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Sample records for photoionized stellar wind

  1. X-Ray Spectral Study of the Photoionized Stellar Wind in Vela X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Shin; Sako, Masao; Ishida, Manabu; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Kahn, Steven M.; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Nagase, Fumiaki; Paerels, Frederik; Takahashi, Tadayuki; /JAXA, Sagamihara /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Tokyo Metropolitan U. /Kogakuin U. /Columbia U., Astron. Astrophys.

    2006-07-10

    We present results from quantitative modeling and spectral analysis of the high mass X-ray binary system Vela X-1 obtained with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer. The observations cover three orbital phase ranges within a single binary orbit. The spectra exhibit emission lines from H-like and He-like ions driven by photoionization, as well as fluorescent emission lines from several elements in lower charge states. The properties of these X-ray lines are measured with the highest accuracy to date. In order to interpret and make full use of the high-quality data, we have developed a simulator, which calculates the ionization and thermal structure of a stellar wind photoionized by an X-ray source, and performs Monte Carlo simulations of X-ray photons propagating through the wind. The emergent spectra are then computed as a function of the viewing angle accurately accounting for photon transport in three dimensions including dynamics. From comparisons of the observed spectra with results from the simulator, we are able to find the ionization structure and the geometrical distribution of material in the stellar wind of Vela X-1 that can reproduce the observed spectral line intensities and continuum shapes at different orbital phases remarkably well. We find that the stellar wind profile can be represented by a CAK-model with a star mass loss rate of (1.5-2.0) x 10{sup -6} M{sub {circle_dot}} yr{sup -1}, assuming a terminal velocity of 1100 km s{sup -1}. It is found that a large fraction of X-ray emission lines from highly ionized ions are formed in the region between the neutron star and the companion star. We also find that the fluorescent X-ray lines must be produced in at least three distinct regions: (1) the extended stellar wind, (2) reflection off the stellar photosphere, and (3) in a distribution of dense material partially covering and possibly trailing the neutron star, which may be associated with an accretion wake. Finally, from

  2. Stellar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owocki, Stan

    A "stellar wind" is the continuous, supersonic outflow of matter from the surface layers of a star. Our sun has a solar wind, driven by the gas-pressure expansion of the hot (T > 106 K) solar corona. It can be studied through direct in situ measurement by interplanetary spacecraft; but analogous coronal winds in more distant solar-type stars are so tenuous and transparent that that they are difficult to detect directly. Many more luminous stars have winds that are dense enough to be opaque at certain wavelengths of the star's radiation, making it possible to study their wind outflows remotely through careful interpretation of the observed stellar spectra. Red giant stars show slow, dense winds that may be driven by the pressure from magnetohydrodyanmic waves. As stars with initial mass up to 8 M ⊙ evolve toward the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB), a combination of stellar pulsations and radiative scattering off dust can culminate in "superwinds" that strip away the entire stellar envelope, leaving behind a hot white dwarf stellar core with less than the Chandrasekhar mass of ˜ ​​ 1. 4M ⊙. The winds of hot, luminous, massive stars are driven by line-scattering of stellar radiation, but such massive stars can also exhibit superwind episodes, either as Red Supergiants or Luminous Blue Variable stars. The combined wind and superwind mass loss can strip the star's hydrogen envelope, leaving behind a Wolf-Rayet star composed of the products of earlier nuclear burning via the CNO cycle. In addition to such direct effects on a star's own evolution, stellar winds can be a substantial source of mass, momentum, and energy to the interstellar medium, blowing open large cavities or "bubbles" in this ISM, seeding it with nuclear processed material, and even helping trigger the formation of new stars, and influencing their eventual fate as white dwarves or core-collapse supernovae. This chapter reviews the properties of such stellar winds, with an emphasis on the various

  3. Photoionization in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, E.; Lepri, S. T.

    2015-10-01

    In this work we investigate the effects of photoionization on the charge state composition of the solar wind. Using measured solar EUV and X-ray irradiance, the Michigan Ionization Code and a model for the fast and slow solar wind, we calculate the evolution of the charge state distribution of He, C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, and Fe with and without including photoionization for both types of wind. We find that the solar radiation has significant effects on the charge state distribution of C, N, and O, causing the ionization levels of these elements to be higher than without photoionization; differences are largest for oxygen. The ions commonly observed for elements heavier than O are much less affected, except in ICMEs where Fe ions more ionized than 16+ can also be affected by the solar radiation. We also show that the commonly used O7+/O6+ density ratio is the most sensitive to photoionization; this sensitivity also causes the value of this ratio to depend on the phase of the solar cycle. We show that the O7+/O6+ ratio needs to be used with caution for solar wind classification and coronal temperature estimates, and recommend the C6+/C4+ ratio for these purposes.

  4. Stellar feedback efficiencies: supernovae versus stellar winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierlinger, Katharina M.; Burkert, Andreas; Ntormousi, Evangelia; Fierlinger, Peter; Schartmann, Marc; Ballone, Alessandro; Krause, Martin G. H.; Diehl, Roland

    2016-02-01

    Stellar winds and supernova (SN) explosions of massive stars (`stellar feedback') create bubbles in the interstellar medium (ISM) and insert newly produced heavy elements and kinetic energy into their surroundings, possibly driving turbulence. Most of this energy is thermalized and immediately removed from the ISM by radiative cooling. The rest is available for driving ISM dynamics. In this work we estimate the amount of feedback energy retained as kinetic energy when the bubble walls have decelerated to the sound speed of the ambient medium. We show that the feedback of the most massive star outweighs the feedback from less massive stars. For a giant molecular cloud (GMC) mass of 105 M⊙ (as e.g. found in the Orion GMCs) and a star formation efficiency of 8 per cent the initial mass function predicts a most massive star of approximately 60 M⊙. For this stellar evolution model we test the dependence of the retained kinetic energy of the cold GMC gas on the inclusion of stellar winds. In our model winds insert 2.34 times the energy of an SN and create stellar wind bubbles serving as pressure reservoirs. We find that during the pressure-driven phases of the bubble evolution radiative losses peak near the contact discontinuity (CD), and thus the retained energy depends critically on the scales of the mixing processes across the CD. Taking into account the winds of massive stars increases the amount of kinetic energy deposited in the cold ISM from 0.1 per cent to a few per cent of the feedback energy.

  5. Axisymmetric Simulations of Hot Jupiter-Stellar Wind Hydrodynamic Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, Duncan; Arras, Phil; Li, Zhi-Yun

    2016-03-01

    Gas giant exoplanets orbiting at close distances to the parent star are subjected to large radiation and stellar wind fluxes. In this paper, hydrodynamic simulations of the planetary upper atmosphere and its interaction with the stellar wind are carried out to understand the possible flow regimes and how they affect the Lyα transmission spectrum. Following Tremblin and Chiang, charge exchange reactions are included to explore the role of energetic atoms as compared to thermal particles. In order to understand the role of the tail as compared to the leading edge of the planetary gas, the simulations were carried out under axisymmetry, and photoionization and stellar wind electron impact ionization reactions were included to limit the extent of the neutrals away from the planet. By varying the planetary gas temperature, two regimes are found. At high temperature, a supersonic planetary wind is found, which is turned around by the stellar wind and forms a tail behind the planet. At lower temperatures, the planetary wind is shut off when the stellar wind penetrates inside where the sonic point would have been. In this regime mass is lost by viscous interaction at the boundary between planetary and stellar wind gases. Absorption by cold hydrogen atoms is large near the planetary surface, and decreases away from the planet as expected. The hot hydrogen absorption is in an annulus and typically dominated by the tail, at large impact parameter, rather than by the thin leading edge of the mixing layer near the substellar point.

  6. X-RAY PHOTOIONIZED BUBBLE IN THE WIND OF VELA X-1 PULSAR SUPERGIANT COMPANION

    SciTech Connect

    Krticka, Jiri; Skalicky, Jan; Kubat, Jiri

    2012-10-01

    Vela X-1 is the archetype of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), composed of a neutron star and a massive B supergiant. The supergiant is a source of a strong radiatively driven stellar wind. The neutron star sweeps up this wind and creates a huge amount of X-rays as a result of energy release during the process of wind accretion. Here, we provide detailed NLTE models of the Vela X-1 envelope. We study how the X-rays photoionize the wind and destroy the ions responsible for the wind acceleration. The resulting decrease of the radiative force explains the observed reduction of the wind terminal velocity in a direction to the neutron star. The X-rays create a distinct photoionized region around the neutron star filled with a stagnating flow. The existence of such photoionized bubbles is a general property of HMXBs. We unveil a new principle governing these complex objects, according to which there is an upper limit to the X-ray luminosity the compact star can have without suspending the wind due to inefficient line driving.

  7. X-Ray Photoionized Bubble in the Wind of Vela X-1 Pulsar Supergiant Companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krtička, Jiří; Kubát, Jiří; Skalický, Jan

    2012-10-01

    Vela X-1 is the archetype of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), composed of a neutron star and a massive B supergiant. The supergiant is a source of a strong radiatively driven stellar wind. The neutron star sweeps up this wind and creates a huge amount of X-rays as a result of energy release during the process of wind accretion. Here, we provide detailed NLTE models of the Vela X-1 envelope. We study how the X-rays photoionize the wind and destroy the ions responsible for the wind acceleration. The resulting decrease of the radiative force explains the observed reduction of the wind terminal velocity in a direction to the neutron star. The X-rays create a distinct photoionized region around the neutron star filled with a stagnating flow. The existence of such photoionized bubbles is a general property of HMXBs. We unveil a new principle governing these complex objects, according to which there is an upper limit to the X-ray luminosity the compact star can have without suspending the wind due to inefficient line driving.

  8. Envelope Inflation or Stellar Wind?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ro, S.; Matzner, C. D.

    We an optically-thick, transonic, steady wind model for a H-free Wolf-Rayet star. A bifurcation is found across a critical mass loss rate Mb. Slower winds M < Mb extend by several hydrostatic stellar radii, reproduce features of envelope in ation from Petrovic et al. (2006) and Gräfener et al. (2012), and are energetically unbound. This work is of particular interest for extended envelopes and winds, radiative hydrodynamic instabilities (eg. wind stagnation, clumping, etc.), and NLTE atmospheric models.

  9. STELLAR WIND INFLUENCE ON PLANETARY DYNAMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Heyner, Daniel; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Schmitt, Dieter

    2012-05-10

    We examine the possible influence of early stellar wind conditions on the evolution of planetary dynamo action. In our model, the dynamo operates within a significant ambient magnetospheric magnetic field generated by the interaction between the stellar wind and the planetary magnetic field. This provides a negative feedback mechanism which quenches the dynamo growth. The external magnetic field magnitude which the dynamo experiences, and thus the strength of the quenching, depends on the stellar wind dynamic pressure. As this pressure significantly changes during stellar evolution, we argue that under early stellar system conditions the coupling between the stellar wind and the interior dynamics of a planet is much more important than has been thought up to now. We demonstrate the effects of the feedback coupling in the course of stellar evolution with a planet at a similar distance to the central star as Mercury is to the Sun.

  10. Stellar winds on the main-sequence. I. Wind model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, C. P.; Güdel, M.; Lüftinger, T.; Toth, G.; Brott, I.

    2015-05-01

    Aims: We develop a method for estimating the properties of stellar winds for low-mass main-sequence stars between masses of 0.4 M⊙ and 1.1 M⊙ at a range of distances from the star. Methods: We use 1D thermal pressure driven hydrodynamic wind models run using the Versatile Advection Code. Using in situ measurements of the solar wind, we produce models for the slow and fast components of the solar wind. We consider two radically different methods for scaling the base temperature of the wind to other stars: in Model A, we assume that wind temperatures are fundamentally linked to coronal temperatures, and in Model B, we assume that the sound speed at the base of the wind is a fixed fraction of the escape velocity. In Paper II of this series, we use observationally constrained rotational evolution models to derive wind mass loss rates. Results: Our model for the solar wind provides an excellent description of the real solar wind far from the solar surface, but is unrealistic within the solar corona. We run a grid of 1200 wind models to derive relations for the wind properties as a function of stellar mass, radius, and wind temperature. Using these results, we explore how wind properties depend on stellar mass and rotation. Conclusions: Based on our two assumptions about the scaling of the wind temperature, we argue that there is still significant uncertainty in how these properties should be determined. Resolution of this uncertainty will probably require both the application of solar wind physics to other stars and detailed observational constraints on the properties of stellar winds. In the final section of this paper, we give step by step instructions for how to apply our results to calculate the stellar wind conditions far from the stellar surface.

  11. Powerful, Rotating Disk Winds from Stellar-mass Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. M.; Fabian, A. C.; Kaastra, J.; Kallman, T.; King, A. L.; Proga, D.; Raymond, J.; Reynolds, C. S.

    2015-12-01

    We present an analysis of ionized X-ray disk winds found in the Fe K band of four stellar-mass black holes observed with Chandra, including 4U 1630-47, GRO J1655-40, H 1743-322, and GRS 1915+105. High-resolution photoionization grids were generated in order to model the data. Third-order gratings spectra were used to resolve complex absorption profiles into atomic effects and multiple velocity components. The Fe xxv line is found to be shaped by contributions from the intercombination line (in absorption), and the Fe xxvi line is detected as a spin-orbit doublet. The data require 2-3 absorption zones, depending on the source. The fastest components have velocities approaching or exceeding 0.01c, increasing mass outflow rates and wind kinetic power by orders of magnitude over prior single-zone models. The first-order spectra require re-emission from the wind, broadened by a degree that is loosely consistent with Keplerian orbital velocities at the photoionization radius. This suggests that disk winds are rotating with the orbital velocity of the underlying disk, and provides a new means of estimating launching radii—crucial to understanding wind driving mechanisms. Some aspects of the wind velocities and radii correspond well to the broad-line region in active galactic nuclei (AGNs), suggesting a physical connection. We discuss these results in terms of prevalent models for disk wind production and disk accretion itself, and implications for massive black holes in AGNs.

  12. Stellar winds in binary X-ray systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macgregor, K. B.; Vitello, P. A. J.

    1982-01-01

    It is thought that accretion from a strong stellar wind by a compact object may be responsible for the X-ray emission from binary systems containing a massive early-type primary. To investigate the effect of X-ray heating and ionization on the mass transfer process in systems of this type, an idealized model is constructed for the flow of a radiation-driven wind in the presence of an X-ray source of specified luminosity, L sub x. It is noted that for low values of L sub x, X-ray photoionization gives rise to additional ions having spectral lines with wavelengths situated near the peak of the primary continuum flux distribution. As a consequence, the radiation force acting on the gas increases in relation to its value in the absence of X-rays, and the wind is accelerated to higher velocities. As L sub x is increased, the degree of ionization of the wind increases, and the magnitude of the radiation force is diminished in comparison with the case in which L sub x = 0. This reduction leads at first to a decrease in the wind velocity and ultimately (for L sub x sufficiently large) to the termination of radiatively driven mass loss.

  13. Photoionization of planetary winds: case study HD 209458b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneiter, E. M.; Esquivel, A.; D'Angelo, C. S. Villarreal; Velázquez, P. F.; Raga, A. C.; Costa, A.

    2016-04-01

    Close-in hot Jupiters are exposed to a tremendous photon flux that ionizes the neutral escaping material from the planet leaving an observable imprint that makes them an interesting laboratory for testing theoretical models. In this work, we present 3D hydrodynamic simulations with radiation transfer calculations of a close-in exoplanet in a blow-off state. We calculate the Ly α absorption and compare it with observations of HD 209458b and previous simplified model results. Our results show that the hydrodynamic interaction together with a proper calculation of the photoionization process are able to reproduce the main features of the observed Ly α absorption, in particular at the blue-shifted wings of the line. We found that the ionizing stellar flux produce an almost linear effect on the amount of absorption in the wake. Varying the planetary mass-loss rate and the radiation flux, we were able to reproduce the 10 per cent absorption observed at -100 km s-1.

  14. Stellar winds driven by Alfven waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, J. W.; Olbert, S.

    1973-01-01

    Models of stellar winds were considered in which the dynamic expansion of a corona is driven by Alfven waves propagating outward along radial magnetic field lines. In the presence of Alfven waves, a coronal expansion can exist for a broad range of reference conditions which would, in the absence of waves, lead to static configurations. Wind models in which the acceleration mechanism is due to Alfven waves alone and exhibit lower mass fluxes and higher energies per particle are compared to wind models in which the acceleration is due to thermal processes. For example, winds driven by Alfven waves exhibit streaming velocities at infinity which may vary between the escape velocity at the coronal base and the geometrical mean of the escape velocity and the speed of light. Upper and lower limits were derived for the allowed energy fluxes and mass fluxes associated with these winds.

  15. Saturation of Stellar Winds from Young Suns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takeru K.; Imada, Shinsuke; Kataoka, Ryuho; Kato, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Takuma; Miyahara, Hiroko; Tsuneta, Saku

    2013-10-01

    We investigated mass losses via stellar winds from Sun-like main-sequence stars with a wide range of activity levels. We performed forward-type magnetohydrodynamical numerical experiments for Alfvén wave-driven stellar winds with a wide range of input Poynting flux from the photosphere. Increasing the magnetic field strength and the turbulent velocity at the stellar photosphere from the current solar level, the mass-loss rate rapidly at first increases, owing to suppression of the reflection of the Alfvén waves. The surface materials are lifted up by the magnetic pressure associated with the Alfvén waves, and the cool dense chromosphere is intermittently extended to 10%#8211;20% of the stellar radius. The dense atmospheres enhance the radiative losses, and eventually most of the input Poynting energy from the stellar surface escapes by radiation. As a result, there is no more sufficient energy remaining for the kinetic energy of the wind; the stellar wind saturates in very active stars, as observed in Wood et al. (2002, ApJ, 574, 412; 2005, ApJ, 628, L143). The saturation level is positively correlated with Br,0 f0, where Br,0 and f0 are the magnetic field strength and the filling factor of open flux tubes at the photosphere. If Br,0 f0 is relatively large gtrsim 5 G, the mass-loss rate could be as high as 1000 times. If such a strong mass loss lasts for ˜ 1 billion years, the stellar mass itself would be affected, which could be a solution to the faint young Sun paradox. We derived a Reimers-type scaling relation that estimates the mass-loss rate from an energetics consideration of our simulations. Finally, we derived the evolution of the mass-loss rates, dot;{M} ∝ t-1.23, of our simulations, combining with an observed time evolution of X-ray flux from Sun-like stars, which are shallower than dot;{M} ∝ t-2.33±0.55 in Wood et al. (2005).

  16. Stellar wind in state transitions of high-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čechura, J.; Hadrava, P.

    2015-03-01

    Aims: We have developed a new code for the three-dimensional time-dependent raditation hydrodynamic simulation of the stellar wind in interacting binaries to improve models of accretion in high-mass X-ray binaries and to quantitatively clarify the observed variability of these objects. We used the code to test the influence of various parameters on the structure and properties of circumstellar matter. Methods: Our code takes into account acceleration of the wind due to the Roche effective potential, Coriolis force, gas pressure, and (CAK-) radiative pressure in the lines and continuum of the supergiant radiation field that is modulated by its gravity darkening and by the photo-ionization caused by X-ray radiation from the compact companion. The parameters of Cygnus X-1 were used to test the properties of our model. Results: Both two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations show that the Coriolis force substantially influences the mass loss and consequently the accretion rate onto the compact companion. The gravitational field of the compact companion focuses the stellar wind, which leads to the formation of a curved cone-like gaseous tail behind the companion. The changes of X-ray photo-ionization of the wind material during X-ray spectral-state transitions significantly influence the wind structure and offer an explanation of the variability of Cygnus X-1 in optical observations (the Hα emission).

  17. An evaporating planet in the wind: stellar wind interactions with the radiatively braked exosphere of GJ 436 b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourrier, V.; Lecavelier des Etangs, A.; Ehrenreich, D.; Tanaka, Y. A.; Vidotto, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Observations of the warm Neptune GJ 436 b were performed with HST/STIS at three different epochs (2012, 2013, 2014) in the stellar Lyman-α line. They showed deep, repeated transits that were attributed to a giant exosphere of neutral hydrogen. The low radiation pressure from the M-dwarf host star was shown to play a major role in the dynamics of the escaping gas and its dispersion within a large volume around the planet. Yet by itself it cannot explain the specific time-variable spectral features detected in each transit. Here we investigate the combined role of radiative braking and stellar wind interactions using numerical simulations with the EVaporating Exoplanet code (EVE) and we derive atmospheric and stellar properties through the direct comparison of simulated and observed spectra. The first epoch of observations is difficult to interpret because of the lack of out-of-transit data. In contrast, the results of our simulations match the observations obtained in 2013 and 2014 well. The sharp early ingresses observed in these epochs come from the abrasion of the planetary coma by the stellar wind. Spectra observed at later times during the transit can be produced by a dual exosphere of planetary neutrals (escaped from the upper atmosphere of the planet) and neutralized protons (created by charge-exchange with the stellar wind). We find similar properties at both epochs for the planetary escape rate (~2.5 × 108 g s-1), the stellar photoionization rate (~2 × 10-5 s-1), the stellar wind bulk velocity (~85 km s-1), and its kinetic dispersion velocity (~10 km s-1, corresponding to a kinetic temperature of 12 000 K). We also find high velocities for the escaping gas (~50-60 km s-1) that may indicate magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves that dissipate in the upper atmosphere and drive the planetary outflow. In 2014 the high density of the stellar wind (~3 × 103 cm-3) led to the formation of an exospheric tail that was mainly composed of neutralized protons and produced

  18. Colliding Planetary and Stellar Winds: Charge Exchange and Metal Absorption in Hot Jupiter Exospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Eugene

    2012-10-01

    Hot Jupiters unleash photoevaporative winds that are powered by ionizing radiation from their parent stars. Spectral signatures of such winds have been observed with HST STIS and COS in various UV absorption lines from H I, O I, C II, Mg II, and Si III. Interpretation of these absorption signatures is still debated, and the metal line observations have seen little modeling. Absorption by H I Lyman-alpha occurs at velocities of +/- 100 km/s; such large velocities are difficult to explain because thermal outflows from hot Jupiters have speeds < 30 km/s. Holmstrom et al. {2009} proposed that the anomalously energetic H I arises from charge exchange between planetary H I and protons from the incident stellar wind. If true, then basic quantities-e.g., the planetary mass loss rate, which we hope to infer from the HST data-would need re-calculation to account for the influence of the stellar wind. Charge exchange has not yet been integrated into models of photoevaporative winds. We propose to carry out hydrodynamic simulations of colliding planetary and stellar winds, including charge exchange, that would explain the HST Ly-a observations, thereby clarifying how the inferred planetary mass loss rate depends on stellar wind parameters. We also propose to incorporate photoionization heating by metals, and radiative line cooling by metals, both of which have not been simultaneously treated. The goal will be to reproduce the many HST line spectra of neutral and ionized metals and determine their import for the metallicity and mass loss rate of the planetary wind.

  19. The axisymmetric stellar wind of AG Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Ladbeck, Regina E.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Hillier, D. John; Harries, Tim J.; Howarth, Ian D.

    1994-01-01

    We present optical linear spectropolarimetry of the Luminous Blue Variable AG Carinae obtained after a recent visual brightness increase. The absence of He II lambda 4686 emission, together with the weakening of the He I spectrum and the appearance of Fe lines in the region around 5300 A, confirm that AG Car has started a new excursion across the HR diagram. The H alpha line profile exhibits very extended line wings that are polarized differently in both amount and position angle from either the continuum or the line core. The polarization changes across H alpha, together with variable continuum polarization, indicate the presence of intrinsic polarization. Coexistence of the line-wing polarization with extended flux-line wings evidences that both are formed by electron scattering in a dense wind. The position angle rotates across the line profiles, in a way that presently available models suggest is due to rotation and expansion of the scattering material. AG Car displays very large variations of its linear polarization with time, Delta P approximately 1.2%, indicating significant variations in envelope opacity. We find that the polarization varies along a preferred position angle of approximately 145 deg (with a scatter of +/- 10 deg) which we interpret as a symmetry axis of the stellar wind (with an ambiguity of 90 deg). This position angle is co-aligned with the major axis of the AG Car ring nebula and perpendicular to the AG Car jet. Our observations thus suggest that the axisymmetric geometry seen in the resolved circumstellar environment at various distances already exists within a few stellar radii of AG Car. From the H alpha polarization profile we deduce an interstellar polarization of Q = 0.31%, U = -1.15% at H alpha. The inferred interstellar polarization implies that the intrinsic polarization is not always of the same sign. This indicates either significant temporal changes in the envelope geometry, or it may arise from effects of multiple scattering

  20. On Stellar Wind Bow Shocks with External Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkin, Francis P.

    2016-06-01

    Stellar wind bow shocks have been seen driven by stars of many types, from O to AGB stars as well as pulsars. Recent simulations (e.g. van Marle et al. 2014) have considered the bubble created by a stellar wind of a stationary star in a region of constant magnetic field. By applying a thin-shell formalism, I consider the problem of a stellar wind from a star moving supersonically with respect to a magnetized medium. The properties of the resulting shell are derived, and limitations to the application of the resulting solution are discussed.

  1. Scientists Track Collision of Powerful Stellar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    Wolf-Rayet stars and of the wind-collision region," Dougherty said. The stars in WR 140 complete an orbital cycle in 7.9 years. The astronomers tracked the system for a year and a half, noting dramatic changes in the wind collision region. "People have worked out theoretical models for these collision regions, but the models don't seem to fit what our observations have shown," said Mark Claussen, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Socorro, New Mexico. "The new data on this system should provide the theorists with much better information for refining their models of how Wolf-Rayet stars evolve and how wind-collision regions work," Claussen added. The scientists watched the changes in the stellar system as the star's orbits carried them in paths that bring them nearly as close to each other as Mars is to the Sun and as far as Neptune is from the Sun. Their detailed analysis gave them new information on the Wolf-Rayet star's strong wind. At some points in the orbit, the wind collision region strongly emitted radio waves, and at other points, the scientists could not detect the collison region. Wolf-Rayet stars are giant stars nearing the time when they will explode as supernovae. "No other telescope in the world can see the details revealed by the VLBA," Claussen said. "This unmatched ability allowed us to determine the masses and other properties of the stars, and will help us answer some basic questions about the nature of Wolf-Rayet stars and how they develop." he added. The astronomers plan to continue observing WR 140 to follow the system's changes as the two massive stars continue to circle each other. Dougherty and Claussen worked with Anthony Beasley of the Atacama Large Millimeter Array office, Ashley Zauderer of the University of Maryland and Nick Bolingbroke of the University of Victoria, British Columbia. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated

  2. Binary stellar winds. [flow and magnetic field interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siscoe, G. L.; Heinemann, M. A.

    1974-01-01

    Stellar winds from a binary star will interact with each other along a contact discontinuity. We discuss qualitatively the geometry of the flow and field resulting from this interaction in the simplest case where the stars and winds are identical. We consider the shape of the critical surface (defined as the surface where the flow speed is equal to the sound speed) as a function of stellar separation and the role of shock waves in the flow field. The effect of stellar spin and magnetic sectors on the field configuration is given. The relative roles of mass loss and magnetic torque in the evolution of orbital parameters are discussed.

  3. Binary stellar winds. [flow and magnetic field geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siscoe, G. L.; Heinemann, M. A.

    1974-01-01

    Stellar winds from a binary star pair will interact with each other along a contact discontinuity. We discuss qualitatively the geometry of the flow and field resulting from this interaction in the simplest case where the stars and winds are identical. We consider the shape of the critical surface (defined as the surface where the flow speed is equal to the sound speed) as a function of stellar separation and the role of shock waves in the flow field. The effect of stellar spin and magnetic sectors on the field configuration is given. The relative roles of mass loss and magnetic torque in the evolution of orbital parameters is discussed.

  4. Stellar feedback in galaxies and the origin of galaxy-scale winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Quataert, Eliot; Murray, Norman

    2012-04-01

    Feedback from massive stars is believed to play a critical role in driving galactic super-winds that enrich the intergalactic medium and shape the galaxy mass function, mass-metallicity relation and other global galaxy properties. In previous papers, we have introduced new numerical methods for implementing stellar feedback on sub-giant molecular cloud (sub-GMC) through galactic scales in numerical simulations of galaxies; the key physical processes include radiation pressure in the ultraviolet through infrared, supernovae (Type I and Type II), stellar winds ('fast' O star through 'slow' asymptotic giant branch winds), and H II photoionization. Here, we show that these feedback mechanisms drive galactic winds with outflow rates as high as ˜10-20 times the galaxy star formation rate. The mass-loading efficiency (wind mass-loss rate divided by the star formation rate) scales roughly as ? (where Vc is the galaxy circular velocity), consistent with simple momentum-conservation expectations. We use our suite of simulations to study the relative contribution of each feedback mechanism to the generation of galactic winds in a range of galaxy models, from Small Magellanic Cloud like dwarfs and Milky Way (MW) analogues to z˜ 2 clumpy discs. In massive, gas-rich systems (local starbursts and high-z galaxies), radiation pressure dominates the wind generation. By contrast, for MW-like spirals and dwarf galaxies the gas densities are much lower and sources of shock-heated gas such as supernovae and stellar winds dominate the production of large-scale outflows. In all of our models, however, the winds have a complex multiphase structure that depends on the interaction between multiple feedback mechanisms operating on different spatial scales and time-scales: any single feedback mechanism fails to reproduce the winds observed. We use our simulations to provide fitting functions to the wind mass loading and velocities as a function of galaxy properties, for use in cosmological

  5. Cosmic-ray acceleration at stellar wind terminal shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, G. M.; Axford, W. I.; Forman, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Steady-state spherically symmetric analytic solutions of the cosmic-ray transport equations, applicable to the problem of acceleration of cosmic rays at the terminal shock to a stellar wind, are studied. The spectra, graidents, and flow patterns of particles modulated and accelerated by the stellar wind and shock are investigated by means of monoenergetic-source solutions at finite radius, as well as solutions with monoenergetic and power-law galactic spectra. On the basis of calculations given, early-type stars could supply a significant fraction of the 3 x 10 to the 40th ergs/sec required by galactic cosmic rays.

  6. Fluctuations in Stellar Winds and Their Possible Connections to the Wind Mass Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiueh, Tzihong

    1997-06-01

    We show that the spherical, polytropic stellar winds are stable to all adiabatic fluctuations in the sense of absolute and convective stabilities. It is also shown that the neutrally stable sound waves driven by stellar turbulence or nonradial pulsations are trapped and become much enhanced near both the wind-flow base and the sonic resonance. They can exert great wave pressure at both locations, which are known to be critical in determining wind strength. This finding is strongly suggestive of a possible intimate connection between stellar turbulence and/or pulsations and stellar wind flux. In addition, a scenario for the appearance of large-amplitude waves riding on the winds at great, and hence observable, distances is given in the above context.

  7. Stellar evolution at high mass including the effect of a stellar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R.; Chin, C.-W.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of a stellar wind on the evolution of stars in the mass range from 15 to 120 solar masses is investigated. All the stellar models are constructed with the use of Cox-Stewart opacities. Four possible cases of mass loss are considered: (1) no mass loss at all; (2) substantial mass loss from stars in all stages of evolution; (3) heavy mass loss from red supergiants only; and (4) sudden and very heavy mass loss from luminous yellow supergiants. The assumption of mass loss during the main-sequence phase of evolution is found to lead to a lowering of the luminosity and, unless the mass loss is extremely heavy, of the effective temperature as well. A comparison of the adopted mass-loss rates with observed rates suggests that stellar winds are probably not an important factor in the evolution of main-sequence stars and supergiants unless the initial masses are greater than about 30 solar masses.

  8. Multiline Transfer and the Dynamics of Stellar Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, D. C.; Lucy, L. B.

    1985-01-01

    A Monte Carlo technique for treating multiline transfer in stellar winds is described. With a line list containing many thousands of transitions and with fairly realistic treatments of ionization, excitation and line formation, the resulting code allows the dynamic effects of overlapping lines the investigation of and provides the means to directly synthesize the complete spectrum of a star and its wind. It is found that the computed mass loss rate for data Puppis agrees with the observed rate. The synthesized spectrum of zeta Puppis also agrees with observational data. This confirms that line driving is the dominant acceleration mechanism in this star's wind.

  9. The homunculus of Eta Carinae: An interacting stellar winds paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Adam; Balick, Bruce; Davidson, Kris

    1995-01-01

    We simulate the origin and evolution of the bipolar nebula surrounding Eta Car using numerical two-dimensional gasdynamic models. The generalized interacting stellar winds scenario, wherein a stellar wind interacts with an aspherical circumstellar environment, is adopted. The eruption wind of 1840-1860, which is taken to be spherically symmetric, interacts with a preeruption toroidal density environment. Using reasonable assumptions of initial conditions and eruption parameters based on archival data, we have performed over 30 simulations in an effort to bracket the initial parameters which produce models that best match observations. We find that models with high pole-to-equator density contrasts (greater than 100) and toroidal density configurations nicely account for the observed morphology and kinematics of the homunculus.

  10. Probing Clumpy Stellar Winds in SFXTs

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, R.; Zurita-Heras, J.

    2008-05-23

    Quantitative constraints on the wind clumping of massive stars can be obtained from the study of the hard X-ray variability of SFXTs. In these systems, a large fraction of the hard X-ray emission is emitted in the form of flares with typical duration of 3 ksec, frequency of 7 days and luminosity of 10{sup 36} ergs/s. Such flares are most probably emitted by the interaction of a compact object orbiting at {approx}10 R{sub *} with wind clumps (10{sup 22-23} g). The density ratio between the clumps and the inter-clump medium is 10{sup 2-4}. The parameters of the clumps and of the inter-clump medium are in good agreement with macro-clumping scenario and line-driven instability simulations.

  11. Stellar winds driven by multi-line scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friend, D. B.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents a model of a radiation-driven stellar wind with overlapping spectral lines. It is based on the Castor, Abbott, and Klein (CAK) theory. The presence of overlapping lines allows a photon to be scattered many times in different lines. The properties of the wind at any point depend on the wavelength-averaged intensity, which in turn depends on the structure of the wind. A self-consistent wind model is found. The mass loss rate does not saturate as line overlap becomes more pronounced, but continues to increase. The terminal velocity is much larger than in the CAK model, while the velocity law is shallower. This model might help explain the massive winds from Wolf-Rayet stars.

  12. Stellar wind interaction and pick-up ion escape of the Kepler-11 "super-Earths"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kislyakova, K. G.; Johnstone, C. P.; Odert, P.; Erkaev, N. V.; Lammer, H.; Lüftinger, T.; Holmström, M.; Khodachenko, M. L.; Güdel, M.

    2014-02-01

    Aims: We study the interactions between stellar winds and the extended hydrogen-dominated upper atmospheres of planets. We estimate the resulting escape of planetary pick-up ions from the five "super-Earths" in the compact Kepler-11 system and compare the escape rates with the efficiency of the thermal escape of neutral hydrogen atoms. Methods: Assuming the stellar wind of Kepler-11 is similar to the solar wind, we use a polytropic 1D hydrodynamic wind model to estimate the wind properties at the planetary orbits. We apply a direct simulation Monte Carlo model to model the hydrogen coronae and the stellar wind plasma interaction around Kepler-11b-f within a realistic expected heating efficiency range of 15-40%. The same model is used to estimate the ion pick-up escape from the XUV heated and hydrodynamically extended upper atmospheres of Kepler-11b-f. From the interaction model, we study the influence of possible magnetic moments, calculate the charge exchange and photoionization production rates of planetary ions, and estimate the loss rates of pick-up H+ ions for all five planets. We compare the results between the five "super-Earths" and the thermal escape rates of the neutral planetary hydrogen atoms. Results: Our results show that a huge neutral hydrogen corona is formed around the planet for all Kepler-11b-f exoplanets. The non-symmetric form of the corona changes from planet to planet and is defined mostly by radiation pressure and gravitational effects. Non-thermal escape rates of pick-up ionized hydrogen atoms for Kepler-11 "super-Earths" vary between ~6.4 × 1030 s-1 and ~4.1 × 1031 s-1, depending on the planet's orbital location and assumed heating efficiency. These values correspond to non-thermal mass loss rates of ~1.07 × 107 g s-1 and ~6.8 × 107 g s-1 respectively, which is a few percent of the thermal escape rates.

  13. Stellar wind interaction and pick-up ion escape of the Kepler-11 "super-Earths"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kislyakova, Kristina; Johnstone, Colin; Odert, Petra; Erkaev, Nikolai; Lammer, Helmut; Lüftinger, Theresa; Holmstöm, Mats; Khodachenko, Maxim; Güdel, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    We present the results of modeling of the interactions between stellar wind and the extended hydrogen-dominated upper atmospheres of planets and estimate the resulting escape of planetary pick-up ions from the 5 «super-Earths» in the compact Kepler-11 system. We compare the escape rates with the efficiency of the thermal escape of neutral hydrogen atoms. Assuming the stellar wind of Kepler-11 is similar to the solar wind, we used a polytropic 1D hydrodynamic wind model to estimate the wind properties at the planetary orbits. We applied a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Model to model the hydrogen coronae and the stellar wind plasma interaction around Kepler-11b-f planets within a realistic expected heating efficiency range of 15-40%. The same model was used to estimate the ion pick-up escape from the XUV heated and hydrodynamically extended upper atmospheres of Kepler-11b-f. Modeling clarifies the influence of possible magnetic moments on escape processes and allows to estimate the charge exchange and photoionization production rates of planetary ions as well as the loss rates of pick-up H+ ions for all five planets. This study presents also the comparison of the results between the five 'super-Earths' and in a more general sense also with the thermal escape rates of the neutral planetary hydrogen atoms. Our results show that for all Kepler-11b-f exoplanets, a huge neutral hydrogen corona is formed around the planet. The non-symmetric form of the corona changes from planet to planet and is defined mostly by radiation pressure, charge-exchange and gravitational effects. According to our estimates, nonthermal escape rates of pick-up ionized hydrogen atoms for Kepler-11 «super-Earths» vary between ~ 6.4 × 1030 s-1 and ~ 4.1 × 1031 s-1 depending on the planet's orbital location and assumed heating efficiency. These values correspond to non-thermal mass loss rates of ~ 1.07 × 107 g·s-1 and ~ 6.8 × 107 g·s-1 respectively, which is a few percent of the thermal

  14. Clump formation through colliding stellar winds in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderón, Diego

    2016-07-01

    The gas cloud G2 is currently being tidally disrupted by the Galactic Center super-massive black hole, Sgr A*. The region around the black hole is populated by ˜30 Wolf-Rayet stars, which produce strong outflows. Following an analytical approach, we explore the possibility that gas clumps, such as G2, originate from the collision of identical stellar winds via the Non-Linear Thin Shell Instability. We have found that the collision of relatively slow (<750 km s^{-1}) and strong (˜10^{-5} M_{⊙} yr^{-1}) stellar winds from stars at short separations (<2000 AU) is a process that indeed could produce clumps of G2's mass and above. Such short separation encounters of single stars along their orbits are not common in the Galactic Centre, however close binaries, such as IRS 16SW, are promising clump sources (see Calderón et al. 2016). We also present the first results of 2D models of colliding wind systems using the hydrodynamics adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES, aiming to obtain a clump mass function, and the rate of clump formation and ejection to the ISM. We study the effect of parameters such as wind properties, stellar separation and orbital motion, in order to understand how likely the formation of G2 is in this context.

  15. The Stellar Wind from the Central Star of NGC 7009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George; Iping, Rosina; Chu, You-Hua; Gruendl, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Observations of NGC 7009, including its central star HD 200516, have been obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite, providing spectra covering 905-1187 A with spectral resolution of 15 km/sec. One observation was made with the 30x30 arcsec aperture and includes the star plus the entire nebula. A second observation used the 1.25x20arcsec slit significantly reducing the nebular 'contamination' of the stellar spectrum. This poster discusses the spectrum of the central star. A strong FUV continuum, as expected for Teff=82,000K, dominates the spectrum. The most prominent spectral feature is a very strong P-Cygni profile of O VI 1032-1038. This paper presents models of the stellar spectrum and the wind features to further refine the stellar parameters and mass loss rate.

  16. The dynamic of stellar wind accretion and the HMXB zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Roland; Manousakis, Antonios

    2016-07-01

    The dynamic of the accretion of stellar wind on the pulsar in Vela X-1 is dominated by unstable hydrodynamical flows. Off-states, 10^{37} erg/s flares, quasi-periodic oscillations and log normal flux distribution can all be reproduced by hydrodynamical simulations and reveal the complex motion of bow shocks moving either towards or away from the neutron star. These behaviors are enlightening the zoo of HMXB and suggest new phenomenology to be detected.

  17. The stellar wind velocity field of HD 77581

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manousakis, A.; Walter, R.

    2015-12-01

    Aims: The early acceleration of stellar winds in massive stars is poorly constrained. The scattering of hard X-ray photons emitted by the pulsar in the high-mass X-ray binary Vela X-1 can be used to probe the stellar wind velocity and density profile close to the surface of its supergiant companion HD 77581. Methods: We built a high signal-to-noise and high resolution hard X-ray lightcurve of Vela X-1 measured by Swift/BAT over 300 orbital periods of the system and compared it with the predictions of a grid of hydrodynamic simulations. Results: We obtain very good agreement between observations and simulations for a narrow set of parameters, implying that the wind velocity close to the stellar surface is twice higher than usually assumed with the standard beta law. Locally a velocity gradient of β ~ 0.5 is favoured. Even if still incomplete, hydrodynamic simulations successfully reproduce several observational properties of Vela X-1.

  18. Prevention of accretion onto white dwarfs by stellar winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, James

    1992-01-01

    There is indirect observational evidence that hot white dwarfs may have weak stellar winds. In this paper, the interaction between such a wind and the flow of ISM material in the gravitational field of the white dwarf is investigated with the aim of finding limits on the mass-loss rate and terminal velocity of winds capable of preventing accretion from the ISM. The limiting cases of no relative motion of the star and the ISM and supersonic relative motion of the star through ISM are separately investigated. Each case is treated by generalizing models for the interaction between the solar wind and the local ISM to include the effects of gravity. It is found that, for wind velocities expected for radiatively driven winds, mass-loss rates as low as 10 exp -21 solar mass/yr are sufficient to prevent accretion from the hot phase of the ISM. To prevent accretion during passages through cold clouds, wind mass-loss rates of order 10 exp -18 to 10 exp -17 are required.

  19. Gravitational damping of Alfven waves in stellar atmospheres and winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khabibrakhmanov, I. K.; Mullan, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    We consider how gravity affects the propagation of Alfven waves in a stellar atmosphere. We show that when the ion gyrofrequency exceeds the collision rate, the waves are absorbed at a rate proportional to the gravitational acceleration g. Estimates show that this mechanism can readily account for the observed energy losses in the solar chromosphere. The mechanism predicts that the pressure at the top of the chromosphere P(sub Tc) should scale with g as P(sub Tc) proportional to g(exp delta), where delta approximately equals 2/3; this is close to empirical results which suggest delta approximately equals 0.6. Gravitational damping leads to deposition of energy at a rate proportional to the mass of the particles. Hence, heavier ion are heated more effectively than protons. This is consistent with the observed proportionality between ion temperature and mass in the solar wind. Gravitational damping causes the local g to be effectively decreased by an amount proportional to the wave energy. This feature affects the acceleration of the solar wind. Gravitational damping may also lead to self-regulation of the damping of Alfven waves in stellar winds: this is relevant in the context of slow massive winds in cool giants.

  20. MODELING HIGH-VELOCITY QSO ABSORBERS WITH PHOTOIONIZED MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC DISK WINDS

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumura, Keigo; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Behar, Ehud

    2010-11-10

    We extend our modeling of the ionization structure of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accretion-disk winds, previously applied to Seyfert galaxies, to a population of quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) of much lower X-ray-to-UV flux ratios, i.e., smaller {alpha}{sub ox} index, motivated by UV/X-ray ionized absorbers with extremely high outflow velocities in UV-luminous QSOs. We demonstrate that magnetically driven winds ionized by a spectrum with {alpha}{sub ox} {approx_equal} -2 can produce the charge states responsible for C IV and Fe XXV/Fe XXVI absorption in wind regions with corresponding maximum velocities of v(C IV) {approx_lt}0.1c and v(Fe XXV) {approx_lt} 0.6c (where c is the speed of light) and column densities N {sub H} {approx} 10{sup 23}-10{sup 24} cm{sup -2}, in general agreement with observations. In contrast to the conventional radiation-driven wind models, high-velocity flows are always present in our MHD-driven winds but manifest in the absorption spectra only for {alpha}{sub ox} {approx_lt} -2, as larger {alpha}{sub ox} values ionize the wind completely out to radii too large to demonstrate the presence of these high velocities. We thus predict increasing velocities of these ionized absorbers with decreasing (steeper) {alpha}{sub ox}, a quantity that emerges as the defining parameter in the kinematics of the active galactic nucleus UV/X-ray absorbers.

  1. Stellar winds and the evolution of luminous stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R.; Chin, C.-W.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of a stellar wind on the evolution of stars in the mass range 7-60 solar masses has been investigated for stellar models in which Carson's opacities have been employed. Several cases of mass loss have been considered. It is found that the assumption of heavy mass loss from both blue and red supergiants can account well for the relevant observations of OBN stars, WN stars, and very luminous supergiants of all spectral types. But no amount of mass loss can account adequately for the properties of the B supergiants of lowest luminosity. A critical comparison is made between the present results and some earlier results based on the adoption of Cox-Stewart opacities.

  2. Clump formation through colliding stellar winds in the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderón, D.; Ballone, A.; Cuadra, J.; Schartmann, M.; Burkert, A.; Gillessen, S.

    2016-02-01

    The gas cloud G2 is currently being tidally disrupted by the Galactic Centre supermassive black hole, Sgr A*. The region around the black hole is populated by ˜30 Wolf-Rayet stars, which produce strong outflows. We explore the possibility that gas clumps, such as G2, originate from the collision of stellar winds via the non-linear thin shell instability. Following an analytical approach, we study the thermal evolution of slabs formed in the symmetric collision of winds, evaluating whether instabilities occur, and estimating possible clump masses. We find that the collision of relatively slow (≲750 km s-1) and strong (˜10-5 M⊙ yr-1) stellar winds from stars at short separations (<10 mpc) is a process that indeed could produce clumps of G2's mass and above. Such short separation encounters of single stars along their known orbits are not common in the Galactic Centre, making this process a possible but unlikely origin for G2. We also discuss clump formation in close binaries such as IRS 16SW and in asymmetric encounters as promising alternatives that deserve further numerical study.

  3. INTEGRAL Observations Of Massive Stars Unveil Dynamics Of Stellar Winds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Roland; Zurita-Heras, J.; Leyder, J. C.

    2008-03-01

    INTEGRAL tripled the number of super-giant high-mass X-ray binaries (sgHMXB) known in the Galaxy by revealing absorbed and fast transient systems (SFXT). INTEGRAL also unambiguously detected hard X-ray emission from the colliding wind binary Eta Carinae. These observations provide new insights and quantitative constraints on these binary systems. First wind clumping in massive stars could be characterized observationally from the study of the hard X-ray variability of the compact accreting objects. A large fraction of the hard X-ray emission is emitted in the form of flares with a typical duration of 3 ks, frequency of 7 days and luminosity of 1036 erg/s. Such flares are most probably emitted by the interaction of a compact object orbiting at about 10 R* with wind clumps (1022-23 g) representing a large fraction of the stellar mass-loss rate. The density ratio between the clumps and the inter-clump medium is 102-4 in SFXT systems. These parameters are in good agreement with macro-clumping scenario and line driven instability simulations. SFXT have probably a larger orbital radius than classical sgHMXB. The first unambiguous detection of hard X-rays from Eta Carinae by INTEGRAL unveil relativistic particle acceleration in its colliding stellar winds. The observed emission is in agreement with the predictions of inverse Compton models, and corresponds to about 0.1% of the energy available in the wind collision. Eta Car is expected to be detected in the GeV energy range.

  4. Stellar Wind-Magnetosphere Interactions in Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzasi, Derek L.

    2015-08-01

    One potential star-planet interaction mechanism for hot Jupiters involves planetary heating via currents set up by interactions between the stellar wind and planetary magnetosphere. Early modeling results (Buzasi 2013) indicate that such currents, which are analogous to the terrestrial global electric circuit (GEC), have the potential to provide sufficient heating to account for the additional radius inflation seen in some hot Jupiters. Here we present a more detailed model of this phenomenon, exploring the scale of the effect, the circumstances under which it is likely to be significant, implications for the planetary magnetospheric structure, and observational signatures.

  5. Momentum and energy balance in late-type stellar winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macgregor, K. B.

    1981-01-01

    Observations at ultraviolet and X-ray wavelengths indicate that the classical picture of a static stellar atmosphere containing a radiative equilibrium temperature distribution is inapplicable to the majority of late type stars. Mass loss and the presence of atmospheric regions characterized by gas temperatures in excess of the stellar effective temperature appear to be almost ubiquitous throughout the HR diagram. Evidence pertaining to the thermal and dynamical structure of the outer envelopes of cool stars is summarized. These results are compared with the predictions of several theoretical models which were proposed to account for mass loss from latetype stars. Models in which the outflow is thermally radiatively, or wave driven are considered for identification of the physical processes responsible for the observed wind properties. The observed variation of both the wind, thermal and dynamical structure as one proceeds from the supergiant branch toward the main sequence in the cool portion of the HR diagram give consideration to potential mechanisms for heating and cooling the flow from low gravity stars.

  6. Alfvén wave-driving mechanism of late-type stellar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Young; Xiao-Qing, Li

    1990-05-01

    Because late-type stellar wind has low temperature, massive outflow, and high terminal velocity, theoretical models of thermal pressure or radiation pressure cannot explain the acceleration of late-type stellar wind. Energy damping of Alfvén wave in stellar winds is small, and Alfvén wave is perhaps the driving force of late-type stellar wind if the wave energy-flux is large enough. After theoretical analysis and numerical calculation, we get various velocity distributions by taking various wave energy-fluxes in reliable range, the terminal velocities accord with observations. If late-type stellar winds are driven by thermal pressure, the temperature is higher than acceptable. The results of Alfvén wave driving winds also indicate that massive stellar winds need large energy flux and acceleration is closely related with gravity. In discussion we think that Alfvén wave accelerating late-type stellar wind is feasible and the initial energy-flux, damping of Alfvén wave in stellar winds need further study.

  7. Alfven wave-driving mechanism of late-type stellar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Zheng; Li, Xiao-Qing

    1990-05-01

    Because late-type stellar wind has low temperature, massive outflow, and high terminal velocity, theoretical models of thermal pressure or radiation pressure cannot explain the acceleration of late-type stellar wind. Energy damping of Alfven wave in stellar winds is small, and Alfven wave is perhaps the driving force of late-type stellar wind if the wave energy-flux is large enough. After theoretical analysis and numerical calculation, various velocity distributions are obtained by taking various wave energy-fluxes in reliable range, the terminal velocities accord with observations. If late-type stellar winds are driven by thermal pressure, the temperature is higher that acceptable. The results of Alfven wave driving winds also indicate that massive stellar winds need large energy flux and acceleration is closely related with gravity. In discussion, it is thought that Alfven wave accelerating late-type stellar winds is feasible and the initial energy-flux, damping of Alfven wave in stellar winds need further study.

  8. Alfvén waves as a driving mechanism in stellar winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidotto, A. A.; Jatenco-Pereira, V.

    2010-08-01

    Alfvén waves have been invoked as an important mechanism of particle acceleration in stellar winds of cool stars. After their identification in the solar wind they started to be studied in winds of stars located in different regions of the HR diagram. We discuss here some characteristics of these waves and we present a direct application in the acceleration of late-type stellar winds.

  9. Mechanical Feedback: From Stellar Wind Bubbles to Starbursts (Invited Talk)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oey, M. S.; Clarke, C. J.; Massey, P.

    The current understanding of mechanical feedback is reviewed by evaluating the standard, adiabatic model for shell formation and evolution. This model is relevant to phenomena ranging from individual stellar-wind bubbles to galactic superwinds, forming the basis for our understanding of the multiphase ISM, IGM, and galactic evolutionary processes. Although significant discrepancies between the model and observation have been identified, to date there are none that require a fundamental revision. A variety of evidence, ranging over three orders of magnitude in spatial scale, is broadly consistent with the standard model. This includes kinematics of individual objects, observations of hot gas, the size distribution of HI shells, and outflow rates from starburst galaxies. However, some of the most pressing issues relating to shell evolution are still outstanding and obstruct efforts to resolve key questions like the fate of the hot gas.

  10. Model structure of a cosmic-ray mediated stellar or solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. A.; Axford, W. I.

    1988-01-01

    An idealized hydrodynamic model is presented for the mediation of a free-streaming stellar wind by galactic cosmic rays or energetic particles accelerated at the stellar wind termination shock. The spherically-symmetric stellar wind is taken to be cold; the only body force is the cosmic ray pressure gradient. The cosmic rays are treated as a massless fluid with an effective mean diffusion coefficient k proportional to radial distance r. The structure of the governing equations is investigated both analytically and numerically. Solutions for a range of values of k are presented which describe the deceleration of the stellar wind and a transition to nearly incompressible flow and constant cosmic ray pressure at large r. In the limit of small k the transition steepens to a strong stellar wind termination shock. For large k the stellar wind is decelerated gradually with no shock transition. It is argued that the solutions provide a simple model for the mediation of the solar wind by interstellar ions as both pickup ions and the cosmic ray anomalous component which together dominate the pressure of the solar wind at large r.

  11. Modelling Near-IR polarization to constrain stellar wind bow shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilson, Hilding R.; Ignace, R.; Shrestha, M.; Hoffman, J. L.; Mackey, J.

    2013-06-01

    Bow shocks formed from stellar winds are common phenomena observed about massive and intermediate-mass stars such as zeta Oph, Betelgeuse and delta Cep. These bow shocks provide information about the motion of the star, the stellar wind properties and the density of the ISM. Because bow shocks are asymmetric structures, they also present polarized light that is a function of their shape and density. We present a preliminary work modeling dust polarization from a Wilkin (1996) analytic bow shock model and explore how the polarization changes as a function of stellar wind properties.

  12. Stellar winds with non-WKB Alfven waves 1: Wind models for solar coronal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGregor, K. B.; Charbonneau, P.

    1994-07-01

    We have constructed numerical models for stationary, wind-type outflows that include treatment of the force produced by propagating Alfven waves. We make no assumptions regarding the relative sizes of the wavelengths of such disturbances and the scale lengths that characterize the variation of the physical properties of the expanding stellar atmosphere. Consequently, our models take account the process of Alfven wave reflection, and provide for dynamical effects arising from the simultaneous presence of outward and inward traveling waves in the wind. For physical conditions like those prevailing in the outer solar corona and wind, we find that even relatively high frequency, short wavelength waves can suffer some reflection from the gradient in Alfven speed at the vase of the flow. Among the consequences of the interaction between outward and inward directed perturbations in the sub-Alfvenic portion of the wind is a reduction in the magnitude of the time-averaged wave force relative to its value in the Wentzel-Kramer-Brillouin (WKB) (i.e., short-wavelenght) limit. As a result, the flow velocities of our models interior to the Alfven radius are smaller than those of corresponding WKB models. For models containing very low frequency, long wavelength waves, a substantial amount of wave reflection can also take place in the super-Alvenic portion of the wind. The resulting modifications to the spatial dependences of the eave magnetic and velocity amplitudes can lead to a wave force whose magnitude at large distances exceeds that of an equivalent WKB solution.

  13. Wind Variability of B Supergiants. No. 2; The Two-component Stellar Wind of gamma Arae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinja, R. K.; Massa, D.; Fullerton, A. W.; Howarth, I. D.; Pontefract, M.

    1996-01-01

    The stellar wind of the rapidly rotating early-B supergiant, gamma Ara, is studied using time series, high-resolution IUE spectroscopy secured over approx. 6 days in 1993 March. Results are presented based on an analysis of several line species, including N(N), C(IV), Si(IV), Si(III), C(II), and Al(III). The wind of this star is grossly structured, with evidence for latitude-dependent mass loss which reflects the role of rapid rotation. Independent, co-existing time variable features are identified at low-velocity (redward of approx. -750 km/s) and at higher-speeds extending to approx. -1500 km/s. The interface between these structures is 'defined' by the appearance of a discrete absorption component which is extremely sharp (in velocity space). The central velocity of this 'Super DAC' changes only gradually, over several days, between approx. -400 and -750 km/s in most of the ions. However, its location is shifted redward by almost 400 km/s in Al(III) and C(II), indicating that the physical structure giving rise to this feature has a substantial velocity and ionization jump. Constraints on the relative ionization properties of the wind structures are discussed, together with results based on SEI line-profile-fitting methods. The overall wind activity in gamma Ara exhibits a clear ion dependence, such that low-speed features are promoted in low-ionization species, including Al(III), C(II), and Si(III). We also highlight that - in contrast to most OB stars - there are substantial differences in the epoch-to-epoch time-averaged wind profiles of gamma Ara. We interpret the results in terms of a two-component wind model for gamma Ara, with an equatorially compressed low ionization region, and a high speed, higher-ionization polar outflow. This picture is discussed in the context of the predicted bi-stability mechanism for line-driven winds in rapidly rotating early-B type stars, and the formation of compressed wind regions in rapidly rotating hot stars. The apparent

  14. Stellar Winds and High-Energy Radiation: Evolution and influences on planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, C.; Tu, L.; Güdel, M.; Lüftinger, T.; Lammer, H.; Kislyakova, K.; Fichtinger, B.

    2015-10-01

    As part of the Austrian research network "Pathways to Habitability: From Disks to Active Stars, Planets and Life" (path.univie.ac.at), we study the evolution of stellar output (e.g. winds, high-energy radiation) over the lifetimes of solar-like stars and the influence of stellar output on the development of habitable planetary environments. We have developed a coupled stellar rotation-wind-radiation model that describes the long term evolution of stellar output over the course of a star's life. We show that the initial rotation rate of a star can significantly influence the evolution of winds and high-energy radiation and therefore the development of planetary atmospheres.

  15. YOUNG STELLAR CLUSTERS WITH A SCHUSTER MASS DISTRIBUTION. I. STATIONARY WINDS

    SciTech Connect

    Palous, Jan; Wuensch, Richard; Hueyotl-Zahuantitla, Filiberto; Martinez-Gonzalez, Sergio; Silich, Sergiy; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo

    2013-08-01

    Hydrodynamic models for spherically symmetric winds driven by young stellar clusters with a generalized Schuster stellar density profile are explored. For this we use both semi-analytic models and one-dimensional numerical simulations. We determine the properties of quasi-adiabatic and radiative stationary winds and define the radius at which the flow turns from subsonic to supersonic for all stellar density distributions. Strongly radiative winds significantly diminish their terminal speed and thus their mechanical luminosity is strongly reduced. This also reduces their potential negative feedback into their host galaxy interstellar medium. The critical luminosity above which radiative cooling becomes dominant within the clusters, leading to thermal instabilities which make the winds non-stationary, is determined, and its dependence on the star cluster density profile, core radius, and half-mass radius is discussed.

  16. Ram-pressure balance surfaces for an outwardly accelerating stellar wind bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raga, A. C.; Cantó, J.; Koenigsberger, G.; Esquivel, A.

    2014-10-01

    We study the problem of a stellar wind bow shock (produced by an isotropic wind/plane flowing environment interaction) that lies within the wind acceleration region in the simple, ram-pressure balance approximation. We show that this problem has a simple, approximate analytic solution that produces reasonably accurate results when applied to wind velocity profiles appropriate for radiatively driven winds. These solutions should be useful for initializing numerical simulations and for evaluating whether or not the simulations are giving physically reasonable solutions. Also, our analytic solutions should be useful in the interpretation of observations without the necessity of having to perform complex numerical simulations.

  17. The joint effect of jet and stellar wind on GRB afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Li-jun; Dai, Zi-gao; Huang, Yong-feng; Lu, Tan

    2001-04-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with long durations originate from collapse of massive stars, and this is the present popular idea about the mechanism of energy source of GRBs. Massive stars are unavoidably surrounded by stellar winds. It is also commonly believed that jets exist in GRBs. On the basis of these two viewpoints, the authors performed detailed calculations of the evolution of jets in the stellar wind environment. Because in the transition from relativistic to non-relativistic phase there are serious problems in the traditional formulae for the description of jets, some revised formulae are used. Finally, the authors' results on the evolution in the stellar wind environment are compared with those in the homogeneous medium environment, and with the results of Livio and Waxman. The following conclusions are drawn: (1) In the stellar wind environment, even for calculations up to 10 9s, the flux density does not show any clear tendency of levelling off. (2) In the vicinity of γ = 1/θ 0 there is no break in the light curve. (Here θ 0 is the initial half aperture angle.) (3) When the shock wave changes from a relativistic to a non-relativistic phase, there is a break in the light curve. (4) In comparison with the homogeneous medium, the flux density in the stellar wind environment is comparatively small.

  18. The Effect of Magnetic Spots on Stellar Winds and Angular Momentum Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, O.; Drake, J. J.; Kashyap, V. L.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2009-07-01

    We simulate the effect of latitudinal variations in the location of star spots, as well as their magnetic field strength, on stellar angular momentum loss (AML) to the stellar wind. We use the Michigan solar corona global magnetohydrodynamic model, which incorporates realistic relation between the magnetic field topology and the wind distribution. We find that the spots' location significantly affects the stellar wind structure, and as a result, the total mass loss rate and AML rate. In particular, we find that the AML rate is controlled by the mass flux when spots are located at low latitudes but is controlled by an increased plasma density between the stellar surface and the Alfvén surface when spots are located at high latitudes. Our results suggest that there might be a feedback mechanism between the magnetic field distribution, wind distribution, AML through the wind, and the motions at the convection zone that generate the magnetic field. This feedback might explain the role of coronal magnetic fields in stellar dynamos.

  19. The stellar wind velocity function for red supergiants determined in eclipsing binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Imad A.; Stencel, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    The potential for direct measurement of the acceleration of stellar winds from the supergiant component of Zeta Aurigae-type binary stars is discussed. The aberration angle of the interaction shock cone centered on the hot star provides a measure of the velocity of the cool star wind at the orbit of the secondary. This is confirmed by direct observations of stellar wind (P Cygni) line profile variations. This velocity is generally smaller than the final (terminal) velocity of the wind, deduced from the P Cygni line profiles. The contrast between these results and previously published supergiant wind models is discussed. The implication on the physics of energy source dissipation predicted in the theoretical models is considered.

  20. AGN obscuration from winds: from dusty infrared-driven to warm and X-ray photoionized

    PubMed Central

    Dorodnitsyn, A.; Kallman, T.

    2016-01-01

    We present calculations of AGN winds at ~parsec scales, along with the associated obscuration. We take into account the pressure of infrared radiation on dust grains and the interaction of X-rays from a central black hole with hot and cold plasma. Infrared radiation (IR) is incorporated in radiation-hydrodynamic simulations adopting the flux-limited diffusion approximation. We find that in the range of X-ray luminosities L=0.05 – 0.6Ledd, the Compton-thick part of the flow (aka torus) has an opening angle of approximately 72° – 75° regardless of the luminosity. At L ≳ 0.1 the outflowing dusty wind provides the obscuration with IR pressure playing a major role. The global flow consists of two phases: the cold flow at inclinations θ ≳ 70° and a hot, ionized wind of lower density at lower inclinations. The dynamical pressure of the hot wind is important in shaping the denser IR supported flow. At luminosities ≤0.1Ledd episodes of outflow are followed by extended periods when the wind switches to slow accretion.

  1. AGN Obscuration from Winds: From Dusty Infrared-Driven to Warm and X-Ray Photoionized

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorodnitsyn, A.; Kallman, T.

    2012-01-01

    We present calculations of AGN winds at approximate parsec scales, along with the associated obscuration. We take into account the pressure of infrared radiation on dust grains and the interaction of X-rays from a central black hole with hot and cold plasma. Infrared radiation (IR) is incorporated in radiation-hydrodynamic simulations adopting the flux-limited diffusion approximation. We find that in the range of X-ray luminosities L=0.05 - 0.6L(sub Edd) the Compton-thick part of the flow (aka torus) has an opening angle of approximately 72? -75? regardless of the luminosity. At L 0.1 the outflowing dusty wind provides the obscuration with IR pressure playing a major role. The global flow consists of two phases: the cold flow at inclinations (theta) greater than or approximately 70? and a hot, ionized wind of lower density at lower inclinations. The dynamical pressure of the hot wind is important in shaping the denser IR supported flow. At luminosities less than or equal to 0.1L(sub Edd) episodes of outflow are followed by extended periods when the wind switches to slow accretion.

  2. Super-Eddington stellar winds driven by near-surface energy deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quataert, Eliot; Fernández, Rodrigo; Kasen, Daniel; Klion, Hannah; Paxton, Bill

    2016-05-01

    We develop analytic and numerical models of the properties of super-Eddington stellar winds, motivated by phases in stellar evolution when super-Eddington energy deposition (via, e.g. unstable fusion, wave heating, or a binary companion) heats a region near the stellar surface. This appears to occur in the giant eruptions of luminous blue variables (LBVs), Type IIn supernovae progenitors, classical novae, and X-ray bursts. We show that when the wind kinetic power exceeds Eddington, the photons are trapped and behave like a fluid. Convection does not play a significant role in the wind energy transport. The wind properties depend on the ratio of a characteristic speed in the problem v_crit˜ (dot{E} G)^{1/5} (where dot{E} is the heating rate) to the stellar escape speed near the heating region vesc(rh). For vcrit ≳ vesc(rh), the wind kinetic power at large radii dot{E}_w ˜ dot{E}. For vcrit ≲ vesc(rh), most of the energy is used to unbind the wind material and thus dot{E}_w ≲ dot{E}. Multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations without radiation diffusion using FLASH and one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations with radiation diffusion using MESA are in good agreement with the analytic predictions. The photon luminosity from the wind is itself super-Eddington but in many cases the photon luminosity is likely dominated by `internal shocks' in the wind. We discuss the application of our models to eruptive mass-loss from massive stars and argue that the wind models described here can account for the broad properties of LBV outflows and the enhanced mass-loss in the years prior to Type IIn core-collapse supernovae.

  3. Detection of the Compressed Primary Stellar Wind in eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teodoro, Mairan Macedo; Madura, Thomas I.; Gull, Theodore R.; Corcoran, Michael F.; Hamaguchi, K.

    2014-01-01

    A series of three HST/STIS spectroscopic mappings, spaced approximately one year apart, reveal three partial arcs in [Fe II] and [Ni II] emissions moving outward from eta Carinae. We identify these arcs with the shell-like structures, seen in the 3D hydrodynamical simulations, formed by compression of the primary wind by the secondary wind during periastron passages.

  4. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of the X-Ray-photoionized Wind in Cygnus X-3 with the Chandra High-Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Paerels; Cottam; Sako; Liedahl; Brinkman; van Der Meer RL; Kaastra; Predehl

    2000-04-20

    We present a preliminary analysis of the 1-10 keV spectrum of the massive X-ray binary Cygnus X-3, obtained with the high-energy transmission grating spectrometer on the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. The source reveals a richly detailed discrete emission spectrum, with clear signatures of photoionization-driven excitation. Among the spectroscopic novelties in the data are the first astrophysical detections of a number of He-like "triplets" (Si, S, Ar) with emission-line ratios characteristic of photoionization equilibrium, fully resolved narrow radiative recombination continua of Mg, Si, and S, the presence of the H-like Fe Balmer series, and a clear detection of an approximately 800 km s-1 large-scale velocity field as well as an approximately 1500 km s-1 FWHM Doppler broadening in the source. We briefly touch on the implications of these findings for the structure of the Wolf-Rayet wind. PMID:10770708

  5. Thermal structure of neutral winds from young stellar objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruden, Steven P.; Glassgold, Alfred E.; Shu, Frank H.

    1990-01-01

    The physical processes that control the thermal structure of lightly ionized winds from cool protostars are discussed. Attention is concentrated on the hydrogen gas, and the heating, cooling, and chemical processes that affect the neutral and ionic species of atomic and molecular hydrogen are examined. Warm silicate dust may condense out of the cooling wind and may heat the gas through collisions. Singly ionized sodium atoms, which do not recombine for the mass-loss rates considered, set a lower limit to the ionization fraction in the wind. Magnetic fields, which are presumed to accelerate the wind, couple directly to the ionic component of the gas and transfer momentum and energy to the neutral component through collisions. This process of ambipolar diffusion is found to be the dominant source of heat input to the gas.

  6. Realistic NLTE Radiative Transfer for Modeling Stellar Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Philip D.

    1999-01-01

    This NASA grant supported the development of codes to solve the non-LTE multi-level spherical radiative transfer problem in the presence of velocity fields. Much of this work was done in collaboration with Graham Harper (CASA, University of Colorado). These codes were developed for application to the cool, low-velocity winds of evolved late-type stars. Particular emphasis was placed on modeling the wind of lambda Velorum (K4 lb), the brightest K supergiant in the sky, based on extensive observations of the ultraviolet spectrum with the HST/GHRS from GO program 5307. Several solution techniques were examined, including the Eddington factor Approach described in detail by Bennett & Harper (1997). An Eddington factor variant of Harper's S-MULTI code (Harper 1994) for stationary atmospheres was developed and implemented, although full convergence was not realized. The ratio of wind terminal velocity to turbulent velocity is large (approx. 0.3-0.5) in these cool star winds so this assumption of stationarity provides reasonable starting models. Final models, incorporating specified wind laws, were converged using the comoving CRD S-MULTI code. Details of the solution procedure were published by Bennett & Harper (1997). Our analysis of the wind of lambda Vel, based on wind absorption superimposed on chromospheric emission lines in the ultraviolet, can be found in Carpenter et al. (1999). In this paper, we compare observed wind absorption features to an exact CRD calculation in the comoving frame, and also to a much quicker, but approximate, method using the SEI (Sobolev with Exact Integration) code of Lamers, Cerruti-Sola, & Perinotto (1987). Carpenter et al. (1999) provide detailed comparisons of the exact CRD and approximate SEI results and discuss when SEI is adequate to use for computing wind line profiles. Unfortunately, the observational material is insufficient to unambiguously determine the wind acceleration law for lambda Vel. Relatively few unblended Fe II lines

  7. Detection of the Compressed Primary Stellar Wind in eta Carinae*

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teodoro, M.; Madura, T. I.; Gull, T. R.; Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.

    2013-01-01

    A series of three Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS) spectroscopic mappings, spaced approximately one year apart, reveal three partial arcs in [Fe II] and [Ni II] emissions moving outward from ? Carinae. We identify these arcs with the shell-like structures, seen in the 3D hydrodynamical simulations, formed by compression of the primary wind by the secondary wind during periastron passages.

  8. DETECTION OF THE COMPRESSED PRIMARY STELLAR WIND IN {eta} CARINAE

    SciTech Connect

    Teodoro, M.; Madura, T. I.; Gull, T. R.; Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.

    2013-08-10

    A series of three Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph spectroscopic mappings, spaced approximately one year apart, reveal three partial arcs in [Fe II] and [Ni II] emissions moving outward from {eta} Carinae. We identify these arcs with the shell-like structures, seen in the three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, formed by compression of the primary wind by the secondary wind during periastron passages.

  9. DEVIATION OF STELLAR ORBITS FROM TEST PARTICLE TRAJECTORIES AROUND SGr A* DUE TO TIDES AND WINDS

    SciTech Connect

    Psaltis, Dimitrios; Li, Gongjie; Loeb, Abraham E-mail: gli@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-11-01

    Monitoring the orbits of stars around Sgr A* offers the possibility of detecting the precession of their orbital planes due to frame dragging, of measuring the spin and quadrupole moment of the black hole, and of testing the no-hair theorem. Here we investigate whether the deviations of stellar orbits from test-particle trajectories due to wind mass loss and tidal dissipation of the orbital energy compromise such measurements. We find that the effects of stellar winds are, in general, negligible. On the other hand, for the most eccentric orbits (e > 0.96) for which an optical interferometer, such as GRAVITY, will detect orbital plane precession due to frame dragging, the tidal dissipation of orbital energy occurs at timescales comparable to the timescale of precession due to the quadrupole moment of the black hole. As a result, this non-conservative effect is a potential source of systematic uncertainty in testing the no-hair theorem with stellar orbits.

  10. Deviation of Stellar Orbits from Test Particle Trajectories around Sgr A* Due to Tides and Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psaltis, Dimitrios; Li, Gongjie; Loeb, Abraham

    2013-11-01

    Monitoring the orbits of stars around Sgr A* offers the possibility of detecting the precession of their orbital planes due to frame dragging, of measuring the spin and quadrupole moment of the black hole, and of testing the no-hair theorem. Here we investigate whether the deviations of stellar orbits from test-particle trajectories due to wind mass loss and tidal dissipation of the orbital energy compromise such measurements. We find that the effects of stellar winds are, in general, negligible. On the other hand, for the most eccentric orbits (e > 0.96) for which an optical interferometer, such as GRAVITY, will detect orbital plane precession due to frame dragging, the tidal dissipation of orbital energy occurs at timescales comparable to the timescale of precession due to the quadrupole moment of the black hole. As a result, this non-conservative effect is a potential source of systematic uncertainty in testing the no-hair theorem with stellar orbits.

  11. EG Andromedae: A New Orbit and Additional Evidence for a Photoionized Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenyon, Scott J.; Garcia, Michael R.

    2016-07-01

    We analyze a roughly 20 yr set of spectroscopic observations for the symbiotic binary EG And. Radial velocities derived from echelle spectra are best fit with a circular orbit having an orbital period of P = 483.3 ± 1.6 days and semi-amplitude K = 7.34 ± 0.07 km s‑1. Combined with previous data, these observations rule out an elliptical orbit at the 10σ level. Equivalent widths of H i Balmer emission lines and various absorption features vary in phase with the orbital period. Relative to the radius of the red giant primary, the apparent size of the H ii region is consistent with a model where a hot secondary star with effective temperature T h ≈ 75,000 K ionizes the wind from the red giant.

  12. The orbital evolution of asteroids, pebbles and planets from giant branch stellar radiation and winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veras, Dimitri; Eggl, Siegfried; Gänsicke, Boris T.

    2015-08-01

    The discovery of over 50 planets around evolved stars and more than 35 debris discs orbiting white dwarfs highlight the increasing need to understand small body evolution around both early and asymptotic giant branch (GB) stars. Pebbles and asteroids are susceptible to strong accelerations from the intense luminosity and winds of GB stars. Here, we establish equations that can model time-varying GB stellar radiation, wind drag and mass-loss. We derive the complete three-dimensional equations of motion in orbital elements due to (1) the Epstein and Stokes regimes of stellar wind drag, (2) Poynting-Robertson drag, and (3) the Yarkovsky drift with seasonal and diurnal components. We prove through averaging that the potential secular eccentricity and inclination excitation due to Yarkovsky drift can exceed that from Poynting-Robertson drag and radiation pressure by at least three orders of magnitude, possibly flinging asteroids which survive YORP spin-up into a widely dispersed cloud around the resulting white dwarf. The GB Yarkovsky effect alone may change an asteroid's orbital eccentricity by 10 per cent in just 1 Myr. Damping perturbations from stellar wind drag can be just as extreme, but are strongly dependent on the highly uncertain local gas density and mean free path length. We conclude that GB radiative and wind effects must be considered when modelling the post-main-sequence evolution of bodies smaller than about 1000 km.

  13. Spectroscopy of the Stellar Wind in the Cygnus X-1 System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miskovicova, Ivica; Hanke, Manfred; Wilms, Joern; Nowak, Michael A.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Schultz, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    The X-ray luminosity of black holes is produced through the accretion of material from their companion stars. Depending on the mass of the donor star, accretion of the material falling onto the black hole through the inner Lagrange point of the system or accretion by the strong stellar wind can occur. Cygnus X-1 is a high mass X-ray binary system, where the black hole is powered by accretion of the stellar wind of its supergiant companion star HDE226868. As the companion is close to filling its Roche lobe, the wind is not symmetric, but strongly focused towards the black hole. Chandra-HETGS observations allow for an investigation of this focused stellar wind, which is essential to understand the physics of the accretion flow. We compare observations at the distinct orbital phases of 0.0, 0.2, 0.5 and 0.75. These correspond to different lines of sights towards the source, allowing us to probe the structure and the dynamics of the wind.

  14. Cosmic ray-modified stellar winds. I - Solution topologies and singularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, C. M.; Webb, G. M.

    1987-01-01

    In the present two-fluid hydrodynamical model for stellar wind flow modification due to its interaction with Galactic cosmic rays, these rays are coupled to the stellar wind by either hydromagnetic wave scattering or background flow irregularity propagation. The background flow is modified by the cosmic rays via their pressure gradient. The system of equations used possesses a line of singularities in (r, u, P sub c)-space, or a two-dimensional hypersurface of singularities in (r, u, P sub c, dP sub c/dr)-space, where r, u, and P sub c are respectively the radial distance from the star, the radial wind flow speed, and the cosmic ray pressure. The singular points may be nodes, foci, or saddle points.

  15. The slow ionized wind and rotating disklike system that are associated with the high-mass young stellar object G345.4938+01.4677

    SciTech Connect

    Guzmán, Andrés E.; Garay, Guido; Bronfman, Leonardo; Mardones, Diego; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Moran, James; Brooks, Kate J.; Nyman, Lars-Åke; Sanhueza, Patricio

    2014-12-01

    We report the detection, made using ALMA, of the 92 GHz continuum and hydrogen recombination lines (HRLs) H40α, H42α, and H50β emission toward the ionized wind associated with the high-mass young stellar object G345.4938+01.4677. This is the luminous central dominating source located in the massive and dense molecular clump associated with IRAS 16562–3959. The HRLs exhibit Voigt profiles, which is a strong signature of Stark broadening. We successfully reproduce the observed continuum and HRLs simultaneously using a simple model of a slow ionized wind in local thermodynamic equilibrium, with no need for a high-velocity component. The Lorentzian line wings imply electron densities of 5 × 10{sup 7} cm{sup –3} on average. In addition, we detect SO and SO{sub 2} emission arising from a compact (∼3000 AU) molecular core associated with the central young star. The molecular core exhibits a velocity gradient that is perpendicular to the jet-axis, which we interpret as evidence of rotation. The set of observations toward G345.4938+01.4677 are consistent with it being a young high-mass star associated with a slow photo-ionized wind.

  16. Modelling accretion disc and stellar wind interactions: the case of Sgr A*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, I. M.; Petropoulou, M.; Mimica, P.; Giannios, D.

    2016-07-01

    Sgr A* is an ideal target to study low-luminosity accreting systems. It has been recently proposed that properties of the accretion flow around Sgr A* can be probed through its interactions with the stellar wind of nearby massive stars belonging to the S-cluster. When a star intercepts the accretion disc, the ram and thermal pressures of the disc terminate the stellar wind leading to the formation of a bow shock structure. Here, a semi-analytical model is constructed which describes the geometry of the termination shock formed in the wind. With the employment of numerical hydrodynamic simulations, this model is both verified and extended to a region prone to Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. Because the characteristic wind and stellar velocities are in ˜108 cm s-1 range, the shocked wind may produce detectable X-rays via thermal bremsstrahlung emission. The application of this model to the pericentre passage of S2, the brightest member of the S-cluster, shows that the shocked wind produces roughly a month long X-ray flare with a peak luminosity of L ≈ 4 × 1033 erg s-1 for a stellar mass-loss rate, disc number density, and thermal pressure strength of dot{M}_w= 10^{-7} M_{⊙} yr^{-1}, nd = 105 cm-3, and α = 0.1, respectively. This peak luminosity is comparable to the quiescent X-ray emission detected from Sgr A* and is within the detection capabilities of current X-ray observatories. Its detection could constrain the density and thickness of the disc at a distance of ˜3000 gravitational radii from the supermassive black hole.

  17. Modelling Radiative Stellar Winds with the SIMECA Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stee, Ph.

    Using the SIMECA code developped by Stee & Araùjo ([CITE]), we report theoretical HI visible and near-IR line profiles, i.e. Hα (6562 Å), Hβ (4861 Å) and Brγ (21 656 Å), and intensity maps for a large set of parameters representative of early to late Be spectral types. We have computed the size of the emitting region in the Brγ line and its nearby continuum which both originate from a very extended region, i.e. at least 40 stellar radii which is twice the size of the Hα emitting region. We predict the relative fluxes from the central star, the envelope contribution in the given lines and in the continuum for a wide range of parameters characterizing the disk models. Finally, we have also studied the effect of changing the spectral type on our results and we obtain a clear correlation between the luminosity in Hα and in the infrared.

  18. Latitude-Dependent Effects in the Stellar Wind of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Nathan; Davidson, Kris; Gull, Theodore R.; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Hillier, D. John

    2002-01-01

    The Homunculus reflection nebula around eta Carinae provides the rare opportunity to observe the spectrum of a star from more than one direction. In the case of eta Car, the nebula's geometry is known well enough to infer how wind profiles vary with latitude. We present STIS spectra of several positions in the Homunculus, showing directly that eta Car has an aspherical and axisymmetric stellar wind. P Cygni absorption in Balmer lines depends on latitude, with relatively high velocities and strong absorption near the polar axis. Stronger absorption at high latitudes is surprising, and it suggests higher mass flux toward the poles, perhaps resulting from equatorial gravity darkening on a rotating star. Reflected profiles of He I lines are more puzzling, and offer clues to eta Car's wind geometry and ionization structure. During eta Car's high-excitation state in March 2000, the wind had a fast, dense polar wind, with higher ionization at low latitudes. Older STIS data obtained since 1998 reveal that this global stellar-wind geometry changes during eta Car's 5.5 year cycle, and may suggest that this star s spectroscopic events are shell ejections. Whether or not a companion star triggers these outbursts remains ambiguous. The most dramatic changes in the wind occur at low latitudes, while the dense polar wind remains relatively undisturbed during an event. The apparent stability of the polar wind also supports the inferred bipolar geometry. The wind geometry and its variability have critical implications for understanding the 5.5 year cycle and long-term variability, but do not provide a clear alternative to the binary hypothesis for generating eta Car s X-rays.

  19. Simulations of stellar/pulsar-wind interaction along one full orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch-Ramon, V.; Barkov, M. V.; Khangulyan, D.; Perucho, M.

    2012-08-01

    Context. The winds from a non-accreting pulsar and a massive star in a binary system collide forming a bow-shaped shock structure. The Coriolis force induced by orbital motion deflects the shocked flows, strongly affecting their dynamics. Aims: We study the evolution of the shocked stellar and pulsar winds on scales in which the orbital motion is important. Potential sites of non-thermal activity are investigated. Methods: Relativistic hydrodynamical simulations in two dimensions, performed with the code PLUTO and using the adaptive mesh refinement technique, are used to model interacting stellar and pulsar winds on scales ~80 times the distance between the stars. The hydrodynamical results suggest the suitable locations of sites for particle acceleration and non-thermal emission. Results: In addition to the shock formed towards the star, the shocked and unshocked components of the pulsar wind flowing away from the star terminate by means of additional strong shocks produced by the orbital motion. Strong instabilities lead to the development of turbulence and an effective two-wind mixing in both the leading and trailing sides of the interaction structure, which starts to merge with itself after one orbit. The adopted moderate pulsar-wind Lorentz factor already provides a good qualitative description of the phenomena involved in high-mass binaries with pulsars, and can capture important physical effects that would not appear in non-relativistic treatments. Conclusions: Simulations show that shocks, instabilities, and mass-loading yield efficient mass, momentum, and energy exchanges between the pulsar and the stellar winds. This renders a rapid increase in the entropy of the shocked structure, which will likely be disrupted on scales beyond the simulated ones. Several sites of particle acceleration and low- and high-energy emission can be identified. Doppler boosting will have significant and complex effects on radiation. A movie of the simulation is available in

  20. Interacting supernovae from photoionization-confined shells around red supergiant stars.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Jonathan; Mohamed, Shazrene; Gvaramadze, Vasilii V; Kotak, Rubina; Langer, Norbert; Meyer, Dominique M-A; Moriya, Takashi J; Neilson, Hilding R

    2014-08-21

    Betelgeuse, a nearby red supergiant, is a fast-moving star with a powerful stellar wind that drives a bow shock into its surroundings. This picture has been challenged by the discovery of a dense and almost static shell that is three times closer to the star than the bow shock and has been decelerated by some external force. The two physically distinct structures cannot both be formed by the hydrodynamic interaction of the wind with the interstellar medium. Here we report that a model in which Betelgeuse's wind is photoionized by radiation from external sources can explain the static shell without requiring a new understanding of the bow shock. Pressure from the photoionized wind generates a standing shock in the neutral part of the wind and forms an almost static, photoionization-confined shell. Other red supergiants should have much more massive shells than Betelgeuse, because the photoionization-confined shell traps up to 35 per cent of all mass lost during the red supergiant phase, confining this gas close to the star until it explodes. After the supernova explosion, massive shells dramatically affect the supernova light curve, providing a natural explanation for the many supernovae that have signatures of circumstellar interaction. PMID:25119040

  1. Interacting supernovae from photoionization-confined shells around red supergiant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Jonathan; Mohamed, Shazrene; Gvaramadze, Vasilii V.; Kotak, Rubina; Langer, Norbert; Meyer, Dominique M.-A.; Moriya, Takashi J.; Neilson, Hilding R.

    2014-08-01

    Betelgeuse, a nearby red supergiant, is a fast-moving star with a powerful stellar wind that drives a bow shock into its surroundings. This picture has been challenged by the discovery of a dense and almost static shell that is three times closer to the star than the bow shock and has been decelerated by some external force. The two physically distinct structures cannot both be formed by the hydrodynamic interaction of the wind with the interstellar medium. Here we report that a model in which Betelgeuse's wind is photoionized by radiation from external sources can explain the static shell without requiring a new understanding of the bow shock. Pressure from the photoionized wind generates a standing shock in the neutral part of the wind and forms an almost static, photoionization-confined shell. Other red supergiants should have much more massive shells than Betelgeuse, because the photoionization-confined shell traps up to 35 per cent of all mass lost during the red supergiant phase, confining this gas close to the star until it explodes. After the supernova explosion, massive shells dramatically affect the supernova light curve, providing a natural explanation for the many supernovae that have signatures of circumstellar interaction.

  2. Newborn stars and stellar winds in Barnard 228

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyer, Mark H.; Graham, J. A.

    1989-09-01

    Imaging and spectroscopic observations of premain-sequence stars in the B228 molecular cloud have identified three sites of extended, shock-excited nebulosity. A highly collimated, blueshifted jet is associated with the T Tauri star Sz68 (CoD -33:10685 deg). A candidate Herbig-Haro object is found near Sz68 and the T Tauri star Sz69. A third region of shock-excited nebulosity is identified near the embedded newborn star IRAS 15398-3359. IR excesses observed toward these stellar sources may imply a relationship between outflow activity and the presence of a circumstellar disk. Only one of the two outflow sources with well-defined orientations is aligned with the large-scale, magnetic-field geometry of the cloud in contrast to the global alignment of outflows in the Taurus cloud complex. Data for three previously unidentified emission-line stars are presented. A faint 18th magnitude dMe star located 48 arcsecs west of Sz68 is identified.

  3. A STELLAR WIND ORIGIN FOR THE G2 CLOUD: THREE-DIMENSIONAL NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    De Colle, Fabio; Raga, A. C.; Contreras-Torres, Flavio F.; Toledo-Roy, Juan C.

    2014-07-10

    We present three-dimensional, adaptive mesh refinement simulations of G2, a cloud of gas moving in a highly eccentric orbit toward the galactic center. We assume that G2 originates from a stellar wind interacting with the environment of the Sgr A* black hole. The stellar wind forms a cometary bubble which becomes increasingly elongated as the star approaches periastron. A few months after periastron passage, streams of material begin to accrete on the central black hole with accretion rates M-dot ∼10{sup −8} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. Predicted Brγ emission maps and position-velocity diagrams show an elongated emission resembling recent observations of G2. A large increase in luminosity is predicted by the emission coming from the shocked wind region during periastron passage. The observations, showing a constant Brγ luminosity, remain puzzling, and are explained here assuming that the emission is dominated by the free-wind region. The observed Brγ luminosity (∼8 × 10{sup 30} erg s{sup –1}) is reproduced by a model with a v{sub w} = 50 km s{sup –1} wind velocity and a 10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} mass-loss rate if the emission comes from the shocked wind. A faster and less dense wind reproduces the Brγ luminosity if the emission comes from the inner, free-wind region. The extended cometary wind bubble, largely destroyed by the tidal interaction with the black hole, reforms a few years after periastron passage. As a result, the Brγ emission is more compact after periastron passage.

  4. Radiative waves in stellar winds with line scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Timon; Feldmeier, Achim

    2016-08-01

    Photospheric radiation can drive winds from hot, massive stars by direct momentum transfer through scattering in bound-bound transitions of atmospheric ions. The line radiation force should cause a new radiative wave mode. The dispersion relation from perturbations of the line force was analysed so far either in Sobolev approximation or for pure line absorption. The former does not include the line-driven instability, and the latter cannot account for upstream propagating, radiative waves. We consider a non-Sobolev line force that includes scattering in a simplified way, accounting however for the important line-drag effect. We derive a new dispersion relation for radiative waves, and analyse wave propagation using Fourier methods, and by numerical solution of an integro-differential equation. The existence of an upstream propagating, dispersive radiative wave mode is demonstrated.

  5. Radiative waves in stellar winds with line scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Timon; Feldmeier, Achim

    2016-04-01

    Photospheric radiation can drive winds from hot, massive stars by direct momentum transfer through scattering in bound-bound transitions of atmospheric ions. The line radiation force should cause a new radiative wave mode. The dispersion relation from perturbations of the line force was analyzed so far either in Sobolev approximation or for pure line absorption. The former does not include the line-driven instability, the latter cannot account for upstream propagating, radiative waves. We consider a non-Sobolev line force that includes scattering in a simplified way, accounting however for the important line-drag effect. We derive a new dispersion relation for radiative waves, and analyze wave propagation using Fourier methods, and by numerical solution of an integro-differential equation. The existence of an upstream propagating, dispersive radiative wave mode is demonstrated.

  6. Effects of tidally enhanced stellar wind on the horizontal branch morphology of globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Z.-X.; Chen, X.-F.; Zhang, F.-H.; Han, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Metallicity is the first parameter to influence the horizontal branch (HB) morphology of globular clusters (GCs). It has been found, however, that some other parameters may also play an important role in affecting the morphology. While the nature of these important parameters remains unclear, they are believed to be likely correlated with wind mass-loss of red giants, since this mass loss determines their subsequent locations on the HB. Unfortunately, the mass loss during the red giant stages of the stellar evolution is poorly understood at present. Aims: The stellar winds of red giants may be tidally enhanced by companion stars if they are in binary systems. We investigate the evolutionary consequences of red giants in binaries by including tidally enhanced stellar winds, and examine the effects on the HB morphology of GCs. Methods: We used Eggleton's stellar evolution code to study the binary evolution. The tidally enhanced stellar-wind model of Tout & Eggleton is incorporated into this code, where the tidal enhancement parameter, Bw, has various values (e.g., 10 000 and 500) to examine the dependency of the final results on this parameter. A Monte Carlo simulation was performed to generate a group of binary systems. The position of each primary star on the HB in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram in this sample is obtained through interpolations among the constructed HB evolutionary tracks. Finally, a synthetic HB in the color-magnitude diagram is obtained by transforming the effective temperature and luminosity of each primary star on the HB into B - V colors and absolute magnitude. Results: We find that red, blue, and extreme horizontal branch stars are all produced under the effects of tidally enhanced stellar wind without any additional assumptions on the mass-loss dispersion. Furthermore, the horizontal branch morphology is found to be insensitive to the tidal enhancement parameter, Bw. We compare our theoretical results with the observed horizontal

  7. THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE SHOCKED STELLAR WIND OF PULSAR GAMMA-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zabalza, V.; Paredes, J. M.; Bosch-Ramon, V.

    2011-12-10

    Gamma-ray-loud X-ray binaries are binary systems that show non-thermal broadband emission from radio to gamma rays. If the system comprises a massive star and a young non-accreting pulsar, their winds will collide producing broadband non-thermal emission, most likely originated in the shocked pulsar wind. Thermal X-ray emission is expected from the shocked stellar wind, but until now it has neither been detected nor studied in the context of gamma-ray binaries. We present a semi-analytic model of the thermal X-ray emission from the shocked stellar wind in pulsar gamma-ray binaries, and find that the thermal X-ray emission increases monotonically with the pulsar spin-down luminosity, reaching luminosities of the order of 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1}. The lack of thermal features in the X-ray spectrum of gamma-ray binaries can then be used to constrain the properties of the pulsar and stellar winds. By fitting the observed X-ray spectra of gamma-ray binaries with a source model composed of an absorbed non-thermal power law and the computed thermal X-ray emission, we are able to derive upper limits on the spin-down luminosity of the putative pulsar. We applied this method to LS 5039, the only gamma-ray binary with a radial, powerful wind, and obtain an upper limit on the pulsar spin-down luminosity of {approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}. Given the energetic constraints from its high-energy gamma-ray emission, a non-thermal to spin-down luminosity ratio very close to unity may be required.

  8. A radiation-driven stellar wind model with a line force cutoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Mark J.; Friend, David B.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a model for a radiation-driven stellar wind in which the driving force is abruptly cut off at an adjustable distance from the star. The model is intended to give a first approximation of the effects of ionizing shocks in a stellar wind on the terminal velocity and mass-loss rate. As expected, the wind velocity is found to decrease after the line force is cut off. The terminal velocity depends directly on the velocity of the wind at the point where the driving force is cut off. The mass-loss rate is found to be unaffected as long as the cutoff is outside the critical point of the flow. The model is applied to the star Tau Sco, a strong X-ray source with an anomalously low terminal velocity. It is shown that this low terminal velocity can be caused by a cutoff of the line force at a distance which is consistent with the idea that the observed X-rate emission is produced by shocks in the wind.

  9. FARADAY ROTATION DISTRIBUTIONS FROM STELLAR MAGNETISM IN WIND-BLOWN BUBBLES

    SciTech Connect

    Ignace, R.; Pingel, N. M. E-mail: nmpingle@wisc.edu

    2013-03-01

    Faraday rotation is a valuable tool for detecting magnetic fields. Here, the technique is considered in relation to wind-blown bubbles. In the context of spherical winds with azimuthal or split monopole stellar magnetic field geometries, we derive maps of the distribution of position angle (P.A.) rotation of linearly polarized radiation across projected bubbles. We show that the morphology of maps for split monopole fields are distinct from those produced by the toroidal field topology; however, the toroidal case is the one most likely to be detectable because of its slower decline in field strength with distance from the star. We also consider the important case of a bubble with a spherical sub-volume that is field-free to approximate crudely a 'swept-up' wind interaction between a fast wind (or possibly a supernova ejecta shell) overtaking a slower magnetized wind from a prior state of stellar evolution. With an azimuthal field, the resultant P.A. map displays two arc-like features of opposite rotation measure, similar to observations of the supernova remnant G296.5+10.0. We illustrate how P.A. maps can be used to disentangle Faraday rotation contributions made by the interstellar medium versus the bubble. Although our models involve simplifying assumptions, their consideration leads to a number of general robust conclusions for use in the analysis of radio mapping data sets.

  10. Analytical solutions of stellar winds in B-A type supergiants stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, Ignacio; Cure, Michel

    2013-06-01

    An analytical solution for the δ-slow hydrodynamic solution (Cure et al. 2011) in B-A type supergiants stars is developed. The methodology is based on the analytical solutions of a) Villata (1992), which is described in terms of the stellar and wind parameters and b) Muller & Vink (2008), which is described in terms of fitting parameters from a numerical solution (hydrodynamic). These methodologies only apply for fast solutions, for that reason the line acceleration term (gL) of Muller & Vink method is modified in order to obtain an analytical solution for the δ-slow solution. To find a relationship between the parameters from the fit and the stellar and wind parameters, a computational grid, based on the grid of stellar models from Ekstrom et al. (2012), is created for B-A type supergiants stars with δ-slow hydrodynamic solution. Finally, an analytical solution for B-A type supergiants stars is obtained based on the Lambert W function (Corless et al. 1996). Comparing with the numerical solutions, the terminal velocity has a median relative error below 4% and the mass loss rate has a median relative error below 5%. In addition, we calculated the wind-momentum luminosity relationship (WLR) with the models from the computational grid and compared with the observations, showing a very good agreement.

  11. SPIN EVOLUTION OF ACCRETING YOUNG STARS. II. EFFECT OF ACCRETION-POWERED STELLAR WINDS

    SciTech Connect

    Matt, Sean P.; Greene, Thomas P.; Pudritz, Ralph E. E-mail: thomas.p.greene@nasa.gov E-mail: pudritz@physics.mcmaster.ca

    2012-01-20

    We present a model for the rotational evolution of a young, solar-mass star interacting magnetically with an accretion disk. As in a previous paper (Paper I), the model includes changes in the star's mass and radius as it descends the Hayashi track, a decreasing accretion rate, and a prescription for the angular momentum transfer between the star and disk. Paper I concluded that, for the relatively strong magnetic coupling expected in real systems, additional processes are necessary to explain the existence of slowly rotating pre-main-sequence stars. In the present paper, we extend the stellar spin model to include the effect of a spin-down torque that arises from an accretion-powered stellar wind (APSW). For a range of magnetic field strengths, accretion rates, initial spin rates, and mass outflow rates, the modeled stars exhibit rotation periods within the range of 1-10 days in the age range of 1-3 Myr. This range coincides with the bulk of the observed rotation periods, with the slow rotators corresponding to stars with the lowest accretion rates, strongest magnetic fields, and/or highest stellar wind mass outflow rates. We also make a direct, quantitative comparison between the APSW scenario and the two types of disk-locking models (namely, the X-wind and Ghosh and Lamb type models) and identify some remaining theoretical issues for understanding young star spins.

  12. On the Origin and Evolution of Stellar Chromospheres, Coronae and Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musielak, Z. E.

    2000-01-01

    This grant was awarded by NASA to The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) to construct state-of-the-art, theoretical, two-component, chromospheric models for single stars of different spectral types and different evolutionary status. In our proposal, we suggested to use these models to predict the level of the "basal flux", the observed range of variation of chromospheric activity for a given spectral type, and the decrease of this activity with stellar age. In addition, for red giants and supergiants, we also proposed to construct self-consistent, purely theoretical wind models, and used these models to investigate the origin of "dividing lines" in the H-R diagram. In the following, we describe our completed work. We have accomplished the first main goal of our proposal by constructing first purely theoretical, time-dependent and two-component models of stellar chromospheres.1 The models require specifying only three basic stellar parameters, namely, the effective temperature, gravity and rotation rate, and they take into account non-magnetic and magnetic regions in stellar chromospheres. The non-magnetic regions are heated by acoustic waves generated by the turbulent convection in the stellar subphotospheric layers. The magnetic regions are identified with magnetic flux tubes uniformly distributed over the entire stellar surface and they are heated by longitudinal tube waves generated by turbulent motions in the subphotospheric and photospheric layers. The coverage of stellar surface by magnetic regions (the so-called filling factor) is estimated for a given rotation rate from an observational relationship. The constructed models are time-dependent and are based on the energy balance between the amount of mechanical energy supplied by waves and radiative losses in strong Ca II and Mg II emission lines. To calculate the amount of wave energy in the non-magnetic regions, we have used the Lighthill-Stein theory for sound generation.

  13. Is there a relation between stellar wind braking and the spatial structure of surface magnetic fields?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Timothy M.

    2015-08-01

    For open cluster ages between about 100 Myr and 500 Myr, plots of rotational period vs. color (or equivalently, stellar mass) are almost bimodal, with distinct groups fast and slow rotators at all masses between roughly 0.5 and 1.3 M_sun. One cannot explain these diagrams without invoking some process with a lifetime of a few hundred Myr, that for some but not all stars isolates most of the stellar angular momentum from the torque caused by a magnetized stellar wind. The prevailing theory [e.g. Epstein & Pinsonneault 2014 (ApJ 780, 159) and references therein] locates this process at the base of the stellar convection zone, allowing the wind to spin down the convection zone without much affecting the core. In Brown 2014 (ApJ 789,101) I suggested rather that the break occurs above the stellar photosphere, with different spatial structures of the stellar dynamos accounting for drastically different degrees of magnetic coupling to the stellar wind. In this talk I will describe preliminary results from two observing programs that aim to test the latter hypothesis.One program uses photometry from the LCOGT (ground-based, world-wide) telescope network to measure rotational periods of stars in fairly young open clusters, to improve comparisons between modeled and observed period-color diagrams by increasing sample sizes. The LCOGT network proves nearly ideal for this kind of work, having already provided good data sets for the clusters NGC 6281 and NGC 3532. These clusters are both about 300 Myr old, filling a gap in the current age distribution of observed clusters. The second program uses K2 photometry combined with multicolor photometry (from LCOGT) and spectroscopy (from the ARC 3.5m telescope) to search for rotation-dependent differences in possible proxies for the typical spatial scale of surface magnetic fields. These include the spot/photosphere temperature contrast, and short-timescale variations in various diagnostics of projected starspot area.

  14. The effects of the stellar wind and orbital motion on the jets of high-mass microquasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch-Ramon, V.; Barkov, M. V.

    2016-05-01

    Context. High-mass microquasar jets propagate under the effect of the wind from the companion star, and the orbital motion of the binary system. The stellar wind and the orbit may be dominant factors determining the jet properties beyond the binary scales. Aims: This is an analytical study, performed to characterise the effects of the stellar wind and the orbital motion on the jet properties. Methods: Accounting for the wind thrust transferred to the jet, we derive analytical estimates to characterise the jet evolution under the impact of the stellar wind. We include the Coriolis force effect, induced by orbital motion and enhanced by the wind's presence. Large-scale evolution of the jet is sketched, accounting for wind-to-jet thrust transfer, total energy conservation, and wind-jet flow mixing. Results: If the angle of the wind-induced jet bending is larger than its half-opening angle, the following is expected: (i) a strong recollimation shock; (ii) bending against orbital motion, caused by Coriolis forces and enhanced by the wind presence; and (iii) non-ballistic helical propagation further away. Even if disrupted, the jet can re-accelerate due to ambient pressure gradients, but wind entrainment can weaken this acceleration. On large scales, the opening angle of the helical structure is determined by the wind-jet thrust relation, and the wind-loaded jet flow can be rather slow. Conclusions: The impact of stellar winds on high-mass microquasar jets can yield non-ballistic helical jet trajectories, jet partial disruption and wind mixing, shocks, and possibly non-thermal emission. Among other observational diagnostics, such as radiation variability at any band, the radio morphology on milliarcsecond scales can be informative on the wind-jet interaction.

  15. Learning from our Sun: The Interaction of Stellar with Interstellar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opher, M.; Liewer, P. C.; Velli, M.; Gombosi, T. I.; Manchester, W.; DeZeeuw, D. L.; Toth, G.; Sokolov, I. V.

    2004-05-01

    Stars have winds which interact with the interstellar medium. The intensity of the winds can be 10 million times greater than that of the solar wind. The magnetic fields of these stars can be orders of magnitude greater than that of the Sun. The rotation periods can be appreciably different from that of the Sun. A detailed description of the interaction of stellar winds with the interstellar winds has never been made. The interaction between the Sun and Interstellar Medium creates three major structures: Termination Shock, Heliopause and Bow Shock. Recently, we found (Opher et al. 2003, 2004) that beyond the region where the solar wind become subsonic, the Termination Shock, a jet-sheet structure forms in the equatorial plane of the Sun rotation axis. This structure forms due to the compression of the solar magnetic field by the interstellar wind. The structure of the jet-sheet resembles a the "brim of a baseball cap"- it extends beyond the Termination Shock for 150 AU (almost touching the Bow Shock) and has a width of 10AU. This result is due to a novel application of a state-of-art 3D Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code with a highly refined grid (0.75 AU 4 orders of magnitude smaller than the physical dimensions of the system). The jet-sheet is unstable and oscillates up and down due to a velocity shear instability. We showed that the sinuous mode is the dominant mode that develops into a velocity-shear-instability with a growth rate of 0.027 years-1. We are the first to predict the formation of this structure at the equatorial region in the interaction of magnetized rotating star and an external wind (for a stellar rotation and magnetic field axis aligned). In this work, we extend our previous solar studies and investigate the effect in other solar-like stars. We present the dependence of the jet-sheet structure and the velocity-shear instability on the star mass-loss rate and magnetic field. We discuss further applications to other stellar wind interactions and the

  16. On the Origin and Evolution of Stellar Chromospheres, Coronae and Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musielak, Z. E.

    1997-01-01

    The final report discusses work completed on proposals to construct state-of-the-art, theoretical, two-component, chromospheric models for single stars of different spectral types and different evolutionary status. We suggested to use these models to predict the level of the "basal flux", the observed range of variation of chromospheric activity for a given spectral type, and the decrease of this activity with stellar age. In addition, for red giants and supergiants, we also proposed to construct self-consistent, purely theoretical, chromosphere-wind models, and investigate the origin of "dividing lines" in the H-R diagram. In the report, we list the following six specific goals for the first and second year of the proposed research and then describe the completed work: (1) To calculate the acoustic and magnetic wave energy fluxes for stars located in different regions of the H-R diagram; (2) To investigate the transfer of this non-radiative energy through stellar photospheres and to estimate the amount of energy that reaches the chromosphere; (3) To identify major sources of radiative losses in stellar chromospheres and calculate the amount of emitted energy; (4) To use (1) through (3) to construct purely theoretical, two-component, chromospheric models based on the local energy balance. The models will be constructed for stars of different spectral types and different evolutionary status; (5) To explain theoretically the "basal flux", the location of stellar temperature minima and the observed range of chromospheric activity for stars of the same spectral type; and (6) To construct self-consistent, time-dependent stellar wind models based on the momentum deposition by finite amplitude Alfven waves.

  17. STELLAR WIND INDUCED SOFT X-RAY EMISSION FROM CLOSE-IN EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Kislyakova, K. G.; Lammer, H.; Fossati, L.; Johnstone, C. P.; Holmström, M.; Zaitsev, V. V.

    2015-01-30

    In this Letter, we estimate the X-ray emission from close-in exoplanets. We show that the Solar/Stellar Wind Charge Exchange Mechanism (SWCX), which produces soft X-ray emission, is very effective for hot Jupiters. In this mechanism, X-ray photons are emitted as a result of the charge exchange between heavy ions in the solar wind and the atmospheric neutral particles. In the solar system, comets produce X-rays mostly through the SWCX mechanism, but it has also been shown to operate in the heliosphere, in the terrestrial magnetosheath, and on Mars, Venus, and the Moon. Since the number of emitted photons is proportional to the solar wind mass flux, this mechanism is not very effective for the solar system giants. Here we present a simple estimate of the X-ray emission intensity that can be produced by close-in extrasolar giant planets due to charge exchange with the heavy ions of the stellar wind. Using the example of HD 209458b, we show that this mechanism alone can be responsible for an X-ray emission of ≈10{sup 22} erg s{sup –1}, which is 10{sup 6} times stronger than the emission from the Jovian aurora. We discuss also the possibility of observing the predicted soft X-ray flux of hot Jupiters and show that despite high emission intensities they are unobservable with current facilities.

  18. Modelling accretion disc and stellar wind interactions: the case of Sgr A*

    PubMed Central

    Christie, I. M.; Petropoulou, M.; Mimica, P.; Giannios, D.

    2016-01-01

    Sgr A* is an ideal target to study low-luminosity accreting systems. It has been recently proposed that properties of the accretion flow around Sgr A* can be probed through its interactions with the stellar wind of nearby massive stars belonging to the S-cluster. When a star intercepts the accretion disc, the ram and thermal pressures of the disc terminate the stellar wind leading to the formation of a bow shock structure. Here, a semi-analytical model is constructed which describes the geometry of the termination shock formed in the wind. With the employment of numerical hydrodynamic simulations, this model is both verified and extended to a region prone to Kelvin–Helmholtz instabilities. Because the characteristic wind and stellar velocities are in ∼108 cm s−1 range, the shocked wind may produce detectable X-rays via thermal bremsstrahlung emission. The application of this model to the pericentre passage of S2, the brightest member of the S-cluster, shows that the shocked wind produces roughly a month long X-ray flare with a peak luminosity of L ≈ 4 × 1033 erg s−1 for a stellar mass-loss rate, disc number density, and thermal pressure strength of \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\dot{M}_{\\rm w}= 10^{-7} \\,\\mathrm{M}_{\\odot }\\, {\\rm yr}^{-1}$\\end{document}, nd = 105 cm−3, and α = 0.1, respectively. This peak luminosity is comparable to the quiescent X-ray emission detected from Sgr A* and is within the detection capabilities of current X-ray observatories. Its detection could constrain the density and thickness of the disc at a distance of ∼3000 gravitational radii from the supermassive black hole. PMID:27279781

  19. Detecting stellar-wind bubbles through infrared arcs in H ii regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Jonathan; Haworth, Thomas J.; Gvaramadze, Vasilii V.; Mohamed, Shazrene; Langer, Norbert; Harries, Tim J.

    2016-02-01

    Mid-infrared arcs of dust emission are often seen near ionizing stars within H ii regions. A possible explanations for these arcs is that they could show the outer edges of asymmetric stellar wind bubbles. We use two-dimensional, radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of wind bubbles within H ii regions around individual stars to predict the infrared emission properties of the dust within the H ii region. We assume that dust and gas are dynamically well-coupled and that dust properties (composition, size distribution) are the same in the H ii region as outside it, and that the wind bubble contains no dust. We post-process the simulations to make synthetic intensity maps at infrared wavebands using the torus code. We find that the outer edge of a wind bubble emits brightly at 24 μm through starlight absorbed by dust grains and re-radiated thermally in the infrared. This produces a bright arc of emission for slowly moving stars that have asymmetric wind bubbles, even for cases where there is no bow shock or any corresponding feature in tracers of gas emission. The 24 μm intensity decreases exponentially from the arc with increasing distance from the star because the dust temperature decreases with distance. The size distribution and composition of the dust grains has quantitative but not qualitative effects on our results. Despite the simplifications of our model, we find good qualitative agreement with observations of the H ii region RCW 120, and can provide physical explanations for any quantitative differences. Our model produces an infrared arc with the same shape and size as the arc around CD -38°11636 in RCW 120, and with comparable brightness. This suggests that infrared arcs around O stars in H ii regions may be revealing the extent of stellar wind bubbles, although we have not excluded other explanations.

  20. Photoionized Mixing Layer Models of the Diffuse Ionized Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binette, Luc; Flores-Fajardo, Nahiely; Raga, Alejandro C.; Drissen, Laurent; Morisset, Christophe

    2009-04-01

    It is generally believed that O stars, confined near the galactic midplane, are somehow able to photoionize a significant fraction of what is termed the "diffuse ionized gas" (DIG) of spiral galaxies, which can extend up to 1-2 kpc above the galactic midplane. The heating of the DIG remains poorly understood, however, as simple photoionization models do not reproduce the observed line ratio correlations well or the DIG temperature. We present turbulent mixing layer (TML) models in which warm photoionized condensations are immersed in a hot supersonic wind. Turbulent dissipation and mixing generate an intermediate region where the gas is accelerated, heated, and mixed. The emission spectrum of such layers is compared with observations of Rand of the DIG in the edge-on spiral NGC 891. We generate two sequence of models that fit the line ratio correlations between [S II]/Hα, [O I]/Hα, [N II]/[S II], and [O III]/Hβ reasonably well. In one sequence of models, the hot wind velocity increases, while in the other, the ionization parameter and layer opacity increase. Despite the success of the mixing layer models, the overall efficiency in reprocessing the stellar UV is much too low, much less than 1%, which compels us to reject the TML model in its present form.

  1. The winds of O-stars. II - The terminal velocities of stellar winds of O-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Lamers, H. J. G. L. M.; Pauldrach, A. W. A.

    1989-01-01

    The SEI method (Lamers et al., 1987) is used to obtain P Cygni profiles of the UV resonance lines of C IV, N V, and S IV and of the subordinate UV lines of N IV and C III observed in the spectra of 27 O-type stars. Theoretical profiles which include the turbulence effects agree well with the observations, and they can account for the deep absorption troughs, the shape of the violet absorption wings, and the wavelength of the emission peak. The resulting terminal velocities of the stellar winds are found to be systematically lower by about 400 km/s than previous estimates obtained using the Sobolev approximation (Castor and Lamers, 1979), suggesting that the narrow absorption components, observed in the UV resonance lines of O and B stars, reach the terminal velocity of the winds.

  2. Interstellar bubbles. II - Structure and evolution. [stellar wind interaction with interstellar gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, R.; Mccray, R.; Castor, J.; Moore, R.; Shapiro, P.

    1977-01-01

    The detailed structure of the interaction of a strong stellar wind with the interstellar medium is presented. First, an adiabatic similarity solution is given which is applicable at early times. Second, a similarity solution is derived which includes the effects of thermal conduction between the hot (about 1 million K) interior and the cold shell of swept-up interstellar matter. This solution is then modified to include the effects of radiative energy losses. The evolution of an interstellar bubble is calculated, including the radiative losses. The quantitative results for the outer-shell radius and velocity and the column density of highly ionized species such as O VI are within a factor 2 of the approximate results of Castor, McCray, and Weaver (1975). The effect of stellar motion on the structure of a bubble, the hydrodynamic stability of the outer shell, and the observable properties of the hot region and the outer shell are discussed.

  3. Stellar Winds and Embedded Star Formation in the Galactic Center Quintuplet and Arches Clusters: Multifrequency Radio Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Cornelia C.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Goss, W. M.; Rodríguez, Luis F.

    2005-11-01

    A multifrequency, multiconfiguration study has been made of the compact radio sources in the Galactic center Quintuplet and Arches stellar clusters using the Very Large Array. Ten radio sources have been detected in the Quintuplet cluster. The majority of these radio sources have rising spectral indices and are positionally coincident with young massive stars that are known to have powerful stellar winds. We conclude that the three most compact of these sources are produced by stellar wind emission; thus, mass-loss rates can be derived and have an average value of 3×10-5 Msolar yr-1. The remainder of the sources are likely to be a combination of stellar wind emission and free-free emission from surrounding ionized gas. In three cases, the radio sources have no stellar counterpart, and the radio emission is thought to arise from compact or ultracompact H II regions. If so, these sources would be the first detections of embedded massive stars to be discovered in the Galactic center clusters. The radio nebula associated with the Pistol star resembles the nebula surrounding the luminous blue variable star η Car and may be related to the stellar wind of the Pistol star. Ten compact radio sources are also detected in the Arches cluster and are interpreted to be stellar wind sources, consistent with previous findings. Several of the sources show moderate variability (10%-30%) in their flux density, possibly related to a nonthermal component in the wind emission. A number of radio sources in both clusters have X-ray counterparts, which have been interpreted to be the shocked, colliding winds of massive binary systems.

  4. On the deceleration of Fanaroff-Riley Class I jets: mass loading by stellar winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perucho, M.; Martí, J. M.; Laing, R. A.; Hardee, P. E.

    2014-06-01

    Jets in low-luminosity radio galaxies are known to decelerate from relativistic speeds on parsec scales to mildly or subrelativistic speeds on kiloparsec scales. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain this effect, including strong reconfinement shocks and the growth of instabilities (both leading to boundary-layer entrainment) and mass loading from stellar winds or molecular clouds. We have performed a series of axisymmetric simulations of the early evolution of jets in a realistic ambient medium to probe the effects of mass loading from stellar winds using the code RATPENAT. We study the evolution of Fanaroff-Riley Class I (FR I) jets, with kinetic powers Lj ˜ 1041-1044 erg s-1, within the first 2 kpc of their evolution, where deceleration by stellar mass loading should be most effective. Mass entrainment rates consistent with present models of stellar mass loss in elliptical galaxies produce deceleration and effective decollimation of weak FR I jets within the first kiloparsec. However, powerful FR I jets are not decelerated significantly. In those cases where the mass loading is important, the jets show larger opening angles and decollimate at smaller distances, but the overall structure and dynamics of the bow shock are similar to those of unloaded jets with the same power and thrust. According to our results, the flaring observed on kiloparsec scales is initiated by mass loading in the weaker FR I jets and by reconfinement shocks or the growth of instabilities in the more powerful jets. The final mechanism of decollimation and deceleration is always the development of disruptive pinching modes.

  5. Stellar winds near massive black holes - the case of the S-stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lützgendorf, N.; Helm, E. van der; Pelupessy, F. I.; Portegies Zwart, S.

    2016-03-01

    The Galactic Centre provides a unique laboratory to study the interaction of a supermassive black hole (SMBH) with its gaseous and stellar environment. Simulations to determine the accretion of stellar winds from the surrounding O-stars on to the black hole have been performed earlier, but in those the presence of the S-star system was ignored. The S-stars are a group of young massive B-stars in relatively close orbits around the black hole. Here, we simulate those stars in order to study their contribution to the accretion rate, without taking the more distant and massive O-stars into account. We use the Astrophysical Multipurpose Software Environment to combine gravitational physics, stellar evolution and hydrodynamics in a single simulation of the S-stars orbiting the SMBH, and use this framework to determine the amount of gas that is accreted on to the black hole. We find that the accretion rate is sensitive to the wind properties of the S-stars (rate of mass-loss and terminal velocity). Our simulations are consistent with the observed accretion rate of the black hole only if the stars exhibit high wind mass-loss rates that are comparable with those of evolved 7-10 Myr old stars with masses of M = 19-25 M⊙. This is in contrast with observations that have shown that these stars are rather young, main-sequence B-stars. We therefore conclude that the S-stars cannot account for the accretion rate alone.

  6. Assisted stellar suicide: the wind-driven evolution of the recurrent nova T Pyxidis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knigge, Ch.; King, A. R.; Patterson, J.

    2000-12-01

    We show that the extremely high luminosity of the short-period recurrent nova T Pyx in quiescence can be understood if this system is a wind-driven supersoft x-ray source (SSS). In this scenario, a strong, radiation-induced wind is excited from the secondary star and accelerates the binary evolution. The accretion rate is therefore much higher than in an ordinary cataclysmic binary at the same orbital period, as is the luminosity of the white dwarf primary. In the steady state, the enhanced luminosity is just sufficient to maintain the wind from the secondary. The accretion rate and luminosity predicted by the wind-driven model for T Pyx are in good agreement with the observational evidence. X-ray observations with Chandra or XMM may be able to confirm T Pyx's status as a SSS. T Pyx's lifetime in the wind-driven state is on the order of a million years. Its ultimate fate is not certain, but the system may very well end up destroying itself, either via the complete evaporation of the secondary star, or in a Type Ia supernova if the white dwarf reaches the Chandrasekhar limit. Thus either the primary, the secondary, or both may currently be committing assisted stellar suicide.

  7. Low-velocity variability in the stellar wind of HD 152408 (O8: Iafpe)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinja, Raman K.; Fullerton, A. W.

    1994-01-01

    We describe high-quality, spectroscopic time series observations of variability at low velocities in the stellar wind of the extreme O-supergiant HD 152408. These observations were obtained during a monitoring campaign coordinated between Australia and Chile in 1992 July. Systematic variability on hourly time scales is particularly apparent in the He I lambda 5876 P Cygni profile, which diagnoses the deeper, denser region of the wind. These changes indicate the presence of evolving wind structure, which takes the form of blueward-migrating, discrete optical depth enhancements. Four distinct features are identified over approximately 5 days, spanning a velocity range of about -50 km/s at formation to about -500 km/s (i.e., greater than or approximately equal to 0.5 of the terminal velocity) at the blue edge of the He I absorption trough. Sympathetic variations are also apparent in the Balmer emission lines of HD 152408. The characteristics of these features, including their widths, column densities, and accelerations, suggest similarities to discrete absorption components commonly seen at larger velocities in UV P Cygni profiles of other O-type stars. These optical results demonstrate that frequent, systematic wind variability is present down to very large depths, and provide constraints on the stability of the low-velocity regime of hot-star winds.

  8. Star formation in early-type galaxies: the role of stellar winds and kinematics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, Silvia; Negri, Andrea; Ciotti, Luca

    2015-08-01

    Early-Type galaxies (ETGs) host a hot ISM produced mainly by stellar winds, and heated by Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) and the thermalization of stellar motions. Recent high resolution 2D hydrodynamical simulations (Negri et al. 2014) showed that ordered rotation in the stellar component alters significantly the evolution of the hot ISM, and results in the formation of a centrifugally supported cold equatorial disc. This agrees well with the recent evidence that approximately 50% of massive ETGs host significant quantities of cold gas (Morganti et al. 2006; Young et al. 2014), often in settled configurations, sharing the same kinematics of the stars. In particular, in a systematic investigation of the ATLAS3D sample, the most massive fast-rotating ETGs always have kinematically aligned gas, which suggests an internal origin for it, and molecular gas is detected only in fast rotators (Davis et al. 2011). The observed cold gas seems also to provide material for low level star formation (SF) activity (Combes et al. 2007, Davis et al. 2014). Interestingly, in the ATLAS3D sample, SF and young stellar populations are detected only in fast rotators (Sarzi et al. 2013). In a recent work we investigated whether and how SF takes place in the cold gas disc typically produced in rotating ETGs by our previous 2D simulations, by adding to them the possibility for the gas to form stars (Negri et al. 2015). We also inserted the injection of mass, momentum and energy appropriate for the newly (and continuously) forming stellar population. We found that subsequent generations of stars are formed, and that most of the extended and massive cold disc is consumed by this process, leaving at the present epoch cold gas masses that compare well with those observed. The mass in secondary generations of stars resides mostly in a disc, and could be related to a younger, more metal rich disky stellar component indeed observed in fast rotator ETGs (Cappellari et al. 2013). Most of the mass in

  9. Non-Linear Analysis of the Modular Coil Windings for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Freudenberg, K.D.; Williamson, D.E.; Fan, H.M.; Myatt, L

    2005-05-15

    A non linear FEA study has been performed on the modular coils of the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX). The modular coils provide the primary magnetic field within NCSX and consist of flexible cable conductor wound on a cast and machined winding form and vacuum impregnated with epoxy. Eighteen coils and associated winding forms are connected at assembly into a toroidal shell structure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the structural response of the windings and shell structure during cooldown and normal operation. Two separate software packages were used for the study, and two independent analyses were undertaken. The first analysis performed with Pro/Mechanica, examined both the response of the modular coils to magnetic pressure and thermal effects during a 2 Tesla pulse. Modeled items included a portion of the shell structure the winding packs, and a set of 48 'pseudo clamps'. The so called 'pseudo clamps' are represented simply by blocks of material that are restrained in their respective normal directions and have properties which mimic the stiffness of the spring washers of the actual preload clamps. The winding pack is free to slide on the shell structure and is restrained only by the clamps. A second model, including the complete shell structure of all three coils, was studied with the FEA program ANSYS. Contact regions defined in both Pro/Mechanica and Ansys allow the winding to slide and detach form the shell structure. The two analyses are compared for parameters such as winding/structure gap, overall displacement, equivalent stress and principle strain values.

  10. Stellar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This eerie, dark structure, resembling an imaginary sea serpent's head, is a column of cool molecular hydrogen gas (two atoms of hydrogen in each molecule) and dust that is an incubator for new stars. The stars are embedded inside finger-like protrusions extending from the top of the nebula. Each 'fingertip' is somewhat larger than our own solar system. The pillar is slowly eroding away by the ultraviolet light from nearby hot stars, a process called 'photoevaporation.' As it does, small globules of especially dense gas buried within the cloud is uncovered. These globules have been dubbed 'EGGs' -- an acronym for 'Evaporating Gaseous Globules.' The shadows of the EGGs protect gas behind them, resulting in the finger-like structures at the top of the cloud. Forming inside at least some of the EGGs are embryonic stars -- stars that abruptly stop growing when the EGGs are uncovered and they are separated from the larger reservoir of gas from which they were drawing mass. Eventually the stars emerge, as the EGGs themselves succumb to photoevaporation. The stellar EGGS are found, appropriately enough, in the 'Eagle Nebula' (also called M16 -- the 16th object in Charles Messier's 18th century catalog of 'fuzzy' permanent objects in the sky), a nearby star-forming region 7,000 light-years away in the constellation Serpens. The picture was taken on April 1, 1995 with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. The color image is constructed from three separate images taken in the light of emission from different types of atoms. Red shows emission from singly-ionized sulfur atoms. Green shows emission from hydrogen. Blue shows light emitted by doubly-ionized oxygen atoms.

  11. The effects of stellar winds on the magnetospheres and potential habitability of exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, V.; Jardine, M.; Vidotto, A. A.; Petit, P.; Marsden, S. C.; Jeffers, S. V.; do Nascimento, J. D.

    2014-10-01

    Context. The principle definition of habitability for exoplanets is whether they can sustain liquid water on their surfaces, i.e. that they orbit within the habitable zone. However, the planet's magnetosphere should also be considered, since without it, an exoplanet's atmosphere may be eroded away by stellar winds. Aims: The aim of this paper is to investigate magnetospheric protection of a planet from the effects of stellar winds from solar-mass stars. Methods: We study hypothetical Earth-like exoplanets orbiting in the host star's habitable zone for a sample of 124 solar-mass stars. These are targets that have been observed by the Bcool Collaboration. Using two wind models, we calculate the magnetospheric extent of each exoplanet. These wind models are computationally inexpensive and allow the community to quickly estimate the magnetospheric size of magnetised Earth-analogues orbiting cool stars. Results: Most of the simulated planets in our sample can maintain a magnetosphere of ~5 Earth radii or larger. This suggests that magnetised Earth analogues in the habitable zones of solar analogues are able to protect their atmospheres and is in contrast to planets around young active M dwarfs. In general, we find that Earth-analogues around solar-type stars, of age 1.5 Gyr or older, can maintain at least a Paleoarchean Earth sized magnetosphere. Our results indicate that planets around 0.6-0.8 solar-mass stars on the low activity side of the Vaughan-Preston gap are the optimum observing targets for habitable Earth analogues. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  12. From Solar to Stellar Corona: The Role of Wind, Rotation, and Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Réville, Victor; Brun, Allan Sacha; Strugarek, Antoine; Matt, Sean P.; Bouvier, Jérôme; Folsom, Colin P.; Petit, Pascal

    2015-12-01

    Observations of surface magnetic fields are now within reach for many stellar types thanks to the development of Zeeman-Doppler Imaging. These observations are extremely useful for constraining rotational evolution models of stars, as well as for characterizing the generation of the magnetic field. We recently demonstrated that the impact of coronal magnetic field topology on the rotational braking of a star can be parameterized with a scalar parameter: the open magnetic flux. However, without running costly numerical simulations of the stellar wind, reconstructing the coronal structure of the large-scale magnetic field is not trivial. An alternative—broadly used in solar physics—is to extrapolate the surface magnetic field assuming a potential field in the corona, to describe the opening of the field lines by the magnetized wind. This technique relies on the definition of a so-called source surface radius, which is often fixed to the canonical value of 2.5{R}⊙ . However this value likely varies from star to star. To resolve this issue, we use our extended set of 2.5D wind simulations published in 2015 to provide a criterion for the opening of field lines as well as a simple tool to assess the source surface radius and the open magnetic flux. This allows us to derive the magnetic torque applied to the star by the wind from any spectropolarimetric observation. We conclude by discussing some estimations of spin-down timescales made using our technique and compare them to observational requirements.

  13. Gadolinium photoionization process

    DOEpatents

    Paisner, J.A.; Comaskey, B.J.; Haynam, C.A.; Eggert, J.H.

    1993-04-13

    A method is provided for selective photoionization of the odd-numbered atomic mass gadolinium isotopes 155 and 157. The selective photoionization is accomplished by circular or linear parallel polarized laser beam energy effecting a three-step photoionization pathway.

  14. Gadolinium photoionization process

    DOEpatents

    Paisner, Jeffrey A.; Comaskey, Brian J.; Haynam, Christopher A.; Eggert, Jon H.

    1993-01-01

    A method is provided for selective photoionization of the odd-numbered atomic mass gadolinium isotopes 155 and 157. The selective photoionization is accomplished by circular or linear parallel polarized laser beam energy effecting a three-step photoionization pathway.

  15. LkH-alpha 101 - The stellar wind, the surrounding nebula, and an associated radio star cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Robert H.; White, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    Radio observations of LkH-alpha 101 have been taken to determine the characteristics of the stellar wind from the central star as well as to image the surrounding nebulosity. They also revealed the presence of a high concentration of weak compact radio sources in the neighborhood of LkH-alpha 101, four of which have optical stellar counterparts. Spectra of three of the stars indicate two T Tauri stars and a highly obscured B star.

  16. Limits on the Magnetosphere/Stellar Wind Interactions for the Extrasolar Planet about Tau Bootis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Desch, M. D.; Lazio, T. J.; Bastian, T.; Zarka, P.

    Among the most impressive astronomical discoveries in the past decade are the observations of Jupiter-like planets in orbit around stars similar to our sun (Mayor and Queloz 1995; Marcy 1998). These extrasolar planets are detected primarily from optical signatures of the star's orbital perturbation about the star/planet center of mass. To date, over 80 massive planets have been discovered about sun-like stars, these stars located in the near-vicinity of our own solar system (< 100 pc). By analogy with the sun's gas giant planets, it has been predicted that these extrasolar planets will have electrically-active stellar-wind driven planetary magnetospheres possibly capable of emitting long-wavelength radio emission (Burke 1992; Farrell et al. 1999; Bastian et al. 2000; Zarka et al. 2001) consistent with radiometric Bode's laws known to apply in our solar system. In 1999 and in 2002, the Very Large Array (VLA) surveyed the region near Tau Bootes for long-wavelength radio emission from its extrasolar planet. This planet had been previously predicted to be a good candidate for coherent electron cyclotron radio emission in the 10's of MHz. While no obvious signal was detected at 74 MHz to a sensitivity of <0.12 Janskys, the results can be applied to place upper limits on the stellar winds and planetary magnetic field.

  17. Extended red objects and stellar-wind bow shocks in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sexton, Remington O.; Povich, Matthew S.; Smith, Nathan; Babler, Brian L.; Meade, Marilyn R.; Rudolph, Alexander L.

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of infrared photometry on 39 extended red objects (EROs) in the Carina Nebula, observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Most EROs are identified by bright, extended 8.0 μm emission, which ranges from 10 arcsec to 40 arcsec in size, but our sample also includes four EROs identified by extended 24 μm emission. Of particular interest are nine EROs associated with late O- or early B-type stars and characterized by arc-shaped morphology, suggesting dusty, stellar-wind bow shocks. These objects are preferentially oriented towards the central regions of the Carina Nebula, suggesting that these bow shocks are generally produced by the interactions of OB winds with the bulk expansion of the H II region rather than high proper motion. We identify preferred regions of mid-infrared colour space occupied by our bow shock candidates, which also contain bow shock candidates in M17 and RCW 49 but are well separated from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission or circumstellar discs. Colour cuts identify an additional 12 marginally resolved bow shock candidates, 10 of which are also associated with known late O or early B stars. H II region expansion velocities derived from bow shock candidate standoff distances are ˜10 km s-1, assuming typical H II region gas densities, comparable to expansion velocities derived from bow shocks in M17 and RCW 49. One candidate bow shock provides direct evidence of physical interaction between the massive stellar winds originating in the Trumpler 15 and Trumpler 14 clusters, supporting the conclusion that both clusters are at similar heliocentric distances.

  18. The HEAO-2 Guest Investigator Program: Non-linear growth of instabilities in line-driven stellar winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, G. B.

    1985-01-01

    The linear instability of line-driven stellar winds to take proper account of the dynamical effect of scattered radiation were analyzed. It is found that: (1) the drag effect of the mean scattered radiation does greatly reduce the contribution of scattering lines to the instability at the very base of the wind, but the instability growth rate associated with such lines rapidly increases as the flow moves outward from the base, reaching more than 50% of the growth rate for pure absorption lines within a stellar radius of the surface, and eventually reaching 80% of that rate at large radii; (2) perturbations in the scattered radiation field may be important for the propagation of wind disturbances, but they have little effect on the wind instability; and (3) the contribution of strongly shadowed lines to the wind instability is often reduced compared to that of unshadowed lines, but their overall effect is not one of damping in the outer parts of the wind. It is concluded that, even when all scattering effects are taken into account, the bulk of the flow in a line-driven stellar wind is still highly unstable.

  19. Solar/Stellar Granulation as the Key Lower Boundary Condition for Coronal Heating and Wind Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2014-06-01

    Much of the hot plasma that eventually becomes the supersonic solar wind appears to have its origin in small (100 km diameter) magnetic flux tubes that sit in the downflowing lanes between convective granules in the Sun's photosphere. Convective overturning motions jostle these flux tubes and induce kink-mode oscillations that can grow into Alfven waves in the corona. A great deal of recent work has been done to explore how these Alfvenic fluctuations may drive a turbulent cascade, heat the plasma by gradual dissipation, and provide direct acceleration to a wind via wave pressure gradients. This presentation will outline this work and show how an accurate description of granulation is a key input to self-consistent models of coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. These self-consistent models have also been applied successfully to predicting: (1) high-energy emission from accreting T Tauri stars, (2) the mass loss rates of cool dwarfs and red giants, and (3) the combined X-ray, radio, and submillimeter emission from a young nearby M dwarf. In addition, a recent analysis of stellar granulation with Kepler photometry has shown that our understanding of the shallow convection zones of F-type stars still requires additional refinement. In all cases, the combination of multiple types of observational data has been crucial to improving our understanding. For the Sun, the next-generation capabilities of ATST/DKIST are expected to provide much more precise knowledge about this important lower boundary condition to the heliosphere.

  20. FUSE Observations of Stellar Wind Variability in {Sk -67°166}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullerton, A. W.; Massa, D. L.; Howarth, I. D.; Owocki, S. P.; Prinja, R. K.; Willis, A. J.

    2000-12-01

    We present results from an 18-day campaign to monitor stellar wind variability in {Sk -67°166} (HDE 269698), an O4 If+ star in the Large Magellanic Cloud, with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. Optical depth enhancements that progress from blue to red through the absorption trough are prominent in all unsaturated P Cygni profiles, particularly the resonance doublets of {S 4} and {P 5}. Related variability is evident in the resonance lines of {S 6} and {O 6}. The variations are qualitatively similar to those observed in the {Si 4} wind lines of the Galactic supergiant ζ Puppis [O4 I(n)f] during a 16-day monitoring campaign with IUE. However, the FUSE observations contain more diagnostic information about the nature of the structures responsible for the observed variability. In particular, the relative amplitudes of the variations in {S 4} and {S 6} provide the first empirical constraint on the ionization equilibrium of these structures in an O star wind, while the variability of {O 6} traces the distribution of very hot gas. This work is based on observations made with the NASA-CNES-CSA Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. FUSE is operated for NASA by the Johns Hopkins University under NASA contract NAS5-32985.

  1. TIDALLY ENHANCED STELLAR WIND: A WAY TO MAKE THE SYMBIOTIC CHANNEL TO TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA VIABLE

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Han, Z.

    2011-07-10

    In the symbiotic (or WD+RG) channel of the single-degenerate scenario for type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), the explosions occur a relatively long time after star formation. The birthrate from this channel would be too low to account for all observed SNe Ia were it not for some mechanism to enhance the rate of accretion on to the white dwarf. A tidally enhanced stellar wind, of the type which has been postulated to explain many phenomena related to giant star evolution in binary systems, can do this. Compared to mass stripping, this model extends the space of SNe Ia progenitors to longer orbital periods and hence increases the birthrate to about 0.0069 yr{sup -1} for the symbiotic channel. Two symbiotic stars, T CrB and RS Oph, considered to be the most likely progenitors of SNe Ia through the symbiotic channel, are well inside the period-companion mass space predicted by our models.

  2. The variable stellar wind of Rigel probed at high spatial and spectral resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesneau, O.; Kaufer, A.; Stahl, O.; Colvinter, C.; Spang, A.; Dessart, L.; Prinja, R.; Chini, R.

    2014-06-01

    Context. Luminous BA-type supergiants are the brightest stars in the visible that can be observed in distant galaxies and are potentially accurate distance indicators. The impact of the variability of the stellar winds on the distance determination remains poorly understood. Aims: Our aim is to probe the inhomogeneous structures in the stellar wind using spectro-interferometric monitoring. Methods: We present a spatially resolved, high-spectral resolution (R = 12 000) K-band temporal monitoring of the bright supergiant β Orionis (Rigel, B8 Iab) using AMBER at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). Rigel was observed in the Brγ line and its nearby continuum once per month over 3 months in 2006-2007, and 5 months in 2009-2010. These unprecedented observations were complemented by contemporaneous optical high-resolution spectroscopy. We analyse the near-IR spectra and visibilities with the 1D non-LTE radiative-transfer code CMFGEN. The differential and closure phase signals are evidence of asymmetries that are interpreted as perturbations of the wind. Results: A systematic visibility decrease is observed across the Brγ line indicating that at a radius of about 1.25 R∗ the photospheric absorption is filled by emission from the wind. During the 2006-2007 period the Brγ and likely the continuum forming regions were larger than in the 2009-2010 epoch. Using CMFGEN we infer a mass-loss rate change of about 20% between the two epochs. We also find time variations in the differential visibilities and phases. The 2006-2007 period is characterised by noticeable variations in the differential visibilities in Doppler position and width and by weak variations in differential and closure phase. The 2009-2010 period is much quieter with virtually no detectable variations in the dispersed visibilities but a strong S-shaped signal is observed in differential phase coinciding with a strong ejection event discernible in the optical spectra. The differential phase signal

  3. Geometry and physical conditions in the stellar wind of AG Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitherer, Claus; Allen, Richard; Altner, Bruce; Damineli, Augusto; Drissen, Laurent; Idiart, Thais; Lupie, Olivia; Nota, Antonella; Robert, Carmelle; Schmutz, Werner

    1994-01-01

    AG Carinae is one of the prototypes of the class of Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs). Since 1990 the star has continuously brightened in its visual continuum. We report on a multi-instrument and -wavelength observing campaign to monitor the current activity phase of AG Car. Ground-based photometry, polarimetry, spectroscopy, and space-ultraviolet spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry have been obtained. From the variability of the polarization at ultraviolet and optical wavelengths we detect significant intrinsic polarization. P(sub int) greater than or equal to 0.5% is a large value for a hot, luminous star, suggesting departure from spherical symmetry in the wind of AG Car. The intrinsic polarization is variable on a timescale of 2 months or less. The measured ultraviolet polarization (intrinsic + interstellar) dropped to 0.5% in 1992 May and returned to 1% in 1992 July. The results are interpreted in terms of a variable outflow with a density enhancement in the equatorial plane. A similar model was suggested for the related object R127 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). This geometry is reminiscent of the large-scale morphology of the gas nebula and dust 'jet' surrounding AG Car. It is therefore likely that physical conditions close to the stellar surface are responsible for the geometry of the spatially resolved circumstellar material around AG Car. Despite the drastic change of the photospheric conditions, the mass-loss rate did not increase. We find no evidence for a positive correlation between wind density and stellar radius. This makes models that explain the radius increase by opacity effects in the outflow unlikely. The mechanism responsible for the temperature and radius variations is still unknown but most likely has its origin in subphotospheric regions.

  4. Time-dependent models of radiatively driven stellar winds. I - Nonlinear evolution of instabilities for a pure absorption model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owocki, Stanley P.; Castor, John I.; Rybicki, George B.

    1988-01-01

    Numerical radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of the nonlinear evolution of instabilities in radiatively driven stellar winds have been performed. The results show a strong tendency for the unstable flow to form rather sharp rarefactions in which the highest speed material has very low density. The qualitative features of the model agree well with the reqirements of displaced narrow absorption components in UV lines.

  5. Active Galactic Nucleus Obscuration from Winds: From Dusty Infrared-Driven to Warm and X-Ray Photoionized

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorodnitsyn, Anton V.; Kallman, Timothy R.

    2012-01-01

    We present calculations of active galactic nucleus winds at approx.parsec scales along with the associated obscuration. We take into account the pressure of infrared radiation on dust grains and the interaction of X-rays from a central black hole with hot and cold plasma. Infrared radiation (IR) is incorporated in radiation-hydrodynamic simulations adopting the flux-limited diffusion approximation. We find that in the range of X-ray luminosities L = 0.05-0.6 L(sub Edd), the Compton-thick part of the flow (aka torus) has an opening angle of approximately 72deg - 75deg regardless of the luminosity. At L > or approx. 0.1, the outflowing dusty wind provides the obscuration with IR pressure playing a major role. The global flow consists of two phases: the cold flow at inclinations (theta) > or approx.70deg and a hot, ionized wind of lower density at lower inclinations. The dynamical pressure of the hot wind is important in shaping the denser IR-supported flow. At luminosities < or = 0.1 L(sub Edd) episodes of outflow are followed by extended periods when the wind switches to slow accretion. Key words: acceleration of particles . galaxies: active . hydrodynamics . methods: numerical Online-only material: color figures

  6. Feedback from winds and supernovae in massive stellar clusters - II. X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, H.; Pittard, J. M.

    2014-06-01

    The X-ray emission from a simulated massive stellar cluster is investigated. The emission is calculated from a 3D hydrodynamical model which incorporates the mechanical feedback from the stellar winds of three O stars embedded in a giant molecular cloud (GMC) clump containing 3240 M⊙ of molecular material within a 4 pc radius. A simple prescription for the evolution of the stars is used, with the first supernova (SN) explosion at t = 4.4 Myr. We find that the presence of the GMC clump causes short-lived attenuation effects on the X-ray emission of the cluster. However, once most of the material has been ablated away by the winds, the remaining dense clumps do not have a noticeable effect on the attenuation compared with the assumed interstellar medium (ISM) column. We determine the evolution of the cluster X-ray luminosity, LX, and spectra, and generate synthetic images. The intrinsic X-ray luminosity drops from nearly 1034 erg s-1 while the winds are `bottled up', to a near-constant value of 1.7 × 1032 erg s-1 between t = 1 and 4 Myr. LX reduces slightly during each star's red supergiant stage due to the depressurization of the hot gas. However, LX increases to ≈1034 erg s-1 during each star's Wolf-Rayet stage. The X-ray luminosity is enhanced by two to three orders of magnitude to ˜1037 erg s-1 for at least 4600 yr after each SN explosion, at which time the blast wave leaves the grid and the X-ray luminosity drops. The X-ray luminosity of our simulation is generally considerably fainter than predicted from spherically symmetric bubble models, due to the leakage of hot gas material through gaps in the outer shell. This process reduces the pressure within our simulation and thus the X-ray emission. However, the X-ray luminosities and temperatures which we obtain are comparable to similarly powerful massive young clusters.

  7. Modeling Diffuse X-ray Emission around the Galactic Center from Colliding Stellar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post Russell, Christopher Michael; Cuadra, Jorge; Wang, Q. Daniel; Kallman, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    The Galactic center is a hotbed of astrophysical phenomena. The ~30 evolved massive stars orbiting the super massive black hole (SMBH) on scales <10" inject a large fraction of the matter that accretes onto the SMBH, and their wind-wind collisions create large swaths of shocked, hot, X-ray emitting material around Sgr A*. The 3Ms Chandra X-ray Visionary Program of the Galactic center provided unprecedented detail of this region by resolving the diffuse thermal emission around the SMBH, and also revealed the presence of SMBH feedback into its immediate surroundings. With the original intent of computing the accretion onto the SMBH, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations with various feedback prescriptions modeled the 30 Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars orbiting the SMBH over 1100 years while ejecting their stellar winds, thus providing various descriptions of the hot shocked gas around Sgr A*. In this work, we perform 3D X-ray radiative transfer calculations on these hydrodynamic simulations with the goal of reproducing the Chandra observations in the central ±6" around Sgr A*. The model spectral shape from the 2"-5" ring agrees very well with the observations for all feedback models, and the X-ray flux levels of the no or weak feedback models agree with the observation for r<~3". The model flux is too low beyond this radius, while the strong feedback models produce too low a flux throughout the entire simulation region. This is because the strong outflow emanating from the SMBH clears out much of the hot, X-ray emitting gas from its vicinity. These strong feedback simulations are thus excluded from describing Sgr A*. We will conclude by discussing ways to improve the no and weak feedback models, such as by including the O stars and their winds, which should cause the WR-wind X-ray emission to increase as these adiabatic shocks (whose strength is inversely proportional to the distance to the shock) will occur closer to their WR stars.

  8. Tidally Enhanced Stellar Wind in Binaries as a Second Parameter for the Horizontal Branch Morphology of Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Z.; Lei, Z.

    2014-04-01

    Metallicity is the first parameter to influence the horizontal branch morphology of globular clusters. It has been found, however, that some other parameters may also play an important role in affecting the morphology. While the nature of these other important parameters remains unclear, they are believed to be correlated with the mass loss during the red giant stages, from which the horizontal branch stars have descended. Unfortunately, the mass loss during the red giant stages of stellar evolution are poorly understood at present. In this talk, we investigate the physical consequences of tidally-enhanced stellar winds during the evolution of binary stars on enhancing the mass loss of red giant primaries, with accompanying effects for the horizontal branch morphology of globular clusters. In a binary system, the stellar wind of the red giant primary star may be largely enhanced by its companion star. Different separation of the binary system, however, will lead to a different mass loss rate of the primary star. We found that red, blue, and extreme horizontal branch stars are all produced under the effects of tidally-enhanced stellar wind without any additional assumptions on the mass loss dispersion. Furthermore, the horizontal branch morphology is found to be insensitive to the tidal enhancement parameter, B.

  9. Scientists Find X Rays from Stellar Winds That May Play Significant Role in Galactic Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-09-01

    Colorful star-forming regions that have captivated stargazers since the advent of the telescope 400 years ago contain gas thousands of times more energetic than previously recognized, powered by colliding stellar winds. This multimillion-degree gas radiated as X rays is one of the long-sought sources of energy and elements in the Milky Way galaxy's interstellar medium. A team led by Leisa Townsley, a senior research associate in astronomy and astrophysics at Penn State University, uncovered this wind phenomenon in the Rosette Nebula, a stellar nursery. With the Chandra X-ray Observatory, the team found that the most massive stars in the nebula produce winds that slam into each other, create violent shocks, and infuse the region with 6-million-degree gas. The findings are presented in Washington, D.C., today at a conference entitled "Two Years of Science with Chandra." "A ghostly glow of diffuse X-ray emission pervades the Rosette Nebula and perhaps many other similar star-forming regions throughout the Galaxy," said Townsley. "We now have a new view of the engine lighting the beautiful Rosette Nebula and new evidence for how the interstellar medium may be energized." Townsley and her colleagues created a striking X-ray panorama of the Rosette Molecular Cloud from four images with Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer. This is a swath of the sky nearly 100 light years across sprayed with hundreds of X-ray-emitting young stars. In one corner of the Rosette Molecular Cloud lies the Rosette Nebula, called an "H II region" because the hydrogen gas there has been stripped of its electrons due to the strong ultraviolet radiation from its young stars. This region, about 5,000 light years away in the constellation Monoceros, the Unicorn, has long been a favorite among amateur astronomers. The wispy, colorful display is visible with small telescopes. The Chandra survey reveals, for the first time, 6-million-degree gas at the center of the Rosette Nebula, occupying a

  10. Probing the stellar wind environment of Vela X-1 with MAXI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malacaria, C.; Mihara, T.; Santangelo, A.; Makishima, K.; Matsuoka, M.; Morii, M.; Sugizaki, M.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Vela X-1 is one of the best-studied and most luminous accreting X-ray pulsars. The supergiant optical companion produces a strong radiatively driven stellar wind that is accreted onto the neutron star, producing highly variable X-ray emission. A complex phenomenology that is due to both gravitational and radiative effects needs to be taken into account to reproduce orbital spectral variations. Aims: We have investigated the spectral and light curve properties of the X-ray emission from Vela X-1 along the binary orbit. These studies allow constraining the stellar wind properties and its perturbations that are induced by the pulsating neutron star. Methods: We took advantage of the All Sky Monitor MAXI/GSC data to analyze Vela X-1 spectra and light curves. By studying the orbital profiles in the 4-10 and 10-20 keV energy bands, we extracted a sample of orbital light curves (~15% of the total) showing a dip around the inferior conjunction, that is, a double-peaked shape. We analyzed orbital phase-averaged and phase-resolved spectra of both the double-peaked and the standard sample. Results: The dip in the double-peaked sample needs NH ~ 2 × 1024cm-2 to be explained by absorption alone, which is not observed in our analysis. We show that Thomson scattering from an extended and ionized accretion wake can contribute to the observed dip. Fit by a cutoff power-law model, the two analyzed samples show orbital modulation of the photon index that hardens by ~0.3 around the inferior conjunction, compared to earlier and later phases. This indicates a possible inadequacy of this model. In contrast, including a partial covering component at certain orbital phase bins allows a constant photon index along the orbital phases, indicating a highly inhomogeneous environment whose column density has a local peak around the inferior conjunction. We discuss our results in the framework of possible scenarios.

  11. Gusty, gaseous flows of FIRE: galactic winds in cosmological simulations with explicit stellar feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratov, Alexander L.; Kereš, Dušan; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Hopkins, Philip F.; Quataert, Eliot; Murray, Norman

    2015-12-01

    We present an analysis of the galaxy-scale gaseous outflows from the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) simulations. This suite of hydrodynamic cosmological zoom simulations resolves formation of star-forming giant molecular clouds to z = 0, and features an explicit stellar feedback model on small scales. Our simulations reveal that high-redshift galaxies undergo bursts of star formation followed by powerful gusts of galactic outflows that eject much of the interstellar medium and temporarily suppress star formation. At low redshift, however, sufficiently massive galaxies corresponding to L* progenitors develop stable discs and switch into a continuous and quiescent mode of star formation that does not drive outflows far into the halo. Mass-loading factors for winds in L* progenitors are η ≈ 10 at high redshift, but decrease to η ≪ 1 at low redshift. Although lower values of η are expected as haloes grow in mass over time, we show that the strong suppression of outflows with decreasing redshift cannot be explained by mass evolution alone. Circumgalactic outflow velocities are variable and broadly distributed, but typically range between one and three times the circular velocity of the halo. Much of the ejected material builds a reservoir of enriched gas within the circumgalactic medium, some of which could be later recycled to fuel further star formation. However, a fraction of the gas that leaves the virial radius through galactic winds is never regained, causing most haloes with mass Mh ≤ 1012 M⊙ to be deficient in baryons compared to the cosmic mean by z = 0.

  12. The threshold for stellar winds in hot main-sequence stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grigsby, James A.; Morrison, Nancy D.

    1995-01-01

    The profiles of ultraviolet resonance lines of C IV were surveyed in a sample of 29 cluster and association members in the spectral type range O9-B2 III-V, together with a few field stars of interest. The temperatures and gravities of the stars were taken from the model atmosphere analysis by Grigsby, Morrison, & Anderson (1992), and the luminosities were estimated on the basis of cluster and association distances from the recent literature. A parameter P(sub w) was defined in order to describe the degree and assymetry of the C IV profile. This parameter, together with total C IV equivalent width, was found to be well correlated with stellar luminosity and temperature. A few anomalous stars were noted: tau Sco, HD 66665, HD 13621, and the ON stars HD12323 and HD 201345. The results suggest a sudden onset of observable mass loss at T(effective) = 27,500 +/- 500 K, log (L/solar luminosity) = 4.4 +/- 0.12, in agreement with the previous study by Prinja (1989). At T(effective) = 28,000 K and log g = 4, our non-LTE model atmospheres show an enhancement in the ground-state population of C(+3) in their topmost layer, which could be responsible for initiation of the winds via radiation pressure on the C(+3) ions, or for the onset of visibility of C(+3) ions in the wind because of an increase in the optical depth in the C IV lines in the outermost layers.

  13. The initial mass function and global rates of mass, momentum, and energy input to the interstellar medium via stellar winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Buren, D.

    1985-01-01

    Published observational data are compiled and analyzed, using theoretical stellar-evolution models to determine the global rates of mass, momentum, and energy injected into the interstellar medium (ISM) by stellar winds. Expressions derived include psi = 0.00054 x (M to the -1.03) stars formed/sq kpc yr log M (where M is the initial mass function in solar mass units) and mass-loss = (2 x 10 to the -13th) x (L to the 1.25) solar mass/yr (with L in solar luminosity units). It is found that the wind/supernova injection of energy into the ISM and the mass loss from stars of 5 solar mass or more are approximately balanced by the dissipation of energy by cloud-cloud collisions and the formation of stars, respectively.

  14. The distant future of solar activity: A case study of Beta Hydri. III - Transition region, corona, and stellar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dravins, D.; Linde, P.; Ayres, T. R.; Linsky, J. L.; Monsignori-Fossi, B.; Simon, T.; Wallinder, F.

    1993-01-01

    The paper investigates the secular decay of solar-type activity through a detailed comparison of the present sun with the very old solar-type star, Beta Hyi, taken as a proxy of the future sun. Analyses of successive atmospheric layers are presented, with emphasis of the outermost parts. The FUV emission lines for the transition zone are among the faintest so far seen in any solar-type star. The coronal soft X-ray spectrum was measured through different filters on EXOSAT and compared to simulated X-ray observations of the sun seen as a star. The flux from Beta Hyi is weaker than that from the solar corona and has a different spectrum. It is inferred that a thermally driven stellar wind can no longer be supported, which removes the mechanism from further rotational braking of the star through a magnetic stellar wind.

  15. Mapping the latitude dependence of the primary stellar wind of eta Carinae using the spectrum reflected on the Homunculus nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odessey, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    The binary star Eta Carinae underwent a massive eruption in the 1840s, resulting in a huge nebula of ejected material, called the Homunculus. Despite preventing us from the direct view from the central source, the Homunculus acts like a mirror, allowing us to see the spectrum of the central binary system from different stellar latitudes. Therefore, by mapping the spectrum along the nebula we are actually probing the dependence of the spectrum with stellar latitude. Our project focuses on the P Cyg absorption component of H lines mostly in the optical and near-infrared wavelengths. in order to investigate the structure of the primary stellar wind. A full spectral mapping of the entire nebula was constructed by combining multiple dithered long slit observations using the ESO/X-Shooter high-resolution spectrograph. Such mapping allowed us to assemble a data cube containing the spectrum of each position along the nebula. Preliminary analysis confirms that the primary wind indeed has a deeper absorption component at high stellar latitudes (polar region). Also, contrary to our expectations, our analysis indicates that the polar region does not seem entirely radially symmetric in terms of density, which invites further investigation into the source of these discrepancies.

  16. The interactions of winds from massive young stellar objects: X-ray emission, dynamics and cavity evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkin, E. R.; Pittard, J. M.; Hoare, M. G.; Wright, N. J.; Drake, J. J.

    2009-12-01

    Two-dimensional axis-symmetric hydrodynamical simulations are presented which explore the interaction of stellar and disc winds with surrounding infalling cloud material. The star and its accompanying disc blow winds inside a cavity cleared out by an earlier jet. The collision of the winds with their surroundings generates shock-heated plasma which reaches temperatures up to ~108K. Attenuated X-ray spectra are calculated from solving the equation of radiative transfer along lines of sight. This process is repeated at various epochs throughout the simulations to examine the evolution of the intrinsic and attenuated fluxes. We find that the dynamic nature of the wind-cavity interaction fuels intrinsic variability in the observed emission on time-scales of several hundred years. This is principally due to variations in the position of the reverse shock which is influenced by changes in the shape of the cavity wall. The collision of the winds with the cavity wall can cause clumps of cloud material to be stripped away. Mixing of these clumps into the winds mass-loads the flow and enhances the X-ray emission measure. The position and shape of the reverse shock play a key role in determining the strength and hardness of the X-ray emission. In some models the reverse shock is oblique to much of the stellar and disc outflows, whereas in others it is closely normal over a wide range of polar angles. For reasonable stellar and disc wind parameters, the integrated count rate and spatial extent of the intensity peak for X-ray emission agree with Chandra observations of the deeply embedded massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) S106 IRS 4, Mon R2 IRS 3A and AFGL 2591. The evolution of the cavity is heavily dependent on the ratio of the inflow to outflow ram pressures. The cavity closes up if the inflow is too strong and rapidly widens if the outflowing winds are too strong. The velocity shear between the respective flows creates Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities which corrugate the

  17. The Physics of Wind-Fed Accretion

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, Christopher W.; Liedahl, Duane A.; Akiyama, Shizuka

    2008-09-30

    We provide a brief review of the physical processes behind the radiative driving of the winds of OB stars and the Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton capture and accretion of a fraction of the stellar wind by a compact object, typically a neutron star, in detached high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). In addition, we describe a program to develop global models of the radiatively-driven photoionized winds and accretion flows of HMXBs, with particular attention to the prototypical system Vela X-l. The models combine XSTAR photoionization calculations, HULLAC emission models appropriate to X-ray photoionized plasmas, improved models of the radiative driving of photoionized winds, FLASH time-dependent adaptive-mesh hydrodynamics calculations, and Monte Carlo radiation transport. We present two- and three-dimensional maps of the density, temperature, velocity, ionization parameter, and emissivity distributions of representative X-ray emission lines, as well as synthetic global Monte Carlo X-ray spectra. Such models help to better constrain the properties of the winds of HMXBs, which bear on such fundamental questions as the long-term evolution of these binaries and the chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium.

  18. The Physics of Wind-Fed Accretion

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, C W; Liedahl, D A; Akiyama, S; Plewa, T

    2008-05-27

    We provide a brief review of the physical processes behind the radiative driving of the winds of OB stars and the Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton capture and accretion of a fraction of the stellar wind by a compact object, typically a neutron star, in detached high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). In addition, we describe a program to develop global models of the radiatively-driven photoionized winds and accretion flows of HMXBs, with particular attention to the prototypical system Vela X-1. The models combine XSTAR photoionization calculations, HULLAC emission models appropriate to X-ray photoionized plasmas, improved models of the radiative driving of photoionized winds, FLASH time-dependent adaptive-mesh hydrodynamics calculations, and Monte Carlo radiation transport. We present two- and three-dimensional maps of the density, temperature, velocity, ionization parameter, and emissivity distributions of representative X-ray emission lines, as well as synthetic global Monte Carlo X-ray spectra. Such models help to better constrain the properties of the winds of HMXBs, which bear on such fundamental questions as the long-term evolution of these binaries and the chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium.

  19. Spectral Diagnostics of Galactic and Stellar X-Ray Emission from Charge Exchange Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wargelin, B.

    2003-01-01

    The proposed research uses the electron beam ion trap at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to study the X-ray emission from charge-exchange recombination of highly charged ions with neutral gases. The resulting data fill a void in the existing experimental and theoretical data and are needed to explain all or part of the observed X-ray emission from the Galactic Ridge, solar and stellar winds, the Galactic Center, supernova ejecta, and photoionized nebulae.

  20. Effect of scattering on the transonic solution topology and intrinsic variability of line-driven stellar winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundqvist, Jon O.; Owocki, Stanley P.

    2015-11-01

    For line-driven winds from hot, luminous OB stars, we examine the subtle but important role of diffuse, scattered radiation in determining both the topology of steady-state solutions and intrinsic variability in the transonic wind base. We use a smooth source function formalizm to obtain non-local, integral expressions for the direct and diffuse components of the line-force that account for deviations from the usual localized, Sobolev forms. As the scattering source function is reduced, we find the solution topology in the transonic region transitions from X-type, with a unique wind solution, to a nodal type, characterized by a degenerate family of solutions. Specifically, in the idealized case of an optically thin source function and a uniformly bright stellar disc, the unique X-type solution proves to be a stable attractor to which time-dependent numerical radiation-hydrodynamical simulations relax. But in models where the scattering strength is only modestly reduced, the topology instead turns nodal, with the associated solution degeneracy now manifest by intrinsic structure and variability that persist down to the photospheric wind base. This highlights the potentially crucial role of diffuse radiation for the dynamics and variability of line-driven winds, and seriously challenges the use of Sobolev theory in the transonic wind region. Since such Sobolev-based models are commonly used in broad applications like stellar evolution and feedback, this prompts development of new wind models, not only for further quantifying the intrinsic variability found here, but also for computing new theoretical predictions of global properties like velocity laws and mass-loss rates.

  1. Spectroscopy of the γ-ray burst GRB 021004: a structured jet ploughing through a massive stellar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starling, R. L. C.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Hughes, M. A.; Tanvir, N. R.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Rol, E.; Salamanca, I.

    2005-06-01

    We present spectra of the afterglow of the γ-ray burst GRB 021004 taken with the ISIS spectrograph on the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) and with the Focal Reducer/Low Dispersion Spectrograph 1 (FORS1) on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) at three epochs spanning 0.49-6.62 d after the burst. We observe strong absorption probably coming from the host galaxy, alongside absorption in HI, SiIV and CIV with blueshifts of up to 2900 km s-1 from the explosion centre, which we assume originates close to the progenitor. We find no significant variability of these spectral features. We investigate the origin of the outflowing material and evaluate various possible progenitor models. The most plausible explanation is that these result in the fossil stellar wind of a highly evolved Wolf-Rayet (WR) star. However, ionization from the burst itself prevents the existence of HI, SiIV and CIV close to the afterglow surface where the fast stellar wind should dominate, and large amounts of blueshifted hydrogen are not expected in a WR star wind. We propose that the WR star wind is enriched by a hydrogen-rich companion, and that the GRB has a structured jet geometry in which the γ-rays emerge in a small opening angle within the wider opening angle of the cone of the afterglow. This scenario is able to explain both the spectral-line features and the irregular light curve of this afterglow.

  2. X-shooter spectroscopy of young stellar objects. V. Slow winds in T Tauri stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natta, A.; Testi, L.; Alcalá, J. M.; Rigliaco, E.; Covino, E.; Stelzer, B.; D'Elia, V.

    2014-09-01

    Disks around T Tauri stars are known to lose mass, as best shown by the profiles of the forbidden emission lines of low-ionization species. At least two separate kinematic components have been identified, one characterized by velocity shifts of tens to hundreds of km s-1 (HVC) and one with a much lower velocity of a few km s-1 (LVC). The HVC are convincingly associated to the emission of jets, but the origin of the LVC is still unknown. In this paper we analyze the forbidden line spectrum of a sample of 44 mostly low-mass young stars in Lupus and σ Ori observed with the X-shooter ESO spectrometer. We detect forbidden line emission of O i, O ii, S ii, N i, and N ii, and characterize the line profiles as LVC, blueshifted HVC, and redshifted HVC. We focus our study on the LVC. We show that there is a good correlation between line luminosity and both Lstar and the accretion luminosity (or the mass accretion rate) over a large interval of values (Lstar~ 10-2-1 L⊙; Lacc~ 10-5-10-1 L⊙; Ṁacc~ 10-11 - 10-7 M⊙/yr). The lines show the presence of a slow wind (Vpeak< 20 km s-1) that is dense (nH> 108 cm-3), warm (T ~ 5000-10 000 K), mostly neutral. We estimate the mass of the emitting gas and provide a value for the maximum volume it occupies. Both quantities increase steeply with the stellar mass, from ~ 10-12 M⊙ and ~0.01 AU3 for Mstar~ 0.1 M⊙, to ~ 3 × 10-10 M⊙ and ~1 AU3 for Mstar~ 1 M⊙, respectively. These results provide quite stringent constraints to wind models in low-mass young stars, that need to be explored further. Based on observations collected at the European Souther Observatory at Paranal, under programs 084.C-0269(A), 085.C-0238(A), 086.C-0173(A), 087.C-0244(A) and 089.C-0143(A).Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. Ion Runaway Instability in Low-Density, Line-driven Stellar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owocki, Stanley P.; Puls, Joachim

    2002-04-01

    We examine the linear instability of low-density, line-driven stellar winds to runaway of the heavy minor ions when the drift speed of these ions relative to the bulk, passive plasma of hydrogen and helium approaches or exceeds the plasma thermal speed. We first focus on the surprising results of recent steady state, two-component models, which indicate that the limited Coulomb coupling associated with suprathermal ion drift leads not to an ion runaway, but instead to a relatively sharp shift of both the ion and passive fluids to a much lower outward acceleration. Drawing on analogies with subsonic outflow in the solar wind, we provide a physical discussion of how this lower acceleration is the natural consequence of the weaker frictional coupling, allowing the ion line driving to maintain its steady state balance against collisional drag with a comparatively shallow ion velocity gradient. However, we then carry out a time-dependent, linearized stability analysis of these two-component steady solutions and thereby find that, as the ion drift increases from sub- to suprathermal speeds, a wave mode characterized by separation between the ion versus passive plasma goes from being strongly damped to being strongly amplified. Unlike the usual line-driven flow instability of high-density, strongly coupled flows, this ion separation instability occurs even in the long-wavelength Sobolev limit, although with only a modest spatial growth rate. At shorter wavelengths, the onset of instability occurs for ion drift speeds that are still somewhat below the plasma thermal speed and, moreover, generally has a very large spatial growth. For all wavelengths, however, the temporal growth rate exceeds the already rapid growth of line-driven instability by a typical factor of ~100, corresponding to the mass-density ratio between the bulk plasma and the driven minor ions. We further show that this ion separation mode has an inward propagation speed that is strongly enhanced (at its

  4. A Bipolar Planetary Nebula NGC 6537: Photoionization or Shock Heating?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyung, Siek

    1999-04-01

    NGC 6537 is an extremely high excitation bipolar planetary nebula. It exhibits a huge range of excitation from lines of [N I] to [Si VI] or [Fe VII], i.e. from neutral atoms to atoms requiring an ionization potential of 167eV. Its kinematical structures are of special interest. We are here primarily concerned with its high resolution spectrum as revealed by the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory (resolution 0.2 A,) and supplemented by UV and near-UV data. Photoionization model reproduces the observed global spectrum of NGC 6537, the absolute H beta flux, and the observed visual or blue magnitude fairly well. The nebulosity of NGC 6537 is likely to be the result of photo-ionization by a very hot star of Teff 180,000 K, although the global nebular morphology and kinematics suggest an effect by strong stellar winds and resulting shock heating. NGC 6537 can be classified as a Peimbert Type I planetary nebula. It is extremely young and it may have originated from a star of about 5 M_sun.

  5. Instabilities in line-driven stellar winds. III - Wave propagation in the case of pure line absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owocki, S. P.; Rybicki, G. B.

    1986-01-01

    The spatial and temporal evolution of small-amplitude velocity perturbations is examined in the idealized case of a stellar wind that is driven by pure line absorption of the star's continuum radiation. It is established that the instability in the supersonic region is of the advective type relative to the star, but of the absolute type relative to the wind itself. It is also shown that the inward propagation of information in such a wind is limited to the sound speed, in contrast to the theory of Abbott, which predicts inward propagation faster than sound. This apparent contradiction is resolved through an extensive discussion of the analytically soluble case of zero sound speed.

  6. Interstellar Weather Vanes: GLIMPSE Mid-Infrared Stellar Wind Bow Shocks in M17 and RCW 49

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povich, Matthew S.; Benjamin, Robert A.; Whitney, Barbara A.; Babler, Brian L.; Indebetouw, Rémy; Meade, Marilyn R.; Churchwell, Ed

    2008-12-01

    We report the discovery of six infrared stellar wind bow shocks in the Galactic massive star formation regions M17 and RCW 49 from Spitzer GLIMPSE (Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire) images. The Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) on the Spitzer Space Telescope clearly resolves the arc-shaped emission produced by the bow shocks. We combine Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS), Spitzer, MSX, and IRAS observations to obtain the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the bow shocks and their individual driving stars. We use the stellar SEDs to estimate the spectral types of the three newly identified O stars in RCW 49 and one previously undiscovered O star in M17. One of the bow shocks in RCW 49 reveals the presence of a large-scale flow of gas escaping the H II region at a few 102 km s-1. Radiation transfer modeling of the steep rise in the SED of this bow shock toward longer mid-infrared wavelengths indicates that the emission is coming principally from dust heated by the star driving the shock. The other five bow shocks occur where the stellar winds of O stars sweep up dust in the expanding H II regions.

  7. Radio Detections of Stellar Winds from the Pistol Star and Other Stars in the Galactic Center Quintuplet Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Cornelia C.; Figer, Don F.; Goss, W. M.; Morris, Mark

    1999-11-01

    Very Large Array images of the Sickle and Pistol H II regions near the Galactic center at 8.3 and 4.9 GHz reveal six point sources in the region where the dense Quintuplet stellar cluster is located. The spectral indices of five of these sources between 6 and 3.6 cm have values of α=0.5 to 0.8 (where Sν~να), consistent with the interpretation that the radio sources correspond to ionized stellar winds of the massive stars in this cluster. The radio source associated with the Pistol star shows α=-0.4+/-0.2, consistent with a flat or slightly nonthermal spectrum.

  8. Modelling of the solar/stellar wind two-jet structure induced by azimuthal stellar magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golikov, Evgeniy; Belov, Nickolai; Alexashov, Dmitry; Izmodenov, Vladislav

    2016-07-01

    Opher et al. (2015), Drake et al. (2015) have shown that the heliospheric magnetic field results in formation of two-jet structure of the solar wind flow in the inner heliosheath, i.e. in the subsonic region between the heliospheric termination shock and the heliopause. In this scenario the heliopause has tube-like topology as compared with sheet-like topology in the most models of the global heliosphere (e.g. Izmodenov and Alexashov, 2015). In this paper we explore the two-jet scenario for the simplified astrosphere with the star is at rest with respect to the circumstellar medium and radial magnetic field is neglected as compared with azimuthal component. Our work is further elaboration of Drake et al. (2015) paper. We performed parametric numerical analyses showing how the structure of the flow changes depending on the model parameters. Also, we present three first integrals of the ideal MHD equations for the considered problem and use them to get links between analytical and numerical considerations.

  9. Solar Wind Ablation of Terrestrial Planet Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas Earle; Fok, Mei-Ching H.; Delcourt, Dominique C.

    2009-01-01

    Internal plasma sources usually arise in planetary magnetospheres as a product of stellar ablation processes. With the ignition of a new star and the onset of its ultraviolet and stellar wind emissions, much of the volatiles in the stellar system undergo a phase transition from gas to plasma. Condensation and accretion into a disk is replaced by radiation and stellar wind ablation of volatile materials from the system- Planets or smaller bodies that harbor intrinsic magnetic fields develop an apparent shield against direct stellar wind impact, but UV radiation still ionizes their gas phases, and the resulting internal plasmas serve to conduct currents to and from the central body along reconnected magnetic field linkages. Photoionization and thermalization of electrons warms the ionospheric topside, enhancing Jeans' escape of super-thermal particles, with ambipolar diffusion and acceleration. Moreover, observations and simulations of auroral processes at Earth indicate that solar wind energy dissipation is concentrated by the geomagnetic field by a factor of 10-100, enhancing heavy species plasma and gas escape from gravity, and providing more current carrying capacity. Thus internal plasmas enable coupling with the plasma, neutral gas and by extension, the entire body. The stellar wind is locally loaded and slowed to develop the required power. The internal source plasma is accelerated and heated, inflating the magnetosphere as it seeks escape, and is ultimately blown away in the stellar wind. Bodies with little sensible atmosphere may still produce an exosphere of sputtered matter when exposed to direct solar wind impact. Bodies with a magnetosphere and internal sources of plasma interact more strongly with the stellar wind owing to the magnetic linkage between the two created by reconnection.

  10. The steady state solutions of radiatively driven stellar winds for a non-Sobolev, pure absorption model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. H.; Owocki, S. P.; Castor, J. I.

    1990-01-01

    The steady state solution topology for absorption line-driven flows is investigated for the condition that the Sobolev approximation is not used to compute the line force. The solution topology near the sonic point is of the nodal type with two positive slope solutions. The shallower of these slopes applies to reasonable lower boundary conditions and realistic ion thermal speed v(th) and to the Sobolev limit of zero of the usual Castor, Abbott, and Klein model. At finite v(th), this solution consists of a family of very similar solutions converging on the sonic point. It is concluded that a non-Sobolev, absorption line-driven flow with a realistic values of v(th) has no uniquely defined steady state. To the extent that a pure absorption model of the outflow of stellar winds is applicable, radiatively driven winds should be intrinsically variable.

  11. Synchrotron radiation from the winds of O supergiants - Tb = 10 to the 7. 6th K at 60 stellar radii

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, R.B.; Titus, M.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Results are presented on VLBI measurements of the nonthermal radio components around two O supergiant stars: Cyg OB2 No. 9 and HD 167971. The measurements were used to characterize the brightness temperature of the emission and to measure the size of compact 5-10 mJy components in these stars, reported by Bieging et al. (1989). The sizes found for the 5-10 mJy components are consistent with the free-free wind radii, indicating that the compact companions are not the sources of nonthermal radiation. Results suggest that there is a small fractional population (10 to the -4th to 10 to the -7th) of ultrarelativistic electrons (Teff of about 10 to the 11th K) coexisting with the stellar wind, which emit optically thin synchrotron radiation. This is in agreement with the synchrotron model of White (1985). 21 refs.

  12. High efficiency photoionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1984-01-01

    A high efficiency photoionization detector using tetraaminoethylenes in a gaseous state having a low ionization potential and a relative photoionization cross section which closely matches the emission spectrum of xenon gas. Imaging proportional counters are also disclosed using the novel photoionization detector of the invention. The compound of greatest interest is TMAE which comprises tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene which has a measured ionization potential of 5.36.+-.0.02 eV, and a vapor pressure of 0.35 torr at 20.degree. C.

  13. High efficiency photoionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.

    1984-01-31

    A high efficiency photoionization detector is described using tetraaminoethylenes in a gaseous state having a low ionization potential and a relative photoionization cross section which closely matches the emission spectrum of xenon gas. Imaging proportional counters are also disclosed using the novel photoionization detector of the invention. The compound of greatest interest is TMAE which comprises tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene which has a measured ionization potential of 5.36 [+-] 0.02 eV, and a vapor pressure of 0.35 torr at 20 C. 6 figs.

  14. A Wolf-Rayet-Like Progenitor of SN 2013cu from Spectral Observations of a Stellar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Arcavi, I.; Ofek, E. O.; Ben-Ami, S.; Cenko, S. B.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Cao, Y.; Yaron, O.; Tal, D.; Silverman, J. M.; Horesh, A.; Cia, A. De; Taddia, F.; Sollerman, J.; Perley, D.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Nugent, P. E.; Filippenko, A. V.; Wheeler, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    The explosive fate of massive Wolf-Rayet stars (WRSs) is a key open question in stellar physics. An appealing option is that hydrogen- deficient WRSs are the progenitors of some hydrogen-poor supernova explosions of types IIb, Ib and Ic. A blue object, having luminosity and colours consistent with those of some WRSs, has recently been identified in pre-explosion images at the location of a supernova of type Ib, but has not yet been conclusively determined to have been the progenitor. Similar work has so far only resulted in non-detections. Comparison of early photometric observations of type Ic supernovae with theoretical models suggests that the progenitor stars had radii of less than 10(exp 12) centimetres, as expected for some WRSs. The signature of WRSs, their emission line spectra, cannot be probed by such studies. Here we report the detection of strong emission lines in a spectrum of type IIb supernova 2013cu (iPTF13ast) obtained approximately 15.5 hours after explosion (by 'flash spectroscopy', which captures the effects of the supernova explosion shock breakout flash on material surrounding the progenitor star).We identify Wolf-Rayet-like wind signatures, suggesting a progenitor of the WN(h) subclass (those WRSs with winds dominated by helium and nitrogen, with traces of hydrogen). The extent of this dense wind may indicate increased mass loss from the progenitor shortly before its explosion, consistent with recent theoretical predictions.

  15. Molecular photoionization dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dehmer, Joseph L.

    1982-05-01

    This program seeks to develop both physical insight and quantitative characterization of molecular photoionization processes. Progress is briefly described, and some publications resulting from the research are listed. (WHK)

  16. Evolution of solitary density waves in stellar winds of early-type stars: A simple explanation of discrete absorption component behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldron, Wayne L.; Klein, Larry; Altner, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    We model the evolution of a density shell propagating through the stellar wind of an early-type star, in order to investigate the effects of such shells on UV P Cygni line profiles. Unlike previous treatments, we solve the mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations, using an explicit time-differencing scheme, and present a parametric study of the density, velocity, and temperature response. Under the assumed conditions, relatively large spatial scale, large-amplitude density shells propagate as stable waves through the supersonic portion of the wind. Their dynamical behavior appears to mimic propagating 'solitary waves,' and they are found to accelerate at the same rate as the underlying steady state stellar wind (i.e., the shell rides the wind). These hydrodynamically stable structures quantitatively reproduce the anomalous 'discrete absorption component' (DAC) behavior observed in the winds of luminous early-type stars, as illustrated by comparisons of model predictions to an extensive International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) time series of spectra of zeta Puppis (O4f). From these comparisons, we find no conclusive evidence indicative of DACs accelerating at a significantly slower rate than the underlying stellar wind, contrary to earlier reports. In addition, these density shells are found to be consistent within the constraints set by the IR observations. We conclude that the concept of propagating density shells should be seriously reconsidered as a possible explanation of the DAC phenomenon in early-type stars.

  17. Orbital period changes and possible stellar wind mass loss in the algol-type binary system AT Pegasi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Magdy A.

    2012-12-01

    An analysis of the measurements of mid-eclipse times of AT Peg has been presented. It indicates a period decrease rate of dP/dt = -4.2 × 10-7 d/yr, which can be interpreted in terms of mass loss from the system via stellar wind with a rate between (1 and 2) × 10-8 Mʘ/yr. The O-C diagram shows a growing sine wave covering two different cycles of 13 yr and 31.9 yr with amplitudes equal to 0.026 and 0.032 day, respectively. These unequal durations of the cycles may be explained by magnetic activity cycling variations due to star spots. The obtained characteristics of the second cycle are consistent with similar systems when applying Applegate’s mechanism.

  18. Simplified models of stellar wind anatomy for interpreting high-resolution data. Analytical approach to embedded spiral geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homan, Ward; Decin, Leen; de Koter, Alex; van Marle, Allard Jan; Lombaert, Robin; Vlemmings, Wouter

    2015-07-01

    Context. Recent high-resolution observations have shown that stellar winds harbour complexities that strongly deviate from spherical symmetry, which generally is assumed as standard wind model. One such morphology is the Archimedean spiral, which is generally believed to be formed by binary interactions, as has been directly observed in multiple sources. Aims: We seek to investigate the manifestation in the observables of spiral structures embedded in the spherical outflows of cool stars. We aim to provide an intuitive bedrock with which upcoming ALMA data can be compared and interpreted. Methods: By means of an extended parameter study, we modelled rotational CO emission from the stellar outflow of asymptotic giant branch stars. To this end, we developed a simplified analytical parametrised description of a 3D spiral structure. This model is embedded into a spherical wind and fed into the 3D radiative transfer code LIME, which produces 3D intensity maps throughout velocity space. Subsequently, we investigated the spectral signature of rotational transitions of CO in the models, as well as the spatial aspect of this emission by means of wide-slit position-velocity (PV) diagrams. Additionally, we quantified the potential for misinterpreting the 3D data in a 1D context. Finally, we simulated ALMA observations to explore the effect of interferometric noise and artefacts on the emission signatures. Results: The spectral signatures of the CO rotational transition v = 0J = 3 - 2 are very efficient at concealing the dual nature of the outflow. Only a select few parameter combinations allow for the spectral lines to disclose the presence of the spiral structure. If the spiral cannot be distinguished from the spherical signal, this might result in an incorrect interpretation in a 1D context. Consequently, erroneous mass-loss rates would be calculated. The magnitude of these errors is mainly confined to a factor of a few, but in extreme cases can exceed an order of magnitude

  19. Extrasolar Giant Magnetospheric Response to Steady-state Stellar Wind Pressure at 10, 5, 1, and 0.2 au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilley, Matt A.; Harnett, Erika M.; Winglee, Robert M.

    2016-08-01

    A three-dimensional, multifluid simulation of a giant planet’s magnetospheric interaction with steady-state stellar wind from a Sun-like star was performed for four different orbital semimajor axes—10, 5, 1, and 0.2 au. We simulate the effect of the increasing, steady-state stellar wind pressure related to the planetary orbital semimajor axis on the global magnetospheric dynamics for a Saturn-like planet, including an Enceladus-like plasma torus. Mass-loss processes are shown to vary with orbital distance, with the centrifugal interchange instability displayed only in the 10 and 5 au cases, which reach a state of mass-loss equilibrium more slowly than the 1 or 0.2 au cases. The compression of the magnetosphere in the 1 and 0.2 au cases contributes to the quenching of the interchange process by increasing the ratio of total plasma thermal energy to corotational energy. The strength of field-aligned currents, associated with auroral radio emissions, is shown to increase in magnitude and latitudinal coverage with a corresponding shift equatorward from increased dynamic ram pressure experienced in the hotter orbits. Similar to observed hot Jovian planets, the warm exo-Saturn simulated in the current work shows enhanced ion density in the magnetosheath and magnetopause regions, as well as the plasma torus, which could contribute to altered transit signals, suggesting that for planets in warmer (>0.1 au) orbits, planetary magnetic field strengths and possibly exomoons—via the plasma torus—could be observable with future missions.

  20. Modeling the thermal X-ray emission around the Galactic center from colliding stellar winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Christopher Michael Post; Wang, Daniel; Cuadra, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    The Galactic center is a hotbed of astrophysical activity. Powering these processes is the injection of wind material from ˜30 massive Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars orbiting within 12" of the super-massive black hole (SMBH). Hydrodynamic simulations of such colliding and accreting winds produce a complex density and temperature structure of cold wind material shocking with the ambient medium, creating a large reservoir of hot, X-ray-emitting gas. A Chandra X-ray Visionary Program that observed the Galactic center for 3 Ms resolved this diffuse emission. This work computes the X-ray emission from these hydrodynamic simulations of the WR winds with the aim of reproducing the Chandra observations, amid exploring a variety of SMBH feedback mechanisms. The success of the model is the spectrum from the 2"-5" ring around the SMBH matches the shape of the observed spectrum very well. This naturally explains that the hot gas comes from colliding WR winds, and that the winds speeds of these stars are in general well constrained. The model flux in this ring and over the ±6" images of 4-9keV is ˜2.2× lower than the observations, with stronger feedback mechanisms leading to weaker X-ray emission since more hot, X-ray-emitting gas is cleared from the spherical r < 12" simulation volume. Possible improvements to rectify this flux discrepancy are increasing the mass loss rates of the WRs and/or adding more gas into the simulation, such as from the O stars and their winds, so the adiabatic WR shocks occur closer to their stars, thereby becoming brighter in X-rays.

  1. Modeling the thermal X-ray emission around the Galactic center from colliding stellar winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post Russell, Christopher Michael; Wang, Daniel; Cuadra, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    The Galactic center is a hotbed of astrophysical activity. Powering these processes is the injection of wind material from ˜30 massive Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars orbiting within 12” of the super-massive black hole (SMBH). Hydrodynamic simulations of such colliding and accreting winds produce a complex density and temperature structure of cold wind material shocking with the ambient medium, creating a large reservoir of hot, X-ray-emitting gas. A Chandra X-ray Visionary Program that observed the Galactic center for 3 Ms resolved this diffuse emission. This work computes the X-ray emission from these hydrodynamic simulations of the WR winds with the aim of reproducing the Chandra observations, amid exploring a variety of SMBH feedback mechanisms. The success of the model is the spectrum from the 2”-5” ring around the SMBH matches the shape of the observed spectrum very well. This naturally explains that the hot gas comes from colliding WR winds, and that the winds speeds of these stars are in general well constrained. The model flux in this ring and over the ±6” images of 4-9keV is ˜2.2× lower than the observations, with stronger feedback mechanisms leading to weaker X-ray emission since more hot, X-ray-emitting gas is cleared from the spherical r < 12” simulation volume. Possible improvements to rectify this flux discrepancy are increasing the mass loss rates of the WRs and/or adding more gas into the simulation, such as from the O stars and their winds, so the adiabatic WR shocks occur closer to their stars, thereby becoming brighter in X-rays.

  2. Properties of Longitudinal Flux Tube Waves. III; Wave Propagation in Solar and Stellar Wind Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuntz, M.; Suess, S. T.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the analytic properties of longitudinal tube waves taking into account ambient wind flows. This is an extension of the studies of Papers I and II, which assumed a mean flow speed of zero and also dealt with a simplified horizontal pressure balance. Applications include the study of longitudinal flux tube waves in stars with significant mass loss and heating and dynamics of plumes in the solar wind. Slow magnetosonic waves, also called longitudinal waves, have been observed in solar plumes and are likely an important source of heating. We show that the inclusion of ambient wind flows considerably alters the limiting shock strength as well as the energy damping length of waves.

  3. Properties of Longitudinal Flux Tube Waves. III; Wave Propagation in Solar and Stellar Wind FLows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuntz, M.; Suess, S. T.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the analytic properties of longitudinal tube waves taking into account ambient wind flows. This is an extension of the studies of Papers I and II, which assumed a mean flow speed of zero and also dealt with a simplified horizontal pressure balance. Applications include the study of longitudinal flux tube waves in stars with significant mass loss and the heating and dynamics of plumes in the solar wind. Slow magnetosonic waves, also called longitudinal waves, have been observed in solar plumes and are likely an important source of heating. We show that the inclusion of ambient wind flows considerably alters the limiting shock strength as well as the energy damping length of the waves.

  4. Wolf-Rayet Stellar Wind Instability: Very Rapid Variability of the Line Spectrum of HD 90657

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, Lawrence

    In our IUE observation of the WN+O6 binary system, HD 90657, changes in the spectrum were detected with a time scale shorter than 90 minutes (Koenigsberger and Auer 1987). The variation requires the existence of significant changes in the small scale structure of the wind. We propose to augment this result by observation of the system at four distinct orbital phases, using absorption of the O-star flux as a direct probe of the small scale wind structure. The data obtained will both give general information on the growth of wind instabilities and determine if they are periodio-an important constraint on their origin. We will also inspect the IUE archives for other evidence of short time scale variations in WR targets.

  5. THE MYSTERIOUS SICKLE OBJECT IN THE CARINA NEBULA: A STELLAR WIND INDUCED BOW SHOCK GRAZING A CLUMP?

    SciTech Connect

    Ngoumou, Judith; Preibisch, Thomas; Ratzka, Thorsten; Burkert, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    Optical and near-infrared images of the Carina Nebula show a peculiar arc-shaped feature, which we call the ''Sickle'', next to the B-type star Trumpler 14 MJ 218. We use multi-wavelength observations to explore and constrain the nature and origin of the nebulosity. Using submillimeter data from APEX/LABOCA as well as Herschel far-infrared maps, we discovered a dense, compact clump with a mass of {approx}40 M{sub Sun} located close to the apex of the Sickle. We investigate how the B star MJ 218, the Sickle, and the clump are related. Our numerical simulations show that, in principle, a B-type star located near the edge of a clump can produce a crescent-shaped wind shock front, similar to the observed morphology. However, the observed proper motion of MJ 218 suggests that the star moves with high velocity ({approx}100 km s{sup -1}) through the ambient interstellar gas. We argue that the star is just about to graze along the surface of the clump, and the Sickle is a bow shock induced by the stellar wind, as the object moves supersonically through the density gradient in the envelope of the clump.

  6. Photoionization and Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2000-01-01

    Theoretically self-consistent calculations for photoionization and (e + ion) recombination are described. The same eigenfunction expansion for the ion is employed in coupled channel calculations for both processes, thus ensuring consistency between cross sections and rates. The theoretical treatment of (e + ion) recombination subsumes both the non-resonant recombination ("radiative recombination"), and the resonant recombination ("di-electronic recombination") processes in a unified scheme. In addition to the total, unified recombination rates, level-specific recombination rates and photoionization cross sections are obtained for a large number of atomic levels. Both relativistic Breit-Pauli, and non-relativistic LS coupling, calculations are carried out in the close coupling approximation using the R-matrix method. Although the calculations are computationally intensive, they yield nearly all photoionization and recombination parameters needed for astrophysical photoionization models with higher precision than hitherto possible, estimated at about 10-20% from comparison with experimentally available data (including experimentally derived DR rates). Results are electronically available for over 40 atoms and ions. Photoionization and recombination of He-, and Li-like C and Fe are described for X-ray modeling. The unified method yields total and complete (e+ion) recombination rate coefficients, that can not otherwise be obtained theoretically or experimentally.

  7. A Wolf-Rayet-like progenitor of SN 2013cu from spectral observations of a stellar wind.

    PubMed

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Arcavi, I; Ofek, E O; Ben-Ami, S; Cenko, S B; Kasliwal, M M; Cao, Y; Yaron, O; Tal, D; Silverman, J M; Horesh, A; De Cia, A; Taddia, F; Sollerman, J; Perley, D; Vreeswijk, P M; Kulkarni, S R; Nugent, P E; Filippenko, A V; Wheeler, J C

    2014-05-22

    The explosive fate of massive Wolf-Rayet stars (WRSs) is a key open question in stellar physics. An appealing option is that hydrogen-deficient WRSs are the progenitors of some hydrogen-poor supernova explosions of types IIb, Ib and Ic (ref. 2). A blue object, having luminosity and colours consistent with those of some WRSs, has recently been identified in pre-explosion images at the location of a supernova of type Ib (ref. 3), but has not yet been conclusively determined to have been the progenitor. Similar work has so far only resulted in non-detections. Comparison of early photometric observations of type Ic supernovae with theoretical models suggests that the progenitor stars had radii of less than 10(12) centimetres, as expected for some WRSs. The signature of WRSs, their emission line spectra, cannot be probed by such studies. Here we report the detection of strong emission lines in a spectrum of type IIb supernova 2013cu (iPTF13ast) obtained approximately 15.5 hours after explosion (by 'flash spectroscopy', which captures the effects of the supernova explosion shock breakout flash on material surrounding the progenitor star). We identify Wolf-Rayet-like wind signatures, suggesting a progenitor of the WN(h) subclass (those WRSs with winds dominated by helium and nitrogen, with traces of hydrogen). The extent of this dense wind may indicate increased mass loss from the progenitor shortly before its explosion, consistent with recent theoretical predictions. PMID:24848059

  8. The sn stars - Magnetically controlled stellar winds among the helium-weak stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shore, Steven N.; Brown, Douglas N.; Sonneborn, George

    1987-01-01

    The paper reports observations of magnetically controlled stellar mass outflows in three helium-weak sn stars: HD 21699 = HR 1063; HD 5737 = Alpha Scl; and HD 79158 = 36 Lyn. IUE observations show that the C IV resonance doublet is variable on the rotational timescale but that there are no other strong-spectrum variations in the UV. Magnetic fields, which reverse sign on the rotational timescale, are present in all three stars. This phenomenology is interpreted in terms of jetlike mass loss above the magnetic poles, and these objects are discussed in the context of a general survey of the C IV and Si IV profiles of other more typical helium-weak stars.

  9. Influence of a stellar wind on the evolution of a star of 30 solar masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R.; Chin, C.

    1980-01-01

    A coarse grid of theoretical evolutionary tracks was calculated for a 30 solar mass star to determine the role of mass loss in the evolution of the star during core He burning. The Cox-Stewart opacities were applied, and the rate of mass loss, criterion for convection, and initial chemical composition were taken into consideration. Using the Schwarzschild criterion, the star undergoes little mass loss during core He burning and remains a blue supergiant separated from main sequence stars on the H-R diagram. The stellar remnant consists of the original He core and may appear bluer than equally luminous main sequence stars; a variety of possible evolutionary tracks can be obtained for an initial solar mass of 30 with proper choices of free parameters.

  10. Accretion, jets and winds: High-energy emission from young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, H. M.

    2011-06-01

    This article summarizes the processes of high-energy emission in young stellar objects. Stars of spectral type A and B are called Herbig Ae/Be (HAeBe) stars in this stage, all later spectral types are termed classical T Tauri stars (CTTS). Both types are studied by high-resolution X-ray and UV spectroscopy and modeling. Three mechanisms contribute to the high-energy emission from CTTS: 1) CTTS have active coronae similar to main-sequence stars, 2) the accreted material passes through an accretion shock at the stellar surface, which heats it to a few MK, and 3) some CTTS drive powerful outflows. Shocks within these jets can heat the plasma to X-ray emitting temperatures. Coronae are already well characterized in the literature; for the latter two scenarios models are shown. The magnetic field suppresses motion perpendicular to the field lines in the accretion shock, thus justifying a 1D geometry. The radiative loss is calculated as optically thin emission. A mixture of shocked and coronal gas is fitted to X-ray observations of accreting CTTS. Specifically, the model explains the peculiar line-ratios in the He-like triplets of Ne IX and O VII. All stars require only small mass accretion rates to power the X-ray emission. In contrast, the HAeBe HD 163296 has line ratios similar to coronal sources, indicating that neither a high density nor a strong UV-field is present in the region of the X-ray emission. This could be caused by a shock in its jet. Similar emission is found in the deeply absorbed CTTS DG Tau. Shock velocities between 400 and 500 km s-1 are required to explain the observed spectrum. Doctoral Thesis Award Lecture 2010

  11. The Production Phase for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) Modular Coil Winding Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Heitzenroeder, P.; Brown, T.; Neilson, G.; Malinowski, F.; Sutton, L.; Nelson, B.; Williamson, D.; Horton, N.; Goddard, B.; Edwards, J.; Bowling, K.; Hatzilias, K.

    2005-10-20

    The production phase for the NCSX modular coil winding forms has been underway for approximately one year as of this date. This is the culmination of R&D efforts performed in 2001-4. The R&D efforts included limited manufacturing studies while NCSX was in its conceptual design phase followed by more detailed manufacturing studies by two teams which included the fabrication of full scale prototypes. This provided the foundation necessary for the production parts to be produced under a firm price and schedule contract that was issued in September 2004. This paper will describe the winding forms, the production team and team management, details of the production process, and the achievements for the first year.

  12. Interplay of Tidal Evolution and Stellar Wind Braking in the Rotation of Stars Hosting Massive Close-In Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraz-Mello, S.; Tadeu dos Santos, M.; Folonier, H.; Czismadia, Sz.; do Nascimento, J.-D., Jr.; Pätzold, M.

    2015-07-01

    This paper deals with the application of the creep tide theory (Ferraz-Mello) to the study of the rotation of stars hosting massive close-in planets. The stars have nearly the same tidal relaxation factors as gaseous planets and the evolution of their rotation is similar to that of close-in hot Jupiters: they tidally evolve toward a stationary solution. However, stellar rotation may also be affected by stellar wind braking. Thus, while the rotation of a quiet host star evolves toward a stationary attractor with a frequency (1+6{e}2) times the orbital mean motion of the companion, the continuous loss of angular momentum in an active star displaces the stationary solution toward slower values: active host stars with big close-in companions tend to have rotational periods longer than the orbital periods of their companions. The study of some hypothetical examples shows that, because of tidal evolution, the rules of gyrochronology cannot be used to estimate the age of one system with a large close-in companion, no matter if the star is quiet or active, if the current semimajor axis of the companion is smaller than 0.03-0.04 AU. Details on the evolution of the systems: CoRoT LRc06E21637, CoRoT-27, Kepler-75, CoRoT-2, CoRoT-18, CoRoT-14 and on hypothetical systems with planets of mass 1-4 {M}{Jup} in orbit around a star similar to the Sun are given.

  13. The binary systems IC 10 X-1 and NGC 300 X-1: Accretion of matter from an intense Wolf-Rayet stellar wind onto a black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutukov, A. V.; Fedorova, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    The current evolutionary stage of the binary systems IC 10 X-1 and NGC 300 X-1, which contain a massive black hole and a Wolf-Rayet star with a strong stellar wind that does not fill its Roche lobe, is considered. The high X-ray luminosity and X-ray properties testify to the presence of accretion disks in these systems. The consistency of the conditions for the existence of such a disk and the possibility of reproducing the observed X-ray luminosity in the framework of the Bondi-Hoyle-Littleton theory for a spherically symmetric stellar wind is analyzed. A brief review of information about the mass-loss rates of Wolf-Rayet stars and the speeds of their stellar winds is given. The evolution of these systems at the current stage is computed. Estimates made using the derived parameters show that it is not possible to achieve consistency, since the conditions for the existence of an accretion disk require that the speed of the Wolf-Rayetwind be appreciably lower than is required to reproduce the observedX-ray luminosity. Several explanations of this situation are possible: (1) the real pattern of the motion of the stellar-wind material in the binary is substantially more complex than is assumed in the Bondi-Hoyle-Littleton theory, changing the conditions for the formation of an accretion disk and influencing the accretion rate onto the black hole; (2) some of the accreting material leaves the accretor due to X-ray heating; (3) the accretion efficiency in these systems is nearly an order of magnitude lower than in the case of accretion through a thin disk onto a non-rotating black hole; (4) the intensity of the Wolf-Rayet wind is one to two orders of magnitude lower than has been suggested by modern studies.

  14. Radiation Pressure-Driven Magnetic Disk Winds in Broad Absorption Line Quasi-Stellar Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeKool, Martin; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1995-01-01

    We explore a model in which QSO broad absorption lines (BALS) are formed in a radiation pressure-driven wind emerging from a magnetized accretion disk. The magnetic field threading the disk material is dragged by the flow and is compressed by the radiation pressure until it is dynamically important and strong enough to contribute to the confinement of the BAL clouds. We construct a simple self-similar model for such radiatively driven magnetized disk winds, in order to explore their properties. It is found that solutions exist for which the entire magnetized flow is confined to a thin wedge over the surface of the disk. For reasonable values of the mass-loss rate, a typical magnetic field strength such that the magnetic pressure is comparable to the inferred gas pressure in BAL clouds, and a moderate amount of internal soft X-ray absorption, we find that the opening angle of the flow is approximately 0.1 rad, in good agreement with the observed covering factor of the broad absorption line region.

  15. Long-wavelength, free-free spectral energy distributions from porous stellar winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignace, R.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of macroclumps for free-free spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of ionized winds is considered. The goal is to emphasize distinctions between microclumping and macroclumping effects. Microclumping can alter SED slopes and flux levels if the volume filling factor of the clumps varies with radius; however, the modifications are independent of the clump geometry. To what extent does macroclumping alter SED slopes and flux levels? In addressing the question, two specific types of macroclump geometries are explored: shell fragments (pancake-shaped) and spherical clumps. Analytic and semi-analytic results are derived in the limiting case that clumps never obscure one another. Numerical calculations based on a porosity formalism is used when clumps do overlap. Under the assumptions of a constant expansion, isothermal, and fixed ionization wind, the fragment model leads to results that are essentially identical to the microclumping result. Mass-loss rate determinations are not affected by porosity effects for shell fragments. By contrast, spherical clumps can lead to a reduction in long-wavelength fluxes, but the reductions are only significant for extreme volume filling factors.

  16. Galaxies on FIRE: Stellar Feedback Explains Inefficient Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.

    2014-06-01

    Many of the most fundamental unsolved questions in star and galaxy formation revolve around star formation and "feedback" from both massive stars and accretion onto super-massive black holes. I'll present new simulations which attempt to realistically model the diverse physics of the interstellar medium, star formation, and feedback from stellar radiation pressure, supernovae, stellar winds, and photo-ionization. These mechanisms lead to 'self-regulated' galaxy and star formation, in which global correlations such as the Schmidt-Kennicutt law and the global inefficiency of star formation -- the stellar mass function -- emerge naturally. Within galaxies, feedback regulates the structure of the interstellar medium, and many observed properties of the ISM, star formation, and galaxies can be understood as a fundamental consequence of super-sonic turbulence in a rapidly cooling, self-gravitating medium. But feedback also produces galactic super-winds that can dramatically alter the cosmological evolution of galaxies, their behavior in galaxy mergers, and structure of the inter-galactic medium: these winds depend non-linearly on multiple feedback mechanisms in a way that explains why they have been so difficult to model in previous "sub-grid" approaches.

  17. Molecular photoionization studies

    SciTech Connect

    Dehmer, P.M.

    1983-01-01

    This program is concerned with the study of the electronic structure of small molecules and clusters of molecules. Of particular interest is the interaction of discrete electronic states with one another and with the various ionization and dissociation continua. Since the Second Annual Meeting of the DOE-OHER Program on The Physics and Chemistry of Energy-Related Atmospheric Pollutants in April 1981, significant progress has been made in the following areas: (1) the study of the electronic structure of dimers and small clusters of rare gas atoms using photoionization techniques; (2) similar studies on clusters of CO/sub 2/ molecules; (3) the study of electronic structure of rare gas dimers and trimers using photoelectron and photoelectron-photoion coincidence techniques; (4) the investigation of the relationship between Rydberg states in atoms, van der Waals molecules, and chemically-bonded molecules; (5) the extension of the study of photoabsorption, photoionization, and predissociation processes in H/sub 2/ to the unsymmetric isotope HD; (6) the study of photoelectron spectra of H/sub 2/ and C/sub 2/H/sub 2/; (7) a review of some of the aspects of dissociation processes in small molecules; and (8) the creation of a new program to study the spectra and dynamics of the photoionization processes in small molecules using the technique of multiphoton ionization followed by mass and electron energy analysis of the product ions and electrons. Some of the highlights of this work are reviewed.

  18. Photoionization-photoelectron research

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, J.; Ruscic, B.

    1993-12-01

    The photoionization research program is aimed at understanding the basic processes of interaction of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light with atoms and molecules. This research provides valuable information on both thermochemistry and dynamics. Recent studies include atoms, clusters, hydrides, sulfides and an important fluoride.

  19. On the interaction between dust and gas in late-type stellar atmospheres and winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macgregor, K. B.; Stencel, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    An assumption inherent to most models of dust-driven winds from cool, evolved stars is that the radiative and collisional drag forces acting on an individual dust grain are in balance throughout the flow. We have checked the validity of this supposition of 'complete momentum coupling' by comparing the grain motion obtained from such a model with that derived from solution of the full grain equation of motion. For physical conditions typical of the circumstellar envelopes of oxygen-rich red giants, we find that silicate grains with initial radii smaller than about 5 x 10 exp -6 cm decouple from the ambient gas near the base of the outflow. The implications of these results for models of dust-driven mass loss from late-type giants and supergiants are discussed.

  20. Stellar wind variations in HD 45166: The continuing story. [Wolf-Rayet star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Allan J.; Stickland, David J.; Heap, Sara R.

    1988-01-01

    High resolution SWP IUE spectra of HD 45166 (qWR+B8V) obtained over a 36 hr continuous run, together with earlier observations, reveal 2 distinct modes of UV variability in this object. Gross, epoch-linked changes are seen in the strengths of the qWR emission lines, accompanied by large changes in its highly ionized photospheric absorption spectrum. Rapid (hours) variability in strong, multiple, high velocity, wind discrete absorption components (DAC), in the CIV lambda 1550 resonance lines, which superpose to give the appearance of a broad P Cygni absorption profile at many epochs is also observed. These multiple DAC's (often at least 3 are seen) propagate in velocity, from 0.6 to 1.0 v inf, on a timescale of 1 day, implying an acceleration of 180 cm/s comparable to that seen in O-type stars.

  1. Photoionization models of the CALIFA HII regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisset, C.; Delgado-Inglada, G.; Sánchez, S. F.

    2016-06-01

    We present here a short summary of a forthcoming paper on photoionization models based on CALIFA observations of HII regions. For each of the ˜ 20,000 sources of the CALIFA H ii regions catalog, a grid of photoionization models is computed assuming the ionizing SED being described by the underlying stellar population obtained from spectral synthesis modeling. The nebular metallicity (associated to O/H) is defined using the classical strong line method O3N2. The remaining free parameters are the abundance ratio N/O and the ionization parameter U, which are determined by looking for the model fitting [N II]/Hα and [O III]/Hβ. The models are also selected to fit [O II]/Hβ. This process leads to a set of ˜ 3,200 models that reproduce simultaneously the three observations. We determine new relations between the nebular parameters, like the ionization parameter U and the [O II]/[O III] or [S II]/[S III] line ratios. A new relation between N/O and O/H is obtained, mostly compatible with previous empirical determinations (and not with previous results obtained using photoionization models). A new relation between U and O/H is also determined. All the models are publicly available on the Mexican Millions Models database 3MdB.

  2. Recent X-ray observations of the symbiotic star AG Peg: do they signify Colliding Stellar Winds?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhekov, Svetozar A.; Tomov, Toma

    2016-06-01

    We present an analysis of recent X-ray observations of the symbiotic star AG Peg. The X-ray emission of AG Peg as observed with Swift in 2015 shows considerable variability on time scale of days as variability on shorter time scales might be present as well. Analysis of the X-ray spectra obtained in 2013 and 2015 confirms that AG Peg is an X-ray source of class β of the X-ray sources amongst the symbiotic stars. The X-ray emission of AG Peg as observed with ROSAT (1993 June) might well originate from colliding stellar winds (CSW) in binary system. On the other hand, the characteristics of the X-ray emission of AG Peg in 2013 and 2015 (Swift) are hard to accommodate in the framework of the CSW picture. Analysis of the light curves in 2015 shows that the power spectrum of the X-ray variability in AG Peg resembles that of the flicker noise (or flickering) being typical for accretion processes in astronomical objects. This is a sign that CSWs did not play a key role for the X-ray emission from AG Peg in 2013-2015 and a different mechanism (probably accretion) is also getting into play.

  3. DYNAMICAL EVIDENCE FOR A MAGNETOCENTRIFUGAL WIND FROM A 20 M{sub Sun} BINARY YOUNG STELLAR OBJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Greenhill, L. J.; Goddi, C.; Humphreys, E. M. L.; Chandler, C. J.; Matthews, L. D.

    2013-06-20

    In Orion BN/KL, proper motions of {lambda}7 mm vibrationally excited SiO masers trace the rotation of a nearly edge-on disk and a bipolar wide-angle outflow 10-100 AU from radio source I, a binary young stellar object of {approx}20 M{sub Sun }. Here we map ground-state {lambda}7 mm SiO emission with the Very Large Array and track proper motions over 9 yr. The innermost and strongest emission lies in two extended arcs bracketing Source I. The proper motions trace a northeast-southwest bipolar outflow 100-1000 AU from Source I with a median three-dimensional motion of {approx}18 km s{sup -1}. An overlying distribution of {lambda}1.3 cm H{sub 2}O masers betrays similar flow characteristics. Gas dynamics and emission morphology traced by the masers suggest the presence of a magnetocentrifugal disk wind. Reinforcing evidence lies in the colinearity of the flow, apparent rotation across the flow parallel to the disk rotation, and recollimation that narrows the flow opening angle {approx}120 AU downstream. The arcs of ground-state SiO emission may mark the transition point to a shocked super-Alfvenic outflow.

  4. Recent X-ray observations of the symbiotic star AG Peg: do they signify colliding stellar winds?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhekov, Svetozar A.; Tomov, Toma

    2016-09-01

    We present an analysis of recent X-ray observations of the symbiotic star AG Peg. The X-ray emission of AG Peg as observed with Swift in 2015 shows considerable variability on time-scale of days as variability on shorter time-scales might be present as well. Analysis of the X-ray spectra obtained in 2013 and 2015 confirms that AG Peg is an X-ray source of class β of the X-ray sources amongst the symbiotic stars. The X-ray emission of AG Peg as observed with ROSAT (1993 June) might well originate from colliding stellar winds (CSWs) in binary system. On the other hand, the characteristics of the X-ray emission of AG Peg in 2013 and 2015 (Swift) are hard to accommodate in the framework of the CSW picture. Analysis of the light curves in 2015 shows that the power spectrum of the X-ray variability in AG Peg resembles that of the flicker noise (or flickering) being typical for accretion processes in astronomical objects. This is a sign that CSWs did not play a key role for the X-ray emission from AG Peg in 2013-2015 and a different mechanism (probably accretion) is also getting into play.

  5. Solar photoionization as a loss mechanism of neutral interstellar hydrogen in interplanetary space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogawa, H. S.; Wu, C. Y. Robert; Gangopadhyay, P.; Judge, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    Two primary loss mechanisms of interstellar neutral hydrogen in interplanetary space are resonance charge exchange ionization with solar wind protons and photoionization by solar EUV radiation. The later process has often been neglected since the average photoionization rate has been estimated to be as much as 5 to 10 times smaller than the charge exchange rate. These factors are based on ionization rates from early measurements of solar EUV and solar wind fluxes. Using revised solar EUV and solar wind fluxes measured near the ecliptic plane we have reinvestigated the ionization rates of interplanetary hydrogen. The result of our analysis indicates that indeed the photoionization rate during solar minimum can be smaller than charge exchange by a factor of 5; however, during solar maximum conditions when solar EUV fluxes are high, and solar wind fluxes are low, photoionization can be over 60% of the charge exchange rate at Earth orbit. To obtain an accurate estimate of the importance of photoionization relative to charge exchange, we have included photoionization from both the ground and metastable states of hydrogen. We find, however, that the photoionization from the metastable state does not contribute significantly to the overall photoionization rate.

  6. Infrared Spectro-Interferometry of Massive Stars: Disks, Winds, Outflows, and Stellar Multiplicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Stefan

    2007-06-01

    for the dynamical orbit and the dynamical mass. Taking the measured flux ratio and the derived location in the HR-diagram into account, we estimated the spectral types and masses of Theta 1 Ori C1 and C2 to be O5.5 (M=34.0 M_sun) and O9.5 (M=15.5 M_sun), respectively. Thus, the companion C2 appears to be much more massive than previously thought, suggesting strong wind-wind interaction during the periastron passage, which we predict for epoch 2007.5 with a small physical separation of only approx. 1.5 AU. From the IOTA data on Theta 1 Ori C, we reconstructed the first optical aperture synthesis image of a young star. We also obtained IOTA data for Theta 1 Ori D, which appears resolved, perhaps indicating the presence of a close, faint companion. Eta Carinae: Using VLTI/AMBER, we performed the first NIR spectro-interferometry of the Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) Eta Car, simultaneously obtaining high spatial and spectral resolutions (R=1,500 and 12,000). The measured wavelength-dependent visibilities, differential phases, and closure phases were used to constrain the geometry of the continuum-emitting region, as well as the Br Gamma 2.166 micron and He I 2.059 micron line-emitting region. We compared the measured visibilities with predictions of the radiative transfer model of Hillier et al. (2001), finding good agreement. For the interpretation of the non-zero differential and closure phases measured within the Br Gamma line, we present a simple geometric model of an inclined, latitude-dependent wind zone. Thus, our observations support theoretical models of anisotropic winds from fast-rotating, luminous hot stars with enhanced high-velocity mass loss near the polar regions. In the He I line, we measured non-zero phases as well, indicating asymmetries in the brightness distribution, which we discuss in the context of wind-wind interaction between Eta Car and its hypothetical hot binary companion. Using simulations, we examined the possibility to directly detect this

  7. Spectral Diagnostics of Galactic and Stellar X-Ray Emission from Charge Exchange Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wargelin, B.

    2002-01-01

    The proposed research uses the electron beam ion trap at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to study X-ray emission from charge-exchange recombination of highly charged ions with neutral gases. The resulting data fill a void in existing experimental and theoretical understanding of this atomic physics process, and are needed to explain all or part of the observed X-ray emission from the soft X-ray background, stellar winds, the Galactic Center, supernova ejecta, and photoionized nebulae. Progress made during the first year of the grant is described, as is work planned for the second year.

  8. Cometary compact H II regions are stellar-wind bow shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Buren, Dave; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Wood, Douglas O. S.; Churchwell, ED

    1990-01-01

    Comet-shaped H II regions, like G34.3 + 0.2, are easily explained as bow shocks created by wind-blowing massive stars moving supersonically through molecular clouds. The required velocities of the stars through dense clumps are less than about 10 km/s, comparable to the velocity dispersion of stars in OB associations. An analytic model of bow shocks matches the gross characteristics seen in the radio continuum and the velocity structure inferred from hydrogen recombination and molecular line observations. The champagne flow model cannot account for these structures. VLBI observations of masers associated with the shells of cometary compact H II regions should reveal tailward proper motions predominantly parallel to the shell, rather than perpendicular. It is predicted that over a decade baseline, high signal-to-noise VLA observations of this class of objects will show headward pattern motion in the direction of the symmetry axis, but not expansion. Finally, shock-generated and coronal infrared lines are also predicted.

  9. Stellar wind-magnetosphere interaction at exoplanets: computations of auroral radio powers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, J. D.; Milan, S. E.

    2016-09-01

    We present calculations of the auroral radio powers expected from exoplanets with magnetospheres driven by an Earth-like magnetospheric interaction with the solar wind. Specifically, we compute the twin cell-vortical ionospheric flows, currents, and resulting radio powers resulting from a Dungey cycle process driven by dayside and nightside magnetic reconnection, as a function of planetary orbital distance and magnetic field strength. We include saturation of the magnetospheric convection, as observed at the terrestrial magnetosphere, and we present power-law approximations for the convection potentials, radio powers and spectral flux densities. We specifically consider a solar-age system and a young (1 Gyr) system. We show that the radio power increases with magnetic field strength for magnetospheres with saturated convection potential, and broadly decreases with increasing orbital distance. We show that the magnetospheric convection at hot Jupiters will be saturated, and thus unable to dissipate the full available incident Poynting flux, such that the magnetic Radiometric Bode's Law (RBL) presents a substantial overestimation of the radio powers for hot Jupiters. Our radio powers for hot Jupiters are ˜5-1300 TW for hot Jupiters with field strengths of 0.1-10 BJ orbiting a Sun-like star, while we find that competing effects yield essentially identical powers for hot Jupiters orbiting a young Sun-like star. However, in particular, for planets with weaker magnetic fields, our powers are higher at larger orbital distances than given by the RBL, and there are many configurations of planet that are expected to be detectable using SKA.

  10. Magnetically Driven Jets from Accretion Disks. I. Steady Solutions and Application to Jets/Winds in Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudoh, Takahiro; Shibata, Kazunari

    1997-01-01

    We solve one-dimensional steady and axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations to study basic properties of astrophysical jets from accretion disks. Assuming the configuration of the poloidal magnetic field, we solve for a wide range of parameters of the poloidal magnetic field strength in the disk. We include a thermal energy in the solution, although the jet is mainly accelerated by the magnetic force, so that we are able to obtain the mass flux of the jet and physical quantities, such as temperature, in the disk. We find that the mass flux (Ṁ) depends on the poloidal magnetic field strength of the disk (Bp0) when the toroidal component of the magnetic field (Bφ0) is dominant near the disk surface, although it is independent of the magnetic field when the poloidal component is dominant there:Ṁ~const,if |Bφ/Bp|0<<1,Bp0,if |Bφ/Bp|0>>1. Since Michel's minimum energy solution [v∞~(B2p0/Ṁ)1/3] is almost satisfied in the magnetically driven jets, the terminal velocity (v∞) depends on Bp0 as v∞~B1/3p0 when | Bφ/Bp |0 >> 1, and as v∞~B2/3p0 when | Bφ/Bp |0 << 1. When the toroidal component of the magnetic field is dominant near the disk surface (| Bφ/Bp |0 >> 1), the acceleration mainly takes place after the flow speed exceeds the Alfvén speed. This means that the magnetic pressure largely contributes to the acceleration of these jets. We also study the dependence of mass flux on the other parameters, such as inclination angle of the poloidal field, the rotational velocity of the disk, and the r-dependence of the poloidal magnetic field strength along the field line, where r is the distance from the axis. We discuss the application of these models, i.e., the MHD jets from accretion disks, to jets/winds observed in young stellar objects (such as optical jets, T Tauri winds, and fast neutral winds). The mass-loss rates observed in these jets/winds will constrain the physical quantities in the disks. When the mass-loss rate is Ṁ~10-8 M⊙ yr-1

  11. Photoionization of Li2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Pindzola, M. S.; Ballance, C. P.; Colgan, J.

    2014-05-01

    Single and double photoionization cross sections for Li2 are calculated using a time-dependent close-coupling method. The correlation between the outer two electrons of Li2 is obtained by relaxation of the close-coupled equations in imaginary time. Propagation of the close-coupled equations in real time yields single and double photoionization cross sections for Li2. The two active electron cross sections are compared with one active electron distorted-wave and close-coupling results for both Li and Li2. This work was supported in part by grants from NSF and US DoE. Computational work was carried out at NERSC in Oakland, California, NICS in Knoxville, Tennessee, and OLCF in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

  12. Photoionization of argon clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Dehmer, Patricia M.; Pratt, Stephen T.

    1982-01-01

    Argon clusters were produced in a free supersonic molecular beam expansion of pure argon at room temperature and the photoionization efficiency curves of the trimer through hexamer were measured in the wavelength regions from threshold to 700 Â. A study of the Ar⁺3 photoionization efficiency curve as a function of nozzle stagnation pressure shows that fragmentation of heavier clusters can dominate the spectrum, even near threshold, and even when the nozzle conditions are such that the Ar⁺4 intensity is only a small fraction of the Ar⁺3 intensity. The Ar⁺3 photoionization efficiency curve, obtained using nozzle stagnation conditions such that no heavier ions were detected, exhibits several broad peaks near threshold which show similarities to bands of the dimer. At high nozzle stagnation pressures, the photoionization efficiency curves for Ar⁺3 to Ar⁺6 are nearly identical due to the effects of fragmentation. These spectra exhibit two very broad features which are similar to features observed in the solid. The threshold regions for all the positive ions show extremely gradual onsets, making it difficult to determine the appearance potentials accurately. The appearance potentials for Ar⁺2 and Ar⁺3 are 855.0±1.5 and 865.0±1.5 Â, respectively, yielding a value of 0.18±0.05 eV for the dissociation energy of Ar⁺3. The appearance potentials for the heavier clusters Ar⁺4 through Ar⁺6 are all approximately 870±2 Â.

  13. Photoionization of Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgan, James

    2011-05-01

    The time-dependent close-coupling approach to multiple photoionization of lithium is presented. Double photoionization of lithium can be treated as a two-electron ejection process where the outgoing electrons move in the field of a ``frozen-core'' Li2+ 1 s state. Recent calculations of this process have resulted in total and triple differential cross sections that are in good agreement with other close-coupling approaches. The time-dependent approach can also be extended to treat the interaction of all three lithium electrons, as is required if triple photoionization is examined, that is, the simultaneous ejection of all three electrons from lithium. The most detailed information about this process is found in the fully angular and energy differential cross sections, which provide information as to how the ionized electrons leave the atom. We present our formulation of the fully differential cross section expression, and provide some convergence studies of the angular distributions. The Los Alamos National Laboratory is operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC5206NA25396.

  14. Photoionized Plasma and Opacity Experiments on the Z Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, James

    2008-04-01

    Laboratory experiments at Z use high energy density to create plasma conditions similar to extreme astrophysical environments, including stellar interiors and accretion powered objects. The importance of radiation unifies these topics, even though the plasmas involved are very different. Understanding stellar interiors requires knowledge of radiation transport in dense, hot, collision-dominated plasma. A Z x-ray source was used to measure iron plasma transmission at 156 eV electron temperature, 2x higher than in prior work. The data provide the first experimental tests of absorption features critical for stellar interior opacity models and may provide insight into whether the present discrepancy between solar models and helioseismology originates in opacity model deficiencies or in some other aspect of the solar model. In contrast, accretion physics requires interpretation of x-ray spectra from lower density photoionization-dominated plasma. Exploiting astrophysical spectra requires a spectral model that connects the observations with a model that describes the overall picture of the astrophysical object. However, photoionized plasma spectral models are largely untested. Z-pinch radiation was used to create photoionized iron and neon plasmas with photoionization parameter 5-25 erg cm /s. Comparisons with the data improve x-ray photoionization models and promote more accurate interpretation of spectra acquired with astrophysical observatories. The prospects for new experiments at the higher radiation powers provided by the recently upgraded Z facility will be described.* In collaboration with scientists from CEA, LANL, LLNL, Oxford, Prism, Queens University, Swarthmore College, U. Nevada Reno, and Sandia ++Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. The X-ray absorption spectrum of 4U1700-37 and its implications for the stellar wind of the companion HD153919

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, N. E.; Kallman, T. R.; Swank, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    The first high resolution non-dispersive 2-60 KeV X-ray spectra of 4U1700-37 is presented. The continuum is typical of that found from X-ray pulsars; that is a flat power law between 2 and 10 keV and, beyond 10 keV, an exponential decay of characteristic energy varying between 10 and 20 keV. No X-ray pulsations were detected between 160 ms and 6 min with an amplitude greater than approximately 2%. The absorption measured at binary phases approximately 0.72 is comparable to that expected from the stellar wind of the primary. The gravitational capture of material in the wind is found to be more than enough to power the X-ray source. The increase in the average absorption after phi o approximately 0.5 is confirmed. The minimum level of adsorption is a factor of 2 or 3 lower than that reported by previous observers, which may be related to a factor of approximately 10 decline in the average X-ray luminosity over the same interval. Short term approximately 50% variations in adsorption are seen for the first time which appear to be loosely correlated with approximately 10 min flickering activity in the X-ray flux. These most likely originate from inhomogeneities in the stellar wind of the primary.

  16. Stellarator hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.; Ludescher, C.

    1984-08-01

    The present paper briefly reviews the subject of tokamak-stellarator and pinch-stellarator hybrids, and points to two interesting new possibilities: compact-torus-stellarators and mirror-stellarators.

  17. Photoelectron photoion molecular beam spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Trevor, D.J.

    1980-12-01

    The use of supersonic molecular beams in photoionization mass spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy to assist in the understanding of photoexcitation in the vacuum ultraviolet is described. Rotational relaxation and condensation due to supersonic expansion were shown to offer new possibilities for molecular photoionization studies. Molecular beam photoionization mass spectroscopy has been extended above 21 eV photon energy by the use of Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) facilities. Design considerations are discussed that have advanced the state-of-the-art in high resolution vuv photoelectron spectroscopy. To extend gas-phase studies to 160 eV photon energy, a windowless vuv-xuv beam line design is proposed.

  18. Photoionization of Atomic Sc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sossah, A. M.; Zhou, H.-L.; Manson, S. T.; Hibbert, A.

    2009-05-01

    Photoionization cross sections are calculated for the ground ([Mg] 3p^63d4s^2 ^2D^e) state of atomic Sc for photon energies from threshold to 40.0 eV. The discrete Sc^+ orbitals are generated using both the AUTOSTRUCTURE and CIV3 codes, and R-matrix is used to carry out the cross section calculations. The results are compared with each other, then with previous calculations and available experimental data for final-ionic states representing the 3d and 4s main lines and associated satellites (ionization with excitation) in the region of the 3p -> 3d giant resonances [1]. Reasonably good agreement between our non-relativistic results and experiment is obtained. This work is supported by US DOE and NSF [4pt] [1] S. B. Whitfield, K. Kehoe, R. Wehlitz, M. O. Krause, and C. D. Caldwell ->hys. Rev. A 64, 022701 (2001).

  19. Photoionization-photoelectron research.

    SciTech Connect

    Ruscic, B.

    1998-03-06

    In the broad sense of a general definition, the fundamental goal of this research program is to explore, understand, and utilize the basic processes of interaction of vacuum UV light with atoms and molecules. In practical terms, this program uses photoionization mass spectrometry and other related techniques to study chemically relevant transient and metastable species that are intimately connected to energy-producing processes, such as combustion, or play-prominent roles in the associated environmental issues. Some recent examples of species that have been studied are: CH{sub 3}, CH{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}O, CH{sub 2}OH, CH{sub 3}S, CH{sub 2}SH, HCS, HNCO, NCO, HNCS, NCS, the isomers of C{sub 2}H{sub 5}O, HOBr, CF{sub 3} and CF{sub 3}OH. The ephemeral species of interest are produced in situ using various suitable techniques, such as sublimation, pyrolysis, microwave discharge, chemical abstraction reactions with H or F atoms, laser photodissociation, on-line synthesis, and others. The desired information is obtained by applying a variety of suitable photoionization methods, which use both conventional and coherent light sources in the vacuum W region. The spiritus movens of our studies is the need to provide the chemical community with essential information on the species of interest, such as accurate and reliable thermochemical, spectroscopic and structural data, and thus contribute to the global comprehension of the underlying chemical processes. The scientific motivation is also fueled by the necessity to unveil useful generalities, such as bonding patterns within a class of related compounds, or systematic behavior in the ubiquitous autoionization processes. In addition, the nature of the results obtained in this program is such that it generates a significant impetus for further theoretical work. The experimental work of this program is coordinated with other related experimental and theoretical efforts of the Chemical Dynamics Group to provide a broad perspective

  20. UNDERSTANDING THE UNUSUAL X-RAY EMISSION PROPERTIES OF THE MASSIVE, CLOSE BINARY WR 20a: A HIGH ENERGY WINDOW INTO THE STELLAR WIND INITIATION REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Montes, Gabriela; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; De Colle, Fabio; Strickler, Rachel

    2013-11-10

    The problem of explaining the X-ray emission properties of the massive, close binary WR 20a is discussed. Located near the cluster core of Westerlund 2, WR 20a is composed of two nearly identical Wolf-Rayet stars of 82 and 83 solar masses orbiting with a period of only 3.7 days. Although Chandra observations were taken during the secondary optical eclipse, the X-ray light curve shows no signs of a flux decrement. In fact, WR 20a appears slightly more X-ray luminous and softer during the optical eclipse, opposite to what has been observed in other binary systems. To aid in our interpretation of the data, we compare with the results of hydrodynamical simulations using the adaptive mesh refinement code Mezcal which includes radiative cooling and a radiative acceleration force term. It is shown that the X-ray emission can be successfully explained in models where the wind-wind collision interface in this system occurs while the outflowing material is still being accelerated. Consequently, WR 20a serves as a critical test-case for how radiatively driven stellar winds are initiated and how they interact. Our models not only procure a robust description of current Chandra data, which cover the orbital phases between 0.3 and 0.6, but also provide detailed predictions over the entire orbit.

  1. The Disk Wind in the Rapidly Spinning Stellar-mass Black Hole 4U 1630-472 Observed with NuSTAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Ashley L.; Walton, Dominic J.; Miller, Jon M.; Barret, Didier; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Fabian, Andy C.; Furst, Felix; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Krivonos, Roman; Mori, Kaya; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Stern, Daniel; Tomsick, John A.; Zhang, William W.

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of a short NuSTAR observation of the stellar-mass black hole and low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1630-472. Reflection from the inner accretion disk is clearly detected for the first time in this source, owing to the sensitivity of NuSTAR. With fits to the reflection spectrum, we find evidence for a rapidly spinning black hole, a* = 0.985(+0.005/-0.014) (1 sigma statistical errors). However, archival data show that the source has relatively low radio luminosity. Recently claimed relationships between jet power and black hole spin would predict either a lower spin or a higher peak radio luminosity. We also report the clear detection of an absorption feature at 7.03 +/- 0.03 keV, likely signaling a disk wind. If this line arises in dense, moderately ionized gas (log xi = 3.6(+0.2/-0.3) and is dominated by He-like Fe xxv, the wind has a velocity of v/c = 0.043(+0.002/-0.007) (12900(+600/-2100) km s(exp -1)). If the line is instead associated with a more highly ionized gas (log xi = 6.1(+0.7/-0.6)), and is dominated by Fe xxvi, evidence of a blueshift is only marginal, after taking systematic errors into account. Our analysis suggests the ionized wind may be launched within 200-1100 Rg, and may be magnetically driven.

  2. The ejection of shells in the stellar wind of P CYG - The most plausible explanation of the Balmer-line radial velocity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markova, N.

    1986-07-01

    Our new data of the Balmer line radial velocities in the P Cygni spectrum are compared to the measurments published by de Groot (1969), Kolka (1983) and Markova (1986). The observed variations are analysed in terms of a model proposed by Kolka (1983) which implies a multiple ejection of shells in the stellar wind of P Cygni. It is shown that all data agree to an ejection time scale of about 200 days. The estimated accelerations for the three data groups are very close which supposes a stability of the ejection mechanism over an interval of about 40 yr. The radial velocities of nalmer and the FeII and FeIII (far UV) lines are compared. The identity of the Balmer and the FeII and FeIII shells is discussed.

  3. Measuring the stellar wind parameters in IGR J17544-2619 and Vela X-1 constrains the accretion physics in supergiant fast X-ray transient and classical supergiant X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giménez-García, A.; Shenar, T.; Torrejón, J. M.; Oskinova, L.; Martínez-Núñez, S.; Hamann, W.-R.; Rodes-Roca, J. J.; González-Galán, A.; Alonso-Santiago, J.; González-Fernández, C.; Bernabeu, G.; Sander, A.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Classical supergiant X-ray binaries (SGXBs) and supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs) are two types of high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) that present similar donors but, at the same time, show very different behavior in the X-rays. The reason for this dichotomy of wind-fed HMXBs is still a matter of debate. Among the several explanations that have been proposed, some of them invoke specific stellar wind properties of the donor stars. Only dedicated empiric analysis of the donors' stellar wind can provide the required information to accomplish an adequate test of these theories. However, such analyses are scarce. Aims: To close this gap, we perform a comparative analysis of the optical companion in two important systems: IGR J17544-2619 (SFXT) and Vela X-1 (SGXB). We analyze the spectra of each star in detail and derive their stellar and wind properties. As a next step, we compare the wind parameters, giving us an excellent chance of recognizing key differences between donor winds in SFXTs and SGXBs. Methods: We use archival infrared, optical and ultraviolet observations, and analyze them with the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) Potsdam Wolf-Rayet model atmosphere code. We derive the physical properties of the stars and their stellar winds, accounting for the influence of X-rays on the stellar winds. Results: We find that the stellar parameters derived from the analysis generally agree well with the spectral types of the two donors: O9I (IGR J17544-2619) and B0.5Iae (Vela X-1). The distance to the sources have been revised and also agree well with the estimations already available in the literature. In IGR J17544-2619 we are able to narrow the uncertainty to d = 3.0 ± 0.2 kpc. From the stellar radius of the donor and its X-ray behavior, the eccentricity of IGR J17544-2619 is constrained to e< 0.25. The derived chemical abundances point to certain mixing during the lifetime of the donors. An important difference between the stellar winds of the

  4. Stellarator-Spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Moroz, P.E.

    1997-03-01

    A novel concept for magnetic plasma confinement, Stellarator-Spheromak (SSP), is proposed. Numerical analysis with the classical-stellarator-type outboard stellarator windings demonstrates a number of potential advantages of SSP for controlled nuclear fusion. Among the main ones are: simple and compact magnet coil configuration, absence of material structures (e.g. magnet coils or conducting walls) in the center of the torus, high rotational transform, and a possibility of MHD equilibria with very high {beta} (pressure/magnetic pressure) of the confined plasma.

  5. Photoionization Dynamics of Small Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Dehmer, Joseph L.; Dill, Dan; Parr, Albert C.

    1985-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed remarkable progress in characterizing dynamical aspects of the molecular photoionization process. The general challenge is to gain physical insight into those processes occuring during photo excitation and eventual escape of the photoelectron through the anisotropic molecular field, in terms of various observables such as photoionization cross-sections and branching ratios, photoelectron angular distributions and even newer probes mentioned below. Much of the progress in this field has mirrored earlier work in atomic photoionization dynamics where many key ideas were developed (e.g., channel interaction, quantum defect analysis, potential barrier phenomena and experimental techniques). However, additional concepts and techniques were required to deal with the strictly molecular aspects of the problem, particularly the anisotropy of the multicenter molecular field and the interaction among rovibronic modes.

  6. FUSE Observations of the SMC 16 day Wolf-Rayet Binary Sanduleak 1 (WO4+O4): Atmospheric Eclipses and Colliding Stellar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Louis, Nicole; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Marchenko, Sergey; Pittard, Julian Mark

    2005-08-01

    In this paper we present the results of a FUSE monitoring campaign of the SMC WO4+O4 V Wolf-Rayet binary Sanduleak 1. Our 18 spectra obtained during a little more than one orbital cycle in 2000 October combined with four archival spectra show variability in the S VI, C III, C IV, and O VI P Cygni profiles, which we attribute to emission from the shock cone resulting from the collision between the two strong winds and to atmospheric eclipses of the O star continuum light by the W-R wind. All the lines vary in concert indicating that the cooling is such that even lines such as the OVI λλ1032, 1038 doublet form in the linear part of the cone. We have also applied both a simple geometrical model and profile fits, including emission from the normal wind, extra emission from the shock cone, and the atmospheric eclipse. Adopting an orbital inclination of ~40°, we deduce a total cone opening angle of ~80° and a streaming velocity for the gas along the shock cone of ~3000 km s-1. The luminosity ratio required to fit our spectra is LO/LW-R=3.5, and the stellar radii are 3.5 and 12 Rsolar, respectively, for the W-R and O stars. We also present radiative driving models for this binary system having two massive stars with strong winds and discuss radiative inhibition and braking effects. In particular, we address the coupling of the O star radiation with the W-R star wind. Finally, we present a PICA hydrodynamic colliding-wind model for Sand 1. We find an opening angle for the shock cone similar to that deduced from the line-profile fitting, but significantly longer cooling lengths along the shock cone. However, the model reveals some cold gas that is stripped off the O4 surface and mixed with the hotter WO4 material, thereby accelerating its cooling. This could very well explain why shorter cooling lengths are inferred from the profile fits. Based on observations made with the NASA-CNES-CSA Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. FUSE is operated for NASA by Johns Hopkins

  7. Time delay in molecular photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockett, P.; Frumker, E.; Villeneuve, D. M.; Corkum, P. B.

    2016-05-01

    Time-delays in the photoionization of molecules are investigated. As compared to atomic ionization, the time-delays expected from molecular ionization present a much richer phenomenon, with a strong spatial dependence due to the anisotropic nature of the molecular scattering potential. We investigate this from a scattering theory perspective, and make use of molecular photoionization calculations to examine this effect in representative homonuclear and hetronuclear diatomic molecules, nitrogen and carbon monoxide. We present energy and angle-resolved maps of the Wigner delay time for single-photon valence ionization, and discuss the possibilities for experimental measurements.

  8. Some features of the radial-velocity variations of lines of different intensity in the spectrum of HD 93521. Variability of the stellar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rzaev, A. Kh.

    2007-12-01

    CCD spectra taken with the PFES echelle spectrograph of the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences are used to perform a detailed study of the variability of the profiles of Hell, H β, and H α lines in the spectrum of HD 93521. The pattern and nature of the variability of the Hell lines are similar to those of weak HeI lines and are due to nonradial pulsations. The period and amplitude of the radial-velocity variations are the same for the blue and red halves of the absorption profile but their phases are opposite. The behavior of the variations of H β and H α hydrogen lines relative to their mean profiles is the same as that of strong HeI line and is due to nonradial pulsations. The period and phase of the radial-velocity oscillations are the same for the blue and red halves of the absorption profile but their amplitude are different. The behavior of the radial-velocity variations of the absorption and emission components of the H α line indicates that the latter also are caused by nonradial pulsations. All this is indicative of the complex structure of the stellar wind in the region of its origin. The behavior of variability and wind kinematics differ in different directions and for different regions of the atmosphere and/or envelope.

  9. Using Astrospheric Lyα Absorption Observed by HST to Study the Stellar Winds of α Cen AB and Proxima Cen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, B. E.; Linsky, J. L.; Mueller, H.-R.; Zank, G. P.

    2000-12-01

    Using HST observations of the nearby α Cen AB binary system (G2 V+K0 V) and its distant companion star Proxima Cen (M5.5 Ve), we study H I Lyα absorption produced by heated neutral hydrogen gas in the heliosphere, and we also study absorption from analogous ``astrospheric'' material surrounding the stars. We use these data to show how astrospheric Lyα absorption allows us for the first time to estimate the properties of solar-like stellar winds. Unlike α Cen AB, no astrospheric absorption whatsoever is detected toward Proxima Cen, suggesting that Proxima Cen's wind must be significantly weaker than that of the α Cen AB system. Hydrodynamic models of the astrospheres are computed assuming different mass-loss rates to determine which predict the correct amount of H I absorption, and these studies suggest a mass-loss rate of ˙ {M} ≈ 2 ˙ {M}sun for α Cen AB and ˙ {M} <= 0.2 ˙ {M}sun for Proxima Cen. Support for this work is provided by NASA grants NAG5-9041 and S-56500-D to the University of Colorado.

  10. Spitzer Space Telescope IRS Spectral Mapping of Photoionized Columns in M16 and the Carina HII Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotera, Angela; Simpson, J. P.; Sellgren, K.; Stolovy, S. R.

    2013-01-01

    Photoevaporated columns of dust and gas - also called elephant trunks, pillars or fingers - are found in the periphery of many H II regions. They have been observed within the Galaxy, the SMC and the LMC. These features are thought to be sites of current star formation, but the question remains whether the columns persist because stars formed in the denser regions prior to interactions with the UV radiation and stellar winds of nearby massive stars, or because of core collapse resulting from these interactions. We have obtained Spitzer IRS spectral maps of three columns within M 16 and three columns within the Carina nebula, to test our understanding of the impact on these transitory features of differing stellar populations and initial conditions. We use the wealth of molecular, atomic and PAH emission lines located within the spectral range of the high resolution IRS modes (9.9-37.2 micron) to determine the excitation state, dust and gas temperatures, and probe the shock characteristics within the columns as a function of location. Using the IRS spectral mapping mode, in conjunction with the CUBISM tool and the CLOUDY H II region model code, we have constructed detailed maps of the accessible emission lines and derived parameters for each column. Mapping the distribution of the physical states of the dust and gas in these columns is enhancing our understanding of the competing processes within these dynamic objects. The data presented here represent the only IRS spectral maps of photoionized pillars.

  11. THE DISK WIND IN THE RAPIDLY SPINNING STELLAR-MASS BLACK HOLE 4U 1630–472 OBSERVED WITH NuSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    King, Ashley L.; Miller, Jon M.; Walton, Dominic J.; Fürst, Felix; Harrison, Fiona A.; Barret, Didier; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Krivonos, Roman; Tomsick, John A.; Christensen, Finn E.; Fabian, Andy C.; Hailey, Charles J.; Mori, Kaya; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W.

    2014-03-20

    We present an analysis of a short NuSTAR observation of the stellar-mass black hole and low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1630–472. Reflection from the inner accretion disk is clearly detected for the first time in this source, owing to the sensitivity of NuSTAR. With fits to the reflection spectrum, we find evidence for a rapidly spinning black hole, a{sub ∗}=0.985{sub −0.014}{sup +0.005} (1σ statistical errors). However, archival data show that the source has relatively low radio luminosity. Recently claimed relationships between jet power and black hole spin would predict either a lower spin or a higher peak radio luminosity. We also report the clear detection of an absorption feature at 7.03 ± 0.03 keV, likely signaling a disk wind. If this line arises in dense, moderately ionized gas (log ξ=3.6{sub −0.3}{sup +0.2}) and is dominated by He-like Fe XXV, the wind has a velocity of v/c=0.043{sub −0.007}{sup +0.002} (12900{sub −2100}{sup +600} km s{sup –1}). If the line is instead associated with a more highly ionized gas (log ξ=6.1{sub −0.6}{sup +0.7}), and is dominated by Fe XXVI, evidence of a blueshift is only marginal, after taking systematic errors into account. Our analysis suggests the ionized wind may be launched within 200-1100 Rg, and may be magnetically driven.

  12. Mass-Selective Laser Photoionization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smalley, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the nature and applications of mass-selective laser photoionization. The ionization can be done with a single intense laser pulse lasting a few billionths of a second with no molecular fragmentation. Applications focus on: (1) benzene clusters, excimers, and exciplexes; (2) metal clusters; and (3) triplet formation and decay. (Author/JN)

  13. Stellar evolution.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, H.-Y. (Editor); Muriel, A.

    1972-01-01

    Aspects of normal stellar evolution are discussed together with evolution near the main sequence, stellar evolution from main sequence to white dwarf or carbon ignition, the structure of massive main-sequence stars, and problems of stellar stability and stellar pulsation. Other subjects considered include variable stars, white dwarfs, close binaries, novae, early supernova luminosity, neutron stars, the photometry of field horizontal-branch stars, and stellar opacity. Transport mechanisms in stars are examined together with thermonuclear reactions and nucleosynthesis, the instability problem in nuclear burning shells, stellar coalescence, and intense magnetic fields in astrophysics. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  14. Shining a light on galactic outflows: photoionized outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisholm, John; Tremonti, Christy A.; Leitherer, Claus; Chen, Yanmei; Wofford, Aida

    2016-04-01

    We study the ionization structure of galactic outflows in 37 nearby, star-forming galaxies with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. We use the O I, Si II, Si III, and Si IV ultraviolet absorption lines to characterize the different ionization states of outflowing gas. We measure the equivalent widths, line widths, and outflow velocities of the four transitions, and find shallow scaling relations between them and galactic stellar mass and star formation rate. Regardless of the ionization potential, lines of similar strength have similar velocities and line widths, indicating that the four transitions can be modelled as a comoving phase. The Si equivalent width ratios (e.g. Si IV/Si II) have low dispersion, and little variation with stellar mass; while ratios with O I and Si vary by a factor of 2 for a given stellar mass. Photoionization models reproduce these equivalent width ratios, while shock models under predict the relative amount of high ionization gas. The photoionization models constrain the ionization parameter (U) between -2.25 < log (U) < -1.5, and require that the outflow metallicities are greater than 0.5 Z⊙. We derive ionization fractions for the transitions, and show that the range of ionization parameters and stellar metallicities leads to a factor of 1.15-10 variation in the ionization fractions. Historically, mass outflow rates are calculated by converting a column density measurement from a single metal ion into a total hydrogen column density using an ionization fraction, thus mass outflow rates are sensitive to the assumed ionization structure of the outflow.

  15. Dirac R-matrix calculations of photoionization cross-sections of Ni XIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardar, S.; Bilal, M.; Bari, M. A.; Nazir, R. T.; Hannan, A.; Salahuddin, M.; Nasim, M. H.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we report total photoionization cross-sections of Ni XIII in the ground state (3P2) and four excited states (3P1,0, 1D2, 1S0) for the first time over the photon energy range 380-480 eV. The target wavefunctions are constructed with fully relativistic atomic structure GRASP code. Our calculated energy levels and oscillator strengths of core ion Ni XIV agree well with available experimental and theoretical results. The ionization threshold value of ground state of Ni XIII is found to be more closer to the experimental ionization energy and improved over the previous calculations. The photoionization cross-sections are calculated using the fully relativistic DARC code with an appropriate energy step of 0.01 eV to delineate the resonance structures. The calculated ionization cross-sections are important for the modelling of features of photoionized plasmas and for stellar opacities.

  16. Astrospheres and Stellar Bow shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Marle, Allard Jan

    2016-07-01

    As stars evolve, they deliver feedback to the surrounding medium in the form of stellar wind and radiation. These shape the surrounding matter, forming what is called an astrosphere, a sphere of influence in which the star dominates the morphology and composition of the surrounding medium. Astrospheres are fascinating objects. Because they are formed through the interaction between the stellar feedback and the interstellar gas, they can tell us a great deal about both. Furthermore, because they are shaped over time they provide us with a window into the past. This is of particular interest for the study of stellar evolution, because the astrosphere reflects changes in the properties of the stellar wind, which relate directly to the properties of the star. A special sub-class of astrospheres, the stellar bow shocks, occur when the progenitor star moves through the surrounding medium at supersonic speed. Because the properties of the bow shock relate directly to both the stellar wind and the interstellar medium, the shape and size of the bow shock can be used to determine these properties. Using state-of-the-art numerical codes, it is possible to simulate the interaction between the stellar wind and radiation and the interstellar medium. These results can then be compared to observations. They can also be used to predict the type of observations that are best suited to study these objects. In this fashion computational and observational astronomy can support each other in their efforts to gain a better understanding of stars and their environment.

  17. Attosecond Delays in Molecular Photoionization.

    PubMed

    Huppert, Martin; Jordan, Inga; Baykusheva, Denitsa; von Conta, Aaron; Wörner, Hans Jakob

    2016-08-26

    We report measurements of energy-dependent photoionization delays between the two outermost valence shells of N_{2}O and H_{2}O. The combination of single-shot signal referencing with the use of different metal foils to filter the attosecond pulse train enables us to extract delays from congested spectra. Remarkably large delays up to 160 as are observed in N_{2}O, whereas the delays in H_{2}O are all smaller than 50 as in the photon-energy range of 20-40 eV. These results are interpreted by developing a theory of molecular photoionization delays. The long delays measured in N_{2}O are shown to reflect the population of molecular shape resonances that trap the photoelectron for a duration of up to ∼110 as. The unstructured continua of H_{2}O result in much smaller delays at the same photon energies. Our experimental and theoretical methods make the study of molecular attosecond photoionization dynamics accessible. PMID:27610849

  18. Stellar Dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, Paul

    This chapter steps finally away from the sun and towards the stars, the idea being to apply the physical insight gained so far to see how much of stellar magnetism can be understood in terms of dynamo action. Dynamo action in the convective core of massive main-sequence stars is first considered and shown viable. For intermediate-mass main-sequence stars the fossil field hypothesis will carry the day, although possible dynamo alternatives are also briefly discussed. The extension of the solar dynamo models investigated in Chap. 3 (10.1007/978-3-642-32093-4_3) to other solar-type stars will first take us through an important detour in first having to understand rotational evolution in response to angular momentum loss in a magnetized wind. Dynamo action in fully convective stars comes next, and the chapter closes with an overview of the situation for pre- and post-main-sequence stars and compact objects, leading finally to the magnetic fields of galaxies and beyond.

  19. THE PERSISTENCE OF COOL GALACTIC WINDS IN HIGH STELLAR MASS GALAXIES BETWEEN z {approx} 1.4 AND {approx}1

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Kate H. R.; Koo, David C.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Martin, Crystal L.; Coil, Alison L.; Newman, Jeffrey A.

    2010-08-20

    We present an analysis of the Mg II {lambda}{lambda}2796, 2803 and Fe II {lambda}{lambda}2586, 2600 absorption line profiles in co-added spectra of 468 galaxies at 0.7 < z < 1.5. The galaxy sample, drawn from the Team Keck Treasury Redshift Survey of the GOODS-N field, has a range in stellar mass (M{sub *}) comparable to that of the sample at z {approx} 1.4 analyzed in a similar manner by Weiner et al. (W09), but extends to lower redshifts and has specific star formation rates which are lower by {approx}0.6 dex. We identify outflows of cool gas from the Doppler shift of the Mg II absorption lines and find that the equivalent width (EW) of absorption due to outflowing gas increases on average with M{sub *} and star formation rate (SFR). We attribute the large EWs measured in spectra of the more massive, higher-SFR galaxies to optically thick absorbing clouds having large velocity widths. The outflows have hydrogen column densities N(H) {approx}> 10{sup 19.4} cm{sup -2} and extend to velocities of {approx}500 km s{sup -1}. While galaxies with SFR>10 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} host strong outflows in both this and the W09 sample, we do not detect outflows in lower-SFR (i.e., log M{sub *}/M{sub sun} {approx}< 10.5) galaxies at lower redshifts. Using a simple galaxy evolution model that assumes exponentially declining SFRs, we infer that strong outflows persist in galaxies with log M{sub *}/M{sub sun} > 10.5 as they age between z = 1.4 and z {approx} 1, presumably because of their high absolute SFRs. Finally, our spectral analysis, combined with high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging, weakly suggests that outflow absorption strength increases with galaxy SFR surface density.

  20. The interaction of an O star wind with a Herbig-Haro jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquivel, A.; Raga, A. C.; Cantó, J.; Rodríguez-González, A.

    2009-11-01

    Context: Herbig-Haro jets ejected from young, low mass stars in the proximity of O/B stars will interact with the more or less isotropic winds from the more massive stars. An example of this are the jets from the stars within the proplyds near θ-Orionis. Aims: In this paper, we consider the interaction of an externally photoionized HH jet with an isotropic wind ejected from the ionizing photon source. We study this problem through numerical simulations, allowing us to obtain predictions of the detailed structure of the flow and predictions of Hα intensity maps. This is a natural extension of a previously developed analytic model for the interaction between a jet and an isotropic stellar wind. Methods: We present 3D simulations of a bipolar HH jet interacting with an isotropic wind from a massive star, assuming that the radiation from the star photoionizes all of the flow. We describe different possible flow configurations, exploring a limited set of jet and stellar wind parameters and orientations of the jet/counterjet ejection. We have computed 6 models, two of which also include a time-variability in the jet velocity. Results: We compare the locus of the computed jet/counterjet systems with the analytic model, and find very good agreement except for cases in which the direction of the jet (or the counterjet) approaches the direction to the wind source (i.e., the O star). For the models with variable ejection velocities, we find that the internal working surfaces follow straighter trajectories (and the inter-working surface segments more curved trajectories) than the equivalent steady jet model.

  1. Stellar Metamorphosis:

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [TOP LEFT AND RIGHT] The Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 has captured images of the birth of two planetary nebulae as they emerge from wrappings of gas and dust, like butterflies breaking out of their cocoons. These images highlight a fleeting phase in the stellar burnout process, occurring just before dying stars are transformed into planetary nebulae. The left-hand image is the Cotton Candy nebula, IRAS 17150-3224; the right-hand image, the Silkworm nebula, IRAS 17441-2411. Called proto-planetary nebulae, these dying stars have been caught in a transition phase between a red giant and a planetary nebula. This phase is only about 1,000 years long, very short in comparison to the 1 billion-year lifetime of a star. These images provide the earliest snapshots of the transition process. Studying images of proto-planetary nebulae is important to understanding the process of star death. A star begins to die when it has exhausted its thermonuclear fuel - hydrogen and helium. The star then becomes bright and cool (red giant phase) and swells to several tens of times its normal size. It begins puffing thin shells of gas off into space. These shells become the star's cocoon. In the Hubble images, the shells are the concentric rings seen around each nebula. But the images also reveal the nebulae breaking out from those shells. The butterfly-like wings of gas and dust are a common shape of planetary nebulae. Such butterfly shapes are created by the 'interacting winds' process, in which a more recent 'fast wind' - material propelled by radiation from the hot central star - punches a hole in the cocoon, allowing the nebula to emerge. (This 'interacting wind' theory was first proposed by Dr. Sun Kwok to explain the origin of planetary nebulae, and has been subsequently proven successful in explaining their shapes.) The nebulae are being illuminated by light from the invisible central star, which is then reflected toward us. We are viewing the nebulae

  2. Biomedical applications of laser photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Moore, Larry J.; Fassett, John R.; O'Haver, Thomas C.

    1991-07-01

    Trace elements are important for many essential metabolic functions. Zinc is a structural/functional component in more than 200 enzymes active in the biochemistry of cell division and tissue growth, neurology and endocrine control. Calcium is involved in intracellular control mechanisms and in skeletal bone building and resorption processes related to osteoporosis. Sensitive and selective laser photoionization is being developed to understand mechanisms in smaller samples and biological units approaching the cellular domain. Zinc has an ionization potential of 9.4 eV, or 75766.8 cm-1. Several processes are being explored, including two-photon resonant, three- photon ionization utilizing sequential UV transitions, e.g., 4s2 1S0 yields 4s4p 3P1 and 4s4p 3P1 yields 4s5d 3D1. Preliminary zinc stable isotope ratio data obtained by thermal atomization and laser photoionization agree with accepted values within 2 to 5%, except for anomalous 67Zn. Photoionization of calcium is being studied for isotope enrichment and ratio measurement using narrow and medium bandwidth lasers. Several ionization pathways, e.g., 4s2 1S0 - 2hv1 yields 4s10s - hv2 yields Ca+ (4s2S), are being investigated for isotopically selective ionization. Auto-ionization pathways are explored for greater efficiency in isotopic analysis. All studies have utilized a Nd:YAG- pumped laser system with one or two frequency-doubled tunable dye lasers coupled either to a magnetic sector or time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

  3. Photoionization of methanol and formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warneck, P.

    1971-01-01

    Photoions produced in methanol and formaldehyde by radiation in the spectral region 450-1150 A were analyzed mass spectrometrically, and their relative yields were determined as a function of wavelength. First ionization potentials were determined, and the ion yield curves were interpreted in terms of ionization processes in conjunction with other data. Fragment ions were detected on mass numbers of 31, 30, 29, 15, and 14 for methanol, and 29, 2, and 1 for formaldehyde. The associated appearance potentials were determined and were used to calculate heats of formation of the ions CH2OH(+) and HCO(+), and the radicals CH3, CH2, and HCO.

  4. Photoabsorption and photoionization of HD

    SciTech Connect

    Dehmer, Patricia M.; Chupka, William A.

    1983-01-01

    Relative photoabsorption and photoionization cross sections have been measured for HD at a temperature of 78 K in the wavelength region from 735 to 805 Â. The present wavelength resolution of 0.016 Â represents an improvement of more than two orders of magnitude over that of previous photoionization studies of this molecule. Bands of the 3pπ D ¹Πu←X ¹Σg⁺ system are observed to v'=17, and ionization efficiencies are reported for a number of Rydberg states of low principal quantum number. As in the case of H2, the ionization efficiency is close to unity for Rydberg states that can autoionize with Δv= -1, but drops to zero for states that can autoionize only with a large change in vibrational quantum number and that are significantly predissociated (such as the 3pπ D ¹Πu state). The breakdown of (g,u) symmetry in HD and the resulting effects on the absorption spectrum and on the decay paths of the Rydberg states are discussed.

  5. Double photoionization of SO 2 and fragmentation spectroscopy of SO 2++ studied by a photoion-photoion coincidence method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dujardin, Gérald; Leach, Sydney; Dutuit, Odile; Guyon, Paul-Marie; Richard-Viard, Martine

    1984-08-01

    Doubly charged sulphur dioxide cations (SO 2++) are produced by photoionization with synchrotron radiation from ACO in the excitation-energy range 34-54 eV. A new photoion-photoion coincidence (PIPICO) experiment is described in which coincidences between photoion fragments originating from the dissociation of the doubly charged parent cation are counted. This PIPICO method enables us to study the fragmentation of individual electronically excited states of SO 2++ and to determine the corresponding absolute double-photoionization partial cross sections as a function of the excitation energy. A tentative assignment of the three observed α, β and γ SO 2++ states is given. The dissociation processes of the α and β states into the products SO + + O + are found to be non-statistical in nature; the γ state dissociates completely into three atomic fragments S + + O + + O. Three main observed features of the double-photoionization cross-section curves are discussed in the text: appearance potentials, linear threshold laws, and constant double-photoionization cross sections relative to the total ionization cross section at high energies.

  6. IPOPv2: Photoionization of Ni XIV - a test case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delahaye, F.; Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P.; Zeippen, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    Several years ago, M. Asplund and coauthors (2004) proposed a revision of the Solar composition. The use of this new prescription for Solar abundances in standard stellar models generated a strong disagreement between the predictions and the observations of Solar observables. Many claimed that the Standard Solar Model (SSM) was faulty, and more specifically the opacities used in such models. As a result, activities around the stellar opacities were boosted. New experiments (J. Bailey at Sandia on Z-Pinch, The OPAC consortium at LULI200) to measure directly absorbtion coefficients have been realized or are underway. Several theoretical groups (CEA-OPAS, Los Alamos Nat. Lab., CEA-SCORCG, The Opacity Project - The Iron Project (IPOPv2)) have started new sets of calculations using different approaches and codes. While the new results seem to confirm the good quality of the opacities used in SSM, it remains important to improve and complement the data currently available. We present recent results in the case of the photoionization cross sections for Ni XIV (Ni13+) from IPOPv2 and possible implications on stellar modelling.

  7. Solar Wind Five

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, M. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Topics of discussion were: solar corona, MHD waves and turbulence, acceleration of the solar wind, stellar coronae and winds, long term variations, energetic particles, plasma distribution functions and waves, spatial dependences, and minor ions.

  8. Single and double photoionization of Li2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pindzola, M. S.; Li, Ye; Colgan, J.

    2015-01-01

    Time-dependent close-coupling methods are used to study the single and double photoionization of Li2. Formulations for both one-active and two-active electron methods make use of Hartree with local exchange potentials for the core electrons. Both the single and double photoionization cross sections for Li2 are found to be larger for linear polarization than for circular polarization, in sharp contrast to that found before for H2. In particular the double photoionization cross sections for Li2 are found to be approximately five times larger than for H2 and thus more easily observed by future experiments.

  9. Imaging molecular orbitals using photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santra, Robin

    2006-10-01

    The interpretation of a recent experiment using high-order harmonic generation [Itatani et al., Nature 432 (2004) 867] as a measurement of the highest occupied molecular orbital of a molecule is conceptually problematic, even if the independent-particle picture is taken seriously. Guided by the relationship between the amplitude for one-photon-induced electron emission and the electron-ion recombination amplitude in the three-step model of high-order harmonic generation, it is argued that synchrotron-based photoionization might be a superior approach to imaging molecular orbitals. Within the Hartree-Fock independent-particle picture, the molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions, measured as a function of photon energy, could be used to reconstruct all orbitals occupied in the Hartree-Fock ground state of the molecule investigated. It is suggested that laser alignment techniques could be employed to facilitate the measurement of the molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions.

  10. Cluster beam analysis via photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Grover, J.R. ); Herron, W.J.; Coolbaugh, M.T.; Peifer, W.R.; Garvey, J.F. )

    1991-08-22

    A photoionization method for quantitatively analyzing the neutral products of free jet expansions is described. The basic principle is to measure the yield of an ion characterization of each component cluster at a photon energy just below that at which production of the same ion from larger clusters can be detected. Since there is then no problem with fragmentation, the beam density of each neutral cluster can be measured in the presence of larger clusters. Although these measurements must be done in the test ions' onset regions where their yields are often quite small, the technique is made highly practicable by the large intensities of widely tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron light now available at electron storage rings. As an example, the method is applied to the analysis of cluster beams collimated from the free jet expansion of a 200:1 ammonia-chlorobenzene mixture.

  11. 2006 Photoions, Photoionization & Photodetachment held on January 29-February 3, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Continetti Nancy Ryan Gray

    2006-09-06

    The 4th Gordon Conference on Photoions, Photoionization and Photodetachment will be held January 29-February 3, 2006 at the Santa Ynez Valley Marriott in Buellton, California. This meeting will continue to cover fundamentals and applications of photoionization and photodetachment, including valence and core-level phenomena and applications to reaction dynamics, ultrashort laser pulses and the study of exotic molecules and anions. Further information will be available soon at the Gordon Conference Website, and will be announced.

  12. Fine- and hyperfine-structure effects in molecular photoionization. I. General theory and direct photoionization.

    PubMed

    Germann, Matthias; Willitsch, Stefan

    2016-07-28

    We develop a model for predicting fine- and hyperfine intensities in the direct photoionization of molecules based on the separability of electron and nuclear spin states from vibrational-electronic states. Using spherical tensor algebra, we derive highly symmetrized forms of the squared photoionization dipole matrix elements from which we derive the salient selection and propensity rules for fine- and hyperfine resolved photoionizing transitions. Our theoretical results are validated by the analysis of the fine-structure resolved photoelectron spectrum of O2 reported by Palm and Merkt [Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 1385 (1998)] and are used for predicting hyperfine populations of molecular ions produced by photoionization. PMID:27475368

  13. Stellar chromospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    Developments in the understanding and use of chromospheric diagnostics are discussed with emphasis on the following aspects: (1) trends emerging from semiempirical models of single stars; (2) the validity of claims that theoretical models of chromospheres are becoming realistic; (3) the correlation between the widths of Ca 2 H and K line emission cores and stellar absolute luminosity extending over 15 magnitudes (Wilson-Bappu relation); and (4) the existence of systematic flow patterns in stellar chromospheres.

  14. Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peletier, Reynier F.

    2013-10-01

    This is a summary of my lectures during the 2011 Canary Islands Winter School in Puerto de la Cruz. I give an introduction to the field of stellar populations in galaxies, and highlight some new results. Since the title of the Winter School is Secular Evolution in Galaxies I mostly concentrate on nearby galaxies, which are best suited to study this theme. Of course, the understanding of stellar populations is intimately connected to understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies, one of the great outstanding problems of astronomy. We are currently in a situation where very large observational advances have been made in recent years. Galaxies have been detected up to a redshift of ten. A huge effort has to be made so that stellar population theory can catch up with observations. Since most galaxies are far away, information about them has to come from stellar population synthesis of integrated light. Here I will discuss how stellar evolution theory, together with observations in our Milky Way and Local Group, are used as building blocks to analyse these integrated stellar populations.

  15. Ultraviolet photoionization in CO2 TEA lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, S. J.; Smith, A. L. S.

    1988-07-01

    The effects of gas composition and spark parameters on the UV emission in CO2 TEA laser gas mixtures were investigated together with the nature of photoionization process and the photoelectron-loss mechanism. A linear relationship was found between N2 concentration and photoionization (with no such dependence on C concentration, from CO and CO2), but the increases in photoionization that could be effected by optimizing the spark discharge circuit parameters were much higher than those produced by changes in gas composition. UV emission was directly proportional to the amount of stored electrical energy in the spark-discharge circuit and to the cube of the peak current produced in the spark by the discharge of this energy. Photoionization was also found to be proportional to the spark electrode gap. It was found that free-space sparks gave a considerably broader emission pattern than a surface-guided notched spark.

  16. Radiation-driven winds of hot luminous stars. XVIII. The unreliability of stellar and wind parameter determinations from optical vs. UV spectral analysis of selected central stars of planetary nebulae and the possibility of some CSPNs as single-star supernova Ia progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, T. L.; Pauldrach, A. W. A.; Kaschinski, C. B.

    2016-08-01

    Context. The uncertainty in the degree to which radiation-driven winds of hot stars might be affected by small inhomogeneities in the density leads to a corresponding uncertainty in the determination of the atmospheric mass loss rates from the strength of optical recombination lines and - since the mass loss rate is not a free parameter but a function of the stellar parameters mass, radius, luminosity, and abundances - in principle also in the determination of these stellar parameters. Furthermore, the optical recombination lines also react sensitively to even small changes in the density structure resulting from the (often assumed instead of computed) velocity law of the outflow. This raises the question of how reliable the parameter determinations from such lines are. Aims: The currently existing severe discrepancy between central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPN) stellar and wind parameters derived from model fits to the optical spectra and those derived using hydrodynamically consistent model fits to the UV spectra is to be reassessed via a simultaneous optical/UV analysis using a state-of-the-art model atmosphere code. Methods: We have modified our hydrodynamically consistent model atmosphere code with an implementation of the usual ad hoc treatment of clumping (small inhomogeneities in the density) in the wind. This allows us to re-evaluate, with respect to their influence on the appearance of the UV spectra and their compatibility with the observations, the parameters determined in an earlier study that had employed clumping in its models to achieve a fit to the observed optical spectra. Results: The discrepancy between the optical and the UV analyses is confirmed to be the result of a missing consistency between stellar and wind parameters in the optical analysis. While clumping in the wind does significantly increase the emission in the optical hydrogen and helium recombination lines, the influence of the density (velocity field) is of the same order as

  17. Photoionized astrophysical plasmas in the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Edward; Rose, Steven

    2010-10-15

    The time-dependent collisional-radiative code ALICE [E. G. Hill and S. J. Rose, High Energy Density Phys. 5, 302 (2009)] is used to model the spectrum from a laboratory photoionized silicon plasma [S. Fujioka et al., Nat. Phys. 5, 821 (2009)]. The results show a good agreement with the laboratory spectrum and lend support to the accompanying analytical discussion of photoionized laboratory spectra, their parametrization, and relevance to astrophysics.

  18. Scaling stellar feedback: A study of the physical processes involved in star-forming regions of vastly different sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, Eric W.

    2009-09-01

    Regions of recent or ongoing star formation often contain massive stars capable of ionizing the surfaces of nearby molecular clouds. These layers of ionized gas, called H II regions, produce emission lines that serve as beacons of star formation as we look out into distant parts of our Galaxy and the universe. The complex physical processes of star formation are responsible for the chemical and structural evolution of galaxies throughout the history of the universe on many size scales. Light and winds from massive stars heat and compress nearby clouds, acting to simultaneously inhibit and enhance further star formation. To disentangle the importance of competing processes such as photoionization, supernovae, stellar winds, magnetic fields, radiation pressure, I have studied the dominant physical processes in nearby H II regions to determine the relative contribution of each feedback mechanism as a function of star formation intensity. The Orion Nebula is an H II region that is visible to the naked eye. Due to its proximity to the Sun and brightness, it has been studied extensively in all wavelengths. It is dominated by a single O star and offers the least complex environment to compare with models of H II regions. The most complex site of star formation in the local universe is 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Hundreds of O stars dominated a region thousands of times larger than the Orion Nebula. Together these two examples provide the constraints necessary to quantify stellar feedback on different scales.

  19. Stellar Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is one of NASA's "Vision Missions" - concepts for future, space-based, strategic missions that could enormously increase our capabilities for observing the Cosmos. SI is designed as a UV/Optical Interferometer which will enable 0.1 milli-arcsecond (mas) spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and, via asteroseismology, stellar interiors and of the Universe in general. The ultra-sharp images of the Stellar Imager will revolutionize our view of many dynamic astrophysical processes by transforming point sources into extended sources, and snapshots into evolving views. SI, with a characteristic angular resolution of 0.1 milli-arcseconds at 2000 Angstroms, represents an advance in image detail of several hundred times over that provided by the Hubble Space Telescope. The Stellar Imager will zoom in on what today-with few exceptions - we only know as point sources, revealing processes never before seen, thus providing a tool as fundamental to astrophysics as the microscope is to the study of life on Earth. SI's science focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe, particularly on magnetic activity on the surfaces of stars like the Sun. It's prime goal is to enable long-term forecasting of solar activity and the space weather that it drives, in support of the Living With a Star program in the Exploration Era. SI will also revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magneto-hydrodynamically controlled processes in the Universe. Stellar Imager is included as a "Flagship and Landmark Discovery Mission" in the 2005 Sun Solar System Connection (SSSC) Roadmap and as a candidate for a "Pathways to Life Observatory" in the Exploration of the Universe Division (EUD) Roadmap (May, 2005) and as such is a candidate mission for the 2025-2030 timeframe. An artist's drawing of the current "baseline" concept for SI is presented.

  20. 2001 Gordon Research Conference on Photoions, Photoionization and Photodetachment. Final progress report [agenda and attendees list

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Mark

    2001-07-13

    The Gordon Research Conference on Photoions, Photoionization and Photodetachment was held at Williams College, Williamstown, Massachusetts, July 8-13, 2001. The 72 conference attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field, coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, and including US and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate discussion about the key issues in the field today. Time for formal presentations was limited. Sessions included the following topics: Vibrational structure, Time resolved studies: nuclear wavepackets, Valence photoionization, Clusters and networks, Resonance structures and decay mechanisms, Ultrafast photoionization, Threshold photoionization, Molecule fixed properties, and Collisional phenomena.

  1. Stellar Ablation of Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas E.; Horwitz, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    We review observations and theories of the solar ablation of planetary atmospheres, focusing on the terrestrial case where a large magnetosphere holds off the solar wind, so that there is little direct atmospheric impact, but also couples the solar wind electromagnetically to the auroral zones. We consider the photothermal escape flows known as the polar wind or refilling flows, the enhanced mass flux escape flows that result from localized solar wind energy dissipation in the auroral zones, and the resultant enhanced neutral atom escape flows. We term these latter two escape flows the "auroral wind." We review observations and theories of the heating and acceleration of auroral winds, including energy inputs from precipitating particles, electromagnetic energy flux at magnetohydrodynamic and plasma wave frequencies, and acceleration by parallel electric fields and by convection pickup processes also known as "centrifugal acceleration." We consider also the global circulation of ionospheric plasmas within the magnetosphere, their participation in magnetospheric disturbances as absorbers of momentum and energy, and their ultimate loss from the magnetosphere into the downstream solar wind, loading reconnection processes that occur at high altitudes near the magnetospheric boundaries. We consider the role of planetary magnetization and the accumulating evidence of stellar ablation of extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Finally, we suggest and discuss future needs for both the theory and observation of the planetary ionospheres and their role in solar wind interactions, to achieve the generality required for a predictive science of the coupling of stellar and planetary atmospheres over the full range of possible conditions.

  2. Photoionization cross section for He in the hyperspherical coordinate method

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.L.; Starace, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    In order to more fully explore the role of electron correlations in the photoionization process the hyperspherical coordinate method of Macek was employed in calculating photoionization cross sections of He. Results are presented and discussed. (WHK)

  3. Vacuum Ultraviolet Photoionization of Complex Chemical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostko, Oleg; Bandyopadhyay, Biswajit; Ahmed, Musahid

    2016-05-01

    Tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation coupled to mass spectrometry is applied to the study of complex chemical systems. The identification of novel reactive intermediates and radicals is revealed in flame, pulsed photolysis, and pyrolysis reactors, leading to the elucidation of spectroscopy, reaction mechanisms, and kinetics. Mass-resolved threshold photoelectron photoion coincidence measurements provide unprecedented access to vibrationally resolved spectra of free radicals present in high-temperature reactors. Photoionization measurements in water clusters, nucleic acid base dimers, and their complexes with water provide signatures of proton transfer in hydrogen-bonded and π-stacked systems. Experimental and theoretical methods to track ion-molecule reactions and fragmentation pathways in intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen-bonded systems in sugars and alcohols are described. Photoionization of laser-ablated molecules, clusters, and their reaction products inform thermodynamics and spectroscopy that are relevant to astrochemistry and catalysis. New directions in coupling VUV radiation to interrogate complex chemical systems are discussed.

  4. Vacuum Ultraviolet Photoionization of Complex Chemical Systems.

    PubMed

    Kostko, Oleg; Bandyopadhyay, Biswajit; Ahmed, Musahid

    2016-05-27

    Tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation coupled to mass spectrometry is applied to the study of complex chemical systems. The identification of novel reactive intermediates and radicals is revealed in flame, pulsed photolysis, and pyrolysis reactors, leading to the elucidation of spectroscopy, reaction mechanisms, and kinetics. Mass-resolved threshold photoelectron photoion coincidence measurements provide unprecedented access to vibrationally resolved spectra of free radicals present in high-temperature reactors. Photoionization measurements in water clusters, nucleic acid base dimers, and their complexes with water provide signatures of proton transfer in hydrogen-bonded and π-stacked systems. Experimental and theoretical methods to track ion-molecule reactions and fragmentation pathways in intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen-bonded systems in sugars and alcohols are described. Photoionization of laser-ablated molecules, clusters, and their reaction products inform thermodynamics and spectroscopy that are relevant to astrochemistry and catalysis. New directions in coupling VUV radiation to interrogate complex chemical systems are discussed. PMID:26980311

  5. Early stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahler, Steven W.

    1994-01-01

    Research into the formation and early evolution of stars is currently an area of great interest and activity. The theoretical and observational foundations for this development are reviewed in this paper. By now, the basic physics governing cloud collapse is well understood, as is the structure of the resulting protostars. However, the theory predicts protostellar luminosities that are greater than those of most infrared sources. Observationally, it is thought that protostars emit powerful winds that push away remnant cloud gas, but both the origin of these winds and the nature of their interaction with ambient gas are controversial. Finally, the theory of pre-main-sequence stars has been modified to incorporate more realistic initial conditions. This improvement helps to explain the distribution of such stars in the H-R diagram. Many important issues, such as the origin of binary stars and stellar clusters, remain as challenges for future research.

  6. The Properties of the local Interstellar Medium and the Interaction of the Stellar Winds of epsilon Indi and lambda Andromedae with the Interstellar Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Brian E.; Alexander, William R.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    1996-01-01

    We present new observations of the Ly alpha lines of Epsilon Indi (K5 5) and A Andromedae (G8 4-3 + ?) These data were obtained by the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. Analysis of the interstellar H 1 and D 1 absorption lines reveals that the velocities and temperatures inferred from the H 1 lines are inconsistent with the parameters inferred from the D 1 lines, unless the H 1 absorption is assumed to be produced by two absorption components. One absorption component is produced by interstellar material. For both lines of sight observed, the velocity of this component is consistent with the velocity predicted by the local flow vector. For the Epsilon Indi data, the large velocity separation between the stellar emission and the interstellar absorption allows us to measure the H 1 column density independent of the shape of the intrinsic stellar Ly alpha profile. This approach permits us to quote an accurate column density and to assess its uncertainty with far more confidence than in previous analyses, for which the errors were dominated by uncertainties in the assumed stellar profiles.

  7. Massive Stars: Stellar Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Luciana

    2007-07-01

    Massive stars dominate the chemical and dynamical evolution of the ISM, and ultimately of their parent galaxy and the universe, because of their fast evolution and intense supersonic winds. Four decades ago, the first rocket UV spectra of massive stars revealed the importance of mass loss and began to change our understanding of their evolution. Recently, advances in stellar modeling, and the observation of crucial ions in the far-UV spectral range, led to the resolution of long-standing issues in our understanding of massive star atmospheres. A revised (downwards) calibration of Teff for early spectral types is emerging as a result. Meanwhile, HST imaging, and large ground-based telescopes with multislit spectroscopic capabilities, had opened the possibility of resolved studies of stellar populations in Local Group galaxies, which sample a variety of metallicity and environment conditions. More recently, GALEX is providing a global, deep view of the young stellar populations for hundreds of nearby galaxies, revealing their recent star-formation history and modalities. The wide-field coverage and sensitivity of the GALEX UV imaging, easily detecting extremely low levels of star formation, is again changing some of our views on massive star formation in galaxies.

  8. Correlation between photoeletron and photoion in ultrafast multichannel photoionization of Ar

    SciTech Connect

    Itakura, R.; Fushitani, M.; Hishikawa, A.; Sako, T.

    2015-12-31

    We theoretically investigate coherent dynamics of ions created through ultrafast multichannel photoionization from a viewpoint of photoelectron-photoion correlation. The model calculation on single-photon ionization of Ar reveals that the coherent hole dynamics in Ar{sup +} associated with a superposition of the spin-orbit states {sup 2}PJ (J = 3/2 and 1/2) can be identified by monitoring only the photoion created by a Fourier-transform limited extreme ultraviolet (EUV) pulse with the fs pulse duration, while the coherence is lost by a chirped EUV pulse. It is demonstrated that by coincidence detection of the photoelectron and photoion the coherent hole dynamics can be extracted even in the case of ionization by a chirped EUV pulse with the sufficiently wide bandwidth.

  9. The Winds of B Supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fullerton, A. W.; Massa, D. L.; Prinja, R. K.; Owocki, S. P.; Cranmer, S. R.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the work conducted under the program "The Winds of B Supergiants," conducted by Raytheon STX Corporation. The report consists of a journal article "Wind variability in B supergiants III. Corotating spiral structures in the stellar wind of HD 64760." The first step in the project was the analysis of the 1996 time series of 2 B supergiants and an O star. These data were analyzed and reported on at the ESO workshop, "Cyclical Variability in Stellar Winds."

  10. Absolute partial photoionization cross sections of ozone.

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, J.; Chemistry

    2008-04-01

    Despite the current concerns about ozone, absolute partial photoionization cross sections for this molecule in the vacuum ultraviolet (valence) region have been unavailable. By eclectic re-evaluation of old/new data and plausible assumptions, such cross sections have been assembled to fill this void.