 0.02 %. The enhanced photovoltaic property is attributed to efficient charge collection from low overall series resistance and high surface area-to-geometric area ratio by the photo-activated ZnO ETLs.

  7. Laser-assisted solar cell metallization processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, A.; Gupta, S.; Mcmullin, P. G.; Palaschak, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    Laser-assisted processing techniques for producing high-quality solar cell metallization patterns are being investigated, developed, and characterized. The tasks comprising these investigations are outlined.

  8. Very High Efficiency Solar Cell Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, A.; Kirkpatrick, D.; Honsberg, C.; Moore, D.; Wanlass, M.; Emery, K.; Schwartz, R.; Carlson, D.; Bowden, S.; Aiken, D.; Gray, A.; Kurtz, S.; Kazmerski, L., et al

    2009-01-01

    The Very High Efficiency Solar Cell (VHESC) program is developing integrated optical system - PV modules for portable applications that operate at greater than 50% efficiency. We are integrating the optical design with the solar cell design, and have entered previously unoccupied design space. Our approach is driven by proven quantitative models for the solar cell design, the optical design, and the integration of these designs. Optical systems efficiency with an optical efficiency of 93% and solar cell device results under ideal dichroic splitting optics summing to 42.7 {+-} 2.5% are described.

  9. Front contact solar cell with formed emitter

    DOEpatents

    Cousins, Peter John (Menlo Park, CA)

    2012-07-17

    A bipolar solar cell includes a backside junction formed by an N-type silicon substrate and a P-type polysilicon emitter formed on the backside of the solar cell. An antireflection layer may be formed on a textured front surface of the silicon substrate. A negative polarity metal contact on the front side of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the substrate, while a positive polarity metal contact on the backside of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the polysilicon emitter. An external electrical circuit may be connected to the negative and positive metal contacts to be powered by the solar cell. The positive polarity metal contact may form an infrared reflecting layer with an underlying dielectric layer for increased solar radiation collection.

  10. Front contact solar cell with formed emitter

    DOEpatents

    Cousins, Peter John

    2014-11-04

    A bipolar solar cell includes a backside junction formed by an N-type silicon substrate and a P-type polysilicon emitter formed on the backside of the solar cell. An antireflection layer may be formed on a textured front surface of the silicon substrate. A negative polarity metal contact on the front side of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the substrate, while a positive polarity metal contact on the backside of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the polysilicon emitter. An external electrical circuit may be connected to the negative and positive metal contacts to be powered by the solar cell. The positive polarity metal contact may form an infrared reflecting layer with an underlying dielectric layer for increased solar radiation collection.

  11. PERSPECTIVE www.rsc.org/pps | Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences Effects of solar UV radiation on aquatic ecosystems and interactions with

    E-print Network

    Columbia University

    species and aquatic ecosystems (e.g., lakes, rivers, marshes, oceans). Solar UV radiation penetrates and high to mid latitudes have aroused concern about the effects of increased solar UV-B radiation of low temperatures.7 Exposure to solar UV radiation can reduce productivity, affect reproduction

  12. Changes in photochemically significant solar UV spectral irradiance as estimated by the composite Mg II index and scale factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deland, Matthew T.; Cebula, Richard P.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the impact of solar ultraviolet irradiance variations on stratospheric ozone abundances currently requires the use of proxy indicators. The Mg II core-to-wing index has been developed as an indicator of solar UV activity between 175-400 nm that is independent of most instrument artifacts, and measures solar variability on both rotational and solar cycle time scales. Linear regression fits have been used to merge the individual Mg II index data sets from the Nimbus-7, NOAA-9, and NOAA-11 instruments onto a single reference scale. The change in 27-dayrunning average of the composite Mg II index from solar maximum to solar minimum is approximately 8 percent for solar cycle 21, and approximately 9 percent for solar cycle 22 through January 1992. Scaling factors based on the short-term variations in the Mg II index and solar irradiance data sets have been developed to estimate solar variability at mid-UV and near-UV wavelengths. Near 205 nm, where solar irradiance variations are important for stratospheric photo-chemistry and dynamics, the estimated change in irradiance during solar cycle 22 is approximately 10 percent using the composite Mg II index and scale factors.

  13. PAPER www.rsc.org/pps | Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences Alteration of chromophoric dissolved organic matter by solar UV radiation

    E-print Network

    Sommaruga, Ruben

    dissolved organic matter by solar UV radiation causes rapid changes in bacterial community composition) on bacterial abundance, activity and community composition in a coastal lagoon of the Atlantic Ocean with high of the lagoon was exposed to different regions of the solar spectrum (full solar radiation, UV-A + PAR, PAR

  14. Estimating chlorophyll content and photochemical yield of photosystem II (?PSII) using solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence measurements at different growing stages of attached leaves.

    PubMed

    Tubuxin, Bayaer; Rahimzadeh-Bajgiran, Parinaz; Ginnan, Yusaku; Hosoi, Fumiki; Omasa, Kenji

    2015-09-01

    This paper illustrates the possibility of measuring chlorophyll (Chl) content and Chl fluorescence parameters by the solar-induced Chl fluorescence (SIF) method using the Fraunhofer line depth (FLD) principle, and compares the results with the standard measurement methods. A high-spectral resolution HR2000+ and an ordinary USB4000 spectrometer were used to measure leaf reflectance under solar and artificial light, respectively, to estimate Chl fluorescence. Using leaves of Capsicum annuum cv. 'Sven' (paprika), the relationships between the Chl content and the steady-state Chl fluorescence near oxygen absorption bands of O2B (686nm) and O2A (760nm), measured under artificial and solar light at different growing stages of leaves, were evaluated. The Chl fluorescence yields of ?F 686nm/?F 760nm ratios obtained from both methods correlated well with the Chl content (steady-state solar light: R(2) = 0.73; artificial light: R(2) = 0.94). The SIF method was less accurate for Chl content estimation when Chl content was high. The steady-state solar-induced Chl fluorescence yield ratio correlated very well with the artificial-light-induced one (R(2) = 0.84). A new methodology is then presented to estimate photochemical yield of photosystem II (?PSII) from the SIF measurements, which was verified against the standard Chl fluorescence measurement method (pulse-amplitude modulated method). The high coefficient of determination (R(2) = 0.74) between the ?PSII of the two methods shows that photosynthesis process parameters can be successfully estimated using the presented methodology. PMID:26071530

  15. Estimating chlorophyll content and photochemical yield of photosystem II (?PSII) using solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence measurements at different growing stages of attached leaves

    PubMed Central

    Tubuxin, Bayaer; Rahimzadeh-Bajgiran, Parinaz; Ginnan, Yusaku; Hosoi, Fumiki; Omasa, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    This paper illustrates the possibility of measuring chlorophyll (Chl) content and Chl fluorescence parameters by the solar-induced Chl fluorescence (SIF) method using the Fraunhofer line depth (FLD) principle, and compares the results with the standard measurement methods. A high-spectral resolution HR2000+ and an ordinary USB4000 spectrometer were used to measure leaf reflectance under solar and artificial light, respectively, to estimate Chl fluorescence. Using leaves of Capsicum annuum cv. ‘Sven’ (paprika), the relationships between the Chl content and the steady-state Chl fluorescence near oxygen absorption bands of O2B (686nm) and O2A (760nm), measured under artificial and solar light at different growing stages of leaves, were evaluated. The Chl fluorescence yields of ?F 686nm/?F 760nm ratios obtained from both methods correlated well with the Chl content (steady-state solar light: R2 = 0.73; artificial light: R2 = 0.94). The SIF method was less accurate for Chl content estimation when Chl content was high. The steady-state solar-induced Chl fluorescence yield ratio correlated very well with the artificial-light-induced one (R2 = 0.84). A new methodology is then presented to estimate photochemical yield of photosystem II (?PSII) from the SIF measurements, which was verified against the standard Chl fluorescence measurement method (pulse-amplitude modulated method). The high coefficient of determination (R2 = 0.74) between the ?PSII of the two methods shows that photosynthesis process parameters can be successfully estimated using the presented methodology. PMID:26071530

  16. Method for processing silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Landry, M.D.; Pitts, J.R.

    1997-05-06

    The instant invention teaches a novel method for fabricating silicon solar cells utilizing concentrated solar radiation. The solar radiation is concentrated by use of a solar furnace which is used to form a front surface junction and back-surface field in one processing step. The present invention also provides a method of making multicrystalline silicon from amorphous silicon. The invention also teaches a method of texturing the surface of a wafer by forming a porous silicon layer on the surface of a silicon substrate and a method of gettering impurities. Also contemplated by the invention are methods of surface passivation, forming novel solar cell structures, and hydrogen passivation. 2 figs.

  17. Method for processing silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Tsuo, Y. Simon (Golden, CO); Landry, Marc D. (Lafayette, CO); Pitts, John R. (Lakewood, CO)

    1997-01-01

    The instant invention teaches a novel method for fabricating silicon solar cells utilizing concentrated solar radiation. The solar radiation is concentrated by use of a solar furnace which is used to form a front surface junction and back-surface field in one processing step. The present invention also provides a method of making multicrystallline silicon from amorphous silicon. The invention also teaches a method of texturing the surface of a wafer by forming a porous silicon layer on the surface of a silicon substrate and a method of gettering impurities. Also contemplated by the invention are methods of surface passivation, forming novel solar cell structures, and hydrogen passivation.

  18. Monolithic cascade-type solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, S.; Shibukawa, A.; Yamaguchi, M.

    1985-12-01

    Solar cells consist of a semiconductor base, a bottom cell with a band-gap energy of E1, and a top cell with a band-gap energy of E2, and 0.96 E1 1.36 eV and (0.80 E + 0.77) eV E2 (0.80 E1 + 0.92) eV. A monolithic cascade-type solar cell was prepared with an n(+)-type GaAs base, a GaInAs bottom solar cell, and a GaAiInAs top solar cell. The surface of the cell is coated with a SiO antireflection film. The efficiency of the cell is 32%.

  19. Epitaxial silicon growth for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daiello, R. V.; Robinson, P. H.; Richman, D.

    1978-01-01

    Growth and fabrication procedures for the baseline solar cells are described along with measured cell parameters, and the results. Reproducibility of these results was established and the direction to be taken for higher efficiency is identified.

  20. Monolithic cells for solar fuels.

    PubMed

    Rongé, Jan; Bosserez, Tom; Martel, David; Nervi, Carlo; Boarino, Luca; Taulelle, Francis; Decher, Gero; Bordiga, Silvia; Martens, Johan A

    2014-12-01

    Hybrid energy generation models based on a variety of alternative energy supply technologies are considered the best way to cope with the depletion of fossil energy resources and to limit global warming. One of the currently missing technologies is the mimic of natural photosynthesis to convert carbon dioxide and water into chemical fuel using sunlight. This idea has been around for decades, but artificial photosynthesis of organic molecules is still far away from providing real-world solutions. The scientific challenge is to perform in an efficient way the multi-electron transfer reactions of water oxidation and carbon dioxide reduction using holes and single electrons generated in an illuminated semiconductor. In this tutorial review the design of photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells that combine solar water oxidation and CO2 reduction is discussed. In such PEC cells simultaneous transport and efficient use of light, electrons, protons and molecules has to be managed. It is explained how efficiency can be gained by compartmentalisation of the water oxidation and CO2 reduction processes by proton exchange membranes, and monolithic concepts of artificial leaves and solar membranes are presented. Besides transferring protons from the anode to the cathode compartment the membrane serves as a molecular barrier material to prevent cross-over of oxygen and fuel molecules. Innovative nano-organized multimaterials will be needed to realise practical artificial photosynthesis devices. This review provides an overview of synthesis techniques which could be used to realise monolithic multifunctional membrane-electrode assemblies, such as Layer-by-Layer (LbL) deposition, Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), and porous silicon (porSi) engineering. Advances in modelling approaches, electrochemical techniques and in situ spectroscopies to characterise overall PEC cell performance are discussed. PMID:24526085

  1. Perovskite Solar Cells with Large-Area CVD-Graphene for Tandem Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Lang, Felix; Gluba, Marc A; Albrecht, Steve; Rappich, Jörg; Korte, Lars; Rech, Bernd; Nickel, Norbert H

    2015-07-16

    Perovskite solar cells with transparent contacts may be used to compensate for thermalization losses of silicon solar cells in tandem devices. This offers a way to outreach stagnating efficiencies. However, perovskite top cells in tandem structures require contact layers with high electrical conductivity and optimal transparency. We address this challenge by implementing large-area graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition as a highly transparent electrode in perovskite solar cells, leading to identical charge collection efficiencies. Electrical performance of solar cells with a graphene-based contact reached those of solar cells with standard gold contacts. The optical transmission by far exceeds that of reference devices and amounts to 64.3% below the perovskite band gap. Finally, we demonstrate a four-terminal tandem device combining a high band gap graphene-contacted perovskite top solar cell (Eg = 1.6 eV) with an amorphous/crystalline silicon bottom solar cell (Eg = 1.12 eV). PMID:26266857

  2. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    In the past decade, research on organic solar cells has gone through an important development stage leading to major enhancements in power conversion efficiency, from 4% to 9% in single-junction devices. During this period, there are many novel processing techniques and device designs that have been proposed and adapted in organic solar-cell devices. One well-known device architecture that helps maximize the solar cell efficiency is the multi-junction tandem solar-cell design. Given this design, multiple photoactive absorbers as subcells are stacked in a monolithic fashion and assembled via series connection into one complete device, known as the tandem solar cell. Since multiple absorbers with different optical energy bandgaps are being applied in one tandem solar-cell device, the corresponding solar cell efficiency is maximized through expanded absorption spectrum and reduced carrier thermalization loss. In Chapter 3, the architecture of solution-processible, visibly transparent solar cells is introduced. Unlike conventional organic solar-cell devices with opaque electrodes (such as silver, aluminum, gold and etc.), the semi-transparent solar cells rely on highly transparent electrodes and visibly transparent photoactive absorbers. Given these two criteria, we first demonstrated the visibly transparent single-junction solar cells via the polymer absorber with near-infrared absorption and the top electrode based on solution-processible silver nanowire conductor. The highest visible transparency (400 ˜ 700 nm) of 65% was achieved for the complete device structure. More importantly, power conversion efficiency of 4% was also demonstrated. In Chapter 4, we stacked two semi-transparent photoactive absorbers in the tandem architecture in order to realize the semi-transparent tandem solar cells. A noticeable performance improvement from 4% to 7% was observed. More importantly, we modified the interconnecting layers with the incorporation of a thin conjugated polyelectrolyte layer functioning as the surface dipole formation layer to provide better electrical contact with the photoactive layer. Due to the effectiveness of the conjugated polyelectrolyte layer, performance improvement was also observed. Furthermore, other issues regarding the semi-transparent tandem solar cells (e.g., photocurrent matching, exterior color tuning, and transparency tuning) are all explored to optimize best performance. In Chapter 5 and 6, the architectures of double- and triple-junction tandem solar cells are explored. Theoretically, triple-junction tandem solar cells with three photoactive absorbers with cascaded energy bandgaps have the potential to achieve higher performance, in comparison with double-junction tandem solar cells. Such expectations can be ascribed to the minimized carrier thermalization loss and further improved light absorption. However, the design of triple-junction solar cells often involves sophisticated multiple layer deposition as well as substantial optimization. Therefore, there is a lack of successful demonstrations of triple-junction solar cells outperforming the double-junction counterparts. To solve the incompatible issues related to the layer deposition in the fabrication, we proposed a novel architecture of inverted-structure tandem solar cells with newly designed interconnecting layers. Our design of interconnecting layers does not only focus on maintaining the orthogonal solution processing advantages, but also provides an excellent compatibility in the energy level alignment to allow different absorber materials to be used. Furthermore, we also explored the light management inside the double- and triple-junction tandem solar cells. The study of light management was carried out through optical simulation method based transfer matrix formalism. The intention is to obtain a balanced photocurrent output from each subcells inside the tandem solar cell, thus the minimal recombination loss at the contact of interconnecting layers and the optimal efficiency can be expected. With help from simulations, we were able to ca

  3. Solar power satellites - Heat engine or solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oman, H.; Gregory, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    A solar power satellite is the energy-converting element of a system that can deliver some 10 GW of power to utilities on the earth's surface. We evaluated heat engines and solar cells for converting sunshine to electric power at the satellite. A potassium Rankine cycle was the best of the heat engines, and 50 microns thick single-crystal silicon cells were the best of the photovoltaic converters. Neither solar cells nor heat engines had a clear advantage when all factors were considered. The potassium-turbine power plant, however, was more difficult to assemble and required a more expensive orbital assembly base. We therefore based our cost analyses on solar-cell energy conversion, concluding that satellite-generated power could be delivered to utilities for around 4 to 5 cents a kWh.

  4. Coupling of Luminescent Solar Concentrators to Plasmonic Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shu-Yi

    To make inexpensive solar cells is a continuous goal for solar photovoltaic (PV) energy industry. Thin film solar cells of various materials have been developed and continue to emerge in order to replace bulk silicon solar cells. A thin film solar cell not only uses less material but also requires a less expensive refinery process. In addition, other advantages coming along with small thickness are higher open circuit voltage and higher conversion efficiency. However, thin film solar cells, especially those made of silicon, have significant optical losses. In order to address this problem, this thesis investigates the spectral coupling of thin films PV to luminescent solar concentrators (LSC). LSC are passive devices, consisting of plastic sheets embedded with fluorescent dyes which absorb part of the incoming radiation spectrum and emit at specific wavelength. The emitted light is concentrated by total internal reflection to the edge of the sheet, where the PVs are placed. Since the light emitted from the LSC edge is usually in a narrow spectral range, it is possible to employ diverse strategies to enhance PV absorption at the peak of the emission wavelength. Employing plasmonic nanostructures has been shown to enhance absorption of thin films via forward scattering, diffraction and localized surface plasmon. These two strategies are theoretically investigated here for improving the absorption and elevating the output power of a thin film solar cell. First, the idea of spectral coupling of luminescent solar concentrators to plasmonic solar cells is introduced to assess its potential for increasing the power output. This study is carried out employing P3HT/PC60BM organic solar cells and LSC with Lumogen Red dyes. A simplified spectral coupling analysis is employed to predict the power density, considering the output spectrum of the LSC equivalent to the emission spectrum of the dye and neglecting any angular dependence. Plasmonic tuning is conducted to enhance absorption at the emission peak of the dye. A factorial increase in the output power density of coupled PV as compared to PV exposed directly to solar spectrum is observed for high light concentration on the edge. These initial results motivated a more in-depth study of coupled LSC-PV system, which took into account the radiative transport inside the realistic LSC. These investigations were carried out on LSCs using Lumogen Red305 and Rhodamine 6G dyes coupled to pristine and plasmonic ultra-thin film silicon solar cells. Prediction based on detailed balance shows that the coupled LSC-plasmonic solar cell can generate 63.7 mW/cm2 with a photocurrent density of 71.3 mA/cm2 which is higher than that of cSi solar cells available on current market. The second part of the thesis focuses on PV absorption enhancement techniques. First, the effect of vertical positioning of plasmonic nanostructures on absorption enhancement was theoretically investigated to understand which one of the three mechanisms usually responsible for the enhancement (forward scattering, diffraction and localized surface plamson) plays the dominant role. Simulation results suggested that the maximum enhancement occurred when placing the nanostructures in the rear side of the cell because of longer path length due to scattering. The experimental effort then switched focus on substrate patterning, which is a less expensive alternative to plasmonic absorption enhancement. Specifically, a nanostructured substrate was prepared by a simple electrochemical process based on two-step aluminum anodization technique. The absorption of thin film silicon deposited on these substrates showed a broadband enhancement. The overall photocurrent density was up to 40% higher than that of films deposited on flat substrates. In conclusion, the studies carried out in this thesis indicate that spectral coupling of LSCs to thin film solar cells could lead to significant improvements in PV output power density. Moreover, while the absorption of thin film solar cells can be enhanced by plasmonic nanostructures, it is shown th

  5. Plasmon Enhanced Hetero-Junction Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Gen; Ching, Levine; Sadoqi, Mostafa; Xu, Huizhong

    2015-03-01

    Here we report a systematic study of plasmon-enhanced hetero-junction solar cells made of colloidal quantum dots (PbS) and nanowires (ZnO), with/without metal nanoparticles (Au). The structure of solar cell devices was characterized by AFM, SEM and profilometer, etc. The power conversion efficiencies of solar cell devices were characterized by solar simulator (OAI TriSOL, AM1.5G Class AAA). The enhancement in the photocurrent due to introduction of metal nanoparticles was obvious. We believe this is due to the plasmonic effect from the metal nanoparticles. The correlation between surface roughness, film uniformity and device performance was also studied.

  6. EE580 Solar Cells Todd J. Kaiser

    E-print Network

    Kaiser, Todd J.

    7/21/2010 1 EE580 ­ Solar Cells Todd J. Kaiser · Lecture 03 · Nature of Sunlight 1Montana State University: Solar Cells Lecture 3: Nature of Sunlight Wave-Particle Duality · Light acts as ­ Waves: photons ­ individual packets of energy · Photoelectric Effect · Blackbody Radiation 2Montana State

  7. Elastic Hinge for Solar-Cell Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, R. M.

    1987-01-01

    Elastic hinge folds to small thickness, allows easy replacement of panels attached, and provides part of torque for refolding without additional springs. Holds modules of solar-cell array. Modules kept in open position by external restraint. When restraint removed, elasticity of molybdenum hinge elements helps to fold facing modules together. Hinge developed for foldable modules for solar-cell panels.

  8. (Melanin-Sensitized Solar Cell) : 696220016

    E-print Network

    (Melanin-Sensitized Solar Cell) : : : 696220016 #12; #12;#12; #12;I PLD-sensitized solar cell use. In order to improve such question, this research used the melanin which the human body and the most biology had to regard the dye to catch the photon.The melanin met several requirements

  9. EE580 Solar Cells Todd J. Kaiser

    E-print Network

    Kaiser, Todd J.

    of Electrical Principles · Electric Charge · Electric Current · Electric Fields · Electric Potential Difference University: Solar Cells Lecture 7: EE Fundamentals 5 Electric Current (I) · Movement of charge creates University: Solar Cells Lecture 7: EE Fundamentals What is Electrical Engineering · Opposite of lightning

  10. Nanowire-based All Oxide Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang*, Benjamin D. Yuhas and Peidong; Yang, Peidong

    2008-12-07

    We present an all-oxide solar cell fabricated from vertically oriented zinc oxide nanowires and cuprous oxide nanoparticles. Our solar cell consists of vertically oriented n-type zinc oxide nanowires, surrounded by a film constructed from p-type cuprous oxide nanoparticles. Our solution-based synthesis of inexpensive and environmentally benign oxide materials in a solar cell would allow for the facile production of large-scale photovoltaic devices. We found that the solar cell performance is enhanced with the addition of an intermediate oxide insulating layer between the nanowires and the nanoparticles. This observation of the important dependence of the shunt resistance on the photovoltaic performance is widely applicable to any nanowire solar cell constructed with the nanowire array in direct contact with one electrode.

  11. Epitaxial silicon growth for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daiello, R. V.; Robinson, P. H.; Richman, D.

    1979-01-01

    The epitaxial procedures, solar cell fabrication, and evaluation techniques are described. The development of baseline epitaxial solar cell structures grown on high quality conventional silicon substrates is discussed. Diagnostic layers and solar cells grown on four potentially low cost silicon substrates are considered. The crystallographic properties of such layers and the performance of epitaxially grown solar cells fabricated on these materials are described. An advanced epitaxial reactor, the rotary disc, is described along with the results of growing solar cell structures of the baseline type on low cost substrates. The add on cost for the epitaxial process is assessed and the economic advantages of the epitaxial process as they relate to silicon substrate selection are examined.

  12. Fullerene surfactants and their use in polymer solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Jen, Kwan-Yue; Yip, Hin-Lap; Li, Chang-Zhi

    2015-12-15

    Fullerene surfactant compounds useful as interfacial layer in polymer solar cells to enhance solar cell efficiency. Polymer solar cell including a fullerene surfactant-containing interfacial layer intermediate cathode and active layer.

  13. Singlet oxygen sensitizing materials based on porous silicone: photochemical characterization, effect of dye reloading and application to water disinfection with solar reactors.

    PubMed

    Manjón, Francisco; Santana-Magaña, Montserrat; García-Fresnadillo, David; Orellana, Guillermo

    2010-06-01

    Photogeneration of singlet molecular oxygen ((1)O(2)) is applied to organic synthesis (photooxidations), atmosphere/water treatment (disinfection), antibiofouling materials and in photodynamic therapy of cancer. In this paper, (1)O(2) photosensitizing materials containing the dyes tris(4,4'-diphenyl-2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) (1, RDB(2+)) or tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline)ruthenium(II) (2, RDP(2+)), immobilized on porous silicone (abbreviated RDB/pSil and RDP/pSil), have been produced and tested for waterborne Enterococcus faecalis inactivation using a laboratory solar simulator and a compound parabolic collector (CPC)-based solar photoreactor. In order to investigate the feasibility of its reuse, the sunlight-exposed RDP/pSil sensitizing material (RDP/pSil-a) has been reloaded with RDP(2+) (RDP/pSil-r). Surprisingly, results for bacteria inactivation with the reloaded material have demonstrated a 4-fold higher efficiency compared to those of either RDP/pSil-a, unused RDB/pSil and the original RDP/pSil. Surface and bulk photochemical characterization of the new material (RDP/pSil-r) has shown that the bactericidal efficiency enhancement is due to aggregation of the silicone-supported photosensitizer on the surface of the polymer, as evidenced by confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Photogenerated (1)O(2) lifetimes in the wet sensitizer-doped silicone have been determined to be ten times longer than in water. These facts, together with the water rheology in the solar reactor and the interfacial production of the biocidal species, account for the more effective disinfection observed with the reloaded photosensitizing material. These results extend and improve the operational lifetime of photocatalytic materials for point-of-use (1)O(2)-mediated solar water disinfection. PMID:20393668

  14. High-Temperature Solar Cell Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Merritt, Danielle

    2004-01-01

    The vast majority of satellites and near-earth probes developed to date have relied upon photovoltaic power generation. If future missions to probe environments close to the sun will be able to use photovoltaic power, solar cells that can function at high temperatures, under high light intensity, and high radiation conditions must be developed. For example, the equilibrium temperature of a Mercury surface station will be about 450 C, and the temperature of solar arrays on the proposed "Solar Probe" mission will extend to temperatures as high as 2000 C (although it is likely that the craft will operate on stored power rather than solar energy during the closest approach to the sun). Advanced thermal design principles, such as replacing some of the solar array area with reflectors, off-pointing, and designing the cells to reflect rather than absorb light out of the band of peak response, can reduce these operating temperature somewhat. Nevertheless, it is desirable to develop approaches to high-temperature solar cell design that can operate under temperature extremes far greater than today's cells. Solar cells made from wide bandgap (WBG) compound semiconductors are an obvious choice for such an application. In order to aid in the experimental development of such solar cells, we have initiated a program studying the theoretical and experimental photovoltaic performance of wide bandgap materials. In particular, we have been investigating the use of GaP, SiC, and GaN materials for space solar cells. We will present theoretical results on the limitations on current cell technologies and the photovoltaic performance of these wide-bandgap solar cells in a variety of space conditions. We will also give an overview of some of NASA's cell developmental efforts in this area and discuss possible future mission applications.

  15. Sensitized energy transfer for organic solar cells, optical solar concentrators, and solar pumped lasers

    E-print Network

    Reusswig, Philip David

    2014-01-01

    The separation of chromophore absorption and excitonic processes, such as singlet exciton fission and photoluminescence, offers several advantages to the design of organic solar cells and luminescent solar concentrators ...

  16. Coating Processes Boost Performance of Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    NASA currently has spacecraft orbiting Mercury (MESSENGER), imaging the asteroid Vesta (Dawn), roaming the red plains of Mars (the Opportunity rover), and providing a laboratory for humans to advance scientific research in space (the International Space Station, or ISS). The heart of the technology that powers those missions and many others can be held in the palm of your hand - the solar cell. Solar, or photovoltaic (PV), cells are what make up the panels and arrays that draw on the Sun s light to generate electricity for everything from the Hubble Space Telescope s imaging equipment to the life support systems for the ISS. To enable NASA spacecraft to utilize the Sun s energy for exploring destinations as distant as Jupiter, the Agency has invested significant research into improving solar cell design and efficiency. Glenn Research Center has been a national leader in advancing PV technology. The Center s Photovoltaic and Power Technologies Branch has conducted numerous experiments aimed at developing lighter, more efficient solar cells that are less expensive to manufacture. Initiatives like the Forward Technology Solar Cell Experiments I and II in which PV cells developed by NASA and private industry were mounted outside the ISS have tested how various solar technologies perform in the harsh conditions of space. While NASA seeks to improve solar cells for space applications, the results are returning to Earth to benefit the solar energy industry.

  17. Pharmacologic Alternatives to Riboflavin Photochemical Corneal Cross-Linking: A Comparison Study of Cell Toxicity Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Kim, MiJung; Takaoka, Anna; Hoang, Quan V.; Trokel, Stephen L.; Paik, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The efficacy of therapeutic cross-linking of the cornea using riboflavin photochemistry (commonly abbreviated as CXL) has caused its use to become widespread. Because there are known chemical agents that cross-link collagenous tissues, it may be possible to cross-link tissue pharmacologically. The present study was undertaken to compare the cell toxicity of such agents. Methods. Nine topical cross-linking agents (five nitroalcohols, glyceraldehyde [GLYC], genipin [GP], paraformaldehyde [FA], and glutaraldehyde [GLUT]) were tested with four different cell lines (immortalized human corneal epithelial cells, human skin fibroblasts, primary bovine corneal endothelial cells, and immortalized human retinal pigment epithelial cells [ARPE-19]). The cells were grown in planar culture and exposed to each agent in a range of concentrations (0.001 mM to 10 mM) for 24 hours followed by a 48-hour recovery phase. Toxicity thresholds were determined by using the trypan blue exclusion method. Results. A semiquantitative analysis using five categories of toxicity/fixation was carried out, based on plate attachment, uptake of trypan blue stain, and cellular fixation. The toxicity levels varied by a factor of 103 with the least toxic being mononitroalcohols and GLYC, intermediate toxicity for a nitrodiol and nitrotriol, and the most toxic being GLUT, FA, GP, and bronopol, a brominated nitrodiol. When comparing toxicity between different cell lines, the levels were generally in agreement. Conclusions. There are significant differences in cell toxicity among potential topical cross-linking compounds. The balance between cross-linking of tissue and cell toxicity should be borne in mind as compounds and strategies to improve mechanical tissue properties through therapeutic tissue cross-linking continue to develop. PMID:24722697

  18. The Case for the Large Scale Development of Solar Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, S. A.

    1977-01-01

    Traces the history of solar energy development. Discusses global effects (temperature, particle and other pollution) of burning fossil fuels. Provides energy balance equations for solar energy distribution and discusses flat plate collectors, solar cells, photochemical and photobiological conversion of solar energy, heat pumps. (CS)

  19. Tandem photovoltaic solar cells and increased solar energy conversion efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loferski, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    Tandem photovoltaic cells, as proposed by Jackson (1955) to increase the efficiency of solar energy conversion, involve the construction of a system of stacked p/n homojunction photovoltaic cells composed of different semiconductors. It had been pointed out by critics, however, that the total power which could be extracted from the cells in the stack placed side by side was substantially greater than the power obtained from the stacked cells. A reexamination of the tandem cell concept in view of the development of the past few years is conducted. It is concluded that the use of tandem cell systems in flat plate collectors, as originally envisioned by Jackson, may yet become feasible as a result of the development of economically acceptable solar cells for large scale terrestrial power generation.

  20. Semiconductor quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jianjun; Cao, Guozhong

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have been drawing great attention recently as a material for solar energy conversion due to their versatile optical and electrical properties. The QD-sensitized solar cell (QDSC) is one of the burgeoning semiconductor QD solar cells that shows promising developments for the next generation of solar cells. This article focuses on recent developments in QDSCs, including 1) the effect of quantum confinement on QDSCs, 2) the multiple exciton generation (MEG) of QDs, 3) fabrication methods of QDs, and 4) nanocrystalline photoelectrodes for solar cells. We also make suggestions for future research on QDSCs. Although the efficiency of QDSCs is still low, we think there will be major breakthroughs in developing QDSCs in the future. PMID:24191178

  1. Development of gallium arsenide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The potential of ion implantation as a means of developing gallium arsenide solar cells with high efficiency performance was investigated. Computer calculations on gallium arsenide cell characteristics are presented to show the effects of surface recombination, junction space-charge recombination, and built-in fields produced by nonuniform doping of the surface region. The fabrication technology is summarized. Electrical and optical measurements on samples of solar cells are included.

  2. Photochemical Production and Behavior of Hydroperoxyacids in Heterotrophic Bacteria Attached to Senescent Phytoplanktonic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Morgan; Sempéré, Richard; Vaultier, Frédéric; Rontani, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    The photooxidation of cellular monounsaturated fatty acids was investigated in senescent phytoplanktonic cells (Emiliania huxleyi) and in their attached bacteria under laboratory controlled conditions. Our results indicated that UV-visible irradiation of phytodetritus induced the photooxidation of oleic (produced by phytoplankton and bacteria) and cis-vaccenic (specifically produced by bacteria) acids. These experiments confirmed the involvement of a substantial singlet oxygen transfer from senescent phytoplanktonic cells to attached bacteria, and revealed a significant correlation between the concentration of chlorophyll, a photosensitizer, in the phytodetritus and the photodegradation state of bacteria. Hydroperoxyacids (fatty acid photoproducts) appeared to be quickly degraded to ketoacids and hydroxyacids in bacteria and in phytoplanktonic cells. This degradation involves homolytic cleavage (most likely induced by UV and/or transition metal ions) and peroxygenase activity (yielding epoxy acids). PMID:23736689

  3. Dye-sensitized Solar Cells for Solar Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, M. S.; Deol, Y. S.; Kumar, Manish; Prasad, Narottam; Janu, Yojana

    2011-10-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) also known as Gratzel cells, have attracted the interests of researchers to a great extent because of its cost effective and easy manufacturing process without involving highly sophisticated lithographic technique and high cost raw materials as usually seen in conventional solar cell. Based on simple photo-electrochemical process, it has got immense potential in converting solar energy to electrical power in remote and desert area where the supply of conventional power is not possible. The overall peak power-production efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells has been reported around 11 percent, so they are best suited to low-density applications and the price-to-performance ratio obtained through these solar cells is superior to others. DSSCs have ability to absorb even diffused sunlight and therefore work in cloudy whether as well without much impact over the efficiency. The present communication deals with a review of our work on DSSCs wherein we have used cost effective natural dyes/pigments as a sensitizer of nc-TiO2 and discussed about various key factors affecting the conversion efficiency of DSSC.

  4. Bypass diode for a solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Rim, Seung Bum; Kim, Taeseok; Smith, David D; Cousins, Peter J

    2013-11-12

    Methods of fabricating bypass diodes for solar cells are described. In once embodiment, a method includes forming a first conductive region of a first conductivity type above a substrate of a solar cell. A second conductive region of a second conductivity type is formed on the first conductive region. In another embodiment, a method includes forming a first conductive region of a first conductivity type above a substrate of a solar cell. A second conductive region of a second conductivity type is formed within, and surrounded by, an uppermost portion of the first conductive region but is not formed in a lowermost portion of the first conductive region.

  5. Solar cell with silicon oxynitride dielectric layer

    DOEpatents

    Shepherd, Michael; Smith, David D

    2015-04-28

    Solar cells with silicon oxynitride dielectric layers and methods of forming silicon oxynitride dielectric layers for solar cell fabrication are described. For example, an emitter region of a solar cell includes a portion of a substrate having a back surface opposite a light receiving surface. A silicon oxynitride (SiO.sub.xN.sub.y, 0

  6. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1994-05-31

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell is described wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga[sub 0.52]In[sub 0.48]P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer. 1 fig.

  7. Solar Cell Production using UMG Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Hovel, Harold; Prettyman, Kevin

    2009-09-21

    Materials studies and solar cells made from various blends of UMG Si are compared with reference solar (PV) grade in terms of efficiencies, voltages, currents, diffusion lengths, minority carrier lifetimes and compositions. The UMG material used in this study performed unexpectedly well when used in cells manufactured both in a lab environment and on a commercial PV line. The limited number of cells of each composition does not support a full statistical analysis. However in comparing solar efficiencies, it is clear that a relatively minor delta exists between UMG blends and the particular PV grade material used in this study. That delta is between zero and 0.5 percentage points.

  8. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M. (Lakewood, CO); Kurtz, Sarah R. (Golden, CO)

    1994-01-01

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga.sub.0.52 In.sub.0.48 P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer.

  9. Catalysis of Photochemical Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albini, A.

    1986-01-01

    Offers a classification system of catalytic effects in photochemical reactions, contrasting characteristic properties of photochemical and thermal reactions. Discusses catalysis and sensitization, examples of catalyzed reactions of excepted states, complexing ground state substrates, and catalysis of primary photoproducts. (JM)

  10. Polymer-fullerene composite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Barry C; Fréchet, Jean M J

    2008-01-01

    Fossil fuel alternatives, such as solar energy, are moving to the forefront in a variety of research fields. Polymer-based organic photovoltaic systems hold the promise for a cost-effective, lightweight solar energy conversion platform, which could benefit from simple solution processing of the active layer. The function of such excitonic solar cells is based on photoinduced electron transfer from a donor to an acceptor. Fullerenes have become the ubiquitous acceptors because of their high electron affinity and ability to transport charge effectively. The most effective solar cells have been made from bicontinuous polymer-fullerene composites, or so-called bulk heterojunctions. The best solar cells currently achieve an efficiency of about 5%, thus significant advances in the fundamental understanding of the complex interplay between the active layer morphology and electronic properties are required if this technology is to find viable application. PMID:18041798

  11. Radiative cooling of solar cells LINXIAO ZHU,1

    E-print Network

    Fan, Shanhui

    increased temperature of the solar cell has adverse consequences on both its efficiency and its reliability for power conversion effi- ciency of around 33.7% [1] under the AM1.5 solar spectrum. Thus, while a solar for the performance and reli- ability of solar cells. The conversion efficiency of solar cells typically deteriorates

  12. Improved CMX solar cell coverglasses and optical solar reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalley, A. M.; Jones, D. P.; Dollery, A. A.; Murphy, N.; Porter, D. A.

    Recent development programs have demonstrated that considerable improvements in optical and thermooptical performance as well as mechanical properties of CMX solar cell coverglasses and optical solar reflectors (OSRs) can be achieved. Optical coatings can increase infrared emittance by 4 percent and decrease solar absorptance by 50 percent. Chemical treatments can be used to increase glass strength to four times its untreated value or to provide integral antireflection layers which reduce reflection to 0.5 percent per surface. Automated test equipment for proving the strength of each coverglass and mirror has been designed and manufactured.

  13. Transparent superstrate terrestrial solar cell module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The design, development, fabrication, and testing of the transparent solar cell module were examined. Cell performance and material process characteristics were determined by extensive tests and design modifications were made prior to preproduction fabrication. These tests included three cell submodules and two full size engineering modules. Along with hardware and test activity, engineering documentation was prepared and submitted.

  14. Dye-sensitized solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Skotheim, T.A.

    1980-03-04

    A low-cost dye-sensitized Schottky barrier solar cell is comprised of a substrate of semiconductor with an ohmic contact on one face, a sensitizing dye adsorbed onto the opposite face of the semiconductor, a transparent thin-film layer of a reducing agent over the dye, and a thin-film layer of metal over the reducing agent. The ohmic contact and metal layer constitute electrodes for connection to an external circuit and one or the other or both are made transparent to permit light to penetrate to the dye and be absorbed therein for generating electric current. The semiconductor material chosen to be the substrate is one having a wide bandgap and which therefore is transparent; the dye selected is one having a ground state within the bandgap of the semiconductor to generate carriers in the semiconductor, and a first excited state above the conduction band edge of the semiconductor to readily conduct electrons from the dye to the semiconductor; the reducing agent selected is one having a ground state above the ground state of the sensitizer to provide a plentiful source of electrons to the dye during current generation and thereby enhance the generation; and the metal for the thin-film layer of metal is selected to have a Fermi level in the vicinity of or above the ground state of the reducing agent to thereby amply supply electrons to the reducing agent. 3 figs.

  15. Dye-sensitized solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Skotheim, Terje A. [Berkeley, CA

    1980-03-04

    A low-cost dye-sensitized Schottky barrier solar cell comprised of a substrate of semiconductor with an ohmic contact on one face, a sensitizing dye adsorbed onto the opposite face of the semiconductor, a transparent thin-film layer of a reducing agent over the dye, and a thin-film layer of metal over the reducing agent. The ohmic contact and metal layer constitute electrodes for connection to an external circuit and one or the other or both are made transparent to permit light to penetrate to the dye and be absorbed therein for generating electric current. The semiconductor material chosen to be the substrate is one having a wide bandgap and which therefore is transparent; the dye selected is one having a ground state within the bandgap of the semiconductor to generate carriers in the semiconductor, and a first excited state above the conduction band edge of the semiconductor to readily conduct electrons from the dye to the semiconductor; the reducing agent selected is one having a ground state above the ground state of the sensitizer to provide a plentiful source of electrons to the dye during current generation and thereby enhance the generation; and the metal for the thin-film layer of metal is selected to have a Fermi level in the vicinity of or above the ground state of the reducing agent to thereby amply supply electrons to the reducing agent.

  16. Annular Electrode Improves Solar-Cell Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baraona, C. R.; Forestieri, A. F.; Frey, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    Improved method of electrical-resistance welding of solar-cell inter-connections developed by using an annular welding-electrode shape. Improved weld electrode consists of two coaxial cylinders, outer one with annular cross section and inner one with circular cross section. Possible annular weld-electrode configurations result in better quality welds for interconnecting solar-array elements.

  17. Quantum Junction Solar Cells Jiang Tang,,

    E-print Network

    Sargent, Edward H. "Ted"

    power conversion efficiencies of 5.4%. Control over doping in quantum solids, and the successful having record 43.5% efficiency under solar concentration.3 This demands optimization of multiple, the benefit of quantum tuning has, at best, been half-realized. Constructing a solar cell in which

  18. Perovskite solar cells: Continuing to soar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGehee, Michael D.

    2014-09-01

    The dream of printing highly efficient solar cells is closer than ever to being realized. Solvent engineering has enabled the deposition of uniform perovskite semiconductor films that yield greater than 15% power-conversion efficiency.

  19. Advanced Silicon Space Solar Cells Using Nanotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, J.M.; Ruby, D.S.; Zaidi, S.H.

    1999-03-31

    Application of nanotechnology and advanced optical structures offer new possibilities for improved radiation tolerance in silicon solar cells. We describe the application of subwavelength diffractive structures to enhance optical absorption near the surface, and thereby improve the radiation tolerance.

  20. Colloidal cluster phases and solar cells 

    E-print Network

    Mailer, Alastair George

    2012-11-28

    The arrangement of soft materials through solution processing techniques is a topic of profound importance for next generation solar cells; the resulting morphology has a major influence on construction, performance and ...

  1. Solar cell array design handbook, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschenbach, H. S.

    1976-01-01

    Twelve chapters discuss the following: historical developments, the environment and its effects, solar cells, solar cell filters and covers, solar cell and other electrical interconnections, blocking and shunt diodes, substrates and deployment mechanisms, material properties, design synthesis and optimization, design analysis, procurement, production and cost aspects, evaluation and test, orbital performance, and illustrative design examples. A comprehensive index permits rapid locating of desired topics. The handbook consists of two volumes: Volume 1 is of an expository nature while Volume 2 contains detailed design data in an appendix-like fashion. Volume 2 includes solar cell performance data, applicable unit conversion factors and physical constants, and mechanical, electrical, thermal optical, magnetic, and outgassing material properties. Extensive references are provided.

  2. Solar Cells: Slicing and Dicing Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, R.

    2008-02-01

    Solar cells take advantage of our most abundant source of energy, the Sun. A technique that improves the conversion of photons to electrons could potentially lead to a dramatic improvement in device efficiency.

  3. Colloidal Nanoparticles for Intermediate Band Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Vörös, Márton; Galli, Giulia; Zimanyi, Gergely T

    2015-07-28

    The Intermediate Band (IB) solar cell concept is a promising idea to transcend the Shockley-Queisser limit. Using the results of first-principles calculations, we propose that colloidal nanoparticles (CNPs) are a viable and efficient platform for the implementation of the IB solar cell concept. We focused on CdSe CNPs and we showed that intragap states present in the isolated CNPs with reconstructed surfaces combine to form an IB in arrays of CNPs, which is well separated from the valence and conduction band edges. We demonstrated that optical transitions to and from the IB are active. We also showed that the IB can be electron doped in a solution, e.g., by decamethylcobaltocene, thus activating an IB-induced absorption process. Our results, together with the recent report of a nearly 10% efficient CNP solar cell, indicate that colloidal nanoparticle intermediate band solar cells are a promising platform to overcome the Shockley-Queisser limit. PMID:26042468

  4. Rational design of hybrid organic solar cells

    E-print Network

    Lentz, Levi (Levi Carl)

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, we will present a novel design for a nano-structured organic-inorganic hybrid photovoltaic material that will address current challenges in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic-based solar cell materials. ...

  5. Texturization of multicrystalline silicon solar cells

    E-print Network

    Li, Dai-Yin

    2010-01-01

    A significant efficiency gain for crystalline silicon solar cells can be achieved by surface texturization. This research was directed at developing a low-cost, high-throughput and reliable texturing method that can create ...

  6. Indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Tom (Morris Plains, NJ); Ghosh, Amal K. (New Providence, NJ)

    1982-12-28

    A high photo-conversion efficiency indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cell is spray deposited from a solution containing indium trichloride. The solar cell exhibits an Air Mass One solar conversion efficiency in excess of about 10%.

  7. Photochemical upconversion of light for renewable energy and more

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Timothy W.; Macqueen, Rowan W.

    2015-09-01

    Photochemical upconversion has been put forward as a candidate technology to improve the light-harvesting capabilities of thin-film photovoltaic cells, by harvesting transmitted sub-bandgap light and re-radiating the absorbed energy at a usable wavelength. Efficiencies of 10% have been observed under solar-level irradiation, and up to 86% (quantum yield of 43%) has been observed under strong irradiance. In this proceeding, we explain the triplet-triplet annihilation mechanism underlying photochemical upconversion and delve into the chemical kinetics to extract strategies to improve device performance. We suggest that one of these strategies, concentrating the sensitizer species, may be flawed without proper consideration of the sensitizer identity, due to enhanced emitter triplet decay caused by the external heavy atom effect.

  8. Recent advances in flexible perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Susrutha, B; Giribabu, Lingamallu; Singh, Surya Prakash

    2015-09-22

    Flexible and low-weight thin-film perovskite solar cells have attracted considerable attention for developing large-area, roll-to-roll and differently shaped photovoltaics with improved power conversion efficiencies. In this review, we describe how researchers have adopted different approaches to enhance the device performance of the flexible perovskite solar cells to compete with rigid substrates with tailored electron/hole transport materials and flexible substrates. PMID:26198773

  9. Silicon solar cells, a manufacturing cost analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grenon, L. A.; Coleman, M. G.

    1978-01-01

    A detailed cost analysis of solar cell module manufacturing, utilizing process sequences incorporating near-term technology, has been performed. The entire structuring of a factory to manufacture solar cell modules, starting from supplied polycrystalline silicon and other raw materials, was specified. This analysis then formed the basis for a sensitivity analysis of the major cost factors. The results of the cost and sensitivity analyses are presented here.

  10. Stretchable, wearable dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhibin; Deng, Jue; Sun, Xuemei; Li, Houpu; Peng, Huisheng

    2014-05-01

    A stretchable, wearable dye-sensitized solar-cell textile is developed from elastic, electrically conducting fiber as a counter electrode and spring-like titanium wire as the working electrode. Dyesensitized solar cells are demonstrated with energy-conversion efficiencies up to 7.13%. The high energy-conversion efficiencies can be well maintained under stretch by 30% and after stretch for 20 cycles. PMID:24648169

  11. High-temperature Solar Cell Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Merritt, Danielle; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Scheiman, David

    2005-01-01

    The vast majority of space probes to date have relied upon photovoltaic power generation. If future missions designed to probe environments close to the sun (Figure 1) will be able to use such power generation, solar cells that can function at high temperatures, under high light intensity, and high radiation conditions must be developed. The significant problem is that solar cells lose performance at high temperatures.

  12. statistical physics statistics of radiation Efficiency of a Solar Cell

    E-print Network

    statistical physics statistics of radiation Efficiency of a Solar Cell In this problem, we will show that simple physics constrains the efficiency of a solar cell. Consider a planar solar cell) Suppose that the solar cell can only absorb radiation quanta from the sun with an energy greater than

  13. Achieving High Performance Perovskite Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang

    2015-03-01

    Recently, metal halide perovskite based solar cell with the characteristics of rather low raw materials cost, great potential for simple process and scalable production, and extreme high power conversion efficiency (PCE), have been highlighted as one of the most competitive technologies for next generation thin film photovoltaic (PV). In UCLA, we have realized an efficient pathway to achieve high performance pervoskite solar cells, where the findings are beneficial to this unique materials/devices system. Our recent progress lies in perovskite film formation, defect passivation, transport materials design, interface engineering with respect to high performance solar cell, as well as the exploration of its applications beyond photovoltaics. These achievements include: 1) development of vapor assisted solution process (VASP) and moisture assisted solution process, which produces perovskite film with improved conformity, high crystallinity, reduced recombination rate, and the resulting high performance; 2) examination of the defects property of perovskite materials, and demonstration of a self-induced passivation approach to reduce carrier recombination; 3) interface engineering based on design of the carrier transport materials and the electrodes, in combination with high quality perovskite film, which delivers 15 ~ 20% PCEs; 4) a novel integration of bulk heterojunction to perovskite solar cell to achieve better light harvest; 5) fabrication of inverted solar cell device with high efficiency and flexibility and 6) exploration the application of perovskite materials to photodetector. Further development in film, device architecture, and interfaces will lead to continuous improved perovskite solar cells and other organic-inorganic hybrid optoelectronics.

  14. Perovskite solar cells: from materials to devices.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyun Suk; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Perovskite solar cells based on organometal halide light absorbers have been considered a promising photovoltaic technology due to their superb power conversion efficiency (PCE) along with very low material costs. Since the first report on a long-term durable solid-state perovskite solar cell with a PCE of 9.7% in 2012, a PCE as high as 19.3% was demonstrated in 2014, and a certified PCE of 17.9% was shown in 2014. Such a high photovoltaic performance is attributed to optically high absorption characteristics and balanced charge transport properties with long diffusion lengths. Nevertheless, there are lots of puzzles to unravel the basis for such high photovoltaic performances. The working principle of perovskite solar cells has not been well established by far, which is the most important thing for understanding perovksite solar cells. In this review, basic fundamentals of perovskite materials including opto-electronic and dielectric properties are described to give a better understanding and insight into high-performing perovskite solar cells. In addition, various fabrication techniques and device structures are described toward the further improvement of perovskite solar cells. PMID:25358818

  15. Solar cells fabricated with unconventional silicon materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minahan, J. A.; Castorena, E.; Dionne, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Solar cells have been fabricated using silicon materials supplied in the DOE/JPL Large Solar Array program. Each of the silicon materials studied in this program was produced in a unique manner and with intent of producing silicon in a grade and form that would offer the possibility of economic deployment in photovoltaic arrays for generation of electricity. This report will attempt to provide an overview of the results for some of the materials and highlight in particular results obtained for solar cells fabricated from the advanced CZ silicon. Emphasis will be given to consideration of the purity of virgin silicon material used in the heat exchange method.

  16. Photochemical solar energy conversion utilizing semiconductors localized in membrane-mimetic systems. Performance report, April 1, 1989--August 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Fendler, J.H.

    1991-08-31

    Extending the frontiers of colloidal photochemistry and colloidal electrochemistry to solar photochemistry research had been the main objective of this research. More specific objectives of this proposal include the examination of semiconductor-particle-mediated photoelectron transfer and photoelectric effects in different membrane mimetic systems. Emphasis had been placed on developing bilayer lipid membranes and Langmuir-Blodgett films as new membrane-mimetic systems, as well as on the characterization and utilization of these systems.

  17. Plastic Schottky-barrier solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Waldrop, J.R.; Cohen, M.J.

    1981-12-30

    A photovoltaic cell structure is fabricated from an active medium including an undoped polyacetylene, organic semiconductor. When a film of such material is in rectifying contact with a metallic area electrode, a Schottky-barrier junction is obtained within the body of the cell structure. Also, a gold overlayer passivates a magnesium layer on the undoped polyacetylene film. With the proper selection and location of elements a photovoltaic cell structure and solar cell are obtained.

  18. Large area space solar cell assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowlan, M. J.; Spitzer, M. B.

    1982-01-01

    Results of the development of a 34.3 sq cm space solar cell and integral glass cover are presented. Average AM(0) cell efficiency is 14 percent. The cell design includes a high performance back surface reflector yielding a thermal alpha of approximately 0.66. A novel process is described which integrates cell fabrication and encapsulation thereby achieving a reduction of encapsulation cost. Test results indicate the potential of this new technology.

  19. MIS silicon solar cells: potential advantages

    SciTech Connect

    Cheek, G.; Mertens, R.

    1981-05-01

    Recent progress with silicon solar cells based on the MIS or SIS structure is reviewed. To be competitive with pn junction technology in the near term, these cells must be much cheaper or have a higher efficiency in a production environment. Apparently, the minority carrier MIS cells have the greatest potential for large-scale applications. The data currently indicate that all types of MIS/SIS cells have some inherent instability problems.

  20. Advanced Solar Cells for Satellite Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, Dennis J.; Weinberg, Irving

    1994-01-01

    The multiple natures of today's space missions with regard to operational lifetime, orbital environment, cost and size of spacecraft, to name just a few, present such a broad range of performance requirements to be met by the solar array that no single design can suffice to meet them all. The result is a demand for development of specialized solar cell types that help to optimize overall satellite performance within a specified cost range for any given space mission. Historically, space solar array performance has been optimized for a given mission by tailoring the features of silicon solar cells to account for the orbital environment and average operating conditions expected during the mission. It has become necessary to turn to entirely new photovoltaic materials and device designs to meet the requirements of future missions, both in the near and far term. This paper will outline some of the mission drivers and resulting performance requirements that must be met by advanced solar cells, and provide an overview of some of the advanced cell technologies under development to meet them. The discussion will include high efficiency, radiation hard single junction cells; monolithic and mechanically stacked multiple bandgap cells; and thin film cells.

  1. Optimization and performance of Space Station Freedom solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khemthong, S.; Hansen, N.; Bower, M.

    1991-01-01

    High efficiency, large area and low cost solar cells are the drivers for Space Station solar array designs. The manufacturing throughput, process complexity, yield of the cells, and array manufacturing technique determine the economics of the solar array design. The cell efficiency optimization of large area (8 x 8 m), dielectric wrapthrough contact solar cells are described. The results of the optimization are reported and the solar cell performance of limited production runs is reported.

  2. Manufacture of Solar Cells on the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freundich, Alex; Ignatiev, Alex; Horton, Charles; Duke, Mike; Curren, Peter; Sibille, Laurent

    2005-01-01

    In support of the space exploration initiative a new architecture for the production of solar cells on the lunar surface is devised. The paper discusses experimental data on the fabrication and properties of lunar glass substrates, evaporated lunar regolith thin film (antireflect coatings and insulators), and preliminary attempts in the fabrication of thin film (silicon/II-VI) photovoltaic materials on lunar regolith substrates. A conceptual design for a solar powered robotic rover capable of fabricating solar cells directly on the lunar surface is provided. Technical challenges in the development of such a facility and strategies to alleviate perceived difficulties are discussed. Finally, preliminary cost benefit ratio analysis for different in situ solar cell production scenarios (using exclusively in-situ planetary resources or hybrid) are discussed.

  3. Multijunction Solar Cells Optimized for the Mars Surface Solar Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmondson, Kenneth M.; Fetzer, Chris; Karam, Nasser H.; Stella, Paul; Mardesich, Nick; Mueller, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This paper gives an update on the performance of the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) which have been continually performing for more than 3 years beyond their original 90-day missions. The paper also gives the latest results on the optimization of a multijunction solar cell that is optimized to give more power on the surface of Mars.

  4. Nanoparticle Solar Cell Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Breeze, Alison, J; Sahoo, Yudhisthira; Reddy, Damoder; Sholin, Veronica; Carter, Sue

    2008-06-17

    The purpose of this work was to demonstrate all-inorganic nanoparticle-based solar cells with photovoltaic performance extending into the near-IR region of the solar spectrum as a pathway towards improving power conversion efficiencies. The field of all-inorganic nanoparticle-based solar cells is very new, with only one literature publication in the prior to our project. Very little is understood regarding how these devices function. Inorganic solar cells with IR performance have previously been fabricated using traditional methods such as physical vapor deposition and sputtering, and solution-processed devices utilizing IR-absorbing organic polymers have been investigated. The solution-based deposition of nanoparticles offers the potential of a low-cost manufacturing process combined with the ability to tune the chemical synthesis and material properties to control the device properties. This work, in collaboration with the Sue Carter research group at the University of California, Santa Cruz, has greatly expanded the knowledge base in this field, exploring multiple material systems and several key areas of device physics including temperature, bandgap and electrode device behavior dependence, material morphological behavior, and the role of buffer layers. One publication has been accepted to Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells pending minor revision and another two papers are being written now. While device performance in the near-IR did not reach the level anticipated at the beginning of this grant, we did observe one of the highest near-IR efficiencies for a nanoparticle-based solar cell device to date. We also identified several key parameters of importance for improving both near-IR performance and nanoparticle solar cells in general, and demonstrated multiple pathways which showed promise for future commercialization with further research.

  5. Method of fabricating a solar cell array

    DOEpatents

    Lazzery, Angelo G. (Oaklyn, NJ); Crouthamel, Marvin S. (Pennsauken, NJ); Coyle, Peter J. (Oaklyn, NJ)

    1982-01-01

    A first set of pre-tabbed solar cells are assembled in a predetermined array with at least part of each tab facing upward, each tab being fixed to a bonding pad on one cell and abutting a bonding pad on an adjacent cell. The cells are held in place with a first vacuum support. The array is then inverted onto a second vacuum support which holds the tabs firmly against the cell pads they abut. The cells are exposed to radiation to melt and reflow the solder pads for bonding the tab portions not already fixed to bonding pads to these pads.

  6. Liquid cooled, linear focus solar cell receiver

    DOEpatents

    Kirpich, Aaron S. (Broomall, PA)

    1985-01-01

    Separate structures for electrical insulation and thermal conduction are established within a liquid cooled, linear focus solar cell receiver for use with parabolic or Fresnel optical concentrators. The receiver includes a V-shaped aluminum extrusion having a pair of outer faces each formed with a channel receiving a string of solar cells in thermal contact with the extrusion. Each cell string is attached to a continuous glass cover secured within the channel with spring clips to isolate the string from the external environment. Repair or replacement of solar cells is effected simply by detaching the spring clips to remove the cover/cell assembly without interrupting circulation of coolant fluid through the receiver. The lower surface of the channel in thermal contact with the cells of the string is anodized to establish a suitable standoff voltage capability between the cells and the extrusion. Primary electrical insulation is provided by a dielectric tape disposed between the coolant tube and extrusion. Adjacent solar cells are soldered to interconnect members designed to accommodate thermal expansion and mismatches. The coolant tube is clamped into the extrusion channel with a releasably attachable clamping strip to facilitate easy removal of the receiver from the coolant circuit.

  7. Liquid cooled, linear focus solar cell receiver

    DOEpatents

    Kirpich, A.S.

    1983-12-08

    Separate structures for electrical insulation and thermal conduction are established within a liquid cooled, linear focus solar cell receiver for use with parabolic or Fresnel optical concentrators. The receiver includes a V-shaped aluminum extrusion having a pair of outer faces each formed with a channel receiving a string of solar cells in thermal contact with the extrusion. Each cell string is attached to a continuous glass cover secured within the channel with spring clips to isolate the string from the external environment. Repair or replacement of solar cells is effected simply by detaching the spring clips to remove the cover/cell assembly without interrupting circulation of coolant fluid through the receiver. The lower surface of the channel in thermal contact with the cells of the string is anodized to establish a suitable standoff voltage capability between the cells and the extrusion. Primary electrical insulation is provided by a dielectric tape disposed between the coolant tube and extrusion. Adjacent solar cells are soldered to interconnect members designed to accommodate thermal expansion and mismatches. The coolant tube is clamped into the extrusion channel with a releasably attachable clamping strip to facilitate easy removal of the receiver from the coolant circuit.

  8. - and Perovskite-Sensitised Mesoscopic Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grätzel, Michael; Durrant, James R.

    2015-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Historical background * Mode of function of dye-sensitised solar cells * DSSC research and development * Solid-state mesoscopic cells based on molecular dyes or perovskite pigments as sensitisers * Pilot production of modules, field tests and commercial DSSC development * Outlook * Acknowledgements * References

  9. Walking-Beam Solar-Cell Conveyor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feder, H.; Frasch, W.

    1982-01-01

    Microprocessor-controlled walking-beam conveyor moves cells between work stations in automated assembly line. Conveyor has arm at each work station. In unison arms pick up all solar cells and advance them one station; then beam retracks to be in position for next step. Microprocessor sets beam stroke, speed, and position.

  10. Method of restoring degraded solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Staebler, David L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1983-01-01

    Amorphous silicon solar cells have been shown to have efficiencies which degrade as a result of long exposure to light. Annealing such cells in air at a temperature of about 200.degree. C. for at least 30 minutes restores their efficiency.

  11. Method of restoring degraded solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Staebler, D.L.

    1983-02-01

    Amorphous silicon solar cells have been shown to have efficiencies which degrade as a result of long exposure to light. Annealing such cells in air at a temperature of about 200 C for at least 30 minutes restores their efficiency. 2 figs.

  12. Hotspot Endurance Of Solar-Cell Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, C. C.; Sugimura, R. S.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Procedure for evaluating modules for use with concentrators now available. Solar simulator illuminates photovoltaic cells through Fresnel lens of concentrator module. Module and test cells inspected visually at 24-h intervals during test and again when test completed. After test, electrical characteristics of module measured for comparison with pretest characteristics.

  13. Inexpensive Antireflection Coating for Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tracy, C. E.; Kern, W.; Vibronek, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    Continuous method for applying antireflection coating to solar cells increases efficiency of devices by preventing energy from being reflected away, but adds little to manufacturing cost. Method consists of spraying solution on cells or glass collector plates, drying sprayed layer, and curing it. Solution is formulated to spread evenly over surfaces.

  14. High-efficiency concentrator silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sinton, R.A.; Cuevas, A.; King, R.R.; Swanson, R.M. . Solid-State Electronics Lab.)

    1990-11-01

    This report presents results from extensive process development in high-efficiency Si solar cells. An advanced design for a 1.56-cm{sup 2} cell with front grids achieved 26% efficiency at 90 suns. This is especially significant since this cell does not require a prismatic cover glass. New designs for simplified backside-contact solar cells were advanced from a status of near-nonfunctionality to demonstrated 21--22% for one-sun cells in sizes up to 37.5 cm{sup 2}. An efficiency of 26% was achieved for similar 0.64-cm{sup 2} concentrator cells at 150 suns. More fundamental work on dopant-diffused regions is also presented here. The recombination vs. various process and physical parameters was studied in detail for boron and phosphorous diffusions. Emitter-design studies based solidly upon these new data indicate the performance vs design parameters for a variety of the cases of most interest to solar cell designers. Extractions of p-type bandgap narrowing and the surface recombination for p- and n-type regions from these studies have a generality that extends beyond solar cells into basic device modeling. 68 refs., 50 figs.

  15. Microstructural analysis of solar cell welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. J.; Watson, G. K.; Baraona, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    Parallel-gap resistance welding of silicon solar cells with copper interconnects results in complex microstructural variations that depend on the welding variables. At relatively low heat input solid-state welds are produced. At medium heat the Ag-Cu eutectic forms resulting in a braze joint. High heat produces a fusion weld with complete melting of the silver layer on the silicon solar cell. If the silicon is also melted, cracking occurs in the silicon cell below the weld nugget. These determinations were made using light microscopy, microprobe, and scanning electron microscopy analyses.

  16. Collection efficiency measurements for solar cell research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, H. L.; Olsen, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    A system was established for measuring absolute, spectral collection efficiency that is well suited to solar cell research and development. Determination of spectral collection efficiency involves measurements of the incident photon intensity, the device reflection coefficient, and the cell short circuit current. A monochromatic photon flux is obtained with a high intensity Bausch and Lomb monochromator, and an Epply thermopile detector is used to measure incident intensity. Normal incidence reflectivity measurements are achieved with a prism type beam splitter. The experimental approach is discussed, measurements of the reflectivity of evaporated silver films are considered. Collection efficiency measurements of silicon solar cells are presented, and collection efficiency studies of Cu20 solar cells are discussed.

  17. Solar Cell Calibration and Measurement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila; Brinker, Dave; Curtis, Henry; Jenkins, Phillip; Scheiman, Dave

    1997-01-01

    The increasing complexity of space solar cells and the increasing international markets for both cells and arrays has resulted in workshops jointly sponsored by NASDA, ESA and NASA. These workshops are designed to obtain international agreement on standardized values for the AMO spectrum and constant, recommend laboratory measurement practices and establish a set of protocols for international comparison of laboratory measurements. A working draft of an ISO standard, WDI 5387, 'Requirements for Measurement and Calibration Procedures for Space Solar Cells' was discussed with a focus on the scope of the document, a definition of primary standard cell, and required error analysis for all measurement techniques. Working groups addressed the issues of Air Mass Zero (AMO) solar constant and spectrum, laboratory measurement techniques, and the international round robin methodology. A summary is presented of the current state of each area and the formulation of the ISO document.

  18. High efficiency low cost solar cell power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekey, I.; Blocker, W.

    1978-01-01

    A concept for generating high-efficiency, low-cost, solar-cell power is outlined with reference to solar cell parameters, optical concentrators, and thermal control procedures. A design for a 12.5-kw power module for space operation is discussed noting the optical system, spectrum splitter, light conversion system, cell cooling, power conditioner, and tracking mechanism. It is found that for an unconcentrated array, efficiency approaches 60% when ten or more bandgaps are used. For a 12-band system, a computer program distributed bandgaps for maximum efficiency and equal cell currents. Rigid materials and thin films have been proposed for optical components and prisms, gratings, and dichroic mirrors have been recommended for spectrum splitting. Various radiator concepts are noted including that of Weatherston and Smith (1960) and Hedgepeth and Knapp (1978). The concept may be suitable for the Solar Power Satellite.

  19. November 21, 2000 PV Lesson Plan 1 Solar Cells

    E-print Network

    Oregon, University of

    November 21, 2000 PV Lesson Plan 1 ­ Solar Cells Prepared for the Oregon Million Solar Roofs High School Gary Grace ­ South Eugene High School In Schools #12;1 Solar Cells Lesson Plan Content: In this lesson, students are introduced to the basic physics and chemistry behind the operation of a solar cell

  20. Questions I will answer What is a solar cell?

    E-print Network

    McGehee, Michael

    grid 4 #12;5 #12;Solar panels on the Interna9onal Space Sta9on 6 #12;Area needed to power the country (150 km)2 of Nevada covered with 15 % efficient solar cells could provide#12;Questions I will answer · What is a solar cell? · How are solar cells

  1. EE Times: Semi News Groups claim breakthroughs in solar cells

    E-print Network

    Rogers, John A.

    claim to offer nearly twice the efficiency as silicon in solar cells. But solar cells based concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) modules for large- scale solar power generation. Semprius' microEE Times: Semi News Groups claim breakthroughs in solar cells Mark LaPedus Page 1 of 2 EE Times (05

  2. Third Working Meeting on Gallium Arsenide Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, G. H. (compiler)

    1976-01-01

    Research results are reported for GaAs Schottky barrier solar cells, GaAlAs/GaAs heteroface solar cells, and GaAlAs graded band gap solar cells. Related materials studies are presented. A systems study for GaAs and Si solar concentrator systems is given.

  3. Solar energy-conversion processes in organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhihua; Zang, Huidong; Hu, Bin

    2008-09-01

    Organic semiconducting materials have demonstrated attractive light-absorption and photocurrent-generation functions due to their delocalized ? electrons as well as intra-molecular and inter-molecular charge separation processes. On the other hand, organic semiconducting materials have easy property tuning, are mechanically flexible, and have large-area thin film formation properties. As a result, organic materials have become potential candidates in solar energy applications. This article will review critical energy-conversion processes in organic solar cells with the focus on singlet and triplet photovoltaic responses.

  4. Silicon solar cell process. Development, fabrication and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoo, H. I.; Iles, P. A.; Tanner, D. P.

    1978-01-01

    Solar cells were fabricated from unconventional silicon sheets, and the performances were characterized with an emphasis on statistical evaluation. A number of solar cell fabrication processes were used and conversion efficiency was measured under AMO condition at 25 C. Silso solar cells using standard processing showed an average efficiency of about 9.6%. Solar cells with back surface field process showed about the same efficiency as the cells from standard process. Solar cells from grain boundary passivation process did not show any improvements in solar cell performance.

  5. Printable CIGS thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaojuan

    2013-03-01

    Among the various thin film solar cells in the market, CuInGaSe thin film solar cells have been considered as the most promising alternatives to crystalline silicon solar cells because of their high photo-electricity conversion efficiency, reliability, and stability. However, many fabrication methods of CIGS thin film are based on vacuum processes such as evaporation and sputtering techniques which are not cost efficient. This work develops a solution method using paste or ink liquid spin-coated on glass that would be competitive to conventional ways in terms of cost effective, non-vacuum needed, and quick processing. A mixture precursor was prepared by dissolving appropriate amounts of composition chemicals. After the mixture solution was cooled, a viscous paste was prepared and ready for spin-coating process. A slight bluish CIG thin film on substrate was then put in a tube furnace with evaporation of metal Se followed by depositing CdS layer and ZnO nanoparticle thin film coating to complete a solar cell fabrication. Structure, absorption spectrum, and photo-electricity conversion efficiency for the as-grown CIGS thin film solar cell are under study.

  6. CZTSSe thin film solar cells: Surface treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, Chinmay Sunil

    Chalcopyrite semiconducting materials, specifically CZTS, are a promising alternative to traditional silicon solar cell technology. Because of the high absorption coefficient; films of the order of 1 micrometer thickness are sufficient for the fabrication of solar cells. Liquid based synthesis methods are advantageous because they are easily scalable using the roll to roll manufacturing techniques. Various treatments are explored in this study to enhance the performance of the selenized CZTS film based solar cells. Thiourea can be used as a sulfur source and can be used to tune band gap of CZTSSe. Bromine etching can be used to manipulate the thickness of sintered CZTSSe film. The etching treatment creates recombination centers which lead to poor device performance. Various after treatments were used to improve the performance of the devices. It was observed that the performance of the solar cell devices could not be improved by any of the after treatment steps. Other surface treatment processes are explored including KCN etching and gaseous H2S treatments. Hybrid solar cells which included use of CIGS nanoparticles at the interface between CZTSSe and CdS are also explored.

  7. Black silicon for solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, Matthias; Otto, Martin; Käsebier, Thomas; Füchsel, Kevin; Wehrspohn, Ralf; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Tünnermann, Andreas; Pertsch, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    We present experimental results and rigorous numerical simulations on the optical properties of Black Silicon surfaces and their implications for solar cell applications. The Black Silicon is fabricated by reactive ion etching of crystalline silicon with SF6 and O2. This produces a surface consisting of sharp randomly distributed needle like features with a characteristic lateral spacing of about a few hundreds of nanometers and a wide range of aspect ratios depending on the process parameters. Due to the very low reflectance over a broad spectral range and a pronounced light trapping effect at the silicon absorption edge such Black Silicon surface textures are beneficial for photon management in photovoltaic applications. We demonstrate that those light trapping properties prevail upon functionalization of the Black Silicon with dielectric coatings, necessary to construct a photovoltaic system. The experimental investigations are accompanied by rigorous numerical simulations based on three dimensional models of the Black Silicon structures. Those simulations allow insights into the light trapping mechanism and the influence of the substrate thickness onto the optical performance of the Black Silicon. Finally we use an analytical solar cell model to relate the optical properties of Black Silicon to the maximum photo current and solar cell efficiency in dependence of the solar cell thickness. The results are compared to standard light trapping schemes and implications especially for thin solar cells are discussed.

  8. Method of manufacturing a solar cell panel

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, P.

    1982-03-30

    The photovoltaic cells are retained and protected by a transparent elastomer layer extruded when hot prior to vulcanization and applied against the cells with a slight pressure to cause it to go into the spaces between cells, and vulcanized by heating, for example at 110* C. Or at 180* C., thanks to the presence of incorporated peroxides. Application in the production of electricity from solar energy.

  9. Solar Cell Efficiency Tables (Version 33)

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M. A.; Emery, K.; Hishikawa, Y.; Warta, W.

    2009-01-01

    Consolidated tables showing an extensive listing of the highest independently confirmed efficiencies for solar cells and modules are presented. Guidelines for inclusion of results into these tables are outlined and new entries since July 2008 are reviewed. Efficiencies are updated to the new reference solar spectrum tabulated in IEC 60904-3 Ed. 2 revised in April 2008 and an updated list of recognised test centres is also included.

  10. Large area monolithic organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hui; Tao, Cheng; Hambsch, Mike; Pivrikas, Almantas; Velusamy, Marappan; Aljada, Muhsen; Zhang, Yuliang; Burn, Paul L.; Meredith, Paul

    2012-11-01

    Although efficiencies of > 10% have recently been achieved in laboratory-scale organic solar cells, these competitive performance figures are yet to be translated to large active areas and geometries relevant for viable manufacturing. One of the factors hindering scale-up is a lack of knowledge of device physics at the sub-module level, particularly cell architecture, electrode geometry and current collection pathways. A more in depth understanding of how photocurrent and photovoltage extraction can be optimised over large active areas is urgently needed. Another key factor suppressing conversion efficiencies in large area cells is the relatively high sheet resistance of the transparent conducting anode - typically indium tin oxide. Hence, to replace ITO with alternative transparent conducting anodes is also a high priority on the pathway to viable module-level organic solar cells. In our paper we will focus on large area devices relevant to sub-module scales - 5 cm × 5 cm monolithic geometry. We have applied a range of experimental techniques to create a more comprehensive understanding of the true device physics that could help make large area, monolithic organic solar cells more viable. By employing this knowledge, a novel transparent anode consisting of molybdenum oxide (MoOx) and silver (Ag) is developed to replace ITO and PEDOT-free large area solar cell sub-modules, acting as both a transparent window and hole-collecting electrode. The proposed architecture and anode materials are well suited to high throughput, low cost all-solution processing.

  11. Fabricating solar cells with silicon nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Loscutoff, Paul; Molesa, Steve; Kim, Taeseok

    2014-09-02

    A laser contact process is employed to form contact holes to emitters of a solar cell. Doped silicon nanoparticles are formed over a substrate of the solar cell. The surface of individual or clusters of silicon nanoparticles is coated with a nanoparticle passivation film. Contact holes to emitters of the solar cell are formed by impinging a laser beam on the passivated silicon nanoparticles. For example, the laser contact process may be a laser ablation process. In that case, the emitters may be formed by diffusing dopants from the silicon nanoparticles prior to forming the contact holes to the emitters. As another example, the laser contact process may be a laser melting process whereby portions of the silicon nanoparticles are melted to form the emitters and contact holes to the emitters.

  12. Nanophotonic front electrodes for perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paetzold, Ulrich Wilhelm; Qiu, Weiming; Finger, Friedhelm; Poortmans, Jef; Cheyns, David

    2015-04-01

    In less than 3 years' time, a vast progress in power conversion efficiencies of organometal halide perovskite solar cells has been achieved by optimization of the device architecture, charge transport layers, and interfaces. A further increase in these efficiencies is expected from an improvement in the optical properties via anti-reflection coatings and nanophotonic light management concepts. In this contribution, we report on the development and implementation of a nanophotonic front electrode for perovskite solar cells. The nanostructures were replicated via the versatile and large-area compatible UV-nanoimprint lithography. The shallow design of the used transparent and conductive nanostructures enabled easy integration into our solution-based baseline process. Prototype methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells show an improvement of 5% in short-circuit current density and an improvement from 9.6% to 9.9% in power conversion efficiency compared to the flat reference device.

  13. Plasmonic ITO-free polymer solar cell.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Yi; Kang, Yu Ling; Chen, Yu-Cheng; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Lin, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Yi-Hsiang; Chen, Yi-Jiun; Lu, Chun-Yang; Lin, Hoang Yan; Wang, Lon A; Wu, Chung-Chih; Lee, Si-Chen

    2014-03-10

    The aluminum and sliver multilayered nano-grating structure is fabricated by laser interference lithography and the intervals between nanoslits is filled with modified PEDOT:PSS. The grating structured transparent electrode functions as the anti-reflection layer which not only decreases the reflected light but also increases the absorption of the active layer. The performances of P3HT:PC??BM solar cells are studied experimentally and theoretically in detail. The field intensities of the transverse magnetic (TM) and transverse electrical (TE) waves distributed in the active layer are simulated by rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA). The power conversion efficiency of the plasmonic ITO-free polymer solar cell can reach 3.64% which is higher than ITO based polymer solar cell with efficiency of 3.45%. PMID:24922253

  14. Gaalas/Gaas Solar Cell Process Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almgren, D. W.; Csigi, K. I.

    1980-01-01

    Available information on liquid phase, vapor phase (including chemical vapor deposition) and molecular beam epitaxy growth procedures that could be used to fabricate single crystal, heteroface, (AlGa) As/GaAs solar cells, for space applications is summarized. A comparison of the basic cost elements of the epitaxy growth processes shows that the current infinite melt LPE process has the lower cost per cell for an annual production rate of 10,000 cells. The metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MO-CVD) process has the potential for low cost production of solar cells but there is currently a significant uncertainty in process yield, i.e., the fraction of active material in the input gas stream that ends up in the cell. Additional work is needed to optimize and document the process parameters for the MO-CVD process.

  15. Space solar cell research - Problems and potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, Dennis J.

    1986-01-01

    The value of a passive, maintenance-free, renewable energy source was immediately recognized in the early days of the space program, and the silicon solar cell, despite its infancy, was quickly pressed into service. Efficiencies of those early space solar arrays were low, and lifetimes shorter than hoped for, but within a decade significant advances had been made in both areas. Better performance was achieved because of a variety of factors, ranging from improvements in silicon single crystal material, to better device designs, to a better understanding of the factors that affect the performance of a solar cell in space. Chief among the latter, particularly for the mid-to-high altitude (HEO) and geosynchronous (GEO) orbits, are the effects of the naturally occurring particulate radiation environment. Although not as broadly important to the photovoltaic community at large as increased efficiency, the topic of radiation damage is critically important to use of solar cells in space, and is a major component of the NASA research program in space photovoltaics. This paper will give a brief overview of some of the opportunities and challenges for space photovoltaic applications, and will discuss some of the current reseach directed at achieving high efficiency and controlling the effects of radiation damage in space solar cells.

  16. Photochemical performance of ZnO nanostructures in dye sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Partha Pratim; Mukhopadhyay, Soumita; Agarkar, Shruti A.; Jana, Arpita; Devi, P. Sujatha

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the photoconversion efficiencies of ZnO having diverse microstructures and structural defects have been investigated. A conversion efficiency of 1.38% was achieved for the DSSCs fabricated with as prepared ZnO nanorods having minimum vacancy defects and a favourable one dimensional directional pathway for electron conduction. The DSSCs fabricated with ZnO nanoparticles exhibited relatively low conversion efficiency of 1.004% probably due to multiple trapping/detrapping phenomena within the grain boundaries and ZnO flowers though exhibited a high dye adsorption capability exhibited the lowest conversion efficiency of 0.59% due to a high concentration of structural defects. Based on the experimental evidences, we believe that the type of defects and their concentrations are more important than shape in controlling the overall performance of ZnO based DSSCs.

  17. Multi-junction solar cell device

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Daniel J. (Lakewood, CO); Geisz, John F. (Wheat Ridge, CO)

    2007-12-18

    A multi-junction solar cell device (10) is provided. The multi-junction solar cell device (10) comprises either two or three active solar cells connected in series in a monolithic structure. The multi-junction device (10) comprises a bottom active cell (20) having a single-crystal silicon substrate base and an emitter layer (23). The multi-junction device (10) further comprises one or two subsequent active cells each having a base layer (32) and an emitter layer (23) with interconnecting tunnel junctions between each active cell. At least one layer that forms each of the top and middle active cells is composed of a single-crystal III-V semiconductor alloy that is substantially lattice-matched to the silicon substrate (22). The polarity of the active p-n junction cells is either p-on-n or n-on-p. The present invention further includes a method for substantially lattice matching single-crystal III-V semiconductor layers with the silicon substrate (22) by including boron and/or nitrogen in the chemical structure of these layers.

  18. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter John

    2015-07-21

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  19. High performance polymer tandem solar cell

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Wilson Jose; Schneider, Fabio Kurt; Mohd Yusoff, Abd. Rashid bin; Jang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    A power conversion efficiency of 9.02% is obtained for a fully solution-processed polymer tandem solar cell, based on the diketopyrrolopyrrole unit polymer as a low bandgap photoactive material in the rear subcell, in conjunction with a new robust interconnecting layer. This interconnecting layer is optically transparent, electrically conductive, and physically strong, thus, the charges can be collected and recombined in the interconnecting layer under illumination, while the charge is generated and extracted under dark conditions. This indicates that careful interface engineering of the charge-carrier transport layer is a useful approach to further improve the performance of polymer tandem solar cells. PMID:26669577

  20. High performance polymer tandem solar cell.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Wilson Jose; Schneider, Fabio Kurt; Mohd Yusoff, Abd Rashid Bin; Jang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    A power conversion efficiency of 9.02% is obtained for a fully solution-processed polymer tandem solar cell, based on the diketopyrrolopyrrole unit polymer as a low bandgap photoactive material in the rear subcell, in conjunction with a new robust interconnecting layer. This interconnecting layer is optically transparent, electrically conductive, and physically strong, thus, the charges can be collected and recombined in the interconnecting layer under illumination, while the charge is generated and extracted under dark conditions. This indicates that careful interface engineering of the charge-carrier transport layer is a useful approach to further improve the performance of polymer tandem solar cells. PMID:26669577

  1. High throughput solar cell ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Pass, Thomas; Cousins, Peter John; Viatella, John

    2014-10-14

    A solar cell is formed using a solar cell ablation system. The ablation system includes a single laser source and several laser scanners. The laser scanners include a master laser scanner, with the rest of the laser scanners being slaved to the master laser scanner. A laser beam from the laser source is split into several laser beams, with the laser beams being scanned onto corresponding wafers using the laser scanners in accordance with one or more patterns. The laser beams may be scanned on the wafers using the same or different power levels of the laser source.

  2. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter John

    2014-07-22

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline materiat layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  3. High throughput solar cell ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Pass, Thomas; Cousins, Peter John; Viatella, John

    2012-09-11

    A solar cell is formed using a solar cell ablation system. The ablation system includes a single laser source and several laser scanners. The laser scanners include a master laser scanner, with the rest of the laser scanners being slaved to the master laser scanner. A laser beam from the laser source is split into several laser beams, with the laser beams being scanned onto corresponding wafers using the laser scanners in accordance with one or more patterns. The laser beams may be scanned on the wafers using the same or different power levels of the laser source.

  4. Origami-enabled deformable silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Rui; Huang, Hai; Liang, Hanshuang; Liang, Mengbing; Tu, Hongen; Xu, Yong; Song, Zeming; Jiang, Hanqing; Yu, Hongyu

    2014-02-24

    Deformable electronics have found various applications and elastomeric materials have been widely used to reach flexibility and stretchability. In this Letter, we report an alternative approach to enable deformability through origami. In this approach, the deformability is achieved through folding and unfolding at the creases while the functional devices do not experience strain. We have demonstrated an example of origami-enabled silicon solar cells and showed that this solar cell can reach up to 644% areal compactness while maintaining reasonable good performance upon cyclic folding/unfolding. This approach opens an alternative direction of producing flexible, stretchable, and deformable electronics.

  5. Oxide heterostructures for ecient solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Assmann, E.; Blaha, P.; Laskowski, R; Held, K.; Okamoto, Satoshi; Sangiovanni, G.

    2013-01-01

    We propose an unexplored class of absorbing materials for high-efficiency solar cells: heterostructures of transition-metal oxides. In particular, LaVO3 grown on SrTiO3 has a direct band gap ~1.1 eV in the optimal range as well as an internal potential gradient, which can greatly help to separate the photogenerated electron-hole pairs. Furthermore, oxide heterostructures afford the flexibility to combine LaVO3 with other materials such as LaFeO3 in order to achieve even higher efficiencies with band-gap graded solar cells. We use density-functional theory to demonstrate these features.

  6. Design and fabrication of solar cell modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaughnessy, T. P.

    1978-01-01

    A program conducted for design, fabrication and evaluation of twelve silicon solar cell modules is described. The purpose of the program was to develop a module design consistent with the requirements and objectives of JPL specification and to also incorporate elements of new technologies under development to meet LSSA Project goals. Module development emphasized preparation of a technically and economically competitive design based upon utilization of ion implanted solar cells and a glass encapsulation system. The modules fabricated, tested and delivered were of nominal 2 X 2 foot dimensions and 20 watt minimum rating. Basic design, design rationale, performance and results of environmental testing are described.

  7. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David; Cousins, Peter

    2012-12-04

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  8. Solar heating of GaAs nanowire solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shao-Hua; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2015-11-30

    We use a coupled thermal-optical approach to model the operating temperature rise in GaAs nanowire solar cells. We find that despite more highly concentrated light absorption and lower thermal conductivity, the overall temperature rise in a nanowire structure is no higher than in a planar structure. Moreover, coating the nanowires with a transparent polymer can increase the radiative cooling power by 2.2 times, lowering the operating temperature by nearly 7 K. PMID:26698787

  9. Printable CIGS thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaojuan

    2014-03-01

    Among the various thin film solar cells in the market, CuInGaSe thin film cells have been considered as the most promising alternatives to silicon solar cells because of their high photo-electricity efficiency, reliability, and stability. However, many fabrication of CIGS thin film are based on vacuum processes such as evaporation sputtering techniques which are not cost efficient. This work develops a method using paste or ink liquid spin-coated on glass that would be to conventional ways in terms of cost effective, non-vacuum needed, quick processing. A mixture precursor was prepared by dissolving appropriate amounts of chemicals. After the mixture solution was cooled, a viscous paste prepared and ready for spin-coating process. A slight bluish CIG thin film substrate was then put in a tube furnace with evaporation of metal Se by depositing CdS layer and ZnO nanoparticle thin film coating to a solar cell fabrication. Structure, absorption spectrum, and photo-conversion efficiency for the as-grown CIGS thin film solar cell under study.

  10. Advances in large area polycrystalline solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vendura, G. J., Jr.; Johnson, G.; Hoelscher, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    Polycrystaline silicon is presently routinely processed into low cost 10 cm by 10 cm solar cells. However assuming minimal handling difficulties, only minor equipment modifications and no increase in processing complexity, the fabrication of even larger geometries would be economically advantageous. This investigation addressed the feasibility of developing 10 cm by 15 cm solar cells from research through pilot line production stages. The major thrust was to minimize costing by using existing production equipment and proven techniques wherever possible. Accordingly methods were developed to section larger substrates from existing cast ingots, a simple solar cell was designed and low cost processes implemented. After numerous preliminary experiments, pilot line production of 1500 cells was completed. Of these approximately 62 percent exhibited efficiencies greater than 7.0 percent, 53 percent were greater than 8.0 percent and 15 percent were greater than 9.0 percent. Based on this study, the regular production of 10 cm by 15 cm solar cells was determined to be both feasible and cost effective using existing processing methods.

  11. Plastic solar cells with engineered interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xugang; Marks, Tobin J.

    2013-03-01

    We discuss here bulk-heterojunction polymer solar cells with engineered interfaces to achieve desired phase separations (vertical and horizontal), molecule orientations, ohmic contacts, and electronic properties for device performance maximization, and to enhance the device durability by eliminating corrosive interfacial layers. The strategies discussed include development of novel interfacial layers such as self-assembled organic layers and inorganic metal oxide layers, and using inverted cell architectures. Interface engineering leads to optimal active layer morphologies and to polymer ?- orientation, as well as maximum open circuit voltage. Using p-type NiO as the anode hole transporting/electron blocking layer results in dramatically enhanced device performance of P3HT/PCBM polymer solar cells with PCEs up to 5%. Electrical property and surface morphology investigations of NiO elucidate the mechanism for the enhanced performance. Other novel interfacial materials such as self-assembled organic monolayers and graphene oxide (GO) have also been incorporated into polymer solar cells to achieve comparable PCEs with improved device stability. Using ZnO as electron transporting/hole blocking layer and employing an inverted device architecture, polymer solar cells achieve desired molecule ?-orientation and vertical phase separation, therefore extremely high fill factors and promising power conversion efficiencies. In addition to interfacial layer materials, active layer components with state-of-the-art device performance, both polymer and small molecule developed in this laboratory, will also be discussed.

  12. Electrical overstress failure in silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pease, R.L.; Barnum, J.R.; van Lint, V.A.J.; Vulliet, W.V.; Wrobel, T.F.

    1982-11-01

    A solar-cell electrical-overstress-failure model and the results of experimental measurements of threshold pulsed failure currents on four types of silicon solar cells are presented. The transient EMP field surrounding a lightning stroke has been identified as a potential threat to a photovoltaic array, yet failure analysis of solar cells in a pulsed environment had not previously been reported. Failure in the low-resistivity concentrator cells at pulse widths between 1 ..mu..s and 1 ms occurred initially in the junction. Finger damage in the form of silver melting occurs at currents only slightly greater than that required for junction damage. The result of reverse-bias transient-overstress tests on high-resistivity (10 ..cap omega..cm) cells demonstrated that the predominant failure mode was due to edge currents. These flat-plate cells failed at currents of only 4 to 20 A, which is one or two orders of magnitude below the model predictions. It thus appears that high-resistivity flat-plate cells are quite vulnerable to electrical overstress which could be produced by a variety of mechanisms.

  13. Electrical overstress failure in silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pease, R. L.; Barnum, J. R.; Vanlint, V. A. J.; Vulliet, W. V.; Wrobel, T. F.

    1982-11-01

    A solar-cell electrical-overstress-failure model and the results of experimental measurements of threshold pulsed failure currents on four types of silicon solar cells are presented. The transient electromagnet pulse field surrounding a lightning stroke was identified as a potential threat to a photovoltaic array, yet failure analysis of solar cells in a pulsed environment had not previously been reported. Failure in the low-resistivity concentrator cells at pulse widths between 1 SIGMA and 1 ms occurred initially in the junction. Finger damage in the form of silver melting occurs at currents only slightly greater than that required for junction damage. The result of reverse-bias transient-overstress tests on high-resistivity (10 LAMBDA cm) cells demonstrated that the predominant failure mode was due to edge currents. These flat-plate cells failed at currents of only 4 to 20 A, which is one or two orders of magnitude below the model predictions. It thus appears that high-resistivity flat-plate cells are quite vulnerable to electrical overstress which could be produced by a variety of mechanisms.

  14. Plastic Schottky barrier solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Waldrop, James R. (Thousand Oaks, CA); Cohen, Marshall J. (Thousand Oaks, CA)

    1984-01-24

    A photovoltaic cell structure is fabricated from an active medium including an undoped, intrinsically p-type organic semiconductor comprising polyacetylene. When a film of such material is in rectifying contact with a magnesium electrode, a Schottky-barrier junction is obtained within the body of the cell structure. Also, a gold overlayer passivates the magnesium layer on the undoped polyacetylene film.

  15. High efficiency ultrathin silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storti, G.; Wrigley, C. Y.

    1979-01-01

    This paper summarizes developments in ultrathin, (50 micron), silicon solar cells for high power-to-weight ratio space power systems. The fabrication technology developments included uniformly thinning oriented silicon slices, enhancement of internal reflection, optimizing high-temperature processes, surface texturing and back surface field enhancement. The best textured-surface ultrathin cells have achieved 14.3% AMO efficiency, while pilot-manufacturing quantities of smooth-surfaced cells have been fabricated with efficiencies of 12%. Data are presented on cell structure, fabrication collection efficiencies and optical properties.

  16. Direct-Write Contacts for Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kaydanova, T.; van Hest, M.F.A.M.; Miedaner, A.; Curtis, C. J.; Alleman, J. L.; Dabney, M. S.; Garnett, E.; Shaheen, S.; Ginley, D. S.; Smith, L.; Collins, R.; Hanoka, J. I.; Gabor, A. M.

    2005-01-01

    We report on our project to develop inkjet printable contacts for solar cells. Ag, Cu, and Ni metallizations were inkjet printed with near vacuum deposition quality. Thick, highly conducting lines of Ag and Cu demonstrating good adhesion to glass, Si, and PCB have been printed at 100-200 C in air and N2, respectively. Ag grids were inkjet-printed on Si solar cells and fired through silicon nitride AR layer at 850 C resulting in 8% cells. Next-generation multicomponent inks (including etching agents) have also been developed with improved fire-through contacts leading to higher cell efficiencies. The approach developed can be easily extended to other conductors such as Pt, Pd, and Au, etc. In addition, PEDOT-PSS polymer-based conductors were inkjet-printed with the conductivity as good or better than those of polymer-based conductors.

  17. Hot electron plasmon-protected solar cell.

    PubMed

    Kong, J; Rose, A H; Yang, C; Wu, X; Merlo, J M; Burns, M J; Naughton, M J; Kempa, K

    2015-09-21

    A solar cell based on a hot electron plasmon protection effect is proposed and made plausible by simulations, non-local modeling of the response, and quantum mechanical calculations. In this cell, a thin-film, plasmonic metamaterial structure acts as both an efficient photon absorber in the visible frequency range and a plasmonic resonator in the IR range, the latter of which absorbs and protects against phonon emission the free energy of the hot electrons in an adjacent semiconductor junction. We show that in this structure, electron-plasmon scattering is much more efficient than electron-phonon scattering in cooling-off hot electrons, and the plasmon-stored energy is recoverable as an additional cell voltage. The proposed structure could become a prototype of a new generation of high efficiency solar cells. PMID:26406739

  18. Studies of silicon pn junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, F. A.; Neugroschel, A.

    1977-01-01

    Modifications of the basic Shockley equations that result from the random and nonrandom spatial variations of the chemical composition of a semiconductor were developed. These modifications underlie the existence of the extensive emitter recombination current that limits the voltage over the open circuit of solar cells. The measurement of parameters, series resistance and the base diffusion length is discussed. Two methods are presented for establishing the energy bandgap narrowing in the heavily-doped emitter region. Corrections that can be important in the application of one of these methods to small test cells are examined. Oxide-charge-induced high-low-junction emitter (OCI-HLE) test cells which exhibit considerably higher voltage over the open circuit than was previously seen in n-on-p solar cells are described.

  19. Center punched solar cell module development effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, R. E.; Mortensen, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    The results are given of an advanced module development program with the objective of providing a low cost solar cell mechanical interconnect design. The design approach, which avoids soldering or welding operations, lends itself to automated assembly techniques thus supporting the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project goals. The first group of six modules contained aluminum contact cells and the second group of six modules contained silver-titanium-palladium contact cells. Extensive component and environmental testing at the module level showed that reliable cell mechanical interconnection can be achieved when utilizing the proper electrical contact materials and pressures. A discussion is given of the module design, manufacturing procedure, test program, significant problem areas and solutions, and conclusions and recommendations as formulated and conducted by XEOS.

  20. Flexible plastic solar cells offer great advantages when compared with

    E-print Network

    Langendoen, Koen

    Flexible plastic solar cells offer great advantages when compared with traditional silicon solar for a solar cell: extremely easy to produce, very cheap and with good perspectives for high efficiencies. Since ten years considerable progress has been made in developing new and very promising types of solar

  1. Stratospheric NO and NO2 profiles at sunset from analysis of high-resolution balloon-borne infrared solar absorption spectra obtained at 33 deg N and calculations with a time-dependent photochemical model

    SciTech Connect

    Rinsland, C.P.; Boughner, R.E.; Larsen, J.C.; Goldman, A.

    1984-08-01

    Simultaneous stratospheric vertical profiles of NO and NO2 at sunset were derived from an analysis of infrared solar absorption spectra recorded from a float altitude of 33 km with an interferometer system during a balloon flight. A nonlinear least squares procedure was used to analyze the spectral data in regions of absorption by NO and NO2 lines. Normalized factors, determined from calculations of time dependent altitude profiles with a detailed photochemical model, were included in the onion peeling analysis to correct for the rapid diurnal changes in NO and NO2 concentrations with time near sunset. The CO2 profile was also derived from the analysis and is reported.

  2. Stratospheric NO and NO2 profiles at sunset from analysis of high-resolution balloon-borne infrared solar absorption spectra obtained at 33 deg N and calculations with a time-dependent photochemical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Boughner, R. E.; Larsen, J. C.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Murcray, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    Simultaneous stratospheric vertical profiles of NO and NO2 at sunset were derived from an analysis of infrared solar absorption spectra recorded from a float altitude of 33 km with an interferometer system during a balloon flight. A nonlinear least squares procedure was used to analyze the spectral data in regions of absorption by NO and NO2 lines. Normalized factors, determined from calculations of time dependent altitude profiles with a detailed photochemical model, were included in the onion peeling analysis to correct for the rapid diurnal changes in NO and NO2 concentrations with time near sunset. The CO2 profile was also derived from the analysis and is reported.

  3. Space solar cell technology development - A perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott-Monck, J.

    1982-01-01

    The developmental history of photovoltaics is examined as a basis for predicting further advances to the year 2000. Transistor technology was the precursor of solar cell development. Terrestrial cells were modified for space through changes in geometry and size, as well as the use of Ag-Ti contacts and manufacture of a p-type base. The violet cell was produced for Comsat, and involved shallow junctions, new contacts, and an enhanced antireflection coating for better radiation tolerance. The driving force was the desire by private companies to reduce cost and weight for commercial satellite power supplies. Liquid phase epitaxial (LPE) GaAs cells are the latest advancement, having a 4 sq cm area and increased efficiency. GaAs cells are expected to be flight ready in the 1980s. Testing is still necessary to verify production techniques and the resistance to electron and photon damage. Research will continue in CVD cell technology, new panel technology, and ultrathin Si cells.

  4. Evaluation of solar cells for potential space satellite power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The evaluation focused on the following subjects: (1) the relative merits of alternative solar cell materials, based on performance and availability, (2) the best manufacturing methods for various solar cell options and the effects of extremely large production volumes on their ultimate costs and operational characteristics, (3) the areas of uncertainty in achieving large solar cell production volumes, (4) the effects of concentration ratios on solar array mass and system performance, (5) the factors influencing solar cell life in the radiation environment during transport to and in geosynchronous orbit, and (6) the merits of conducting solar cell manufacturing operations in space.

  5. Bandgap tuning of multiferroic oxide solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechache, R.; Harnagea, C.; Li, S.; Cardenas, L.; Huang, W.; Chakrabartty, J.; Rosei, F.

    2015-01-01

    Multiferroic films are increasingly being studied for applications in solar energy conversion because of their efficient ferroelectric polarization-driven carrier separation and above-bandgap generated photovoltages, which in principle can lead to energy conversion efficiencies beyond the maximum value (˜34%) reported in traditional silicon-based bipolar heterojunction solar cells. However, the efficiency reported so far is still too low (<2%) to be considered for commercialization. Here, we demonstrate a new approach to effectively tune the bandgap of double perovskite multiferroic oxides by engineering the cationic ordering for the case of Bi2FeCrO6. Using this approach, we report a power conversion efficiency of 8.1% under AM 1.5?G irradiation (100?mW?cm-2) for Bi2FeCrO6 thin-film solar cells in a multilayer configuration.

  6. Piezoresistance and solar cell efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, Victor G.

    1987-01-01

    Diffusion-induced stresses in silicon are shown to result in large localized changes in the minority-carrier mobility which in turn can have a significant effect on cell output. Evidence is given that both compressive and tensile stresses can be generated in either the emitter or the base region. Tensile stresses in the base appear to be much more effective in altering cell performance than do compressive stresses. While most stress-related effects appear to degrade cell efficiency, this is not always the case. Evidence is presented showing that arsenic-induced stresses can result in emitter characteristics comparable to those found in the MINP cell without requiring a high degree of surface passivation.

  7. Basic mechanisms governing solar-cell efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, F. A.; Neugroschel, A.; Sah, C. T.

    1976-01-01

    The efficiency of a solar cell depends on the material parameters appearing in the set of differential equations that describe the transport, recombination, and generation of electrons and holes. This paper describes the many basic mechanisms occurring in semiconductors that can control these material parameters.

  8. Large area Czochralski silicon for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, S. N.; Wakefield, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    A detailed model of a typical Czochralski silicon crystal puller is utilized to predict maximum crystal growth rate as a function of various furnace parameters. Results of this analysis, when combined with multiblade slurry sawing, indicate that the Czochralski process is highly attractive for achieving near-term cost reduction of solar cell silicon.

  9. Method of fabricating a solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Pass, Thomas; Rogers, Robert

    2014-02-25

    Methods of fabricating solar cells are described. A porous layer may be formed on a surface of a substrate, the porous layer including a plurality of particles and a plurality of voids. A solution may be dispensed into one or more regions of the porous layer to provide a patterned composite layer. The substrate may then be heated.

  10. Hybrid solar cells: Perovskites under the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonietta Loi, Maria; Hummelen, Jan C.

    2013-12-01

    Mixed-halide organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites are reported to display electron-hole diffusion lengths over 1 ?m. This observation provides important insight into the charge-carrier dynamics of this class of semiconductors and increases the expectations for highly efficient and cheap solar cells.

  11. Low cost silicon solar cell array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, F. T. C.

    1974-01-01

    The technological options available for producing low cost silicon solar cell arrays were examined. A project value of approximately $250/sq m and $2/watt is projected, based on mass production capacity demand. Recommendations are included for the most promising cost reduction options.

  12. Phthalocyanine Blends Improve Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Varotto, Alessandro; Nam, Chang-Yong; Radivojevic, Ivana; Tomé, Joao; Cavaleiro, José A.S.; Black, Charles T.; Drain, Charles Michael

    2010-01-01

    A core phthalocyanine platform allows engineering the solubility properties the band gap; shifting the maximum absorption toward the red. A simple method to increase the efficiency of heterojunction solar cells uses a self-organized blend of the phthalocyanine chromophores fabricated by solution processing. PMID:20136126

  13. Metal electrode for amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Richard (Princeton, NJ)

    1983-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell having an N-type region wherein the contact to the N-type region is composed of a material having a work function of about 3.7 electron volts or less. Suitable materials include strontium, barium and magnesium and rare earth metals such as gadolinium and yttrium.

  14. Studies of heteroface solar cell performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feucht, D. L.; Milnes, A. G.

    1975-01-01

    The development, fabrication, and failure modes of AlxGa(1-x)As-GaAs heteroface solar cells are described. Crystal growth, the diffusion of Zn into the GaAs layer to form the p-n junction, SEM studies of the diffusion length of GaAs, and procedures for making ohmic contacts are discussed.

  15. Perovskite Solar Cells: Beyond Methylammonium Lead Iodide.

    PubMed

    Boix, Pablo P; Agarwala, Shweta; Koh, Teck Ming; Mathews, Nripan; Mhaisalkar, Subodh G

    2015-03-01

    Organic-inorganic lead halide based perovskites solar cells are by far the highest efficiency solution-processed solar cells, threatening to challenge thin film and polycrystalline silicon ones. Despite the intense research in this area, concerns surrounding the long-term stability as well as the toxicity of lead in the archetypal perovskite, CH3NH3PbI3, have the potential to derail commercialization. Although the search for Pb-free perovskites have naturally shifted to other transition metal cations and formulations that replace the organic moiety, efficiencies with these substitutions are still substantially lower than those of the Pb-perovskite. The perovskite family offers rich multitudes of crystal structures and substituents with the potential to uncover new and exciting photophysical phenomena that hold the promise of higher solar cell efficiencies. In addressing materials beyond CH3NH3PbI3, this Perspective will discuss a broad palette of elemental substitutions, solid solutions, and multidimensional families that will provide the next fillip toward market viability of the perovskite solar cells. PMID:26262670

  16. Assembly jig assures reliable solar cell modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofarrell, H. O.

    1966-01-01

    Assembly jig holds the components for a solar cell module in place as the assembly is soldered and bonded by the even heat of an oven. The jig is designed to the configuration of the planned module. It eliminates uneven thermal conditions caused by hand soldering methods.

  17. Screening Mechanically-Defective Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Leipold, M. H.

    1987-01-01

    Flexure test eliminates failure-prone wafers before further processing. Probability of cracking of silicon solar cells substantially reduced by mechanical proof testing of silicon wafers before further processing, according to report. Report based on study demonstrating weak wafers eliminated by subjecting all wafers in manufacturing batch to biaxial-flexure test.

  18. Glasses for Solar-Cell Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.

    1982-01-01

    Report presents data on glass for encapsulation of solar-cell arrays, with special emphasis on materials and processes for automated high-volume production of low-cost arrays. Commercial suppliers of glass are listed. Factors that affect the cost of glass are examined: type (sheet, float, or plate), formulation, and energy consumed in manufacturing.

  19. A Photoelectrochemical Solar Cell: An Undergraduate Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreau, Sharon M.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Preparation and testing of a cadmium selenide photoelectrical solar cell was introduced into an environmental chemistry course to illustrate solid state semiconductor and electrochemical principles. Background information, procedures, and results are provided for the experiment which can be accomplished in a three- to four-hour laboratory session…

  20. EE580 Solar Cells Todd J. Kaiser

    E-print Network

    Kaiser, Todd J.

    orientation · Si crystal inevitably contains oxygen impurities dissolved from the quartz crucible holding: Solar Cells Types of Crystalline Silicon · Carefully made Silicon forms crystals. Different levels of crystal structure may exist ranging from single crystal to totally non-crystalline ­ Single crystal

  1. High efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sah, C. Tang

    1986-01-01

    A review of the entire research program since its inception ten years ago is given. The initial effort focused on the effects of impurities on the efficiency of silicon solar cells to provide figures of maximum allowable impurity density for efficiencies up to about 16 to 17%. Highly accurate experimental techniques were extended to characterize the recombination properties of the residual imputities in the silicon solar cell. A numerical simulator of the solar cell was also developed, using the Circuit Technique for Semiconductor Analysis. Recent effort focused on the delineation of the material and device parameters which limited the silicon efficiency to below 20% and on an investigation of cell designs to break the 20% barrier. Designs of the cell device structure and geometry can further reduce recombination losses as well as the sensitivity and criticalness of the fabrication technology required to exceed 20%. Further research is needed on the fundamental characterization of the carrier recombination properties at the chemical impurity and physical defect centers. It is shown that only single crystalline silicon cell technology can be successful in attaining efficiencies greater than 20%.

  2. High temperature investigations of crystalline silicon solar cell materials

    E-print Network

    Hudelson, George David Stephen, III

    2009-01-01

    Crystalline silicon solar cells are a promising candidate to provide a sustainable, clean energy source for the future. In order to bring about widespread adoption of solar cells, much work is needed to reduce their cost. ...

  3. Harmful Shunting Mechanisms Found in Silicon Solar Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-05-01

    Scientists developed near-field optical microscopy for imaging electrical breakdown in solar cells and identified critical electrical breakdown mechanisms operating in industrial silicon and epitaxial silicon solar cells.

  4. Interface and composition analysis on perovskite solar cells

    E-print Network

    Matteocci, Fabio; Busby, Yan; Pireaux, Jean-Jaques; Divitini, Giorgio; Cacovich, Stefania; Ducati, Caterina; di Carlo, Aldo

    2015-11-02

    Organometal halide (hybrid) perovskite solar cells have been fabricated following four different deposition procedures and investigated in order to find correlations between the solar cell characteristics/performance and their structure...

  5. Accelerated/abbreviated test methods for predicting life of solar cell encapsulants to Jet Propulsion Laboratory California Institute of Technology for the encapsulation task of the low-cost solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolyer, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    An important principle is that encapsulants should be tested in a total array system allowing realistic interaction of components. Therefore, micromodule test specimens were fabricated with a variety of encapsulants, substrates, and types of circuitry. One common failure mode was corrosion of circuitry and solar cell metallization due to moisture penetration. Another was darkening and/or opacification of encapsulant. A test program plan was proposed. It includes multicondition accelerated exposure. Another method was hyperaccelerated photochemical exposure using a solar concentrator. It simulates 20 year of sunlight exposure in a short period of one to two weeks. The study was beneficial in identifying some cost effective encapsulants and array designs.

  6. Nanocluster production for solar cell applications

    SciTech Connect

    Al Dosari, Haila M.; Ayesh, Ahmad I.

    2013-08-07

    This research focuses on the fabrication and characterization of silver (Ag) and silicon (Si) nanoclusters that might be used for solar cell applications. Silver and silicon nanoclusters have been synthesized by means of dc magnetron sputtering and inert gas condensation inside an ultra-high vacuum compatible system. We have found that nanocluster size distributions can be tuned by various source parameters, such as the sputtering discharge power, flow rate of argon inert gas, and aggregation length. Quadrupole mass filter and transmission electron microscopy were used to evaluate the size distribution of Ag and Si nanoclusters. Ag nanoclusters with average size in the range of 3.6–8.3 nm were synthesized (herein size refers to the nanocluster diameter), whereas Si nanoclusters' average size was controlled to range between 2.9 and 7.4 nm by controlling the source parameters. This work illustrates the ability of controlling the Si and Ag nanoclusters' sizes by proper optimization of the operation conditions. By controlling nanoclusters' sizes, one can alter their surface properties to suit the need to enhance solar cell efficiency. Herein, Ag nanoclusters were deposited on commercial polycrystalline solar cells. Short circuit current (I{sub SC}), open circuit voltage (V{sub OC}), fill factor, and efficiency (?) were obtained under light source with an intensity of 30 mW/cm{sup 2}. A 22.7% enhancement in solar cell efficiency could be measured after deposition of Ag nanoclusters, which demonstrates that Ag nanoclusters generated in this work are useful to enhance solar cell efficiency.

  7. Gallium Arsenide solar cell radiation damage experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, R. H.; Kinnison, J. D.; Herbert, G. A.; Meulenberg, A.

    1991-01-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cells for space applications from three different manufactures were irradiated with 10 MeV protons or 1 MeV electrons. The electrical performance of the cells was measured at several fluence levels and compared. Silicon cells were included for reference and comparison. All the GaAs cell types performed similarly throughout the testing and showed a 36 to 56 percent power areal density advantage over the silicon cells. Thinner (8-mil versus 12-mil) GaAs cells provide a significant weight reduction. The use of germanium (Ge) substrates to improve mechanical integrity can be implemented with little impact on end of life performance in a radiation environment.

  8. Multi-Exciton Generation in Nanostructured Solar Cells

    E-print Network

    Multi-Exciton Generation in Nanostructured Solar Cells 1 G.T. Zimanyi UC Davis The energy is challenging, philosophically satisfying and fun #12;Multi-Exciton Generation in Nanostructured Solar Cells 2. Science: - GaAs: Alta Devices: 28% lab, 23.5% NREL verified - Organic solar cells: Sumitomo 10

  9. Dielectric nanostructures for broadband light trapping in organic solar cells

    E-print Network

    Fan, Shanhui

    Dielectric nanostructures for broadband light trapping in organic solar cells Aaswath Raman, Zongfu@stanford.edu Abstract: Organic bulk heterojunction solar cells are a promising candidate for low-cost next lying on top of the organic solar cell stack produce a 8-15% increase in photocurrent for a model

  10. Flexible thermal cycle test equipment for concentrator solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Hebert, Peter H. (Glendale, CA); Brandt, Randolph J. (Palmdale, CA)

    2012-06-19

    A system and method for performing thermal stress testing of photovoltaic solar cells is presented. The system and method allows rapid testing of photovoltaic solar cells under controllable thermal conditions. The system and method presents a means of rapidly applying thermal stresses to one or more photovoltaic solar cells in a consistent and repeatable manner.

  11. Back-contacted back-junction silicon solar cells

    E-print Network

    Johansen, Tom Henning

    Back-contacted back-junction silicon solar cells Krister Mangersnes THESIS submitted in partial of making high-efficiency back-contacted back-junction silicon solar cells. Though a bit disappointing, we Conventional silicon solar cells have a front-side contacted emitter. Back-contacted back-junction (BC

  12. Solar cell radiation handbook. Addendum 1: 1982-1988

    SciTech Connect

    Anspaugh, B.E.

    1989-02-01

    The Solar Cell Radiation Handbook (JPL Publication 82-69) is updated. In order to maintain currency of solar cell radiation data, recent solar cell designs have been acquired, irradiated with 1 MeV electrons, and measured. The results of these radiation experiments are reported.

  13. Solar cell radiation handbook. Addendum 1: 1982-1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, Bruce E.

    1989-01-01

    The Solar Cell Radiation Handbook (JPL Publication 82-69) is updated. In order to maintain currency of solar cell radiation data, recent solar cell designs have been acquired, irradiated with 1 MeV electrons, and measured. The results of these radiation experiments are reported.

  14. Strongly Correlated Electron Systems Functionalized for Solar Cells and Memristors

    E-print Network

    . Correlated impurities + Coulomb interaction 2. Multiple scattering theory 3. Plasmon-enhanced solar cells 4 · one exciton per photon · relaxation to band edge multiple junctions multiple gaps multiple electrons in Nanoparticle Solar Cells 6 Max efficiency for Solar Cells with Multiple Exciton Generation (MEG): 44% 1

  15. Hybrid Silicon Nanocone-Polymer Solar Cells Sangmoo Jeong,

    E-print Network

    Fan, Shanhui

    with enhanced light absorption resulted in a power conversion efficiency above 11%. Based on our simulation solar cell.1 Conventional Si solar cells have p-n junctions inside for an efficient extraction of lightHybrid Silicon Nanocone-Polymer Solar Cells Sangmoo Jeong, Erik C. Garnett, Shuang Wang, Zongfu Yu

  16. EELE408 Photovoltaics Lecture 16: Silicon Solar Cell Fabrication Techniques

    E-print Network

    Kaiser, Todd J.

    by Efficiency 22 Rear Panel before Lamination 23 Buried Contact Solar Cells · High Efficiency · Laser groved1 EELE408 Photovoltaics Lecture 16: Silicon Solar Cell Fabrication Techniques Dr. Todd J. Kaiser - Bozeman Screen Printed Solar Cells · Starting wafer is about 0.5 mm thick and 10 x 10 cm2. The wafer is p

  17. Cu(In,Ga)Se2 and Related Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Uwe; Schock, Hans W.

    2015-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Material properties * Cell and module technology * Device physics * Wide-gap chalcopyrites * Kesterite (CZTS) solar cells * Conclusions * References

  18. The emergence of perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Martin A.; Ho-Baillie, Anita; Snaith, Henry J.

    2014-07-01

    The past two years have seen the unprecedentedly rapid emergence of a new class of solar cell based on mixed organic-inorganic halide perovskites. Although the first efficient solid-state perovskite cells were reported only in mid-2012, extremely rapid progress was made during 2013 with energy conversion efficiencies reaching a confirmed 16.2% at the end of the year. This increased to a confirmed efficiency of 17.9% in early 2014, with unconfirmed values as high as 19.3% claimed. Moreover, a broad range of different fabrication approaches and device concepts is represented among the highest performing devices -- this diversity suggests that performance is still far from fully optimized. This Review briefly outlines notable achievements to date, describes the unique attributes of these perovskites leading to their rapid emergence and discusses challenges facing the successful development and commercialization of perovskite solar cells.

  19. Development of integral covers on solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, P.; Somberg, H.

    1971-01-01

    The electron-beam technique for evaporating a dielectric material onto solar cells is investigated. A process has been developed which will provide a highly transparent, low stress, 2 mil thick cover capable of withstanding conventional space type qualification tests including humidity, thermal shock, and thermal cycling. The covers have demonstrated the ability to withstand 10 to the 15th power 1 MeV electrons and UV irradiation with minor darkening. Investigation of the cell AR coating has produced a space qualifiable titanium oxide coating which will give an additional 6% current output over similar silicon oxide coated cells when covered by glass.

  20. Accelerated stress testing of terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, J. L.; Lathrop, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    A program to investigate the reliability characteristics of unencapsulated low-cost terrestrial solar cells using accelerated stress testing is described. Reliability (or parametric degradation) factors appropriate to the cell technologies and use conditions were studied and a series of accelerated stress tests was synthesized. An electrical measurement procedure and a data analysis and management system was derived, and stress test fixturing and material flow procedures were set up after consideration was given to the number of cells to be stress tested and measured and the nature of the information to be obtained from the process. Selected results and conclusions are presented.

  1. Hypervelocity Impact Studies on Solar Cell Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.; Best, Stevie R.

    2001-01-01

    Space environmental effects have caused severe problems as satellites move toward increased power and operating voltage levels. The greatest unknown, however, is the effect of high velocity micrometeoroid impacts on high voltage arrays (>200V). Understanding such impact phenomena is necessary for the design of future reliable, high voltage solar arrays, especially for Space Solar Power applications. Therefore, the objective of this work was to study the effect of hypervelocity impacts on high voltage solar arrays. Initially, state of the art, 18% efficient GaAs solar cell strings were targeted. The maximum bias voltage on a two-cell string was -200 V while the adjacent string was held at -140 V relative to the plasma potential. A hollow cathode device provided the plasma. Soda lime glass particles 40-120 micrometers in diameter were accelerated in the Hypervelocity Impact Facility to velocities as high as 11.6 km/sec. Coordinates and velocity were obtained for each of the approximately 40 particle impact sites on each shot. Arcing did occur, and both discharging and recharging of arcs between the two strings was observed. The recharging phenomena appeared to stop at approximately 66V string differential. No arcing was observed at 400 V on concentrator cell modules for the Stretched Lens Array.

  2. Enhancing Solar Cell Efficiencies through 1-D Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The current global energy problem can be attributed to insufficient fossil fuel supplies and excessive greenhouse gas emissions resulting from increasing fossil fuel consumption. The huge demand for clean energy potentially can be met by solar-to-electricity conversions. The large-scale use of solar energy is not occurring due to the high cost and inadequate efficiencies of existing solar cells. Nanostructured materials have offered new opportunities to design more efficient solar cells, particularly one-dimensional (1-D) nanomaterials for enhancing solar cell efficiencies. These 1-D nanostructures, including nanotubes, nanowires, and nanorods, offer significant opportunities to improve efficiencies of solar cells by facilitating photon absorption, electron transport, and electron collection; however, tremendous challenges must be conquered before the large-scale commercialization of such cells. This review specifically focuses on the use of 1-D nanostructures for enhancing solar cell efficiencies. Other nanostructured solar cells or solar cells based on bulk materials are not covered in this review. Major topics addressed include dye-sensitized solar cells, quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells, and p-n junction solar cells.

  3. Solar Airplanes and Regenerative Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, David J.

    2007-01-01

    A solar electric aircraft with the potential to "fly forever" has captured NASA's interest, and the concept for such an aircraft was pursued under Aeronautics Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Feasibility of this aircraft happens to depend on the successful development of solar power technologies critical to NASA's Exploration Initiatives; hence, there was widespread interest throughout NASA to bring these technologies to a flight demonstration. The most critical is an energy storage system to sustain mission power during night periods. For the solar airplane, whose flight capability is already limited by the diffuse nature of solar flux and subject to latitude and time of year constraints, the feasibility of long endurance flight depends on a storage density figure of merit better than 400-600 watt-hr per kilogram. This figure of merit is beyond the capability of present day storage technologies (other than nuclear) but may be achievable in the hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell (RFC). This potential has led NASA to undertake the practical development of a hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell, initially as solar energy storage for a high altitude UAV science platform but eventually to serve as the primary power source for NASAs lunar base and other planet surface installations. Potentially the highest storage capacity and lowest weight of any non-nuclear device, a flight-weight RFC aboard a solar-electric aircraft that is flown continuously through several successive day-night cycles will provide the most convincing demonstration that this technology's widespread potential has been realized. In 1998 NASA began development of a closed cycle hydrogen oxygen PEM RFC under the Aeronautics Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project and continued its development, originally for a solar electric airplane flight, through FY2005 under the Low Emissions Alternative Power (LEAP) project. Construction of the closed loop system began in 2002 at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. System checkout was completed, and testing began, in July of 2003. The initial test sequences were done with only a fuel cell or electrolyzer in the test rig. Those tests were used to verify the test apparatus, procedures, and software. The first complete cycles of the fully closed loop, regenerative fuel cell system were successfully completed in the following September. Following some hardware upgrades to increase reactant recirculation flow, the test rig was operated at full power in December 2003 and again in January 2004. In March 2004 a newer generation of fuel cell and electrolyzer stacks was substituted for the original hardware and these stacks were successfully tested at full power under cyclic operation in June of 2004.

  4. Deng & Schiff, Amorphous Silicon Based Solar Cells rev. 7/30/2002, Page 1 Amorphous Silicon Based Solar Cells

    E-print Network

    Deng, Xunming

    Deng & Schiff, Amorphous Silicon Based Solar Cells rev. 7/30/2002, Page 1 Amorphous Silicon Based Solar Cells Xunming Deng and Eric A. Schiff Table of Contents 1 Overview 3 1.1 Amorphous Silicon: The First Bipolar Amorphous Semiconductor 3 1.2 Designs for Amorphous Silicon Solar Cells: A Guided Tour 6

  5. Laser synthesized super-hydrophobic conducting carbon with broccoli-type morphology as a counter-electrode for dye sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokhale, Rohan; Agarkar, Shruti; Debgupta, Joyashish; Shinde, Deodatta; Lefez, Benoit; Banerjee, Abhik; Jog, Jyoti; More, Mahendra; Hannoyer, Beatrice; Ogale, Satishchandra

    2012-10-01

    A laser photochemical process is introduced to realize superhydrophobic conducting carbon coatings with broccoli-type hierarchical morphology for use as a metal-free counter electrode in a dye sensitized solar cell. The process involves pulsed excimer laser irradiation of a thin layer of liquid haloaromatic organic solvent o-dichlorobenzene (DCB). The coating reflects a carbon nanoparticle-self assembled and process-controlled morphology that yields solar to electric power conversion efficiency of 5.1% as opposed to 6.2% obtained with the conventional Pt-based electrode.A laser photochemical process is introduced to realize superhydrophobic conducting carbon coatings with broccoli-type hierarchical morphology for use as a metal-free counter electrode in a dye sensitized solar cell. The process involves pulsed excimer laser irradiation of a thin layer of liquid haloaromatic organic solvent o-dichlorobenzene (DCB). The coating reflects a carbon nanoparticle-self assembled and process-controlled morphology that yields solar to electric power conversion efficiency of 5.1% as opposed to 6.2% obtained with the conventional Pt-based electrode. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials and equipment details, solar cell fabrication protocol, electrolyte spreading time measurement details, XPS spectra, electronic study, film adhesion test detailed analysis and field emission results. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr32082g

  6. Semi-transparent inverted organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, H.; Winkler, T.; Tilgner, M.; Flügge, H.; Schmale, S.; Bülow, T.; Meyer, J.; Johannes, H.-H.; Riedl, T.; Kowalsky, W.

    2009-08-01

    We will present efficient semi-transparent bulk-heterojunction [regioregular of poly(3-hexylthiophene): (6,6)-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester] solar cells with an inverted device architecture. Highly transparent ZnO and TiO2 films prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition are used as cathode interlayers on top of ITO. The topanode consists of a RF-sputtered ITO layer. To avoid damage due to the plasma deposition of this layer, a sputtering buffer layer of MoO3 is used as protection. This concept allows for devices with a transmissivity higher than 60 % for wavelengths 650 nm. The thickness of the MoO3 buffer has been varied in order to study its effect on the electrical properties of the solar cell and its ability to prevent possible damage to the organic active layers upon ITO deposition. Without this buffer or for thin buffers it has been found that device performance is very poor concerning the leakage current, the fill factor, the short circuit current and the power conversion efficiencies. As a reference inverted solar cells with a metal electrode (Al) instead of the ITO-top contact are used. The variation between the PCE of top versus conventional illumination of the semi-transparent cells was also examined and will be interpreted in view of the results of the optical simulation of the dielectric device stack with and without reflection top electrode. Power conversion efficiencies of 2-3 % for the opaque inverted solar cells and 1.5-2.5 % for the semi-transparent devices were obtained under an AM1.5G illumination.

  7. Gallium arsenide solar cell radiation damage study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, R. H.; Herbert, G. A.; Kinnison, J. D.; Meulenberg, A.

    1989-01-01

    A thorough analysis has been made of electron- and proton- damaged GaAs solar cells suitable for use in space. It is found that, although some electrical parametric data and spectral response data are quite similar, the type of damage due to the two types of radiation is different. An I-V analysis model shows that electrons damage the bulk of the cell and its currents relatively more, while protons damage the junction of the cell and its voltages more. It is suggested that multiple defects due to protons in a strong field region such as a p/n junction cause the greater degradation in cell voltage, whereas the individual point defects in the quasi-neutral minority-carrier-diffusion regions due to electrons cause the greater degradation in cell current and spectral response.

  8. A light-trapping solar cell coverglass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1990-01-01

    A novel method of reducing surface reflectivity which eliminates the need to texturize the surface of the cell is presented. A double light pass is achieved by using a light-trapping coverglass which redirects reflected light back to the cell surface by total internal reflection. This technique allows low-reflectance surfaces to be used on planar solar cells, including GaAs and InP, with the benefit of increasing the possible short-circuit current (and hence the efficiency) by 6 to 10 percent with no additional steps added to the cell manufacturing process. The coverglass design also has applications to reduction of grid shadowing and to light trapping within the cell.

  9. Solar cell array panel and method of manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, A. F.; Alsbach, W. G.

    1985-09-17

    An integral lightweight solar cell panel containing a plurality of interconnected solar cells bonded to a fiber-reinforced polyimide film made from an isoimide-containing precursor. The solar cells can be placed on the reinforced polyimide film while the film is in a partially cured condition and the cells become bonded to the film upon completion of the cure. A transparent polymeric film, such as a polyimide, can be used as protective means for the front surfaces of the cells.

  10. Development of standardized specifications for silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott-Monck, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    A space silicon solar cell assembly (cell and coverglass) specification aimed at standardizing the diverse requirements of current cell or assembly specifications was developed. This specification was designed to minimize both the procurement and manufacturing costs for space qualified silicon solar cell assembilies. In addition, an impact analysis estimating the technological and economic effects of employing a standardized space silicon solar cell assembly was performed.

  11. New technology developments of solar cell fabrication by NEDO

    SciTech Connect

    Katsumata, Hiroshi; Ihara, Takuro; Tatekura, Fujio

    1994-12-31

    The development of solar cell fabrication technologies is being conducted in the 1993--96 segment of the ``New Sunshine Program.`` To date, a conversion efficiency of above 20% has been obtained with solar cells using III-V-group compound semiconductors and single crystal silicon. Challenging R and D is under way on solar cells using amorphous silicon, polycrystalline silicon, and compound thin film, designed to lower solar cell production costs. This paper describes the goals, content, and present situations of development with these solar cell fabrication technologies.

  12. Device Physics of Nanoscale Interdigitated Solar Cells (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, W.; Levi, D.

    2008-05-01

    Nanoscale interdigitated solar cell device architectures are being investigated for organic and inorganic solar cell devices. Due to the inherent complexity of these device designs quantitative modeling is needed to understand the device physics. Theoretical concepts have been proposed that nanodomains of different phases may form in polycrystalline CIGS solar cells. These theories propose that the nanodomains may form complex 3D intertwined p-n networks that enhance device performance.Recent experimental evidence offers some support for the existence of nanodomains in CIGS thin films. This study utilizes CIGS solar cells to examine general and CIGS-specific concepts in nanoscale interdigitated solar cells.

  13. Recent advances in sensitized mesoscopic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Grätzel, Michael

    2009-11-17

    Perhaps the largest challenge for our global society is to find ways to replace the slowly but inevitably vanishing fossil fuel supplies by renewable resources and, at the same time, avoid negative effects from the current energy system on climate, environment, and health. The quality of human life to a large degree depends upon the availability of clean energy sources. The worldwide power consumption is expected to double in the next 3 decades because of the increase in world population and the rising demand of energy in the developing countries. This implies enhanced depletion of fossil fuel reserves, leading to further aggravation of the environmental pollution. As a consequence of dwindling resources, a huge power supply gap of 14 terawatts is expected to open up by year 2050 equaling today's entire consumption, thus threatening to create a planetary emergency of gigantic dimensions. Solar energy is expected to play a crucial role as a future energy source. The sun provides about 120,000 terawatts to the earth's surface, which amounts to 6000 times the present rate of the world's energy consumption. However, capturing solar energy and converting it to electricity or chemical fuels, such as hydrogen, at low cost and using abundantly available raw materials remains a huge challenge. Chemistry is expected to make pivotal contributions to identify environmentally friendly solutions to this energy problem. One area of great promise is that of solar converters generally referred to as "organic photovoltaic cells" (OPV) that employ organic constituents for light harvesting or charge carrier transport. While this field is still in its infancy, it is receiving enormous research attention, with the number of publications growing exponentially over the past decade. The advantage of this new generation of solar cells is that they can be produced at low cost, i.e., potentially less than 1 U.S. $/peak watt. Some but not all OPV embodiments can avoid the expensive and energy-intensive high vacuum and materials purification steps that are currently employed in the fabrication of all other thin-film solar cells. Organic materials are abundantly available, so that the technology can be scaled up to the terawatt scale without running into feedstock supply problems. This gives organic-based solar cells an advantage over the two major competing thin-film photovoltaic devices, i.e., CdTe and CuIn(As)Se, which use highly toxic materials of low natural abundance. However, a drawback of the current embodiment of OPV cells is that their efficiency is significantly lower than that for single and multicrystalline silicon as well as CdTe and CuIn(As)Se cells. Also, polymer-based OPV cells are very sensitive to water and oxygen and, hence, need to be carefully sealed to avoid rapid degradation. The research discussed within the framework of this Account aims at identifying and providing solutions to the efficiency problems that the OPV field is still facing. The discussion focuses on mesoscopic solar cells, in particular, dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs), which have been developed in our laboratory and remain the focus of our investigations. The efficiency problem is being tackled using molecular science and nanotechnology. The sensitizer constitutes the heart of the DSC, using sunlight to pump electrons from a lower to a higher energy level, generating in this fashion an electric potential difference, which can exploited to produce electric work. Currently, there is a quest for sensitizers that achieve effective harnessing of the red and near-IR part of sunlight, converting these photons to electricity better than the currently used generation of dyes. Progress in this area has been significant over the past few years, resulting in a boost in the conversion efficiency of the DSC that will be reviewed. PMID:19715294

  14. Spin dependent photocurrents in ribbon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Seager, C.H.; Venturini, E.L.; Schubert, W.K.

    1992-11-01

    Spin Dependent Transport (SDT) is a method of identifying recombination centers which employs a microwave resonance condition to affect the recombination rate of minority carriers in a device. When this technique is used to analyze the diffusion-limited currents produced by long-wavelength optical excitation, it has the potential to chemically identify the major recombination sites in solar cells. We have used this resonance technique to analyze short circuit photocurrents in Edge-defined film-Fed Growth (EFG) ribbon silicon solar cells. At room temperature, our observed photocurrent resonances have zero-crossing g values and linewidths which are similar to SDT observations made on the trans-barrier currents in silicon bicrystals, and electron spin resonance signals seen in damaged silicon, and polycrystalline silicon. These dangling-bond-like SDT signals depend on cell illumination levels in a way that suggests that the values of recombination velocity at electrically active linear boundaries decrease with illumination intensity. Hydrogen processed cells show markedly smaller SDT response, consistent with the passivation of Si dangling bond defects. While most of our SDT observations have been made on n{sup +}/p EFG cells, we suggest that measurements made at low temperatures on other cell structures might uncover resonances due to other recombination centers in this material.

  15. New high-efficiency silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Crotty, G. T.

    1985-01-01

    A design for silicon solar cells was investigated as an approach to increasing the cell open-circuit voltage and efficiency for flat-plate terrestrial photovoltaic applications. This deviates from past designs, where either the entire front surface of the cell is covered by a planar junction or the surface is textured before junction formation, which results in an even greater (up to 70%) junction area. The heavily doped front region and the junction space charge region are potential areas of high recombination for generated and injected minority carriers. The design presented reduces junction area by spreading equidiameter dot junctions across the surface of the cell, spaced about a diffusion length or less from each other. Various dot diameters and spacings allowed variations in total junction area. A simplified analysis was done to obtain a first-order design optimization. Efficiencies of up to 19% can be obtained. Cell fabrication involved extra masking steps for selective junction diffusion, and made surface passivation a key element in obtaining good collection. It also involved photolithography, with line widths down to microns. A method is demonstrated for achieving potentially high open-circuit voltages and solar-cell efficiencies.

  16. Highly efficient light management for perovskite solar cells

    E-print Network

    Wang, Dong-Lin; Hou, Guo-Jiao; Zhu, Zhen-Gang; Yan, Qing-Bo; Su, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Organic-inorganic halide perovskite solar cells have enormous potential to impact the existing photovoltaic industry. As realizing a higher conversion efficiency of the solar cell is still the most crucial task, a great number of schemes were proposed to minimize the carrier loss by optimizing the electrical properties of the perovskite solar cells. Here, we focus on another significant aspect that is to minimize the light loss by optimizing the light management to gain a high efficiency for perovskite solar cells. In our scheme, the slotted and inverted prism structured SiO2 layers are adopted to trap more light into the solar cells, and a better transparent conducting oxide layer is employed to reduce the parasitic absorption. For such an implementation, the efficiency and the serviceable angle of the perovskite solar cell can be promoted impressively. This proposal would shed new light on developing the high-performance perovskite solar cells.

  17. Review on the application of nanostructure materials in solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshar, Elham N.; Xosrovashvili, Georgi; Rouhi, Rasoul; Gorji, Nima E.

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, nanostructure materials have opened a promising route to future of the renewable sources, especially in the solar cells. This paper considers the advantages of nanostructure materials in improving the performance and stability of the solar cell structures. These structures have been employed for various performance/energy conversion enhancement strategies. Here, we have investigated four types of nanostructures applied in solar cells, where all of them are named as quantum solar cells. We have also discussed recent development of quantum dot nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes enabling quantum solar cells to be competitive with the conventional solar cells. Furthermore, the advantages, disadvantages and industrializing challenges of nanostructured solar cells have been investigated.

  18. Highly efficient light management for perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong-Lin; Cui, Hui-Juan; Hou, Guo-Jiao; Zhu, Zhen-Gang; Yan, Qing-Bo; Su, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Organic-inorganic halide perovskite solar cells have enormous potential to impact the existing photovoltaic industry. As realizing a higher conversion efficiency of the solar cell is still the most crucial task, a great number of schemes were proposed to minimize the carrier loss by optimizing the electrical properties of the perovskite solar cells. Here, we focus on another significant aspect that is to minimize the light loss by optimizing the light management to gain a high efficiency for perovskite solar cells. In our scheme, the slotted and inverted prism structured SiO2 layers are adopted to trap more light into the solar cells, and a better transparent conducting oxide layer is employed to reduce the parasitic absorption. For such an implementation, the efficiency and the serviceable angle of the perovskite solar cell can be promoted impressively. This proposal would shed new light on developing the high-performance perovskite solar cells. PMID:26733112

  19. Compensated amorphous-silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Devaud, G.

    1982-06-21

    An amorphous silicon solar cell including an electrically conductive substrate, a layer of glow discharge deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon having regions of differing conductivity with at least one region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has opposed first and second major surfaces where the first major surface contacts the elecrically conductive substrate and an electrode for electrically contacting the second major surface. The intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon region is deposited in a glow discharge with an atmosphere which includes not less than about 0.02 atom percent mono-atomic boron. An improved N.I.P. solar cell is disclosed using a BF/sub 3/ doped intrinsic layer.

  20. Advanced Solar Cell Testing and Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila; Curtis, Henry; Piszczor, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The topic for this workshop stems from an ongoing effort by the photovoltaic community and U.S. government to address issues and recent problems associated with solar cells and arrays experienced by a number of different space systems. In April 2003, a workshop session was held at the Aerospace Space Power Workshop to discuss an effort by the Air Force to update and standardize solar cell and array qualification test procedures in an effort to ameliorate some of these problems. The organizers of that workshop session thought it was important to continue these discussions and present this information to the entire photovoltaic community. Thus, it was decided to include this topic as a workshop at the following SPRAT conference.

  1. Development of GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Solar cells and mesa diodes were fabricated by the implantation of zinc or beryllium ions into n-type gallium arsenide. Annealing temperatures above 750 C (zinc) or 650 C (beryllium) were found to produce 50% to 100% activation of the implanted ions. Junction depths of about 0.4 micron were produced by 600 keV zinc implants or 70 keV beryllium implants. P-layer sheet resistance was about 150 ohms for 2 x 10 to the 15th power cm/2 zinc or 1 x 10 to the 15th power cm/2 beryllium implants. This is sufficiently low for efficient solar cell fabrication. Contacting procedures were improved to yield reproducibly adherent, low resistance front and back contacts.

  2. Nanostructured upconverters for improved solar cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacQueen, Rowan W.; Schulze, Tim F.; Khoury, Tony; Cheng, Yuen Yap; Stannowski, Bernd; Lips, Klaus; Crossley, Maxwel J.; Schmidt, Timothy

    2013-09-01

    Triplet-triplet annihilation photon upconversion (TTA-UC) is a promising candidate for mitigating sub-band gap absorption losses in solar cells. In TTA-UC, sensitiser dyes absorb sub-band gap photons, cross to a triplet state, and transfer triplet excitons to emitter dyes. Two triplet-excited emitters can undergo TTA, raising one emitter to a higher-energy bright singlet state. The quadratic efficiency of TTA-UC at device-relevant light intensities motivates a push towards the higher chromophore densities achievable in the solid phase. We have begun this process by tethering tetrakisquinoxalino palladium porphyrin to 20nm silica nanoparticles using peptide chemistry techniques, achieving a total-volume concentration of 1.5mM. The phosphorescence kinetics of the tethered porphyrins was measured to quantify quenching by rubrene emitter. Upconverter performance was measured in a solar cell enhancement experiment.

  3. Absorption characteristics of intermediate band solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomi?, S.; Harrison, N. M.; Jones, T. S.

    2010-01-01

    Intermediate band solar cells (IBSC) have emerged as an alternative design for solar cells that can dramatically increase power conversion efficiency. Here, it is demonstrated that a k.p multiband theory with periodic boundary conditions can easily be applied to predict electronic and absorption characteristics of the semiconductor QD arrays that produces a mini-band (IB) that is located in the forbidden energy gap of the QD material and is separated from valence and conduction band of the barrier material. Analysis of the electronic and absorption structure suggest that the most promising design for an IB material that will exhibit its own quasi-Fermi level is to employ small QDs (˜6-10 nm QD lateral size) arranged in a periodic array. Using bigger (>20 nm QD lateral size) QDs leads to extension of the absorption spectra into a longer wavelength region but does not provide a separate IB in the forbidden energy gap.

  4. Dip-Coating Fabrication of Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koepke, B.; Suave, D.

    1982-01-01

    Inexpensive silicon solar cells made by simple dip technique. Cooling shoes direct flow of helium on graphite-coated ceramic substrate to solidify film of liquid silicon on graphite surface as substrate is withdrawn from molten silicon. After heaters control cooling of film and substrate to prevent cracking. Gas jets exit at points about 10 mm from substrate surfaces and 6 to 10 mm above melt surface.

  5. Microcrystalline organic thin-film solar cells.

    PubMed

    Verreet, Bregt; Heremans, Paul; Stesmans, Andre; Rand, Barry P

    2013-10-11

    Microcrystalline organic films with tunable thickness are produced directly on an indium-tin-oxide substrate, by crystallizing a thin amorphous rubrene film followed by its use as a template for subsequent homoepitaxial growth. These films, with exciton diffusion lengths exceeding 200 nm, produce solar cells with increasing photocurrents at thicknesses up to 400 nm with a fill factor >65%, demonstrating significant potential for microcrystalline organic electronic devices. PMID:23939936

  6. The photophysics of perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sum, Tze Chien

    2014-09-01

    Solution-processed hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite solar cells, a newcomer to the photovoltaic arena, have taken the field by storm with their extraordinary power conversion efficiencies exceeding 17%. In this paper, the photophysics and the latest findings on the carrier dynamics and charge transfer mechanisms in this new class of photovoltaic material will be examined and distilled. Some open photophysics questions will also be discussed.

  7. High efficiency silicon solar cell review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godlewski, M. P. (editor)

    1975-01-01

    An overview is presented of the current research and development efforts to improve the performance of the silicon solar cell. The 24 papers presented reviewed experimental and analytic modeling work which emphasizes the improvment of conversion efficiency and the reduction of manufacturing costs. A summary is given of the round-table discussion, in which the near- and far-term directions of future efficiency improvements were discussed.

  8. V-grooved silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baraona, C. R.; Brandhorst, H. W.

    1975-01-01

    Silicon solar cells with macroscopic V-shaped grooves and microscopically texturized surfaces have been made by preferential etching techniques. Various conditions for potassium hydroxide and hydrazine hydrate etching were investigated. Optical reflection losses from these surface were reduced. The reduced reflection occurred at all wavelengths and resulted in improved short circuit current and spectral response. Improved collection efficiency is also expected from this structure due to generation of carriers closer to the cell junction. Microscopic point measurements of collected current using a scanning electron microscope showed that current collected at the peaks of the texturized surface were only 80% of those collected in the valleys.

  9. V-grooved silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baraona, C. R.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Silicon solar cells with macroscopic V-shaped grooves and microscopically texturized surfaces were made by preferential etching techniques. Various conditions for potassium hydroxide and hydrazine hydrate etching were investigated. Optical reflection losses from these surface were reduced. The reduced reflection occurred at all wavelengths and resulted in improved short circuit current and spectral response. Improved collection efficiency is also expected from this structure due to generation of carriers closer to the cell junction. Microscopic point measurements of collected current using a scanning electron microscope showed that current collected at the peaks of the texturized surface were only 80 percent of those collected in the valleys.

  10. Inversion layer solar cell fabrication and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Call, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Inversion layer solar cells have been fabricated by etching through the diffused layer on p-type silicon wafers in a comb-like contact pattern. The charge separation comes from an induced p-n junction at the surface. This inverted surface is caused by a layer of transparent material applied to the surface that either contains free positive ions or that creates donor states at the interface. Cells have increased from 3 ma Isc to 100 ma by application of sodium silicate. The action is unstable, however, and decays with time.

  11. Epitaxial solar-cell fabrication, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daiello, R. V.; Robinson, P. H.; Kressel, H.

    1977-01-01

    Dichlorosilane (SiH2Cl2) was used as the silicon source material in all of the epitaxial growths. Both n/p/p(+) and p/n/n(+) structures were studied. Correlations were made between the measured profiles and the solar cell parameters, especially cell open-circuit voltage. It was found that in order to obtain consistently high open-circuit voltage, the epitaxial techniques used to grow the surface layer must be altered to obtain very abrupt doping profiles in the vicinity of the junction. With these techniques, it was possible to grow reproducibly both p/n/n(+) and n/p/p(+) solar cell structures having open-circuit voltages in the 610- to 630-mV range, with fill-factors in excess of 0.80 and AM-1 efficiencies of about 13%. Combinations and comparisons of epitaxial and diffused surface layers were also made. Using such surface layers, we found that the blue response of epitaxial cells could be improved, resulting in AM-1 short-circuit current densities of about 30 mA/cm sq. The best cells fabricated in this manner had AM-1 efficiency of 14.1%.

  12. Measurement and Characterization of Concentrator Solar Cells II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheiman, Dave; Sater, Bernard L.; Chubb, Donald; Jenkins, Phillip; Snyder, Dave

    2005-01-01

    Concentrator solar cells are continuing to get more consideration for use in power systems. This interest is because concentrator systems can have a net lower cost per watt in solar cell materials plus ongoing improvements in sun-tracking technology. Quantitatively measuring the efficiency of solar cells under concentration is difficult. Traditionally, the light concentration on solar cells has been determined by using a ratio of the measured solar cell s short circuit current to that at one sun, this assumes that current changes proportionally with light intensity. This works well with low to moderate (<20 suns) concentration levels on "well-behaved" linear cells but does not apply when cells respond superlinearly, current increases faster than intensity, or sublinearly, current increases more slowly than intensity. This paper continues work on using view factors to determine the concentration level and linearity of the solar cell with mathematical view factor analysis and experimental results [1].

  13. AlGaAs top solar cell for mechanical attachment in a multi-junction tandem concentrator solar cell stack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinetta, L. C.; Hannon, M. H.; Mcneely, J. B.; Barnett, A. M.

    1991-01-01

    The AstroPower self-supporting, transparent AlGaAs top solar cell can be stacked upon any well-developed bottom solar cell for improved system performance. This is an approach to improve the performance and scale of space photovoltaic power systems. Mechanically stacked tandem solar cell concentrator systems based on the AlGaAs top concentrator solar cell can provide near term efficiencies of 36 percent (AMO, 100x). Possible tandem stack efficiencies greater than 38 percent (100x, AMO) are feasible with a careful selection of materials. In a three solar cell stack, system efficiencies exceed 41 percent (100x, AMO). These device results demonstrate a practical solution for a state-of-the-art top solar cell for attachment to an existing, well-developed solar cell.

  14. WORKING QUANTUM EFFICIENCY OF CDTE SOLAR CELL Zimeng Cheng

    E-print Network

    WORKING QUANTUM EFFICIENCY OF CDTE SOLAR CELL Zimeng Cheng 1 , Kwok Lo 2 , Jingong Pan 1 , Dongguo Chen 1 , Tao Zhou 2 , Qi Wang 3 , George E. Georgiou 1 , Ken K. Chin 1 1 Apollo CdTe Solar Energy Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO 80401 USA ABSTRACT For p-CdTe/n-CdS solar cell

  15. Folded-Light-Path Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cells

    E-print Network

    Sargent, Edward H. "Ted"

    avenues to overcoming limited electronic transport in these materials. Progress has recently been madeFolded-Light-Path Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cells Ghada I. Koleilat*, Illan J. Kramer*, Chris T-processed solar cells offer the promise of low cost, large-area processing, and, prospectively, high solar power

  16. Defect behavior of polycrystalline solar cell silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Schroder, D.K.; Park, S.H.; Hwang, I.G.; Mohr, J.B.; Hanly, M.P.

    1993-05-01

    The major objective of this study, conducted from October 1988 to September 1991, was to gain an understanding of the behavior of impurities in polycrystalline silicon and the influence of these impurities on solar cell efficiency. The authors studied edge-defined film-fed growth (EFG) and cast poly-Si materials and solar cells. With EFG Si they concentrated on chromium-doped materials and cells to determine the role of Cr on solar cell performance. Cast poly-Si samples were not deliberately contaminated. Samples were characterized by cell efficiency, current-voltage, deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), surface photovoltage (SPV), open-circuit voltage decay, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements. They find that Cr forms Cr-B pairs with boron at room temperature and these pairs dissociate into Cr{sub i}{sup +} and B{sup {minus}} during anneals at 210{degrees}C for 10 min. Following the anneal, Cr-B pairs reform at room temperature with a time constant of 230 h. Chromium forms CrSi{sub 2} precipitates in heavily contaminated regions and they find evidence of CrSi{sub 2} gettering, but a lack of chromium segregation or precipitation to grain boundaries and dislocations. Cr-B pairs have well defined DLTS peaks. However, DLTS spectra of other defects are not well defined, giving broad peaks indicative of defects with a range of energy levels in the band gap. In some high-stress, low-efficiency cast poly-Si they detect SiC precipitates, but not in low-stress, high-efficiency samples. SPV measurements result in nonlinear SPV curves in some materials that are likely due to varying optical absorption coefficients due to locally varying stress in the material.

  17. Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 71 (2002) 261271 Photoelectric behavior of nanocrystalline TiO2

    E-print Network

    Huang, Yanyi

    2002-01-01

    Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 71 (2002) 261­271 Photoelectric behavior of nanocrystalline Ti; received in revised form 18 April 2001; accepted 30 May 2001 Abstract The photoelectric behavior of a black. A sandwich-type solar cell fabricated by this dye-sensitized nanocrystalline TiO2 film generated 6:1 mA cmÀ2

  18. Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 77 (2003) 319330 Structure and photoelectrochemical properties

    E-print Network

    Huang, Yanyi

    2003-01-01

    , and compared its photoelectrical properties as sensitizer in Gr.atzel-type solar cells with that of N3Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 77 (2003) 319­330 Letters Structure and photoelectrochemical Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Photoelectric conversion; Polypyridyl complex; Sensitization

  19. Variation of solar cell sensitivity and solar radiation on tilted surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klucher, T. M.

    1978-01-01

    The validity is studied that one of various insolation models used to compute solar radiation incident on tilted surfaces from global data measured on horizontal surfaces. The variation of solar cell sensitivity to solar radiation is determined over a wide range of atmospheric condition. A new model was formulated that reduced the deviations between measured and predicted insolation to less than 3 percent. Evaluation of solar cell sensitivity data indicates small change (2-3 percent) in sensitivity from winter to summer for tilted cells. The feasibility of using such global data as a means for calibrating terrestrial solar cells is discussed.

  20. A PHOTOCHEMICAL BOX MODEL FOR URBAN AIR QUALITY SIMULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple 'box-approach' to air quality simulation modeling has been developed in conjunction with a newly formulated photochemical kinetic mechanism to produce an easily applied Photochemical Box Model (PBM). This approach represents an urban area as a single cell 20 km in both l...

  1. Hairlike Percutaneous Photochemical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Thomas; Loeb, Gerald

    2004-01-01

    Instrumentation systems based on hairlike fiber-optic photochemical sensors have been proposed as minimally invasive means of detecting biochemicals associated with cancer and other diseases. The fiber-optic sensors could be mass-produced as inexpensive, disposable components. The sensory tip of a fiber-optic sensor would be injected through the patient's skin into subcutaneous tissue. A biosensing material on the sensory tip would bind or otherwise react with the biochemical(s) of interest [the analyte(s)] to produce a change in optical properties that would be measured by use of an external photonic analyzer. After use, a fiber-optic sensor could be simply removed by plucking it out with tweezers. A fiber-optic sensor according to the proposal would be of the approximate size and shape of a human hair, and its sensory tip would resemble a follicle. Once inserted into a patient's subcutaneous tissue, the sensor would even more closely resemble a hair growing from a follicle (see Figure 1). The biosensing material on the sensory tip could consist of a chemical and/or cells cultured and modified for the purpose. The biosensing material would be contained within a membrane that would cover the tip. If the membrane were not permeable by an analyte, then it would be necessary to create pores in the membrane that would be large enough to allow analyte molecules to diffuse to the biosensing material, but not so large as to allow cells (if present as part of the biosensing material) to diffuse out. The end of the fiber-optic sensor opposite the sensory tip would be inserted in a fiberoptic socket in the photonic analyzer.

  2. Solar module having reflector between cells

    DOEpatents

    Kardauskas, Michael J. (Billerica, MA)

    1999-01-01

    A photovoltaic module comprising an array of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells disposed in a planar and mutually spaced relationship between a light-transparent front cover member in sheet form and a back sheet structure is provided with a novel light-reflecting means disposed between adjacent cells for reflecting light falling in the areas between cells back toward said transparent cover member for further internal reflection onto the solar cells. The light-reflecting comprises a flexible plastic film that has been embossed so as to have a plurality of small V-shaped grooves in its front surface, and a thin light-reflecting coating on said front surface, the portions of said coating along the sides of said grooves forming light-reflecting facets, said grooves being formed so that said facets will reflect light impinging thereon back into said transparent cover sheet with an angle of incidence greater than the critical angle, whereby substantially all of the reflected light will be internally reflected from said cover sheet back to said solar modules, thereby increasing the current output of the module.

  3. Simulation of an electrowetting solar concentration cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Iftekhar; Rosengarten, Gary

    2015-09-01

    Electrowetting control of liquid lenses has emerged as a novel approach for solar tracking and concentration. Recent studies have demonstrated the concept of steering sunlight using thin electrowetting cells without the use of any bulky mechanical equipment. Effective application of this technique may facilitate designing thin and flat solar concentrators. Understanding the behavior of liquid-liquid and liquid-solid interface of the electrowetting cell through trial and error experimental processes is not efficient and is time consuming. In this paper, we present a simulation model to predict the liquid-liquid and liquid-solid interface behavior of electrowetting cell as a function of various parameters such as applied voltage, dielectric constant, cell size etc. We used Comsol Multiphysics simulations incorporating experimental data of different liquids. We have designed both two dimensional and three dimensional simulation models, which predict the shape of the liquid lenses. The model calculates the contact angle using the Young-Lippman equation and uses a moving mesh interface to solve the Navier-stokes equation with Navier slip wall boundary condition. Simulation of the electric field from the electrodes is coupled to the Young-Lippman equation. The model can also be used to determine operational characteristics of other MEMS electrowetting devices such as electrowetting display, optical switches, electronic paper, electrowetting Fresnel lens etc.

  4. Solar Coronal Cells as Seen by STEREO - Duration: 6 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    The changes of a coronal cell region as solar rotation carries it across the solar disk as seen with NASA's STEREO-B spacecraft. The camera is fixed on the region (panning with it) and shows the pl...

  5. Evaluation of concentration solar cells for terrestrial applications

    E-print Network

    An, Tao, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01

    Solar energy has become a hot prospect for the future replacement of fossil fuels, which have limited reserves and cause environmental problems. Solar cell is such a device to directly generate electricity from this clean ...

  6. MANUFACTURE OF PHOTOVOLTAIC SOLAR CELL USING PLANT CHLOROPHYLL

    EPA Science Inventory

    To date, we have successfully manufactured working chlorophyll sensitized solar cells using chlorophyll (and b mixture) from spinach leaves. We have evaluated the electronic characteristics (voltage, current, and power outputs using different loading resistors) of this solar c...

  7. TRANSPARENT COATINGS FOR SOLAR CELLS RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect

    Glatkowski, P.J.; Landis, D.A.

    2013-04-16

    Todays solar cells are fabricated using metal oxide based transparent conductive coatings (TCC) or metal wires with optoelectronic performance exceeding that currently possible with Carbon Nanotube (CNT) based TCCs. The motivation for replacing current TCC is their inherent brittleness, high deposition cost, and high deposition temperatures; leading to reduced performance on thin substrates. With improved processing, application and characterization techniques Nanofiber and/or CNT based TCCs can overcome these shortcomings while offering the ability to be applied in atmospheric conditions using low cost coating processes At todays level of development, CNT based TCC are nearing commercial use in touch screens, some types of information displays (i.e. electronic paper), and certain military applications. However, the resistivity and transparency requirements for use in current commercial solar cells are more stringent than in many of these applications. Therefore, significant research on fundamental nanotube composition, dispersion and deposition are required to reach the required performance commanded by photovoltaic devices. The objective of this project was to research and develop transparent conductive coatings based on novel nanomaterial composite coatings, which comprise nanotubes, nanofibers, and other nanostructured materials along with binder materials. One objective was to show that these new nanomaterials perform at an electrical resistivity and optical transparency suitable for use in solar cells and other energy-related applications. A second objective was to generate new structures and chemistries with improved resistivity and transparency performance. The materials also included the binders and surface treatments that facilitate the utility of the electrically conductive portion of these composites in solar photovoltaic devices. Performance enhancement venues included: CNT purification and metallic tube separation techniques, chemical doping, CNT patterning and alignment, advances in commercial and research materials and field effect schemes. In addition, Eikos continued to develop improved efficiency coating materials and transfer methods suitable for batch and continuous roll-to-roll fabrication requirements. Finally, Eikos collaborated with NREL and the PV-community at large in fabricating and characterizing Invisicon���® enabled solar cells.

  8. Quantum Dots Investigated for Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Castro, Stephanie L.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has been investigating the synthesis of quantum dots of CdSe and CuInS2 for use in intermediate-bandgap solar cells. Using quantum dots in a solar cell to create an intermediate band will allow the harvesting of a much larger portion of the available solar spectrum. Theoretical studies predict a potential efficiency of 63.2 percent, which is approximately a factor of 2 better than any state-of-the-art devices available today. This technology is also applicable to thin-film devices--where it offers a potential four-fold increase in power-to-weight ratio over the state of the art. Intermediate-bandgap solar cells require that quantum dots be sandwiched in an intrinsic region between the photovoltaic solar cell's ordinary p- and n-type regions (see the preceding figure). The quantum dots form the intermediate band of discrete states that allow sub-bandgap energies to be absorbed. However, when the current is extracted, it is limited by the bandgap, not the individual photon energies. The energy states of the quantum dot can be controlled by controlling the size of the dot. Ironically, the ground-state energy levels are inversely proportional to the size of the quantum dots. We have prepared a variety of quantum dots using the typical organometallic synthesis routes pioneered by Ba Wendi et al., in the early 1990's. The most studied quantum dots prepared by this method have been of CdSe. To produce these dots, researchers inject a syringe of the desired organometallic precursors into heated triocytlphosphine oxide (TOPO) that has been vigorously stirred under an inert atmosphere (see the following figure). The solution immediately begins to change from colorless to yellow, then orange and red/brown, as the quantum dots increase in size. When the desired size is reached, the heat is removed from the flask. Quantum dots of different sizes can be identified by placing them under a "black light" and observing the various color differences in their fluorescence (see the photograph).

  9. High efficiency, radiation-hard solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ager III, J.W.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2004-10-22

    The direct gap of the In{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}N alloy system extends continuously from InN (0.7 eV, in the near IR) to GaN (3.4 eV, in the mid-ultraviolet). This opens the intriguing possibility of using this single ternary alloy system in single or multi-junction (MJ) solar cells of the type used for space-based surveillance satellites. To evaluate the suitability of In{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}N as a material for space applications, high quality thin films were grown with molecular beam epitaxy and extensive damage testing with electron, proton, and alpha particle radiation was performed. Using the room temperature photoluminescence intensity as a indirect measure of minority carrier lifetime, it is shown that In{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}N retains its optoelectronic properties at radiation damage doses at least 2 orders of magnitude higher than the damage thresholds of the materials (GaAs and GaInP) currently used in high efficiency MJ cells. This indicates that the In{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}N is well-suited for the future development of ultra radiation-hard optoelectronics. Critical issues affecting development of solar cells using this material system were addressed. The presence of an electron-rich surface layer in InN and In{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}N (0 < x < 0.63) was investigated; it was shown that this is a less significant effect at large x. Evidence of p-type activity below the surface in Mg-doped InN was obtained; this is a significant step toward achieving photovoltaic action and, ultimately, a solar cell using this material.

  10. Materials That Enhance Efficiency and Radiation Resistance of Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiadong; Wang, Haorong

    2012-01-01

    A thin layer (approximately 10 microns) of a novel "transparent" fluorescent material is applied to existing solar cells or modules to effectively block and convert UV light, or other lower solar response waveband of solar radiation, to visible or IR light that can be more efficiently used by solar cells for additional photocurrent. Meanwhile, the layer of fluorescent coating material remains fully "transparent" to the visible and IR waveband of solar radiation, resulting in a net gain of solar cell efficiency. This innovation alters the effective solar spectral power distribution to which an existing cell gets exposed, and matches the maximum photovoltaic (PV) response of existing cells. By shifting a low PV response waveband (e.g., UV) of solar radiation to a high PV response waveband (e.g. Vis-Near IR) with novel fluorescent materials that are transparent to other solar-cell sensitive wavebands, electrical output from solar cells will be enhanced. This approach enhances the efficiency of solar cells by converting UV and high-energy particles in space that would otherwise be wasted to visible/IR light. This innovation is a generic technique that can be readily implemented to significantly increase efficiencies of both space and terrestrial solar cells, without incurring much cost, thus bringing a broad base of economical, social, and environmental benefits. The key to this approach is that the "fluorescent" material must be very efficient, and cannot block or attenuate the "desirable" and unconverted" waveband of solar radiation (e.g. Vis-NIR) from reaching the cells. Some nano-phosphors and novel organometallic complex materials have been identified that enhance the energy efficiency on some state-of-the-art commercial silicon and thin-film-based solar cells by over 6%.

  11. Low-Cost Photovoltaics: Luminescent Solar Concentrators And Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cells

    E-print Network

    Leow, Shin Woei

    2014-01-01

    solar concentrator with 7.1% power conversion efficiency,”power conversion efficiency = incident solar power/convertedsolar concentrator (LSC) windows with front-facing photovoltaic (PV) cells were built and their gain and power efficiency

  12. Thin silicon solar cell performance characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gay, C. F.

    1978-01-01

    Refined techniques for surface texturizing, back surface field and back surface reflector formation were evaluated for use with shallow junction, single-crystal silicon solar cells. Each process was characterized individually and collectively as a function of device thickness and bulk resistivity. Among the variables measured and reported are open circuit voltage, short circuit current and spectral response. Substantial improvements were obtained by the utilization of a low cost aluminum paste process to simultaneously remove the unwanted n(+) diffused region, form the back surface field and produce an ohmic contact metallization. The highly effective BSF which results from applying this process has allowed fabrication of cells 0.05 mm thick with initial outputs as high as 79.5 mW/4 sq cm (28 C, AM0) and superior electron radiation tolerance. Cells of 0.02 mm to 0.04 mm thickness have been fabricated with power to mass ratios well in excess of 2 watts per gram.

  13. Photonic Crystal Geometry for Organic Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samulski, Edward; Lopez, Rene; Ko, Doo-Hyun; Tumbleston, John

    2010-03-01

    Efficient absorption of light calls for thicker PV active layers whereas carrier transport always benefits from thinner ones, and this dichotomy is at the heart of an efficiency/cost conundrum that has kept solar energy expensive relative to fossil fuels. We report a 2-D, photonic crystal morphology that enhances the efficiency of organic photovoltaic cells relative to conventional planar cells.[1] The morphology is developed by patterning an organic photoactive bulk heterojunction blend using PRINT a process that lends itself to large area fabrication of nanostructures.[2] The photonic crystal cell morphology increases photocurrents generally, and particularly through the excitation of resonant modes near the band edge of the organic PV material. [1] Ko, D.-H.; Tumbleston, J. R.; Zhang, L.; Williams, S.; DeSimone, J. M.; Rene, L.; Samulski, E. T. Nano Lett. 2009, 9, 2742--2746. [2] Hampton et al. Adv. Mater. 2008, 20, 2667.

  14. OPTEC: A Cubesat for Solar Cell Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey; Hepp, Aloysius; Arutyunov, Dennis; White, Kelsey; Witsberger, Paul

    2014-01-01

    A new type of small spacecraft, the cubesat, has introduced a new concept for extremely small, low-cost missions into space. Cubesats are designed to be launched as secondary payloads on other missions, and are made up of unit elements (U) of size 10 cm by 10 cm by 10 cm, with a nominal mass of no more than 1.33 kg per U. We have designed a cubesat, OPTEC (Orbital Photovoltaic Testbed Cubesat) as a low-cost testbed to demonstrate, calibrate, and test solar cell technologies in space. Size of the cubesat is 2U (10x10x20cm, and the mass 2.66 kg. The cubesat deploys from the International Space Station into Low Earth Orbit at an altitude of about 420 km. Up to two 4x8cm test solar panels can be flown, with full I-V curves and temperature measurements taken.

  15. A theoretical analysis of the current-voltage characteristics of solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, R. C. Y.; Hauser, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: (1) dark current-voltage characteristics of solar cells; (2) high efficiency silicon solar cells; (3) short circuit current density as a function of temperature and the radiation intensity; (4) Keldysh-Franz effects and silicon solar cells; (5) thin silicon solar cells; (6) optimum solar cell designs for concentrated sunlight; (7) nonuniform illumination effects of a solar cell; and (8) high-low junction emitter solar cells.

  16. High efficiency solar cells combining a perovskite and a silicon heterojunction solar cells via an optical splitting system

    SciTech Connect

    Uzu, Hisashi E-mail: npark@skku.edu; Ichikawa, Mitsuru; Hino, Masashi; Nakano, Kunihiro; Meguro, Tomomi; Yamamoto, Kenji; Hernández, José Luis; Kim, Hui-Seon; Park, Nam-Gyu E-mail: npark@skku.edu

    2015-01-05

    We have applied an optical splitting system in order to achieve very high conversion efficiency for a full spectrum multi-junction solar cell. This system consists of multiple solar cells with different band gap optically coupled via an “optical splitter.” An optical splitter is a multi-layered beam splitter with very high reflection in the shorter-wave-length range and very high transmission in the longer-wave-length range. By splitting the incident solar spectrum and distributing it to each solar cell, the solar energy can be managed more efficiently. We have fabricated optical splitters and used them with a wide-gap amorphous silicon (a-Si) solar cell or a CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} perovskite solar cell as top cells, combined with mono-crystalline silicon heterojunction (HJ) solar cells as bottom cells. We have achieved with a 550?nm cutoff splitter an active area conversion efficiency of over 25% using a-Si and HJ solar cells and 28% using perovskite and HJ solar cells.

  17. Method of making solar cell with wrap-around electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Amick, J.A.

    1982-12-07

    A solar cell is provided which has a front electrode which wraps around the edge of the cell and onto a portion of the back of the cell. A second electrode is also provided on the back of the cell thereby permitting all electrical connections to be made on one side of the cell. A method for making such a cell also is disclosed.

  18. [Advances in microbial solar cells--A review].

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoyun; Yu, Changping; Zheng, Tianling

    2015-08-01

    The energy crisis has become one of the major problems hindering the development of the world. The emergence of microbial fuel cells provides a new solution to the energy crisis. Microbial solar cells, integrating photosynthetic organisms such as plants and microalgae into microbial fuel cells, can convert solar energy into electrical energy. Microbial solar cell has steady electric energy, and broad application prospects in wastewater treatment, biodiesel processing and intermediate metabolites production. Here we reviewed recent progress of microbial solar cells from the perspective of the role of photosynthetic organisms in microbial fuel cells, based on a vast amount of literature, and discussed their advantages and deficiency. At last, brief analysis of the facing problems and research needs of microbial fuel cells are undertaken. This work was expected to be beneficial for the application of the microbial solar cells technology. PMID:26665592

  19. Characterization of production GaAs solar cells for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.

    1988-01-01

    The electrical performance of GaAs solar cells was characterized as a function of irradiation with protons and electrons with the underlying goal of producing solar cells suitable for use in space. Proton energies used varied between 50 keV and 10 MeV, and damage coefficients were derived for liquid phase epitaxy GaAs solar cells. Electron energies varied between 0.7 and 2.4 MeV. Cells from recent production runs were characterized as a function of electron and proton irradiation. These same cells were also characterized as a function of solar intensity and operating temperature, both before and after the electron irradiations. The long term stability of GaAs cells during photon exposure was examined. Some cells were found to degrade with photon exposure and some did not. Calibration standards were made for GaAs/Ge solar cells by flight on a high altitude balloon.

  20. Electro-optics of perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qianqian; Armin, Ardalan; Nagiri, Ravi Chandra Raju; Burn, Paul L.; Meredith, Paul

    2015-02-01

    Organohalide-perovskite solar cells have emerged as a leading next-generation photovoltaic technology. However, despite surging efficiencies, many questions remain unanswered regarding the mechanisms of operation. Here we report a detailed study of the electro-optics of efficient CH3NH3PbI3-perovskite-only planar devices. We report the dielectric constants over a large frequency range. Importantly, we found the real part of the static dielectric constant to be ?70, from which we estimate the exciton-binding energy to be of order 2?meV, which strongly indicates a non-excitonic mechanism. Also, Jonscher's Law behaviour was consistent with the perovskite having ionic character. Accurate knowledge of the cell's optical constants allowed improved modelling and design, and using this information we fabricated an optimized device with an efficiency of 16.5%. The optimized devices have ?100% spectrally flat internal quantum efficiencies and minimal bimolecular recombination. These findings establish systematic design rules to achieve silicon-like efficiencies in simple perovskite solar cells.

  1. Solar Cell Nanotechnology Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Biswajit

    2014-05-07

    The objective of this project is to develop a low cost nonlithographic nanofabrication technology for the fabrication of thin film porous templates as well as uniform arrays of semiconductor nanostructures for the implementation of high efficiency solar cells. Solar cells based on semiconductor nanostructures are expected to have very high energy conversion efficiencies due to the increased absorption coefficients of semiconductor nanostructures. In addition, the thin film porous template can be used for optimum surface texturing of solar cells leading to additional enhancement in energy conversion efficiency. An important requirement for these applications is the ability to synthesize nanostructure arrays of different dimensions with good size control. This project employed nanoporous alumina templates created by the anodization of aluminum thin films deposited on glass substrates for the fabrication of the nanostructures and optimized the process parameters to obtain uniform pore diameters. An additional requirement is uniformity or regularity of the nanostructure arrays. While constant current anodization was observed to provide controlled pore diameters, constant voltage anodization was needed for regularity of the nanostructure arrays. Thus a two-step anodization process was investigated and developed in this project for improving the pore size distribution and pore periodicity of the nanoporous alumina templates. CdTe was selected to be the active material for the nanowires, and the process for the successful synthesis of CdTe nanowires was developed in this project. Two different synthesis approaches were investigated in this project, electrochemical and electrophoretic deposition. While electrochemical synthesis was successfully employed for the synthesis of nanowires inside the pores of the alumina templates, the technique was determined to be non-optimum due to the need of elevated temperature that is detrimental to the structural integrity of the nanoporous alumina templates. In order to eliminate this problem, electrophoretic deposition was selected as the more appropriate technique, which involves the guided deposition of semiconductor nanoparticles in the presence of ultrasonic energy to form the crystalline nanowires. Extensive experimental research was carried out to optimize the process parameters for formation of crystalline nanowires. It was observed that the environmental bath temperature plays a critical role in determining the structural integrity of the nanowires and hence their lengths. Investigation was carried out for the formation of semitransparent ohmic contacts on the nanowires to facilitate photocurrent spectroscopy measurements as well as for solar cell implementation. Formation of such ohmic contacts was found to be challenging and a process involving mechanical and electrochemical polishing was developed to facilitate such contacts. The use of nanoporous alumina templates for the surface texturing of mono- and multi-crystalline solar cells was extensively investigated by electrochemical etching of the silicon through the pores of the nanoporous templates. The processes for template formation as well as etching were optimized and the alumina/silicon interface was investigated using capacitance-voltage characterization. The process developed was found to be viable for improving solar cell performance.

  2. Robot End Effector To Place and Solder Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagerty, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    Encapsulated in robot end effector is RF induction-heating coil for heating solar cell while in transit. Holes in encapsulant permit end of unit to act as vacuum pickup to grip solar cell. Use of RF induction heating allows cell to be heated without requiring direct mechanical and thermal contact of bonding tool such as soldering iron.

  3. Solar-Driven Microbial Photoelectrochemical Cells with a Nanowire Photocathode

    E-print Network

    Li, Yat

    . In this regard, microbial fuel cells (MFCs) hold great promises to address both issues simultaneouslySolar-Driven Microbial Photoelectrochemical Cells with a Nanowire Photocathode Fang Qian,* Gongming cell (solar MPC) that can produce sustainable energy through coupling the microbial catalysis

  4. An all metal solar cell Vrin R. A. Holm,

    E-print Network

    An all metal solar cell Vårin R. A. Holm, University of Bergen Ranveig Flatabø, Martin Greve, Bodil Holst, University of Bergen Nano Physics Group · The production parameters of the cell in Bergen, Norway. Traditional semiconductor solar cells, though in wide commercial use, have

  5. High efficiency solar cells for laser power beaming applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    Understanding solar cell response to pulsed laser outputs is important for the evaluation of power beaming applications. The time response of high efficiency GaAs and silicon solar cells to a 25 nS monochromatic pulse input is described. The PC-1D computer code is used to analyze the cell current during and after the pulse for various conditions.

  6. Polarization effects and tests for crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiming, Lu; Zhigang, Wang; Hui, Hu

    2015-09-01

    We try to find a fast and simple potential induced degradation effect (PID) test procedure for crystalline silicon solar cells. With sodium chloride (NaCl) solution as Na+ source, PVB as lamination material, we can carry out the test in 1 h. Solar cells with newly developed PID resistance process were also tested. The increase of reverse current of solar cell can be considered a key standard to determine if the solar cell was prone to PID. Moreover, it showed that the increase of reverse current for the PID resistance solar cell was less than 2. In addition, the test results of the solar cells fitted very well with that of the modules by standard procedure.

  7. Advantages of thin silicon solar cells for use in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denman, O. S.

    1978-01-01

    A system definition study on the Solar Power Satellite System showed that a thin, 50 micrometers, silicon solar cell has significant advantages. The advantages include a significantly lower performance degradation in a radiation environment and high power-to-mass ratios. The advantages of such cells for an employment in space is further investigated. Basic questions concerning the operation of solar cells are considered along with aspects of radiation induced performance degradation. The question arose in this connection how thin a silicon solar cell had to be to achieve resistance to radiation degradation and still have good initial performance. It was found that single-crystal silicon solar cells could be as thin as 50 micrometers and still develop high conversion efficiencies. It is concluded that the use of 50 micrometer silicon solar cells in space-based photovoltaic power systems would be advantageous.

  8. Solare Cell Roof Tile And Method Of Forming Same

    DOEpatents

    Hanoka, Jack I. (Brookline, MA); Real, Markus (Oberberg, CH)

    1999-11-16

    A solar cell roof tile includes a front support layer, a transparent encapsulant layer, a plurality of interconnected solar cells and a backskin layer. The front support layer is formed of light transmitting material and has first and second surfaces. The transparent encapsulant layer is disposed adjacent the second surface of the front support layer. The interconnected solar cells has a first surface disposed adjacent the transparent encapsulant layer. The backskin layer has a first surface disposed adjacent a second surface of the interconnected solar cells, wherein a portion of the backskin layer wraps around and contacts the first surface of the front support layer to form the border region. A portion of the border region has an extended width. The solar cell roof tile may have stand-offs disposed on the extended width border region for providing vertical spacing with respect to an adjacent solar cell roof tile.

  9. Studies of silicon p-n junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugroschel, A.; Lindholm, F. A.

    1979-01-01

    To provide theoretical support for investigating different ways to obtain high open-circuit voltages in p-n junction silicon solar cells, an analytical treatment of heavily doped transparent-emitter devices is presented that includes the effects of bandgap narrowing, Fermi-Dirac statistics, a doping concentration gradient, and a finite surface recombination velocity at the emitter surface. Topics covered include: (1) experimental determination of bandgap narrowing in the emitter of silicon p-n junction devices; (2) heavily doped transparent regions in junction solar cells, diodes, and transistors; (3) high-low-emitter solar cell; (4) determination of lifetimes and recombination currents in p-n junction solar cells; (5) MOS and oxide-charged-induced BSF solar cells; and (6) design of high efficiency solar cells for space and terrestrial applications.

  10. Photon management structures for solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bläsi, Benedikt; Hauser, Hubert; Walk, Christian; Michl, Bernhard; Guttowski, Aron; Mellor, Alexander; Benick, Jan; Peters, Marius; Jüchter, Sabrina; Wellens, Christine; Kübler, Volker; Hermle, Martin; Wolf, Andreas J.

    2012-06-01

    Since micro- and nanostructures for photon management are of increasing importance in novel high-efficiency solar cell concepts, structuring techniques with up-scaling potential play a key role in their realization. Interference lithography and nanoimprint processes are presented as technologies for origination and replication of fine-tailored photonic structures on large areas. At first, these structure origination and replication technologies are presented in detail: With the interference pattern of two or more coherent waves, a wide variety of structures with feature sizes ranging from 100 nm to 100 ?m can be generated in photoresist by interference lithography. Examples are linear gratings, crossed gratings, hexagonal structures, three dimensional photonic crystals or surface-relief diffusers. The strength of this technology is that homogeneous structures can be originated on areas of up to 1.2 x 1.2 m2. The structures in photoresist, the so-called master structures, can serve as an etching mask for a pattern transfer, as a template for infiltration with different materials or they can be replicated via electroplating and subsequent replication processes. Especially in combination with replication steps, the industrially feasible production of elaborate structures is possible. As a particularly interesting process, nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is described in detail. As a way towards industrial production, a roller NIL tool is presented. After the description of the basic technologies, three application examples for solar cells are presented with details about the design of the structures, the structuring processes, sample characterization and evaluation: (1) honeycomb structures for the front side texturization of multicrystalline silicon wafer solar cells, (2) diffractive rear side gratings for absorption enhancement in the spectral region near the band gap of silicon, and (3) plasmonic metal nanoparticle arrays manufactured by combined imprint and lift off processes.

  11. Dip-coated sheet silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, J. D.; Maciolek, R. B.; Zook, J. D.; Scott, M. W.

    1976-01-01

    A cost-effective method is being developed for producing solar cell quality sheet silicon by dip coating inexpensive ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large grain silicon. Mullite (Aluminum Silicate) ceramic substrates coated with a thin layer of graphite have been dipped into molten silicon to produce 20-150 micron thick layers having grain sizes as large as .4 cm x 4 cm. With these silicon layers photovoltaic diodes have been fabricated with measured and inherent conversion efficiencies of 4% and 7%, respectively.

  12. Method of fabricating bifacial tandem solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Wojtczuk, Steven J; Chiu, Philip T; Zhang, Xuebing; Gagnon, Edward; Timmons, Michael

    2014-10-07

    A method of fabricating on a semiconductor substrate bifacial tandem solar cells with semiconductor subcells having a lower bandgap than the substrate bandgap on one side of the substrate and with subcells having a higher bandgap than the substrate on the other including, first, growing a lower bandgap subcell on one substrate side that uses only the same periodic table group V material in the dislocation-reducing grading layers and bottom subcells as is present in the substrate and after the initial growth is complete and then flipping the substrate and growing the higher bandgap subcells on the opposite substrate side which can be of different group V material.

  13. Cold crucible Czochralski for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trumble, T. M.

    1982-01-01

    The efficiency and radiation resistance of present silicon solar cells are a function of the oxygen and carbon impurities and the boron doping used to provide the proper resistivity material. The standard Czochralski process used grow single crystal silicon contaminates the silicon stock material due to the use of a quartz crucible and graphite components. The use of a process which replaces these elements with a water cooled copper to crucible has provided a major step in providing gallium doped (100) crystal orientation, low oxygen, low carbon, silicon. A discussion of the Cold Crucible Czochralski process and recent float Zone developments is provided.

  14. The Photophysics of Perovskite Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sum, Tze-Chien

    2015-03-01

    Solution processed organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite solar cells, with power conversion efficiencies approaching 20%, are presently the forerunner amongst the next generation photovoltaic technologies. These remarkable performances can be attributed to their large absorption coefficients, long charge carrier diffusion lengths and low non-radiative recombination rates. In addition, these materials also possess excellent light emission and optical gain properties. In this talk, I will review the developmental milestones in this field and distil the recent findings on the photophysical mechanisms of this remarkable material. I will also highlight some of our latest charge dynamics studies and other investigations on the novel properties of this amazing material system.

  15. New generation of space batteries: GaAs solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongwei; Shi, Wenzao

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes a new generation of space power sources -- GaAs solar cells -- and the status of their development inside China and abroad. In conjunction with this, on the basis of unique properties associated with GaAs solar cells, it points out the direction of development, clarifies the value of key space applications, and forecasts the application prospects for GaAs solar cells.

  16. Spraylon fluorocarbon encapsulation for silicon solar cell arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A development program was performed for evaluating, modifying, and optimizing the Lockheed formulated liquid transparent filmforming Spraylon fluorocarbon protective coating for silicon solar cells and modules. The program objectives were designed to meet the requirements of the low-cost automated solar cell array fabrication process. As part of the study, a computer program was used to establish the limits of the safe working stress in the coated silicon solar cell array system under severe thermal shock.

  17. [Type here] Copper Indium Selenide (CIS) Solar Cell

    E-print Network

    Hochberg, Michael

    they are a thin film technology they can be less costly than Si cells. This WAVESol panel from Ascent Solar has. This ThinFilm panel from Silicon Solar Inc., has a 7.2V DC and a short circuit current of 200mA (1.44 watts[Type here] Copper Indium Selenide (CIS) Solar Cell CIS cells are made with a thin layer of CuInSe2

  18. Will Organic Synthesis Within Icy Grains or on Dust Surfaces in the Primitive Solar Nebula Completely Erase the Effects of Photochemical Self Shielding?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Johnson, Natasha M.

    2012-01-01

    There are at least 3 separate photochemical self-shielding models with different degrees of commonality. All of these models rely on the selective absorption of (12))C(16)O dissociative photons as the radiation source penetrates through the gas allowing the production of reactive O-17 and O-18 atoms within a specific volume. Each model also assumes that the undissociated C(16)O is stable and does not participate in the chemistry of nebular dust grains. In what follows we will argue that this last, very important assumption is simply not true despite the very high energy of the CO molecular bond.

  19. Protection and sensitization of normal and malignant cells by a naturally occurring compound in a model of photochemical damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yuan-Hao; Kumar, Neeru; Glickman, Randolph D.

    2012-03-01

    Certain phytonutrients are known to confer protection and immunosuppression against radiation insults. Radiation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) can either lead to the destruction of normal tissue cells, or induce tumor radioresistance by activating ROS scavenging proteins. To identify whether the triterpene phytonutrient, ursolic acid, reduces radiation-induced damage in normal cells and promotes the apoptosis of malignant cells, we investigated the biologic mechanisms and effect of radiation-cell interaction with or without treatment with ursolic acid in human skin melanoma cells (ATCC CRL-11147TM) and transformed human retinal pigment epithelial (hTERT-RPE) cells. UV-VIS light was employed to investigate the efficacy of ursolic acid in altering cellular viability by modulations of p53 and NF-?B p65 signaling. Cell response was investigated by changes in proliferative activity and free radical generation assessed by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin liquid chromatography. Ursolic acid pretreatment strongly increased the level of p53 and decreased the level of phosphorylated p65 leading to enhanced cell death of skin melanoma cells in response to UV-VIS exposure. In contrast, ursolic acid appeared to downregulate p53 levels without disturbing NF-?B activation along with an increase of oxidative stress in hTERT-RPE cells. These findings indicate that ursolic acid may beneficially increase the radiosensitivity of tumor cells while potentiating a photoprotective effect on benign cells through differential effects on the NF-?B and p53 signaling pathways.

  20. High efficiency thin-film GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stirn, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    Several oxidation techniques are discussed which have been found to increase the open circuit (V sub oc) of metal-GaAs Schottky barrier solar cells, the oxide chemistry, attempts to measure surface state parameters, the evolving characteristics of the solar cell as background contamination (has been decreased, but not eliminated), results of focused Nd/YAG laser beam recrystallization of Ge films evaporated onto tungsten, and studies of AMOS solar cells fabricated on sliced polycrystalline GaAs wafers. Also discussed are projected materials availability and costs for GaAs thin-film solar cells.

  1. Intermediate Band Solar Cell with Extreme Broadband Spectrum Quantum Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datas, A.; López, E.; Ramiro, I.; Antolín, E.; Martí, A.; Luque, A.; Tamaki, R.; Shoji, Y.; Sogabe, T.; Okada, Y.

    2015-04-01

    We report, for the first time, about an intermediate band solar cell implemented with InAs/AlGaAs quantum dots whose photoresponse expands from 250 to ˜6000 nm . To our knowledge, this is the broadest quantum efficiency reported to date for a solar cell and demonstrates that the intermediate band solar cell is capable of producing photocurrent when illuminated with photons whose energy equals the energy of the lowest band gap. We show experimental evidences indicating that this result is in agreement with the theory of the intermediate band solar cell, according to which the generation recombination between the intermediate band and the valence band makes this photocurrent detectable.

  2. Graphene-Based Bulk-Heterojunction Solar Cells: A Review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Eric; Nalwa, Hari Singh

    2015-09-01

    The current highest power-conversion efficiencies found for different types of solar cell devices range from 20% to 46%, depending on the nature of the photovoltaic materials used and device configuration. Graphene has emerged as an important organic photovoltaic material for photoenergy conversion, where graphene can be used as a transparent electrode, active interfacial layer, electron transport layer, hole transport layer, or electron/hole separation layer in fabricating solar cell devices. This review article briefly discusses some recent advances made in different types of photovoltaic materials, and then summarizes the current status of graphene-based bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells, including graphene-containing perovskite and tandem solar cell devices. Power-conversion efficiencies currently exceed 10% for heteroatom-doped multilayer graphene-based BHJ solar cells and 15.6% for graphene-containing perovskite-based solar cells. The role of graphene layer thickness, bending, thermal annealing, passivation, heteroatom doping, perovskite materials, and tandem solar cell structure on the photovoltaic performance of graphene-based solar cells is discussed. Besides aiming for high power-conversion efficiency, factors such as long-term environmental stability and degradation, and the cost-effectiveness of graphene-based solar cells for large-scale commercial production are challenging tasks. PMID:26716184

  3. Testing of gallium arsenide solar cells on the CRRES vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trumble, T. M.

    1985-01-01

    A flight experiment was designed to determine the optimum design for gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cell panels in a radiation environment. Elements of the experiment design include, different coverglass material and thicknesses, welded and soldered interconnects, different solar cell efficiencies, different solar cell types, and measurement of annealing properties. This experiment is scheduled to fly on the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES). This satellite will simultaneously measure the radiation environment and provide engineering data on solar cell degradation that can be directly related to radiation damage.

  4. Junctions for monolithic cascade solar cells and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, C.L.R.

    1989-11-21

    This patent describes a method of forming a monolithic cascade solar cell including sub-cells of different radiation converting bandgaps. It comprises: forming a first radiation converting solar sub-cell having a first bandgap on a substrate; forming an interconnecting thin layers of gold over the first sub-cell. The thin layer of gold being substantially transparent to wavelengths of radiation having frequency matching the bandgap of the bandgap of the first radiation converting sub-cell; and forming at least one more radiation converting solar sub-cell having a second bandgap over the interconnecting thin layer of gold.

  5. Indium phosphide solar cells for laser power beaming applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    Lasers can be used to transmit power to photovoltaic cells. Solar cell efficiencies are enhanced significantly under monochromatic light, and therefore a laser beam of proper wavelength could be a very effective source of illumination for a solar array operating at very high efficiencies. This work reviews the modeling studies made on indium phosphide solar cells for such an application. These cells are known to be very radiation resistant and have a potential for high efficiency. Effects of cell series resistance, laser intensity, and temperature on cell performance have been discussed.

  6. Photochemical DNA Cleavage by the Antitumor Agent

    E-print Network

    Gates, Kent. S.

    Photochemical DNA Cleavage by the Antitumor Agent 3-Amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine 1,4-Dioxide to derive its therapeutic activity by selectively damaging DNA in oxygen-poor (hypoxic) tumor cells.1,2 DNA,2 that the one-electron reduced form of the drug (2) reacts directly with DNA, although recent studies have

  7. Demonstration of the feasibility of automated silicon solar cell fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, W. E.; Schwartz, F. M.

    1975-01-01

    A study effort was undertaken to determine the process, steps and design requirements of an automated silicon solar cell production facility. Identification of the key process steps was made and a laboratory model was conceptually designed to demonstrate the feasibility of automating the silicon solar cell fabrication process. A detailed laboratory model was designed to demonstrate those functions most critical to the question of solar cell fabrication process automating feasibility. The study and conceptual design have established the technical feasibility of automating the solar cell manufacturing process to produce low cost solar cells with improved performance. Estimates predict an automated process throughput of 21,973 kilograms of silicon a year on a three shift 49-week basis, producing 4,747,000 hexagonal cells (38mm/side), a total of 3,373 kilowatts at an estimated manufacturing cost of $0.866 per cell or $1.22 per watt.

  8. Results of the 1970 balloon flight solar cell standardization program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    For the eighth consective year, high-altitude calibration of solar cells was accomplished with the aid of free-flight balloons. Flights were conducted to an altitude of 36,576 m which is above 99.5% of earth's atmosphere where all water vapor levels and significant ozone bands are absent. Solar cells calibrated in this manner are significant used as intensity references in solar simulators and in terrestrial sunlight. Discussed is the method employed for high altitude balloon flight solar cell calibration. Also presented are data collected on 52 standard solar cells on two flights conducted in 1970. Solar cells flown repeatedly on successive flights have shown correlation of better than + or - 1.0%.

  9. Recyclable organic solar cells on cellulose nanocrystal substrates

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yinhua; Fuentes-Hernandez, Canek; Khan, Talha M.; Liu, Jen-Chieh; Hsu, James; Shim, Jae Won; Dindar, Amir; Youngblood, Jeffrey P.; Moon, Robert J.; Kippelen, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Solar energy is potentially the largest source of renewable energy at our disposal, but significant advances are required to make photovoltaic technologies economically viable and, from a life-cycle perspective, environmentally friendly, and consequently scalable. Cellulose nanomaterials are emerging high-value nanoparticles extracted from plants that are abundant, renewable, and sustainable. Here, we report on the first demonstration of efficient polymer solar cells fabricated on optically transparent cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) substrates. The solar cells fabricated on the CNC substrates display good rectification in the dark and reach a power conversion efficiency of 2.7%. In addition, we demonstrate that these solar cells can be easily separated and recycled into their major components using low-energy processes at room temperature, opening the door for a truly recyclable solar cell technology. Efficient and easily recyclable organic solar cells on CNC substrates are expected to be an attractive technology for sustainable, scalable, and environmentally-friendly energy production. PMID:23524333

  10. Nanostructures for photon management in solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, Vijay Kris; Cui, Yi

    2013-07-01

    The concurrent development of high-performance materials, new device and system architectures, and nanofabrication processes has driven widespread research and development in the field of nanostructures for photon management in photovoltaics. The fundamental goals of photon management are to reduce incident light reflection, improve absorption, and tailor the optical properties of a device for use in different types of energy conversion systems. Nanostructures rely on a core set of phenomena to attain these goals, including gradation of the refractive index, coupling to waveguide modes through surface structuring, and modification of the photonic band structure of a device. In this review, we present recent developments in the field of nanostructures for photon management in solar cells with applications across different materials and system architectures. We focus both on theoretical and numerical studies and on progress in fabricating solar cells containing photonic nanostructures. We show that nanoscale light management structures have yielded real efficiency gains in many types of photovoltaic devices; however, we note that important work remains to ensure that improved optical performance does not come at the expense of poor electrical properties.

  11. Nanobump assembly for plasmonic organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hyung-Jun; Jung, Kinam; Lee, Gunhee; Ko, Youngjun; Lee, Jong-Kwon; Choi, Mansoo; Lee, Changhee

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate novel plasmonic organic solar cells (OSCs) by embedding an easy processible nanobump assembly (NBA) for harnessing more light. The NBA is consisted of precisely size-controlled Ag nanoparticles (NPs) generated by an aerosol process at atmospheric pressure and thermally deposited molybdenum oxide (MoO3) layer which follows the underlying nano structure of NPs. The active layer, spin-casted polymer blend solution, has an undulated structure conformably covering the NBA structure. To find the optimal condition of the NBA structure for enhancing light harvest as well as carrier transfer, we systematically investigate the effect of the size of Ag NPs and the MoO3 coverage on the device performance. It is observed that the photocurrent of device increases as the size of Ag NP increases owing to enhanced plasmonic and scattering effect. In addition, the increased light absorption is effectively transferred to the photocurrent with small carrier losses, when the Ag NPs are fully covered by the MoO3 layer. As a result, the NBA structure consisted of 40 nm Ag NPs enclosed by 20 nm MoO3 layer leads to 18% improvement in the power conversion efficiency compared to the device without the NBA structure. Therefore, the NBA plasmonic structure provides a reliable and efficient light harvesting in a broad range of wavelength, which consequently enhances the performance of organic solar cells.

  12. Aqueous dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Bella, Federico; Gerbaldi, Claudio; Barolo, Claudia; Grätzel, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Nowadays, dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are the most extensively investigated systems for the conversion of solar energy into electricity, particularly for implementation in devices where low cost and good performance are required. Nevertheless, a key aspect is still to be addressed, being considered strongly harmful for a long time, which is the presence of water in the cell, either in the electrolyte or at the electrode/electrolyte interface. Here comes the present review, in the course of which we try our best to address the highly topical role of water in DSSCs, trying to figure out if it is a poisoner or the keyword to success, by means of a thoroughly detailed analysis of all the established phenomena in an aqueous environment. Actually, in the last few years the scientific community has suddenly turned its efforts in the direction of using water as a solvent, as demonstrated by the amount of research articles being published in the literature. Indeed, by means of DSSCs fabricated with water-based electrolytes, reduced costs, non-flammability, reduced volatility and improved environmental compatibility could be easily achieved. As a result, an increasing number of novel electrodes, dyes and electrolyte components are continuously proposed, being highly challenging from the materials science viewpoint and with the golden thread of producing truly water-based DSSCs. If the initial purpose of DSSCs was the construction of an artificial photosynthetic system able to convert solar light into electricity, the use of water as the key component may represent a great step forward towards their widespread diffusion in the market. PMID:25864577

  13. Reducing the Cost of Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Scanlon, B.

    2012-04-01

    Solar-powered electricity prices could soon approach those of power from coal or natural gas thanks to collaborative research with solar startup Ampulse Corporation at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Silicon wafers account for almost half the cost of today's solar photovoltaic panels, so reducing or eliminating wafer costs is essential to bringing prices down. Current crystalline silicon technology converts energy in a highly efficient manner; however, that technology is manufactured with processes that could stand some improvement. The industry needs a method that is less complex, creates less waste and uses less energy. First, half the refined silicon is lost as dust in the wafer-sawing process, driving module costs higher. Wafers are sawn off of large cylindrical ingots, or boules, of silicon. A typical 2-meter boule loses as many as 6,000 potential wafers during sawing. Second, the wafers produced are much thicker than necessary. To efficiently convert sunlight into electricity, the wafers need be only one-tenth the typical thickness. NREL, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Ampulse have partnered on an approach to eliminate this waste and dramatically lower the cost of the finished solar panels. By using a chemical vapor deposition process to grow the silicon on inexpensive foil, Ampulse is able to make the solar cells just thick enough to convert most of the solar energy into electricity. No more sawdust - and no more wasting refined silicon materials. NREL developed the technology to grow high-quality silicon and ORNL developed the metal foil that has the correct crystal structure to support that growth. Ampulse is installing a pilot manufacturing line in NREL's Process Development Integration Laboratory, where solar companies can work closely with lab scientists on integrated equipment to answer pressing questions related to their technology development, as well as rapidly overcoming R and D challenges and risk. NREL's program is focused on transformative innovation in the domestic PV industry. With knowledge and expertise acquired from the PDIL pilot production line tools, Ampulse plans to design a full-scale production line to accommodate long rolls of metal foil. The Ampulse process 'goes straight from pure silicon-containing gas to high-quality crystal silicon film,' said Brent Nelson, the operational manager for the Process Development Integration Laboratory. 'The advantage is you can make the wafer just as thin as you need it - 10 microns or less.' Most of today's solar cells are made out of wafer crystalline silicon, though thin-film cells made of more exotic elements such as copper, indium, gallium, arsenic, cadmium, tellurium and others are making a strong push into the market. The advantage of silicon is its abundance, because it is derived from sand. Silicon's disadvantage is that purifying it into wafers suitable for solar cells can be expensive and energy intensive. Manufacturers add carbon and heat to sand to produce metallurgical-grade silicon, which is useful in other industries, but not yet suitable for making solar cells. So this metallurgical-grade silicon is then converted to pure trichlorosilane (SiCl3) or silane (SiH4) gas. Typically, the purified gas is then converted to create a silicon feedstock at 1,000 degrees Celsius. This feedstock is melted at 1,414 C and recrystallized into crystal ingots that are finally sawed into wafers. The Ampulse method differs in that it eliminates the last two steps in the traditional process and works directly with the silane gas growing only the needed silicon right onto a foil substrate. A team of NREL scientists had developed a way to use a process called hot-wire chemical vapor deposition to thicken silicon wafers with near perfect crystal structure. Using a hot tungsten filament much like the one found in an incandescent light bulb, the silane gas molecules are broken apart and deposited onto the wafer using the chemical vapor deposition technique at about 700 C - a much lower temperature than needed to make the wafer. The hot filament dec

  14. Results from the IMP-J violet solar cell experiment and violet cell balloon flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, E. M.

    1976-01-01

    The IMP-J violet solar cell experiment was flown in an orbit with mild thermal cycling and low hard particle radiation. The results of the experiment show that violet cells degrade at about the same rate as conventional cells in such an orbit. Balloon flight measurements show that violet solar cells produce approximately 20% more power than conventional cells.

  15. Results from the IMP-J violet solar cell experiment and violet cell balloon flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, E. M.

    1976-01-01

    The Interplanetary Monitoring Platform-J violet solar cell experiment was flown in an orbit with mild thermal cycling and low hard-particle radiation. The results of the experiment show that violet cells degrade at about the same rate as conventional cells in such an orbit. Balloon flight measurements show that violet solar cells produce approximately 20% more power than conventional cells.

  16. Laser processing of silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzeff, J. S.; Lopez, M.; Burger, D. R.

    1981-01-01

    Results of a study to utilize an Nd:glass laser for production line annealing of ion implantation induced damage in solar cells are reported. Czochralski-grown and sawn Si wafers 7.6 cm in diam, 0.35 mm thick, were implanted with phosphorus junctions and boron BSFs. Annealing with electron beam, laser, and firing of an Al paste to form the BSFs in different cells was compared. The laser was employed at 1.06 and 0.53 micron and in combination of both, with a 20-50 nsec pulsewidth, and energy densities of 1.2, 1.5, 1.9, and 2.1 J/sq cm. Best optical coupling was observed with the combined wavelengths and a 20 nsec pulse, using energy densities less than 1.5 J/sq cm. Although the Al sintered cells displayed the best characteristics, laser annealing is concluded to offer electrically active, defect-free, shallow junction Si substrates for high efficiency cells.

  17. Photochemical tissue bonding

    DOEpatents

    Redmond, Robert W. (Brookline, MA); Kochevar, Irene E. (Charlestown, MA)

    2012-01-10

    Photochemical tissue bonding methods include the application of a photosensitizer to a tissue and/or tissue graft, followed by irradiation with electromagnetic energy to produce a tissue seal. The methods are useful for tissue adhesion, such as in wound closure, tissue grafting, skin grafting, musculoskeletal tissue repair, ligament or tendon repair and corneal repair.

  18. PHOTOCHEMICAL REACTIVITY OF PERCHLOROETHYLENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchloroethylene (PCE), a solvent used in dry cleaning, has been suspected of contributing significantly to photochemical ozone/oxidant (O3/Ox) problems in urban atmospheres. Past evidence, however, was neither complete nor consistent. To interpret more conclusively the past evi...

  19. PHOTOCHEMICAL AEROSOL DYNAMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    New data are reported on (1) the rate of formation of condensable chemical species by photochemical reactions, (2) the effect of the reaction products on the particle size distribution and (3) the distribution of reaction products as a function of particle size. Gas-to-particle c...

  20. Laser beam apparatus and method for analyzing solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Staebler, David L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1980-01-01

    A laser beam apparatus and method for analyzing, inter alia, the current versus voltage curve at the point of illumination on a solar cell and the open circuit voltage of a solar cell. The apparatus incorporates a lock-in amplifier, and a laser beam light chopper which permits the measurement of the AC current of the solar cell at an applied DC voltage at the position on the solar cell where the cell is illuminated and a feedback scheme which permits the direct scanning measurements of the open circuit voltage. The accuracy of the measurement is a function of the intensity and wavelength of the laser light with respect to the intensity and wavelength distribution of sunlight and the percentage the dark current is at the open circuit voltage to the short circuit current of the solar cell.

  1. Plasma Texturing of Silicon Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, Mohan; Roy, Madhu; Ruby, Douglas S.; Zaidi, Saleem H.

    1999-07-20

    Surface texture promotes enhanced light absorption in Si solar cells. The quality of lower cost multicrystalline-silicon (mc-Si) has increased to the point that its cell performance is close to that of single c-Si cells, with the major difference resulting from the inability to texture mc-Si affordably. This has reduced the cost-per-watt advantage of mc-Si. Surface texturing aimed at enhanced absorption in Si has been historically obtained by creating multimicrometer-sized pyramids using anisotropic wet etchants on single-crystalline silicon that take advantage of its single crystalline orientation. Since the surface feature sizes are several times the length of the incident solar wavelengths involved, the optical analysis of the reflected and absorbed light can be understood using geometrical optics. Geometrical textures reduce reflection and improve absorption by double-bounce and oblique light coupling into the semiconductor. However, geometrical texturing suffers from several disadvantages that limit its effectiveness. Some of these are listed below: (a) Wet-chemical anisotropic etching used to form random pyramids on <100> crystal orientation is not effective in the texturing of low-cost multicrystalline wafers, (b) Anti-reflection films deposited on random features to reduce reflection have a resonant structure limiting their effectiveness to a narrow range of angles and wavelengths. Various forms of surface texturing have been applied to mc-Si in research, including laser-structuring, mechanical grinding, porous-Si etching, and photolithographically defined etching. However, these may be too costly to ever be used in large-scale production. A Japanese firm has reported the development of an RIE process using Cl{sub 2} gas, which textures multiple wafers per batch, making it attractive for mass-production [1]. Using this process, they have produced a 17.1% efficient 225-cm{sup 2} mc-Si cell, which is the highest efficiency mc-Si cell of its size ever reported. This proves that RIE texturing does not cause performance-limiting damage to Si cells. In this paper, we will discuss an RIE texturing process that avoids the use of toxic and corrosive Cl{sub 2} gas.

  2. Theory of back-surface-field solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonroos, O.

    1979-01-01

    Report describes simple concise theory of back-surface-field (BSF) solar cells (npp + junctions) based on Shockley's depletion-layer approximation and cites superiority of two-junction devices over conventional unijunction cells.

  3. Simulated space environment tests on cadmium sulfide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, D. R.; Oman, H.

    1971-01-01

    Cadmium sulfide (Cu2s - CdS) solar cells were tested under simulated space environmental conditions. Some cells were thermally cycled with illumination from a Xenon-arc solar simulator. A cycle was one hour of illumination followed immediately with one-half hour of darkness. In the light, the cells reached an equilibrium temperature of 60 C (333 K) and in the dark the cell temperature dropped to -120 C (153 K). Other cells were constantly illuminated with a Xenon-arc solar simulator. The equilibrium temperature of these cells was 55 C (328 K). The black vacuum chamber walls were cooled with liquid nitrogen to simulate a space heat sink. Chamber pressure was maintained at 0.000001 torr or less. Almost all of the solar cells tested degraded in power when exposed to a simulated space environment of either thermal cycling or constant illumination. The cells tested the longest were exposed to 10.050 thermal cycles.

  4. Experimental analysis of I--V characteristics of solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mialhe, P.; Charette, J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a simple experiment that can be performed by undergraduate students to derive the values of solar cell parameters from the plot of the output load current versus the voltage at the terminals of the cell.

  5. Oligo and Poly-thiophene/Zno Hybrid Nanowire Solar Cells

    E-print Network

    Briseno, Alejandro L.

    2010-01-01

    solar cells are benchmark systems that have attained power conversion efficienciessolar cells, then there must be an improved fundamental understanding of the organic/inorganic interface in order to improve power conversion efficiencies.

  6. Development of high-efficiency solar cells on silicon web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, A.; Meier, D. L.; Campbell, R. B.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Rai-Choudhury, P.

    1984-01-01

    The development of high efficiency solar cells on a silicon web is discussed. Heat treatment effects on web quality; the influence of twin plane lamellae, trace impurities and stress on minority carrier lifetime; and the fabrication of cells are discussed.

  7. Material Development for Highly Processable Thin Film Solar Cells

    E-print Network

    Bob, Brion

    2014-01-01

    light. The power conversion efficiency of a solar cell issolar cells have been a topic of growing research interest during the past several years in response to steadily increasing power conversion efficiency

  8. Through cell vias contacts for multijunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Olivier; Volatier, Maïté; Darnon, Maxime; Jaouad, Abdelatif; Bouzazi, Boussairi; Arès, Richard; Fafard, Simon; Aimez, Vincent

    2015-09-01

    The efficiency of multijunction solar cells used in concentrated photovoltaic systems is limited by shading from the grid line top electrode and electrical losses in the top epilayers. We propose to use through cell vias contacts to suppress the top electrode. Simulations show that the combination of through cell vias contacts with thin fingers has a potential absolute efficiency gain of 2 to 3% for concentration factors between 500 and 2000x. In addition, bus bars suppression improves by more than 20% the power extracted from a 6" wafer. Such an architecture requires additional technological steps. We discuss the challenges associated with via etching and report promising etching results for III-V heterostructures and germanium.

  9. Block 2 solar cell module environmental test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, K. L.

    1978-01-01

    Environmental tests were performed of on 76 solar cell modules produced by four different manufacturers. The following tests were performed: (1) 28 day temperature and humidity; (2) rain and icing; (3) salt fog; (4) sand and dust; (5) vacuum/steam/pressure; (6) fungus; (7) temperature/altitude; and (8) thermal shock. Environmental testing of the solar cell modules produced cracked cells, cracked encapsulant and encapsulant delaminations on various modules. In addition, there was some minor cell and frame corrosion.

  10. SOITEC's 4 junction solar cell module one year on sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerster, Eckart; Gerstmaier, Tobias; Gombert, Andreas; Krause, Rainer; van Riesen, Sascha; Wanka, Sven; Zech, Tobias

    2015-09-01

    During the last years SOITEC has co-developed a 4-junction solar cell (SmartCell™) with world record conversion efficiency. To verify suitability for concentrator application in SOITEC's Concentrix™ CPV module, early long-term outdoor performance monitoring was initiated. To date, some module prototypes have been already exposed for more than one year in desert environment; no performance degradation is observable. Accelerated ageing testing executed on the cells also indicates comparable reliability performance to standard triple junction concentrator solar cells.

  11. Flexible solar cells based on cadmium sulfide and telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Khrypunov, G. S. Chernykh, E. P.; Kovtun, N. A.; Belonogov, E. K.

    2009-08-15

    Output parameters and diode characteristics under illumination of flexible thin-film solar cells ITO/CdS/CdTe/Cu/Au formed on polyimide films by vacuum methods are studied. Using mathematical modeling of the effect of diode characteristics under illumination on the efficiency, the physicothechnical parameters of such structures are optimized. This made it possible to obtain laboratory samples of flexible solar cells based on cadmium sulfide and telluride with an efficiency of 11.4%. Solar modules with an efficiency of 4.5% based on the developed flexible solar cells are formed for the first time.

  12. Solar cell is housed in light-bulb enclosure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Inexpensive, conventional solar-cell module uses focusing principle of electric lamp in reverse to produce electric power from sunlight. Standard outdoor light enclosure provides low-cost housing which concentrates sunlight in solar cell. Unit is capable of producing approximately 1 watt of electric power.

  13. Laser-assisted solar-cell metallization processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, S.

    1984-01-01

    A photolytic metal deposition system using a focused continuous wave ultraviolet laser, a photolytic metal deposition system using a mask and ultraviolet flood illumination, and a pyrolytic metal deposition system using a focused continuous wave laser were studied. Fabrication of solar cells, as well as characterization to determine the effects of transient heat on solar cell junctions were investigated.

  14. Solar Cells DOI: 10.1002/ange.201203330

    E-print Network

    high open circuit voltages (VOC) and power conversion efficiencies (PCE) up to 2.7%. The optimalSolar Cells DOI: 10.1002/ange.201203330 A Supramolecular Complex in Small-Molecule Solar Cells or reticulated structures, they form efficient active layers in photovoltaic devices.[1,3] In earlier studies, we

  15. Analytical determination of critical crack size in solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.

    1988-01-01

    Although solar cells usually have chips and cracks, no material specifications concerning the allowable crack size on solar cells are available for quality assurance and engineering design usage. Any material specifications that the cell manufacturers use were developed for cosmetic reasons that have no technical basis. Therefore, the Applied Solar Energy Corporation (ASEC) has sponsored a continuing program for the fracture mechanics evaluation of GaAs. Fracture mechanics concepts were utilized to develop an analytical model that can predict the critical crack size of solar cells. This model indicates that the edge cracks of a solar cell are more critical than its surface cracks. In addition, the model suggests that the material specifications on the allowable crack size used for Si solar cells should not be applied to GaAs solar cells. The analytical model was applied to Si and GaAs solar cells, but it would also be applicable to the semiconductor wafers of other materials, such as a GaAs thin film on a Ge substrate, using appropriate input data.

  16. Coaxial silicon nanowires as solar cells and nanoelectronic power sources

    E-print Network

    Lee, Ka Yee C.

    LETTERS Coaxial silicon nanowires as solar cells and nanoelectronic power sources Bozhi Tian1. Lieber1,2 Solar cells are attractive candidates for clean and renewable power1,2 ; with miniaturization power output of up to 200 pW per nano- wire device and an apparent energy conversion efficiency of up

  17. SOLAR CELLS Low trap-state density and long

    E-print Network

    Sargent, Edward H. "Ted"

    ) perovskite solar cells (PSCs) have now achieved 20.1% certified power con- version efficiencies (1REPORTS SOLAR CELLS Low trap-state density and long carrier diffusion in organolead trihalide-state densities on the order of 109 to 1010 per cubic centimeter in MAPbX3 single crystals (comparable to the best

  18. Low-cost production of solar-cell panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, D. B.; Gallagher, B. D.; Sanchez, L. E.

    1980-01-01

    Large-scale production model combines most modern manufacturing techniques to produce silicon-solar-cell panels of low costs by 1982. Model proposes facility capable of operating around the clock with annual production capacity of 20 W of solar cell panels.

  19. High Efficiency Si Solar Cells Characterization Using Impedance Spectroscopy Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braña, A. F.; Forniés, E.; López, N.; García, B. J.

    2015-10-01

    Impedance Spectroscopy has been used to analyse commercial Si photovoltaic solar cells, to obtain information about minority carrier lifetimes, series and parallel resistances, and acceptor impurity densities. Silicon solar cells efficiencies ranging between 17 and 18% from different manufacturers have been analysed obtaining differences mainly in the electron lifetimes and doping densities. Relations between these parameters and DC curves are discussed.

  20. A Path to High-Concentration Luminescent Solar Concentrators with Nanorod Lumophores and Micro-Silicon Solar Cells

    E-print Network

    Faraon, Andrei

    -Silicon Solar Cells Scientific Achievement We fabricated and modeled luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) incorporating micro-silicon solar cells and tunable CdSe/CdS nanorod lumophores, demonstrating a practical path of both direct sunlight and diffuse light onto high- efficiency solar cells, and our work predicts

  1. Comparative modeling of InP solar cell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, R. K.; Weinberg, I.; Flood, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    The comparative modeling of p(+)n and n(+)p indium phosphide solar cell structures is studied using a numerical program PC-1D. The optimal design study has predicted that the p(+)n structure offers improved cell efficiencies as compared to n(+)p structure, due to higher open-circuit voltage. The various cell material and process parameters to achieve the maximum cell efficiencies are reported. The effect of some of the cell parameters on InP cell I-V characteristics was studied. The available radiation resistance data on n(+)p and p(+)p InP solar cells are also critically discussed.

  2. Innovative laser based solar cell scribing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frei, Bruno; Schneeberger, Stefan; Witte, Reiner

    2011-03-01

    The solar photovoltaic market is continuously growing utilizing boths crystalline silicon (c-Si) as well as thin film technologies. This growth is directly dependant on the manufacturing costs for solar cells. Factors for cost reduction are innovative ideas for an optimization of precision and throughput. Lasers are excellent tools to provide highly efficient processes with impressive accuracy. They need to be used in combination with fast and precise motion systems for a maximum gain in the manufacturing process, yielding best cost of ownership. In this article such an innovative solution is presented for laser scribing in thin film Si modules. A combination of a new glass substrate holding system combined with a fast and precise motion system is the foundation for a cost effective scribing machine. In addition, the advantages of fiber lasers in beam delivery and beam quality guarantee not only shorter setup and down times but also high resolution and reproducibility for the scribing processes P1, P2 and P3. The precision of the whole system allows to reduce the dead zone to a minimum and therefore to improve the efficiency of the modules.

  3. High-Efficiency Solar Cell Concepts: Physics, Materials, and Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mascarenhas, A.; Francoeur, S.; Seong, M. J.; Fluegel, B.; Zhang, Y.; Wanlass, M. W.

    2005-01-01

    Over the past three decades, significant progress has been made in the area of high-efficiency multijunction solar cells, with the effort primarily directed at current-matched solar cells in tandem. The key materials issues here have been obtaining semiconductors with the required bandgaps for sequential absorption of light in the solar spectrum and that are lattice matched to readily available substrates. The GaInP/GaAs/Ge cell is a striking example of success achieved in this area. Recently, several new approaches for high-efficiency solar cell design have emerged, that involve novel methods for tailoring alloy bandgaps, as well as alternate technologies for hetero-epitaxy of III-V's on Si. The advantages and difficulties expected to be encountered with each approach will be discussed, addressing both the materials issues and device physics whilst contrasting them with other fourth-generation solar cell concepts.

  4. Flexible, FEP-Teflon covered solar cell module development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschenbach, H. S.; Cannady, M. D.

    1976-01-01

    Techniques and equipment were developed for the large scale, low-cost fabrication of lightweight, roll-up and fold-up, FEP-Teflon encapsulated solar cell modules. Modules were fabricated by interconnecting solderless single-crystal silicon solar cells and heat laminating them at approximately 300 C between layers of optically clear FEP and to a loadbearing Kapton substrate sheet. Modules were fabricated from both conventional and wraparound contact solar cells. A heat seal technique was developed for mechanically interconnecting modules into an array. The electrical interconnections for both roll-up and fold-up arrays were also developed. The use of parallel-gap resistance welding, ultrasonic bonding, and thermocompression bonding processes for attaching interconnects to solar cells were investigated. Parallel-gap welding was found to be best suited for interconnecting the solderless solar cells into modules. Details of the fabrication equipment, fabrication processes, module and interconnect designs, environmental test equipment, and test results are presented.

  5. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy for in situ Electrical Characterization of Organic Solar Cells

    E-print Network

    Fisher, Frank

    Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy for in situ Electrical Characterization of Organic Solar Cells., University of Pittsburgh The most efficient organic solar cell today is made from blending conjugated donors and acceptors in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells. Most microscopic characterization

  6. Numerical Modeling of CIGS Solar Cells: Definition of the Baseline and

    E-print Network

    Sites, James R.

    Thesis Numerical Modeling of CIGS Solar Cells: Definition of the Baseline and Explanation our supervision by Markus Gloeckler entitled "Numerical Modeling of CIGS Solar Cells: Definition Solar Cells: Definition of the Baseline and Explanation of Superposition Failure Abstract: Numerical

  7. SCALING-UP OF NEW GENERATION OF 3D FLEXIBLE ORGANIC SOLAR CELLS

    E-print Network

    Kassegne, Samuel Kinde

    ..................................................................................6 2.1 Basic Device Physics of Solar CellsSCALING-UP OF NEW GENERATION OF 3D FLEXIBLE ORGANIC SOLAR CELLS _______________ A Thesis Presented Generation of 3D Flexible Organic Solar Cell _____________________________________________ Samuel Kinde

  8. Modeling and control of thin film surface morphology: application to thin film solar cells

    E-print Network

    Huang, Jianqiao

    2012-01-01

    films and solar cells. Journal of Applied Physics, 88:148–thin-film silicon solar cells. Applied Physics Letters, 97:solar cells with rough interfaces: Effect of back contact and interface roughness. Journal of Applied Physics, [

  9. Core-Shell Nanopillar Array Solar Cells using Cadmium Sulfide Coating on Indium Phosphide Nanopillars

    E-print Network

    Tu, Bor-An Clayton

    2013-01-01

    tandem solar cell with 10.6% power conversion efficiency. ,”picture of the power conversion efficiency of solar cells,solar cell under light. Source: National Instruments [57] The final power conversion efficiency (

  10. Comprehensive silicon solar cell computer modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamorte, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    The development of an efficient, comprehensive Si solar cell modeling program that has the capability of simulation accuracy of 5 percent or less is examined. A general investigation of computerized simulation is provided. Computer simulation programs are subdivided into a number of major tasks: (1) analytical method used to represent the physical system; (2) phenomena submodels that comprise the simulation of the system; (3) coding of the analysis and the phenomena submodels; (4) coding scheme that results in efficient use of the CPU so that CPU costs are low; and (5) modularized simulation program with respect to structures that may be analyzed, addition and/or modification of phenomena submodels as new experimental data become available, and the addition of other photovoltaic materials.

  11. Contact formation in gallium arsenide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, Victor G.; Fatemi, Navid S.

    1988-01-01

    Gold and gold-based alloys, commonly used as solar cell contact materials, are known to react readily with gallium arsenide. Experiments were performed to identify the mechanisms involved in these GaAs-metal interactions. It is shown that the reaction of GaAs with gold takes place via a dissociative diffusion process. It is shown further that the GaAs-metal reaction rate is controlled to a very great extent by the condition of the free surface of the contact metal, an interesting example of which is the previously unexplained increase in the reaction rate that has been observed for samples annealed in a vacuum environment as compared to those annealed in a gaseous ambient. A number of other hard-to-explain observations, such as the low-temperature formation of voids in the gold lattice and crystallite growth on the gold surface, are explained by invoking this mechanism.

  12. Efficiency of silicon solar cells containing chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, A. M. (inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Efficiency of silicon solar cells containing about one quadrillon atoms cu cm of chromium is improved about 26% by thermal annealing of the silicon wafer at a temperature of 200 C to form chromium precipitates having a diameter of less than 1 Angstrom. Further improvement in efficiency is achieved by scribing laser lines onto the back surface of the wafer at a spacing of at least 0.5 mm and at a depth of less than 13 micrometers to preferentially precipitate chromium near the back surface and away from the junction region of the device. This provides an economical way to improve the deleterious effects of chromium, one of the impurities present in metallurgical grade silicon mateial.

  13. Efficiency of silicon solar cells containing chromium

    DOEpatents

    Frosch, Robert A. Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space (New Port Beach, CA); Salama, Amal M. (New Port Beach, CA)

    1982-01-01

    Efficiency of silicon solar cells containing about 10.sup.15 atoms/cm.sup.3 of chromium is improved about 26% by thermal annealing of the silicon wafer at a temperature of 200.degree. C. to form chromium precipitates having a diameter of less than 1 Angstrom. Further improvement in efficiency is achieved by scribing laser lines onto the back surface of the wafer at a spacing of at least 0.5 mm and at a depth of less than 13 micrometers to preferentially precipitate chromium near the back surface and away from the junction region of the device. This provides an economical way to improve the deleterious effects of chromium, one of the impurities present in metallurgical grade silicon material.

  14. Hot photocarrier dynamics in organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Lane, P A; Cunningham, P D; Melinger, J S; Esenturk, O; Heilweil, E J

    2015-01-01

    Photocurrent in an organic solar cell is generated by a charge transfer reaction between electron donors and acceptors. Charge transfer is expected to proceed from thermalized states, but this picture has been challenged by recent studies that have investigated the role of hot excitons. Here we show a direct link between excess excitation energy and photocarrier mobility. Charge transfer from excited donor molecules generates hot photocarriers with excess energy coming from the offset between the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the donor and that of the acceptor. Hot photocarriers manifest themselves through a short-lived spike in terahertz photoconductivity that decays on a picosecond timescale as carriers thermalize. Different dynamics are observed when exciting the acceptor at its absorption edge to a thermalized state. Charge transfer in this case generates thermalized carriers described by terahertz photoconductivity dynamics consisting of an instrument-limited rise to a long-lived signal. PMID:26179323

  15. Organic Charge Carriers for Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Völker, Sebastian F; Collavini, Silvia; Delgado, Juan Luis

    2015-09-21

    The photovoltaic field is currently experiencing the "perovskite revolution". These materials have been known for decades, but only recently have they been applied in solid-state solar cells to obtain outstanding power conversion efficiencies. Given that the variety of perovskites used so far is limited, a lot of attention has been devoted to the development of suitable organic charge-transport materials to improve device performance. In this article, we will focus on the most promising materials able to transport electrons or holes from a structural point of view. Thereby, we focus on organic materials owing to their ease of preparation and manipulation, and this is nicely combined with the potential tuning of their properties through chemical synthesis. PMID:26311591

  16. Hot photocarrier dynamics in organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, P. A.; Cunningham, P. D.; Melinger, J. S.; Esenturk, O.; Heilweil, E. J.

    2015-07-01

    Photocurrent in an organic solar cell is generated by a charge transfer reaction between electron donors and acceptors. Charge transfer is expected to proceed from thermalized states, but this picture has been challenged by recent studies that have investigated the role of hot excitons. Here we show a direct link between excess excitation energy and photocarrier mobility. Charge transfer from excited donor molecules generates hot photocarriers with excess energy coming from the offset between the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the donor and that of the acceptor. Hot photocarriers manifest themselves through a short-lived spike in terahertz photoconductivity that decays on a picosecond timescale as carriers thermalize. Different dynamics are observed when exciting the acceptor at its absorption edge to a thermalized state. Charge transfer in this case generates thermalized carriers described by terahertz photoconductivity dynamics consisting of an instrument-limited rise to a long-lived signal.

  17. Hybrid Organic Solar Cells Blended with CNTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Sudip; Uchida, Hideo; Umeno, Masayoshi

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, composite carbon nanotubes (C-CNTs); single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) and multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs) are synthesized using an ultrasonic nebulizer in a large quartz tube for photovoltaic device fabrication in poly-3-octyl-thiophene (P3OT)/n-Si heterojunction solar cells. We found that the device fabricated with C-CNTs shows much better photovoltaic performance than that of a device without C-CNTs. The device with C-CNTs shows open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.454 V, a short circuit current density (Jsc) of 12.792 mA/cm2, fill factor (FF) of 0.361 and power conversion efficiency of 2.098 %. Here, we proposed that SWCNTs and MWCNTs provide efficient percolation paths for both electron and hole transportation to opposite electrodes and leading to the suppression of charge carrier recombination, thereby increasing the photovoltaic device performance.

  18. Inexpensive solar cell and method therefor

    SciTech Connect

    King, W.J.

    1983-02-15

    Solar cells are manufactured by a simplified method in which a single protective layer acts as an anti-reflection coating and an encapsulation. In cases where the junction is formed by ion implantation techniques, the same layer also serves as the implantation oxide. In addition, this multi-purpose layer may also serve as a mass analyzer, allowing the desired species of ions to reach the surface of the semiconductor but blocking the heavier undesired species. The necessary contacts may be formed prior to implantation, and the use of alloyed aluminum contacts with aluminum oxide passivation permits a simplified contacting procedure. A fully automatic contacting method and configuration for linear materials is also disclosed.

  19. Core-shell silicon nanowire solar cells.

    PubMed

    Adachi, M M; Anantram, M P; Karim, K S

    2013-01-01

    Silicon nanowires can enhance broadband optical absorption and reduce radial carrier collection distances in solar cell devices. Arrays of disordered nanowires grown by vapor-liquid-solid method are attractive because they can be grown on low-cost substrates such as glass, and are large area compatible. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that an array of disordered silicon nanowires surrounded by a thin transparent conductive oxide has both low diffuse and specular reflection with total values as low as < 4% over a broad wavelength range of 400?nm < ? < 650?nm. These anti-reflective properties together with enhanced infrared absorption in the core-shell nanowire facilitates enhancement in external quantum efficiency using two different active shell materials: amorphous silicon and nanocrystalline silicon. As a result, the core-shell nanowire device exhibits a short-circuit current enhancement of 15% with an amorphous Si shell and 26% with a nanocrystalline Si shell compared to their corresponding planar devices. PMID:23529071

  20. Wearable solar cells by stacking textile electrodes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shaowu; Yang, Zhibin; Chen, Peining; Deng, Jue; Li, Houpu; Peng, Huisheng

    2014-06-10

    A new and general method to produce flexible, wearable dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) textiles by the stacking of two textile electrodes has been developed. A metal-textile electrode that was made from micrometer-sized metal wires was used as a working electrode, while the textile counter electrode was woven from highly aligned carbon nanotube fibers with high mechanical strengths and electrical conductivities. The resulting DSC textile exhibited a high energy conversion efficiency that was well maintained under bending. Compared with the woven DSC textiles that are based on wire-shaped devices, this stacked DSC textile unexpectedly exhibited a unique deformation from a rectangle to a parallelogram, which is highly desired in portable electronics. This lightweight and wearable stacked DSC textile is superior to conventional planar DSCs because the energy conversion efficiency of the stacked DSC textile was independent of the angle of incident light. PMID:24789065

  1. Solar cells incorporating light harvesting arrays

    DOEpatents

    Lindsey, Jonathan S. (Raleigh, NC); Meyer, Gerald J. (Baltimore, MD)

    2002-01-01

    A solar cell incorporates a light harvesting array that comprises: (a) a first substrate comprising a first electrode; and (b) a layer of light harvesting rods electrically coupled to the first electrode, each of the light harvesting rods comprising a polymer of Formula I: X.sup.1.paren open-st.X.sup.m+1).sub.m (I) wherein m is at least 1, and may be from two, three or four to 20 or more; X.sup.1 is a charge separation group (and preferably a porphyrinic macrocycle, which may be one ligand of a double-decker sandwich compound) having an excited-state of energy equal to or lower than that of X.sup.2 ; and X.sup.2 through X.sup.m+1 are chromophores (and again are preferably porphyrinic macrocycles).

  2. Optical performance of exposed solar cell covers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hichwa, Bryant P.; Selee, Steven R.; Dodds, Jerry; Long, Greg S.

    1991-01-01

    The characterization results of samples flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) are discussed. These samples included both coated and uncoated fused silica and ceria glass substrates used in the manufacture of solar cell covers. The coatings comprised a single-layer magnesium fluoride antireflection coating and an all-dielectric high-reflector multilayer coating centered at 350 nm. Samples were mounted on both the leading and trailing surfaces of the LDEF for exposure to the environment of space. The optical properties of the coatings will be compared to control samples which were stored on the ground during the LDEF Mission. Results of Auger Electron Spectroscopy and Rutherford Backscatter Spectroscopy measurements made on several of the coatings are presented to explain the effects of space on the chemical composition of the coatings.

  3. Optical performance of exposed solar cell covers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Thomas H.; Hichwa, Bryant P.; Selee, Steven R.; Dodds, Jerry; Long, Greg S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the characterization results of samples flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). These samples included both coated and uncoated fused silica and ceria glass substrates used in the manufacture of solar cell covers. The coatings comprised a single-layer magnesium fluoride antireflection coating and an all-dielectric high-reflector multilayer coating centered at 350 nm. Samples were mounted on both the leading and trailing surfaces of the LDEF for exposure to the environment of space. The optical properties of the coatings will be compared to control samples which were stored on the ground during the LDEF Mission. Results of Auger Electron Spectroscopy and Rutherford Backscatter Spectroscopy measurements made on several of the coatings will be presented to explain the effects of space on the chemical composition of the coatings.

  4. Photochemically Generated Elemental Selenium Forms Conjugates with Serum Proteins that Are Preferentially Cytotoxic to Leukemia and Selected Solid Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Daziano, Jean-Pierre; Günther, Wolfgang H.H.; Krieg, Marianne; Tsujino, Ichiro; Miyagi, Kiyoko; Anderson, Gregory S.; Sampson, Reynée W.; Ostrowski, Martin D.; Muir, Sarah A.; Bula, Raymond J.; Sieber, Fritz

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if and how photoproducts contribute to the anti-tumor effect of merocyanine-mediated PDT. A panel of barbituric, thiobarbituric and selenobarbituric acid analogues of Merocyanine 540 was photobleached, and the resulting photoproducts were characterized by absorption, fluorescence emission, mass, energy dispersive X-ray, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and tested for cytotoxic activity against tumor cell lines and freshly explanted bone marrow cells. While all dyes were readily photobleached, only photoproducts of selone dyes showed cytotoxic activity. One-hour incubations with micromolar concentrations of selone-derived photoproducts were sufficient to reduce leukemia/lymphoma cells ?10,000 fold while preserving virtually all normal CD34-positive bone marrow cells. Of 6 multi-drug resistant tumor cell lines tested, 5 were as sensitive or more sensitive to photoproducts than the corresponding wild-type lines. Physicochemical characterizations of the cytotoxic activity indicated that it consisted of conjugates of subnano particles of elemental selenium and (lipo)proteins. The discovery of cytotoxic Se-protein conjugates provides a rare example of photoproducts contributing substantially to the anti-tumor effect of PDT and challenges the long-held view that Se in oxidation state zero is biologically inert. Agents modeled after our Se-protein conjugates may prove useful for the treatment of leukemia. PMID:22211823

  5. Silicon solar cells: Past, present and the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youn-Jung; Kim, Byung-Sung; Ifitiquar, S. M.; Park, Cheolmin; Yi, Junsin

    2014-08-01

    There has been a great demand for renewable energy for the last few years. However, the solar cell industry is currently experiencing a temporary plateau due to a sluggish economy and an oversupply of low-quality cells. The current situation can be overcome by reducing the production cost and by improving the cell is conversion efficiency. New materials such as compound semiconductor thin films have been explored to reduce the fabrication cost, and structural changes have been explored to improve the cell's efficiency. Although a record efficiency of 24.7% is held by a PERL — structured silicon solar cell and 13.44% has been realized using a thin silicon film, the mass production of these cells is still too expensive. Crystalline and amorphous silicon — based solar cells have led the solar industry and have occupied more than half of the market so far. They will remain so in the future photovoltaic (PV) market by playing a pivotal role in the solar industry. In this paper, we discuss two primary approaches that may boost the silicon — based solar cell market; one is a high efficiency approach and the other is a low cost approach. We also discuss the future prospects of various solar cells.

  6. Micro Solar Cells with Concentration and Light Trapping Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lanfang; Breuckner, Eric; Corcoran, Christopher; Yao, Yuan; Xu, Lu; Nuzzo, Ralph

    2013-03-01

    Compared with conventional bulk plate semiconductor solar cells, micro solar cells provide opportunity for novel design geometry and provide test bed for light trapping at the device level as well as module level. Surface recombination, however, will have to be addressed properly as the much increased surface area due to the reduced dimension is more prominent in these devices than conventional solar cells. In this poster, we present experimental demonstration of silicon micro solar cells with concentration and light trapping optics. Silicon micro solar cell with optimized surface passivation and doping profile that exhibit high efficiency is demonstrated. Effective incorporation of high quantum yield fluorescent centers in the polymer matrix into which micro solar cell was encapsulated was investigated for luminescent solar concentration application. Micro-cell on a semi-transparent, nanopatterned reflector formed by soft-imprint lithography was investigated for near field effect related solar conversion performance enhancement. This work is supported by the DOE `Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion' Energy Frontier Research Center under grant DE-SC0001293

  7. Energy yield determination of concentrator solar cells using laboratory measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisz, John F.; García, Iván; McMahon, William E.; Steiner, Myles A.; Ochoa, Mario; France, Ryan M.; Habte, Aron; Friedman, Daniel J.

    2015-09-01

    The annual energy conversion efficiency is calculated for a four junction inverted metamorphic solar cell that has been completely characterized in the laboratory at room temperature using measurements fit to a comprehensive optoelectronic model of the multijunction solar cells. A simple model of the temperature dependence is used predict the performance of the solar cell under varying temperature and spectra characteristic of Golden, CO for an entire year. The annual energy conversion efficiency is calculated by integrating the predicted cell performance over the entire year. The effects of geometric concentration, CPV system thermal characteristics, and luminescent coupling are highlighted.

  8. Development of a high efficiency thin silicon solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindmayer, J.

    1975-01-01

    Specific power output and radiation resistance characteristics developed for thin film silicon solar cells are reported. The technological base for fabricating these high efficiency cells and limitations of cell photovoltage are included. In addition, optical and electronic measurement instrumentation and mathematical analyses aids are included. Antireflection coatings for these cells are discussed.

  9. Effects of cell area on the performance of dye sensitized solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Khatani, Mehboob E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my E-mail: azclement@yahoo.com Mohamed, Norani Muti E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my E-mail: azclement@yahoo.com Hamid, Nor Hisham E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my E-mail: azclement@yahoo.com Sahmer, Ahmad Zahrin E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my E-mail: azclement@yahoo.com Samsudin, Adel E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my E-mail: azclement@yahoo.com

    2014-10-24

    Dye sensitized solar cells (DSCs) have significant advantage over the current silicon cells by having low manufacturing cost and potentially high conversion efficiency. Therefore, DSCs are expected to be used as the next generation solar cell device that covers wide range of new applications. In order to achieve highly efficient DSCs for practical application, study on the effect of increasing the cell’s area on the performance of dye sensitized solar need to be carried out. Three different DSC cell areas namely, 1, 12.96 and 93.5 cm{sup 2} respectively were fabricated and analyzed through solar simulator and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). From the analysis of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), it was observed that the cell’s electron lifetime was influenced significantly by the cell’s area. Although the collection efficiency of all cells recorded to be approximately 100% but higher recombination rate with increased cell area reduced the performance of the cell.

  10. Photochemical isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C.P.; Jensen, R.J.; Cotter, T.P.; Greiner, N.R.; Boyer, K.

    1987-04-28

    A process is described for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium and plutonium. 8 figs.

  11. Developments toward an 18% efficient silicon solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulenberg, A., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Limitations to increased open-circuit voltage were identified and experimentally verified for 0.1 ohm-cm solar cells with heavily doped emitters. After major reduction in the dark current contribution from the metal-silicon interface of the grid contacts, the surface recombination velocity of the oxide-silicon interface of shallow junction solar cells is the limiting factor. In deep junction solar cells, where the junction field does not aid surface collection, the emitter bulk is the limiting factor. Singly-diffused, shallow junction cells have been fabricated with open circuit voltages in excess of 645 mV. Double-diffusion shallow and deep junctions cells have displayed voltages above 650 mV. MIS solar cells formed on 0.1 ohm-cm substrates have exibited the lowest dark currents produced in the course of the contract work.

  12. A verified technique for calibrating space solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, Bruce

    1987-01-01

    Solar cells have been flown on high-altitude balloons for over 24 years, to produce solar cell standards that can be used to set the intensity of solar simulators. The events of a typical balloon calibration flight are reported. These are: the preflight events, including the preflight cell measurements and the assembly of the flight cells onto the solar tracker; the activities at the National Scientific Balloon Facility in Palestine, Texas, including the preflight calibrations, the mating of the tracker and cells onto the balloon, preparations for launch, and the launch; the payload recovery, which includes tracking the balloon by aircraft, terminating the flight, and retrieving the payload. In 1985, the cells flow on the balloon were also flown on a shuttle flight and measured independently. The two measurement methods are compared and shown to agree within 1 percent.

  13. Silicon solar cells: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Green, Martin A

    2013-08-13

    The vast majority of photovoltaic (PV) solar cells produced to date have been based on silicon wafers, with this dominance likely to continue well into the future. The surge in manufacturing volume over the last decade has resulted in greatly decreased costs. Multiple companies are now well below the US$1 W?¹ module manufacturing cost benchmark that was once regarded as the lowest possible with this technology. Despite these huge cost reductions, there is obvious scope for much more, as the polysilicon source material becomes more competitively priced, the new 'quasi-mono' and related controlled crystallization directional solidification processes are brought fully online, the sizes of ingot produced this way increase, wafer slicing switches to much quicker diamond impregnated approaches and cell conversion efficiencies increase towards the 25 per cent level. This makes the US Government's 'SunShot' target of US$1 W?¹ installed system cost by 2020 very achievable with silicon PVs. Paths to lower cost beyond this point are also explored. PMID:23816904

  14. Alternative designs for nanocrystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhavan, Atul

    Nanocrystalline silicon is an attractive material for solar cells. It has very small grains, about 20 nm, and yet its electronic properties are very similar to those of crystalline silicon. The material exhibits smaller mobilities than crystalline Silicon, but the minority carrier lifetimes are reasonable. It is known that the properties of the material depend critically upon deposition parameters, in particular, the degree of grain boundary passivation achieved during growth and grain size. Previous work has shown that as the material grows, the grains tend to agglomerate into a cluster, and the development of this cluster leads to poorer electronic properties. The traditional method for overcoming such clustering has been to change the hydrogen to silane dilution ratio as the material grows, keeping the material near its crystalline to amorphous transition zone. However, this method is dependent upon the precise growth chemistry and is not suitable for mass production. In this project, we develop a new device design, a superlattice comprising alternating layers of amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon, which allows one to precisely control the agglomeration of grains without having to resort to hydrogen profiling techniques. We study structural properties such as grain size and the degree of crystallnity, and electronic properties such as carrier diffusion lengths and defect densities. We show that an appropriate design of the superlattice allows one to minimize defect densities and maximize carrier diffusion lengths. We also study how to reduce series resistance in solar cells, and show that an appropriate combination of superlattice and contacts can lead to devices with high fill factors and good solar cell efficiencies. We also report on a new discovery, namely that the optical absorption itself depends critically upon grain size. Larger grain sizes, up to 50 nm, lead to increased optical absorption, a totally unexpected and very useful discovery for devices, since higher absorption translates into larger current densities. We show that such grain sizes can be achieved using deposition at higher temperatures. We develop a new technique, post-deposition annealing, to help passivate the grain boundaries in devices prepared at higher temperatures. Without such annealing, the device properties for devices grown at higher temperatures with larger grains are very poor. We show that when the devices are grown with larger grains, and then passivated using this new annealing technique, the current and efficiencies increase by 40% compared to similar devices prepared at lower temperatures. We also propose the concept of a Multiphase cell by alloying germanium with silicon in the back layer of the device. Since germanium has a stronger absorption co-efficient than silicon, we show that we can enhance the infrared spectral response and also achieve good IV curves by optimally grading the germane flow. Finally, we implement these concepts on textured backreflectors to further enhance the efficiencies by light trapping.

  15. Process development for high-efficiency silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, J.M.; Basore, P.A.; Buck, M.E.; Ruby, D.S.; Schubert, W.K.; Silva, B.L.; Tingley, J.W.

    1991-12-31

    Fabrication of high-efficiency silicon solar cells in an industrial environment requires a different optimization than in a laboratory environment. Strategies are presented for process development of high-efficiency silicon solar cells, with a goal of simplifying technology transfer into an industrial setting. The strategies emphasize the use of statistical experimental design for process optimization, and the use of baseline processes and cells for process monitoring and quality control. 8 refs.

  16. Development of a new integral solar cell protective cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naselow, A. B.; Dupont, P. S.; Scott-Monck, J.

    1983-01-01

    A unique polyimide polymer has been developed which shows promise as an encapsulant for interconnected solar cell modules. Such an integral cover offers important weight and cost advantages. The polymer has been characterized on silicon solar cells with respect to electrical output and spectral response. The response of the material-coated cells to electron, low-energy proton, and vacuum-ultraviolet radiation, thermal shock and humidity tests was determined.

  17. 28% efficient GaAs concentrator solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    MacMillan, H.F.; Hamaker, H.C.; Kaminar, N.R.; Kuryla, M.S.; Ristow, M.L.; Liu, D.D.; Virshup, G.F.; Gee, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    AlGaAs/GaAs heteroface solar concentrator cells which exhibit efficiencies in excess of 27% at high solar concentrations (>400 suns, AM1.5D, 100 mW/cm/sup 2/) have been fabricated with both n/p and p/n configurations. The best n/p cell achieved an efficiency of 28.1% around 400 suns, and the best p/n cell achieved an efficiency of 27.5% around 1000 suns. The high performance of these GaAs concentrator cells compared to our earlier high-efficiency cells was due to improved control of the MOCVD growth conditions and improved cell fabrication procedures (gridline definition and edge passivation). The design parameters of the solar cell structures and optimized grid pattern were determined with a realistic computer modeling program. An evaluation of the device characteristics and implications regarding future GaAs concentrator cell development is presented. 12 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Polymer/Nanocrystal Hybrid Solar Cells: Influence of Molecular Precursor Design on Film Nanomorphology, Charge Generation and Device Performance

    PubMed Central

    MacLachlan, Andrew J; Rath, Thomas; Cappel, Ute B; Dowland, Simon A; Amenitsch, Heinz; Knall, Astrid-Caroline; Buchmaier, Christine; Trimmel, Gregor; Nelson, Jenny; Haque, Saif A

    2015-01-01

    In this work, molecular tuning of metal xanthate precursors is shown to have a marked effect on the heterojunction morphology of hybrid poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT)/CdS blends and, as a result, the photochemical processes and overall performance of in situ fabricated hybrid solar cells. A series of cadmium xanthate complexes is synthesized for use as in situ precursors to cadmium sulfide nanoparticles in hybrid P3HT/CdS solar cells. The formation of CdS domains is studied by simultaneous GIWAXS (grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering) and GISAXS (grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering), revealing knowledge about crystal growth and the formation of different morphologies observed using TEM (transmission electron microscopy). These measurements show that there is a strong relationship between precursor structure and heterojunction nanomorphology. A combination of TAS (transient absorption spectroscopy) and photovoltaic device performance measurements is used to show the intricate balance required between charge photogeneration and percolated domains in order to effectively extract charges to maximize device power conversion efficiencies. This study presents a strong case for xanthate complexes as a useful route to designing optimal heterojunction morphologies for use in the emerging field of hybrid organic/inorganic solar cells, due to the fact that the nanomorphology can be tuned via careful design of these precursor materials. PMID:25866496

  19. Evaluation of solar cells and arrays for potential solar power satellite applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almgren, D. W.; Csigi, K.; Gaudet, A. D.

    1978-01-01

    Proposed solar array designs and manufacturing methods are evaluated to identify options which show the greatest promise of leading up to the develpment of a cost-effective SPS solar cell array design. The key program elements which have to be accomplished as part of an SPS solar cell array development program are defined. The issues focussed on are: (1) definition of one or more designs of a candidate SPS solar array module, using results from current system studies; (2) development of the necessary manufacturing requirements for the candidate SPS solar cell arrays and an assessment of the market size, timing, and industry infrastructure needed to produce the arrays for the SPS program; (3) evaluation of current DOE, NASA and DOD photovoltaic programs to determine the impacts of recent advances in solar cell materials, array designs and manufacturing technology on the candidate SPS solar cell arrays; and (4) definition of key program elements for the development of the most promising solar cell arrays for the SPS program.

  20. Simulation of interdigitated back contact solar cell with trench structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo Min; Chun, Seungju; Kang, Min Gu; Song, Hee-Eun; Lee, Jong-Han; Boo, Hyunpil; Bae, Soohyun; Kang, Yoonmook; Lee, Hae-Seok; Kim, Donghwan

    2015-02-01

    We performed two-dimensional technology computer-aided design simulations for interdigitated back contact (IBC) solar cells with rear trench structures (TS), denoted here as TS-IBC solar cells. First, we calculated a reference simulation model for conventional IBC solar cells. We then assumed a trench structure at the rear surface of the IBC solar cell. For this structure, we analyzed solar cell performance as a function of various trench depths and type. It was found that emitter trench formation affects minority carrier collection, such that the short-circuit current density increases with increasing trench depth. However, the back-surface field (BSF) trench exhibited poor minority carrier collection, which reduced the conversion efficiency of the TS-IBC solar cells. It was also found that for the same trench depth (30 ?m), the difference in conversion efficiencies of an IBC solar cell with an emitter trench and that with a BSF trench was 0.6%. We are thus convinced that the emitter trench structure is more important than the BSF trench structure.

  1. Effects of angular confinement and concentration to realistic solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Höhn, O. Kraus, T.; Bläsi, B.; Schwarz, U. T.

    2015-01-21

    In standard solar cells, light impinges under a very small angular range, whereas the solar cell emits light into the whole half space. Due to this expansion of etendué, entropy is generated, which limits the maximal efficiency of solar cells. This limit can be overcome by either increasing the angle of incidence by concentration or by decreasing the angle of emission by an angularly confining element or by a combination of both. In an ideal solar cell with radiative recombination as the only loss mechanism, angular confinement and concentration are thermodynamically equivalent. It is shown that concentration in a device, where non-radiative losses such as Shockley-Read-Hall and Auger recombination are considered, is not equivalent to angular confinement. As soon as non-radiative losses are considered, the gain in efficiency due to angular confinement drops significantly in contrast to the gain caused by concentration. With the help of detailed balance calculations, it is furthermore shown that angular confinement can help to increase the efficiency of solar cells under concentrated sunlight even if no measurable gain is expected for the solar cell under 1-sun-illumination. Our analysis predicts a relative gain of 3.14% relative in efficiency for a realistic solar cell with a concentration factor of 500.

  2. Solar cells. High-efficiency solution-processed perovskite solar cells with millimeter-scale grains.

    PubMed

    Nie, Wanyi; Tsai, Hsinhan; Asadpour, Reza; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Neukirch, Amanda J; Gupta, Gautam; Crochet, Jared J; Chhowalla, Manish; Tretiak, Sergei; Alam, Muhammad A; Wang, Hsing-Lin; Mohite, Aditya D

    2015-01-30

    State-of-the-art photovoltaics use high-purity, large-area, wafer-scale single-crystalline semiconductors grown by sophisticated, high-temperature crystal growth processes. We demonstrate a solution-based hot-casting technique to grow continuous, pinhole-free thin films of organometallic perovskites with millimeter-scale crystalline grains. We fabricated planar solar cells with efficiencies approaching 18%, with little cell-to-cell variability. The devices show hysteresis-free photovoltaic response, which had been a fundamental bottleneck for the stable operation of perovskite devices. Characterization and modeling attribute the improved performance to reduced bulk defects and improved charge carrier mobility in large-grain devices. We anticipate that this technique will lead the field toward synthesis of wafer-scale crystalline perovskites, necessary for the fabrication of high-efficiency solar cells, and will be applicable to several other material systems plagued by polydispersity, defects, and grain boundary recombination in solution-processed thin films. PMID:25635093

  3. Award-Winning Etching Process Cuts Solar Cell Costs Optimizing solar-cell technology can be a complex job, requiring expertise in material

    E-print Network

    efficiency as a typical crystalline silicon solar cell with a more costly antireflec- tive coating. At 100°F-of-inci- dence performance of black silicon may result in solar modules that produce 1%­3% more energy, becauseAward-Winning Etching Process Cuts Solar Cell Costs Optimizing solar-cell technology can

  4. Indium Phosphide Window Layers for Indium Gallium Arsenide Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.

    2005-01-01

    Window layers help in reducing the surface recombination at the emitter surface of the solar cells resulting in significant improvement in energy conversion efficiency. Indium gallium arsenide (In(x)Ga(1-x)As) and related materials based solar cells are quite promising for photovoltaic and thermophotovoltaic applications. The flexibility of the change in the bandgap energy and the growth of InGaAs on different substrates make this material very attractive for multi-bandgap energy, multi-junction solar cell approaches. The high efficiency and better radiation performance of the solar cell structures based on InGaAs make them suitable for space power applications. This work investigates the suitability of indium phosphide (InP) window layers for lattice-matched In(0.53)Ga(0.47)As (bandgap energy 0.74 eV) solar cells. We present the first data on the effects of the p-type InP window layer on p-on-n lattice-matched InGaAs solar cells. The modeled quantum efficiency results show a significant improvement in the blue region with the InP window. The bare InGaAs solar cell performance suffers due to high surface recombination velocity (10(exp 7) cm/s). The large band discontinuity at the InP/InGaAs heterojunction offers a great potential barrier to minority carriers. The calculated results demonstrate that the InP window layer effectively passivates the solar cell front surface, hence resulting in reduced surface recombination and therefore, significantly improving the performance of the InGaAs solar cell.

  5. Response of silicon solar cell to pulsed laser illumination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willowby, D.; Alexander, D.; Edge, T.; Herren, K.

    1993-01-01

    The response of silicon solar cell(s) to pulsed laser illumination is discussed. The motivation was due to the interest of Earth to space/Moon power beaming applications. When this work began, it was not known if solar cells would respond to laser light with pulse lengths in the nanosecond range and a repetition frequency in the kHz range. This is because the laser pulse would be shorter than the minority carrier lifetime of silicon. A 20-nanosecond (ns) full width half max (FWHM) pulse from an aluminum-gallium/arsenide (Al-Ga-As) diode laser was used to illuminate silicon solar cells at a wavelength of 885 nanometers (nm). Using a high-speed digital oscilloscope, the response of the solar cells to individual pulses across various resistive loads was observed and recorded.

  6. Fabrication of a 100 ?m thick crystalline silicon solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovinen, A.

    1997-01-01

    Direct energy conversion from sun light to electricity using crystalline silicon based solar cell modules has been commercially available for several years. Above 20% conversion efficiencies have been realised in laboratory scale since 1990 [1]. The more important issue in the present solar cell fabrication development is to adopt such procedures and equipment that allow practical module efficiencies with less material and processing costs. One way to cut the material costs is to use thinner silicon wafers, which gives more wafers per length of a silicon log. In a high conversion efficiency cell the thickness has to be well below electron diffusion length for collection of the energy from long wavelength part of the solar spectrum. The diffusion length is an indicator of the material quality. Thin crystalline silicon solar cell technology gives the opportunity to choose cheaper, lower quality silicon as a starting material for the cell process without severe reduction in the conversion efficiency. Optimisation of a thin crystalline silicon solar cell design includes efficient light trapping and passivation of the cell surfaces. The proportion of a cell surface area to the cell volume increases as thickness is reduced. This magnifies the relative importance of surface recombination of the charge carriers as compared to the volume recombination in a solar cell. Although the quality demand on the cell material is relaxed, high conversion efficiency thin solar cell technology puts more weight on the quality of the surface passivation. In this paper, the fabrication procedure of thin crystalline silicon solar cell samples used in H.U.T. Electron Physics Laboratory is presented. The sample material is thinned using a 20% hot KOH bath to a nominal 1007 ?m thickness. The standard cell sample is a 24 mm × 24 mm square with a p-type substrate, aluminium doped back surface field and phosphorous front diffusion. Aluminium evaporation through a stainless steel mask is adopted as a quick and simple metallisation scheme for both front and back contacts [2]. The current-voltage-characteristics together with spectral response data of a typical thin crystalline silicon solar cell is also illustrated for the evaluation of the process. The measurement data is evaluated using the procedures and software developed by the author [2, 3]. The software includes diode modelling of the solar cell current-voltage data and breaking the spectral response to contributions from the emitter, depletion region and the base with numerical estimates on diffusion length, surface recombination velocities and charge carrier lifetimes.

  7. Neural Network Modeling of Degradation of Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Himanshu; Ghosh, Bahniman; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2011-05-25

    Neural network modeling has been used to predict the degradation in conversion efficiency of solar cells in this work. The model takes intensity of light, temperature and exposure time as inputs and predicts the conversion efficiency of the solar cell. Backpropagation algorithm has been used to train the network. It is found that the neural network model satisfactorily predicts the degradation in efficiency of the solar cell with exposure time. The error in the computed results, after comparison with experimental results, lies in the range of 0.005-0.01, which is quite low.

  8. Air stable organic-inorganic nanoparticles hybrid solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Qian, Lei; Yang, Jihua; Xue, Jiangeng; Holloway, Paul H.

    2015-09-29

    A solar cell includes a low work function cathode, an active layer of an organic-inorganic nanoparticle composite, a ZnO nanoparticle layer situated between and physically contacting the cathode and active layers; and a transparent high work function anode that is a bilayer electrode. The inclusion of the ZnO nanoparticle layer results in a solar cell displaying a conversion efficiency increase and reduces the device degradation rate. Embodiments of the invention are directed to novel ZnO nanoparticles that are advantageous for use as the ZnO nanoparticle layers of the novel solar cells and a method to prepare the ZnO nanoparticles.

  9. Development of pulsed processes for the manufacture of solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnucci, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    The results of a 1-year program to develop the processes required for low-energy ion implantation for the automated production of silicon solar cells are described. The program included: (1) demonstrating state-of-the-art ion implantation equipment and designing an automated ion implanter, (2) making efforts to improve the performance of ion-implanted solar cells to 16.5 percent AM1, (3) developing a model of the pulse annealing process used in solar cell production, and (4) preparing an economic analysis of the process costs of ion implantation.

  10. Device simulation of cuprous oxide heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiguchi, Yuki; Miyajima, Shinsuke

    2015-11-01

    We developed a device simulation model of cuprous oxide (Cu2O)-based heterojunction solar cells. The developed model well reproduces the reported experimental current density-voltage characteristics and the external quantum efficiency results. By using the model, we explored structures for high-efficiency Cu2O-based heterojunction solar cells. It was found that the electron affinity of the buffer layer between transparent conducting oxide and Cu2O significantly affects solar cell performance. Surface recombination on the rear side of the device can be suppressed by employing a highly doped back surface layer. Our device simulation demonstrates a conversion efficiency of 16% without any optical confinement structure.

  11. Performance enhancement of polymer solar cells using copper oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanninayake, Aruna P.; Gunashekar, Subhashini; Li, Shengyi; Church, Benjamin C.; Abu-Zahra, Nidal

    2015-06-01

    Copper oxide (CuO) is a p-type semiconductor with a band gap energy of 1.5 eV, this is close to the ideal energy gap of 1.4 eV required for solar cells to allow good solar spectral absorption. The inherent electrical characteristics of CuO nanoparticles make them attractive candidates for improving the performance of polymer solar cells when incorporated into the active polymer layer. The UV-visible absorption spectra and external quantum efficiency of P3HT/PC70BM solar cells containing different weight percentages of CuO nanoparticles showed a clear enhancement in the photo absorption of the active layer, this increased the power conversion efficiency of the solar cells by 24% in comparison to the reference cell. The short circuit current of the reference cell was found to be 5.234 mA cm-2 and it seemed to increase to 6.484 mA cm-2 in cells containing 0.6 mg of CuO NPs; in addition, the fill factor increased from 61.15% to 68.0%, showing an enhancement of 11.2%. These observations suggest that the optimum concentration of CuO nanoparticles was 0.6 mg in the active layer. These significant findings can be applied to design high-efficiency polymer solar cells containing inorganic nanoparticles.

  12. Progress in the Multijunction Solar Cell Mantech Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keener, David N.; Marvin, Dean; Brinker, David J.; Curtis, Henry B.

    2004-01-01

    In September, 1995, the joint Wright Laboratory/Phillips Laboratory/NASA Lewis Multijunction Solar Cell Manufacturing Technology (ManTech) Program began to improve multijunction cell performance and scale them up to production size and quantity to support Air Force and commercial satellite programs. The first milestone of the program has been reached and the purpose of this paper is to present the results of the program so far. The objectives of the Multijunction Solar Cell ManTech Program are to increase the GaInP2/GaAs/Ge lot average cell efficiency to 24-26%, increase the cell size to > or equal to 16 sq cm while maintaining high efficiency, and limit the per cell costs to < or equal to 1.15X state of the art GaAs/Ge cells. Advanced manufacturing technology and process control techniques such as in-situ process monitoring and real time process feedback are being used to optimize multijunction solar cell growth processes to achieve these goals. This paper will discuss progress made in Phase I of the program and give an overview of Phase II but will focus on side-by-side testing results collected by Phillips Laboratory and NASA Lewis on Phase I deliverable cells from both vendors. Cell performance, pre- and post radiation, and temperature coefficient results on initial production multijunction solar cells will be presented and discussed. The data shows that this technology meets the objectives of the program, and that, in the interim before a new solar simulation standard becomes widely available, the measurement techniques being used by the major space solar cell manufacturers are providing adequate testing results for solar array design.

  13. Investigation of high efficiency GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Larry C.; Dunham, Glen; Addis, F. W.; Huber, Dan; Linden, Kurt

    1989-01-01

    Investigations of basic mechanisms which limit the performance of high efficiency GaAs solar cells are discussed. P/N heteroface structures have been fabricated from MOCVD epiwafers. Typical AM1 efficiencies are in the 21 to 22 percent range, with a SERI measurement for one cell being 21.5 percent. The cells are nominally 1.5 x 1.5 cm in size. Studies have involved photoresponse, T-I-V analyses, and interpretation of data in terms of appropriate models to determine key cell parameters. Results of these studies are utilized to determine future approaches for increasing GaAs solar cell efficiencies.

  14. Current- and lattice-matched tandem solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.

    1985-10-21

    A multijunction (cascade) tandem photovoltaic solar cell device is fabricated of a Ga/sub x/In/sub 1-x/P (0.505 equal to or less than x equal to or less than 0.515) top cell semiconductor lattice-matched to a GaAs bottom cell semiconductor at a low resistance heterojunction, preferably a p/sup +//n/sup +/ heterojunction between the cells. The top and bottom cells are both lattice-matched and current-matched for high efficiency solar radiation conversion to electrical energy.

  15. Space Qualification Test of a-Silicon Solar Cell Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Q.; Lawton, R. A.; Manion, S. J.; Okuno, J. O.; Ruiz, R. P.; Vu, D. T.; Vu, D. T.; Kayali, S. A.; Jeffrey, F. R.

    2004-01-01

    The basic requirements of solar cell modules for space applications are generally described in MIL-S-83576 for the specific needs of the USAF. However, the specifications of solar cells intended for use on space terrestrial applications are not well defined. Therefore, this qualifications test effort was concentrated on critical areas specific to the microseismometer probe which is intended to be included in the Mars microprobe programs. Parameters that were evaluated included performance dependence on: illuminating angles, terrestrial temperatures, lifetime, as well as impact landing conditions. Our qualification efforts were limited to these most critical areas of concern. Most of the tested solar cell modules have met the requirements of the program except the impact tests. Surprisingly, one of the two single PIN 2 x 1 amorphous solar cell modules continued to function even after the 80000G impact tests. The output power parameters, Pout, FF, Isc and Voc, of the single PIN amorphous solar cell module were found to be 3.14 mW, 0.40, 9.98 mA and 0.78 V, respectively. These parameters are good enough to consider the solar module as a possible power source for the microprobe seismometer. Some recommendations were made to improve the usefulness of the amorphous silicon solar cell modules in space terrestrial applications, based on the results obtained from the intensive short term lab test effort.

  16. Multi-band gap and new solar cell options workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchby, J.; Timmons, M.; Olson, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    Discussions of the multi-band gap (MBG) and new solar cell options workshop are presented. Topics discussed include: greater than 2 terminal cells; radiation damage preventing development of MBG cells for space; lattice matching; measurement of true performance; future of II-VI materials in MBG devices; and quaternaries.

  17. Development of high efficiency solar cells on silicon web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, A.; Meier, D. L.; Campbell, R. B.; Schmidt, D. N.; Rai-Choudhury, P.

    1984-01-01

    Web base material is being improved with a goal toward obtaining solar cell efficiencies in excess of 18% (AM1). Carrier loss mechanisms in web silicon was investigated, techniques were developed to reduce carrier recombination in the web, and web cells were fabricated using effective surface passivation. The effect of stress on web cell performance was also investigated.

  18. Solar Cell and Array Technology Development for NASA Solar Electric Propulsion Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, Michael; McNatt, Jeremiah; Mercer, Carolyn; Kerslake, Tom; Pappa, Richard

    2012-01-01

    NASA is currently developing advanced solar cell and solar array technologies to support future exploration activities. These advanced photovoltaic technology development efforts are needed to enable very large (multi-hundred kilowatt) power systems that must be compatible with solar electric propulsion (SEP) missions. The technology being developed must address a wide variety of requirements and cover the necessary advances in solar cell, blanket integration, and large solar array structures that are needed for this class of missions. Th is paper will summarize NASA's plans for high power SEP missions, initi al mission studies and power system requirements, plans for advanced photovoltaic technology development, and the status of specific cell and array technology development and testing that have already been conducted.

  19. Solar cell having improved front surface metallization

    SciTech Connect

    Lillington, D.R.; Mardesich, N.; Dill, H.G.; Garlick, G.F.J.

    1987-09-15

    This patent describes a solar cell comprising: a first layer of gallium arsenide semiconductor material of an N+ conductivity; a second layer of gallium arsenide semiconductor material of an N conductivity overlying the first layer; a third layer of gallium arsenide semiconductor material of a P conductivity overlying the N conductivity layer and forming a P-N junction therebetween. A layer of aluminium gallium arsenide semiconductor material of a p conductivity overlying the front major surface of the P conductivity third layer and having an exposed surface essentially parallel to the front major surface and at least one edge; a plurality of metallic contact lines made of a first metal alloy composition and being spaced apart by a first predetermined distance traversing the exposed surface and extending through the aluminium gallium arsenide layer to the front major surface and making electrical contact to the third layer; a plurality of longitudinally disposed metallic grid lines made of a second metal alloy composition and being spaced apart by a second predetermined distance located on the exposed surface of the aluminium gallium arsenide layer and which cross the metallic contact lines and make electrical contact to the metallic lines; a flat metallic strip disposed on the aluminium gallium arsenide layer exposed surface near the edge, the strip electrically coupling the metallic grid lines to one another; and a back contact located on the back major surface.

  20. Solar cell with improved electrical contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Cavicchi, B.T.; Dill, H.G.; Zemmrich, D.K.

    1987-10-06

    A solar cell is described comprising: a first layer of semiconductor material of a first conductivity type; a second layer of semiconductor material of a second opposite conductivity type disposed on the first layer forming a semiconductor junction therebetween. The first and second layers having first and second major essentially parallel surfaces, respectively, essentially parallel to the semiconductor junction; a layer of aluminum gallium arsenide semiconductor material of the second conductivity type disposed on the second major surface and having an exposed front major surface essentially parallel to the second major surface and further having grooves extending vertically to the second layer; electrically conductive material filling the grooves and electrically contacting the second layer to form metallic contact lines; a flat conductive bar transversely disposed on the exposed front major surface across the grooves and making electrical contact ot the electrically conductive material in the grooves; an electrically conductive flat strip disposed on the exposed major surface and spaced apart from the conductive bar; and at least one electrically conductive bridge electrically coupling the conductive bar to the contact strip.