Science.gov

Sample records for photometric titration procedure

  1. Determination of lanthanum by flame photometric titration.

    PubMed

    Svehla, G; Slevin, P J

    1968-09-01

    The flame emission of lanthanum at 560 mmu decreases linearly with phosphate concentration until a 1:1 molar ratio is reached, and then remains practically constant. Lanthanum can be titrated with phosphate, the equivalence point being detected from the change in emission intensity. Errors due to consumption of solution by the atomizer can be kept low by using short spraying times and low galvanometer damping. The average error is about -1% for 0.1M solutions and less than -5% for 0.01M. The method gives good results in the presence of titanium(III), zirconium, thorium and aluminium but cerium(III) and yttrium seriously interfere. PMID:18960392

  2. Automatic photometric titrations of calcium and magnesium in carbonate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, L.; Brannock, W.W.

    1955-01-01

    Rapid nonsubjective methods have been developed for the determination of calcium and magnesium in carbonate rocks. From a single solution of the sample, calcium is titrated directly, and magnesium is titrated after a rapid removal of R2O3 and precipitation of calcium as the tungstate. A concentrated and a dilute solution of disodium ethylenediamine tetraacetate are used as titrants. The concentrated solution is added almost to the end point, then the weak solution is added in an automatic titrator to determine the end point precisely.

  3. Scopolamine Effects Under a Titrating-Delayed-Nonmatching-to-Position Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porritt, M.; Poling, A.

    2008-01-01

    In a study of working memory, the performance of rats under titrating-delayed-nonmatching- to-position (TDNMTP) procedures was examined. Overall accuracy and the number of trials completed were inversely related to titration value, whereas the highest delay attained was directly related to titration value. When given intraperitoneally,…

  4. Photometric parameters Photometric evolution

    E-print Network

    Kruit, Piet van der

    Outline Photometric parameters Photometric evolution Population synthesis STRUCTURE OF GALAXIES 4. Photometric parameters and evolution Piet van der Kruit Kapteyn Astronomical Institute University of Groningen and evolution #12;Outline Photometric parameters Photometric evolution Population synthesis Outline Photometric

  5. Thermodynamics study of the dimerization equilibria of rhodamine B and 6G in different ionic strengths by photometric titration and chemometrics method.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Jahanbakhsh; Niazi, Ali; Kubista, Mikael

    2005-11-01

    The dimerization constants of rhodamine B and 6G have been determined by studying the dependence of their absorption spectra on the temperature in the range 20-80 degrees C at different total concentrations of rhodamine B (5.89 x 10(-6) to 2.36 x 10(-4)M) and rhodamine 6G (2.34 x 10(-5) to 5.89 x 10(-4)M) and in different concentrations of LiCl, NaCl and KCl salts as supporting electrolytes. The monomer-dimer equilibrium of rhodamine B and 6G have been determined by chemometrics refinement of the absorption spectra obtained by thermometric titrations performed at different ionic strengths. The quantitative analysis of the data of undefined mixtures, was carried out by simultaneous resolution of the overlapping spectral bands in the whole set of absorption spectra. The dimerization constants are varied by changing the ionic strength and the degree of dimerization are decreased by increasing of the ionic strength of the medium. The enthalpy and entropy of the dimerization reactions were determined from the dependence of the equilibrium constants on the temperature (van't Hoff equation). From the thermodynamic results the TDeltaS degrees -DeltaH degrees plot was sketched. It shows a fairly good positive correlation which indicates the enthalpy-entropy compensation in the dimerization reactions (compensation effect). PMID:16257772

  6. Microscale Titration in Schools Titration Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the requirements of the National Titration Competition and describes how a team in a local competition used the technique. Compares microscale titration to conventional titration. Outlines the benefits of employing microscale techniques. (DDR)

  7. Tracer-monitored flow titrations.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Milton K; Rocha, Diogo L; Rocha, Fábio R P; Zagatto, Elias A G

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility of implementing tracer-monitored titrations in a flow system is demonstrated. A dye tracer is used to estimate the instant sample and titrant volumetric fractions without the need for volume, mass or peak width measurements. The approach was applied to spectrophotometric flow titrations involving variations of sample and titrant flow-rates (i.e. triangle programmed technique) or concentration gradients established along the sample zone (i.e. flow injection system). Both strategies required simultaneous monitoring of two absorbing species, namely the titration indicator and the dye tracer. Mixing conditions were improved by placing a chamber with mechanical stirring in the analytical path aiming at to minimize diffusional effects. Unlike most of flow-based titrations, the innovation is considered as a true titration, as it does not require a calibration curve thus complying with IUPAC definition. As an application, acidity evaluation in vinegars involving titration with sodium hydroxide was selected. Phenolphthalein and brilliant blue FCF were used as indicator and dye tracer, respectively. Effects of sample volume, titrand/titrant concentrations and flow rates were investigated aiming at improved accuracy and precision. Results were reliable and in agreement with those obtained by a reference titration procedure. PMID:26703261

  8. Mineralization procedure for determination of copper in aerosols using photometric method based on copper-BPKQH complex

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia Sanchez, F.; Navas Diaz, A.; Medinilla, J. )

    1990-09-01

    A mineralization procedure is proposed for copper aerosols in which samples are mineralized by wet-ashing with HNO3 + HCIO4 mixture. Copper content is determined by a photometric method based on formation of a complex between copper and benzyl 2-pyridyl ketone 2-quinolylhydrazone (BPKQH). The influence of pH, ethanol content, and reagent concentration is studied. Copper determination at pH = 7.3, in the range 0.05 to 3 ppm is proposed. Mineralization with HNO3 is carried out in different conditions of evaporation (with or without dryness) and manipulation. Analysis of variance by the (ANOVA) single factor method shows that digestion conditions significantly increase the variability of results. Repeatability assays suggest that nitric acid alone gives low precision. Recovery assays reveal that the HNO3 digestion process causes copper loss by volatilization. Mineralization with HNO3 + HCIO4 is optimized on the basis of the accuracy and precision obtained. The ANOVA method suggests that mineralization conditions significantly increase total variability of results and also that results of the photometric method are not significantly different from those of the AAS method. The optimum mineralization procedure gave an RSD of 0.63% and a copper recovery of 98.4%. The combined digestion and quantification method was applied to determination of copper in aerosol samples obtained during leaf spraying operations of olive trees in the field.

  9. On the Atmospheric Extinction Reduction Procedure in Multiband Wide-Field Photometric Surveys

    E-print Network

    Zakharov, A; Biryukov, A; Kroussanova, N; Prokhorov, M; Beskin, G; Karpov, S; Bondar, S; Ivanov, E; Perkov, A; Sasyuk, V

    2015-01-01

    We propose an improved method for the atmospheric extinction reduction within optical photometry. Our method is based on the simultaneous multicolor observations of photometric standards. Such data are now available within the modern wide-field sky surveys and contain a large amount of information about instant atmospheric conditions. So, it became possible to estimate the extinction parameters on the basis of a quite short observational dataset and, hence, to trace the rapid stars twinkling accurately. Having been developed for a new MiniMegaTORTORA observational system, the proposed method can be adopted for a wide range of modern observational programs.

  10. An Environmental Friendly Procedure for Photometric Determination of Hypochlorite in Tap Water Employing a Miniaturized Multicommuted Flow Analysis Setup

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Sivanildo S.; Reis, Boaventura F.

    2011-01-01

    A photometric procedure for the determination of ClO? in tap water employing a miniaturized multicommuted flow analysis setup and an LED-based photometer is described. The analytical procedure was implemented using leucocrystal violet (LCV; 4,4?,4??-methylidynetris (N,N-dimethylaniline), C25H31N3) as a chromogenic reagent. Solenoid micropumps employed for solutions propelling were assembled together with the photometer in order to compose a compact unit of small dimensions. After control variables optimization, the system was applied for the determination of ClO? in samples of tap water, and aiming accuracy assessment samples were also analyzed using an independent method. Applying the paired t-test between results obtained using both methods, no significant difference at the 95% confidence level was observed. Other useful features include low reagent consumption, 2.4??g of LCV per determination, a linear response ranging from 0.02 up to 2.0?mg?L?1??ClO?, a relative standard deviation of 1.0% (n = 11) for samples containing 0.2?mg?L?1??ClO?, a detection limit of 6.0??g?L?1??ClO?, a sampling throughput of 84 determinations per hour, and a waste generation of 432??L per determination. PMID:21747732

  11. Colloid Titration--A Rapid Method for the Determination of Charged Colloid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ueno, Keihei; Kina, Ken'yu

    1985-01-01

    "Colloid titration" is a volumetric method for determining charged polyelectrolytes in aqueous solutions. The principle of colloid titration, reagents used in the procedure, methods of endpoint detection, preparation of reagent solutions, general procedure used, results obtained, and pH profile of colloid titration are considered. (JN)

  12. Acid Rain Analysis by Standard Addition Titration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ophardt, Charles E.

    1985-01-01

    The standard addition titration is a precise and rapid method for the determination of the acidity in rain or snow samples. The method requires use of a standard buret, a pH meter, and Gran's plot to determine the equivalence point. Experimental procedures used and typical results obtained are presented. (JN)

  13. Filtrates & Residues: Olfactory Titration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, John T.; Eddy, Roberta M.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an experiment that uses a unique acid-base indicator--the odor of raw onion--to indicate the end point of the titration of sodium hydroxide with hydrochloric acid. Allows the student to detect the completion of the neutralization reaction by olfaction rather than sight. (JRH)

  14. Spectrophotometric Titration of a Mixture of Calcium and Magnesium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulton, Robert; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes a spectrophotometric titration experiment which uses a manual titration spectrophotometer and manually operated buret, rather than special instrumentation. Identifies the equipment, materials, and procedures needed for the completion of the experiment. Recommends the use of this experiment in introductory quantitative analysis…

  15. pH Static Titration: A Quasistatic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalowski, Tadeusz; Toporek, Marcin; Rymanowski, Maciej

    2007-01-01

    The pH-static titration is applicable to those systems where at least two types of reactions occur in comparable intensities. The commonalities in titrimetric procedure realized according to pH-static titration, irrespective of the kind of chemical processes occurring are discussed.

  16. Titration Curves: Fact and Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlain, John

    1997-01-01

    Discusses ways in which datalogging equipment can enable titration curves to be measured accurately and how computing power can be used to predict the shape of curves. Highlights include sources of error, use of spreadsheets to generate titration curves, titration of a weak acid with a strong alkali, dibasic acids, weak acid and weak base, and…

  17. Ion-selective electrodes in potentiometric titrations; a new method for processing and evaluating titration data.

    PubMed

    Granholm, Kim; Sokalski, Tomasz; Lewenstam, Andrzej; Ivaska, Ari

    2015-08-12

    A new method to convert the potential of an ion-selective electrode to concentration or activity in potentiometric titration is proposed. The advantage of this method is that the electrode standard potential and the slope of the calibration curve do not have to be known. Instead two activities on the titration curve have to be estimated e.g. the starting activity before the titration begins and the activity at the end of the titration in the presence of large excess of titrant. This new method is beneficial when the analyte is in a complexed matrix or in a harsh environment which affects the properties of the electrode and the traditional calibration procedure with standard solutions cannot be used. The new method was implemented both in a method of linearization based on the Grans's plot and in determination of the stability constant of a complex and the concentration of the complexing ligand in the sample. The new method gave accurate results when using titrations data from experiments with samples of known composition and with real industrial harsh black liquor sample. A complexometric titration model was also developed. PMID:26320956

  18. Development of a simple desulfurization procedure for the determination of butyltins in complex sediment samples using gas chromatography-pulsed flame photometric detection.

    PubMed

    Bravo, M; Valenzuela, A; Quiroz, W; Pinto, M; Flores, M; Pinochet, H

    2010-05-15

    In this study a rapid solid phase extraction (SPE) procedure was developed to minimize the effect of different sulfur species for the determination of butyltin in sediments. The organosulfur species and organotins were firstly retained on C8 cartridges and then organotins were selectively eluted and analyzed by gas chromatography-pulsed flame photometric detection (GC-PFPD). Optimal conditions for the SPE procedure were obtained using an experimental design approach. The method's accuracy was established by analyzing a certified reference material (CRM), BCR-646 freshwater sediment. The experimental values were found to be in agreement with the assigned values for butyltins. Finally, complex sediment samples collected from a Chilean harbor were analyzed using this methodology to demonstrate its analytical potential for the determination of butyltin in environmental samples. PMID:20298890

  19. Video Observations Encompassing the 2002 Leonid Storm: First Results and a Revised Photometric Procedure for Video Meteor Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, William J.; Suggs, Robert; Swift, Wesley; Gural, Peter S.; Brown, Peter; Ellis, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    During the 2001 Leonid storm, Marshall Space Flight Center, with the cooperation of the University of Western Ontario and the United States Air Force, deployed 6 teams of observers equipped with intensified video systems to sites located in North America, the Pacific, and Mongolia. The campaign was extremely successful, with the entire period of enhanced Leonid activity (over 16 hours) captured on video tape in a consistent manner. We present the first results from the analysis of this unique, 2 terabyte data set and discuss the problems involved in reducing large amounts of video meteor data. In particular, the question of how to determine meteor masses though photometric analysis will be re-examined, and new techniques will be proposed that eliminate some of the deficiencies suffered by the techniques currently employed in video meteor analysis.

  20. APAP and Alternative Titration Methods

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Omer; Parthasarathy, Sairam

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review Positive airway pressure therapy (PAP) is commonly prescribed treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Traditionally, the determination of the optimal pressure for treatment of sleep-disordered breathing was made by manual titration of the device by a sleep technician in attendance during polysomnography. However, the advent of alternative methods for determination of optimal PAP – such as auto-titrating PAP (APAP) – has seen tremendous growth over the past decade. The purpose of this review is to improve our understanding of the currently available alternative methods for titration of PAP in patients with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) with special emphasis on obstructive sleep apnea. Recent Findings Recent prospective-randomized studies of alternative methods of titration suggest that pressure determinations made by such devices are comparable to traditional manual titrations made in the sleep laboratory. Obstacles to the adoption of such alternative modes of titration into day-to-day practice may be attributable to issues surrounding appropriate patient selection, differences between devices, re-imbursement policies of third party payors, consensus amongst sleep experts, and individual physicians’ practice patterns and volumes. While newer generations and types of auto-titrating PAP devices are entering the sleep field constantly, providers’ knowledge and time availability remain limiting factors. Summary There is tremendous growth in the technology and scientific evidence in support of alternative modes of PAP titration for sleep-disordered breathing, but barriers to implementation remain. PMID:20806054

  1. Titrating-Delay Matching-to-Sample in the Pigeon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kangas, Brian D.; Vaidya, Manish; Branch, Marc N.

    2010-01-01

    The titrating-delay matching-to-sample (TDMTS) procedure offers researchers an additional behavioral task thought to capture some important features of remembering. In this procedure, the delay between sample offset and comparison onset adjusts as a function of the subject's performance. Specifically, correct matches increase the delay and…

  2. Effects of Acute and Chronic Cocaine Administration on Titrating-Delay Matching-to-Sample Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kangas, Brian D.; Branch, Marc N.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of cocaine were examined under a titrating-delay matching-to-sample procedure. In this procedure, the delay between sample stimulus offset and comparison stimuli onset adjusts as a function of the subject's performance. Specifically, matches increase the delay and mismatches decrease the delay. Titrated delay values served as the…

  3. Amperometric, Bipotentiometric, and Coulometric Titration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, John T.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses recent review articles in various kinds of titration. Also discusses new research in apparatus and methodology, acid-base reactions, precipitation and complexing reactions, oxidation-reduction reactions, and nomenclature. Cites 338 references. (CS)

  4. Asphalt compatibility testing using the automated Heithaus titration test

    SciTech Connect

    Pauli, A.T.

    1996-12-31

    The Heithaus titration test or variations of the test have been used for over 35 years to predict compatibilities of blends of asphalts from different crude sources. Asphalt compatibility is determined from three calculated parameters that measure the state of peptization of an asphalt or asphalt blend. The parameter p{sub a} is a measure of the peptizability of the asphaltenes. The parameter p{sub a} is a measure of the peptizing power of the maltenes, and the parameter P, derived from p{sub a} and p{sub o} values, is a measure of the overall state of peptization of the asphalt or asphalt blend. In Heithaus original procedure, samples of asphalt were dissolved in toluene and titrated with n-heptane in order to initiate flocculation. The onset of flocculation was detected either by photography or by spotting a filter paper with a small amount of the titrated solution. Recently, an {open_quotes}automated{close_quotes} procedure, after Hotier and Robin, has been developed for use with asphalt. In the automated method UV-visible spectrophotometric detection measures the onset of flocculation as a peak with the percent transmittance plotted as a function of the volume of titrating solvent added to a solution of asphalt. The automated procedure has proven to be less operator dependent and much faster than the original Heithaus procedure. Results from the automated procedure show the data to be consistent with results from the original, {open_quotes}classical{close_quotes} Heithaus procedure.

  5. ANTIBODY TITRATION PROTOCOL NOTE: When titrating an antibody for use in flow cytometry, you should

    E-print Network

    ANTIBODY TITRATION PROTOCOL NOTE: When titrating an antibody for use in flow cytometry, you should attempt to titrate it under the same conditions in which it will be used during your experimental cell're titrating. You should titrate each new vial of antibody you receive in your lab, even if you've used

  6. Titrating-delay matching-to-sample in the pigeon.

    PubMed

    Kangas, Brian D; Vaidya, Manish; Branch, Marc N

    2010-07-01

    The titrating-delay matching-to-sample (TDMTS) procedure offers researchers an additional behavioral task thought to capture some important features of remembering. In this procedure, the delay between sample offset and comparison onset adjusts as a function of the subject's performance. Specifically, correct matches increase the delay and incorrect matches decrease the delay, and steady-state titrated delays serve as the primary dependent measure. The present series of experiments investigated the effects of several procedural variables on performance in TDMTS procedures in an effort to elucidate better its features to allow for more precision in future use. Experiment 1 reports results from a parametric analysis of fixed-ratio response requirements on the sample key that indicated improved remembering in the form of higher daily titrated delay values as the requirement was increased. Experiment 2 investigated the extent to which the initial delay value in each session affected session-wide delay values. Results indicated that regardless of value of the initial delay, the subjects' performances adjusted the delay values in the direction of the known baseline delay-value levels. Experiment 3 manipulated the step size by which delay values were adjusted and the results indicated that larger step sizes increased both session-to-session variability and within-session range of titrated delay values, although the average values remained approximately the same. These results suggest that the TDMTS task serves as a promising procedure to study what many refer to as memory. PMID:21279163

  7. Determination of Acidity Constants by Gradient Flow-Injection Titration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conceicao, Antonio C. L.; Minas da Piedade, Manuel E.

    2006-01-01

    A three-hour laboratory experiment, designed for an advanced undergraduate course in instrumental analysis that illustrates the application of the gradient chamber flow-injection titration (GCFIT) method with spectrophotometric detection to determine acidity constants is presented. The procedure involves the use of an acid-base indicator to obtain…

  8. Amperometric, Bipotentiometric, and Coulometric Titration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, John T.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature on amperometric, bipotentiometric, and coulometric titration methods examining: apparatus and methodology; acid-base reactions; precipitation and complexing reactions (considering methods involving silver, mercury, EDTA or analogous reagents, and other organic compounds); and oxidation-reduction reactions (considering methods…

  9. High-sensitivity titration microcalorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikov, A. A.; Grigoryev, S. V.; Chuikin, A. V.

    2015-02-01

    A differential titration microcalorimeter for studying intermolecular interactions in solutions has been designed. To increase the speed of the instrument, the dynamic correction method has been used. It has been shown that electrical calibration of the microcalorimeter is consistent with its chemical calibration. The use of the instrument for measuring the integral heats of dilution of 1-propanol has been demonstrated.

  10. Polyelectrolyte Titration: Theory and Experiment

    E-print Network

    I. Borukhov; D. Andelman; R. Borrega; M. Cloitre; L. Leibler; H. Orland

    2000-05-18

    Titration of methacrylic acid / ethyl-acrylate copolymers is studied experimentally and theoretically. At low salt concentrations, this polyacid exhibits a plateau in the titration curve below the neutralization point. The plateau has been often attributed to a first-order phase transition associated with polymer conformational changes. We argue that the specific shape of titration curves of hydrophobic polyelectrolytes is due to electrostatics and does not necessarily require a conformation change of the polyelectrolyte chains. We calculate the free energy at the mean-field level and its first-order (one loop) correction using a loop expansion. The latter is dominated by Debye-Huckel--like charge-charge correlations as well as by correlations between dissociation sites along the polymer chain. We show that the one-loop corrections to the free energy lead to titration curves that agree with experiments. In particular, the model explains the decrease of the pH at the plateau when the polymer concentration is increased or when salt is added to the solution.

  11. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 425 - Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... concentrations determined by EPA test procedure 376.1 (see 40 CFR 136.3, Table IB, parameter 66 (49 FR 43234... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Potassium Ferricyanide Titration..., App. A Appendix A to Part 425—Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method Source The...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 425 - Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... concentrations determined by EPA test procedure 376.1 (see 40 CFR 136.3, Table IB, parameter 66 (49 FR 43234... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Potassium Ferricyanide Titration..., App. A Appendix A to Part 425—Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method Source The...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 425 - Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... concentrations determined by EPA test procedure 376.1 (see 40 CFR 136.3, Table IB, parameter 66 (49 FR 43234... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Potassium Ferricyanide Titration... Appendix A to Part 425—Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method Source The potassium ferricyanide...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 425 - Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... concentrations determined by EPA test procedure 376.1 (see 40 CFR 136.3, Table IB, parameter 66 (49 FR 43234... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Potassium Ferricyanide Titration..., App. A Appendix A to Part 425—Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method Source The...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 425 - Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... concentrations determined by EPA test procedure 376.1 (see 40 CFR 136.3, Table IB, parameter 66 (49 FR 43234... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Potassium Ferricyanide Titration... Appendix A to Part 425—Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method Source The potassium ferricyanide...

  16. Colorblindness and Titrations with Visual Indicators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diehl, Harvey; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Discusses various issues related to colorblind students performing titrations with visual indicators. Includes tables showing precisions in the titration of a weak acid by colorblind students using phenolphthalein and thymolphthalein and in the titration of a weak base by colorblind persons using methyl red and bromcresol green. (JN)

  17. A Monte Carlo Study of Titrating Polyelectrolytes

    E-print Network

    Söderberg, Bo

    A Monte Carlo Study of Titrating Polyelectrolytes Magnus Ullner y and Bo J¨onsson z Physical three different models for linear, titrating polyelectrolytes in a salt­free environment: i) a rigid chains, with up to several thousand titrating groups. The results have been compared to a mean field

  18. An elevated temperature titration calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.; Zanonato, P.L.; Choppin, G.R. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1991-06-01

    A variable-temperature (313 K to 353 K) titration calorimeter of high sensitivity has been constructed. The purpose of the calorimeter is to study temperature effects on the enthalpies of complex formation and of other reactions of metal cations such as hydrolysis and precipitation. Operation of the calorimetric system, including that final calculation of the heat released during titration, is automatic via computer control. Calibration tests of the calorimeter using 2-amino-2-hydroxymethyl-1,3-propanediol gave -(46.0 {plus minus} 0.3) kJ mol{sup {minus}1} and -(46.2 {plus minus} 0.2) kJ mol{sup {minus}1} for the enthalpy of protonation, at 318 K and at 343 K, respectively. For titrations of 2-bis(2-hydroxyethyl) amino-2-hydroxymethyl-1,3-propanediol, enthalpy of protonation values of -(28.4 {plus minus} 0.3) kJ mol{sup {minus}1} and -(29.3 {plus minus} 0.2) kJ mol{sup {minus}1} were obtained at 318 K and at 343 K, respectively. 6 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Going Beyond, Going Further: The Preparation of Acid-Base Titration Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClendon, Michael

    1984-01-01

    Background information, list of materials needed, and procedures used are provided for a simple technique for generating mechanically plotted acid-base titration curves. The method is suitable for second-year high school chemistry students. (JN)

  20. Recruitment Maneuvers and PEEP Titration.

    PubMed

    Hess, Dean R

    2015-11-01

    The injurious effects of alveolar overdistention are well accepted, and there is little debate regarding the importance of pressure and volume limitation during mechanical ventilation. The role of recruitment maneuvers is more controversial. Alveolar recruitment is desirable if it can be achieved, but the potential for recruitment is variable among patients with ARDS. A stepwise recruitment maneuver, similar to an incremental PEEP titration, is favored over sustained inflation recruitment maneuvers. Many approaches to PEEP titration have been proposed, and the best method to choose the most appropriate level for an individual patient is unclear. A PEEP level should be selected that balances alveolar recruitment against overdistention. The easiest approach to select PEEP might be according to the severity of the disease: 5-10 cm H2O PEEP in mild ARDS, 10-15 cm H2O PEEP in moderate ARDS, and 15-20 cm H2O PEEP in severe ARDS. Recruitment maneuvers and PEEP should be used within the context of lung protection and not just as a means of improving oxygenation. PMID:26493593

  1. Assembling and Using an LED-Based Detector to Monitor Absorbance Changes during Acid-Base Titrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Willy G.; Cavalheiro, E´der T. G.

    2015-01-01

    A simple photometric assembly based in an LED as a light source and a photodiode as a detector is proposed in order to follow the absorbance changes as a function of the titrant volume added during the course of acid-base titrations in the presence of a suitable visual indicator. The simplicity and low cost of the electronic device allow the…

  2. Precipitation titration of perchlorate using new titrants

    SciTech Connect

    Selig, W.

    1980-05-01

    We have evaluated the following new titrants for the potentiometric precipitation titration of perchlorate: cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CETAC), cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CETAB), cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), and benzyldimethyltetradecylammonium chloride (BDTAC). Titrations were monitored with a fluoroborate ion-selective electrode (ISE) and a double-junction reference electrode. The titration system was controlled by a Tektronix 4051 graphics system. The perchlorate, nitrate, and calcium ISE may also be used to monitor emf's. 7 tables, 2 figures.

  3. A Tabular Approach to Titration Calculations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Kieran F.

    2012-01-01

    Titrations are common laboratory exercises in high school and university chemistry courses, because they are easy, relatively inexpensive, and they illustrate a number of fundamental chemical principles. While students have little difficulty with calculations involving a single titration step, there is a significant leap in conceptual difficulty…

  4. Measuring titratable alkalinity by single versus double endpoint titration: An evaluation in two cyprinodont species and implications for characterizing net H+

    E-print Network

    Grosell, Martin

    Measuring titratable alkalinity by single versus double endpoint titration: An evaluation in two Fundulus heteroclitus Na+ homeostasis Acid­base balance Titratable alkalinity Ammonia Net H+ transport were the result of using double endpoint titrations to measure titratable alkalinity fluxes

  5. Nanopore back titration analysis of dipicolinic acid.

    PubMed

    Han, Yujing; Zhou, Shuo; Wang, Liang; Guan, Xiyun

    2015-02-01

    Here, we report a novel label-free nanopore back titration method for the detection of dipicolinic acid, a marker molecule for bacterial spores. By competitive binding of the target analyte and a large ligand probe to metal ions, dipicolinic acid could be sensitively and selectively detected. This nanopore back titration approach should find useful applications in the detection of other species of medical, biological, or environmental importance if their direct detection is difficult to achieve. PMID:25074707

  6. LABORATORY EXPERIMENT 6 PRECIPITATION TITRATION WITH SILVER NITRATE.

    E-print Network

    Nazarenko, Alexander

    LABORATORY EXPERIMENT 6 PRECIPITATION TITRATION WITH SILVER NITRATE. The AgNO3 solution (~0.02 M titrations are to be done in triplicate. I. Standardization of AgNO3 solution 1. The Determination of Chloride by Titration with an Adsorption Indicator Discussion In this titration, the anionic adsorption

  7. Coulometric Titration of Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) with Spectrophotometric Endpoint Detection: An Experiment for the Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kathryn R.; Young, Vaneica Y.; Killian, Benjamin J.

    2011-01-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) is commonly used as an anticoagulant in blood-collection procedures. In this experiment for the instrumental analysis laboratory, students determine the quantity of EDTA in commercial collection tubes by coulometric titration with electrolytically generated Cu[superscript 2+]. The endpoint is detected…

  8. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry in the Student Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadso, Lars; Li, Yujing; Li, Xi

    2011-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the measurement of the heat produced by the stepwise addition of one substance to another. It is a common experimental technique, for example, in pharmaceutical science, to measure equilibrium constants and reaction enthalpies. We describe a stirring device and an injection pump that can be used with a…

  9. Titration Calculations with Computer Algebra Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lachance, Russ; Biaglow, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the symbolic algebraic solution of the titration equations for a diprotic acid, as obtained using "Mathematica," "Maple," and "Mathcad." The equilibrium and conservation equations are solved symbolically by the programs to eliminate the approximations that normally would be performed by the student. Of the three programs,…

  10. Virtual Titrator: A Student-Oriented Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, David; Johnson, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Describes a titrator system, constructed from a computer-interfaced pH-meter, that was designed to increase student involvement in the process. Combines automatic data collection with real-time graphical display and interactive controls to focus attention on the process rather than on bits of data. Improves understanding of concepts and…

  11. Tracer monitored titrations: measurement of total alkalinity.

    PubMed

    Martz, Todd R; Dickson, Andrew G; DeGrandpre, Michael D

    2006-03-15

    We introduce a new titration methodology, tracer monitored titration (TMT), in which analyses are free of volumetric and gravimetric measurements and insensitive to pump precision and reproducibility. Spectrophotometric monitoring of titrant dilution, rather than volume increment, lays the burden of analytical performance solely on the spectrophotometer. In the method described here, the titrant is a standardized mixture of acid-base indicator and strong acid. Dilution of a pulse of titrant in a titration vessel is tracked using the total indicator concentration measured spectrophotometrically. The concentrations of reacted and unreacted indicator species, derived from Beer's law, are used to calculate the relative proportions of titrant and sample in addition to the equilibrium position (pH) of the titration mixture. Because the method does not require volumetric or gravimetric additions of titrant, simple low-precision pumps can be used. Here, we demonstrate application of TMT for analysis of total alkalinity (A(T)). High-precision, high-accuracy seawater A(T) measurements are crucial for understanding, for example, the marine CaCO3 budget and saturation state, anthropogenic CO2 penetration into the oceans, calcareous phytoplankton blooms, and coral reef dynamics. We present data from 286 titrations on three types of total alkalinity standards: Na2CO3 in 0.7 mol kg x soln(-1) NaCl, NaOH in 0.7 mol kg x soln(-1) NaCl, and a seawater Certified Reference Material (CRM). Based on Na2CO3 standards, the accuracy and precision are +/-0.2 and +/-0.1% (4 and 2 micromol kg x soln(-1) for A(T) approximately 2100-2500 micromol kg x soln(-1), n = 242), using low-precision solenoid pumps to introduce sample and titrant. Similar accuracy and precision were found for analyses run 42 days after the initial experiments. Excellent performance is achieved by optimizing the spectrophotometric detection system and relying upon basic chemical thermodynamics for calculating the equivalence point. Although applied to acid-base titrations in this paper, the approach should be generally applicable to other types of titrations. PMID:16536416

  12. An Olfactory Indicator for Acid-Base Titrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flair, Mark N.; Setzer, William N.

    1990-01-01

    The use of an olfactory acid-base indicator in titrations for visually impaired students is discussed. Potential olfactory indicators include eugenol, thymol, vanillin, and thiophenol. Titrations performed with each indicator with eugenol proved to be successful. (KR)

  13. Titration of dengue viruses by immunofluorescence in microtiter plates.

    PubMed Central

    Schoepp, R J; Beaty, B J

    1984-01-01

    A fast, reliable, and inexpensive method was developed for titration of dengue viruses in microtiter plates with an indirect fluorescent-antibody technique. No significant differences were found in median infectious dose endpoints of samples titrated in microtiter plates as compared with titrations in multichambered slides. Images PMID:6392318

  14. Titrating Polyelectrolytes --Variational Calculations and Monte Carlo Simulations

    E-print Network

    Söderberg, Bo

    LU TP 95­1 May 1995 Titrating Polyelectrolytes -- Variational Calculations and Monte Carlo properties of a titrating polyelectrolyte in a discrete representation. In the variational treatment.e. titratable groups in a polymer will exchange protons with the solution and the polymer net charge will vary

  15. Determination of carbonate carbon in geological materials by coulometric titration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engleman, E.E.; Jackson, L.L.; Norton, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    A coulometric titration is used for the determination of carbonate carbon in geological materials. Carbon dioxide is evolved from the sample by the addition of 2 M perchloric acid, with heating, and is determined by automated coulometric titration. The coulometric titration showed improved speed and precision with comparable accuracy to gravimetric and gasometric techniques. ?? 1985.

  16. LABORATORY EXPERIMENT 3 Alkalimetric Titration of an Acid

    E-print Network

    Nazarenko, Alexander

    LABORATORY EXPERIMENT 3 Alkalimetric Titration of an Acid A carbonate-free sodium hydroxide is the most common reagent for alkalimetric titration (KOH and Ba(OH)2 are also employed). None and titrate until stable pink color. O OH O O - O O - O O - + OH - + OH2 Oxalic acid dihydrate (FW 126

  17. Catalytic Methanol Oxidation Site Titration with Organic Bases During

    E-print Network

    Iglesia, Enrique

    Catalytic Methanol Oxidation Site Titration with Organic Bases During Catalysis: Selectivity titration of protons with organic bases to control the densities of acid sites in Keggin clusters of Keggin structures was measured by titration of Brønsted acid sites with a sterically hindered pyridine (2

  18. Simple and Automated Coulometric Titration of Acid Using Nonisolated Electrodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntzleman, Thomas S.; Kenney, Joshua B.; Hasbrouck, Scott; Collins, Michael J.; Amend, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Coulometric titrations involve the quantification of analyte by measurements of current and time. In most coulometric titrations, the anode and cathode are placed in isolated cells that are connected by a salt bridge. By contrast, the experiments described here involve coulometric titrations (of acidic protons in solution) using a silver anode and…

  19. Digital movie-based on automatic titrations.

    PubMed

    Lima, Ricardo Alexandre C; Almeida, Luciano F; Lyra, Wellington S; Siqueira, Lucas A; Gaião, Edvaldo N; Paiva Junior, Sérgio S L; Lima, Rafaela L F C

    2016-01-15

    This study proposes the use of digital movies (DMs) in a flow-batch analyzer (FBA) to perform automatic, fast and accurate titrations. The term used for this process is "Digital movie-based on automatic titrations" (DMB-AT). A webcam records the DM during the addition of the titrant to the mixing chamber (MC). While the DM is recorded, it is decompiled into frames ordered sequentially at a constant rate of 26 frames per second (FPS). The first frame is used as a reference to define the region of interest (ROI) of 28×13pixels and the R, G and B values, which are used to calculate the Hue (H) values for each frame. The Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) is calculated between the H values of the initial frame and each subsequent frame. The titration curves are plotted in real time using the r values and the opening time of the titrant valve. The end point is estimated by the second derivative method. A software written in C language manages all analytical steps and data treatment in real time. The feasibility of the method was attested by application in acid/base test samples and edible oils. Results were compared with classical titration and did not present statistically significant differences when the paired t-test at the 95% confidence level was applied. The proposed method is able to process about 117-128 samples per hour for the test and edible oil samples, respectively, and its precision was confirmed by overall relative standard deviation (RSD) values, always less than 1.0%. PMID:26592600

  20. DU, GOLDMAN, SEITZ: BINOCULAR PHOTOMETRIC STEREO 1 Binocular Photometric Stereo

    E-print Network

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    DU, GOLDMAN, SEITZ: BINOCULAR PHOTOMETRIC STEREO 1 Binocular Photometric Stereo Hao Du1,3 duhao on a range of examples. 1 Introduction Binocular stereo methods yield relatively coarse shape reconstructions, compared to binocular stereo. A key weakness of photometric stereo, however, is the lack of metric shape

  1. SSB Binding to ssDNA Using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry

    PubMed Central

    Kozlov, Alexander G.; Lohman, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a powerful method for studying protein–DNA interactions in solution. As long as binding is accompanied by an appreciable enthalpy change, ITC studies can yield quantitative information on stoichiometries, binding energetics (affinity, binding enthalpy and entropy) and potential site–site interactions (cooperativity). This can provide a full thermodynamic description of an interacting system which is necessary to understand the stability and specificity of protein–DNA interactions and to correlate the activities or functions of different species. Here we describe procedures to perform and analyze ITC studies using as examples, the E. coli SSB (homotetramer with 4 OB-folds) and D. radiodurans SSB (homodimer with 4 OB-folds). For oligomeric protein systems such as these, we emphasize the need to be aware of the likelihood that solution conditions will influence not only the affinity and enthalpy of binding but also the mode by which the SSB oligomer binds ssDNA. PMID:22976176

  2. Assessment of two theoretical methods to estimate potentiometric titration curves of peptides: comparison with experiment.

    PubMed

    Makowska, Joanna; Bagiñska, Katarzyna; Makowski, Mariusz; Jagielska, Anna; Liwo, Adam; Kasprzykowski, Franciszek; Chmurzyñski, Lech; Scheraga, Harold A

    2006-03-01

    We compared the ability of two theoretical methods of pH-dependent conformational calculations to reproduce experimental potentiometric titration curves of two models of peptides: Ac-K5-NHMe in 95% methanol (MeOH)/5% water mixture and Ac-XX(A)7OO-NH2 (XAO) (where X is diaminobutyric acid, A is alanine, and O is ornithine) in water, methanol (MeOH), and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), respectively. The titration curve of the former was taken from the literature, and the curve of the latter was determined in this work. The first theoretical method involves a conformational search using the electrostatically driven Monte Carlo (EDMC) method with a low-cost energy function (ECEPP/3 plus the SRFOPT surface-solvation model, assumming that all titratable groups are uncharged) and subsequent reevaluation of the free energy at a given pH with the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, considering variable protonation states. In the second procedure, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are run with the AMBER force field and the generalized Born model of electrostatic solvation, and the protonation states are sampled during constant-pH MD runs. In all three solvents, the first pKa of XAO is strongly downshifted compared to the value for the reference compounds (ethylamine and propylamine, respectively); the water and methanol curves have one, and the DMSO curve has two jumps characteristic of remarkable differences in the dissociation constants of acidic groups. The predicted titration curves of Ac-K5-NHMe are in good agreement with the experimental ones; better agreement is achieved with the MD-based method. The titration curves of XAO in methanol and DMSO, calculated using the MD-based approach, trace the shape of the experimental curves, reproducing the pH jump, while those calculated with the EDMC-based approach and the titration curve in water calculated using the MD-based approach have smooth shapes characteristic of the titration of weak multifunctional acids with small differences between the dissociation constants. Nevertheless, quantitative agreement between theoretically predicted and experimental titration curves is not achieved in all three solvents even with the MD-based approach, which is manifested by a smaller pH range of the calculated titration curves with respect to the experimental curves. The poorer agreement obtained for water than for the nonaqueous solvents suggests a significant role of specific solvation in water, which cannot be accounted for by the mean-field solvation models. PMID:16509748

  3. A Critical Assessment of Photometric Redshift Methods: A CANDELS Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlen, Tomas; Mobasher, Bahram; Faber, Sandra M.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Barro, Guillermo; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Finlator, Kristian; Fontana, Adriano; Gruetzbauch, Ruth; Johnson, Seth; Pforr, Janine; Salvato, Mara; Wiklind, Tommy; Wuyts, Stijn; Acquaviva, Viviana; Dickinson, Mark E.; Guo, Yicheng; Huang, Jiasheng; Huang, Kuang-Han; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Bell, Eric F.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Galametz, Audrey; Gawiser, Eric; Giavalisco, Mauro; Grogin, Norman A.; Hathi, Nimish; Kocevski, Dale; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Koo, David C.; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; McGrath, Elizabeth J.; Papovich, Casey; Peth, Michael; Ryan, Russell; Somerville, Rachel; Weiner, Benjamin; Wilson, Grant

    2013-10-01

    We present results from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) photometric redshift methods investigation. In this investigation, the results from 11 participants, each using a different combination of photometric redshift code, template spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and priors, are used to examine the properties of photometric redshifts applied to deep fields with broadband multi-wavelength coverage. The photometry used includes U-band through mid-infrared filters and was derived using the TFIT method. Comparing the results, we find that there is no particular code or set of template SEDs that results in significantly better photometric redshifts compared to others. However, we find that codes producing the lowest scatter and outlier fraction utilize a training sample to optimize photometric redshifts by adding zero-point offsets, template adjusting, or adding extra smoothing errors. These results therefore stress the importance of the training procedure. We find a strong dependence of the photometric redshift accuracy on the signal-to-noise ratio of the photometry. On the other hand, we find a weak dependence of the photometric redshift scatter with redshift and galaxy color. We find that most photometric redshift codes quote redshift errors (e.g., 68% confidence intervals) that are too small compared to that expected from the spectroscopic control sample. We find that all codes show a statistically significant bias in the photometric redshifts. However, the bias is in all cases smaller than the scatter; the latter therefore dominates the errors. Finally, we find that combining results from multiple codes significantly decreases the photometric redshift scatter and outlier fraction. We discuss different ways of combining data to produce accurate photometric redshifts and error estimates.

  4. A CRITICAL ASSESSMENT OF PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT METHODS: A CANDELS INVESTIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlen, Tomas; Ferguson, Henry C.; Mobasher, Bahram; Faber, Sandra M.; Barro, Guillermo; Guo, Yicheng; Finlator, Kristian; Fontana, Adriano; Gruetzbauch, Ruth; Johnson, Seth; Pforr, Janine; Dickinson, Mark E.; Salvato, Mara; Wuyts, Stijn; Wiklind, Tommy; Acquaviva, Viviana; Huang, Jiasheng; Huang, Kuang-Han; Newman, Jeffrey A.; and others

    2013-10-01

    We present results from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) photometric redshift methods investigation. In this investigation, the results from 11 participants, each using a different combination of photometric redshift code, template spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and priors, are used to examine the properties of photometric redshifts applied to deep fields with broadband multi-wavelength coverage. The photometry used includes U-band through mid-infrared filters and was derived using the TFIT method. Comparing the results, we find that there is no particular code or set of template SEDs that results in significantly better photometric redshifts compared to others. However, we find that codes producing the lowest scatter and outlier fraction utilize a training sample to optimize photometric redshifts by adding zero-point offsets, template adjusting, or adding extra smoothing errors. These results therefore stress the importance of the training procedure. We find a strong dependence of the photometric redshift accuracy on the signal-to-noise ratio of the photometry. On the other hand, we find a weak dependence of the photometric redshift scatter with redshift and galaxy color. We find that most photometric redshift codes quote redshift errors (e.g., 68% confidence intervals) that are too small compared to that expected from the spectroscopic control sample. We find that all codes show a statistically significant bias in the photometric redshifts. However, the bias is in all cases smaller than the scatter; the latter therefore dominates the errors. Finally, we find that combining results from multiple codes significantly decreases the photometric redshift scatter and outlier fraction. We discuss different ways of combining data to produce accurate photometric redshifts and error estimates.

  5. Photometric properties of Mars soils analogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.; Jost, B.; Beck, P.; Okubo, C.; McEwen, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    We have measured the bidirectional reflectance of analogs of dry, wet, and frozen Martian soils over a wide range of phase angles in the visible spectral range. All samples were produced from two geologic samples: the standard JSC Mars-1 soil simulant and Hawaiian basaltic sand. In a first step, experiments were conducted with the dry samples to investigate the effects of surface texture. Comparisons with results independently obtained by different teams with similar samples showed a satisfying reproducibility of the photometric measurements as well as a noticeable influence of surface textures resulting from different sample preparation procedures. In a second step, water was introduced to produce wet and frozen samples and their photometry investigated. Optical microscope images of the samples provided information about their microtexture. Liquid water, even in relatively low amount, resulted in the disappearance of the backscattering peak and the appearance of a forward-scattering peak whose intensity increases with the amount of water. Specular reflections only appeared when water was present in an amount large enough to allow water to form a film at the surface of the sample. Icy samples showed a wide variability of photometric properties depending on the physical properties of the water ice. We discuss the implications of these measurements in terms of the expected photometric behavior of the Martian surface, from equatorial to circum-polar regions. In particular, we propose some simple photometric criteria to improve the identification of wet and/or icy soils from multiple observations under different geometries.

  6. Biochemical Titration of Glycogen In vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Joffrey; Bellot, Grégory; Pouysségur, Jacques; Mazure, Nathalie M.

    2013-01-01

    Glycogen is the main energetic polymer of glucose in vertebrate animals and plays a crucial role in whole body metabolism as well as in cellular metabolism. Many methods to detect glycogen already exist but only a few are quantitative. We describe here a method using the Abcam Glycogen assay kit, which is based on specific degradation of glycogen to glucose by glucoamylase. Glucose is then specifically oxidized to a product that reacts with the OxiRed probe to produce fluorescence. Titration is accurate, sensitive and can be achieved on cell extracts or tissue sections. However, in contrast to other techniques, it does not give information about the distribution of glycogen in the cell. As an example of this technique, we describe here the titration of glycogen in two cell lines, Chinese hamster lung fibroblast CCL39 and human colon carcinoma LS174, incubated in normoxia (21% O2) versus hypoxia (1% O2). We hypothesized that hypoxia is a signal that prepares cells to synthesize and store glycogen in order to survive1. PMID:24300406

  7. LABORATORY EXPERIMENT 4 Alkalimetric Titration of an Acid Mixture

    E-print Network

    Nazarenko, Alexander

    LABORATORY EXPERIMENT 4 Alkalimetric Titration of an Acid Mixture In this experiment to semi-automatic volumetric analysis and potentiometric titrations. Phosphoric Acid, H3PO4 (pK1= 2.16, pK2 = 7.16, pK3=12.3). Phosphoric acid can be titrated as a monobasic acid: H3PO4 + NaOH NaH2PO4 + H2

  8. Automated titration method for use on blended asphalts

    DOEpatents

    Pauli, Adam T. (Cheyenne, WY); Robertson, Raymond E. (Laramie, WY); Branthaver, Jan F. (Chatham, IL); Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY)

    2012-08-07

    A system for determining parameters and compatibility of a substance such as an asphalt or other petroleum substance uses titration to highly accurately determine one or more flocculation occurrences and is especially applicable to the determination or use of Heithaus parameters and optimal mixing of various asphalt stocks. In a preferred embodiment, automated titration in an oxygen gas exclusive system and further using spectrophotometric analysis (2-8) of solution turbidity is presented. A reversible titration technique enabling in-situ titration measurement of various solution concentrations is also presented.

  9. Workshop on the Strömvil Photometric System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, A. G. Davis; Straižys, V.; Høg, E.

    1999-12-01

    On October 6 - 8 a workshop on the Strömvil Photometric System was held in Vilnius and at the Moletai Observatory in Lithuania. Papers were given concerning the creation and use of the system, its special abilities to recognize stars of all spectral types and peculiarities even in the case of areas with high values of interstellar reddening. Reports were made on studies of synthetic photometry to investigate the classification properties of photometric systems. The photometric design of the planned GAIA orbiting observatory was outlined. Current observations being made in the system on the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope were described and plans for future work at this site were discussed. The members of the workshop agreed on the following recommendations: A. All the groups cooperating in Strömvil measures should use common observing and reduction procedures. In reduction this means using IRAF and DAOPHOT. B. A database will be set up at ITPA which will contain information from each observatory concerning the CCD chip(s) being used, the observers and the details of observations made at that site. Data on standard stars and regions as well as areas used for scientific studies will be included. C. Error ellipses (from studies with synthetic photometry calibrated in temperature and log g) will be calculated for the various systems being proposed for GAIA, for stars of V = 16 and 18 magnitude. The choice of a photometric system for GAIA should be based on the classification abilities of the system. Since the satellite will observe stars in areas which are heavily reddened the system must be able to correct for reddening effects. D. The Workshop members recommended that a meeting be held in 2000 to discuss the properties of photometric systems proposed for GAIA and the methods by which a choice of the final system for GAIA should be made.

  10. Automated analysis of calorimetric demicellization titrations.

    PubMed

    Textor, Martin; Keller, Sandro

    2015-09-15

    Determination of the critical micellar concentration of surfactants and of the heat of demicellization by means of isothermal titration calorimetry usually involves either calculation of the first derivative of the heat of demicellization with respect to surfactant concentration or application of a generic sigmoidal fit to the demicellization isotherm. Here, we show that a combination of both approaches provides an unbiased and reproducible data analysis strategy without the need for user input other than the calorimetric data proper. The approach is explained and exemplified using demicellization isotherms of the fluorinated surfactant F6OPC (3,3,4,4,5,5,6,6,7,7,8,8,8-tridecafluoro-n-octylphosphocholine) and the zwitterionic detergent CHAPSO (3-([3-cholamidopropyl]dimethylammonio)-2-hydroxy-1-propanesulfonate). PMID:26079704

  11. "Footprint" titrations yield valid thermodynamic isotherms.

    PubMed Central

    Brenowitz, M; Senear, D F; Shea, M A; Ackers, G K

    1986-01-01

    A central issue in gene regulation is the mechanism, and biological function, of the cooperative binding of regulatory protein ligands to specific sites on DNA. To elucidate the physical-chemical basis of these interactions we have developed a thermodynamically rigorous method for conducting DNase I "footprint" (protection) titration experiments. The intrinsic binding constants and also those for cooperative interactions between various sites can be resolved from the individual-site binding curves determined by this technique. Experimental studies of cI-repressor-operator binding have demonstrated that the method provides an accurate representation of the fractional saturation of a binding site. We present individual-site binding curves for a lambda operator with two competent sites that demonstrate the presence of cooperative interactions between the sites. These curves set a lower limit to the magnitude of the cooperative free energy without comparison to single-site mutant operators. Images PMID:3464963

  12. Supernova Photometric Lightcurve Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi, Tayeb; Narayan, Gautham

    2016-01-01

    This is a preliminary report on photometric supernova classification. We first explore the properties of supernova light curves, and attempt to restructure the unevenly sampled and sparse data from assorted datasets to allow for processing and classification. The data was primarily drawn from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) simulated data, created for the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge. This poster shows a method for producing a non-parametric representation of the light curve data, and applying a Random Forest classifier algorithm to distinguish between supernovae types. We examine the impact of Principal Component Analysis to reduce the dimensionality of the dataset, for future classification work. The classification code will be used in a stage of the ANTARES pipeline, created for use on the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope alert data and other wide-field surveys. The final figure-of-merit for the DES data in the r band was 60% for binary classification (Type I vs II).Zaidi was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program (AST-1262829).

  13. 3-D Surface Visualization of pH Titration "Topos": Equivalence Point Cliffs, Dilution Ramps, and Buffer Plateaus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Garon C.; Hossain, Md Mainul; MacCarthy, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    3-D topographic surfaces ("topos") can be generated to visualize how pH behaves during titration and dilution procedures. The surfaces are constructed by plotting computed pH values above a composition grid with volume of base added in one direction and overall system dilution on the other. What emerge are surface features that…

  14. A Closer Look at Acid-Base Olfactory Titrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neppel, Kerry; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.; Queen, Connie; Reed, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Olfactory titrations using raw onions and eugenol as acid-base indicators are reported. An in-depth investigation on olfactory titrations is presented to include requirements for potential olfactory indicators and protocols for using garlic, onions, and vanillin as acid-base olfactory indicators are tested.

  15. Quantitative Analysis of Sulfate in Water by Indirect EDTA Titration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belle-Oudry, Deirdre

    2008-01-01

    The determination of sulfate concentration in water by indirect EDTA titration is an instructive experiment that is easily implemented in an analytical chemistry laboratory course. A water sample is treated with excess barium chloride to precipitate sulfate ions as BaSO[subscript 4](s). The unprecipitated barium ions are then titrated with EDTA.…

  16. Microscale pH Titrations Using an Automatic Pipet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flint, Edward B.; Kortz, Carrie L.; Taylor, Max A.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a microscale pH titration technique that utilizes an automatic pipet. A small aliquot (1-5 mL) of the analyte solution is titrated with repeated additions of titrant, and the pH is determined after each delivery. The equivalence point is determined graphically by either the second derivative method or a Gran plot. The pipet can be…

  17. Hydrogen-ion titrations of amino acids and proteins in solutions containing concentrated electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Fergg, F.; Kuehner, D.E.; Blanch, H.W.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1994-12-01

    This report describes a first attempt to quantify the net charge as a function of solution pH for lysozyme and {alpha}-chymotrypsin at 0.1 M, 1.0 M and 3.0 M ionic strength, (IS). The calculations are based on the residue (titratable group) pK{sub a}`s in the amino-acid sequence of the protein. To determine these pK{sub a}`s, a simple theory was used which assumes that the pK{sub a}`s are independent from each other in the protein and are equal to their pK{sub a} values in free amino-acid solution (Independent-Site Theory, IST). Residue pK{sub a}`s were obtained from amino-acid hydrogen-ion titrations at three different KCl concentrations corresponding to 0.1M, 1.0M and 3.0M ionic strength. After construction of a suitable apparatus, the experimental procedure and data reduction were computerized to perform a large number of titrations. Most measured pK{sub a}`s showed high reproducibility (the difference of pK{sub a} values observed between two experiments was less than 0.05). For IS = 0.1M, observed pK{sub a}`s agreed with literature values to within a few hundredths of a pH unit. Furthermore, the ionic-strength dependence of the pK{sub a}`s followed the trends reported in the literature, viz. pK{sub a} values decrease with increasing ionic strength until they reach a minimum at about IS = 0.5M. At still higher IS, pK{sub a}`s increase as the ionic strength rises to 3M. The known pK{sub a}`s of all titratable groups in a protein were used with the IST to give a first approximation of how the protein net charge varies with pH at high ionic strength. A comparison of the titration curves based on the IST with experimental lysozyme and {alpha}-chymotrypsin titration data indicates acceptable agreement at IS = 0.1M. However, comparison of measured and calculated titration curves at IS = 1M and IS = 3M indicates only quantitative agreement.

  18. Photometric Subluminous Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Gaitán, S.

    2014-10-01

    We present a new photometric identification technique for subluminous type Ia supernovae capable of selecting out this subgroup from the normal type Ia population. The technique reveals that a proper subluminous definition needs to include color besides light-curve width. Furthermore, it can be used to identify a variety of newly discovered peculiar type Ia supernovae demonstrating photometric similarities between these different objects.

  19. Satellite Photometric Error Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, T.; Castro, P.; Gregory, S.; Dao, P.

    In this paper, we present analysis of the errors associated with optical photometry used in non-resolved object characterization for the Space Situational Awareness (SSA) community. We begin with an overview of standard astronomical techniques used to measure the brightness of spatially unresolved objects (point source photometry) in deep space. After discussing the standard astronomical techniques, we present the application of astronomical photometry for the purposes of space object characterization. Examples of filter photometry of geosynchronous satellites processed using the current techniques are shown. Next we advocate the adoption of new techniques based on in-frame photometric calibrations enabled by newly available all-sky star catalogs that contain highly accurate photometry.

  20. Titration and hysteresis in epigenetic chromatin silencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayarian, Adel; Sengupta, Anirvan M.

    2013-06-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms of silencing via heritable chromatin modifications play a major role in gene regulation and cell fate specification. We consider a model of epigenetic chromatin silencing in budding yeast and study the bifurcation diagram and characterize the bistable and the monostable regimes. The main focus of this paper is to examine how the perturbations altering the activity of histone modifying enzymes affect the epigenetic states. We analyze the implications of having the total number of silencing proteins, given by the sum of proteins bound to the nucleosomes and the ones available in the ambient, to be constant. This constraint couples different regions of chromatin through the shared reservoir of ambient silencing proteins. We show that the response of the system to perturbations depends dramatically on the titration effect caused by the above constraint. In particular, for a certain range of overall abundance of silencing proteins, the hysteresis loop changes qualitatively with certain jump replaced by continuous merger of different states. In addition, we find a nonmonotonic dependence of gene expression on the rate of histone deacetylation activity of Sir2. We discuss how these qualitative predictions of our model could be compared with experimental studies of the yeast system under anti-silencing drugs.

  1. Titration of gold nanoparticles in phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Han-Wen; Schadt, Mark J; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2015-12-01

    In the organic-aqueous phase transfer process of gold nanoparticles, there are two types of distinctive interfaces involving hydrophilic and hydrophobic ligands, the understanding of which is important for the design of functional nanomaterials for analytical/bioanalytical applications and the control over the nanoparticles' nanoactivity and nanotoxicity in different phases. This report describes new findings of an investigation of the quantitative aspect of ligand ion pairing at the capping monolayer structure that drives the phase extraction of gold nanoparticles. Alkanethiolate-capped gold nanoparticles of 8 nm diameter with high size monodispersity (RSD ? 5%) were first derivatized by a ligand place exchange reaction with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid to form a mixed monolayer shell consisting of both hydrophobic (-CH3) and hydrophilic (-COOH) groups. It was followed by quantitative titration of the resulting nanoparticles with a cationic species (-NR4(+)) in a toluene phase, yielding ion pairing of -NR4(+) and -COO(-) on part of the capping monolayer. Analysis of the phase extraction allowed a quantitative determination of the percentage of ion pairing and structural changes in the capping monolayer on the nanoparticles. The results, along with morphological characterization, are discussed in terms of the interfacial structural changes and their implications on the rational design of surface-functionalized nanoparticles and fine tuning of the interfacial reactivity. PMID:26523548

  2. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 425 - Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method A Appendix...425, App. A Appendix A to Part 425—Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method Source The potassium ferricyanide titration method is...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 425 - Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method A Appendix...425, App. A Appendix A to Part 425—Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method Source The potassium ferricyanide titration method is...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 425 - Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method A Appendix...425, App. A Appendix A to Part 425—Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method Source The potassium ferricyanide titration method is...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 425 - Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method A Appendix...425, App. A Appendix A to Part 425—Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method Source The potassium ferricyanide titration method is...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 425 - Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method A Appendix...425, App. A Appendix A to Part 425—Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method Source The potassium ferricyanide titration method is...

  7. Novel titration method for surface-functionalised silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofen, Kai; Weber, Siegfried; Chan, Chiu Ping Candace; Majewski, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes three inexpensive and fast analytical methods to characterise grafted particle surfaces. The reaction of silica with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane, (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane and N-(phosphonomethyl)iminodiacetic acid hydrate, respectively, leads to NH2-, SO3H- or COOH-functionalised silica, which were characterised by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry and titration in nonaqueous media as well as with two titration methods in a water-based environment. In the work presented, factors influencing the titrations are pointed out and solutions are presented to overcome these limiting factors are shown.

  8. New Insights into Chitosan-DNA Interactions Using Isothermal Titration Microcalorimetry

    E-print Network

    Buschmann, Michael

    New Insights into Chitosan-DNA Interactions Using Isothermal Titration Microcalorimetry Pei Lian Ma of deacetylation (DDA), and molecular weight (Mn) of chitosan, using isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC

  9. Photometric stereo endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Parot, Vicente; Lim, Daryl; González, Germán; Traverso, Giovanni; Nishioka, Norman S.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. While color video endoscopy has enabled wide-field examination of the gastrointestinal tract, it often misses or incorrectly classifies lesions. Many of these missed lesions exhibit characteristic three-dimensional surface topographies. An endoscopic system that adds topographical measurements to conventional color imagery could therefore increase lesion detection and improve classification accuracy. We introduce photometric stereo endoscopy (PSE), a technique which allows high spatial frequency components of surface topography to be acquired simultaneously with conventional two-dimensional color imagery. We implement this technique in an endoscopic form factor and demonstrate that it can acquire the topography of small features with complex geometries and heterogeneous optical properties. PSE imaging of ex vivo human gastrointestinal tissue shows that surface topography measurements enable differentiation of abnormal shapes from surrounding normal tissue. Together, these results confirm that the topographical measurements can be obtained with relatively simple hardware in an endoscopic form factor, and suggest the potential of PSE to improve lesion detection and classification in gastrointestinal imaging. PMID:23864015

  10. Titratable acidity: a Pitts concept revisited.

    PubMed

    Mioni, Roberto; Mioni, Giuseppe

    2014-08-01

    Titratable Acidity (TA) in urine can be measured directly or calculated from actual and reference pH, by using the pKa? 6,8 for phosphate. In urine, H?PO?(-) represents the excretion of filtered H?PO?(-), filtrated HPO?(2-) being completely reabsorbed by the proximal tubule (the Van Slyke approach). Since excretion of H?PO?(-) frequently exceeds its glomerular filtration, this approach is considered inadequate by Pitts. He claimed that it is the tubular H(+) secretion which converts filtered HPO?(2-) to H?PO?(-), thereafter excreted in urine. This is only true under conditions of inorganic acid or neutral phosphate loading, when the maximum tubular phosphate reabsorption (TmPi) is overcharged. In controls, H?PO?(-) excretion is lower than its glomerular filtration, provided that acid-base status is normal and tubular phosphate reabsorption is below the TmPi. The TmPi is lower than its glomerular filtration, provided that acid-base status is normal and tubular phosphate reabsorption is below the TmPi. When the TmPi is exceeded, a portion of HPO?(2-) escapes proximal reabsorption, reaching the distal tubule where its absorption is precluded, while tubular H(+) secretion converts HPO?(2-) to H?PO?(-). In man and dog, the attainment of TmPi is evidenced by a FE% of 20%, and only beyond this limit H?PO?(-) excretion exceeds glomerular filtration. When FE% is lower than 20%, H?PO?(-) filtration exceeds excretion, HPO4(2-) being completely reabsorbed at the proximal tubule by NaPi-2a and 2c cotransporters. While Van Slyke's approach is always valid, Pitts' approach is only valid under loading conditions, when the two processes of H?PO?(-) excretion overlap each other. NH (+4) increases inversely to TA excretion in conditions of acidosis and tP restriction, but is independent of TA in Pi-replete dogs, independently of acidosis. PMID:24684475

  11. A Titration Technique for Demonstrating a Magma Replenishment Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodder, A. P. W.

    1983-01-01

    Conductiometric titrations can be used to simulate subduction-setting volcanism. Suggestions are made as to the use of this technique in teaching volcanic mechanisms and geochemical indications of tectonic settings. (JN)

  12. Titration Microcalorimetry Study: Interaction of Drug and Ionic Microgel System

    E-print Network

    Tian, Y.

    Doxorubicin (DOX) and Pluronic-PAA interaction was investigated using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). DOX/polymer interaction is governed primarily by electrostatic interaction. The uptake of DOX results in the ...

  13. A photometric study of the Orion OB 1 association. I - Observational data. II - Photometric analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, W. H., Jr.; Hesser, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    A catalog of observational data is presented for stars in the region of the young stellar association Orion OB 1. Photoelectric observations obtained in the uvby-beta and UBV systems are compiled along with previous photoelectric and spectroscopic data for all these stars as well as for several bright members of the association with available photometric indices. Mean weighted values are computed for the photometric data and summarized in tables expected to be reasonably complete for association members earlier than spectral type A0. Membership criteria are derived, and qualitative membership probabilities summarized, for the 526 stars in the final program. The analytical procedures are discussed for association stars of B, intermediate, and AF types. Effects of the nebular environment and various calibrations of Balmer-line and four-color indices are considered for the determination of absolute magnitudes for the B-type stars.

  14. A Variety of Electrochemical Methods in a Coulometric Titration Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotz, Albert

    1998-06-01

    An experiment for a practical course is described in which the amounts of HCl and KI in a mixture of standardized solutions are determined by three coulometric titrations. The iodide content is titrated with bromine that is generated at the anode from bromide which oxidizes the I- to I2 and further to IBr2-. The titration is followed with a twin-polarizable platinum electrode which essentially records the I2 and (after the endpoint) Br2 levels. Analysis of the chloride content is performed indirectly by titration of the acid through cathodic reduction of H+ to H2. The titration is monitored with a glass electrode. Finally I- and Cl- are determined simultaneously by anodic dissolution of a silver wire with a silver electrode recording the course of the titration. The experiment provides an internal check of the quality of the analysis and presents a variety of electrochemical methods of pedagogical value. Hints for the practical performance of the experiment in laboratory courses are given, and the necessary electronic circuits for self-assembling are described. Laboratory experiences with students' data collection by hand, recorder and computer are dealt with in this experiment. A complete list of earlier papers is provided, which can be found in this Journal, on the subject of coulometric analysis.

  15. Titration Force Microscopy on Supported Lipid Sergi Garcia-Manyes, Pau Gorostiza, and Fausto Sanz*,

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Julio M.

    Titration Force Microscopy on Supported Lipid Bilayers Sergi Garcia-Manyes, Pau Gorostiza titration where the titration agent is a weak acid (attached to the AFM tip) with the particularity of being to the pKa of the surface under study and the other to the pKa of the titrating probe attached to the tip

  16. Reliability of home CPAP titration with different automatic CPAP devices

    PubMed Central

    Sériès, Frédéric; Plante, Julie; Lacasse, Yves

    2008-01-01

    Background CPAP titration may be completed by automatic apparatus. However, differences in pressure behaviour could interfere with the reliability of pressure recommendations. Our objective was to compare pressure behaviour and effective pressure recommendations between three Automatic CPAP machines (Autoset Spirit, Remstar Auto, GK 420). Methods Sixteen untreated obstructive sleep apnea patients were randomly allocated to one of the 3 tested machines for a one-week home titration trial in a crossover design with a 10 days washout period between trials. Results The median pressure value was significantly lower with machine GK 420 (5.9 +/- 1.8 cm H2O) than with the other devices both after one night and one week of CPAP titration (7.4 +/- 1.3 and 6.6 +/- 1.9 cm H2O). The maximal pressure obtained over the one-week titration was significantly higher with Remstar Auto (12.6 +/- 2.4 cm H2O, Mean +/- SD) than with the two other ones (10.9 +/- 1.0 and 11.0 +/- 2.4 cm H2O). The variance in pressure recommendation significantly differed between the three machines after one night and between Autoset Spirit and the two other machines after 1 week. Conclusion Pressure behaviour and pressure recommendation significantly differ between Auto CPAP machines both after one night and one week of home titration. PMID:18652688

  17. Potentiometric titration and equivalent weight of humic acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pommer, A.M.; Breger, I.A.

    1960-01-01

    The "acid nature" of humic acid has been controversial for many years. Some investigators claim that humic acid is a true weak acid, while others feel that its behaviour during potentiometric titration can be accounted for by colloidal adsorption of hydrogen ions. The acid character of humic acid has been reinvestigated using newly-derived relationships for the titration of weak acids with strong base. Re-interpreting the potentiometric titration data published by Thiele and Kettner in 1953, it was found that Merck humic acid behaves as a weak polyelectrolytic acid having an equivalent weight of 150, a pKa of 6.8 to 7.0, and a titration exponent of about 4.8. Interdretation of similar data pertaining to the titration of phenol-formaldehyde and pyrogallol-formaldehyde resins, considered to be analogs for humic acid by Thiele and Kettner, leads to the conclusion that it is not possible to differentiate between adsorption and acid-base reaction for these substances. ?? 1960.

  18. Characterization of Titratable Amphiphiles in Lipid Membranes by Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pierrat, Philippe; Lebeau, Luc

    2015-11-17

    Understanding the ionization behavior of lipid membranes is a key parameter for successful development of lipid-based drug delivery systems. Accurate determination of the ionization state of a titratable species incorporated in a lipid bilayer however requires special care. Herein we investigated the behavior of titratable lipids in liposomes by fluorescence spectroscopy and determined which extrinsic parameters-i.e., besides those directly related to their molecular structure-determine their ionization state. Two fluorescent dyes, TNS and R18, have been used to investigate basic and acidic titratable lipids, respectively. Our results suggest that the titration behavior of the ionizable lipid in the membrane is more sensitive to the composition of the membrane and to its physical state than to the presence of solutes in the aqueous phase. Essentially overlooked in earlier studies on ionizable lipid assemblies, the concentration of the titratable lipid in the membrane was found to have a major effect on the ionization state of the lipid polar head. This may result in a shift in the apparent pKa value which may be as large as two pKa units and cannot be satisfactorily predicted. PMID:26507074

  19. Photometric variability of Be stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovski, K.

    The complexity of the short term photometric variability of Be stars is discussed on the basis of observations carried out at the Hvar Observatory. Preliminary photometric data are presented for three Be variable stars: Zeta Tau (HD 37202); EW Lac (HD 217050); and KY And (HD 218674). Power spectra were obtained of the light variations using a mesh of 400 discrete frequencies. The periods of the variations are given in a table, and all are less than one day. The preliminary results are compared with Percy's (1982) theoretical model of Be variability, and the results are discussed in detail.

  20. Anion-exchange nanospheres as titration reagents for anionic analytes.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jingying; Xie, Xiaojiang; Bakker, Eric

    2015-08-18

    We present here anion-exchange nanospheres as novel titration reagents for anions. The nanospheres contain a lipophilic cation for which the counterion is initially Cl(-). Ion exchange takes place between Cl(-) in the nanospheres and a more lipophilic anion in the sample, such as ClO4(-) and NO3(-). Consecutive titration in the same sample solution for ClO4(-) and NO3(-) were demonstrated. As an application, the concentration of NO3(-) in spinach was successfully determined using this method. PMID:26201018

  1. Photometric Redshifts and Photometry Errors

    E-print Network

    D. Wittman; P. Riechers; V. E. Margoniner

    2007-09-21

    We examine the impact of non-Gaussian photometry errors on photometric redshift performance. We find that they greatly increase the scatter, but this can be mitigated to some extent by incorporating the correct noise model into the photometric redshift estimation process. However, the remaining scatter is still equivalent to that of a much shallower survey with Gaussian photometry errors. We also estimate the impact of non-Gaussian errors on the spectroscopic sample size required to verify the photometric redshift rms scatter to a given precision. Even with Gaussian {\\it photometry} errors, photometric redshift errors are sufficiently non-Gaussian to require an order of magnitude larger sample than simple Gaussian statistics would indicate. The requirements increase from this baseline if non-Gaussian photometry errors are included. Again the impact can be mitigated by incorporating the correct noise model, but only to the equivalent of a survey with much larger Gaussian photometry errors. However, these requirements may well be overestimates because they are based on a need to know the rms, which is particularly sensitive to tails. Other parametrizations of the distribution may require smaller samples.

  2. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS OF SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, Sukanya; Magnelli, Benjamin; Lutz, Dieter; Berta, Stefano; Popesso, Paola; McKee, Christopher F.; Pozzi, Francesca

    2013-08-20

    We use the photometric redshift method of Chakrabarti and McKee to infer photometric redshifts of submillimeter galaxies with far-IR (FIR) Herschel data obtained as part of the PACS Evolutionary Probe program. For the sample with spectroscopic redshifts, we demonstrate the validity of this method over a large range of redshifts (4 {approx}> z {approx}> 0.3) and luminosities, finding an average accuracy in (1 + z{sub phot})/(1 + z{sub spec}) of 10%. Thus, this method is more accurate than other FIR photometric redshift methods. This method is different from typical FIR photometric methods in deriving redshifts from the light-to-gas mass (L/M) ratio of infrared-bright galaxies inferred from the FIR spectral energy distribution, rather than dust temperatures. To assess the dependence of our photometric redshift method on the data in this sample, we contrast the average accuracy of our method when we use PACS data, versus SPIRE data, versus both PACS and SPIRE data. We also discuss potential selection effects that may affect the Herschel sample. Once the redshift is derived, we can determine physical properties of infrared-bright galaxies, including the temperature variation within the dust envelope, luminosity, mass, and surface density. We use data from the GOODS-S field to calculate the star formation rate density (SFRD) of submillimeter bright sources detected by AzTEC and PACS. The AzTEC-PACS sources, which have a threshold 850 {mu}m flux {approx}> 5 mJy, contribute 15% of the SFRD from all ultraluminous infrared galaxies (L{sub IR} {approx}> 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }), and 3% of the total SFRD at z {approx} 2.

  3. OZONE CALIBRATION AND AUDIT BY GAS PHASE TITRATION IN EXCESS OZONE. BENDIX (TRADE NAME) TRANSPORTABLE FIELD CALIBRATION SYSTEM, MODELS 8861D AND 8861DA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detailed procedures for the dynamic calibration and audit of chemiluminescence ozone analyzers are presented. The calibrations and audits are performed by means of a gas phase titration technique using the rapid gas phase reaction between nitric oxide and ozone with excess ozone ...

  4. Potentiometric titration of gold, platinum, and some other precious metals

    SciTech Connect

    Selig, W.S.

    1991-02-04

    Gold, platinum, and several other platinum metals can be determined by titration with cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC). CPC forms a precipitate with AuCl{sub 4}{sup {minus}} and PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}}. Differentiation of AuCl{sub 4{minus}} and PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}} with this titrant is not possible; however, their sum can be determined. Titration with tetraphenylarsonium chloride at pH 1 is selective for tetrachloroaurate, which thus can be determined in the presence of hexachloroplatinate. Hexachloroosmate(IV), tetrachloroplatinite(II), tetrachloropalladate(II), hexachloropalladate(IV), and hexachloroiridate(IV) can also be determined potentiometrically vs. CPC. The indicating electrode is prepared by coating a spectroscopic graphite rod with a solution of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) and dioctylphthalate (DOP) in tetrahydrofuran (THF). Gold in gold cyanide plating baths and in potassium aurocyanide can be determined by potentiometric titration vs standard silver nitrate, using a silver ion-selective indicating electrode. The monovalent gold need not be converted to the trivalent state with aqua regia, resulting in a considerable saving of time and effort. Free cyanide and aurocyanide can be titrated sequentially by this method. Chloride does not interfere and can, in fact, also be sequentially determined. 17 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Using Spreadsheets to Produce Acid-Base Titration Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cawley, Martin James; Parkinson, John

    1995-01-01

    Describes two spreadsheets for producing acid-base titration curves, one uses relatively simple cell formulae that can be written into the spreadsheet by inexperienced students and the second uses more complex formulae that are best written by the teacher. (JRH)

  6. Titration of Isolated Cell Walls of Lemna minor L 1

    PubMed Central

    Morvan, Claudine; Demarty, Maurice; Thellier, Michel

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical model has been built to bypass the equation of titration of the cell wall. This equation, which is an extension of the Henderson-Hasselbach equation, underlines the importance of the exchange constant, the ionic strength as well as the rate of neutralization. The model is restricted to the case when the ionization degree is equal to the neutralization degree. The shape of the titration curve is shown to be strongly dependent on the valency of the base used. Experimental results have shown that isolated cell walls bear at least two kinds of sites. The first sites which are titrated after a short time of equilibration are attributed to polyuronic acids (capacity: 0.3 milliequivalents per gram fresh cell walls). The second sites, are obtained after a long time of equilibration (capacity: 1.2 to 1.3 milliequivalents per gram, fresh cell walls). Titrations have been performed with different bases [KOH, NaOH, and Ca(OH)2] and under different ionic strengths. The results obtained with NaOH and KOH do not exhibit any difference of selectivity. Conversely, the sites have a much bigger affinity for the Ca2+ ions than for the monovalent ones. The apparent pKa of the uronic acids was estimated to lie between 3.0 and 3.4; this is consistent with the values obtained with polyuronic acid solutions. PMID:16660868

  7. Toward Millimagnitude Photometric Calibration (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dose, E.

    2014-12-01

    (Abstract only) Asteroid roation, exoplanet transits, and similar measurements will increasingly call for photometric precisions better than about 10 millimagnitudes, often between nights and ideally between distant observers. The present work applies detailed spectral simulations to test popular photometric calibration practices, and to test new extensions of these practices. Using 107 synthetic spectra of stars of diverse colors, detailed atmospheric transmission spectra computed by solar-energy software, realistic spectra of popular astronomy gear, and the option of three sources of noise added at realistic millimagnitude levels, we find that certain adjustments to current calibration practices can help remove small systematic errors, especially for imperfect filters, high airmasses, and possibly passing thin cirrus clouds.

  8. Photometric study of IC 2156

    E-print Network

    Tadross, A L

    2015-01-01

    The optical UBVRI photometric analysis has been established using SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY (SDSS database) in order to estimate the astrophysical parameters of poorly studied open star cluster IC 2156. The results of the present study are compared with a previous one of ours, which relied on the 2MASS JHK infrared photometry. The stellar density distributions and color-magnitude diagrams of the cluster are used to determine the geometrical structure; limited radius, core and tidal radii, the distances from the Sun, from the Galactic plane and from the Galactic center. Also, the main photometric parameters; age, distance modulus, color excesses, membership, total mass, luminosity, mass functions and relaxation time; have been estimated.

  9. Photometric variability in earthshine observations.

    PubMed

    Langford, Sally V; Wyithe, J Stuart B; Turner, Edwin L

    2009-04-01

    The identification of an extrasolar planet as Earth-like will depend on the detection of atmospheric signatures or surface non-uniformities. In this paper we present spatially unresolved flux light curves of Earth for the purpose of studying a prototype extrasolar terrestrial planet. Our monitoring of the photometric variability of earthshine revealed changes of up to 23% per hour in the brightness of Earth's scattered light at around 600 nm, due to the removal of specular reflection from the view of the Moon. This variability is accompanied by reddening of the spectrum and results from a change in surface properties across the continental boundary between the Indian Ocean and Africa's east coast. Our results based on earthshine monitoring indicate that specular reflection should provide a useful tool in determining the presence of liquid water on extrasolar planets via photometric observations. PMID:19344309

  10. Galaxy clustering using photometric redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So?tan, A. M.; Chodorowski, M. J.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the evolution of the galaxy two-point correlation function (CF) over a wide redshift range, 0.2 < z ? 3. For the first time, the systematic analysis covers the redshifts above 1-1.5. The catalogue of ˜250 000 galaxies with i+ < 25 and known photometric redshifts in the Subaru Deep field is used. The galaxies are divided into three luminosity classes and several distance/redshift bins. First, the 2D CF is determined for each luminosity class and distance bin. Calculations are based on the quantitative differences between the surface distributions of galaxy pairs with comparable and distinctly different photometric redshifts. The power-law approximation for the CF is used. A limited accuracy of photometric redshifts as compared to the spectroscopic ones has been examined and taken into account. Then, the 3D functions for all the selected luminosities and distance are calculated. The power-law parameters of the CF, the slope and the correlation length are determined. Both parameters do not show strong variations over the whole investigated redshift range. The slope of the luminous galaxies appears to be consistently steeper than that for the fainter ones. The linear bias factor, b(z), grows systematically with redshift; assuming the local normalization b(0) ? 1.1-1.2, the bias reaches 3-3.5 at the high-redshift limit.

  11. Electrophoretic separation of alginic sodium diester and sodium hexametaphosphate in chondroitin sulfate that interfere with the cetylpyridinium chloride titration assay.

    PubMed

    Weiguo, Zhang; Giancaspro, Gabriel; Adams, Kristie M; Neal-Kababick, James; Hildreth, Jana; Li, Aishan; Roman, Mark C; Betz, Joseph M

    2014-01-01

    The most commonly used chondroitin sulfate (CS) assay method is cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) titration. Cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis (CAME) is the technique used for detection of impurities in the U.S. Pharmacopeia's CS monograph. Because CPC titration is a relatively nonspecific quantitative technique, the apparent amount of CS as determined by CPC titration alone may not reflect the true amount of CS due to possible interference with the CPC assay by impurities that contain CPC titratable functional groups. When CAME is used in conjunction with CPC titration, certain non-CS and adulterants can be visualized and estimated, and a true value for CS can be assigned once the presence of these non-CS impurities has been ruled out. This study examines conjunct application of CPC and CAME in ascertaining CS assay and purity in the presence of certain adulterants. These include propylene glycol alginate sulfate sodium, known in commerce as alginic sodium diester (ASD), and Zero One (Z1), a water-soluble agent newly reported in the CS marketplace and subsequently identified as sodium hexametaphosphate. ASD, Z1, and CS are similar in physical appearance and solubility in water and ethanol. They are also titratable anions and form ionic pairs with CPC, therefore interfering with the CPC titration assay for CS CAME separates these adulterants from each other and from CS by differences in their electrophoretic mobility. CAME is able to detect these impurities in CS at levels as low as 0.66% by weight. Although it is recommended that a method for detecting impurities (e.g., CAME) be used in cormbination with relatively nonspecific assay methods such as CPC titration, this is seldom done in practice. Assay results for CS derived fromn CPC titration may, therefore, be misleading, leaving the CS supply chain vulnerable to adulteration. In this study, the authors investigated ASD and Z1 adulteration of CS and developed an electrophoretic separation of these adulterants in CS and procedures to isolate ASD from CS matrixes containing these adulterants. The authors describe in this paper utilization of an orthogonal approach to establish the identity of Z1 as sodium hexametaphosphate and to confirm the identity of ASD, including ethanol fractionation, FTIR spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and NMR spectroscopy. The authors suggest that CAME is a cost-effective and easy to use methodfor detecting certain impurities in CS raw ingredients and recommend that CPC and CAME be used in combination by QC laboratories as a means of effectively deterring the practice of adulterating CS raw materials with the known adulterants ASD and Z1 and/or other non-chondroitin substances that can be separated from CSby CAME and that exhibit CPC titration behavior similar to CS. PMID:25372663

  12. Adsorbates in a Box: Titration of Substrate Electronic States Zhihai Cheng,1

    E-print Network

    Einstein, Theodore L.

    Adsorbates in a Box: Titration of Substrate Electronic States Zhihai Cheng,1 Jonathan Wyrick,2,29]. In this experimental study we show that confined electronic states of the substrate can actually be titrated

  13. Solution Equilibrium Titration for High-Throughput Affinity Estimation of Unpurified Antibodies and Antibody Fragments.

    PubMed

    Della Ducata, Daniela; Jaehrling, Jan; Hänel, Cornelia; Satzger, Marion; Wolber, Meike; Ostendorp, Ralf; Pabst, Stefan; Brocks, Bodo

    2015-12-01

    The generation of therapeutic antibodies with extremely high affinities down to the low picomolar range is today feasible with state-of-the art recombinant technologies. However, reliable and efficient identification of lead candidates with the desired affinity from a pool of thousands of antibody clones remains a challenge. Here, we describe a high-throughput procedure that allows reliable affinity screening of unpurified immunoglobulin G or antibody fragments. The method is based on the principle of solution equilibrium titration (SET) using highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence as a readout system. Because the binding partners are not labeled, the resulting KD represents a sound approximation of the real affinity. For screening, diluted bacterial lysates or cell culture supernatants are equilibrated with four different concentrations of a soluble target molecule, and unbound antibodies are subsequently quantified on 384-well Meso Scale Discovery (MSD) plates coated with the respective antigen. For determination of KD values from the resulting titration curves, fit models deduced from the law of mass action for 1:1 and 2:1 binding modes are applied to assess hundreds of interactions simultaneously. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated by comparing results from different screening campaigns from affinity optimization projects with results from detailed affinity characterization. PMID:26179403

  14. Photometric Detection of Extra-Solar Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatzes, Artie P.; Cochran, William D.

    2004-01-01

    This NASA Origins Program grant supported the TEMPEST Texas McDonald Photometric Extrasolar Search for Transits) program at McDonald Observatory, which searches for transits of extrasolar planets across the disks of their parent stars. The basic approach is to use a wide-field ground-based telescope (in our case the McDonald Observatory 0.76m telescope and it s Prime Focus Corrector) to search for transits of short period (1-15 day orbits) of close-in hot-Jupiter planets in orbit around a large sample of field stars. The next task is to search these data streams for possible transit events. We collected our first set of test data for this program using the 0.76 m PFC in the summer of 1998. From those data, we developed the optimal observing procedures, including tailoring the stellar density, exposure times, and filters to best-suit the instrument and project. In the summer of 1999, we obtained the first partial season of data on a dedicated field in the constellation Cygnus. These data were used to develop and refine the reduction and analysis procedures to produce high-precision photometry and search for transits in the resulting light curves. The TeMPEST project subsequently obtained three full seasons of data on six different fields using the McDonald Observatory 0.76m PFC.

  15. The Acid-Base Titration of a Very Weak Acid: Boric Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celeste, M.; Azevedo, C.; Cavaleiro, Ana M. V.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment based on the titration of boric acid with strong base in the presence of d-mannitol is described. Boric acid is a very weak acid and direct titration with NaOH is not possible. An auxiliary reagent that contributes to the release of protons in a known stoichiometry facilitates the acid-base titration. Students obtain the…

  16. Titrating PolyelectrolytessVariational Calculations and Monte Carlo Simulations Bo Jo1nsson*, and Magnus Ullner

    E-print Network

    Peterson, Carsten

    Titrating PolyelectrolytessVariational Calculations and Monte Carlo Simulations Bo Jo1nsson Variational methods are used to calculate structural and thermodynamical properties of a titrating; i.e., titratable groups in a polymer will exchange protons with the solution and the polymer net

  17. Relations between Protonation Constants and Titration Curves in Polyprotic Acids: A Critical View

    E-print Network

    Ullmann, G. Matthias

    Relations between Protonation Constants and Titration Curves in Polyprotic Acids: A Critical View G. In this paper, the relation between these pKa values and their relation to titration curves is discussed. Often inflection points of total and individual titration curves or the pH value where the proton binding site

  18. Linking Surface Potential and Deprotonation in Nanoporous Silica: Second Harmonic Generation and Acid/Base Titration

    E-print Network

    Borguet, Eric

    and Acid/Base Titration R. Kramer Campen,,,§ Allison K. Pymer,,| Satoshi Nihonyanagi,, and Eric Borguet development in nanoporous silica. We do so using conventional titration techniques and a noninvasive, all by internal surface sites. Such a threshold pH, above which acid/base or ion titration curves of porous

  19. Monitoring of an RNA Multistep Folding Pathway by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry

    E-print Network

    Perreault, Jean-Pierre

    Monitoring of an RNA Multistep Folding Pathway by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Ce´dric Reymond Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Que´bec, Canada ABSTRACT Isothermal titration calorimetry was used to monitor.1 pseudoknot is the limiting step of the molecular mechanism. Last, as illustrated here, isothermal titration

  20. On-Chip Titration of an Anticoagulant Argatroban and Determination of the Clotting Time within

    E-print Network

    Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    On-Chip Titration of an Anticoagulant Argatroban and Determination of the Clotting Time within was developed to titrate an anticoagulant (argatroban) into blood samples and to measure the clotting time using) titration of argatroban (0-1.5 µg/mL) into plugs and measurement of the resulting APTTs at room temperature

  1. Propagation of error in fulvic acid titration data: a comparison of three analytical methods

    E-print Network

    Morel, François M. M.

    Propagation of error in fulvic acid titration data: a comparison of three analytical methods but little consideration has been given to the magnitude of error in the resulting titration data. Most of random instrumenterror into a titrationdata set is not uniform throughout a titration and the pattern

  2. New Concepts A Novel View of pH Titration in Biomolecules

    E-print Network

    Onufriev, Alexey

    New Concepts A Novel View of pH Titration in Biomolecules Alexey Onufriev, David A. Case,* and G 31, 2001 ABSTRACT: When individual titratable sites in a molecule interact with each other, their pH titration can be considerably more complex than that of an independent site described by the classical

  3. Journal of Electroanalytical Chemistry 512 (2001) 8391 Faradaic impedance titration of pure 3-mercaptopropionic acid

    E-print Network

    Kwak, Juhyoun

    2001-01-01

    Journal of Electroanalytical Chemistry 512 (2001) 83­91 Faradaic impedance titration of pure 3-assembled monolayers (SAMs) have been studied using the faradaic impedance titration method. The Fe(CN)6 3- is used strength. The in-plane electrostatic force effect, which causes a broadening of the titration curves

  4. Relations between Protonation Constants and Titration Curves in Polyprotic Acids: A Critical View

    E-print Network

    Ullmann, G. Matthias

    Relations between Protonation Constants and Titration Curves in Polyprotic Acids: A Critical View G. B November 20, 2002 Supporting information 1 #12;1. Inflection Points of Titration Curves Monoprotic Acid. The titration curve of a monoprotic acid is given by eq 1 which is algebraically equivalent

  5. Titration of chiral kink sites on Cu(6 4 3) using iodine adsorption

    E-print Network

    Gellman, Andrew J.

    Titration of chiral kink sites on Cu(6 4 3) using iodine adsorption Preeti Kamakoti a,b , Joshua be used to selectively titrate the kink sites on intrinsically chiral Cu surfaces vicinal to Cu(1 1 1). Ó vicinal to Cu(1 1 1) can be used to selectively titrate the chiral binding sites associated with kinked

  6. Comparison of the Zeta Potential with the Diffuse Layer Potential from Charge Titration

    E-print Network

    Attard, Phil

    Comparison of the Zeta Potential with the Diffuse Layer Potential from Charge Titration Phil Attard) theory is used to compare charge titration and zeta potential data for several colloids. It is found titration, whereas the so-called zeta potential is generally determined by electrokinetic techniques (e

  7. Kids in a Candy Store: An Analogy for Back Titration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Last, Arthur M.

    1998-09-01

    A simple analogy for back titration is presented. A child is sent into a candy store with a known amount of money in order to purchase a candy bar and the cost of the bar is subsequently determined by counting the amount of change the child brings back. This is analogous to adding excess acid to a base and determining how much base was present by titrating the unreacted acid. The analogy is extended to illustrate what happens when an acidic or basic impurity is present in the system and is further developed to cover a situation in which the acid and unknown base react in a 2:1 ratio rather than a 1:1 ratio.

  8. Modified titration intratympanic gentamicin injection for unilateral intractable Ménière's disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Leng, Yang-Ming; Shi, Hong; Zhou, Ren-Hong; Liu, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Wen-Juan; Zhang, Su-Lin; Kong, Wei-Jia

    2015-10-01

    This study looked into the efficacy of a modified titration protocol of intratympanic gentamicin injection (ITG) in the patients with unilateral intractable Ménière's disease (MD). Modified titration protocol of ITG at a low dose (20 mg/mL) was administered to 10 patients with definite unilateral intractable MD. After initial first two fixed ITGs on weekly basis, the patients might or might not be given any more injections, depending on the appearance of unilateral vestibular loss (UVL). ITG was terminated if the patients satisfied the criteria of UVL. All patients were followed-up for at least two years. The effects of ITG on the vertigo attack, functional level scores and postural balance were evaluated. Of the 10 cases, 8 showed the sign of UVL after receiving initial two ITGs and were not given any more intratympanic injections, and the other 2 patients were administered three ITGs. A two-year follow-up revealed that complete and substantial vertigo control was achieved in 9 cases, and limited vertigo control in 1 patient. Hearing level was lowered in 2 patients. The posture stability and functional level scores were improved. Our study showed that the modified titration protocol of ITG at a low dose could effectively control vertigo in patients with unilateral intractable MD. PMID:26489633

  9. RANDOM FORESTS FOR PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS

    SciTech Connect

    Carliles, Samuel; Szalay, Alexander S.; Budavari, Tamas; Heinis, Sebastien; Priebe, Carey

    2010-03-20

    The main challenge today in photometric redshift estimation is not in the accuracy but in understanding the uncertainties. We introduce an empirical method based on Random Forests to address these issues. The training algorithm builds a set of optimal decision trees on subsets of the available spectroscopic sample, which provide independent constraints on the redshift of each galaxy. The combined forest estimates have intriguing statistical properties, notable among which are Gaussian errors. We demonstrate the power of our approach on multi-color measurements of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

  10. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Marriner, John; /Fermilab

    2012-06-29

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

  11. A photometric study of the Orion OB 1 association. 2: Photometric analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, W. H., Jr.; Hesser, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The procedures adopted for analysis of photometric data in terms of color excesses, intrinsic color indexes, absolute visual magnitudes, and rotational-velocity effects are discussed in detail for Orion association B-, intermediate (I)-, and AF-type stars. The effects of the nebular environment and a comparison of various calibrations of Balmer-line and four-color indexes are considered for the determination of individual absolute magnitudes for B-type stars. When absolute magnitudes of stars in the region of the Orion Nebula are determined from the beta index, emission mechanisms appear to spuriously brighten them. A detailed comparison of absolute magnitudes derived from Balmer-line indexes and MK spectral-type calibrations is presented. The data are also examined with regard to the effects of polarization and infrared excesses. The results suggest a complex combination of intracluster and circumstellar origins for these processes.

  12. Standard Test Method for Solar Photometric Transmittance of Sheet Materials Using Sunlight

    E-print Network

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1996-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the measurement of solar photometric transmittance of materials in sheet form. Solar photometric transmittance is measured using a photometer (illuminance meter) in an enclosure with the sun and sky as the source of radiation. The enclosure and method of test is specified in Test Method E 1175 (or Test Method E 1084). 1.2 The purpose of this test method is to specify a photometric sensor to be used with the procedure for measuring the solar photometric transmittance of sheet materials containing inhomogeneities in their optical properties. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  13. Titratable acidity of beverages influences salivary pH recovery.

    PubMed

    Tenuta, Livia Maria Andaló; Fernández, Constanza Estefany; Brandão, Ana Carolina Siqueira; Cury, Jaime Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    A low pH and a high titratable acidity of juices and cola-based beverages are relevant factors that contribute to dental erosion, but the relative importance of these properties to maintain salivary pH at demineralizing levels for long periods of time after drinking is unknown. In this crossover study conducted in vivo, orange juice, a cola-based soft drink, and a 10% sucrose solution (negative control) were tested. These drinks differ in terms of their pH (3.5 ± 0.04, 2.5 ± 0.05, and 5.9 ± 0.1, respectively) and titratable acidity (3.17 ± 0.06, 0.57 ± 0.04 and < 0.005 mmols OH- to reach pH 5.5, respectively). Eight volunteers with a normal salivary flow rate and buffering capacity kept 15 mL of each beverage in their mouth for 10 s, expectorated it, and their saliva was collected after 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 s. The salivary pH, determined using a mini pH electrode, returned to the baseline value at 30 s after expectoration of the cola-based soft drink, but only at 90 s after expectoration of the orange juice. The salivary pH increased to greater than 5.5 at 15 s after expectoration of the cola drink and at 30 s after expectoration of the orange juice. These findings suggest that the titratable acidity of a beverage influences salivary pH values after drinking acidic beverages more than the beverage pH. PMID:25715032

  14. A titration model for evaluating calcium hydroxide removal techniques

    PubMed Central

    PHILLIPS, Mark; McCLANAHAN, Scott; BOWLES, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Objective Calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) has been used in endodontics as an intracanal medicament due to its antimicrobial effects and its ability to inactivate bacterial endotoxin. The inability to totally remove this intracanal medicament from the root canal system, however, may interfere with the setting of eugenol-based sealers or inhibit bonding of resin to dentin, thus presenting clinical challenges with endodontic treatment. This study used a chemical titration method to measure residual Ca(OH)2 left after different endodontic irrigation methods. Material and Methods Eighty-six human canine roots were prepared for obturation. Thirty teeth were filled with known but different amounts of Ca(OH)2 for 7 days, which were dissolved out and titrated to quantitate the residual Ca(OH)2 recovered from each root to produce a standard curve. Forty-eight of the remaining teeth were filled with equal amounts of Ca(OH)2 followed by gross Ca(OH)2 removal using hand files and randomized treatment of either: 1) Syringe irrigation; 2) Syringe irrigation with use of an apical file; 3) Syringe irrigation with added 30 s of passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI), or 4) Syringe irrigation with apical file and PUI (n=12/group). Residual Ca(OH)2 was dissolved with glycerin and titrated to measure residual Ca(OH)2 left in the root. Results No method completely removed all residual Ca(OH)2. The addition of 30 s PUI with or without apical file use removed Ca(OH)2 significantly better than irrigation alone. Conclusions This technique allowed quantification of residual Ca(OH)2. The use of PUI (with or without apical file) resulted in significantly lower Ca(OH)2 residue compared to irrigation alone. PMID:25760272

  15. PAPER www.rsc.org/pps | Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences Theoretical investigation of the behavior of titratable groups in proteins

    E-print Network

    Ullmann, G. Matthias

    of the behavior of titratable groups in proteins Astrid R. Klingen,a Elisa Bombardaa,b and G. Matthias Ullmann April 2006 DOI: 10.1039/b515479k This paper presents a theoretical analysis of the titration behavior of strongly interacting titratable residues in proteins. Strongly interacting titratable residues exist

  16. A novel approach for high precision rapid potentiometric titrations: Application to hydrazine assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, P.; Malathi, N.; Ananthanarayanan, R.; Praveen, K.; Murali, N.

    2011-11-01

    We propose a high precision rapid personal computer (PC) based potentiometric titration technique using a specially designed mini-cell to carry out redox titrations for assay of chemicals in quality control laboratories attached to industrial, R&D, and nuclear establishments. Using this technique a few microlitre of sample (50-100 ?l) in a total volume of ˜2 ml solution can be titrated and the waste generated after titration is extremely low comparing to that obtained from the conventional titration technique. The entire titration including online data acquisition followed by immediate offline analysis of data to get information about concentration of unknown sample is completed within a couple of minutes (about 2 min). This facility has been created using a new class of sensors, viz., pulsating sensors developed in-house. The basic concept in designing such instrument and the salient features of the titration device are presented in this paper. The performance of the titration facility was examined by conducting some of the high resolution redox titrations using dilute solutions--hydrazine against KIO3 in HCl medium, Fe(II) against Ce(IV) and uranium using Davies-Gray method. The precision of titrations using this innovative approach lies between 0.048% and 1.0% relative standard deviation in different redox titrations. With the evolution of this rapid PC based titrator it was possible to develop a simple but high precision potentiometric titration technique for quick determination of hydrazine in nuclear fuel dissolver solution in the context of reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel in fast breeder reactors.

  17. A novel approach for high precision rapid potentiometric titrations: application to hydrazine assay.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, P; Malathi, N; Ananthanarayanan, R; Praveen, K; Murali, N

    2011-11-01

    We propose a high precision rapid personal computer (PC) based potentiometric titration technique using a specially designed mini-cell to carry out redox titrations for assay of chemicals in quality control laboratories attached to industrial, R&D, and nuclear establishments. Using this technique a few microlitre of sample (50-100 ?l) in a total volume of ~2 ml solution can be titrated and the waste generated after titration is extremely low comparing to that obtained from the conventional titration technique. The entire titration including online data acquisition followed by immediate offline analysis of data to get information about concentration of unknown sample is completed within a couple of minutes (about 2 min). This facility has been created using a new class of sensors, viz., pulsating sensors developed in-house. The basic concept in designing such instrument and the salient features of the titration device are presented in this paper. The performance of the titration facility was examined by conducting some of the high resolution redox titrations using dilute solutions--hydrazine against KIO(3) in HCl medium, Fe(II) against Ce(IV) and uranium using Davies-Gray method. The precision of titrations using this innovative approach lies between 0.048% and 1.0% relative standard deviation in different redox titrations. With the evolution of this rapid PC based titrator it was possible to develop a simple but high precision potentiometric titration technique for quick determination of hydrazine in nuclear fuel dissolver solution in the context of reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel in fast breeder reactors. PMID:22128994

  18. Oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate (OTFC) for the treatment of breakthrough pain in cancer patients: a controlled dose titration study.

    PubMed

    Portenoy, R K; Payne, R; Coluzzi, P; Raschko, J W; Lyss, A; Busch, M A; Frigerio, V; Ingham, J; Loseth, D B; Nordbrock, E; Rhiner, M

    1999-02-01

    Oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate (OTFC) is a novel opioid formulation in which the potent synthetic mu-agonist fentanyl is embedded in a sweetened matrix that is dissolved in the mouth. It is undergoing investigation as a treatment for cancer-related breakthrough pain, a prevalent phenomenon defined as a transitory flare of moderate to severe pain that interrupts otherwise controlled persistent pain. There have been no controlled trials of other treatments for this condition. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of ascending doses of OTFC, a novel controlled dose titration methodology was developed that applied blinding and randomization procedures to the evaluation of recurrent pains in the home environment. The study was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind dose titration study in ambulatory cancer patients. The sample comprised adult patients receiving a scheduled oral opioid regimen equivalent to 60-1000 mg oral morphine per day, who were experiencing at least one episode per day of breakthrough pain and had achieved at least partial relief of this pain by use of an oral opioid rescue dose. After collection of 2 days of baseline data concerning the efficacy of the usual rescue drug, patients were randomly treated with either 200 or 400 microg OTFC unit doses in double-blind fashion. Up to two breakthrough pains each day could be treated with up to four OTFC unit doses per pain. OTFC in unit doses containing 200, 400, 600, 800, 1200 or 1600 microg of fentanyl citrate were available for the study. The unit dose was titrated upward in steps until the patient had 2 consecutive days on which breakthrough pain could be treated with the single unit dose, titration was ineffective at a 1600 microg unit dose, or 20 days elapsed. To maintain the double-blind, orders to titrate up were ignored one-third of the time according to a pre-defined randomization schedule accessible only to an unblinded study pharmacist. Main outcome measures included, numeric or categorical measures of pain intensity, pain relief, and global assessment of drug performance. Dose response relationships were found suggesting that the methodology was sensitive to opioid effects. Seventy-four percent of patients were successfully titrated. There was no relationship between the total daily dose of the fixed schedule opioid regimen and the dose of OTFC required to manage the breakthrough pain. Although the study was not designed to provide a definitive comparison between OTFC and the usual rescue drug, exploratory analyses found that OTFC provided significantly greater analgesic effect at 15, 30 and 60 min, and a more rapid onset of effect, than the usual rescue drug. Adverse effects of the OTFC were typically opioid-related, specifically somnolence, nausea and dizziness. Very few adverse events were severe or serious. This study demonstrated the feasibility of controlled trial methodology in studies of breakthrough pain. OTFC appears to be a safe and effective therapy for breakthrough pain, and dose titration can usually identify a unit dose capable of providing adequate analgesia. If the lack of a relationship between the effective OTFC dose and fixed schedule opioid regimen is confirmed, dose titration may be needed in the clinical use of this formulation. Further investigation of OTFC as a specific treatment for breakthrough pain is warranted. PMID:10068176

  19. Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric telescope automation and observing software

    SciTech Connect

    Eric H. Neilsen, Jr. et al.

    2002-10-16

    The photometric telescope (PT) provides observations necessary for the photometric calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Because the attention of the observing staff is occupied by the operation of the 2.5 meter telescope which takes the survey data proper, the PT must reliably take data with little supervision. In this paper we describe the PT's observing program, MOP, which automates most tasks necessary for observing. MOP's automated target selection is closely modeled on the actions a human observer might take, and is built upon a user interface that can be (and has been) used for manual operation. This results in an interface that makes it easy for an observer to track the activities of the automating procedures and intervene with minimum disturbance when necessary. MOP selects targets from the same list of standard star and calibration fields presented to the user, and chooses standard star fields covering ranges of airmass, color, and time necessary to monitor atmospheric extinction and produce a photometric solution. The software determines when additional standard star fields are unnecessary, and selects survey calibration fields according to availability and priority. Other automated features of MOP, such as maintaining the focus and keeping a night log, are also built around still functional manual interfaces, allowing the observer to be as active in observing as desired; MOP's automated features may be used as tools for manual observing, ignored entirely, or allowed to run the telescope with minimal supervision when taking routine data.

  20. A microfabrication-based approach to quantitative isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Jia, Yuan; Lin, Qiao

    2016-04-15

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) directly measures heat evolved in a chemical reaction to determine equilibrium binding properties of biomolecular systems. Conventional ITC instruments are expensive, use complicated design and construction, and require long analysis times. Microfabricated calorimetric devices are promising, although they have yet to allow accurate, quantitative ITC measurements of biochemical reactions. This paper presents a microfabrication-based approach to integrated, quantitative ITC characterization of biomolecular interactions. The approach integrates microfabricated differential calorimetric sensors with microfluidic titration. Biomolecules and reagents are introduced at each of a series of molar ratios, mixed, and allowed to react. The reaction thermal power is differentially measured, and used to determine the thermodynamic profile of the biomolecular interactions. Implemented in a microdevice featuring thermally isolated, well-defined reaction volumes with minimized fluid evaporation as well as highly sensitive thermoelectric sensing, the approach enables accurate and quantitative ITC measurements of protein-ligand interactions under different isothermal conditions. Using the approach, we demonstrate ITC characterization of the binding of 18-Crown-6 with barium chloride, and the binding of ribonuclease A with cytidine 2'-monophosphate within reaction volumes of approximately 0.7µL and at concentrations down to 2mM. For each binding system, the ITC measurements were completed with considerably reduced analysis times and material consumption, and yielded a complete thermodynamic profile of the molecular interaction in agreement with published data. This demonstrates the potential usefulness of our approach for biomolecular characterization in biomedical applications. PMID:26655185

  1. In silico concurrent multisite pH titration in proteins.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hao; Shen, Lin

    2014-07-30

    The concurrent proton binding at multiple sites in macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids is an important yet challenging problem in biochemistry. We develop an efficient generalized Hamiltonian approach to attack this issue. Based on the previously developed generalized-ensemble methods, an effective potential energy is constructed which combines the contributions of all (relevant) protonation states of the molecule. The effective potential preserves important phase regions of all states and, thus, allows efficient sampling of these regions in one simulation. The need for intermediate states in alchemical free energy simulations is greatly reduced. Free energy differences between different protonation states can be determined accurately and enable one to construct the grand canonical partition function. Therefore, the complicated concurrent multisite proton titration process of protein molecules can be satisfactorily simulated. Application of this method to the simulation of the pKa of Glu49, Asp50, and C-terminus of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor shows reasonably good agreement with published experimental work. This method provides an unprecedented vivid picture of how different protonation states change their relative population upon pH titration. We believe that the method will be very useful in deciphering the molecular mechanism of pH-dependent biomolecular processes in terms of a detailed atomistic description. PMID:24889139

  2. [Alkalimetric titrations of salts of organic bases in the Pharmacopoeia].

    PubMed

    Bezáková, Zelmíra; Stankovi?ová, Mária

    2013-12-01

    Modified methods - alkalimetry in ethanol 70% with a defined small volume of hydrochloric acid 0.01 mol/l added to the solution of the sample before the titration and alkalimetry in ethanol 70% or ethanol 96% alone with potentiometric end-point detection for the assay of halide salts of 11 organic N-bases has been investigated. The results were compared to those obtained by the method of the European Pharmacopoeia 7th Ed. (Ph. Eur. 7th Ed.). The Ph. Eur. 7th Ed. use for 8 investigated substances alkalimetry in alcohol 96 % with a defined small volume of hydrochloric acid 0.01 mol/l (5 ml) with potentiometric end-point detection: Cinchocaine hydrochloride, Codeine hydrochloride dihydrate, Ethylmorphine hydrochloride, Lidocaine hydrochloride, Papaverine hydrochloride, Pilocarpine hydrochloride, Quinine hydrochloride, Tetracaine hydrochloride. Our results revealed that the Ph. Eur. 7th Ed. method did not work for 5 drugs from this group: Cinchocaine hydrochloride, Ethylmorphine hydrochloride, Papaverine hydrochloride, Pilocarpine hydrochloride and Tetracaine hydrochloride. In the group of investigated substances we included also drugs with the character of weak organic bases for which Ph. Eur. 7th Ed. prescribed different methods for their assay: Thiamine hydrochloride and Pyridoxine hydrochloride - acidimetric titration in non-aqueous solvents with perchloric acid and Procaine hydrochloride - determination of primary aromatic amino-nitrogen (Ph. Eur. 7th Ed., chapter 2.5.8). PMID:24393115

  3. Standard test method for uranium by Iron (II) reduction in phosphoric acid followed by chromium (VI) titration in the presence of vanadium

    E-print Network

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This test method, commonly referred to as the Modified Davies and Gray technique, covers the titration of uranium in product, fuel, and scrap materials after the material is dissolved. The test method is versatile and has been ruggedness tested. With appropriate sample preparation, this test method can give precise and unbiased uranium assays over a wide variety of material types (1, 2). Details of the titration procedure in the presence of plutonium with appropriate modifications are given in Test Method C1204. 1.2 Uranium levels titrated are usually 20 to 50 mg, but up to 200 mg uranium can be titrated using the reagent volumes stated in this test method. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determ...

  4. Photometric Study of Uranian Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kesten, Philip R.

    1998-01-01

    The best summary of my work at NASA is expressed in the following abstract, submitted the Division for Planetary Science of the American Astronomical Society and to be presented at the annual meeting in Madison in October. We report photometric measurements of Uranian satellites Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel and Titania (10.4 Aug. 1995), and Neptune's satellite Triton (21.2 Sept. 1995) with the infrared camera (IRCAM) and standard J (1.13 - 1.42 microns), H (1.53 - 1.81 microns), and K (2.00 - 2.41 microns) filters at the 3.8-m UKIRT telescope on Mauna Kea. The individual images frames are 256 x 256 pixels with a platescale of .286 arcsec/pixel, resulting in a 1.22 arc min field of view. This summer brought the IR photometry measurements nearly to a close. As indicated by the abstract above, I will present this work at the annual DPS meeting in October. In anticipation of the opening of the new Carl Sagan Laboratory for Cosmochemisty, of which I will be a participating member, I also devoted a considerable fraction of the summer to learning the biochemistry which underlies the experiments to be conducted. To put the end of the summary close to the beginning, it was a most productive summer.

  5. Photometric properties of Triton hazes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, J.; Veverka, J.

    1994-01-01

    Voyager imaging observations of Triton have been used to investigate the characteristics of the atmospheric hazes on Triton at three wavelengths: violet (0.41 micrometers), blue (0.48 micrometers), and green (0.56 micrometers). The globally averaged optical depth is wavelength dependent, varying from 0.034 in green to 0.063 in violet. These photometric results are dominated by the properties of localized discrete clouds rather than by those of the thinner, more widespread haze known to occur on Triton. The cloud particles are bright, with single-scattering albedos near unity at all three wavelengths, suggestive of a transparent icy condensate. The asymmetry parameter (+0.6) and the wavelength dependence of the optical depth both indicate cloud particles 0.2-0.4 micrometers in radius. The clouds are concentrated at 50-60 deg S latitude, where opacities up to three times the global average are observed. This is the same latitude region where most of the evidence for current surface activity is found, suggesting that the clouds may be related to the plumes or at least to some process connected with the sublimation of the south polar cap. The effects of possible temporal variations in the haze opacity are examined. Increases in the haze opacity tend to redden Triton. However, the degree of reddening is not sufficient to explain the full range of observed changed in Triton over the past decade; variations in the surface properties appear to be necessary.

  6. 40 CFR 60.648 - Optional procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1 60.648 Section 60.648 Protection of Environment... procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas—Tutwiler Procedure. 1 1 Gas Engineers Handbook, Fuel.... In principle, this method consists of titrating hydrogen sulfide in a gas sample directly with...

  7. Sailing on the "C": A Vitamin Titration with a Twist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowa, S.; Kondo, A. E.

    2003-05-01

    The experiment takes the traditional redox titration of vitamin C using iodine with starch as an indicator, and presents it to the student as a challenge in guided-inquiry format. Two versions, with different levels of difficulty, are provided, to accommodate students with varying levels of problem-solving skills. The "challenge" is both quantitative and qualitative: if you were an eighteenth-century sea captain packing for a voyage to the New World, would you take oranges, lemons, limes, or grapefruits to prevent your crew from getting scurvy? The challenge ties in history, nutrition, and health with chemistry, and provides students an opportunity to work with familiar food products in the laboratory.

  8. Ultrasonic and densimetric titration applied for acid-base reactions.

    PubMed

    Burakowski, Andrzej; Gli?ski, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Classical acoustic acid-base titration was monitored using sound speed and density measurements. Plots of these parameters, as well as of the adiabatic compressibility coefficient calculated from them, exhibit changes with the volume of added titrant. Compressibility changes can be explained and quantitatively predicted theoretically in terms of Pasynski theory of non-compressible hydrates combined with that of the additivity of the hydration numbers with the amount and type of ions and molecules present in solution. It also seems that this development could be applied in chemical engineering for monitoring the course of chemical processes, since the applied experimental methods can be carried out almost independently on the medium under test (harmful, aggressive, etc.). PMID:25109640

  9. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry: Assisted Crystallization of RNA-Ligand Complexes.

    PubMed

    Da Veiga, Cyrielle; Mezher, Joelle; Dumas, Philippe; Ennifar, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The success rate of nucleic acids/ligands co-crystallization can be significantly improved by performing preliminary biophysical analyses. Among suitable biophysical approaches, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is certainly a method of choice. ITC can be used in a wide range of experimental conditions to monitor in real time the formation of the RNA- or DNA-ligand complex, with the advantage of providing in addition the complete binding profile of the interaction. Following the ITC experiment, the complex is ready to be concentrated for crystallization trials. This chapter describes a detailed experimental protocol for using ITC as a tool for monitoring RNA/small molecule binding, followed by co-crystallization. PMID:26227041

  10. Development and certification of an automated differential titration photocalorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubarev, Yu. A.; Lebedeva, N. Sh.; V'yugin, A. I.; Golubev, S. N.

    2015-04-01

    An automated differential titration photocalorimeter (ADTPC) has been designed for investigating photoinduced processes. This instrument provides means to record thermal and spectral (absorbance) changes in a calorimetric cell. Metrological characteristics of the described ADTPC are detection limit, 0.001 J with a reproducibility of 0.0002 J or better; short-duration noise level, ±5 rel. units; long-duration noise level, ±29 rel. units. ADTPC has been certified against the heats of mixing of solvents and the heat of neutralization reaction between tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane and HCl. The photocalorimetric unit of the device has additionally been certified against the heat of photolysis of K3[Fe(C2O4)3] and the heat of isomerization of azobenzene in heptane. Within the claimed errors, the heats measured with ADTPC are in agreement with the values recommended for the above systems.

  11. Photometric method for determination of acidity constants through integral spectra analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zevatskiy, Yuriy Eduardovich; Ruzanov, Daniil Olegovich; Samoylov, Denis Vladimirovich

    2015-04-01

    An express method for determination of acidity constants of organic acids, based on the analysis of the integral transmittance vs. pH dependence is developed. The integral value is registered as a photocurrent of photometric device simultaneously with potentiometric titration. The proposed method allows to obtain pKa using only simple and low-cost instrumentation. The optical part of the experimental setup has been optimized through the exclusion of the monochromator device. Thus it only takes 10-15 min to obtain one pKa value with the absolute error of less than 0.15 pH units. Application limitations and reliability of the method have been tested for a series of organic acids of various nature.

  12. Patient self-monitoring of blood pressure and self-titration of medication in primary care: the TASMINH2 trial qualitative study of health professionals’ experiences

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Miren I; Greenfield, Sheila M; Bray, Emma P; Hobbs, FD Richard; Holder, Roger; Little, Paul; Mant, Jonathan; Williams, Bryan; McManus, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    Background Self-monitoring with self-titration of antihypertensives leads to reduced blood pressure. Patients are keen on self-monitoring but little is known about healthcare professional views. Aim To explore health professionals‘ views and experiences of patient self-management, particularly with respect to future implementation into routine care. Design and setting Qualitative study embedded within a randomised controlled trial of healthcare professionals participating in the TASMINH2 trial of patient self-monitoring with self-titration of antihypertensives from 24 West Midlands general practices. Method Taped and transcribed semi-structured interviews with 13 GPs, two practice nurses and one healthcare assistant. Constant comparative method of analysis. Results Primary care professionals were positive about self-monitoring, but procedures for ensuring patients measured blood pressure correctly were haphazard. GPs interpreted home readings variably, with many not making adjustment for lower home blood pressure. Interviewees were satisfied with patient training and arrangements for blood pressure monitoring and self-titration of medication during the trial, but less sure about future implementation into routine care. There was evidence of a need for training of both patients and professionals for successful integration of self-management. Conclusion Health professionals wanted more patient involvement in hypertension care but needed a framework to work within. Consideration of how to train patients to measure blood pressure and how home readings become part of their care is required before self-monitoring and self-titration can be implemented widely. As home monitoring becomes more widespread, the development of patient self-management, including self-titration of medication, should follow but this may take time to achieve. PMID:23735408

  13. A Laser-Pointer-Based Spectrometer for Endpoint Detection of EDTA Titrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahm, Christopher E.; Hall, James W.; Mattioni, Brian E.

    2004-01-01

    A laser spectrometer for the ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid (EDTA) titration of magnesium or calcium ions that is designed around a handheld laser pointer as the source and a photoresistor as the detector is developed. Findings show that the use of the spectrometer reduces the degree of uncertainty and error in one part of the EDTA titrations,…

  14. SR-FTIR Study of Bacteria-Water Interactions: Acid-base Titration and Silification Experiments

    E-print Network

    SR-FTIR Study of Bacteria-Water Interactions: Acid-base Titration and Silification Experiments, we use synchrotron radiation-based FTIR to investigate the chemistry of bacterial surfaces with acid/base through fluid cell with BaF2 and ZnSe windows separated by a 6 um mylar spacer. Acid-base titration and Si

  15. Fluoro-glycosyl acridinones are ultra-sensitive active site titrating agents for retaining ?-glycosidases.

    PubMed

    Duo, Tianmeng; Goddard-Borger, Ethan D; Withers, Stephen G

    2014-08-25

    Novel fluorogenic 2-deoxy-2-fluoroglycosyl acridinone active site titrating reagents were synthesised and kinetic parameters determined for their inactivation of two retaining ?-glucosidases, a ?-galactosidase, a ?-xylosidase and several cellulases. Fluorescence-monitored active site titration using this class of reagents reliably measured active enzyme concentrations down to 3 nM. PMID:25004867

  16. Photometric sensors based on sol-gel porous glass doped with organic reagents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Ovadia; Kuyavskaya, B. I.; Sacharov, Y.; Rottman, Claudio; Kuselman, A.; Avnir, David; Ottolenghi, M.

    1993-03-01

    A new class of sensitive disposable sensors for determination of trace concentrations of water pollutants has been developed. It utilizes porous transparent silica glasses doped with organic photometric reagents. The silica sensors are produced at room temperature by the sol-gel procedure, i.e. by hydrolysis followed by polycondensation of tetraalkoxysilanes. Thus, we produced porous glasses doped with organic photometric reagents for the determination of typical cations, anions, pH, oxidation agents (e.g. disinfection agents) as well as typical air pollutants. A mathematical model for a flat plate monolithic iron sensor was developed and the predicted calibration curves were compared with the experimental response.

  17. Coulometric acid-base titration in nanoliter samples with glass and antimony electrodes.

    PubMed

    Karlmark, B; Jaeger, P; Fein, H; Giebisch, G

    1982-01-01

    A modification of the coulometric acid-base titration method is described for the measurement of titratable acid and ammonium in nanoliter samples. The main components consist of a pH-seeking device and a miniaturized antimony electrode system capable of delivering OH- ions at a known rate. The modifications include use of a cup-shaped pH-sensitive glass-membrane electrode for monitoring pH changes during titration and a new electronic titration circuit consisting of a high-impedance differential electrometer, a constant-current source, and an electronic integrating circuit. Details regarding the construction of the components of the titration system and practical aspects of its use are also provided. PMID:7058893

  18. PHOTOMETRIC ORBITS OF EXTRASOLAR PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Robert A.

    2009-09-10

    We define and analyze the photometric orbit (PhO) of an extrasolar planet observed in reflected light. In our definition, the PhO is a Keplerian entity with six parameters: semimajor axis, eccentricity, mean anomaly at some particular time, argument of periastron, inclination angle, and effective radius, which is the square root of the geometric albedo times the planetary radius. Preliminarily, we assume a Lambertian phase function. We study in detail the case of short-period giant planets (SPGPs) and observational parameters relevant to the Kepler mission: 20 ppm photometry with normal errors, 6.5 hr cadence, and three-year duration. We define a relevant 'planetary population of interest' in terms of probability distributions of the PhO parameters. We perform Monte Carlo experiments to estimate the ability to detect planets and to recover PhO parameters from light curves. We calibrate the completeness of a periodogram search technique, and find structure caused by degeneracy. We recover full orbital solutions from synthetic Kepler data sets and estimate the median errors in recovered PhO parameters. We treat in depth a case of a Jupiter body-double. For the stated assumptions, we find that Kepler should obtain orbital solutions for many of the 100-760 SPGP that Jenkins and Doyle estimate Kepler will discover. Because most or all of these discoveries will be followed up by ground-based radial velocity observations, the estimates of inclination angle from the PhO may enable the calculation of true companion masses: Kepler photometry may break the 'msin i' degeneracy. PhO observations may be difficult. There is uncertainty about how low the albedos of SPGPs actually are, about their phase functions, and about a possible noise floor due to systematic errors from instrumental and stellar sources. Nevertheless, simple detection of SPGPs in reflected light should be robust in the regime of Kepler photometry, and estimates of all six orbital parameters may be feasible in at least a subset of cases.

  19. Difference image analysis: The interplay between the photometric scale factor and systematic photometric errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramich, D. M.; Bachelet, E.; Alsubai, K. A.; Mislis, D.; Parley, N.

    2015-05-01

    Context. Understanding the source of systematic errors in photometry is essential for their calibration. Aims: We investigate how photometry performed on difference images can be influenced by errors in the photometric scale factor. Methods: We explore the equations for difference image analysis (DIA), and we derive an expression describing how errors in the difference flux, the photometric scale factor and the reference flux are propagated to the object photometry. Results: We find that the error in the photometric scale factor is important, and while a few studies have shown that it can be at a significant level, it is currently neglected by the vast majority of photometric surveys employing DIA. Conclusions: Minimising the error in the photometric scale factor, or compensating for it in a post-calibration model, is crucial for reducing the systematic errors in DIA photometry.

  20. Apparent Cooperative Assembly of the Bacterial Cell Division Protein FtsZ Demonstrated by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry*

    E-print Network

    Erickson, Harold P.

    by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry* Received for publication, January 27, 2003 Published, JBC Papers in Press isothermal titration calorim- etry (ITC) to measure the heat of FtsZ self-association under various

  1. Structures of Prolyl Oligopeptidase Substrate/Inhibitor Complexes USE OF INHIBITOR BINDING FOR TITRATION OF THE CATALYTIC HISTIDINE RESIDUE*

    E-print Network

    Fülöp, Vilmos

    FOR TITRATION OF THE CATALYTIC HISTIDINE RESIDUE* Received for publication, August 3, 2000, and in revised form- teases. The new titration method gave a single pKa for prolyl oligopeptidase, whose reaction exhibited

  2. Stellar cycles from photometric data: CoRoT stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira Lopes, C. E.; Leão, I. C.; de Freitas, D. B.; Canto Martins, B. L.; Catelan, M.; De Medeiros, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    Context. Until a few years ago, the amplitude variation in the photometric data had been explored to a limited extent mainly because of time resolution and photometric sensitivity limitations. This investigation is now possible thanks to the Kepler and CoRoT databases which provide a unique set of data for studying the nature of stellar variability cycles. Aims: The present study characterizes the amplitude variation in a sample of main-sequence stars with light curves collected using CoRoT exofield CCDs. Methods: We analyze potential stellar activity cycles by studying the variability amplitude over small boxes. The cycle periods and amplitudes were computed based on the Lomb-Scargle periodogram, harmonic fits, and visual inspection. As a first application of our approach, we considered the photometric data for 16 CoRoT FGK main sequence stars, revisited during the IRa01, LRa01 and LRa06 CoRoT runs. Results: The 16 CoRoT stars appear to follow the empirical relations between activity cycle periods (Pcyc) and the rotation period (Prot) found by previous works. In addition to the so-called A (active) and I (inactive) sequences previously identified, there is a possible third sequence, here named S (short-cycles) sequence. However, recovery fractions estimated from simulations suggest that only a half of our sample has confident cycle measurements. Therefore, more study is needed to verify our results, and Kepler data will clearly be useful for such a study. Overall, our procedure provides a key tool for exploring the CoRoT and Kepler databases to identify and characterize stellar cycle variability. The CoRoT space mission was developed and is operated by the French space agency CNES, with the participation of ESA's RSSD and Science Programmes, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Germany, and Spain.

  3. Predicting proton titration in cationic micelle and bilayer environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, Brian H.; Eike, David M.; Murch, Bruce P.; Koenig, Peter H.; Shen, Jana K.

    2014-08-01

    Knowledge of the protonation behavior of pH-sensitive molecules in micelles and bilayers has significant implications in consumer product development and biomedical applications. However, the calculation of pKa's in such environments proves challenging using traditional structure-based calculations. Here we apply all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics with explicit ions and titratable water to calculate the pKa of a fatty acid molecule in a micelle of dodecyl trimethylammonium chloride and liquid as well as gel-phase bilayers of diethyl ester dimethylammonium chloride. Interestingly, the pKa of the fatty acid in the gel bilayer is 5.4, 0.4 units lower than that in the analogous liquid bilayer or micelle, despite the fact that the protonated carboxylic group is significantly more desolvated in the gel bilayer. This work illustrates the capability of all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics in capturing the delicate balance in the free energies of desolvation and Coulombic interactions. It also shows the importance of the explicit treatment of ions in sampling the protonation states. The ability to model dynamics of pH-responsive substrates in a bilayer environment is useful for improving fabric care products as well as our understanding of the side effects of anti-inflammatory drugs.

  4. Predicting proton titration in cationic micelle and bilayer environments

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, Brian H.; Shen, Jana K.; Eike, David M.; Murch, Bruce P.; Koenig, Peter H.

    2014-08-28

    Knowledge of the protonation behavior of pH-sensitive molecules in micelles and bilayers has significant implications in consumer product development and biomedical applications. However, the calculation of pK{sub a}’s in such environments proves challenging using traditional structure-based calculations. Here we apply all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics with explicit ions and titratable water to calculate the pK{sub a} of a fatty acid molecule in a micelle of dodecyl trimethylammonium chloride and liquid as well as gel-phase bilayers of diethyl ester dimethylammonium chloride. Interestingly, the pK{sub a} of the fatty acid in the gel bilayer is 5.4, 0.4 units lower than that in the analogous liquid bilayer or micelle, despite the fact that the protonated carboxylic group is significantly more desolvated in the gel bilayer. This work illustrates the capability of all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics in capturing the delicate balance in the free energies of desolvation and Coulombic interactions. It also shows the importance of the explicit treatment of ions in sampling the protonation states. The ability to model dynamics of pH-responsive substrates in a bilayer environment is useful for improving fabric care products as well as our understanding of the side effects of anti-inflammatory drugs.

  5. Binding isotherms for soluble immobilized affinity ligands from spectral titration.

    PubMed

    Mayes, A G; Eisenthal, R; Hubble, J

    1992-12-01

    The method of spectral titration has been applied to binding equilibria between proteins and soluble immobilized ligands and evaluated using the interaction between Cibacron blue-dextran conjugates and lysozyme. The method is both simple and rapid and provides a convenient screening technique for characterization of soluble adsorbents designed for use in aqueous two-phase affinity extraction or as liquid-phase models for affinity chromatography systems. The results indicate that regardless of ligand density a constant 28% of the total coupled dye is available for high-affinity protein binding at saturation. The dissociation constant for the dye-protein interaction, however, decreases with dye loading. The potential for kinetic investigations has been demonstrated using a stopped-flow apparatus. The results indicate that a simple rate equation is inadequate to describe the data for lysozyme binding to dye-dextran conjugates. A modified model, which better describes the data, was developed by including a second rate limiting process, the transition from stacked to unstacked dye ligands on the dextran backbone. This effect could have practical significance for protein binding kinetics in affinity chromatography, especially in high-performance liquid affinity chromatography applications where mass transfer is rapid. PMID:18601078

  6. Mapping glycoside hydrolase substrate subsites by isothermal titration calorimetry

    PubMed Central

    Zolotnitsky, Gennady; Cogan, Uri; Adir, Noam; Solomon, Vered; Shoham, Gil; Shoham, Yuval

    2004-01-01

    Relating thermodynamic parameters to structural and biochemical data allows a better understanding of substrate binding and its contribution to catalysis. The analysis of the binding of carbohydrates to proteins or enzymes is a special challenge because of the multiple interactions and forces involved. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) provides a direct measure of binding enthalpy (?Ha) and allows the determination of the binding constant (free energy), entropy, and stoichiometry. In this study, we used ITC to elucidate the binding thermodynamics of xylosaccharides for two xylanases of family 10 isolated from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6. The change in the heat capacity of binding (?Cp = ?H/?T) for xylosaccharides differing in one sugar unit was determined by using ITC measurements at different temperatures. Because hydrophobic stacking interactions are associated with negative ?Cp, the data allow us to predict the substrate binding preference in the binding subsites based on the crystal structure of the enzyme. The proposed positional binding preference was consistent with mutants lacking aromatic binding residues at different subsites and was also supported by tryptophan fluorescence analysis. PMID:15277671

  7. A multidimensional approach to the analysis of chemical shift titration experiments in the frame of a multiple reaction scheme.

    PubMed

    D'Aléo, Anthony; Dumont, Elise; Maury, Olivier; Giraud, Nicolas

    2013-10-01

    We present a method for fitting curves acquired by chemical shift titration experiments, in the frame of a three-step complexation mechanism. To that end, we have implemented a fitting procedure, based on a nonlinear least squares fitting method, that determines the best fitting curve using a "coarse grid search" approach and provides distributions for the different parameters of the complexation model that are compatible with the experimental precision. The resulting analysis protocol is first described and validated on a theoretical data set. We show its ability to converge to the true parameter values of the simulated reaction scheme and to evaluate complexation constants together with multidimensional uncertainties. Then, we apply this protocol to the study of the supramolecular interactions, in aqueous solution, between a lanthanide complex and three different model molecules, using NMR titration experiments. We show that within the uncertainty that can be evaluated from the parameter distributions generated during our analysis, the affinities between the lanthanide derivative and each model molecule can be discriminated, and we propose values for the corresponding thermodynamic constants. PMID:23955873

  8. Photometric Evolution of Galaxies in Cosmological Scenarios

    E-print Network

    Gertrud Contardo; Matthias Steinmetz; Uta Fritze-von Alvensleben

    1998-01-28

    The photometric evolution of galaxies in a hierarchically clustering universe is investigated. The study is based on high resolution numerical simulations which include the effects of gas dynamics, shock heating, radiative cooling and a heuristic star formation scheme. The outcome of the simulations is convolved with photometric models which enables us to predict the appearance of galaxies in the broad band colors U, B, V, R, I and K. We demonstrate the effect of the mutual interplay of the hierarchical build-up of galaxies, photometric evolution, k-correction, and intervening absorption on the appearance of forming disk galaxies at redshift one to three. We also discuss to what extend the numerical resolution of current computer simulations is sufficient to make quantitative predictions on surface density profiles and color gradients.

  9. Defining photometric peculiar type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    González-Gaitán, S.; Pignata, G.; Förster, F.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Bufano, F.; Galbany, L.; Hamuy, M.; De Jaeger, T.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Phillips, M. M.; Folatelli, G.; Anderson, J. P.

    2014-11-10

    We present a new photometric identification technique for SN 1991bg-like type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), i.e., objects with light curve characteristics such as later primary maxima and the absence of a secondary peak in redder filters. This method is capable of selecting this sub-group from the normal type Ia population. Furthermore, we find that recently identified peculiar sub-types such as SNe Iax and super-Chandrasekhar SNe Ia have photometric characteristics similar to 91bg-like SNe Ia, namely, the absence of secondary maxima and shoulders at longer wavelengths, and can also be classified with our technique. The similarity of these different SN Ia sub-groups perhaps suggests common physical conditions. This typing methodology permits the photometric identification of peculiar SNe Ia in large upcoming wide-field surveys either to study them further or to obtain a pure sample of normal SNe Ia for cosmological studies.

  10. Anal. Chem. 1982, 54, 2117-2120 2117 validity of the ASV titration method. We are confident that

    E-print Network

    Anal. Chem. 1982, 54, 2117-2120 2117 validity of the ASV titration method. We are confident explainthe typical titration curve obtained by using the ASV method (including, perhaps, an accurate CL is that the complex be nonreducible (5, 6). It is obvious that many assumptions must be met for the ASV-titration

  11. Photometric Redshifts in the IRAC Shallow Survey

    E-print Network

    M. Brodwin; M. J. I. Brown; M. L. N. Ashby; C. Bian; K. Brand; A. Dey; P. R. Eisenhardt; D. J. Eisenstein; A. H. Gonzalez; J. -S. Huang; B. T. Jannuzi; C. S. Kochanek; E. McKenzie; M. A. Pahre; H. A. Smith; B. T. Soifer; S. A. Stanford; D. Stern; R. J. Elston

    2006-07-19

    Accurate photometric redshifts are calculated for nearly 200,000 galaxies to a 4.5 micron flux limit of ~13 uJy in the 8.5 deg^2 Spitzer/IRAC Shallow survey. Using a hybrid photometric redshift algorithm incorporating both neural-net and template-fitting techniques, calibrated with over 15,000 spectroscopic redshifts, a redshift accuracy of \\sigma = 0.06(1+z) is achieved for 95% of galaxies at 01) galaxy clusters. We present one such spectroscopically confirmed cluster at =1.24, ISCS J1434.5+3427. Finally, we present a measurement of the 4.5 micron-selected galaxy redshift distribution.

  12. Photometric Calibrations for the SIRTF Infrared Spectrograph

    E-print Network

    P. W. Morris; V. Charmandaris; T. Herter; L. Armus; J. Houck; G. Sloan

    2002-03-07

    The SIRTF InfraRed Spectrograph (IRS) is faced with many of the same calibration challenges that were experienced in the ISO SWS calibration program, owing to similar wavelength coverage and overlapping spectral resolutions of the two instruments. Although the IRS is up to ~300 times more sensitive and without moving parts, imposing unique calibration challenges on their own, an overlap in photometric sensitivities of the high-resolution modules with the SWS grating sections allows lessons, resources, and certain techniques from the SWS calibration programs to be exploited. We explain where these apply in an overview of the IRS photometric calibration planning.

  13. Photometric diversity of terrains on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, J.; Veverka, J.; Helfenstein, P.; Lee, P.

    1994-01-01

    Voyager disk-resolved images of Triton in the violet (0.41 micrometers) and green (0.56 micrometer wavelengths have been analyzed to derive the photometric characteristics of terrains on Triton. Similar conclusions are found using two distinct but related definitions of photometric units, one based on color ratio and albedo properties (A. S. McEwen, 1990), the other on albedo and brightness ratios at different phase angles (P. Lee et al., 1992). A significant diversity of photometric behavior, much broader than that discovered so far on any other icy satellite, occurs among Triton's terrains. Remarkably, differences in photometric behavior do not correlate well with geologic terrain boundaries defined on the basis of surface morphology. This suggests that in most cases photometric properties on Triton are controlled by thin deposits superposed on underlying geologic units. Single scattering albedos are 0.98 or higher and asymmetry factors range from -0.35 to -0.45 for most units. The most distinct scattering behavior is exhibited by the reddish northern units already identified as the Anomalously Scattering Region (ASR), which scatters light almost isotropically with g = -0.04. In part due to the effects of Triton's clouds and haze, it is difficult to constrain the value of bar-theta, Hapke's macroscopic roughness parameter, precisely for Triton or to map differences in bar-theta among the different photometric terrains. However, our study shows that Triton must be relatively smooth, with bar-theta less than 15-20 degs and suggests that a value of 14 degs is appropriate. The differences in photometric characteristics lead to significantly different phase angle behavior for the various terrains. For example, a terrain (e.g., the ASR) that appears dark relative to another at low phase angles will reverse its contrast (become relatively brighter) at larger phase angles. The photometric parameters have been used to calculate hemispherical albedos for the units and to infer likely surface temperatures. Based on these results, we determine that all but the most southerly regions (i.e., mostly south of the equator) of the reddish northern terrains are likely to have been covered with deposits of nitrogen frost at the time of the Voyager flyby, in agreement with the suggestion from the photometry that these units are overlain by a thin veneer of material.

  14. Comparison of methods for accurate end-point detection of potentiometric titrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villela, R. L. A.; Borges, P. P.; Vysko?il, L.

    2015-01-01

    Detection of the end point in potentiometric titrations has wide application on experiments that demand very low measurement uncertainties mainly for certifying reference materials. Simulations of experimental coulometric titration data and consequential error analysis of the end-point values were conducted using a programming code. These simulations revealed that the Levenberg-Marquardt method is in general more accurate than the traditional second derivative technique used currently as end-point detection for potentiometric titrations. Performance of the methods will be compared and presented in this paper.

  15. On the Physical Meaning of the Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Measurements in Calorimeters with Full Cells

    PubMed Central

    Grolier, Jean-Pierre E.; del Río, Jose Manuel

    2009-01-01

    We have performed a detailed study of the thermodynamics of the titration process in an isothermal titration calorimeter with full cells. We show that the relationship between the enthalpy and the heat measured is better described in terms of the equation ? H = Winj + Q (where Winj is the work necessary to carry out the titration) than in terms of ?H = Q. Moreover, we show that the heat of interaction between two components is related to the partial enthalpy of interaction at infinite dilution of the titrant component, as well as to its partial volume of interaction at infinite dilution. PMID:20054472

  16. On the physical meaning of the isothermal titration calorimetry measurements in calorimeters with full cells.

    PubMed

    Grolier, Jean-Pierre E; del Río, Jose Manuel

    2009-12-01

    We have performed a detailed study of the thermodynamics of the titration process in an isothermal titration calorimeter with full cells. We show that the relationship between the enthalpy and the heat measured is better described in terms of the equation Delta H = W(inj) + Q (where W(inj) is the work necessary to carry out the titration) than in terms of DeltaH = Q. Moreover, we show that the heat of interaction between two components is related to the partial enthalpy of interaction at infinite dilution of the titrant component, as well as to its partial volume of interaction at infinite dilution. PMID:20054472

  17. Kohoutek, photometric photography experiment (S233)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, C. A.; Craven, P. D.

    1981-01-01

    The final results of the Skylab 4 experiment S233, Kohoutek photometric photography experiment, which undertook a series of visible light photographs suitable for photometry and for a photographic history of Comet Kohoutek are described. The experiment concept, the data reduction method, and the results obtained are discussed.

  18. System for clinical photometric stereo endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durr, Nicholas J.; González, Germán.; Lim, Daryl; Traverso, Giovanni; Nishioka, Norman S.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.; Parot, Vicente

    2014-02-01

    Photometric stereo endoscopy is a technique that captures information about the high-spatial-frequency topography of the field of view simultaneously with a conventional color image. Here we describe a system that will enable photometric stereo endoscopy to be clinically evaluated in the large intestine of human patients. The clinical photometric stereo endoscopy system consists of a commercial gastroscope, a commercial video processor, an image capturing and processing unit, custom synchronization electronics, white light LEDs, a set of four fibers with diffusing tips, and an alignment cap. The custom pieces that come into contact with the patient are composed of biocompatible materials that can be sterilized before use. The components can then be assembled in the endoscopy suite before use. The resulting endoscope has the same outer diameter as a conventional colonoscope (14 mm), plugs into a commercial video processor, captures topography and color images at 15 Hz, and displays the conventional color image to the gastroenterologist in real-time. We show that this system can capture a color and topographical video in a tubular colon phantom, demonstrating robustness to complex geometries and motion. The reported system is suitable for in vivo evaluation of photometric stereo endoscopy in the human large intestine.

  19. A photometric perturbation of the counterglow.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, F. E.; Carroll, B.; Roach, J. R.; Aller, L. H.

    1973-01-01

    An example of photometric variability of a counterglow region in the antisolar direction is discussed. A speculative interpretation of its significance leads to the suggestion that the weakened radiance of the counterglow may in this case be due to a dust cloud of scattering material in the general region of the earth-moon system.

  20. A photometric model of the zodiacal light.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, F. E.

    1972-01-01

    An intercomparison of published photometric investigations of the zodiacal light and gegenschein is made, leading to a compilation of brightnesses over the entire sky in a reseau with 5-deg intervals. The results are given in absolute units. Several graphical representations illustrate the compilation.

  1. Some Tungsten Oxidation-Reduction Chemistry: A Paint Pot Titration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickering, Miles; Monts, David L.

    1982-01-01

    Reports an oxidation-reduction experiment using tungsten, somewhat analogous to the classical student experiment involving oxidation-reduction of vanadium. Includes experimental procedures, results, and toxicity/cost of tungsten compounds. (Author/JN)

  2. Photometrical Peculiarities and Outburst Activity of Two Target Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filonenko, V. S.; Churyumov, K. I.

    2005-03-01

    The light curves of short-period comets 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and 9P/Tempel 1 (which are targets for "ROSETTA" and "Deep Impact") have been constructed. Their photometrical behavior was studied. Photometrical parameters have been determined.

  3. Philosophy and updating of the asteroid photometric catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnusson, Per; Barucci, M. Antonietta; Capria, M. T.; Dahlgren, Mats; Fulchignoni, Marcello; Lagerkvist, C. I.

    1992-01-01

    The Asteroid Photometric Catalogue now contains photometric lightcurves for 584 asteroids. We discuss some of the guiding principles behind it. This concerns both observers who offer input to it and users of the product.

  4. Mark Abrahams Lawrence Dill The value of titration experiments: a reply to Moody et al. (1996)

    E-print Network

    Dill, Lawrence M.

    1996-01-01

    FORUM Mark Abrahams á Lawrence Dill The value of titration experiments: a reply to Moody et al to quantify decisions involving con¯icting demands. In 1989, Abrahams and Dill (henceforth referred to as AD

  5. A Computer-Based Simulation of an Acid-Base Titration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boblick, John M.

    1971-01-01

    Reviews the advantages of computer simulated environments for experiments, referring in particular to acid-base titrations. Includes pre-lab instructions and a sample computer printout of a student's use of an acid-base simulation. Ten references. (PR)

  6. An isoperibol calorimeter for the investigation of biochemical kinetics and isothermal titration calorimetry

    E-print Network

    Amadi, Ovid Charles

    2007-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry is a technique used to measure the enthalpy change associated with a molecular binding interaction. From these data, the binding constant for the reaction can be determined. In the scope ...

  7. Photometric Color Conversions for Space Surveillance Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, J.

    In order to maximize sensitivity, optical space surveillance sensors use detectors that have good sensitivity over a wide region of the spectrum. For example, the CCD detectors for the Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research (LINEAR) Project, which are nearly identical to the detectors of the Ground-based Electro-Optical Deep Space Surveillance System, have good sensitivity over the visible spectrum from 380 nanometers to beyond 1000 nanometers. However, photometric calibration of the intensities of objects (stars, satellites, asteroids, etc.) measured by these systems must be referenced to astronomical star catalogs that were measured over much narrower portions of the available spectrum. For example, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Photometric Database contains photometric measurements in five bandpasses that are each about 150 nanometers wide. This paper will present a method for converting between photometric systems with different bandpasses. The method uses the measured response functions of the detectors of interest along with a model of the spectral transmissivity of the atmosphere (Stone, 1996), and a catalog of stellar spectra (Pickles, 1998) to derive polynomial functions that allow for the conversion of brightness measurements from astronomical catalogs to the bandpass of the sensor. The method has been extensively tested using data from the Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research project in comparison with catalog measurements from the USNO B1.0 astrometric catalog, and the SDSS Photometric Database. Through OPAL (Optical Processing Architecture at Lincoln), this technique is being applied to ground-based and space-based sensors including the Space-Based Visible (SBV) system, the Space-Based Space Surveillance (SBSS) system, and the Space Surveillance Telescope (SST).

  8. Optimal filter systems for photometric redshift estimation

    E-print Network

    N. Benitez; M. Moles; J. A. L. Aguerri; E. Alfaro; T. Broadhurst; J. Cabrera; F. J. Castander; J. Cepa; M. Cervino; D. Cristobal-Hornillos; A. Fernandez-Soto; R. M. Gonzalez-Delgado; L. Infante; I. Marquez; V. J. Martinez; J. Masegosa; A. Del Olmo; J. Perea; F. Prada; J. M. Quintana; S. F. Sanchez

    2008-12-18

    In the next years, several cosmological surveys will rely on imaging data to estimate the redshift of galaxies, using traditional filter systems with 4-5 optical broad bands; narrower filters improve the spectral resolution, but strongly reduce the total system throughput. We explore how photometric redshift performance depends on the number of filters n_f, characterizing the survey depth through the fraction of galaxies with unambiguous redshift estimates. For a combination of total exposure time and telescope imaging area of 270 hrs m^2, 4-5 filter systems perform significantly worse, both in completeness depth and precision, than systems with n_f >= 8 filters. Our results suggest that for low n_f, the color-redshift degeneracies overwhelm the improvements in photometric depth, and that even at higher n_f, the effective photometric redshift depth decreases much more slowly with filter width than naively expected from the reduction in S/N. Adding near-IR observations improves the performance of low n_f systems, but still the system which maximizes the photometric redshift completeness is formed by 9 filters with logarithmically increasing bandwidth (constant resolution) and half-band overlap, reaching ~0.7 mag deeper, with 10% better redshift precision, than 4-5 filter systems. A system with 20 constant-width, non-overlapping filters reaches only ~0.1 mag shallower than 4-5 filter systems, but has a precision almost 3 times better, dz = 0.014(1+z) vs. dz = 0.042(1+z). We briefly discuss a practical implementation of such a photometric system: the ALHAMBRA survey.

  9. A zinc-copper couple for the reduction of iron for permanganate titration

    E-print Network

    Jones, William Albert

    1916-01-01

    FOR THE REDUCTION OF IRON FOR PERMANGANATE TITRATION. by William A. Jones ,A thesis submitted to the department of Chemistry and the Faculty of the Graduate School in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Masterfs degree. , y Approved: ' ^ 4... Department of Chemistry. May 13th, 1916. A ZING - COPPER COUPLE FOR THE REDUCTION OF IRON FOR PERMANGANATE TITRATION. By William A. Jones. The following work was undertaken to determine the practical value of electrolysis for the reduction of iron...

  10. Calcium-buffering effects of gluconate and nucleotides, as determined by a novel fluorimetric titration method.

    PubMed

    Woehler, Andrew; Lin, Kun-Han; Neher, Erwin

    2014-11-15

    Significantly more Ca(2+) influx is required for eliciting release of neurotransmitter during whole cell patch clamp recording in the Calyx of Held, when gluconate with 3 mm free ATP is used as pipette filling solution, as compared to a methanesulfonate-based solution with excess Mg(2+). This reduction in efficiency of Ca(2+) in eliciting release is due to low-affinity Ca(2+) binding of both gluconate and ATP(2-) anions. To study these effects we developed a simple fluorimeteric titration procedure, which reports the dissociation constant, KD, of a given Ca(2+) indicator dye, multiplied by 1 plus the sum of Ca(2+) binding ratios of any anions, which act as low-affinity Ca(2+) ligands. For solutions without Ca(2+) binding anions we find KD values for Fura2FF ranging from 11.5 ± 1.7 to 15.6 ± 7.47 ?m depending on the dominant anion used. For Fura6F and KCl-based solutions we find KD = 17.8 ± 1.3 ?m. For solutions with gluconate as the main anion and for solutions that contain nucleotides, such as ATP and GTP, we find much higher values for the product. Assuming that the KD of the indicator dye is equal to that of KCl-based solutions we calculate the summed Ca(2+) binding ratios and find a value of 3.55 for a solution containing 100 mm potassium gluconate and 4 mm ATP. Gluconate contributes a value of 1.75 to this number, while the contribution of ATP depends strongly on the presence of Mg(2+) and varies from 0.8 (with excess Mg(2+)) to 13.8 (in the presence of 3 mm free ATP). Methanesulfonate has negligible Ca(2+) binding capacity. These results explain the reduced efficiency of Ca(2+) influx in the presence of gluconate or nucleotides, as these anions are expected to intercept Ca(2+) ions at short distance. PMID:25194050

  11. Calcium-buffering effects of gluconate and nucleotides, as determined by a novel fluorimetric titration method

    PubMed Central

    Woehler, Andrew; Lin, Kun-Han; Neher, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Significantly more Ca2+ influx is required for eliciting release of neurotransmitter during whole cell patch clamp recording in the Calyx of Held, when gluconate with 3 mm free ATP is used as pipette filling solution, as compared to a methanesulfonate-based solution with excess Mg2+. This reduction in efficiency of Ca2+ in eliciting release is due to low-affinity Ca2+ binding of both gluconate and ATP2? anions. To study these effects we developed a simple fluorimeteric titration procedure, which reports the dissociation constant, KD, of a given Ca2+ indicator dye, multiplied by 1 plus the sum of Ca2+ binding ratios of any anions, which act as low-affinity Ca2+ ligands. For solutions without Ca2+ binding anions we find KD values for Fura2FF ranging from 11.5 ± 1.7 to 15.6 ± 7.47 ?m depending on the dominant anion used. For Fura6F and KCl-based solutions we find KD = 17.8 ± 1.3 ?m. For solutions with gluconate as the main anion and for solutions that contain nucleotides, such as ATP and GTP, we find much higher values for the product. Assuming that the KD of the indicator dye is equal to that of KCl-based solutions we calculate the summed Ca2+ binding ratios and find a value of 3.55 for a solution containing 100 mm potassium gluconate and 4 mm ATP. Gluconate contributes a value of 1.75 to this number, while the contribution of ATP depends strongly on the presence of Mg2+ and varies from 0.8 (with excess Mg2+) to 13.8 (in the presence of 3 mm free ATP). Methanesulfonate has negligible Ca2+ binding capacity. These results explain the reduced efficiency of Ca2+ influx in the presence of gluconate or nucleotides, as these anions are expected to intercept Ca2+ ions at short distance. PMID:25194050

  12. SDSS Data Management and Photometric Quality Assessment

    E-print Network

    Z. Ivezic; R. H. Lupton; D. Schlegel; B. Boroski; J. Adelman-McCarthy; B. Yanny; S. Kent; C. Stoughton; D. Finkbeiner; N. Padmanabhan; C. M. Rockosi; J. E. Gunn; G. R. Knapp; M. A. Strauss; G. T. Richards; D. Eisenstein; T. Nicinski; S. J. Kleinman; J. Krzesinski; P. R. Newman; S. Snedden; A. R. Thakar; A. Szalay; J. A. Munn; J. A. Smith; D. Tucker; B. C. Lee

    2004-10-07

    We summarize the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data acquisition and processing steps, and describe runQA, a pipeline designed for automated data quality assessment. In particular, we show how the position of the stellar locus in color-color diagrams can be used to estimate the accuracy of photometric zeropoint calibration to better than 0.01 mag in 0.03 deg2 patches. Using this method, we estimate that typical photometric zeropoint calibration errors for SDSS imaging data are not larger than ~0.01 mag in the g, r, and i bands, 0.02 mag in the z band, and 0.03 mag in the u band (root-mean-scatter for zeropoint offsets).

  13. Photometric Standards for Non-Standard Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoot, John E.

    2015-05-01

    The AAVSO, professional collaborators, and research consortiums are increasingly requesting that photometric observations be submitted after they have been transformed onto 'standard' photometric systems. This greatly reduces the burden on the principal investigators in managing and merging data from many disparate contributors, but discourages many potential contributors who are unaware that their present equipment can make a valuable contribution. Many potential observers, amateurs, students and instructors are confused over what filters are required and what standards are best. This paper focuses on the best standards and observation methods for observers with one shot color cameras and those possessing monochrome CCD cameras with LRGB filter sets, the two most common configurations used in amateur and educational observatories. This paper examines which current standards best match common equipment and present effective ways for amateurs and students to reduce data to standard systems with common tools and a minimum of mathematical rigor.

  14. Astrophysical science with a spaceborne photometric telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granados, Arno F. (editor); Borucki, William J. (editor)

    1994-01-01

    The FRESIP Project (FRequency of Earth-Sized Inner Planets) is currently under study at NASA Ames Research Center. The goal of FRESIP is the measurement of the frequency of Earth-sized extra-solar planets in inner orbits via the photometric signature of a transit event. This will be accomplished with a spaceborne telescope/photometer capable of photometric precision of two parts in 100,000 at a magnitude of m(sub v) = 12.5. To achieve the maximum scientific value from the FRESIP mission, an astrophysical science workshop was held at the SETI Institute in Mountain View, California, November 11-12, 1993. Workshop participants were invited as experts in their field of astrophysical research and discussed the astrophysical science that can be achieved within the context of the FRESIP mission.

  15. Water Determination Using Karl Fischer Titration Water content needs to be determined at all stages of the manufacturing process from raw materials to

    E-print Network

    Nazarenko, Alexander

    Water Determination Using Karl Fischer Titration Water content needs to be determined at all stages and ease of use is Karl Fischer titration. The titration is based on the oxidation of sulphur dioxide by iodine in the presence of water. It is the same reaction as the iodometric titration of sulphur dioxide

  16. Interference filters for UV photometric instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atrasheuski, Yu. I.; Liudchik, A. M.; Stelmakh, G. F.; Turishev, L. N.; Yurkevich, I. I.

    2012-11-01

    The use of interference filters in UV photometric instrumentation is discussed with the features of the spectral distribution of solar radiation taken into account. In particular, special attention is paid to the problem of reducing the transmission in the long-wavelength wings of UV filters to a level of 0.002-0.001%. Technical means for measuring the parameters of the filters are described. The characteristics of some experimentally produced samples are discussed.

  17. Photometrical evolution of some periodic comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filonenko, Vitaly; Churyumov, Klim

    The detail light curves of some periodic comets for all their appearances have been constructed on the basis of most comprehensive observational data. The photometrical parameters, phase coefficients and asymmetry of light curves have been determined. Also the peculiarities of the brightness outburst activity were investigated. The secular variations of the cometary brightness and their correlations with solar activity have been investigated. These results are important for understanding the mechanisms of origin and evolution of comets.

  18. A Blind Test of Hapke's Photometric Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfenstein, P.; Shepard, M. K.

    2003-01-01

    Hapke's bidirectional reflectance equation is a versatile analytical tool for predicting (i.e. forward modeling) the photometric behavior of a particulate surface from the observed optical and structural properties of its constituents. Remote sensing applications of Hapke s model, however, generally seek to predict the optical and structural properties of particulate soil constituents from the observed photometric behavior of a planetary surface (i.e. inverse-modeling). Our confidence in the latter approach can be established only if we ruthlessly test and optimize it. Here, we summarize preliminary results from a blind-test of the Hapke model using laboratory measurements obtained with the Bloomsburg University Goniometer (B.U.G.). The first author selected eleven well-characterized powder samples and measured the spectrophotometric behavior of each. A subset of twenty undisclosed examples of the photometric measurement sets were sent to the second author who fit the data using the Hapke model and attempted to interpret their optical and mechanical properties from photometry alone.

  19. Improving LSST Photometric Calibration with Gaia Data

    E-print Network

    Axelrod, Tim

    2014-01-01

    We consider the possibility that the Gaia mission can supply data which will improve the photometric calibration of LSST. After outlining the LSST calibra- tion process and the information that will be available from Gaia, we explore two options for using Gaia data. The first is to use Gaia G-band photometry of selected stars, in conjunction with knowledge of the stellar parameters Teff, log g, and AV, and in some cases Z, to create photometric standards in the LSST u, g, r, i, z, and y bands. The accuracies of the resulting standard magnitudes are found to be insufficient to satisfy LSST requirements when generated from main sequence (MS) stars, but generally adequate from DA white dwarfs (WD). The second option is combine the LSST bandpasses into a synthetic Gaia G band, which is a close approximation to the real Gaia G band. This allows synthetic Gaia G photometry to be directly compared with actual Gaia G photometry at a level of accuracy which is useful for both verifying and improving LSST photometric c...

  20. Can Selforganizing Maps Accurately Predict Photometric Redshifts?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, Michael J.; Klose, Christian

    2012-01-01

    We present an unsupervised machine-learning approach that can be employed for estimating photometric redshifts. The proposed method is based on a vector quantization called the self-organizing-map (SOM) approach. A variety of photometrically derived input values were utilized from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey's main galaxy sample, luminous red galaxy, and quasar samples, along with the PHAT0 data set from the Photo-z Accuracy Testing project. Regression results obtained with this new approach were evaluated in terms of root-mean-square error (RMSE) to estimate the accuracy of the photometric redshift estimates. The results demonstrate competitive RMSE and outlier percentages when compared with several other popular approaches, such as artificial neural networks and Gaussian process regression. SOM RMSE results (using delta(z) = z(sub phot) - z(sub spec)) are 0.023 for the main galaxy sample, 0.027 for the luminous red galaxy sample, 0.418 for quasars, and 0.022 for PHAT0 synthetic data. The results demonstrate that there are nonunique solutions for estimating SOM RMSEs. Further research is needed in order to find more robust estimation techniques using SOMs, but the results herein are a positive indication of their capabilities when compared with other well-known methods

  1. Photometric defocus observations of transiting extrasolar planets

    E-print Network

    Hinse, Tobias C; Yoon, Jo-Na; Lee, Chung-Uk; Kim, Yong-Gi; Kim, Chun-Hwey

    2015-01-01

    We have carried out photometric follow-up observations of bright transiting extrasolar planets using the CbNUOJ 0.6m telescope. We have tested the possibility of obtaining high photometric precision by applying the telescope defocus technique allowing the use of several hundred seconds in exposure time for a single measurement. We demonstrate that this technique is capable of obtaining a root-mean-square scatter of order sub-millimagnitude over several hours for a V $\\sim$ 10 host star typical for transiting planets detected from ground-based survey facilities. We compare our results with transit observations with the telescope operated in in-focus mode. High photometric precision is obtained due to the collection of a larger amount of photons resulting in a higher signal compared to other random and systematic noise sources. Accurate telescope tracking is likely to further contribute to lowering systematic noise by probing the same pixels on the CCD. Furthermore, a longer exposure time helps reducing the eff...

  2. The Mobile Insulin Titration Intervention (MITI) for Insulin Glargine Titration in an Urban, Low-Income Population: Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Natalie; Nilo, Annielyn; Singer, Karyn; Bernik, Lidia S; Etiebet, Mary-Ann; Fang, Yixin; Cho, James; Natarajan, Sundar

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients on insulin glargine typically visit a clinician to obtain advice on how to adjust their insulin dose. These multiple clinic visits can be costly and time-consuming, particularly for low-income patients. It may be feasible to achieve insulin titration through text messages and phone calls with patients instead of face-to-face clinic visits. Objective The objectives of this study are to (1) evaluate if the Mobile Insulin Titration Intervention (MITI) is clinically effective by helping patients reach their optimal dose of insulin glargine, (2) determine if the intervention is feasible within the setting and population, (3) assess patient satisfaction with the intervention, and (4) measure the costs associated with this intervention. Methods This is a pilot study evaluating an approach to insulin titration using text messages and phone calls among patients with insulin-dependent type 2 diabetes in the outpatient medical clinic of Bellevue Hospital Center, a safety-net hospital in New York City. Patients will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio to either the MITI arm (texting/phone call intervention) or the usual-care arm (in-person clinic visits). Using a Web-based platform, weekday text messages will be sent to patients in the MITI arm, asking them to text back their fasting blood glucose values. In addition to daily reviews for alarm values, a clinician will rereview the texted values weekly, consult our physician-approved titration algorithm, and call the patients with advice on how to adjust their insulin dose. The primary outcome will be whether or not a patient reaches his/her optimal dose of insulin glargine within 12 weeks. Results Recruitment for this study occurred between June 2013 and December 2014. We are continuing to collect intervention and follow-up data from our patients who are currently enrolled. The results of our data analysis are expected to be available in 2015. Conclusions This study explores the use of widely-available text messaging and voice technologies for insulin titration. We aim to show that remote insulin titration is clinically effective, feasible, satisfactory, and cost saving for low-income patients in a busy, urban clinic. Trial Registration Trial Registration: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01879579; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01879579 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6WUEgjZUO). PMID:25794243

  3. A Global Photometric Analysis of 2MASS Calibration Data

    E-print Network

    S. Nikolaev; M. Weinberg; M. Skrutskie; R. Cutri; S. Wheelock; J. Gizis; E. Howard

    2000-07-31

    We present results from the application of a global photometric calibration (GPC) procedure to calibration data from the first 2 years of The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). The GPC algorithm uses photometry of both primary standards and moderately bright `tracer' stars in 35 2MASS calibration fields. During the first two years of the Survey, each standard was observed on approximately 50 nights, with about 900 individual measurements. Based on the photometry of primary standard stars and secondary tracer stars and under the assumption that the nightly zeropoint drift is linear, GPC ties together all calibration fields and all survey nights simultaneously, producing a globally optimized solution. Calibration solutions for the Northern and Southern hemisphere observatories are found separately, and are tested for global consistency based on common fields near the celestial equator. Several results from the GPC are presented, including establishing candidate secondary standards, monitoring of near-infrared atmospheric extinction coefficients, and verification of global validity of the standards. The solution gives long-term averages of the atmospheric extinction coefficients, A_J=0.096, A_H=0.026, A_{K_s}=0.066 (North) and A_J=0.092, A_H=0.031, A_{K_s}=0.065 (South), with formal error of 0.001. The residuals show small seasonal variations, most likely due to changing atmospheric content of water vapor. Extension of the GPC to approximately 100 field stars in each of the 35 calibration fields yields a catalog of more than two thousand photometric standards ranging from 10th to 14th magnitude, with photometry that is globally consistent to $\\sim 1%$.

  4. A Global Photometric Analysis of 2MASS Calibration Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, Sergei; Weinberg, Martin D.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Cutri, Roc M.; Wheelock, Sherry L.; Gizis, John E.; Howard, Eric M.

    2000-12-01

    We present results from the application of a global photometric calibration (GPC) procedure to calibration data from the first 2 years of the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). The GPC algorithm uses photometry of both primary standards and moderately bright ``tracer'' stars in 35 2MASS calibration fields. During the first 2 years of the survey, each standard was observed on approximately 50 nights, with about 900 individual measurements. Based on the photometry of primary standard stars and secondary tracer stars and under the assumption that the nightly zero-point drift is linear, the GPC ties together all calibration fields and all survey nights simultaneously, producing a globally optimized solution. Calibration solutions for the Northern and Southern Hemisphere observatories are found separately and are tested for global consistency based on common fields near the celestial equator. Several results from the GPC are presented, including establishing candidate secondary standards, monitoring of near-infrared atmospheric extinction coefficients, and verification of the global validity of the standards. The solution gives long-term averages of the atmospheric extinction coefficients (in magnitudes per air mass), AJ=0.096, AH=0.026, AKs=0.066 (north) and AJ=0.092, AH=0.031, AKs=0.065 (south), with formal error of 0.001. The residuals show small seasonal variations, most likely due to changing atmospheric content of water vapor. Extension of the GPC to ~100 field stars in each of the 35 calibration fields yields a catalog of more than 2000 photometric standards ranging from the 10th to 14th magnitude, with photometry that is globally consistent to ~1%.

  5. Molar absorption coefficients of porphyrin esters in chloroform determined by copper titration.

    PubMed Central

    With, T K; Pedersen, J S

    1977-01-01

    Chromatographically pure porphyrin esters free from metalloporphyrins were titrated with Cu2+ to determine the molar amount of porphyrin present. The end point of the titration was defined by a t.l.c. method detecting traces of metal-free porphyrin ester in admxture to its copper complex. From spectrometric measurement at the Soret maximum and the molar amounts found by the titration, epsilonM was calculated for proto-, copro-, penta-, hexa- and hepta-carboxylic and uro-porphyrin permethyl esters. The values for uroporphyrin showed perfect agreement with those of previous workers, whereas those for coproporphyrin were about 5% lower and those for protoporphyrin more than 20% lower. The implications of the findings are discussed. Determinations of epsilonM of some higher esters (ethyl to pentyl) and some partial methyl esters with one carboxyl group free are also presented. PMID:849270

  6. Molar absorption coefficients of porphyrin esters in chloroform determined by copper titration.

    PubMed

    With, T K; Pedersen, J S

    1977-02-01

    Chromatographically pure porphyrin esters free from metalloporphyrins were titrated with Cu2+ to determine the molar amount of porphyrin present. The end point of the titration was defined by a t.l.c. method detecting traces of metal-free porphyrin ester in admxture to its copper complex. From spectrometric measurement at the Soret maximum and the molar amounts found by the titration, epsilonM was calculated for proto-, copro-, penta-, hexa- and hepta-carboxylic and uro-porphyrin permethyl esters. The values for uroporphyrin showed perfect agreement with those of previous workers, whereas those for coproporphyrin were about 5% lower and those for protoporphyrin more than 20% lower. The implications of the findings are discussed. Determinations of epsilonM of some higher esters (ethyl to pentyl) and some partial methyl esters with one carboxyl group free are also presented. PMID:849270

  7. The role of DNA binding sites and slow unbinding kinetics in titration-based oscillators

    E-print Network

    Karapetyan, Sargis

    2015-01-01

    Genetic oscillators, such as circadian clocks, are constantly perturbed by molecular noise arising from the small number of molecules involved in gene regulation. One of the strongest sources of stochasticity is the binary noise that arises from the binding of a regulatory protein to a promoter in the chromosomal DNA. In this study, we focus on two minimal oscillators based on activator titration and repressor titration to understand the key parameters that are important for oscillations and for overcoming binary noise. We show that the rate of unbinding from the DNA, despite traditionally being considered a fast parameter, needs to be slow to broaden the space of oscillatory solutions. The addition of multiple, independent DNA binding sites further expands the oscillatory parameter space for the repressor-titration oscillator and lengthens the period of both oscillators. This effect is a combination of increased effective delay of the unbinding kinetics due to multiple binding sites and increased promoter ul...

  8. Ion-ion correlation and charge reversal at titrating solid interfaces

    E-print Network

    Christophe Labbez; Bo Jonsson; Michal Skarba; Michal Borkovec

    2008-12-01

    Confronting grand canonical titration Monte Carlo simulations (MC) with recently published titration and charge reversal (CR) experiments on silica surfaces by Dove et al. and van der Heyden it et al, we show that ion-ion correlations quantitatively explain why divalent counterions strongly promote surface charge which, in turn, eventually causes a charge reversal (CR). Titration and CR results from simulations and experiments are in excellent agreement without any fitting parameters. This is the first unambiguous evidence that ion-ion correlations are instrumental in the creation of highly charged surfaces and responsible for their CR. Finally, we show that charge correlations result in "anomalous" charge regulation in strongly coupled conditions in qualitative desagreement with its classical treatment.

  9. Clozapine-induced myocarditis may be associated with rapid titration: A case report verified with autopsy.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Nitin; de Leon, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Clozapine-induced myocarditis is a poorly understood, rare, potentially fatal adverse drug reaction with absolute risks ranging from 7 to 34 per 1000 in Australia and 0.07-0.6 per 1000 in other countries. Hypersensitivity reactions have been postulated including some cases probably associated with rapid titrations. This case describes a 50-year-old African-American man with schizoaffective disorder, naïve to clozapine, who probably died from clozapine-induced myocarditis. He was started on 25?mg/day of clozapine and received 1625?mg over 14 days, prior to his death on day 15. The autopsy found predominantly lymphocytic infiltrate of the perivascular soft tissue and myocardium of the ventricles, with occasional eosinophils. Using the Liverpool ADR Causality Assessment Tool, it was deemed probable that the patient's death was secondary to myocarditis. The patient had fulminant death with no obvious changes in vital signs. Neither C-reactive protein nor troponin was measured, but it is unlikely that the results would have arrived in time to prevent the patient's death. Age, rapid titration, and concomitant use of valproate contributed to this case, which was probably an idiosyncratic adverse drug reaction associated with rapid titration. Lamotrigine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome also appears to be an idiosyncratic adverse drug reaction associated with rapid titration, but its incidence has been remarkably reduced since the recommended starting lamotrigine dose was reduced and corrected by the effect of inhibitors such as valproate. Similarly, clozapine-induced myocarditis incidence probably can be reduced with the use of slow titrations, including even slower titrations for patients with lower ability to metabolize clozapine, such as those taking valproate. PMID:26681239

  10. Asteroid taxonomic signatures from photometric phase curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oszkiewicz, Dagmara Anna; Bowell, Edward; Wasserman, L. H.; Muinonen, Karri; Penttilä, Antti; Pieniluoma, Tuomo; Trilling, David E.; Thomas, Cristina A.

    2012-05-01

    We explore the correlation between an asteroid's taxonomy and photometric phase curve using the H, G12 photometric phase function, with the shape of the phase function described by the single parameter G12. We explore the usability of G12 in taxonomic classification for individual objects, asteroid families, and dynamical groups. We conclude that the mean values of G12 for the considered taxonomic complexes are statistically different, and also discuss the overall shape of the G12 distribution for each taxonomic complex. Based on the values of G12 for about half a million asteroids, we compute the probabilities of C, S, and X complex membership for each asteroid. For an individual asteroid, these probabilities are rather evenly distributed over all of the complexes, thus preventing meaningful classification. We then present and discuss the G12 distributions for asteroid families, and predict the taxonomic complex preponderance for asteroid families given the distribution of G12 in each family. For certain asteroid families, the probabilistic prediction of taxonomic complex preponderance can clearly be made. In particular, the C complex preponderant families are the easiest to detect, the Dora and Themis families being prime examples of such families. We continue by presenting the G12-based distribution of taxonomic complexes throughout the main asteroid belt in the proper element phase space. The Nysa-Polana family shows two distinct regions in the proper element space with different G12 values dominating in each region. We conclude that the G12-based probabilistic distribution of taxonomic complexes through the main belt agrees with the general view of C complex asteroid proportion increasing towards the outer belt. We conclude that the G12 photometric parameter cannot be used in determining taxonomic complex for individual asteroids, but it can be utilized in the statistical treatment of asteroid families and different regions of the main asteroid belt.

  11. Using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry to Determine Thermodynamic Parameters of Protein–Glycosaminoglycan Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Amit K.; Rösgen, Jörg; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    It has now become increasingly clear that a complete atomic description of how biomacromolecules recognize each other requires knowledge not only of the structures of the complexes but also of how kinetics and thermodynamics drive the binding process. In particular, such knowledge is lacking for protein–glycosaminoglycan (GAG) complexes. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the only technique that can provide various thermodynamic parameters—enthalpy, entropy, free energy (binding constant), and stoichiometry—from a single experiment. Here we describe different factors that must be taken into consideration in carrying out ITC titrations to obtain meaningful thermodynamic data of protein–GAG interactions. PMID:25325962

  12. Selective two-step titration of thorium by sulfate displacement of the diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid complex

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefer, P.

    1980-07-01

    Thorium and other metals are complexed with excess diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) at pH 1.4, the excess DTPA is titrated with Bi(III) to a xylenol orange end point, sulfate is added to complex Th(IV), and the displaced DTPA again is titrated with Bi(III). Of 61 metal ions and nonmetal anions tested, only Ga(III), Sc(III), tungstate, citrate, oxalate, and thiosulfate interfere seriously. Lesser interferences are In(III), Zr(IV), V(IV), and permanganate. The standard deviation is 2 ..mu..g for 56 to 840 ..mu..g Th.

  13. The Definitive Johnson Kron-Cousins UBVRI Photometric System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landolt, Arlo U.; Clem, James L.

    2015-08-01

    The defining characteristics and a brief history of the Johnson Kron-Cousins UBVRI photometric system will be reviewed, and recent observational efforts to extend the UBVRI standard star network, both in magnitude and sky coverage, presented. The current incarnation of this network now comprises more than 50,000 photometric standards distributed around the sky in three declination zones centered on -50 degrees, the celestial equator, and +50 degrees. The majority of these standards encompass the magnitude range of ~9 < V <~ 22, and the color index range of ~ -0.3 < B-V <~ +2. The standard error of the mean in the photometry is less than 0.005 magnitudes in BVRI and 0.015 magn. in U. Relations have been developed to permit conversion between the UBVRI and SDSS ugriz photometric systems, thereby enhancing the versatility of both photometric systems. Several uses of the UBVRI photometric system, and its synergy with other photometric systems, will be noted.

  14. A photometric study of Saturn's F Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Showalter, Mark R.; Pollack, James B.; Ockert, Maureen E.; Doyle, Laurance R.; Dalton, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    The Saturn F Ring's radially integrated brightness has been measured over a wide range of phase angles from Voyager images; in order to model the resultant phase curve, the ring population has been divided into a dust regime and one of larger bodies, and while single scattering properties of small particles are modeled by semiempirical nonspherical/randomly oriented particles, those of large bodies are based on the photometric behavior of satellites. It is suggested that the dust in the envelope arises from micrometeoroid impacts into the large core particles, and then migrates inward.

  15. Photometric variability of three brown dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaddar, Debasmita

    We report a study of the photometric variability of 3 low-mass, sub-stellar objects. Two of them, 2MASS 1207334-393254 and 2MASS 1139511-315921, are young (10 Myr) brown dwarfs of M8 spectral class. 2MASS 1207334-393254 was observed in the I, R, J and Y bands, through April--May 2004, and in B and I bands through March--April 2005. 2MASS 1139511-315921 was observed in the I band, from October to December, 2004. The third object, 2MASS 04234858-0414035, a field T dwarf, was observed in the I band.

  16. A catalogue of Large Magellanic Cloud star clusters observed in the Washington photometric system

    E-print Network

    Palma, Tali; Clariá, Juan J; Lares, Marcelo; Geisler, Doug; Ahumada, Andrea V

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of this study is to compile a catalogue including the fundamental parameters of a complete sample of 277 star clusters (SCs) of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) observed in the Washington photometric system, including 82 clusters very recently studied by us. All the clusters' parameters such as radii, deprojected distances, reddenings, ages and metallicities have been obtained by appyling essentially the same procedures which are briefly described here. We have used empirical cumulative distribution functions to examine age, metallicity and deprojected distance distributions for different cluster subsamples of the catalogue. Our new sample made up of 82 additional clusters recently studied by us represents about a 40% increase in the total number of LMC SCs observed up to now in the Washington photometric system. In particular, we report here the fundamental parameters obtained for the first time for 42 of these clusters. We found that single LMC SCs are typically older than multiple SCs. Both s...

  17. The Strömvil Photometric System: 1996 - 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, A. G. D.

    2006-06-01

    A group of astronomers has been working on setting up and then using the Strömvil photometric system. The system was announced in Straižys et al. (1996). A summary of the work up to 2003 can be found in Sodžius et al. (2003). The major ability of the Strömvil system is that, from photoelectric measures alone one can determine the reddening, luminosity, gravity and metalicity of stars. With all the new surveys that have been made and ones yet to be made, such a system will be of great use to identify the nature of the new faint stars identified. In 2012 GAIA is planned to be launched. It will make astrometric, spectroscopic and photometric measures of hundreds of millions of stars. It has a narrow band filter system of 14 filters, seven of which are very similar to the Strömvil filters.The main observational programs at present are: 1. Setting up the primary standards. Lithuanian astronomers have been sent to Arizona to use University of Arizona telescopes on Mt. Lemmon. A list of 800 Northern Hemisphere standard stars has been published in Baltic Astronomy (Kazlauskas et al. 2005). 2: At the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope on Mt. Graham Boyle and Philip have been making CCD Strömvil measures of open and globular clusters. 3: At Casleo, in Argentina, Philip and Pintado have been observing open and globular clusters with the 2.15 meter telescope.

  18. Ceres photometric properties from VIR on Dawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarniello, M.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Ammannito, E.; Capaccioni, F.; Capria, M. T.; Carrozzo, F. G.; Fonte, S.; Frigeri, A.; Giardino, M.; Longobardo, A.; Magni, G.; Palomba, E.; Raponi, A.; Tosi, F.; Zambon, F.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.; Li, J.-Y.

    2015-10-01

    Dawn spacecraft [1] entered orbit around Ceres on 6 March 2015. During the approach phase to this dwarf planet and later, through the Survey, High Altitude Mapping (HAMO) and Low Altitude Mapping Orbits (LAMO), the Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIR) will perform detailed observations of the surface of the body. VIR [2] is an imaging spectrometer onboard the Dawn mission and it is composed of two spectral channels: the visible (VIS) covering the 0.25 ?m - 1.0 ?m wavelength range and the infrared (IR) for the 0.95 ?m - 5.0 ?m interval. During the various phases of the mission, the surface of Ceres will be observed under different observation geometries. The measured signal is then affected by photometric issues that need to be minimized in order to exploit the intrinsic spectral variability of the surface, thus allowing the direct comparison between acquisitions taken under different observation conditions. In order to accomplish this task we perform a photometric reduction of the dataset by means of a simplified Hapke model, following the approach of [3].

  19. Charge Density Quantification of Polyelectrolyte Polysaccharides by Conductometric Titration: An Analytical Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farris, Stefano; Mora, Luigi; Capretti, Giorgio; Piergiovanni, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    An easy analytical method for determination of the charge density of polyelectrolytes, including polysaccharides and other biopolymers, is presented. The basic principles of conductometric titration, which is used in the pulp and paper industry as well as in colloid and interface science, were adapted to quantify the charge densities of a…

  20. Titration of Monoprotic Acids with Sodium Hydroxide Contaminated by Sodium Carbonate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalowski, Tadeusz

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the effects of using carbon dioxide contaminated sodium hydroxide solution as a titrant for a solution of a weak monoprotic acid and the resulting distortion of the titration curve in comparison to one obtained when an uncontaminated titrant is used. (CW)

  1. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry and Macromolecular Visualization for the Interaction of Lysozyme and Its Inhibitors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Chin-Chuan; Jensen, Drake; Boyle, Tiffany; O'Brien, Leah C.; De Meo, Cristina; Shabestary, Nahid; Eder, Douglas J.

    2015-01-01

    To provide a research-like experience to upper-division undergraduate students in a biochemistry teaching laboratory, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is employed to determine the binding constants of lysozyme and its inhibitors, N-acetyl glucosamine trimer (NAG[subscript 3]) and monomer (NAG). The extremely weak binding of lysozyme/NAG is…

  2. Tested Demonstrations: Comparison of Strong Acid and Weak Acid Titration Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    A lecture demonstration is presented for comparing titration curves. A plot of pH vs volume of strong base is produced by connecting the external output of a pH meter to a strip recorder. Thus, pH is recorded as a function of time. (BB)

  3. Titration of a Solid Acid Monitored by X-Ray Diffraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dungey, Keenan E.; Epstein, Paul

    2007-01-01

    An experiment is described to introduce students to an important class of solid-state reactions while reinforcing concepts of titration by using a pH meter and a powder X-ray diffractometer. The experiment was successful in teaching students the abstract concepts of solid-state structure and diffraction by applying the diffraction concepts learned…

  4. Solvatochromic Dyes as pH-Independent Indicators for Ionophore Nanosphere-Based Complexometric Titrations.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jingying; Xie, Xiaojiang; Bakker, Eric

    2015-12-15

    For half a century, complexometric titrations of metal ions have been performed with water-soluble chelators and indicators that typically require careful pH control. Very recently, ion-selective nanosphere emulsions were introduced that exhibit ion-exchange properties and are doped with lipophilic ionophores originally developed for chemical ion sensors. They may serve as novel, highly selective and pH independent complexometric reagents. While ion optode emulsions have been demonstrated as useful indicators for such titrations, they exhibit a pH cross-response that unfortunately complicates the identification of the end point. Here, we present pH-independent optode nanospheres as indicators for complexometric titrations, with calcium as an initial example. The nanospheres incorporate an ionic solvatochromic dye (SD), ion exchanger and ionophore. The solvatochromic dye will be only expelled from the core of the nanosphere into the aqueous solution at the end point at which point it results in an optical signal change. The titration curves are demonstrated to be pH-independent and with sharper end points than with previously reported chromoionophore-based optical nanospheres as indicator. The calcium concentration in mineral water was successfully determined using this method. PMID:26595520

  5. Subsite binding energies of an exo-polygalacturonase using isothermal titration calorimetry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermodynamic parameters for binding of a series of galacturonic acid oligomers to an exo-polygalacturonase, RPG16 from Rhizopus oryzae, were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. Binding of oligomers varying in chain length from two to five galacturonic acid residues is an exothermic proc...

  6. Avian influenza virus isolation, propagation and titration in embryonated chicken eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza (AI) virus is usually isolated, propagated, and titrated in embryonated chickens eggs (ECE). Most any sample type can be accommodated for culture with appropriate processing. Isolation may also be accomplished in cell culture particularly if mammalian lineage isolates are suspected, ...

  7. The Simulation of an Oxidation-Reduction Titration Curve with Computer Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteley, Richard V., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Although the simulation of an oxidation/reduction titration curve is an important exercise in an undergraduate course in quantitative analysis, that exercise is frequently simplified to accommodate computational limitations. With the use of readily available computer algebra systems, however, such curves for complicated systems can be generated…

  8. Acid-base titrations for polyacids: Significance of the pK sub a and parameters in the Kern equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meites, L.

    1978-01-01

    A new method is suggested for calculating the dissociation constants of polyvalent acids, especially polymeric acids. In qualitative form the most significant characteristics of the titration curves are demonstrated and identified which are obtained when titrating the solutions of such acids with a standard base potentiometrically.

  9. The Quantitative Resolution of a Mixture of Group II Metal Ions by Thermometric Titration with EDTA. An Analytical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert L.; Popham, Ronald E.

    1983-01-01

    Presents an experiment in thermometric titration used in an analytic chemistry-chemical instrumentation course, consisting of two titrations, one a mixture of calcium and magnesium, the other of calcium, magnesium, and barium ions. Provides equipment and solutions list/specifications, graphs, and discussion of results. (JM)

  10. Rough surface description using photometric stereo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGunnigle, G.; Chantler, M. J.

    2003-06-01

    We present a framework for the measurement, description and discrimination of rough surfaces. The measurement technique, photometric stereo (PS), is a fast, inexpensive, non-contact technique for the estimation of shape. We assess its suitability for the shape estimation of rough surfaces and discuss the consequences of using surface derivatives for surface description. Surface models from the literature are adapted and compared with test surfaces. A method that uses frequency and directional information to discriminate surfaces is presented and demonstrated. We found that PS is an accurate method of measurement for Lambertian surfaces and that, provided the optical properties of the camera are accounted for, the estimated surface derivatives are useful for surface description and discrimination.

  11. Simple Photometric Auxanometers of High Sensitivity 1

    PubMed Central

    Macdowall, Fergus D. H.; Sirois, J. Claude

    1976-01-01

    The elongation phase of growth of plant parts, as 1-cm segments excised from wheat coleoptiles here, is very simply recorded photometrically. One or more aligned segments submerged in aerated buffer pushed an Al foil shutter over a slit of light incident on a photodetector such as a solar or photronic cell, connected directly to a recorder, or a photomultiplier tube in a commercial photometer. Convenient kinetic records were obtained at 5 mm per min chart speed when one segment was combined with a 1-mm long slit, or more segments and longer slits, for which a 1-mm chart unit usually exceeded noise and was equivalent to 4 ?m growth per cm coleoptile. In the presence of 10 cm of coleoptile segments no replenishment of solution was necessary during kinetic measurements of response in a 50-ml reservoir of IAA more concentrated than 30 nm. PMID:16659658

  12. Estimating Photometric Redshifts Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Nicholas; Freitas, Alex; Serjeant, Stephen

    Photometry is used as a cheap and easy way to estimate redshifts of galaxies, which would otherwise require considerable amounts of expensive telescope time. However, the analysis of photometric redshift datasets is a task where it is sometimes difficultto achievea high classification accuracy. This work presents a custom Genetic Algorithm (GA) for mining the Hubble Deep Field North (HDF-N) datasets to achieve accurate IF-THEN classification rules. This kind of knowledge representation has the advantage of being intuitively comprehensible to the user, facilitating astronomers' interpretation of discovered knowledge. The GA is tested againstthe state of the art decision tree algorithm C5.0 [Rulequest, 2005] in two datasets, achieving better classification accuracy and simplerrule sets in both datasets.

  13. Photometric Properties of Enceladus' South Polar Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annex, Andrew; Verbiscer, A. J.; Helfenstein, P.

    2012-10-01

    Cassini images reveal in exquisite detail the complex and varied terrains within the geologically active south pole of Enceladus. The region is dominated by four parallel rifts or sulci, informally known as tiger stripes, from which plumes comprised primarily of water vapor erupt [1,2]. The rich data set of Cassini images acquired at high spatial resolution (< 0.5 km/pixel) and a variety of viewing and illumination geometries enables the quantitative analysis of surface scattering properties through disk-resolved photometry. Here we investigate the photometric properties of individual terrain units [3] through fits of the Hapke photometric model [4] to data acquired in the clear (CL1 CL2), UV3, GRN, and IR3 filters, centered at 0.61, 0.34, 0.57, and 0.93 ?m, respectively. Terrain units include the tiger stripe smooth and platy plank formations, tiger stripe medial dorsum structures, relict tiger stripe structures, south pole funiscular (ropy) plains, south pole lateral fold-and-wedge formations, and the south pole reticulated plains. Despite the constant, ubiquitous infall of plume particles onto the surface, differences in scattering properties, texture, and albedo among terrain units can be discerned. Work supported by NASA's Cassini Data Analysis Program. [1] Porco et al. 2006 Science 311, 1393-1401. [2] Hansen et al. 2008 Nature 456, 477-479. [3] Spencer et al. 2009 in Saturn from Cassini-Huygens (M. K. Dougherty et al. Eds.) 683-724. [4] Hapke 2002 Icarus 157, 523-534.

  14. Extracting H? flux from photometric data in the J-PLUS survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilella-Rojo, G.; Viironen, K.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Cenarro, A. J.; Varela, J.; Díaz-García, L. A.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.; Ederoclite, A.; Marín-Franch, A.; Moles, M.

    2015-08-01

    Aims: We present the main steps that will be taken to extract H? emission flux from Javalambre Photometric Local Universe Survey (J-PLUS) photometric data. Methods: For galaxies with z ? 0.015, the H?+[N ii] emission is covered by the J-PLUS narrow-band filter F660. We explore three different methods to extract the H? + [N ii] flux from J-PLUS photometric data: a combination of a broad-band and a narrow-band filter (r' and F660), two broad-band and a narrow-band filter (r', i' and F660), and an SED-fitting based method using eight photometric points. To test these methodologies, we simulated J-PLUS data from a sample of 7511 SDSS spectra with measured H? flux. Based on the same sample, we derive two empirical relations to correct the derived H?+[N ii] flux from dust extinction and [N ii] contamination. Results: We find that the only unbiased method is the SED-fitting based method. The combination of two filters underestimates the measurements of the H? + [N ii] flux by 22%, while the three filters method are underestimated by 9%. We study the error budget of the SED-fitting based method and find that, in addition to the photometric error, our measurements have a systematic uncertainty of 4.3%. Several sources contribute to this uncertainty: the differences between our measurement procedure and that used to derive the spectroscopic values, the use of simple stellar populations as templates, and the intrinsic errors of the spectra, which were not taken into account. Apart from that, the empirical corrections for dust extinction and [N ii] contamination add an extra uncertainty of 14%. Conclusions: Given the J-PLUS photometric system, the best methodology to extract H? + [N ii] flux is the SED-fitting based method. Using this method, we are able to recover reliable H? fluxes for thousands of nearby galaxies in a robust and homogeneous way. Moreover, each stage of the process (emission line flux, dust extinction correction, and [N ii] decontamination) can be decoupled and improved in the future. This method ensures reliable H? measurements for many studies of galaxy evolution, from the local star formation rate density, to 2D studies in spatially well-resolved galaxies or the study of environmental effects, up to mr' = 21.8 (AB; 3? detection of H?+[N ii] emission).

  15. Novel Methods for Predicting Photometric Redshifts from Broad Band Photometry using Virtual Sensors

    E-print Network

    M. J. Way; A. N. Srivastava

    2006-07-06

    We calculate photometric redshifts from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Main Galaxy Sample, The Galaxy Evolution Explorer All Sky Survey, and The Two Micron All Sky Survey using two new training-set methods. We utilize the broad-band photometry from the three surveys alongside Sloan Digital Sky Survey measures of photometric quality and galaxy morphology. Our first training-set method draws from the theory of ensemble learning while the second employs Gaussian process regression both of which allow for the estimation of redshift along with a measure of uncertainty in the estimation. The Gaussian process models the data very effectively with small training samples of approximately 1000 points or less. These two methods are compared to a well known Artificial Neural Network training-set method and to simple linear and quadratic regression. Our results show that robust photometric redshift errors as low as 0.02 RMS can regularly be obtained. We also demonstrate the need to provide confidence bands on the error estimation made by both classes of models. Our results indicate that variations due to the optimization procedure used for almost all neural networks, combined with the variations due to the data sample, can produce models with variations in accuracy that span an order of magnitude. A key contribution of this paper is to quantify the variability in the quality of results as a function of model and training sample. We show how simply choosing the "best" model given a data set and model class can produce misleading results.

  16. An imaging-based photometric and colorimetric measurement method for characterizing OLED panels for lighting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yiting; Narendran, Nadarajah; Tan, Jianchuan; Mou, Xi

    2014-09-01

    The organic light-emitting diode (OLED) has demonstrated its novelty in displays and certain lighting applications. Similar to white light-emitting diode (LED) technology, it also holds the promise of saving energy. Even though the luminous efficacy values of OLED products have been steadily growing, their longevity is still not well understood. Furthermore, currently there is no industry standard for photometric and colorimetric testing, short and long term, of OLEDs. Each OLED manufacturer tests its OLED panels under different electrical and thermal conditions using different measurement methods. In this study, an imaging-based photometric and colorimetric measurement method for OLED panels was investigated. Unlike an LED that can be considered as a point source, the OLED is a large form area source. Therefore, for an area source to satisfy lighting application needs, it is important that it maintains uniform light level and color properties across the emitting surface of the panel over a long period. This study intended to develop a measurement procedure that can be used to test long-term photometric and colorimetric properties of OLED panels. The objective was to better understand how test parameters such as drive current or luminance and temperature affect the degradation rate. In addition, this study investigated whether data interpolation could allow for determination of degradation and lifetime, L70, at application conditions based on the degradation rates measured at different operating conditions.

  17. Ultraviolet absorbance titration for determining stability constants of humic substances with Cu(II) and Hg(II).

    PubMed

    Bai, Y C; Wu, F C; Liu, C Q; Li, W; Guo, J Y; Fu, P Q; Xing, B S; Zheng, J

    2008-05-26

    We describe an ultraviolet (UV) absorbance titration method that can be used to determine complexing capacities (C(L)) and conditional stability constants (logK) of humic substances (HSs) with metal ions such as Cu(II) and Hg(II). Two fulvic acids (FA) and one humic acid (HA) were used for this study. UV absorbance of HSs gradually increased with the addition of Cu(II) or Hg(II) after blank correction, and these increases followed the theoretical 1:1 (ligand:metal ion) binding model. The results from the absorbance titration calculation for HSs with Cu(II) and Hg(II) compared well with those from fluorescence quenching titration. The titration of the model compound l-tyrosine with Cu(II) proved the validity of this method, and the K and C(L) were within 2.3% and 7.4% of the fluorescence quenching titration. The results suggest that the UV absorbance titration can be used to study the binding capacities of HSs and/or dissolved organic matter (DOM) with trace metals. The advantages and disadvantages of the absorbance titration method were also discussed. PMID:18471492

  18. CD-monitored redox titration of the Rieske Fe-S protein of Rhodobacter sphaeroides: pH dependence of the midpoint potential

    E-print Network

    Crofts, Antony R.

    CD-monitored redox titration of the Rieske Fe-S protein of Rhodobacter sphaeroides: pH dependence.5 in the range of titration, or by two pK values, pKI = 7.6 and pKP = 9.8. Similar titrations and pK values were

  19. Comparing the Data-reduction Methods for Photometric Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Xiaoduan; Li, Jian-Yang; Clark, Beth Ellen

    2015-11-01

    Photometric models describe the light scattering properties of the asteroid’s surface, providing clues for the physical properties of the surface, and photometric correction for comparisons between different area on asteroids and laboratory measurements. Different techniques have been widely used to reduce the photometric data for modeling purposes, including different sampling methods, such as average of each image, or keep only four-corners or center area of each image. The purpose of this work is to compare these techniques, analyzing their different effect on photometric modeling and photometric corrections to spectrophotometric data. Our goal is to identify which data-reduction method is the best approach to retrieve the true photometric properties of planetary surface and generate the most credible photometric corrections. Using a set of image data from the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) Spacecraft’s Multi-Spectral Imager (MSI), we find that the different approaches produce similar results, but they tend to perform differently when the data set is with different quality.

  20. Determinations of Carbon Dioxide by Titration: New Experiments for General, Physical, and Quantitative Analysis Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossno, S. K.; Kalbus, L. H.; Kalbus, G. E.

    1996-02-01

    The determination of mixtures containing NaOH and Na2CO3 or Na2CO3 and NaHCO3 by titration is a common experiment in a Quantitative Analysis course. This determination can be adapted for the analysis of CO2 within a sample. The CO2 is released and absorbed in a solution containing excess NaOH. Titration with standard HCl leads to the determination of CO2 present in the sample. A number of interesting experiments in Quantitative Analysis, General and/or Physical Chemistry have been developed. Among these are the following determinations: CO2 content in carbonated beverages, carbonate and bicarbonate in various real life samples, and the molecular weight of CO2.

  1. Volumetric determination of uranium titanous sulfate as reductant before oxidimetric titration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wahlberg, J.S.; Skinner, D.L.; Rader, L.F., Jr.

    1957-01-01

    Need for a more rapid volumetric method for the routine determination of uranium in uranium-rich materials has led to the development of a method that uses titanous sulfate as a reductant before oxidimetric titration. Separation of the hydrogen sulfide group is not necessary. Interfering elements precipitated by cupferron are removed by automatic filtrations made simultaneously rather than by the longer chloroform extraction method. Uranium is reduced from VI to IV by addition of an excess of titanous sulfate solution, cupric ion serving as an indicator by forming red metallic copper when reduction is complete. The copper is reoxidized by addition of mercuric perchlorate. The reduced uranium is then determined by addition of excess ferric sulfate and titration with ceric sulfate. The method has proved to be rapid, accurate, and economical.

  2. Influence of kinetics on the determination of the surface reactivity of oxide suspensions by acid-base titration.

    PubMed

    Duc, M; Adekola, F; Lefèvre, G; Fédoroff, M

    2006-11-01

    The effect of acid-base titration protocol and speed on pH measurement and surface charge calculation was studied on suspensions of gamma-alumina, hematite, goethite, and silica, whose size and porosity have been well characterized. The titration protocol has an important effect on surface charge calculation as well as on acid-base constants obtained by fitting of the titration curves. Variations of pH versus time after addition of acid or base to the suspension were interpreted as diffusion processes. Resulting apparent diffusion coefficients depend on the nature of the oxide and on its porosity. PMID:16949092

  3. Photometric identification of blue horizontal branch stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K. W.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Klement, R. J.; Xue, X. X.

    2010-11-01

    We investigate the performance of some common machine learning techniques in identifying blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars from photometric data. To train the machine learning algorithms, we use previously published spectroscopic identifications of BHB stars from Sloan digital sky survey (SDSS) data. We investigate the performance of three different techniques, namely k nearest neighbour classification, kernel density estimation for discriminant analysis and a support vector machine (SVM). We discuss the performance of the methods in terms of both completeness (what fraction of input BHB stars are successfully returned as BHB stars) and contamination (what fraction of contaminating sources end up in the output BHB sample). We discuss the prospect of trading off these values, achieving lower contamination at the expense of lower completeness, by adjusting probability thresholds for the classification. We also discuss the role of prior probabilities in the classification performance, and we assess via simulations the reliability of the dataset used for training. Overall it seems that no-prior gives the best completeness, but adopting a prior lowers the contamination. We find that the support vector machine generally delivers the lowest contamination for a given level of completeness, and so is our method of choice. Finally, we classify a large sample of SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7) photometry using the SVM trained on the spectroscopic sample. We identify 27 074 probable BHB stars out of a sample of 294 652 stars. We derive photometric parallaxes and demonstrate that our results are reasonable by comparing to known distances for a selection of globular clusters. We attach our classifications, including probabilities, as an electronic table, so that they can be used either directly as a BHB star catalogue, or as priors to a spectroscopic or other classification method. We also provide our final models so that they can be directly applied to new data. Full Tables 7, A.3 and A.4 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/522/A88

  4. One Moon, many measurements 2: Photometric corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besse, S.; Yokota, Y.; Boardman, J.; Green, R.; Haruyama, J.; Isaacson, P.; Mall, U.; Matsunaga, T.; Ohtake, M.; Pieters, C.; Staid, M.; Sunshine, J.; Yamamoto, S.

    2013-09-01

    Observations of the lunar surface within the past 10 years have been made with various lunar remote sensing instruments, the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) onboard the Chandrayaan-1 mission, the Spectral Profiler (SP), the Multiband Imager (MI), the Terrain Camera (TC) onboard the SELENE mission, and the ground based USGS Robotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) for some of them. The lunar phase functions derived from these datasets, which are used in the photometric modeling to correct for the various illumination conditions of the data, are compared to assess their differences and similarity in order to improve interpretations of lunar surface spectra. The phase functions are found to be similar across various phase angles except in the 0-20° range. Differences across the 0-20° range likely result from two different inputs in the photometric modeling of the M3 and SP data: (1) M3 has larger emission angles due to the characteristics of the instrument and the attitude of the spacecraft, and (2) M3 viewing geometry was derived from the local topography whereas SP used a spherical Moon (no topography). The combination of these two different inputs affects the phase function at small phase angles where shadows play a more substantial role, with spatial resolution differences between M3 and SP being another possible source for the differences. SP data are found to be redder (i.e., steeper slope with increasing wavelengths) than MI, M3 and ROLO. Finally, the M3 overall reflectance is also found to be lower than that the other instruments (i.e., MI, SP, and ROLO), generally at least 10% darker than MI. These differences can be observed at local scales in specific examples at hundreds of meters resolutions. At regional and global scales, the same differences are found, which demonstrates the overall stability of the various datasets. The observations from M3, TC, SP and MI are very stable and agree well; however caution should be used when making interpretations based on the spectral slope of SP data or on the absolute reflectance of M3 data.

  5. A photometric search for transiting planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baliber, Nairn Reese

    In the decade since the discovery of the first planet orbiting a main-sequence star other than the Sun, more than 160 planets have been detected in orbit around other stars, most of them discovered by measuring the velocity of the reflexive motion of their parent stars caused by the gravitational pull of the planets. These discoveries produced a population of planets much different to the ones in our Solar System and created interest in other methods to detect these planets. One such method is searching for transits, the slight photometric dimming of stars caused by a close-orbiting, Jupiter-sized planet passing between a star and our line of sight once per orbit. We report results from TeMPEST, the Texas, McDonald Photometric Extrasolar Search for Transits, a transit survey conducted with the McDonald Observatory 0.76 m Prime Focus Corrector (PFC). We monitored five fields of stars in the plane of the Milky Way over the course of two and a half years. We created a photometry pipeline to perform high-precision differential photometry on all of the images, and used a software detection algorithm to detect transit signals in the light curves. Although no transits were found, we calculated our detection probability by determining the fraction of the stars monitored by TeMPEST which were suitable to show transits, measuring the probability of detecting transit signals based on the temporal coverage of our fields, and measuring our detection efficiency by inserting false transits into TeMPEST data to see what fraction could be recovered by our automatic detection software. We conclude that in our entire data set, we generated an effective sample of 2660 stars, a sample in which if any star is showing a transit, it would have been detected. We found no convincing transits in our data, but current statistics from radial velocity surveys indicate that only one in about 1300 of these stars should be showing transits. These numbers are consistent with the lack of transits produced by TeMPEST and the small number of transits generated by other surveys. We therefore discuss methods by which a transit survey's effective sample may be increased to make such surveys productive in a reasonable amount of time.

  6. Kinetic titration with differential thermometric determination of the end-point.

    PubMed

    Sajó, I

    1968-06-01

    A method has been described for the determination of concentrations below 10(-4)M by applying catalytic reactions and using thermometric end-point determination. A reference solution, identical with the sample solution except for catalyst, is titrated with catalyst solution until the rates of reaction become the same, as shown by a null deflection on a galvanometer connected via bridge circuits to two opposed thermistors placed in the solutions. PMID:18960338

  7. Reduction of sample volume and waste generation in acid/base titrations using microelectrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1996-03-22

    The Analytical Development Section (ADS) has developed microelectrode methods for use with pH titrations and pH determinations. These microelectrode methods offer increased sensitivity and enable analyses to be done with smaller sample and buffer volumes than are used with standard size electrodes. This report establishes the technical validity of the methods and describes the application of these methods to decreased detection limits, decreased waste generation, and decreased radiation exposure.

  8. Equivalence-point electromigration acid-base titration via moving neutralization boundary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qing; Fan, Liu-Yin; Huang, Shan-Sheng; Zhang, Wei; Cao, Cheng-Xi

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we developed a novel method of acid-base titration, viz. the electromigration acid-base titration (EABT), via a moving neutralization boundary (MNR). With HCl and NaOH as the model strong acid and base, respectively, we conducted the experiments on the EABT via the method of moving neutralization boundary for the first time. The experiments revealed that (i) the concentration of agarose gel, the voltage used and the content of background electrolyte (KCl) had evident influence on the boundary movement; (ii) the movement length was a function of the running time under the constant acid and base concentrations; and (iii) there was a good linearity between the length and natural logarithmic concentration of HCl under the optimized conditions, and the linearity could be used to detect the concentration of acid. The experiments further manifested that (i) the RSD values of intra-day and inter-day runs were less than 1.59 and 3.76%, respectively, indicating similar precision and stability in capillary electrophoresis or HPLC; (ii) the indicators with different pK(a) values had no obvious effect on EABT, distinguishing strong influence on the judgment of equivalence-point titration in the classic one; and (iii) the constant equivalence-point titration always existed in the EABT, rather than the classic volumetric analysis. Additionally, the EABT could be put to good use for the determination of actual acid concentrations. The experimental results achieved herein showed a new general guidance for the development of classic volumetric analysis and element (e.g. nitrogen) content analysis in protein chemistry. PMID:21462222

  9. Acid-base titrations using microfluidic paper-based analytical devices.

    PubMed

    Karita, Shingo; Kaneta, Takashi

    2014-12-16

    Rapid and simple acid-base titration was accomplished using a novel microfluidic paper-based analytical device (?PAD). The ?PAD was fabricated by wax printing and consisted of ten reservoirs for reaction and detection. The reaction reservoirs contained various amounts of a primary standard substance, potassium hydrogen phthalate (KHPth), whereas a constant amount of phenolphthalein was added to all the detection reservoirs. A sample solution containing NaOH was dropped onto the center of the ?PAD and was allowed to spread to the reaction reservoirs where the KHPth neutralized it. When the amount of NaOH exceeded that of the KHPth in the reaction reservoirs, unneutralized hydroxide ion penetrated the detection reservoirs, resulting in a color reaction from the phenolphthalein. Therefore, the number of the detection reservoirs with no color change determined the concentration of the NaOH in the sample solution. The titration was completed within 1 min by visually determining the end point, which required neither instrumentation nor software. The volumes of the KHPth and phenolphthalein solutions added to the corresponding reservoirs were optimized to obtain reproducible and accurate results for the concentration of NaOH. The ?PADs determined the concentration of NaOH at orders of magnitude ranging from 0.01 to 1 M. An acid sample, HCl, was also determined using Na2CO3 as a primary standard substance instead of KHPth. Furthermore, the ?PAD was applicable to the titrations of nitric acid, sulfuric acid, acetic acid, and ammonia solutions. The ?PADs were stable for more than 1 month when stored in darkness at room temperature, although this was reduced to only 5 days under daylight conditions. The analysis of acidic hot spring water was also demonstrated in the field using the ?PAD, and the results agreed well with those obtained by classic acid-base titration. PMID:25423320

  10. The ?-phosphorus hyperfine coupling constant in nitroxide: part 3: titration of water by electron paramagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Audran, Gérard; Bosco, Lionel; Brémond, Paul; Butscher, Teddy; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Marque, Sylvain R A; Mellet, Philippe; Parzy, Elodie; Santelli, Maurice; Thiaudière, Eric

    2015-12-14

    Recently, we showed that the phosphorus hyperfine coupling constant aP? of persistent cyclic nitroxides decreased with the normalized polarity Reichardt's constant E. Thus, we investigated the changes in aP? in binary mixtures of solvents. The sensitivity of aP? to the solvent was high enough to allow us to perform water titration in THF, 1,4-dioxane, and acetonitrile by EPR. Accuracies of a few percent were achieved. PMID:26395177

  11. Comparison of ozone determinations by ultraviolet photometry and gas-phase titration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demore, W. B.; Patapoff, M.

    1976-01-01

    A comparison of ozone determinations based on ultraviolet absorption photometry and gas-phase titration (GPT) shows good agreement between the two methods. Together with other results, these findings indicate that three candidate reference methods for ozone, UV photometry, IR photometry, and GPT are in substantial agreement. However, the GPT method is not recommended for routine use by air pollution agencies for calibration of ozone monitors because of susceptibility to experimental error.

  12. Voyager photometry of Triton - Haze and surface photometric properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, J.; Helfenstein, P.; Verbiscer, A.; Veverka, J.

    1991-01-01

    The Voyager whole-disk observations of Triton at 0.41, 0.48, and 0.56 micron filter wavelengths are analyzed using a model which combines an improved version of Hapke's photometric equation with a thin atmospheric haze layer in the appropriate spherical geometry. The model is shown to describe accurately the phase curves over a range of phase angles and to agree with disk-resolved brightness scans along the photometric equator and mirror meridian. According to the model, the photometric parameters of Triton's regolith are reasonably typical of icy satellites, except for the extremely high (close to unity) single-scattering albedo.

  13. Utilizing the virus-induced blocking of apoptosis in an easy baculovirus titration method

    PubMed Central

    Niarchos, Athanasios; Lagoumintzis, George; Poulas, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Baculovirus-mediated protein expression is a robust experimental technique for producing recombinant higher-eukaryotic proteins because it combines high yields with considerable post-translational modification capabilities. In this expression system, the determination of the titer of recombinant baculovirus stocks is important to achieve the correct multiplicity of infection for effective amplification of the virus and high expression of the target protein. To overcome the drawbacks of existing titration methods (e.g., plaque assay, real-time PCR), we present a simple and reliable assay that uses the ability of baculoviruses to block apoptosis in their host cells to accurately titrate virus samples. Briefly, after incubation with serial dilutions of baculovirus samples, Sf9 cells were UV irradiated and, after apoptosis induction, they were viewed via microscopy; the presence of cluster(s) of infected cells as islets indicated blocked apoptosis. Subsequently, baculovirus titers were calculated through the determination of the 50% endpoint dilution. The method is simple, inexpensive, and does not require unique laboratory equipment, consumables or expertise; moreover, it is versatile enough to be adapted for the titration of every virus species that can block apoptosis in any culturable host cells which undergo apoptosis under specific conditions. PMID:26490731

  14. Protein-salt binding data from potentiometric titrations of lysozyme in aqueous solutions containing KCl

    SciTech Connect

    Engmann, J.; Blanch, H.W.; Prausnitz, J.M. |

    1997-03-01

    An existing method for potentiometric titrations of proteins was improved, tested and applied to titrations of the enzyme hen-egg-white lysozyme in aqueous solutions containing KCl at ionic strengths from 0.1 M to 2.0 M at 25 C. Information about the protein`s net charge dependence on pH and ionic strength were obtained and salt binding numbers for the system were calculated using a linkage concept. For the pH range 2.5--11.5, the net charge slightly but distinctly increases with increasing ionic strength between 0.1 M and 2.0 M. The differences are most distinct in the pH region below 5. Above pH 11.35, the net charge decreases with increasing ionic strength. Preliminary calculation of binding numbers from titration curves at 0.1 M and 1.0 M showed selective association of chloride anions and expulsion of potassium ions at low pH. Ion-binding numbers from this work will be used to evaluate thermodynamic properties and to correlate crystallization or precipitation phase-equilibrium data in terms of a model based on the integral-equation theory of fluids which is currently under development.

  15. Effect of Surface Site Interactions on Potentiometric Titration of Hematite (?-Fe2O3) Crystal Faces

    SciTech Connect

    Chatman, Shawn ME; Zarzycki, Piotr P.; Preocanin, Tajana; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2013-02-01

    Time dependent potentiometric pH titrations were used to study the effect of atomic scale surface structure on the protonation behavior of the structurally well defined hematite/aqueous electrolyte interfaces. Our recently proposed thermodynamic model [1,23] was applied to measured acidimetric and alkalimetric titration hysteresis loops, collected from highly organized (001), (012), and (113) crystal face terminations using pH equilibration times ranging from 15 to 30 mins. Hysteresis loop areas indicate that (001) faces equilibrate faster than the (012) and (113) faces, consistent with the different expected ensembles of singly, doubly, and triply coordinated surface sites on each face. Strongly non-linear hysteretic pH-potential relationships were found, with slopes exceeding Nernstian, collectively indicating that protonation and deprotonation is much more complex than embodied in present day surface complexation models. The asymmetrical shape of the acidimetric and alkalimetric titration branches were used to illustrate a proposed steric "leaky screen" repulsion/trapping interaction mechanism that stems from high affinity singly-coordinated sites electrostatically and sterically screening lower affinity doubly and triply coordinated sites. Our data indicate that site interaction is the dominant phenomenon defining surface potential accumulation behavior on single crystal faces of metal oxide minerals.

  16. Statistical mechanical model of coupled transcription from multiple promoters due to transcription factor titration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rydenfelt, Mattias; Cox, Robert Sidney, III; Garcia, Hernan; Phillips, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) with regulatory action at multiple promoter targets is the rule rather than the exception, with examples ranging from the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) in E. coli that regulates hundreds of different genes simultaneously to situations involving multiple copies of the same gene, such as plasmids, retrotransposons, or highly replicated viral DNA. When the number of TFs heavily exceeds the number of binding sites, TF binding to each promoter can be regarded as independent. However, when the number of TF molecules is comparable to the number of binding sites, TF titration will result in correlation (“promoter entanglement”) between transcription of different genes. We develop a statistical mechanical model which takes the TF titration effect into account and use it to predict both the level of gene expression for a general set of promoters and the resulting correlation in transcription rates of different genes. Our results show that the TF titration effect could be important for understanding gene expression in many regulatory settings.

  17. Calorimetry, activity, and micro-FTIR analysis of CO chemisorption, titration, and oxidation on supported Pt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sermon, Paul A.; Self, Valerie A.; Vong, Mariana S. W.; Wurie, Alpha T.

    1990-01-01

    The value of in situ analysis on CO chemisorption, titration and oxidation over supported Pt catalysts using calorimetry, catalytic and micro-FTIR methods is illustrated using silica- and titania-supported samples. Isothermal CO-O and O2-CO titrations have not been widely used on metal surfaces and may be complicated if some oxide supports are reduced by CO titrant. However, they can illuminate the kinetics of CO oxidation on metal/oxide catalysts since during such titrations all O and CO coverages are scanned as a function of time. There are clear advantages in following the rates of the catalyzed CO oxidation via calorimetry and gc-ms simultaneously. At lower temperatures the evidence they provide is complementary. CO oxidation and its catalysis of CO oxidation have been extensively studied with hysteresis and oscillations apparent, and the present results suggest the benefits of a combined approach. Silica support porosity may be important in defining activity-temperature hysteresis. FTIR microspectroscopy reveals the chemical heterogeneity of the catalytic surfaces used; it is interesting that the evidence with regard to the dominant CO surface species and their reactivities with regard to surface oxygen for present oxide-supported Pt are different from those seen on graphite-supported Pt.

  18. Chaotic dynamics of resting ventilatory flow in humans assessed through noise titration

    E-print Network

    Marc Wysocki; Marie-Noelle Fiamma; Christian Straus; Chi-Sang Poon; Thomas Similowski

    2006-06-12

    The mammalian ventilatory behavior exhibits nonlinear dynamics as reflected by certain nonlinearity or complexity indicators (e.g. correlation dimension, approximate entropy, Lyapunov exponents...) but this is not sufficient to determine its possible chaotic nature. To address this, we applied the noise titration technique, previously shown to discern and quantify chaos in short and noisy time series, to ventilatory flow recordings obtained in quietly breathing normal humans. Nine subjects (8 men and 1 woman, 24-42 yrs) were studied during 15-minute epochs of ventilatory steady-state (10.1 +/- 3.0 breaths/minute, tidal volume 0.63 +/- 0.2L). Noise titration applied to the unfiltered signals subsampled at 5 Hz detected nonlinearity in all cases (noise limit 20.2 +/- 12.5%). Noise limit values were weakly correlated to the correlation dimension and the largest Lyapunov exponent of the signals. This study shows that the noise titration approach evidences a chaotic dimension to the behavior of ventilatory flow over time in normal humans during tidal breathing.

  19. Photometric immersion refractometry of bacterial spores.

    PubMed Central

    Gerhardt, P; Beaman, T C; Corner, T R; Greenamyre, J T; Tisa, L S

    1982-01-01

    Photometric immersion refractometry was used to determine the average apparent refractive index (n) of five types of dormant Bacillus spores representing a 600-fold range in moist-heat resistance determined as a D100 value. The n of a spore type increased as the molecular size of various immersion solutes decreased. For comparison of the spore types, the n of the entire spore and of the isolated integument was determined by use of bovine serum albumin, which is excluded from permeating into them. The n of the sporoplast (the structures bounded by the outer pericortex membrane) was determined by use of glucose, which was shown to permeate into the spore only as deeply as the pericortex membrane. Among the various spore types, an exponential increase in the heat resistance correlated with the n of the entire spore and of the sporoplast, but not of the isolated perisporoplast integument. Correlation of the n with the solids content of the entire spore provided a method of experimentally obtaining the refractive index increment (dn/dc), which was constant for the various spore types and enables the calculation of solids and water content from an n. Altogether, the results showed that the total water content is distributed unequally within the dormant spore, with less water in the sporoplast than in the perisporoplast integument, and that the sporoplast becomes more refractile and therefore more dehydrated as the heat resistance becomes greater among the various spore types. PMID:6802796

  20. Photometric decomposition of mergers in disk galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Mezcua, M.; Mediavilla, E.; Lobanov, A. P.; Karouzos, M.

    2014-03-20

    Several observational studies and numerical simulations suggest that mergers must contribute to the evolution of galaxies; however, the role that they play is not yet fully understood. In this paper we study a sample of 52 double nucleus disk galaxies that are considered as candidates for a minor merger event. The luminosity of each of the nuclei and their relative separation are derived from a multi-component photometric fit of the galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey optical images. We find that the nuclei in most of the sources have projected separations ?4 kpc. The ratio of nuclear luminosities indicates that most of the systems are likely in the coalescence stage of a major merger. This is supported by the existence of a single galaxy disk in 65% of the systems studied and the finding of a correlation between nuclear luminosity and host luminosity for the single-disk systems: those sources fitted with as single disk are in a more evolved stage of the merger and present an enhancement of the nuclear luminosity compared to the double-disk systems, as expected from simulations of galaxy mergers. Finally, we identify a sample of 19 double nucleus disk galaxies in which the two nuclei are physically separated by ?1 kpc and constitute thus a sample of sub-kpc binary active galactic nucleus candidates.

  1. Photometric Monitoring of Quasars with Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unwin, Stephen C.; Wehrle, A. E.; Wiita, P. J.; Revalski, M.; Silano, D.; Sprague, D.; Di Lorenzo, P.

    2013-01-01

    We have observed the photometric variability of four flat-spectrum radio quasars, and one radio galaxy (Cyg A) with Kepler, since mid-2010. Kepler’s ability to observe uninterrupted for very extended durations provides a unique opportunity to obtain very long time sequences on active galactic nuclei, something that is hard to do even with dedicated ground-based telescope networks. It allows us to examine these light curves for variability on timescales from hours to weeks, and to probe the physical processes involved in accretion around the central black hole and the organization of some of that energy into jets that ultimately power double-lobed radio sources. Kepler was designed to detect exoplanet transits of stars, and the data analysis pipeline is highly optimized for that purpose. We cannot use the standard analysis tools for the quasi-random variability in quasars, so we re-analysed the raw data, and overcame some of the challenges in calibrating these light curves. We briefly discuss some of the issues in producing calibrated light curves for long timescales. For each quasar we computed power spectra, and found power-law slopes of around -2 for most. Although sensitive to quasi-periodic variations, we did not find any convincing evidence for periodicity in any of our targets. This research was carried out, in part, at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Copyright 2012. California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  2. BROADBAND PHOTOMETRIC REVERBERATION MAPPING OF NGC 4395

    SciTech Connect

    Edri, Haim; Rafter, Stephen E.; Kaspi, Shai; Behar, Ehud; Chelouche, Doron E-mail: shai@physics.technion.ac.il E-mail: doron@sci.haifa.ac.il

    2012-09-01

    We present results of broadband photometric reverberation mapping (RM) to measure the radius of the broad-line region, and subsequently the black hole mass (M{sub BH}), in the nearby, low-luminosity active galactic nuclei NGC 4395. Using the Wise Observatory's 1 m telescope equipped with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey g', r', and i' broadband filters, we monitored NGC 4395 for nine consecutive nights and obtained three light curves each with over 250 data points. The g' and r' bands include time variable contributions from H{beta} and H{alpha}, respectively, plus continuum. The i' band is free of broad lines and covers exclusively continuum. We show that by looking for a peak in the difference between the cross-correlation and the auto-correlation functions for all combinations of filters, we can get a reliable estimate of the time lag necessary to compute M{sub BH}. We measure the time lag for H{alpha} to be 3.6 {+-} 0.8 hr, comparable to previous studies using the line-resolved spectroscopic RM method. We argue that this lag implies a black hole mass of M{sub BH} = (4.9 {+-} 2.6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }.

  3. IMPROVED PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS WITH SURFACE LUMINOSITY PRIORS

    SciTech Connect

    Xia Lifang; Cohen, Seth; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James; Grogin, Norman; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Pirzkal, Nor; Xu Chun

    2009-07-15

    We apply Bayesian statistics with prior probabilities of galaxy surface luminosity (SL) to improve photometric redshifts. We apply the method to a sample of 1266 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the GOODS North and South fields at 0.1 {approx}< z {approx}< 2.0. We start with spectrophotometric redshifts (SPZs) based on Probing Evolution and Reionization Spectroscopically grism spectra, which cover a wavelength range of 6000-9000 A, combined with (U)BViz(JHK) broadband photometry in the GOODS fields. The accuracy of SPZ redshifts is estimated to be {sigma}({delta}(z)) = 0.035 with an systematic offset of -0.026, where {delta}(z) = {delta}z/(1 + z), for galaxies in redshift range of 0.5 {approx}< z {approx}< 1.25. The addition of the SL prior probability helps break the degeneracy of SPZ redshifts between low redshift 4000 A break galaxies and high-redshift Lyman break galaxies which are mostly catastrophic outliers. For the 1138 galaxies at z {approx}< 1.6, the fraction of galaxies with redshift deviation {delta}(z)>0.2 is reduced from 15.0% to 10.4%, while the rms scatter of the fractional redshift error does not change much.

  4. Accuracy and precision of protein-ligand interaction kinetics determined from chemical shift titrations.

    PubMed

    Markin, Craig J; Spyracopoulos, Leo

    2012-12-01

    NMR-monitored chemical shift titrations for the study of weak protein-ligand interactions represent a rich source of information regarding thermodynamic parameters such as dissociation constants (K ( D )) in the micro- to millimolar range, populations for the free and ligand-bound states, and the kinetics of interconversion between states, which are typically within the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale. We recently developed two chemical shift titration methods wherein co-variation of the total protein and ligand concentrations gives increased precision for the K ( D ) value of a 1:1 protein-ligand interaction (Markin and Spyracopoulos in J Biomol NMR 53: 125-138, 2012). In this study, we demonstrate that classical line shape analysis applied to a single set of (1)H-(15)N 2D HSQC NMR spectra acquired using precise protein-ligand chemical shift titration methods we developed, produces accurate and precise kinetic parameters such as the off-rate (k ( off )). For experimentally determined kinetics in the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale, k ( off ) ~ 3,000 s(-1) in this work, the accuracy of classical line shape analysis was determined to be better than 5 % by conducting quantum mechanical NMR simulations of the chemical shift titration methods with the magnetic resonance toolkit GAMMA. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the experimental precision for k ( off ) from line shape analysis of NMR spectra was determined to be 13 %, in agreement with the theoretical precision of 12 % from line shape analysis of the GAMMA simulations in the presence of noise and protein concentration errors. In addition, GAMMA simulations were employed to demonstrate that line shape analysis has the potential to provide reasonably accurate and precise k ( off ) values over a wide range, from 100 to 15,000 s(-1). The validity of line shape analysis for k ( off ) values approaching intermediate exchange (~100 s(-1)), may be facilitated by more accurate K ( D ) measurements from NMR-monitored chemical shift titrations, for which the dependence of K ( D ) on the chemical shift difference (??) between free and bound states is extrapolated to ?? = 0. The demonstrated accuracy and precision for k ( off ) will be valuable for the interpretation of biological kinetics in weakly interacting protein-protein networks, where a small change in the magnitude of the underlying kinetics of a given pathway may lead to large changes in the associated downstream signaling cascade. PMID:23086713

  5. Determination of NO/sub 2//sup -//NO/sub 3//sup -/ mixtures by titration with ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Campanella, L.; Paoletti, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    The analysis of nitrite-nitrate mixtures by indirect titration with ascorbic acid performed before and after passage through a reducing Cd column is proposed and discussed with particular reference to experimental conditions, calculation scheme and concentration ranges.

  6. FAST PHOTOMETRIC IMAGING OF HIGH ALTITUDE OPTICAL FLASHES ABOVE THUNDERSTORMS

    E-print Network

    FAST PHOTOMETRIC IMAGING OF HIGH ALTITUDE OPTICAL FLASHES ABOVE THUNDERSTORMS a dissertation data acquired by the array (named the "Fly's Eye") settled several questions regarding the relationship of the nighttime lower ionospheric electron density profile over large thunderstorm systems [Barrington

  7. IMPA Minicourse Summer 2005 Photometric Calibration of Digital

    E-print Network

    Goesele, Michael

    Michael Goesele Specialized & General Purpose Tools specialized tools spectrophotometer glossmeter haze Spectrophotometer illuminates an object under an angle of 45° observes it along the normal direction performs Goesele Spectrophotometer Photometric Calibration of Digital Cameras for Image-Based Techniques Michael

  8. Photometric correction of VIR spectra of Ceres: empirical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longobardo, A.; Palomba, E.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Ciarniello, M.; Tosi, F.; Li, J.-Y.; Carrozzo, F. G.; Zambon, F.; Raponi, A.; Ammannito, E.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2015-10-01

    The application of the photometric empirical model, already tested for the Vesta asteroid and for the 67P/CG comet, is extended for the first data of Ceres provided by the Dawn/VIR imaging spectrometer

  9. Measuring galaxy environments in large scale photometric surveys

    E-print Network

    Etherington, James

    2015-01-01

    The properties of galaxies in the local universe have been shown to depend upon their environment. Future large scale photometric surveys such as DES and Euclid will be vital to gain insight into the evolution of galaxy properties and the role of environment. Large samples come at the cost of redshift precision and this affects the measurement of environment. We study this by measuring environments using SDSS spectroscopic and photometric redshifts and also simulated photometric redshifts with a range of uncertainties. We consider the Nth nearest neighbour and fixed aperture methods and evaluate the impact of the aperture parameters and the redshift uncertainty. We find that photometric environments have a smaller dynamic range than spectroscopic measurements because uncertain redshifts scatter galaxies from dense environments into less dense environments. At the expected redshift uncertainty of DES, 0.1, there is Spearman rank correlation coefficient of 0.4 between the measurements using the optimal paramete...

  10. Clinical Guidelines for the Manual Titration of Positive Airway Pressure in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Summary: Positive airway pressure (PAP) devices are used to treat patients with sleep related breathing disorders (SRBDs), including obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). After a patient is diagnosed with OSA, the current standard of practice involves performing attended polysomnography (PSG), during which positive airway pressure is adjusted throughout the recording period to determine the optimal pressure for maintaining upper airway patency. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and bilevel positive airway pressure (BPAP) represent the two forms of PAP that are manually titrated during PSG to determine the single fixed pressure of CPAP or the fixed inspiratory and expiratory positive airway pressures (IPAP and EPAP, respectively) of BPAP for subsequent nightly usage. A PAP Titration Task Force of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine reviewed the available literature. Based on this review, the Task Force developed these recommendations for conducting CPAP and BPAP titrations. Major recommendations are as follows: (1) All potential PAP titration candidates should receive adequate PAP education, hands-on demonstration, careful mask fitting, and acclimatization prior to titration. (2) CPAP (IPAP and/or EPAP for patients on BPAP) should be increased until the following obstructive respiratory events are eliminated (no specific order) or the recommended maximum CPAP (IPAP for patients on BPAP) is reached: apneas, hypopneas, respiratory effort-related arousals (RERAs), and snoring. (3) The recommended minimum starting CPAP should be 4 cm H2O for pediatric and adult patients, and the recommended minimum starting IPAP and EPAP should be 8 cm H2O and 4 cm H2O, respectively, for pediatric and adult patients on BPAP. (4) The recommended maximum CPAP should be 15 cm H2O (or recommended maximum IPAP of 20 cm H2O if on BPAP) for patients <12 years, and 20 cm H2O (or recommended maximum IPAP of 30 cm H2O if on BPAP) for patients ?12 years. (5) The recommended minimum IPAP-EPAP differential is 4 cm H2O and the recommended maximum IPAP-EPAP differential is 10 cm H2O (6) CPAP (IPAP and/or EPAP for patients on BPAP depending on the type of event) should be increased by at least 1 cm H2O with an interval no shorter than 5 min, with the goal of eliminating obstructive respiratory events. (7) CPAP (IPAP and EPAP for patients on BPAP) should be increased from any CPAP (or IPAP) level if at least 1 obstructive apnea is observed for patients <12 years, or if at least 2 obstructive apneas are observed for patients ?12 years. (8) CPAP (IPAP for patients on BPAP) should be increased from any CPAP (or IPAP) level if at least 1 hypopnea is observed for patients <12 years, or if at least 3 hypopneas are observed for patients ?12 years. (9) CPAP (IPAP for patients on BPAP) should be increased from any CPAP (or IPAP) level if at least 3 RERAs are observed for patients <12 years, or if at least 5 RERAs are observed for patients ?12 years. (10) CPAP (IPAP for patients on BPAP) may be increased from any CPAP (or IPAP) level if at least 1 min of loud or unambiguous snoring is observed for patients <12 years, or if at least 3 min of loud or unambiguous snoring are observed for patients ?12 years. (11) The titration algorithm for split-night CPAP or BPAP titration studies should be identical to that of full-night CPAP or BPAP titration studies, respectively. (12) If the patient is uncomfortable or intolerant of high pressures on CPAP, the patient may be tried on BPAP. If there are continued obstructive respiratory events at 15 cm H2O of CPAP during the titration study, the patient may be switched to BPAP. (13) The pressure of CPAP or BPAP selected for patient use following the titration study should reflect control of the patient's obstructive respiration by a low (preferably <5 per hour) respiratory disturbance index (RDI) at the selected pressure, a minimum sea level SpO2 above 90% at the pressure, and with a leak within acceptable parameters at the pressure. (14) An optimal titration reduces RDI <5

  11. Realistic uncertainties on Hapke model parameters from photometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, F.; Fernando, J.

    2015-10-01

    We propagate the uncertainties from the photometric measurement to the Hapke's photometric parameter using the Bayesian Monte Carlo approach. Since non-linearities are strong, uncertainties may have a non-Gaussian shape, especially in the case of relatively large uncertainties. We propose here to study synthetic examples in order to characterize the uncertainties of previous analysis but also to propose new strategies for new acquisition campaigns.

  12. The Unusual Photometric Variability of the PMS Star GM Cep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semkov, E. H.; Ibryamov, S. I.; Peneva, S. P.; Milanov, T. R.; Stoyanov, K. A.; Stateva, I. K.; Kjurkchieva, D. P.; Dimitrov, D. P.; Radeva, V. S.

    2015-03-01

    Results from UBVRI photometric observations of the pre-main sequence star GM Cep obtained in the period 2011 April-2014 August are reported in the paper. Presented data are a continuation of our photometric monitoring of the star started in 2008. GM Cep is located in the field of the young open cluster Trumpler 37 and over the past years it has been an object of intense photometric and spectral studies. The star shows a strong photometric variability interpreted as a possible outburst from EXor type in previous studies. Our photometric data for a period of over six years show a large amplitude variability (?V ~ 2.3 mag) and several deep minimums in brightness are observed. The analysis of the collected multicolour photometric data show the typical of UX Ori variables a colour reversal during the minimums in brightness. The observed decreases in brightness have a different shape, and evidences of periodicity are not detected. At the same time, high amplitude rapid variations in brightness typical for the classical T Tauri stars also present on the light curve of GM Cep. The spectrum of GM Cep shows the typical of classical T Tauri stars wide H? emission line and absorption lines of some metals. We calculate the outer radius of the H? emitting region as 10.4 ± 0.5 R? and the accretion rate as 1.8 × 10- 7 M? yr- 1.

  13. The Strömvil Photometric System: Classifying Faint Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, A. G. D.; Boyle, R. P.

    2006-08-01

    Since 1996 a group of astronomers has been working on setting up and then using the Strömvil photometric system, a combination of the four Strömgren and three Vilnius system filters. The system was announced in Straižys et al. (1996). A summary of the work up to 2003 can be found in S?džius et al. (2003). The major ability of the Strömvil system is that, from photoelectric measures alone one can determine the reddening, temperature, gravity and metalicity of stars. With all the new surveys that have been made and ones yet to be made, such a system will be of great use to identify the nature of the new faint stars that will be identified and classify them by stellar type. And since the reddening can be calculated for each region, the intrinsic properties of these stars can be determined. The main observational programs underway in the Strömvil system at present are: 1. Setting up the primary standards. Kazlauskas et al. (2005) have published a list of 780 photoelectric standards in the northern hemisphere. 2. At the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope on Mt. Graham Boyle and Philip have been making CCD Strömvil measures of open and globular clusters. Observations are taken in each run of the rich open cluster M 67. These measures are matched to the high-accuracy CCD photometry of Laugalys et al. (2004) by constraining the corrections to each flatfield to provide the needed one percent photometry in new program fields with only a few standards for zero-point calibration. 3. At Casleo, in Argentina, Philip and Pintado have been observing clusters with the 2.15 meter telescope. 4. On the data reduction side Janusz and Boyle have written the CommandLog which automates the process of data reduction for members of our group. This will ensure that all observations will be reduced in exactly the same way.

  14. Calibration of the MEarth Photometric System: Optical Magnitudes and Photometric Metallicity Estimates for 1802 Nearby M-dwarfs

    E-print Network

    Dittmann, Jason A; Charbonneau, David; Newton, Elisabeth R

    2015-01-01

    The MEarth Project is a photometric survey systematically searching the smallest stars nearest to the Sun for transiting rocky planets. Since 2008, MEarth has taken approximately two million images of 1844 stars suspected to be mid-to-late M dwarfs. We have augmented this survey by taking nightly exposures of photometric standard stars and have utilized this data to photometrically calibrate the $MEarth$ system, identify photometric nights, and obtain an optical magnitude with $1.5\\%$ precision for each M dwarf system. Each optical magnitude is an average over many years of data, and therefore should be largely immune to stellar variability and flaring. We combine this with trigonometric distance measurements, spectroscopic metallicity measurements, and 2MASS infrared magnitude measurements in order to derive a color-magnitude-metallicity relation across the mid-to-late M dwarf spectral sequence that can reproduce spectroscopic metallicity determinations to a precision of 0.1 dex. We release optical magnitude...

  15. Humic substance charge determination by titration with a flexible cationic polyelectrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Wen-Feng; Norde, Willem; Koopal, Luuk K.

    2011-10-01

    The anionic charge of humic substances (HS) plays a major role in the interaction of HS with other components. Therefore, the potential of the polyelectrolyte titration technique to obtain the charge density of HS in simple 1-1 electrolyte solutions has been investigated. Titrations are carried out with an automatic titrator combined with the "Mütek particle charge detector" which allows determination of the Mütek potential and the pH as a function of the added amount of titrant which is a solution of poly-diallyldimethylammonium chloride (polyDADMAC), a cationic strong polyelectrolyte. When the Mütek potential reverses its sign the iso-electric point (IEP) of the polyDADMAC-HS complex is reached. The polyDADMAC/HS mass ratio at the IEP gives information on the HS charge density and from the pH changes in solution an estimate of the charge regulation in the HS-polyDADMAC complex can be obtained. In general, for polyDADMAC-HS complexes an increase in the dissociation of the acid groups of HS is found (charge regulation). The charge regulation decreases with increasing concentration of 1-1 background electrolyte. Cation incorporation can be neglected at 1-1 electrolyte concentrations ? 1 mmol L -1 and a 1-1 stoichiometry exists between the polyDADMAC and HS charge. However, at these low salt concentrations the charge regulation is substantial. A detailed analysis of purified Aldrich humic acid (PAHA) at pH 5 and a range of KCl concentrations reveals that the anionic charge of PAHA in the complex increases at 5 mmol L -1 KCl by 30% and at 150 mmol L -1 KCl by 12%. On the other hand, increasing amounts of K + become incorporated in the complex: at 5 mmol L -1 KCl 5% and at 150 mmol L -1 KCl 24% of the PAHA charge is balanced by K +. By comparing at pH 5 the mass ratios polyDADMAC/PAHA in the complex at the IEP with the theoretical mass ratios of polyDADMAC/PAHA required to neutralize PAHA in the absence of charge regulation and K + incorporation, it is found that at 50 mmol L -1 KCl the extra negative charge due to the interaction between polyDADMAC and PAHA is just compensated by K + incorporation in the complex. Therefore, a pseudo 1-1 stoichiometry exists at about 50 mmol L -1 1-1 electrolyte concentration and only at this salt concentration polyDADMAC titrations and conventional proton titrations give identical results. Most likely this is also true for other HA samples and other pH values. For FA further study is required to reveal the conditions for which polyDADMAC and proton titrations give identical results.

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Titration of Polyoxocations in Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Rustad, James R.

    2005-09-01

    The aqueous complex ion Al30O8(OH)56(H2O)26 18+(Al30) has a variety of bridging and terminal amphoteric surface functional groups which deprotonate over a pH range of 4–7. Their relative degree of protonation is calculated here from a series of molecular dynamics simulations in what appear to be the first molecular dynamics simulations of an acidometric titration. In these simulations, a model M30O8(OH)56(H2O)26 18+ ion is embedded in aqueous solution and titrated with hydroxide ions in the presence of a charge-compensating background of perchlorate ions. Comparison with titration of a model M13O4(OH)24(H2O)12 7+ reveals that the M30 ion is more acidic than the M13 ion due to the presence of acidic nH2O functional groups. The higher acidities of the functional groups on the M30 ion appear to result from enhanced hydration. Metal–oxygen bond lengths are calculated for the ion in solution, an isolated ion in the gas phase, and in its crystalline hydrate sulfate salt. Gas-phase and crystalline bond lengths do not correlate well with those calculated in solution. The acidities do not relate in any simple way to the number of metals coordinating the surface functional group or the M-O bond length. Moreover, the calculated acidity in solution does not correlate with proton affinities calculated for the isolated ion in the absence of solvent. It is concluded that the search for simple indicators of structure–reactivity relationships at the level of individual reactive sites faces major limitations, unless specific information on the hydration states of the functional groups is available.

  17. Non-damaging laser therapy of the macula: Titration algorithm and tissue response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, Daniel; Lavinsky, Daniel; Dalal, Roopa; Huie, Philip

    2014-02-01

    Retinal photocoagulation typically results in permanent scarring and scotomata, which limit its applicability to the macula, preclude treatments in the fovea, and restrict the retreatments. Non-damaging approaches to laser therapy have been tested in the past, but the lack of reliable titration and slow treatment paradigms limited their clinical use. We developed and tested a titration algorithm for sub-visible and non-damaging treatments of the retina with pulses sufficiently short to be used with pattern laser scanning. The algorithm based on Arrhenius model of tissue damage optimizes the power and duration for every energy level, relative to the threshold of lesion visibility established during titration (and defined as 100%). Experiments with pigmented rabbits established that lesions in the 50-75% energy range were invisible ophthalmoscopically, but detectable with Fluorescein Angiography and OCT, while at 30% energy there was only very minor damage to the RPE, which recovered within a few days. Patients with Diabetic Macular Edema (DME) and Central Serous Retinopathy (CSR) have been treated over the edematous areas at 30% energy, using 200?m spots with 0.25 diameter spacing. No signs of laser damage have been detected with any imaging modality. In CSR patients, subretinal fluid resolved within 45 days. In DME patients the edema decreased by approximately 150?m over 60 days. After 3-4 months some patients presented with recurrence of edema, and they responded well to retreatment with the same parameters, without any clinically visible damage. This pilot data indicates a possibility of effective and repeatable macular laser therapy below the tissue damage threshold.

  18. The effects of a sliding scale diuretic titration protocol in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Prasun, Marilyn A; Kocheril, Abraham G; Klass, Patricia H; Dunlap, Stephanie H; Piano, Mariann R

    2005-01-01

    Patients with heart failure (HF) are often instructed to temporarily adjust their diuretic dose. This approach has become routine in some HF management programs; however, no study has specifically examined the effects of a patient-directed flexible diuretic protocol. For the purposes of this study, patients were randomized into a usual care (UC) group (n = 31) or a flexible diuretic titration (DT) group (n = 35). The DT group completed a 6-item diuretic titration protocol once a day, for 3 months. The 6-minute walk distance, plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-BNP), plasma norepinephrine (NE), and quality of life (QOL) were measured at baseline and at 3 months. Hospitalizations, emergency department (ED) visits, and mortality rates were measured at 3 months. Compared to baseline, at 3 months, there was a significant increase in the DT group's 6-minute walk distance (646 +/- 60 ft vs 761 +/- 61 ft, P = .01) and total QOL score (53 +/- 5 vs 38 +/- 5, P = .001), whereas these parameters remained unchanged within the UC group. There were significantly less ED visits in the DT group compared with those in the UC group (3% vs 23%, P = .015). No differences were found between the groups in HF-related hospitalizations or mortality. Within both groups, no differences were found between baseline and 3-month NE or NT-BNP plasma values. Patients with heart failure who used a sliding scale diuretic titration protocol had significant improvements in their exercise tolerance and QOL, had fewer ED visits, and had no change in plasma NE or NT-BNP levels. PMID:15632815

  19. ELISA test for rabies antibody titration in orally vaccinated foxes sampled in the fields.

    PubMed

    Cliquet, F; Sagné, L; Schereffer, J L; Aubert, M F

    2000-08-01

    The assessment of the efficacy of rabies oral vaccination campaigns requires the titration of specific antibodies in the target species. Unfortunately, in Continental Europe, most fox serum samples are in fact "body fluids" taken from cadavers and the lack of a validated titration method for these poor quality sera made it impossible to survey and compare the efficacy of various oral vaccination protocols used by the different European teams. By using ready to use microplates sensitised with rabies virus glycoprotein purchased from a manufacturer and applying a simple and rapid ELISA technique on field fox sera, we obtained antibody quantitation highly correlated with seroneutralising antibody titres measured with a seroneutralisation test on cell culture. We obtained, with fox sera sampled in the same area, the same distribution of high, medium and low titres within all categories of serum quality (from high to very poor quality) and therefore conclude that this ELISA test allows a reliable titration even with highly contaminated body fluids. This test was shown to be equally capable of detecting rabies antibodies in serum samples taken from foxes vaccinated with an highly attenuated rabies virus (the SAG2 double mutant of the Street Alabama Dufferin strain) or with the VRG, the Vaccinia recombinant glycoprotein. Additionally, a strong correlation was demonstrated between titres given by this ELISA (or by the seroneutralisation test) and protection against challenge of foxes orally vaccinated with SAG2 vaccine baits. In view of this validation, this simple and reliable test is proposed for sero-surveying foxes following rabies oral vaccination campaigns. PMID:10869772

  20. Probing oppositely charged surfactant and copolymer interactions by isothermal titration microcalorimetry

    E-print Network

    J. Courtois; J. -F. Berret

    2011-07-26

    The complexation between charged-neutral block copolymers and oppositely charged surfactants was investigated by light scattering experiments and by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The copolymer was poly(sodium acrylate)-b-poly(acrylamide) and the surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB). In a previous report, we had shown that the copolymers and the surfactants co-assembled spontaneously into colloidal complexes. Depending of the charge ratio Z = [DTA+]/[COO-], the complexes were either single surfactant micelles decorated by copolymers, or core-shell hierarchical structures. ITC was performed in order to investigate the thermodynamics of the complex formation. Titrations of copolymers by surfactants and of surfactants by copolymers revealed that the electrostatic co-assembly was an endothermic reaction, suggesting a process dominated by the entropy of the counterions. Here we found that the thermodynamic quantities associated with the reaction depended on the mixing order. When surfactants were added stepwise to copolymers, the titration was associated with the formation of single micelles decorated by a unique polymer. Above a critical charge ratio, the micelles rearranged themselves into 100 nm colloidal complexes in a collective process which displayed the following features : i) the process was very slow as compared to the timescale of Brownian diffusion, ii) the thermodynamic signature was a endothermic peak and iii) the stoichiometry between the positive and negative charges was modified from n = 0.48 (single micelles) to 0.75 (core-shell complexes). The amount of polyelectrolytes needed for the complex formation exceeded the number required to compensate the net micellar charge, confirming the evidence of overcharging in the complex formation.

  1. Photometric calibrations for 21st century science

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, Stephen; Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth; Deustua, Susana E.; Smith, J.Allyn; Adelman, Saul; Allam, Sahar S.; Baptista, Brian; Bohlin, Ralph C.; Clem, James L.; Conley, Alex; Edelstein, Jerry; /UC, Berkeley, Space Sci. Dept. /NOAO, Tucson

    2009-02-01

    The answers to fundamental science questions in astrophysics, ranging from the history of the expansion of the universe to the sizes of nearby stars, hinge on our ability to make precise measurements of diverse astronomical objects. As our knowledge of the underlying physics of objects improves along with advances in detectors and instrumentation, the limits on our capability to extract science from measurements is set, not by our lack of understanding of the nature of these objects, but rather by the most mundane of all issues: the precision with which we can calibrate observations in physical units. In principle, photometric calibration is a solved problem - laboratory reference standards such as blackbody furnaces achieve precisions well in excess of those needed for astrophysics. In practice, however, transferring the calibration from these laboratory standards to astronomical objects of interest is far from trivial - the transfer must reach outside the atmosphere, extend over 4{pi} steradians of sky, cover a wide range of wavelengths, and span an enormous dynamic range in intensity. Virtually all spectrophotometric observations today are calibrated against one or more stellar reference sources, such as Vega, which are themselves tied back to laboratory standards in a variety of ways. This system's accuracy is not uniform. Selected regions of the electromagnetic spectrum are calibrated extremely well, but discontinuities of a few percent still exist, e.g., between the optical and infrared. Independently, model stellar atmospheres are used to calibrate the spectra of selected white dwarf stars, e.g. the HST system, but the ultimate accuracy of this system should be verified against laboratory sources. Our traditional standard star systems, while sufficient until now, need to be improved and extended in order to serve future astrophysics experiments. This white paper calls for a program to improve upon and expand the current networks of spectrophotometrically calibrated stars to provide precise calibration with an accuracy of equal to and better than 1% in the ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum, with excellent sky coverage and large dynamic range.

  2. Photometric constraints on binary asteroid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheirich, Peter

    2015-08-01

    To date, about 50 binary NEAs, 20 Mars-crossing and 80 small MB asteroids are known. We observe also a population of about 200 unbound asteroid systems (asteroid pairs). I will review the photometric observational data we have for the best observed cases and compare them with theories of binary and paired asteroids evolution.The observed characteristics of asteroid systems suggest their formation by rotational fission of parent rubble-pile asteroids after being spun up by the YORP effect. The angular momentum content of binary asteroids is close to critical. The orientations of satellite orbits of observed binary systems are non-random; the orbital poles concentrate near the obliquities of 0 and 180 degrees, i.e., near the YORP asymptotic states.Recently, a significant excess of retrograde satellite orbits was detected, which is not yet explained characteristic.An evolution of binary system depend heavily on the BYORP effect. If BYORP is contractive, the primary and secondary could end in a tidal-BYORP equilibrium. Observations of mutual events between binary components in at least four apparitions are needed for BYORP to be revealed by detecting a quadratic drift in mean anomaly of the satellite. I will show the observational evidence of single-synchronous binary asteroid with tidally locked satellite (175706 1996 FG3), i.e, with the quadratic drift equal to zero, and binary asteroid with contracting orbit (88710 2001 SL9), with positive value of the quadratic drift (the solution for the quadratic drift is ambiguous so far, with possible values of 5 and 8 deg/yr2).The spin configuration of the satellite play a crucial role in the evolution of the system under the influence of the BYORP effect. I will show that the rotational lightcurves of the satellites show that most of them have small libration amplitudes (up to 20 deg.), with a few interesting exceptions.Acknowledgements: This work has been supported by the Grant Agency of the Czech Republic, Grant P209/12/0229, and by the Ministry of Education of the Czech Republic, Grant LG12001.

  3. A photometric model for asteroid (21) Lutetia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasselmann, P.; Leyrat, C.; Fornasier, S.; Barucci, M.; Lazzaro, D.

    2014-07-01

    (21) Lutetia has been successfully observed (July 10, 2010) by the ESA Rosetta spacecraft during its journey toward the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (Sierks et al. 2011, Coradini et al. 2011). All the available data show intriguing characteristics with a complex surface composition interpretation (Barucci et al. 2012). The quite high mean density estimation (3.4±0.3, Pätzold et al. 2011) together with the unmatching density derived from the most probable surface compositions raise a hypothesis of (21) Lutetia having a metal core (Weiss et al 2012). The surface geology of (21) Lutetia is also highly complex with significant interactions between ancient and more recent structures (Thomas et al; 2012). The large craters and lineaments show that the object was heavily battered in the past, probably losing almost all of its crust in the process (Massironi et al 2012). If (21) Lutetia is a partially differentiated asteroid with an impact-stripped crust, a complete study of variegations might help in elucidating this event. Regions or strips of different albedo might indicate heavier- or lighter-battered surface histories. Albedo variations have been detected by Leyrat et al. (2012) in the visible wavelengths. In this work, we present a deeper analysis of the Lutetia photometric properties. For such analysis, a full set of pipelines was developed in the Python 2.7.6 language. Images obtained by the OSIRIS cameras, NAC and WAC, were used alongside the shape model provided by L. Jorda to derive for each facet the luminance angles and the correct I/F. The pipeline takes image pixels and matches with facets on different observational conditions. Facets are iteratively fitted by a phase function and a disk function. Several phase functions were tested as Akimov (1976), Kaasalainen (Kaasalainen et al. 2003), Schroder (Schroder et al; 2013) and polynomial and were implemented; for disk function, McEwen (1991), Akimov and Minnaert (1941) were used. The method can be also applicable for any body with resolved images and precise shape model. As a result, all phase and topological effects are removed and equigonal albedo maps (Shkuratov et al. 2011) were retrieved showing (21) Lutetia real variegations. Images close to the opposition surge, off linear regime, were handled with the Akimov or Kaasalainen functions. The obtained results will be presented and discussed, in particular maps with a distribution of opposition surge properties, such as angular width and amplitude of the surge. The opposition parameters give additional information about the grain-size distribution and grain transparency, and were only retrieved for facets with I/F of phase angles lower than 3 degrees.

  4. Kinetic analysis of gluconate phosphorylation by human gluconokinase using isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Rohatgi, Neha; Guðmundsson, Steinn; Rolfsson, Óttar

    2015-11-30

    Gluconate is a commonly encountered nutrient, which is degraded by the enzyme gluconokinase to generate 6-phosphogluconate. Here we used isothermal titration calorimetry to study the properties of this reaction. ?H, KM and kcat are reported along with substrate binding data. We propose that the reaction follows a ternary complex mechanism, with ATP binding first. The reaction is inhibited by gluconate, as it binds to an Enzyme-ADP complex forming a dead-end complex. The study exemplifies that ITC can be used to determine mechanisms of enzyme catalyzed reactions, for which it is currently not commonly applied. PMID:26505675

  5. Automated high-pressure titration system with in situ infrared spectroscopic detection.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Christopher J; Martin, Paul F; Chen, Jeffrey; Benezeth, Pascale; Schaef, Herbert T; Rosso, Kevin M; Felmy, Andrew R; Loring, John S

    2014-04-01

    A fully automated titration system with infrared detection was developed for investigating interfacial chemistry at high pressures. The apparatus consists of a high-pressure fluid generation and delivery system coupled to a high-pressure cell with infrared optics. A manifold of electronically actuated valves is used to direct pressurized fluids into the cell. Precise reagent additions to the pressurized cell are made with calibrated tubing loops that are filled with reagent and placed in-line with the cell and a syringe pump. The cell's infrared optics facilitate both transmission and attenuated total reflection (ATR) measurements to monitor bulk-fluid composition and solid-surface phenomena such as adsorption, desorption, complexation, dissolution, and precipitation. Switching between the two measurement modes is accomplished with moveable mirrors that direct the light path of a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer into the cell along transmission or ATR light paths. The versatility of the high-pressure IR titration system was demonstrated with three case studies. First, we titrated water into supercritical CO2 (scCO2) to generate an infrared calibration curve and determine the solubility of water in CO2 at 50?°C and 90 bar. Next, we characterized the partitioning of water between a montmorillonite clay and scCO2 at 50?°C and 90 bar. Transmission-mode spectra were used to quantify changes in the clay's sorbed water concentration as a function of scCO2 hydration, and ATR measurements provided insights into competitive residency of water and CO2 on the clay surface and in the interlayer. Finally, we demonstrated how time-dependent studies can be conducted with the system by monitoring the carbonation reaction of forsterite (Mg2SiO4) in water-bearing scCO2 at 50?°C and 90 bar. Immediately after water dissolved in the scCO2, a thin film of adsorbed water formed on the mineral surface, and the film thickness increased with time as the forsterite began to dissolve. However, after approximately 2.5 h, the trend reversed, and a carbonate precipitate began to form on the forsterite surface, exposing dramatic chemical changes in the thin-water film. Collectively, these applications illustrate how the high-pressure IR titration system can provide molecular-level information about the interactions between variably wet scCO2 and minerals relevant to underground storage of CO2 (geologic carbon sequestration). The apparatus could also be utilized to study high-pressure interfacial chemistry in other areas such as catalysis, polymerization, food processing, and oil and gas recovery. PMID:24784630

  6. Comparison of methods for isolation and titration of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus.

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, A J; Swanepoel, R; Leman, P A; Shepherd, S P

    1986-01-01

    The fluorescence focus assay and the plaque assay in CER cells were compared with mouse inoculation for the isolation and titration of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus. The fluorescence focus assay and the plaque assay were of similar sensitivity, but both produced 10- to 100-fold lower titers than did mouse inoculation. For specimens from 26 Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever patients in South Africa, virus was isolated from 20 by mouse inoculation and from only 11 by cell culturing. Although cell cultures were less sensitive for the isolation of virus from clinical specimens, they produced diagnostic results much more rapidly. PMID:3095367

  7. Automated high-pressure titration system with in situ infrared spectroscopic detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Christopher J.; Martin, Paul F.; Chen, Jeffrey; Benezeth, Pascale; Schaef, Herbert T.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Loring, John S.

    2014-04-01

    A fully automated titration system with infrared detection was developed for investigating interfacial chemistry at high pressures. The apparatus consists of a high-pressure fluid generation and delivery system coupled to a high-pressure cell with infrared optics. A manifold of electronically actuated valves is used to direct pressurized fluids into the cell. Precise reagent additions to the pressurized cell are made with calibrated tubing loops that are filled with reagent and placed in-line with the cell and a syringe pump. The cell's infrared optics facilitate both transmission and attenuated total reflection (ATR) measurements to monitor bulk-fluid composition and solid-surface phenomena such as adsorption, desorption, complexation, dissolution, and precipitation. Switching between the two measurement modes is accomplished with moveable mirrors that direct the light path of a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer into the cell along transmission or ATR light paths. The versatility of the high-pressure IR titration system was demonstrated with three case studies. First, we titrated water into supercritical CO2 (scCO2) to generate an infrared calibration curve and determine the solubility of water in CO2 at 50 °C and 90 bar. Next, we characterized the partitioning of water between a montmorillonite clay and scCO2 at 50 °C and 90 bar. Transmission-mode spectra were used to quantify changes in the clay's sorbed water concentration as a function of scCO2 hydration, and ATR measurements provided insights into competitive residency of water and CO2 on the clay surface and in the interlayer. Finally, we demonstrated how time-dependent studies can be conducted with the system by monitoring the carbonation reaction of forsterite (Mg2SiO4) in water-bearing scCO2 at 50 °C and 90 bar. Immediately after water dissolved in the scCO2, a thin film of adsorbed water formed on the mineral surface, and the film thickness increased with time as the forsterite began to dissolve. However, after approximately 2.5 h, the trend reversed, and a carbonate precipitate began to form on the forsterite surface, exposing dramatic chemical changes in the thin-water film. Collectively, these applications illustrate how the high-pressure IR titration system can provide molecular-level information about the interactions between variably wet scCO2 and minerals relevant to underground storage of CO2 (geologic carbon sequestration). The apparatus could also be utilized to study high-pressure interfacial chemistry in other areas such as catalysis, polymerization, food processing, and oil and gas recovery.

  8. Automated High-Pressure Titration System with In Situ Infrared Spectroscopic Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Christopher J.; Martin, Paul F.; Chen, Jeffrey; Benezeth, Pascale; Schaef, Herbert T.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Loring, John S.

    2014-04-17

    A fully automated titration system with infrared detection was developed for investigating interfacial chemistry at high pressures. The apparatus consists of a high-pressure fluid generation and delivery system coupled to a high-pressure cell with infrared optics. A manifold of electronically actuated valves is used to direct pressurized fluids into the cell. Precise reagent additions to the pressurized cell are made with calibrated tubing loops that are filled with reagent and placed in-line with the cell and a syringe pump. The cell’s infrared optics facilitate both transmission and attenuated total reflection (ATR) measurements to monitor bulk-fluid composition and solid-surface phenomena such as adsorption, desorption, complexation, dissolution, and precipitation. Switching between the two measurement modes is accomplished with moveable mirrors that direct radiation from a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer into the cell along transmission or ATR light paths. The versatility of the high-pressure IR titration system is demonstrated with three case studies. First, we titrated water into supercritical CO2 (scCO2) to generate an infrared calibration curve and determine the solubility of water in CO2 at 50 °C and 90 bar. Next, we characterized the partitioning of water between a montmorillonite clay and scCO2 at 50 °C and 90 bar. Transmission-mode spectra were used to quantify changes in the clay’s sorbed water concentration as a function of scCO2 hydration, and ATR measurements provided insights into competitive residency of water and CO2 on the clay surface and in the interlayer. Finally, we demonstrated how time-dependent studies can be conducted with the system by monitoring the carbonation reaction of forsterite (Mg2SiO4) in water-bearing scCO2 at 50 °C and 90 bar. Immediately after water dissolved in the scCO2, a thin film of adsorbed water formed on the mineral surface, and the film thickness increased with time as the forsterite began to dissolve. However, after approximately 2.5 hours, the trend reversed, and a carbonate precipitate began to form on the forsterite surface, exposing dramatic chemical changes in the thin-water film. Collectively, these applications illustrate how the high-pressure IR titration system can provide molecular-level information about the interactions between variably wet scCO2 and minerals relevant to underground storage of CO2 (geologic carbon sequestration). The apparatus could also be utilized to study high-pressure interfacial chemistry in other areas such as catalysis, polymerization, food processing, and oil and gas recovery.

  9. Automated high-pressure titration system with in situ infrared spectroscopic detection

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Christopher J. Martin, Paul F.; Chen, Jeffrey; Schaef, Herbert T.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Loring, John S.; Benezeth, Pascale

    2014-04-15

    A fully automated titration system with infrared detection was developed for investigating interfacial chemistry at high pressures. The apparatus consists of a high-pressure fluid generation and delivery system coupled to a high-pressure cell with infrared optics. A manifold of electronically actuated valves is used to direct pressurized fluids into the cell. Precise reagent additions to the pressurized cell are made with calibrated tubing loops that are filled with reagent and placed in-line with the cell and a syringe pump. The cell's infrared optics facilitate both transmission and attenuated total reflection (ATR) measurements to monitor bulk-fluid composition and solid-surface phenomena such as adsorption, desorption, complexation, dissolution, and precipitation. Switching between the two measurement modes is accomplished with moveable mirrors that direct the light path of a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer into the cell along transmission or ATR light paths. The versatility of the high-pressure IR titration system was demonstrated with three case studies. First, we titrated water into supercritical CO{sub 2} (scCO{sub 2}) to generate an infrared calibration curve and determine the solubility of water in CO{sub 2} at 50?°C and 90 bar. Next, we characterized the partitioning of water between a montmorillonite clay and scCO{sub 2} at 50?°C and 90 bar. Transmission-mode spectra were used to quantify changes in the clay's sorbed water concentration as a function of scCO{sub 2} hydration, and ATR measurements provided insights into competitive residency of water and CO{sub 2} on the clay surface and in the interlayer. Finally, we demonstrated how time-dependent studies can be conducted with the system by monitoring the carbonation reaction of forsterite (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) in water-bearing scCO{sub 2} at 50?°C and 90 bar. Immediately after water dissolved in the scCO{sub 2}, a thin film of adsorbed water formed on the mineral surface, and the film thickness increased with time as the forsterite began to dissolve. However, after approximately 2.5 h, the trend reversed, and a carbonate precipitate began to form on the forsterite surface, exposing dramatic chemical changes in the thin-water film. Collectively, these applications illustrate how the high-pressure IR titration system can provide molecular-level information about the interactions between variably wet scCO{sub 2} and minerals relevant to underground storage of CO{sub 2} (geologic carbon sequestration). The apparatus could also be utilized to study high-pressure interfacial chemistry in other areas such as catalysis, polymerization, food processing, and oil and gas recovery.

  10. Accelerated, Spleen-Based Titration of Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Infectivity in Transgenic Mice Expressing Human Prion Protein with Sensitivity Comparable to That of Survival Time Bioassay

    PubMed Central

    Halliez, Sophie; Reine, Fabienne; Herzog, Laetitia; Jaumain, Emilie; Haïk, Stéphane; Rezaei, Human; Vilotte, Jean-Luc; Laude, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The dietary exposure of the human population to the prions responsible for the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) epizooty has led to the emergence of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD). This fatal, untreatable neurodegenerative disorder is a growing public health concern because the prevalence of the infection seems much greater than the disease incidence and because secondary transmission of vCJD by blood transfusion or use of blood products has occurred. A current limitation in variant CJD risk assessment is the lack of quantitative information on the infectivity of contaminated tissues. To address this limitation, we tested the potential of a transgenic mouse line overexpressing human prion protein (PrP), which was previously reported to propagate vCJD prions. Endpoint titration of vCJD infectivity in different tissues was evaluated by two different methods: (i) the “classical” bioassay, based on the appearance of clinical symptoms and the detection of pathological prion protein in tissues of the inoculated mouse, and (ii) a shortened bioassay based on the detection of the protein in the mouse spleen at defined time points. The two methods proved equally sensitive in quantifying infectivity, even after very-low-dose inoculation of infected material, but the time schedule was shortened from ?2.5 years to ?1 year with the spleen bioassay. Compared to the “gold-standard” RIII model routinely used for endpoint titration of vCJD/BSE prions, either method improved the sensitivity by >2 orders of magnitude and allowed reevaluating the infectious titer of spleen from a vCJD individual at disease end stage to >1,000-fold-higher values. IMPORTANCE Here, we provide key reevaluation of the infectious titer of variant CJD brain and spleen tissues. The highly sensitive, accelerated spleen-based assay should thus constitute a key advance for variant CJD epidemiological and risk assessment purposes and should greatly facilitate future titration studies, including, for example, those aimed at validating decontamination procedures. The overlooked notion that the lymphoid tissue exhibits a higher capacity than the brain to replicate prions even after low-dose infection raises new questions about the molecular and/or cellular determinant(s) involved, a key issue regarding potent silent carriers of variant CJD in the lymphoid tissue. PMID:24850746

  11. Self-Titrating Anticoagulant Nanocomplexes That Restore Homeostatic Regulation of the Coagulation Cascade

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Antithrombotic therapy is a critical portion of the treatment regime for a number of life-threatening conditions, including cardiovascular disease, stroke, and cancer; yet, proper clinical management of anticoagulation remains a challenge because existing agents increase the propensity for bleeding in patients. Here, we describe the development of a bioresponsive peptide–polysaccharide nanocomplex that utilizes a negative feedback mechanism to self-titrate the release of anticoagulant in response to varying levels of coagulation activity. This nanoscale self-titrating activatable therapeutic, or nanoSTAT, consists of a cationic thrombin-cleavable peptide and heparin, an anionic polysaccharide and widely used clinical anticoagulant. Under nonthrombotic conditions, nanoSTATs circulate inactively, neither releasing anticoagulant nor significantly prolonging bleeding time. However, in response to life-threatening pulmonary embolism, nanoSTATs locally release their drug payload and prevent thrombosis. This autonomous negative feedback regulator may improve antithrombotic therapy by increasing the therapeutic window and decreasing the bleeding risk of anticoagulants. PMID:25119520

  12. Photometric Calibration of Consumer Video Cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suggs, Robert; Swift, Wesley, Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Equipment and techniques have been developed to implement a method of photometric calibration of consumer video cameras for imaging of objects that are sufficiently narrow or sufficiently distant to be optically equivalent to point or line sources. Heretofore, it has been difficult to calibrate consumer video cameras, especially in cases of image saturation, because they exhibit nonlinear responses with dynamic ranges much smaller than those of scientific-grade video cameras. The present method not only takes this difficulty in stride but also makes it possible to extend effective dynamic ranges to several powers of ten beyond saturation levels. The method will likely be primarily useful in astronomical photometry. There are also potential commercial applications in medical and industrial imaging of point or line sources in the presence of saturation.This development was prompted by the need to measure brightnesses of debris in amateur video images of the breakup of the Space Shuttle Columbia. The purpose of these measurements is to use the brightness values to estimate relative masses of debris objects. In most of the images, the brightness of the main body of Columbia was found to exceed the dynamic ranges of the cameras. A similar problem arose a few years ago in the analysis of video images of Leonid meteors. The present method is a refined version of the calibration method developed to solve the Leonid calibration problem. In this method, one performs an endto- end calibration of the entire imaging system, including not only the imaging optics and imaging photodetector array but also analog tape recording and playback equipment (if used) and any frame grabber or other analog-to-digital converter (if used). To automatically incorporate the effects of nonlinearity and any other distortions into the calibration, the calibration images are processed in precisely the same manner as are the images of meteors, space-shuttle debris, or other objects that one seeks to analyze. The light source used to generate the calibration images is an artificial variable star comprising a Newtonian collimator illuminated by a light source modulated by a rotating variable neutral- density filter. This source acts as a point source, the brightness of which varies at a known rate. A video camera to be calibrated is aimed at this source. Fixed neutral-density filters are inserted in or removed from the light path as needed to make the video image of the source appear to fluctuate between dark and saturated bright. The resulting video-image data are analyzed by use of custom software that determines the integrated signal in each video frame and determines the system response curve (measured output signal versus input brightness). These determinations constitute the calibration, which is thereafter used in automatic, frame-by-frame processing of the data from the video images to be analyzed.

  13. Critical coagulation concentration-based salt titration for visual quantification in gold nanoparticle-based colorimetric biosensors.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Yu, Lu; Zou, Jiaqi

    2014-02-01

    In gold nanoparticle (GNP)-based colorimetric biosensors, the gradual color shift is often used to correlate with the concentration of target molecules, and therefore a UV-vis spectrometer is usually required for accurate quantification. Here, we present a critical coagulation concentration (CCC)-based salt titration as a generic and simple way to enable accurate quantification in GNP-based colorimetric biosensors without any analytical equipment. The titration is carried out by stepwise addition of a salt titrant to the premixture of sample and GNPs until the color changes rapidly from red to blue, determined solely by visual inspection. The number of titration steps or the final salt concentration required for a rapid color shift (i.e., CCC) is then used to quantitatively correlate with the concentration of target molecules in the sample. The salt titration-based quantification has been demonstrated with two previously reported GNP-based colorimetric biosensors. Compared with quantification based on the gradual color shift with a spectrometer, the visual quantification based on the rapid color shift in the salt titration eliminates the need for any analytical equipment without sacrificing the performance (i.e., sensitivity and accuracy) and therefore is highly suitable for applications in low-resource settings. PMID:23946182

  14. Three different up-titration regimens of ponesimod, an S1P1 receptor modulator, in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Scherz, Michael W; Brossard, Patrick; D'Ambrosio, Daniele; Ipek, Murat; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2015-06-01

    Ponesimod is a selective S1P1 receptor modulator, and induces dose-dependent reduction of circulating lymphocytes upon oral dosing. Previous studies showed that single doses up to 75?mg or multiple doses up to 40?mg once daily are well tolerated, and heart rate (HR) reduction and atrio-ventricular conduction delays upon treatment initiation are reduced by gradual up-titration to the maintenance dose. This single-center, open-label, randomized, multiple-dose, 3-treatment, 3-way crossover study compared the tolerability, safety, pharmacokinetics, cardiodynamics, and effects on lymphocytes of 3 different up-titration regimens of ponesimod in healthy male and female subjects. Up-titration regimens comprised escalating periods of b.i.d. dosing (2.5 or 5?mg) and q.d. dosing (10 or 20?mg or both). After the third up-titration period a variable-duration washout period of 1-3 days was followed by re-challenge with a single 20-mg dose of ponesimod. Adverse events were transient and mild to moderate in intensity, not different between regimens. HR decrease after the first dose was greater than after all subsequent doses, including up-titration doses. Little or no HR change was observed with morning doses of b.i.d. regimens, suggesting that 2.5 and 5?mg b.i.d. are sufficient to sustain cardiac desensitization for the 12-hours dosing interval. PMID:25612299

  15. Photometric Analysis in the Kepler Science Operations Center Pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twicken, Joseph D.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Wu, Hayley; Jenkins, Jon M.; Girouard, Forrest; Klaus, Todd C.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the Photometric Analysis (PA) software component and its context in the Kepler Science Operations Center (SOC) pipeline. The primary tasks of this module are to compute the photometric flux and photocenters (centroids) for over 160,000 long cadence (thirty minute) and 512 short cadence (one minute) stellar targets from the calibrated pixels in their respective apertures. We discuss the science algorithms for long and short cadence PA: cosmic ray cleaning; background estimation and removal; aperture photometry; and flux-weighted centroiding. We discuss the end-to-end propagation of uncertainties for the science algorithms. Finally, we present examples of photometric apertures, raw flux light curves, and centroid time series from Kepler flight data. PA light curves, centroid time series, and barycentric timestamp corrections are exported to the Multi-mission Archive at Space Telescope [Science Institute] (MAST) and are made available to the general public in accordance with the NASA/Kepler data release policy.

  16. Long-term photometric monitoring of WASP-3b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibe, M.-T.; Cuesta, L.; Ullan, A.; Perez-Verde, A.; Navas, J.

    2012-09-01

    Long-term and high-precision photometric observations of planet host stars may provide important auxiliary information for exoplanet-atmosphere research because they allow to investigate the intrinsic stellar variability, as well as to determine transit ephemeris more accurately. Here we present results fromthe photometric follow-up of known transiting close-in giant planets that has been conducted with the CAB robotic telescope over the past two years. In particular, we discuss details of the hot, gas giant exoplanet WASP- 3b. An analysis of new transit observations, together with those available in the literature, showed strong evidence of transit duration variations (TDV) in this planetary system and confirmed the presence of transit time variations (TTV). We briefly present an upto- date review with additional data from the ongoing photometric monitoring campaign and discuss possible scenarios to interpret the data.

  17. Photometric redshift techniques of quasars in big-data era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanxia

    2015-08-01

    With the availability of the huge amounts of data from ground- and space-based large multiband photometric surveys, photometric redshifts provide an estimate for the distance of an astronomical object and have become a crucial tool for extragalactic astronomy and cosmology. Various phtometric redshift approaches are in bloom. Their performance and efficiency not only depend on completeness and quality of data, but also on the volume of data. The increase of data volume lead to different choice of techniques. We present various data mining methods used for photometric redshift estimation of quasars and compare their advantages and disadvantages. In the big-data era, the methods fit for large-scale data are in great requirement.

  18. Photometric exoplanet characterization with angular and spectral differential imaging

    E-print Network

    Vigan, Arthur; Langlois, Maud; Allard, France; Boccaletti, Anthony; Carbillet, Marcel; Mouillet, David; Smith, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    The direct detection of exoplanets has been the subject of intensive research in the recent years. Data obtained with future high-contrast imaging instruments optimized for giant planets direct detection are strongly limited by the speckle noise. Specific observing strategies and data analysis methods, such as angular and spectral differential imaging, are required to attenuate the noise level and possibly detect the faint planet flux. Even though these methods are very efficient at suppressing the speckles, the photometry of the faint planets is dominated by the speckle residuals. The determination of the effective temperature and surface gravity of the detected planets from photometric measurements in different bands is then limited by the photometric error on the planet flux. In this work we investigate this photometric error and the consequences on the determination of the physical parameters of the detected planets. We perform detailed end-to-end simulation with the CAOS-based Software Package for SPHERE...

  19. CosmoPhotoz: Photometric redshift estimation using generalized linear models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, Rafael S.; Elliott, Jonathan; Krone-Martins, Alberto; Ishida, Emille E. O.; Hilbe, Joseph; Cameron, Ewan

    2014-08-01

    CosmoPhotoz determines photometric redshifts from galaxies utilizing their magnitudes. The method uses generalized linear models which reproduce the physical aspects of the output distribution. The code can adopt gamma or inverse gaussian families, either from a frequentist or a Bayesian perspective. A set of publicly available libraries and a web application are available. This software allows users to apply a set of GLMs to their own photometric catalogs and generates publication quality plots with no involvement from the user. The code additionally provides a Shiny application providing a simple user interface.

  20. Spectro-Photometric Constraints on Galaxy Evolution with NGST

    E-print Network

    S. Charlot

    1998-10-26

    The Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) will gather unprecedented spectro-photometric data on galaxies out to the highest redshifts. It is therefore crucial to identify the spectro-photometric diagnostics within reach of NGST, which will allow us to best constrain the history of star formation and evolution of galaxies. The primary parameters to be determined are the ongoing rate of star formation and stellar mass of galaxies at all redshifts. In this context, we briefly review the reliability of various star formation rate and mass estimators of galaxies in a full range of redshifts, with particular emphasis on the relative merits of optical versus near- to mid-IR observations.

  1. Comparision of approaches to photometric redshift estimation of quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Yang; Zhang, Yanxia; Zhao, Yongheng; Tian, Haijun

    2015-08-01

    Based on databases from various different band photometric surveys (optical from SDSS, infrared from UKIDSS and WISE), we compare k-nearest neighbor regression based on KD-tree and Ball-tree, LASSO, PLS (Partial Least Squares), SDG, ridge regression and kernel ridge regression applied for photometric redshift estimation of quasars. The experimental result shows that the perfomance order of these methods is KD-tree kNN, Ball-tree kNN, kernal ridge regression, ridge regression, PLS, SGD, LASSO.

  2. A photometric study of the counterglow from space.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, F. E.; Carroll, B.; Aller, L. H.; Roach, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Photometric observations of the region of the counterglow (Gegenschein) made from OSO-6 are examined. The observations were made during the September to October 1970 period when the counterglow was between the Milky Way arms at a relatively high (negative) galactic latitude. The lines of sight included a slice across the antisun region at an inclination of 48 degrees to the ecliptic. A comparison is made between the photometric gradients as measured from the spacecraft and similar gradients deduced from ground-based observations.

  3. Theoretical autophotogrammetry. I - The method of the photometric potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wildey, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The present work presents preliminary efforts at a mathematical formulation of a photogrammetric method suitable for computerized processing. A theory is derived for the extraction of surface topography from stereometric pairs of photographs. The theory can be applied to either convergent or near-orthographic-projection stereo. Scene brightness is treated as a scalar function defined on a general surface embedded in ordinary three-dimensional space (the actual topography). Correspondence of points is based on adjustments leading to photometric equivalence, while the adjustments are based on the local value of the photometric gradient.

  4. SHARDS: AN OPTICAL SPECTRO-PHOTOMETRIC SURVEY OF DISTANT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo G.; Cava, Antonio; Barro, Guillermo; Villar, Victor; Cardiel, Nicolas; Espino, Nestor; Gallego, Jesus; Ferreras, Ignacio; Rodriguez-Espinosa, Jose Miguel; Balcells, Marc; Cepa, Jordi; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Cenarro, Javier; Charlot, Stephane; Cimatti, Andrea; Conselice, Christopher J.; Daddi, Emmanuele; Elbaz, David; Gobat, R. [Laboratoire AIM-Paris-Saclay, CEA and others

    2013-01-01

    We present the Survey for High-z Absorption Red and Dead Sources (SHARDS), an ESO/GTC Large Program carried out using the OSIRIS instrument on the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). SHARDS is an ultra-deep optical spectro-photometric survey of the GOODS-N field covering 130 arcmin{sup 2} at wavelengths between 500 and 950 nm with 24 contiguous medium-band filters (providing a spectral resolution R {approx} 50). The data reach an AB magnitude of 26.5 (at least at a 3{sigma} level) with sub-arcsec seeing in all bands. SHARDS' main goal is to obtain accurate physical properties of intermediate- and high-z galaxies using well-sampled optical spectral energy distributions (SEDs) with sufficient spectral resolution to measure absorption and emission features, whose analysis will provide reliable stellar population and active galactic nucleus (AGN) parameters. Among the different populations of high-z galaxies, SHARDS' principal targets are massive quiescent galaxies at z > 1, whose existence is one of the major challenges facing current hierarchical models of galaxy formation. In this paper, we outline the observational strategy and include a detailed discussion of the special reduction and calibration procedures which should be applied to the GTC/OSIRIS data. An assessment of the SHARDS data quality is also performed. We present science demonstration results on the detection and study of emission-line galaxies (star-forming objects and AGNs) at z = 0-5. We also analyze the SEDs for a sample of 27 quiescent massive galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the range 1.0 < z {approx}< 1.4. We discuss the improvements introduced by the SHARDS data set in the analysis of their star formation history and stellar properties. We discuss the systematics arising from the use of different stellar population libraries, typical in this kind of study. Averaging the results from the different libraries, we find that the UV-to-MIR SEDs of the massive quiescent galaxies at z = 1.0-1.4 are well described by an exponentially decaying star formation history with scale {tau} = 100-200 Myr, age around 1.5-2.0 Gyr, solar or slightly sub-solar metallicity, and moderate extinction, A(V) {approx} 0.5 mag. We also find that galaxies with masses above M* are typically older than lighter galaxies, as expected in a downsizing scenario of galaxy formation. This trend is, however, model dependent, i.e., it is significantly more evident in the results obtained with some stellar population synthesis libraries, and almost absent in others.

  5. A Photometric Observing Program at the VATT: Setting Up a Calibration Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis Philip, A. G.; Boyle, R. P.; Janusz, R.

    2009-05-01

    Philip and Boyle have been making Strömgren and then Strömvil photometric observations of open and globular clusters at the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope located on Mt. Graham in Arizona. Our aim is to obtain CCD photometric indices good to 0.01 magnitude. Indices of this quality can later be analyzed to yield estimates of temperature, luminosity and metallicity. But we have found that the CCD chip does not yield photometry of this quality without further corrections. Our most observed cluster is the open cluster, M 67. This cluster is also very well observed in the literature. We took the best published values and created a set of "standard" stars for our field. Taking our CCD results we could calculate deltas, as a function of position on the chip, which we then applied to all the CCD frames that we obtained. With this procedure we were able to obtain the precision of 0.01 magnitudes in all the fields that we observed. When we started we were able to use the "A" two-inch square Strömgren four-color set from KPNO. Later the Vatican Observatory bought a set of 3.48 inch square Strömgren filters, The Vatican Observatory had a set of circular Vilnius filters There was also an X filter. These eight filters made our Strömvil set.

  6. Improved methylene blue two-phase titration method for determining cationic surfactant concentration in high-salinity brine.

    PubMed

    Cui, Leyu; Puerto, Maura; López-Salinas, José L; Biswal, Sibani L; Hirasaki, George J

    2014-11-18

    The methylene blue (MB) two-phase titration method is a rapid and efficient method for determining the concentrations of anionic surfactants. The point at which the aqueous and chloroform phases appear equally blue is called Epton's end point. However, many inorganic anions, e.g., Cl(-), NO3(-), Br(-), and I(-), can form ion pairs with MB(+) and interfere with Epton's end point, resulting in the failure of the MB two-phase titration in high-salinity brine. Here we present a method to extend the MB two-phase titration method for determining the concentration of various cationic surfactants in both deionized water and high-salinity brine (22% total dissolved solid). A colorless end point, at which the blue color is completely transferred from the aqueous phase to the chloroform phase, is proposed as titration end point. Light absorbance at the characteristic wavelength of MB is measured using a spectrophotometer. When the absorbance falls below a threshold value of 0.04, the aqueous phase is considered colorless, indicating that the end point has been reached. By using this improved method, the overall error for the titration of a permanent cationic surfactant, e.g., dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide, in deionized (DI) water and high-salinity brine is 1.274% and 1.322% with limits of detection (LOD) of 0.149 and 0.215 mM, respectively. Compared to the traditional acid-base titration method, the error of this improved method for a switchable cationic surfactant, e.g., tertiary amine surfactant (Ethomeen C12), is 2.22% in DI water and 0.106% with LOD of 0.369 and 0.439 mM, respectively. PMID:25365626

  7. Pan-STARRS1 variability of XMM-COSMOS AGN. I. Impact on photometric redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simm, T.; Saglia, R.; Salvato, M.; Bender, R.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Draper, P. W.; Flewelling, H.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Magnier, E. A.; Metcalfe, N.; Tonry, J. L.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2015-12-01

    Aims: Upcoming large area sky surveys like Euclid and eROSITA, which are dedicated to studying the role of dark energy in the expansion history of the Universe and the three-dimensional mass distribution of matter, crucially depend on accurate photometric redshifts. The identification of variable sources, such as active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and the achievable redshift accuracy for varying objects are important in view of the science goals of the Euclid and eROSITA missions. Methods: We probe AGN optical variability for a large sample of X-ray-selected AGNs in the XMM-COSMOS field, using the multi-epoch light curves provided by the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) 3? and Medium Deep Field surveys. To quantify variability we employed a simple statistic to estimate the probability of variability and the normalized excess variance to measure the variability amplitude. Utilizing these two variability parameters, we defined a sample of varying AGNs for every PS1 band. We investigated the influence of variability on the calculation of photometric redshifts by applying three different input photometry sets for our fitting procedure. For each of the five PS1 bands gP1, rP1, iP1, zP1, and yP1, we chose either the epochs minimizing the interval in observing time, the median magnitude values, or randomly drawn light curve points to compute the redshift. In addition, we derived photometric redshifts using PS1 photometry extended by GALEX/IRAC bands. Results: We find that the photometry produced by the 3? survey is sufficient to reliably detect variable sources provided that the fractional variability amplitude is at least ~3%. Considering the photometric redshifts of variable AGNs, we observe that minimizing the time spacing of the chosen points yields superior photometric redshifts in terms of the percentage of outliers (33%) and accuracy (0.07), outperforming the other two approaches. Drawing random points from the light curve gives rise to typically 57% of outliers and an accuracy of ~0.4. Adding GALEX/IRAC bands for the redshift determination weakens the influence of variability. Although the redshift quality generally improves when adding these bands, we still obtain not less than 26% of outliers and an accuracy of 0.05 at best, therefore variable sources should receive a flag stating that their photometric redshifts may be low quality. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgThe catalogues of variable AGNs are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/584/A106

  8. Photometric Detection of Extrasolar Planets by the Transit Method

    E-print Network

    Deeg, Hans-Jörg

    Photometric Detection of Extrasolar Planets by the Transit Method Hans­J¨org Deeg Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E­38200 La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain Abstract. The transit method for the detection of extrasolar planets is based on the detection of stellar brightness variations, which result from the transit

  9. Classical variables in the era of space photometric missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnár, L.; Plachy, E.; Szabó, R.; Benk?, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    The space photometric missions like CoRoT and Kepler transformed our view of pulsating stars, including the well-known RR Lyrae and Cepheid classes. The K2, TESS and PLATO missions will expand these investigations to larger sample sizes and to specific stellar populations.

  10. Photometric stellar variation due to extra-solar comets

    E-print Network

    A. Lecavelier des Etangs; A. Vidal-Madjar; R. Ferlet

    1998-12-21

    We performed numerical simulations of stellar occultations by extra-solar cometary tails. We find that extra-solar comets can be detected by the apparent photometric variations of the central stars. In most cases, the light curve shows a very peculiar ``rounded triangular'' shape. However, in some other cases, the curve can mimic a planetary occultation. Photometric variations due to comet occultations are mainly achromatic. Nevertheless, if comets with small periastrons have smaller particles, these occultations could be chromatic with a larger extinction in the blue by few percents. We also estimate the number of detections expected in a large photometric survey at high accuracy. By the observation of several tens of thousand of stars, it should be possible to detect several hundreds of occultation per year. We thus conclude that a spatial photometric survey would detect a large number of extra-solar comets. This would allow to explore the time evolution of cometary activity, and consequently would probe structure and evolution of extra-solar planetary systems.

  11. Photometric NO/sub x/ analyzer helps surpass EPA standards

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.H.

    1983-10-01

    A photometric analyzer helped Monsanto Company of Pensacola, Florida reduce stack emissions to a point where an observer could not tell the difference between a shutdown and normal plant operation. Oxides of nitrogen output levels have been kept within 200 ppm at typical production rates, well within EPA limits.

  12. Photometric Stereo with General, Unknown Lighting Ronen Basri

    E-print Network

    Daume III, Hal

    Photometric Stereo with General, Unknown Lighting Ronen Basri£ David Jacobs Dept. of Computer properties of an object using multiple images taken with a fixed viewpoint and variable lighting conditions. This work has primarily relied on the presence of a single point source of light in each image. In this pa

  13. The Young Solar Analogs Project: Initial Photometric Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saken, Jon M.; Gray, R. O.; Corbally, C. J.

    2013-06-01

    Since 2007 we have been conducting spectroscopic monitoring of the Ca II H & K lines and G-band for a sample of 31 YSAs in order to better understand their activity cycles and variations, as well as the effects of young stars on their solar systems. The targets cover the spectral range of stars most likely to contain Earth analogs, F8-K2, and a broad enough range of ages, 0.3 Gyr - 1.5 Gyr, to investigate how activity level changes with stellar age. These studies are already showing possible evidence for activity cycles, large variations in starspot activity, and flaring events. In order to obtain a more complete picture of the nature of the stars' activity and examine the correlations between stellar brightness and chromospheric activity, we have started a complimentary campaign of photometric monitoring of these targets in Johnson B, V, and R, Stromgren v and H-alpha, with the use of a small robotic telescope dedicated to this project. This poster will present some results from the first year of photometric monitoring, focusing on the correlations between the photometric bands, and between the photometric and spectroscopic data, as well as an investigation of short-term (1-2 minutes) spectroscopic variations using data obtained earlier this year on the 1.8 m Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope (VATT).

  14. Light Curves of Selected Comets: Photometric Parameters and Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filonenko, V. S.; Churyumov, K. I.

    2001-03-01

    The light curves of four comets were constructed and analyzed. The photometric parameters H_yand nwere determined. The derived values of H_yand nwere compared with those obtained by other authors. The parameter n for Comet Ikeya-Secchi was found to vary. A list of flares in these comets was compiled.

  15. Accurate photometric redshift probability density estimation - method comparison and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Markus Michael; Seitz, Stella; Brimioulle, Fabrice; Frank, Eibe; Friedrich, Oliver; Gruen, Daniel; Hoyle, Ben

    2015-10-01

    We introduce an ordinal classification algorithm for photometric redshift estimation, which significantly improves the reconstruction of photometric redshift probability density functions (PDFs) for individual galaxies and galaxy samples. As a use case we apply our method to CFHTLS galaxies. The ordinal classification algorithm treats distinct redshift bins as ordered values, which improves the quality of photometric redshift PDFs, compared with non-ordinal classification architectures. We also propose a new single value point estimate of the galaxy redshift, which can be used to estimate the full redshift PDF of a galaxy sample. This method is competitive in terms of accuracy with contemporary algorithms, which stack the full redshift PDFs of all galaxies in the sample, but requires orders of magnitude less storage space. The methods described in this paper greatly improve the log-likelihood of individual object redshift PDFs, when compared with a popular neural network code (ANNZ). In our use case, this improvement reaches 50 per cent for high-redshift objects (z ? 0.75). We show that using these more accurate photometric redshift PDFs will lead to a reduction in the systematic biases by up to a factor of 4, when compared with less accurate PDFs obtained from commonly used methods. The cosmological analyses we examine and find improvement upon are the following: gravitational lensing cluster mass estimates, modelling of angular correlation functions and modelling of cosmic shear correlation functions.

  16. PROTOTYPE CORRELATION MASK FLAME PHOTOMETRIC DETECTOR FOR MEASURING SULFUR DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A prototype flame photometric detector system (FPD) to measure gaseous sulfur compounds was fabricated using a previously developed correlation mask optical system and a new flame housing. Also, a new burner for the FPD system was optimized to view the excited molecular sulfur em...

  17. THE FUTURE OF PHOTOMETRIC, SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC AND POLARIMETRIC STANDARDIZATION

    E-print Network

    Tokunaga, Alan

    Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy/Universities Space Research Association, NASA Ames Research Series, Vol. 999, 2007 C. Sterken Steps Toward a Common Near-Infrared Photometric System A. T. Tokunaga Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Dr., Honolulu, HI 96822 W. D. Vacca

  18. The ALHAMBRA survey: Accurate photometric merger fractions from PDF analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Sanjuan, C.; Cenarro, A. J..; Varela, J.; Viironen, K.; ALHAMBRA Team

    2015-05-01

    The estimation of the merger fraction in photometric surveys is limited by the large uncertainty in the photometric redshift compared with the velocity difference in kinematical close pairs (less than 500 km s^{-1}). Several efforts have conducted to deal with this limitation and we present the latest improvements. Our new method (i) provides a robust estimation of the merger fraction by using full probability distribution functions (PDFs) instead of Gaussian distributions, as in previous work; (ii) takes into account the dependence of the luminosity on redshift in both the selection of the samples and the definition of major/minor mergers; and (iii) deals with partial PDFs to define ``red" (E/S0 templates) and ``blue" (spiral/starburst templates) samples without apply any colour selection. We highlight our new method with the estimation of the merger fraction at z < 1 in the ALHAMBRA photometric survey. We find that our merger fractions and rates nicely agree with those from previous spectroscopic work. This new method will be capital for current and future large photometric surveys such as DES, SHARDS, J-PAS, or LSST.

  19. Spectroscopic and photometric monitoring of southern post-AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pooley, D. J.; Cottrell, P. L.; Pollard, K. R.; Albrow, M. D.

    2004-05-01

    We present the results of contemporaneous photometric and spectroscopic monitoring of 20 post-AGB stars from Mt John University Observatory. Photometric measures were carried our suing Johnson BV and Cousins RI filters, and the radial velocity measurements were acquired using spectra from an echelle spectrograph. Our program spanned five years and the stars covered a range of spectral types from B to K in order to investigate the behavior of post-AGB stars as they evolve away from the AGB. A number of stars proved to be variable inways incompatible with post-AGB models and are reclassified. Periodicities are presented for a number of stars. Photometrically, HD 70379 was found to be pulsating in two modes with periods of 85 and 97 d. The radial velocities also varied, with the peak amplitude occurring when the photometry was also changing most. AI CMi presented three different types of spectra associated with photometric brightness, with varying strengths of narrow emission lines and molecular bandheads. The H? profiles in almost all of the stars show evidence of emission which varies on time scales of days to months. The Na D line profiles are generally complex showing between 4 and 7 components due to both circumstellar and interstellar material.

  20. Canadian Tire Money: An Analogy for Use When Discussing Weak Acid Strong Base Titrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Last, Arthur M.

    2003-12-01

    A simple analogy can often provide an instructor with a means of helping students to understand an unfamiliar concept. An analogy involving money can be particularly helpful as most students have experience in dealing with a range of financial transactions in their everyday lives. In this article, use is made of the practice of one well-known Canadian retail chain in returning to its customers a small percentage of an item's purchase price in the form of imitation bank notes that can subsequently be spent in the chain's stores. An analogy is drawn between this practice and the determination of the pKa of a weak acid by titrating it with a strong base, taking into account the hydrolysis of the anion produced.

  1. Application of isothermal titration calorimeter for screening bitterness-suppressing molecules of quinine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yifan; Zhu, Youwei; Zhao, Na; Wu, Jinhui; Hu, Yiqiao

    2016-01-01

    Bitterness-suppressing molecules have drawn ever-increasing attention these years for some unique advantages like low molecular weight, tastelessness and no interference on drug bioavailability. L-Arg was reported to suppress the bitterness of quinine, and we happened to find that the suppressing effects could be demonstrated by isothermal titration calorimeter (ITC). In this study, we investigated the possibility of using ITC to screen bitterness-suppressing molecules for quinine. Among the amino acids we screened, L-Lys bond quinine with high affinity. The results of ITC correlated well with the results of human sensory experiments. L-Arg and L-Lys could suppress the bitterness of quinine while other amino acids could not. Therefore, ITC has the potential to screen bitterness-suppressing molecules. PMID:26213068

  2. DNA heats up : Energetics of genome ejection from phage revealed by isothermal titration calorimetry

    E-print Network

    Meerim Jeembaeva; B. Jönsson; Martin Castelnovo; Alex Evilevitch

    2010-01-06

    Most bacteriophages are known to inject their double-stranded DNA into bacteria upon receptor binding in an essentially spontaneous way. This downhill thermodynamic process from the intact virion toward the empty viral capsid plus released DNA is made possible by the energy stored during active packaging of the genome into the capsid. Only indirect measurements of this energy have been available until now using either single-molecule or osmotic suppression techniques. In this paper, we describe for the first time the use of isothermal titration calorimetry to directly measure the heat released (or equivalently the enthalpy) during DNA ejection from phage lambda, triggered in solution by a solubilized receptor. Quantitative analyses of the results lead to the identification of thermodynamic determinants associated with DNA ejection. The values obtained were found to be consistent with those previously predicted by analytical models and numerical simulations. Moreover, the results confirm the role of DNA hydration in the energetics of genome confinement in viral capsids.

  3. A minimal titration modelization of the mammalian dynamical heat shock response

    E-print Network

    Aude, Sivéry; Thommen, Quentin

    2015-01-01

    Environmental stress, such as oxidative or heat stress, induces the activation of the Heat Shock Response (HSR) which leads to an increase in the heat shock proteins (HSPs) level. These HSPs act as molecular chaperones to maintain proteostasis. Even if the main heat shock response partners are well known, a detailed description of the dynamical properties of the HSR network is still missing. In this study, we derive a minimal mathematical model of cellular response to heat shock that reproduces available experimental data sets both on transcription factor activity and cell viability. This simplistic model highlights the key mechanistic processes that rule the HSR network and reveals (i) the titration of Heat Shock Factor 1 (HSF1) by chaperones as the guiding line of the network, (ii) that protein triage governs the fate of damaged proteins and (iii) three different temperature regimes describing normal, acute or chronic stress.

  4. DNA heats up : Energetics of genome ejection from phage revealed by isothermal titration calorimetry

    E-print Network

    Jeembaeva, Meerim; Castelnovo, Martin; Evilevitch, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Most bacteriophages are known to inject their double-stranded DNA into bacteria upon receptor binding in an essentially spontaneous way. This downhill thermodynamic process from the intact virion toward the empty viral capsid plus released DNA is made possible by the energy stored during active packaging of the genome into the capsid. Only indirect measurements of this energy have been available until now using either single-molecule or osmotic suppression techniques. In this paper, we describe for the first time the use of isothermal titration calorimetry to directly measure the heat released (or equivalently the enthalpy) during DNA ejection from phage lambda, triggered in solution by a solubilized receptor. Quantitative analyses of the results lead to the identification of thermodynamic determinants associated with DNA ejection. The values obtained were found to be consistent with those previously predicted by analytical models and numerical simulations. Moreover, the results confirm the role of DNA hydrat...

  5. A minimal titration modelization of the mammalian dynamical heat shock response

    E-print Network

    Sivéry Aude; Emmanuel Courtade; Quentin Thommen

    2015-10-01

    Environmental stress, such as oxidative or heat stress, induces the activation of the Heat Shock Response (HSR) which leads to an increase in the heat shock proteins (HSPs) level. These HSPs act as molecular chaperones to maintain proteostasis. Even if the main heat shock response partners are well known, a detailed description of the dynamical properties of the HSR network is still missing. In this study, we derive a minimal mathematical model of cellular response to heat shock that reproduces available experimental data sets both on transcription factor activity and cell viability. This simplistic model highlights the key mechanistic processes that rule the HSR network and reveals (i) the titration of Heat Shock Factor 1 (HSF1) by chaperones as the guiding line of the network, (ii) that protein triage governs the fate of damaged proteins and (iii) three different temperature regimes describing normal, acute or chronic stress.

  6. Probing the binding of (+)-catechin to bovine serum albumin by isothermal titration calorimetry and spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangrong; Hao, Yongbing

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the interaction between (+)-catechin and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), in combination with fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Thermodynamic investigations reveal that the electrostatic interaction and hydrophobic interaction are the major binding forces in the binding of (+)-catechin to BSA. The binding of (+)-catechin to BSA is synergistically driven by enthalpy and entropy. Fluorescence experiments suggest that (+)-catechin can quench the fluorescence of BSA through a static quenching mechanism. The obtained binding constants and the equilibrium fraction of unbound (+)-catechin show that (+)-catechin can be stored and transported from the circulatory system to reach its target organ. Binding site I is found to be the primary binding site for (+)-catechin. Additionally, as shown by the UV-vis absorption, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and FT-IR, (+)-catechin may induce conformational and microenvironmental changes of BSA.

  7. The complexity of condensed tannin binding to bovine serum albumin--An isothermal titration calorimetry study.

    PubMed

    Kilmister, Rachel L; Faulkner, Peta; Downey, Mark O; Darby, Samuel J; Falconer, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry was applied to study the binding of purified proanthocyanidin oligomers to bovine serum albumin (BSA). The molecular weight of the proanthocyanidin oligomer had a major impact on its binding to BSA. The calculated change in enthalpy (?H) and association constant (Ka) became greater as the oligomer size increased then plateaued at the heptameric oligomer. These results support a model for precipitation of proteins by proanthocyanidin where increased oligomer size enhanced the opportunity for cross linkages between proteins ultimately forming sediment-able complexes. The authors suggest tannin binding to proteins is opportunistic and involves multiple sites, each with a different Ka and ?H of binding. The ?H of binding comprises both an endothermic hydrophobic interaction and exothermic hydrogen bond component. This suggests the calculated entropy value (?S) for tannin-protein interactions is subject to a systematic error and should be interpreted with caution. PMID:26212957

  8. Substrate binding properties of potato tuber ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase as determined by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Cakir, Bilal; Tuncel, Aytug; Green, Abigail R; Koper, Kaan; Hwang, Seon-Kap; Okita, Thomas W; Kang, ChulHee

    2015-06-01

    Substrate binding properties of the large (LS) and small (SS) subunits of potato tuber ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase were investigated by using isothermal titration calorimetry. Our results clearly show that the wild type heterotetramer (S(WT)L(WT)) possesses two distinct types of ATP binding sites, whereas the homotetrameric LS and SS variant forms only exhibited properties of one of the two binding sites. The wild type enzyme also exhibited significantly increased affinity to this substrate compared to the homotetrameric enzyme forms. No stable binding was evident for the second substrate, glucose-1-phosphate, in the presence or absence of ATP?S suggesting that interaction of glucose-1-phosphate is dependent on hydrolysis of ATP and supports the Theorell-Chance bi bi reaction mechanism. PMID:25953126

  9. Titrating the Cost of Plant Toxins Against Predators: a Case Study with Common Duikers, Sylvicapra grimmia.

    PubMed

    Abu Baker, Mohammad A

    2015-10-01

    Foragers face many variables that influence their food intake. These may include habitat structure, time, climate, resource characteristic, food quality, and plant defenses. I conducted foraging experiments using common duikers that involved: 1) testing the effect of plant toxins on foraging, and 2) titrating toxin intake against safety. I used giving up densities (GUDs, food remaining after foraging) to test for selection among trays containing alfalfa pellets treated with water, with 10 % oxalic acid, or 10 % quebracho tannin. Pairs of trays were placed within islands of woody vegetation and out in open grass. I also conducted a titration experiment by offering the duikers a choice between a patch with water-treated pellets placed at a risky site, or a patch with one of three oxalic acid-treated pellets at a safe site. This made it possible to determine the concentration of oxalic acid at which the cost of toxin in the safe site equals the predation cost at the risky site. The common duikers showed no selectivity among the three treatments at 10 % concentration, however, GUDs in the open grass (i.e., safe) were significantly lower than in the wooded islands (i.e., risky). As the oxalic acid concentration increased at the safe sites, the duiker's food intake from the risky sites increased significantly. The results demonstrate that foraging hazards may come in different forms such as predation and plant toxins, and their interactions may alter habitat use, foraging patterns, and perceptions of risk. These variables occur under natural situations, altering the overall habitat quality. PMID:26364293

  10. In vitro retention of a new thermoplastic titratable mandibular advancement device.

    PubMed

    Braem, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Oral appliance (OA) therapy with a mandibular advancement device (OAm) is a non-invasive, alternative approach to maintaining upper airway patency. The main requirement for an OAm to be effective is the adequate retention on the teeth while the patient is asleep. We evaluated the retentive forces of a new low-cost, customizable, titratable, thermoplastic OAm (BluePro (®); BlueSom, France). Dental impressions and casts were made for one patient with complete upper and lower dental arches including the third molars and class II bite proportions. A setup based on Frasaco ANA-4 models was also used. Two protrusive positions of the mandible were investigated: 3 mm and 8 mm, representing respectively 25% and 65% of the maximal protrusion. The forces required to remove the BluePro (®) device from the carriers were recorded continuously over 730 cycles (=365 days, twice a day) to simulate 1 year of clinical use. At 8 mm protrusion the BluePro (®) device showed retentive forces of ~27N. There was a slight but non-significant decrease in retentive forces in the tests on the epoxified carriers which was not found on the ANA-4 carriers. There were no significant differences between the carriers as a function of protrusion. The BluePro (®) device tested in the present study possesses sufficient retention forces to resist initial jaw opening forces and full mouth opening forces estimated to be ~20N. It could therefore broaden the indications for use of thermoplastic OAms. It could provide a temporary OAm while a custom-made OAm is being manufactured or repaired. Patients could be provided with a low-cost try-out device capable of reliable titration, providing an indication of effectiveness and of patient acceptance of an OAm, although the effect of device shape and size on therapeutic outcome is not yet known. Finally it could provide an affordable OAm solution in resource-restricted healthcare settings. PMID:25901281

  11. Acid-Base Titration of Streptococci and the Physical States of Intracellular Ions

    PubMed Central

    Marquis, Robert E.; Porterfield, Nancy; Matsumura, Philip

    1973-01-01

    Acid titrations of intact and butanol-treated cells of Streptococcus faecalis revealed that nearly all of the intracellular K+ ions could diffuse into the suspending medium in association with small anions, including ribonucleic acid breakdown products, when the cell membrane was damaged. In contrast, nearly all of the intracellular Mg2+ ions appeared to be firmly bound to stable internal cell components but could be displaced reversibly by hydronium ions. The cell membrane acted as a barrier to ion movements, and Mg2+ displacement from intact cells required more acid conditions, by as much as 2.5 pH units, than did displacement from butanol-damaged cells. Some 15 to 20% of the cell magnesium appeared to be associated with surface structures in that it could be removed at pH 7 with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid or displaced by Co2+, Ni2+, Sr2+, or La3+. Magnesium could be displaced from isolated cell walls and membranes by hydronium ions in the pH range from 5 to 3, over which carboxyl groups were titrated. Displacement of magnesium from ribosomes also took place between pH 5 and 3, but it was more difficult to identify the magnesium-releasing groups because both protein carboxyl groups and purine and pyrimidine ring nitrogens can become protonated in this pH range. Isolated protoplast membranes remained structurally intact when completely depleted of magnesium. Furthermore, protoplasts isolated from intact cells were found to have greatly enhanced resistance to osmotic shock in acid media, even when solute loss was not extensive. Osmotic resistance was lost when the protoplasts were again placed in neutral media, and this reversibility suggested that acidification caused changes in the physical properties of membranes as well as solute leakage from cells. PMID:4196240

  12. 21 CFR 862.2160 - Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use. 862.2160...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical... § 862.2160 Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use. (a)...

  13. 21 CFR 862.2160 - Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use. 862.2160...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical... § 862.2160 Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use. (a)...

  14. 21 CFR 862.2160 - Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use. 862.2160...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical... § 862.2160 Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use. (a)...

  15. EXPLORING THE VARIABLE SKY WITH LINEAR. I. PHOTOMETRIC RECALIBRATION WITH THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    E-print Network

    Sesar, Branimir

    We describe photometric recalibration of data obtained by the asteroid survey LINEAR. Although LINEAR was designed for astrometric discovery of moving objects, the data set described here contains over 5 billion photometric ...

  16. 21 CFR 862.2160 - Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use. 862.2160...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical... § 862.2160 Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use. (a)...

  17. Wavelength dependence of spectro-photometric properties and link with the microtexture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilorget, C.; Fernando, J.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Schmidt, F.; Hiroi, T.

    2015-10-01

    The surface scattered sunlight carries major information about the composition and microtexture of surface materials, thus enabling tracing back the geological and climatic processes that occurred on the planetary body. Here we perform laboratory spectro-goniometric measurements of different kinds of granular samples over the VIS-NIR spectral range, coupling the spectral and geometric dimensions to analyze their scattering behavior. To quantify the evolution of the scattering properties with the wavelength, we use an innovative inversion procedure based on a Bayesian approach to estimate photometric parameters from the Hapke model. The granular samples are also characterized by optical and SEM techniques in order to link these scattering variations with the grains' physical properties.

  18. Derivation of sky quality indicators from photometrically calibrated all-sky image mosaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duriscoe, Dan M.; Moore, Chadwick A.; Luginbuhl, Christian B.

    2015-08-01

    A large database of high resolution all-sky measurements of V-band night sky brightness at sites in U.S. National Parks and astronomical observatories is utilized to describe sky quality over a wide geographic area. Mosaics of photometrically calibrated V-band imagery are processed with a semi-automated procedure to reveal the effects of artificial sky glow through graphical presentation and numeric indicators of artificial sky brightness. Comparison with simpler methods such as the use of the Unihedron SQM and naked eye limiting magnitude reveal that areas near the horizon, which are not typically captured with single-channel measurements, contribute significantly to the indicators maximum vertical illuminance, maximum sky luminance, and average all-sky luminance. Distant sources of sky glow may represent future threats to areas of the sky nearer the zenith. Timely identification and quantification of these threats may allow mitigating strategies to be implemented.

  19. A photometric method for the estimation of the oil yield of oil shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cuttitta, Frank

    1951-01-01

    A method is presented for the distillation and photometric estimation of the oil yield of oil-bearing shales. The oil shale is distilled in a closed test tube and the oil extracted with toluene. The optical density of the toluene extract is used in the estimation of oil content and is converted to percentage of oil by reference to a standard curve. This curve is obtained by relating the oil yields determined by the Fischer assay method to the optical density of the toluene extract of the oil evolved by the new procedure. The new method gives results similar to those obtained by the Fischer assay method in a much shorter time. The applicability of the new method to oil-bearing shale and phosphatic shale has been tested.

  20. Flame photometric determination of strontium in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skougstad, Marvin W.

    1957-01-01

    Preliminary search of reported methods of Sr analysis revealed several investigations which have been made for the determination of Sr with the flame photometer, both at relatively low concentrations (0 to 50 ppm Sr) and at higher concentrations. Generally the procedures described involved measurement of Sr emission at either 460.7 mu or at 681 mu. There is disagreement among those reporting methods for Sr as to the preference of the one wavelength over the other. The 681 line (or band) seems to be preferred because of its greater reproducibility and relative freedom from interference. The 460.7 mu line, however, lies in the region of greater sensitivity of the photomultiplier tube, and hence for this reason is preferred by some. This is an advantage, of course, when determining Sr at very low concentrations. This investigation is concerned with determining the optimum conditions for the determination of Sr at low concentration levels in water samples. Early experimental work indicated a greater sensitivity for the 460.7 mu (hereafter designated as 461 mu) Sr line. Therefore, most of the subsequent work was based on a study of the effects of various other materials and conditions on the emission of Sr at this wavelength.

  1. Planck 2013 results. VIII. HFI photometric calibration and mapmaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bertincourt, B.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Filliard, C.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Lellouch, E.; Leonardi, R.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Maurin, L.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Moreno, R.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rusholme, B.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Techene, S.; Terenzi, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the methods used to produce photometrically calibrated maps from the Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) cleaned, time-ordered information. HFI observes the sky over a broad range of frequencies, from 100 to 857 GHz. To obtain the best calibration accuracy over such a large range, two different photometric calibration schemes have to be used. The 545 and 857 GHz data are calibrated by comparing flux-density measurements of Uranus and Neptune with models of their atmospheric emission. The lower frequencies (below 353 GHz) are calibrated using the solar dipole. A component of this anisotropy is time-variable, owing to the orbital motion of the satellite in the solar system. Photometric calibration is thus tightly linked to mapmaking, which also addresses low-frequency noise removal. By comparing observations taken more than one year apart in the same configuration, we have identified apparent gain variations with time. These variations are induced by non-linearities in the read-out electronics chain. We have developed an effective correction to limit their effect on calibration. We present several methods to estimate the precision of the photometric calibration. We distinguish relative uncertainties (between detectors, or between frequencies) and absolute uncertainties. Absolute uncertainties lie in the range from 0.54% to 10% from 100 to 857 GHz. We describe the pipeline used to produce the maps from the HFI timelines, based on the photometric calibration parameters, and the scheme used to set the zero level of the maps a posteriori. We also discuss the cross-calibration between HFI and the SPIRE instrument on board Herschel. Finally we summarize the basic characteristics of the set of HFI maps included in the 2013 Planck data release.

  2. Photometric Reverberation Mapping using a Meter-class Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Carla June; Joner, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    For the past several decades, mass estimates for supermassive black holes hosted by active galactic nuclei (AGNs) have been made using the reverberation mapping (RM) technique. This methodology has produced consistent results and has been used to establish several relations that link the characteristics of the host galaxy to the mass of the central black hole. Despite this success, there are less than 50 AGNs with black hole masses derived from RM. This low number is generally attributed to the difficulties in coordinating large blocks of telescope time for making the simultaneous photometric and spectroscopic observations. In addition, the spectroscopic observations generally require several months of nightly observations with moderate to large size telescopes.We have made photometric observations of several AGNs in selected filters in order to evaluate a photometric methodology for determining the lag time between the variations observed in the continuum and the response signal that is seen coming from the broad-line region (BLR) gas. This time delay represents the mean light travel time to the BLR, and is therefore a measurement of the mean BLR radius. In traditional RM campaigns, this time lag is combined with a measure of the width of the broad line to determine the velocity of the gas and then make a virial estimate of the black hole mass. We investigate results obtained using photometric time lags and a single epoch spectroscopic measurement of the line width in order to estimate the mass of the central black hole.We present results from our photometric observations of several target AGNs made with the West Mountain Observatory 0.9 m reflector during the spring and summer of 2014.This research was supported by the College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences at Brigham Young University as well as through a fellowship from the NASA Rocky Mountain Space Grant Consortium.

  3. Photometric Detection Of An Extra-solar Planetary Transit Across The Sun-like Star HD 209458

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirayath, V.

    2003-12-01

    I report photometric measurements of HD 209458, an extra-solar planetary system known to have an orbiting Jupiter mass planet from radial velocity measurements. The star has been observed with a 10'' Meade Schmidt-Newtonian LXD 55 telescope and a thermo-electrically cooled Nikon Coolpix 995 CCD. I detect two full transits at projected transit times defined by radial velocity measurements. An accuracy of +/- 0.01 stellar magnitudes has been achieved using the equipment described. The primary data analysis procedure used in the determination of stellar magnitude is differential aperture photometry. Also presented are derived values for the diameter of the extra-solar planetary disk. The photometric dimming observed, attributed to the transit of a planet across the stellar disk, is consistent with past photometric measurements made by considerably large observatories (Hubble, Keck I) and provides one of the first small aperture extra-solar planetary detections to date. Sponsored in part by a grant from the Southern California Academy of Sciences and cooperation from Meade Instruments Inc

  4. Interaction of Poloxamers with Liposomes: An Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Study Guohui Wu and Ka Yee C. Lee*

    E-print Network

    Lee, Ka Yee C.

    Interaction of Poloxamers with Liposomes: An Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Study Guohui Wu, the partitioning of poloxamers into fluid-phase liposomes increases with temperature, owing to the enhancement into a lipid bilayer without disrupting liposomes and above which they instead disintegrate liposomes

  5. Reference method for total water in lint cotton by automated oven drying combined with volumetric Karl Fischer titration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a preliminary study to measure total water in lint cotton we demonstrated that volumetric Karl Fischer Titration of moisture transported by a carrier gas from an attached small oven is more accurate than standard oven drying in air. The objective of the present study was to assess the measuremen...

  6. Origin of two time-scale regimes in potentiometric titration of metal oxides. A replica kinetic Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Zarzycki, Piotr P.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2009-06-16

    Replica Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations were used to study the characteristic time scales of potentiometric titration of the metal oxides and (oxy)hydroxides. The effect of surface heterogeneity and surface transformation on the titration kinetics were also examined. Two characteristic relaxation times are often observed experimentally, with the trailing slower part attributed to surface non-uniformity, porosity, polymerization, amorphization, and other dynamic surface processes induced by unbalanced surface charge. However, our simulations show that these two characteristic relaxation times are intrinsic to the proton binding reaction for energetically homogeneous surfaces, and therefore surface heterogeneity or transformation do not necessarily need to be invoked. However, all such second-order surface processes are found to intensify the separation and distinction of the two kinetic regimes. The effect of surface energetic-topographic non-uniformity, as well dynamic surface transformation, interface roughening/smoothing were described in a statistical fashion. Furthermore, our simulations show that a shift in the point-of-zero charge is expected from increased titration speed and the pH-dependence of the titration measurement error is in excellent agreement with experimental studies.

  7. Kinetic properties of two Rhizopus exo-polygalacturonase enzymes hydrolyzing galacturonic acid oligomers using isothermal titration calorimetry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The kinetic characteristics of two Rhizopus oryzae exo-polygalacturonases acting on galacturonic acid oligomers (GalpA) were determined using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). RPG15 hydrolyzing (GalpA)2 demonstrated a Km of 55 uM and kcat of 10.3 s^-1^ while RPG16 was shown to have greater af...

  8. MODIFICATION OF THE IODIMETRIC TITRATION METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF BROMIDE AND ITS APPLICATION TO MIXED DOMESTIC - INDUSTRIAL WASTE EFFLUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The iodimetric titration method for the determination of bromide involves the observation of various color changes, making the method unsuitable for use with samples that are highly colored. A modification is described, which extends the usefulness of the method to highly colored...

  9. Soil CO2 respiration: Comparison of chemical titration, CO2 IRGA analysis and the Solvita gel system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this research is to compare the results of measured soil CO2 respiration using three methods: (1) titration method; (2) Infrared gas analysis (IRGA); and (3) the Solvita gel system for soil CO2 analysis. We acquired 36 soil samples from across the USA for comparison which ranged in pH...

  10. Reference test methods for total water in lint cotton by Karl Fischer Titration and low temperature distillation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a study of comparability of total water contents (%) of conditioned cottons by Karl Fischer Titration (KFT) and Low Temperature Distillation (LTD) reference methods, we demonstrated a match of averaged results based on a large number of replications and weighing the test specimens at the same tim...

  11. Amperometric titration of Cd(II), Hg(II) and Zn(II) in molten alkali thiocyanates with electrolytically generated sulphide ions.

    PubMed

    Cescon, P; Pucciarelli, F; Fiorani, M

    1970-07-01

    The feasibility of the titration of some cations in molten sodium thiocyanate-potassium thiocyanate mixture with electrolytically generated sulphide ions has been tested at 443 K. Quantitative data are given for the titration of cadmium, mercury and zinc ions. PMID:18960785

  12. doi:10.1016/j.gca.2004.08.032 A high-resolution TEM-AEM, pH titration, and modeling study of Zn2

    E-print Network

    Zhu, Chen

    doi:10.1016/j.gca.2004.08.032 A high-resolution TEM-AEM, pH titration, and modeling study of Zn2 were present in the same solution during the entire range of pH titration. High-resolution transmission

  13. Radial velocity variations of photometrically quiet, chromospherically inactive Kepler stars: A link between RV jitter and photometric flicker

    SciTech Connect

    Bastien, Fabienne A.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pepper, Joshua; Wright, Jason T.; Aigrain, Suzanne; Basri, Gibor; Johnson, John A.; Howard, Andrew W.; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.

    2014-02-01

    We compare stellar photometric variability, as measured from Kepler light curves by Basri et al., with measurements of radial velocity (RV) rms variations of all California Planet Search overlap stars. We newly derive rotation periods from the Kepler light curves for all of the stars in our study sample. The RV variations reported herein range from less than 4 to 135 m s{sup –1}, yet the stars all have amplitudes of photometric variability less than 3 mmag, reflecting the preference of the RV program for chromospherically 'quiet' stars. Despite the small size of our sample, we find with high statistical significance that the RV rms manifests strongly in the Fourier power spectrum of the light curve: stars that are noisier in RV have a greater number of frequency components in the light curve. We also find that spot models of the observed light curves systematically underpredict the observed RV variations by factors of ?2-1000, likely because the low-level photometric variations in our sample are driven by processes not included in simple spot models. The stars best fit by these models tend to have simpler light curves, dominated by a single relatively high-amplitude component of variability. Finally, we demonstrate that the RV rms behavior of our sample can be explained in the context of the photometric variability evolutionary diagram introduced by Bastien et al. We use this diagram to derive the surface gravities of the stars in our sample, revealing many of them to have moved off the main sequence. More generally, we find that the stars with the largest RV rms are those that have evolved onto the 'flicker floor' sequence in that diagram, characterized by relatively low amplitude but highly complex photometric variations which grow as the stars evolve to become subgiants.

  14. THE PHOTOMETRIC CLASSIFICATION SERVER FOR Pan-STARRS1

    SciTech Connect

    Saglia, R. P.; Bender, R.; Seitz, S.; Senger, R.; Snigula, J.; Phleps, S.; Wilman, D.; Tonry, J. L.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Heasley, J. N.; Kaiser, N.; Magnier, E. A.; Morgan, J. S.; Greisel, N.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Klement, R. J.; Rix, H.-W.; Smith, K.; Green, P. J.; and others

    2012-02-20

    The Pan-STARRS1 survey is obtaining multi-epoch imaging in five bands (g{sub P1} r{sub P1} i{sub P1} z{sub P1} y{sub P1}) over the entire sky north of declination -30 deg. We describe here the implementation of the Photometric Classification Server (PCS) for Pan-STARRS1. PCS will allow the automatic classification of objects into star/galaxy/quasar classes based on colors and the measurement of photometric redshifts for extragalactic objects, and will constrain stellar parameters for stellar objects, working at the catalog level. We present tests of the system based on high signal-to-noise photometry derived from the Medium-Deep Fields of Pan-STARRS1, using available spectroscopic surveys as training and/or verification sets. We show that the Pan-STARRS1 photometry delivers classifications and photometric redshifts as good as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry to the same magnitude limits. In particular, our preliminary results, based on this relatively limited data set down to the SDSS spectroscopic limits, and therefore potentially improvable, show that stars are correctly classified as such in 85% of cases, galaxies in 97%, and QSOs in 84%. False positives are less than 1% for galaxies, Almost-Equal-To 19% for stars, and Almost-Equal-To 28% for QSOs. Moreover, photometric redshifts for 1000 luminous red galaxies up to redshift 0.5 are determined to 2.4% precision (defined as 1.48 Multiplication-Sign Median|z{sub phot} - z{sub spec}|/(1 + z)) with just 0.4% catastrophic outliers and small (-0.5%) residual bias. For bluer galaxies up to the same redshift, the residual bias (on average -0.5%) trend, percentage of catastrophic failures (1.2%), and precision (4.2%) are higher, but still interestingly small for many science applications. Good photometric redshifts (to 5%) can be obtained for at most 60% of the QSOs of the sample. PCS will create a value-added catalog with classifications and photometric redshifts for eventually many millions of sources.

  15. AMDTreat 5.0+ with PHREEQC titration module to compute caustic chemical quantity, effluent quality, and sludge volume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cravotta, Charles A., III; Means, Brent P; Arthur, Willam; McKenzie, Robert M; Parkhurst, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline chemicals are commonly added to discharges from coal mines to increase pH and decrease concentrations of acidity and dissolved aluminum, iron, manganese, and associated metals. The annual cost of chemical treatment depends on the type and quantities of chemicals added and sludge produced. The AMDTreat computer program, initially developed in 2003, is widely used to compute such costs on the basis of the user-specified flow rate and water quality data for the untreated AMD. Although AMDTreat can use results of empirical titration of net-acidic or net-alkaline effluent with caustic chemicals to accurately estimate costs for treatment, such empirical data are rarely available. A titration simulation module using the geochemical program PHREEQC has been incorporated with AMDTreat 5.0+ to improve the capability of AMDTreat to estimate: (1) the quantity and cost of caustic chemicals to attain a target pH, (2) the chemical composition of the treated effluent, and (3) the volume of sludge produced by the treatment. The simulated titration results for selected caustic chemicals (NaOH, CaO, Ca(OH)2, Na2CO3, or NH3) without aeration or with pre-aeration can be compared with or used in place of empirical titration data to estimate chemical quantities, treated effluent composition, sludge volume (precipitated metals plus unreacted chemical), and associated treatment costs. This paper describes the development, evaluation, and potential utilization of the PHREEQC titration module with the new AMDTreat 5.0+ computer program available at http://www.amd.osmre.gov/.

  16. Effect of temperature on the acid-base properties of the alumina surface: microcalorimetry and acid-base titration experiments.

    PubMed

    Morel, Jean-Pierre; Marmier, Nicolas; Hurel, Charlotte; Morel-Desrosiers, Nicole

    2006-06-15

    Sorption reactions on natural or synthetic materials that can attenuate the migration of pollutants in the geosphere could be affected by temperature variations. Nevertheless, most of the theoretical models describing sorption reactions are at 25 degrees C. To check these models at different temperatures, experimental data such as the enthalpies of sorption are thus required. Highly sensitive microcalorimeters can now be used to determine the heat effects accompanying the sorption of radionuclides on oxide-water interfaces, but enthalpies of sorption cannot be extracted from microcalorimetric data without a clear knowledge of the thermodynamics of protonation and deprotonation of the oxide surface. However, the values reported in the literature show large discrepancies and one must conclude that, amazingly, this fundamental problem of proton binding is not yet resolved. We have thus undertaken to measure by titration microcalorimetry the heat effects accompanying proton exchange at the alumina-water interface at 25 degrees C. Based on (i) the surface sites speciation provided by a surface complexation model (built from acid-base titrations at 25 degrees C) and (ii) results of the microcalorimetric experiments, calculations have been made to extract the enthalpic variations associated respectively to first and second deprotonation of the alumina surface. Values obtained are deltaH1 = 80+/-10 kJ mol(-1) and deltaH2 = 5+/-3 kJ mol(-1). In a second step, these enthalpy values were used to calculate the alumina surface acidity constants at 50 degrees C via the van't Hoff equation. Then a theoretical titration curve at 50 degrees C was calculated and compared to the experimental alumina surface titration curve. Good agreement between the predicted acid-base titration curve and the experimental one was observed. PMID:16504204

  17. Photometric Imaging of the Moon from the Robotic Lunar Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. M.; Kieffer, H. H.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the calibration program for the NASA Earth Observing System (part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise), the U.S. Geological Survey operates the Robotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO). The ROLO project is designed to produce a photometric model of the nearside lunar surface for all phase and libration angles visible from Flagstaff [2]. Goals for this photometric model are 2.5 % absolute and 1.0% relative uncertainty. Although the model is principally intended to produce radiance images of the Moon for use in calibration of Earth-orbiting spacecraft, the ROLO data and model will also provide important information for studies of the lunar soil. Instrumentation: An astronomical observatory dedicated to the radiometry of the Moon has been constructed on the campus of the U.S. Geological Survey Flagstaff Field Station in Arizona. Two separate camera systems are attached to a single telescope mount and boresighted to the same pointing direction. The visible/near infrared (VNIR) camera uses a 512 x 512 pixel CCD and 23 intermediate width interference filters for wavelength selection. The shortwave infrared (SWIR) camera uses a 256 x 256 pixel cooled-HgCdTe infrared array and nine intermediate-width interference filters. Table I and Fig. I provide information on the instrumental passbands. Separate 20-cm-diameter Ritchey-Cretien telescopes are provided for the two cameras. The optics are designed to image the entire Moon within each camera's field of view, resulting in instrument pixel scales of 4 and 8 arcsec /pixel (about 7.4 and 15 km/pixel for the sub-Earth point on the Moon) for VNIR and SWIR respectively. Detailed information on the instrumentation can be found in Anderson et al. Observations: Routine imaging has been in progress since late 1995 for VNIR and late 1997 for SWIR, and is expected to continue through at least 2002. ROLO observes the Moon every clear night between the first and last quarter phases of the moon. On such nights, the Moon is imaged through all 32 filters at half-hour intervals during the time that the Moon is above the 60 deg. zenith angle. Observations of standard stars to measure atmospheric extinction and detector responsivity drifts occupy the remainder of the nighttime. Measurements of the dark current and detector bias levels are made during the dusk and dawn periods for VNIR and throughout the night for SWIR. Flat field corrections and absolute radiance calibrations are provided through observations of a Spectralon plate illuminated by a NIST-traceable 1000 W FEL lamp. Raw data are converted to ISIS cubes and stored on CD-ROM. Detailed information on the observing procedure is also found. As the development of data-reduction software for the ROLO project progresses and additional data are accumulated, the raw data are repeatedly processed into a calibrated form. Corrections for instrument response characteristics, photon scattering processes, and atmospheric extinction are applied to the raw lunar images to produce exoatmospheric radiance images of the Moon. These images are then transformed to a fixed selenographic-grid projection designed to accommodate all of the possible viewing geometries of the ROLO telescope. A preliminary discussion of results for the total irradiance of the Moon derived from ROLO VNIR images acquired through April 1998 was published by Kieffer and Anderson. At that time, difficulties in adequately determining the atmospheric extinction limited the accuracy of the derived lunar irradiance values. Significant improvements in the reduction software have been developed since that time and measurement scatter is expected to be reduced to approximately = or <2% for the data-processing run planned for the summer of 1999. As of June 1999 , ROLO has acquired over 2200 cubes of raw Moon images with VNIR and over 1200 cubes with SWIR. By 2002, ROLO expects to have acquired roughly 3500 images of the Moon through each VNIR filter and nearly 3000 images through each SWIR filter, or more than 100,000 absolutely calibrated images of the Moon. These data are used to create p

  18. Rational Catalyst Design of Titanium-Silica Materials Aided by Site-Specific Titration Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Todd Robert

    Silica-supported titanium materials are widely used for thermocatalytic applications such as hydroxylation of alkanes and aromatics, oxidation of alcohols and ethers, ammoximation of carbonyls, and sulfoxidations, while Ti-based materials are widely studied for photocatalytic applications such as photo-oxidation of organic substrates and photo-reduction of CO 2. However, the underlying phenomena of how to synthesize, identify, and control the active structures in these materials is not well understood because of the narrow scope of previous work. Studies of titanium-based catalysts typically focus on materials where the metal is present as either highly-dispersed Ti cations or in bulk crystalline TiO2 form, neglecting the numerous and potentially useful intermediate structures. Furthermore, these works typically focus on a single synthesis technique and rely upon bulk characterization techniques to understand the materials. Here rigorous titanium-silica synthesis-structure-function relationships are established by examining several different synthetic method and utilizing characterization techniques that enable an atomic-level understanding of the materials. The materials studied span the range from isolated Ti cations to clustered TiOx domains, polymeric TiO x domains, anatase-like 2D TiO2 domains, and 3D crystalline TiO2. Tools to quantify accessible TiO x and tetrahedral Ti sites are developed, utilizing the selective titration of titanium with phenylphosphonic acid (PPA). Catalytic properties are probed with the photocatalytic oxidation of benzyl alcohol and the thermocatalytic epoxidation of cis-cyclooctene with H2O2 . PPA titration data indicate that the rate of benzyl alcohol photo-oxidation is independent of titanium coordination, while the rate of alkene epoxidation with H2O2 is proportional to the number of tetrahedral titanium sites on the catalyst. PPA titration data also enables the estimation of TiO2 particle size and reveals an important distinction between particle and crystal size, as obtained from XRD. In the course of establishing these relationships we've gained the knowledge of how to control TiO x structure, which enables the design of new and better catalysts. Understanding the synthesis-structure-function relationships allow for the design of a tandem photo/thermocatalytic reaction system for producing and consuming H2O2. By partially overcoating a TiO 2 photocatalyst with a ˜2 nm silica layer we observe a 56-fold rate improvement compared to bare-TiO2 for H2O2 synthesis from the proton-assisted reduction of O2. Addition of metal-SiO2 thermocatalysts (metal=Ti, Nb, or Ta) with sites needed for H2O2 activation creates a tandem system wherein the H2O2 produced in situ is utilized for alkene epoxidation. Compared to a thermocatalytic-only system, the tandem system accelerates epoxidation for cis-cyclooctene(11x faster), styrene(20x) and 1-octene(30x). This approach demonstrates a means for epoxidation with O2 that avoids H2O2 purification and transport, simplifies the total process, provides new opportunities for control by independent H2O2 production and consumption in the same reactor, and enhances rates relative to thermocatalytic-only epoxidation by intimately coupling H2O2 generation and consumption. Critically, establishment of titanium-silica synthesis-structure-function relationships enables the design of new catalysts and systems that are less energy- and material-intensive, leading towards more sustainable chemistry.

  19. KEPLER MISSION DESIGN, REALIZED PHOTOMETRIC PERFORMANCE, AND EARLY SCIENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, David G.; Borucki, William J.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Basri, Gibor; Marcy, Geoffrey; Batalha, Natalie M.; Brown, Timothy M.; Caldwell, Douglas; DeVore, Edna; Jenkins, Jon; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Joergen; Cochran, William D.; Dunham, Edward W.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Gould, Alan; Kondo, Yoji; Monet, David

    2010-04-20

    The Kepler Mission, launched on 2009 March 6, was designed with the explicit capability to detect Earth-size planets in the habitable zone of solar-like stars using the transit photometry method. Results from just 43 days of data along with ground-based follow-up observations have identified five new transiting planets with measurements of their masses, radii, and orbital periods. Many aspects of stellar astrophysics also benefit from the unique, precise, extended, and nearly continuous data set for a large number and variety of stars. Early results for classical variables and eclipsing stars show great promise. To fully understand the methodology, processes, and eventually the results from the mission, we present the underlying rationale that ultimately led to the flight and ground system designs used to achieve the exquisite photometric performance. As an example of the initial photometric results, we present variability measurements that can be used to distinguish dwarf stars from red giants.

  20. New photometric investigation of eclipsing binary NSVS 10653195

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Qian, S.-B.; Liao, W.-P.; Zhang, J.; Liu, N.-P.; Wang, J.-J.

    2015-11-01

    New CCD photometric light curves of the low-mass binary system NSVS 10653195 are presented. Our complete B, V, Rc and Ic-band light curves show a remarkable out-eclipsing distortion. This phenomenon suggests that the components of the system may be active. The photometric solutions with star-spot were derived by using the 2013 version of the Wilson-Devinney (WD) code. Based on all available times of light minimum, we analyzed the orbital period changes. The O-C diagram reveals that the period of NSVS 10653195 is decreasing at a rate of dP / dt = - 2.79 ×10-7 days yr-1 , which is probably caused by angular momentum loss.

  1. Photometric study of the pulsating, eclipsing binary OO DRA

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. B.; Deng, L. C.; Tian, J. F.; Wang, K.; Yan, Z. Z.; Luo, C. Q.; Sun, J. J.; Liu, Q. L.; Xin, H. Q.; Zhou, Q.; Luo, Z. Q.

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive photometric study of the pulsating, eclipsing binary OO Dra. Simultaneous B- and V-band photometry of the star was carried out on 14 nights. A revised orbital period and a new ephemeris were derived from the data. The first photometric solution of the binary system and the physical parameters of the component stars are determined. They reveal that OO Dra could be a detached system with a less-massive secondary component nearly filling its Roche lobe. By subtracting the eclipsing light changes from the data, we obtained the intrinsic pulsating light curves of the hotter, massive primary component. A frequency analysis of the residual light yields two confident pulsation modes in both B- and V-band data with the dominant frequency detected at 41.865 c/d. A brief discussion concerning the evolutionary status and the pulsation nature of the binary system is finally given.

  2. Photometric Observations and Light Curve Analysis of BL Eridani

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wonyong; Yim, Hong-Suh; Lee, Chung-Uk; Youn, Jae-Hyuck; Yoon, Joh-Na; Kim, Ho-Il; Moon, Hong-Kyu; Byun, Yong-Ik; Park, Sunyoup

    2006-12-01

    We present light curves of a short period binary system BL Eridani. The light curves were observed with {it VRI} filters by a 50cm wide field robotic telescope at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO), equipped with a 2K CCD camera, which was developed by Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), and Yonsei University Observatory (YUO). The photometric observations were made on 6 nights by automatic operation mode and remote observation mode at SSO and KASI in Korea, respectively. We obtained new {it VRI} CCD light curves and new 5 times of minima, and analyzed the light curves with the Wilson & Deviney (1971) binary 2005 version and derived the new photometric solutions. The mass ratio q = 0.48 in this study shows different value with earlier investigators. According to the model analysis, it is considered that the BL Eri system is currently undergoing contact stage of the two binary components, rather than near-contact stage.

  3. Measuring photometric redshifts using galaxy images and Deep Neural Networks

    E-print Network

    Hoyle, Ben

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new method to estimate the photometric redshift of galaxies by using the full galaxy image in each measured band. This method draws from the latest techniques and advances in machine learning, in particular Deep Neural Networks. We pass the entire multi-band galaxy image into the machine learning architecture to obtain a redshift estimate that is competitive with the best existing standard machine learning techniques. The standard techniques estimate redshifts using post-processed features, such as magnitudes and colours, which are extracted from the galaxy images and are deemed to be salient by the user. This new method removes the user from the photometric redshift estimation pipeline. However we do note that Deep Neural Networks require many orders of magnitude more computing resources than standard machine learning architectures.

  4. A Active Titration Method for the Local Measurement of Tropospheric Hydroxyl Radical.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprengnether, Michele Marie

    The hydroxyl radical plays a central role in the photochemistry of the troposphere. Successful measurement of ambient (OH) provides a useful test of current photochemical theory. In this work, an active titration method was developed as an independent approach to measurement of the local concentration of the tropospheric hydroxyl radical. This chemical kinetic method is based upon the instantaneous release of two compounds into the open air. One of these, the titrant, must react nearly exclusively with OH. The second, the dispersant, is inert on the time scale of the experiment (a few hours). While atmospheric diffusion will cause the concentration of both to drop rapidly in an equivalent manner, their concentration ratio will change only as a function of the titrant reaction with OH. The change in the titrant to dispersant concentration ratio over time thus provides an indirect measure of ambient OH. By instantaneously introducing exotic species into the air, this technique addresses difficulties encountered with previous chemical measurements of (OH) in which continuous, uncontrolled releases, with interfering spatial gradients in relative concentrations, were monitored. A feasibility assessment for the technique was conducted. The analytical precision with which the titrant to dispersant concentration ratio can be measured as a function of concentration was experimentally measured. A gaussian puff model was used to predict the ambient release mixture concentration as a function of time for a range of atmospheric conditions. Our results indicate that the active titration method, using either the cycloalkanes or the halogenated ethenes, is expected to measure ambient (OH) with an accuracy of 40% and a precision of 30% at an OH level of 1times 10^6 cm^{-3} during stable to neutral atmospheric conditions. We determined that halogenated ethenes provide a better analytical precision at low concentrations than cycloalkanes, and the predicted uncertainty in the measurement of (OH) is therefore slightly greater for the cycloalkanes. However, with higher rates of reaction with OH and lower toxicity, the cycloalkanes were chosen as the titrants for further field studies. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617 -253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.) (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  5. A titration approach to identify the capacity for starch digestion in milk-fed calves.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, M S; van den Borne, J J G C; Berends, H; Pantophlet, A J; Schols, H A; Gerrits, W J J

    2015-02-01

    Calf milk replacers (MR) commonly contain 40% to 50% lactose. For economic reasons, starch is of interest as a lactose replacer. Compared with lactose, starch digestion is generally low in calves. It is, however, unknown which enzyme limits the rate of starch digestion. The objectives were to determine which enzyme limits starch digestion and to assess the maximum capacity for starch digestion in milk-fed calves. A within-animal titration study was performed, where lactose was exchanged stepwise for one of four starch products (SP). The four corn-based SP differed in size and branching, therefore requiring different ratios of starch-degrading enzymes for their complete hydrolysis to glucose: gelatinised starch (?-amylase and (iso)maltase); maltodextrin ((iso)maltase and ?-amylase); maltodextrin with ?-1,6-branching (isomaltase, maltase and ?-amylase) and maltose (maltase). When exceeding the animal's capacity to enzymatically hydrolyse starch, fermentation occurs, leading to a reduced faecal dry matter (DM) content and pH. Forty calves (13 weeks of age) were assigned to either a lactose control diet or one of four titration strategies (n=8 per treatment), each testing the stepwise exchange of lactose for one SP. Dietary inclusion of each SP was increased weekly by 3% at the expense of lactose and faecal samples were collected from the rectum weekly to determine DM content and pH. The increase in SP inclusion was stopped when faecal DM content dropped below 10.6% (i.e. 75% of the average initial faecal DM content) for 3 consecutive weeks. For control calves, faecal DM content and pH did not change over time. For 87% of the SP-fed calves, faecal DM and pH decreased already at low inclusion levels, and linear regression provided a better fit of the data (faecal DM content or pH v. time) than non-linear regression. For all SP treatments, faecal DM content and pH decreased in time (P<0.001) and slopes for faecal DM content and pH in time differed from CON; P<0.001 for all SP), but did not differ between SP treatments. Faecal DM content of SP-fed calves decreased by 0.57% and faecal pH by 0.32 per week. In conclusion, faecal DM content and pH sensitively respond to incremental inclusion of SP in calf MR, independently of SP characteristics. All SP require maltase to achieve complete hydrolysis to glucose. We therefore suggest that maltase activity limits starch digestion and that fermentation may contribute substantially to total tract starch disappearance in milk-fed calves. PMID:25205419

  6. Measurement of atmospheric OH by titration of near-IR fluorescent dyes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betterton, Eric A.; Gast, Karl

    1994-01-01

    Recent research has shown that certain polymethine dyes can be detected at ultratrace levels (greater than or equal to 6x10(exp -14) M) in solution by fluorimetry. These detection limits are possible because of the inherent sensitivity of fluorescence techniques, because the dyes fluoresce in the near infrared region where background interference is negligible, and because powerful infrared diode lasers are now available to improve the signal to noise ratio. Other work has shown that the hydroxyl radical destroys the ability of polymethine dyes to fluoresce. These observations form the basis for a new hydroxyl radical detector that is essentially a fluorometric titrator. Theoretically, the detector should show an acceptable sensitivity and response time. Assuming that the atmospheric HO concentration is about 10(exp -11) moles m(exp -3) (i.e. 10(exp 6) molecules cm(exp -3)), then 10 L of air 'titrated' with 20 mL of 10(exp -11) M dye solution (an easily detected concentration) should result in a drop in the fluorescent signal of 50 percent - a readily detectable change. At a flow rate of 3 L min(exp -1) the sampling time would be 3 minutes. The biggest potential problem is selectivity: other oxidants may also cause the fluorescence signal to be lost. The chemistry of polymethine dyes has not been studied in detail and so no quantitative data are available. However, a survey of the literature suggests that in general HO should react up to six orders of magnitude faster than HO2 and other radicals such as RO2 and RO. It should also react much more rapidly than H2O2 and O3. Thus it may be possible to discriminate kinetically against potential interfering substances. It was shown in the laboratory that 10(exp -4) M H2O2 has little effect on the absorption spectrum of the dye IR125 over a period of hours but that the band at 780 nm is slowly lost in water over a period of days even under argon in the dark. By contrast, DMSO solutions of IR125 are stable.

  7. The photometric method of extrasolar planet detection revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Alan; Doyle, Laurance R.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the geometry concerning the photometric method of extrasolar planet detection, i.e., the detection of dimunition of a parent star's brightness during a planetary transit. Under the assumption that planetary orbital inclinations can be defined by a Gaussian with a sigma of 10 deg centered on the parent star's equatorial plane, Monte Carlo simulations suggest that for a given star observed at an inclination of exactly 90 deg, the probability of at least one Earth-sized or larger planet being suitably placed for transits is approximately 4%. This probability drops to 3% for a star observed at an inclination of 80 deg, and is still approximately 0.5% for a star observed at an inclination of 60 deg. If one can select 100 stars with a pre-determined inclination equal or greater than 80 deg, the probability of at least one planet being suitably configured for transits is 95%. The majority of transit events are due to planets in small-a orbits similar to the Earth and Venus; thus, the photometric method in principle is the method best suited for the detection of Earthlike planets. The photometric method also allows for testing whether or not planets can exist within binary systems. This can ge done by selecting binary systems observed at high orbital inclinations, both eclipsing binaries and wider visual binaries. For a 'real-world' example, we look at the alpha Centauri system (i = 79.2 deg). If we assume that the equatorial planes of both components coincide with the system's orbital plane, Monte Carlo simulations suggest that the probability of at least one planet (of either component) being suitably configured for transits is approximately 8%. In conclusion, we present a non-exhaustive list of solar-type stars, both single and within binary systems, which exhibit a high equatorial inclination. These objects may be considered as preliminary candidates for planetary searches via the photometric method.

  8. Studies of Template-based Photometric Classification of Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asimacopoulos, Leia; Londo, Stephen; Macaluso, Joseph; Cunningham, John; Kuhlmann, Steve; Kovacs, Eve

    2016-01-01

    We study photometric classification of Type Ia (SNIa) and core collapse (SNcc) supernovae using a combination of simulated data from DES and real data from SDSS. We increase the number of core collapse templates from the eight commonly used to type SDSS supernovae (PSNID) to forty-five currently available in SNANA. These are implemented in the SNCosmo analysis package. Our goal is to study the accuracy in identifying all types of supernovae as a function of numbers and types of templates.

  9. Solvent extraction-photometric determination of chromium in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Kamburova, M.; Aleksandrov, A.

    1995-12-01

    In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to the problem of the pollution of the biosphere. Chromium is known to be among the most hazardous and highly toxic pollutants. The widespread use of chromium in the national economy increases its level in the environment; therefore, a detailed study of the behavior of chromium in environmental samples has become necessary. In this work, the authors developed a solvent extraction-photometric method for determining chromium in soil using a tetrazolium salt.

  10. ESO & NOT photometric monitoring of the Cloverleaf quasar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostensen, R.; Remy, M.; Lindblad, P. O.; Refsdal, S.; Stabell, R.; Surdej, J.; Barthel, P. D.; Emanuelsen, P. I.; Festin, L.; Gosset, E.; Hainaut, O.; Hakala, P.; Hjelm, M.; Hjorth, J.; Hutsemekers, D.; Jablonski, M.; Kaas, A. A.; Kristen, H.; Larsson, S.; Magain, P.; Pettersson, B.; Pospieszalska-Surdej, A.; Smette, A.; Teuber, J.; Thomsen, B.; van Drom, E.

    1997-12-01

    The Cloverleaf quasar, H1413+117, has been photometrically monitored at ESO (La Silla, Chile) and with the NOT (La Palma, Spain) during the period 1987--1994. All good quality CCD frames have been successfully analysed using two independent methods (i.e. an automatic image decomposition technique and an interactive CLEAN algorithm). The photometric results from the two methods are found to be very similar, and they show that the four lensed QSO images vary significantly in brightness (by up to 0.45 mag), nearly in parallel. The lightcurve of the $D$ component presents some slight departures from the general trend which are very likely caused by micro-lensing effects. Upper limits, at the 99% confidence level, of 150 days on the absolute value for the time delays between the photometric lightcurves of this quadruply imaged variable QSO, are derived. This is unfortunately too large to constrain the lens model but there is little doubt that a better sampling of the lightcurves should allow to accurately derive these time delays. Pending a direct detection of the lensing galaxy (position and redshift), this system thus constitutes another good candidate for a direct and independent determination of the Hubble parameter. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory (La Silla, Chile) and with the Nordic Optical Telescope (La Palma, Spain). Table 1. Logbook for the ESO and NOT observations together with photometric results for the Cloverleaf quasar. This long table can be accessed on the WWW at the URL address: http://vela.astro.ulg.ac.be/grav_lens/glp_homepage.html}

  11. A sparse Gaussian process framework for photometric redshift estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almosallam, Ibrahim A.; Lindsay, Sam N.; Jarvis, Matt J.; Roberts, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate photometric redshifts are a lynchpin for many future experiments to pin down the cosmological model and for studies of galaxy evolution. In this study, a novel sparse regression framework for photometric redshift estimation is presented. Synthetic data set simulating the Euclid survey and real data from SDSS DR12 are used to train and test the proposed models. We show that approaches which include careful data preparation and model design offer a significant improvement in comparison with several competing machine learning algorithms. Standard implementations of most regression algorithms use the minimization of the sum of squared errors as the objective function. For redshift inference, this induces a bias in the posterior mean of the output distribution, which can be problematic. In this paper, we directly minimize the target metric ?z = (zs - zp)/(1 + zs) and address the bias problem via a distribution-based weighting scheme, incorporated as part of the optimization objective. The results are compared with other machine learning algorithms in the field such as artificial neural networks (ANN), Gaussian processes (GPs) and sparse GPs. The proposed framework reaches a mean absolute ?z = 0.0026(1 + zs), over the redshift range of 0 ? zs ? 2 on the simulated data, and ?z = 0.0178(1 + zs) over the entire redshift range on the SDSS DR12 survey, outperforming the standard ANNz used in the literature. We also investigate how the relative size of the training sample affects the photometric redshift accuracy. We find that a training sample of >30 per cent of total sample size, provides little additional constraint on the photometric redshifts, and note that our GP formalism strongly outperforms ANNz in the sparse data regime for the simulated data set.

  12. Long Term Photometric and Spectroscopic Monitoring of Semiregular Variable Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadmus, R. R., Jr.

    2015-06-01

    The understanding of semiregular variable stars presents a number of challenges that can be addressed by consistent long term photometric and spectroscopic monitoring. The observing program at Grinnell College has generated a large body of such data that has been used to investigate modes of pulsation, the role of dust, the possible role of chaos, and other issues. This paper summarizes these efforts and encourages other observers to help maintain the continuity of these data sets.

  13. Microdensitometer errors: Their effect on photometric data reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozyan, E. P.; Opal, C. B.

    1984-01-01

    The performance of densitometers used for photometric data reduction of high dynamic range electrographic plate material is analyzed. Densitometer repeatability is tested by comparing two scans of one plate. Internal densitometer errors are examined by constructing histograms of digitized densities and finding inoperative bits and differential nonlinearity in the analog to digital converter. Such problems appear common to the four densitometers used in this investigation and introduce systematic algorithm dependent errors in the results. Strategies to improve densitometer performance are suggested.

  14. Photometric monitoring of the young star Par 1724 in Orion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhäuser, R.; Koeltzsch, A.; Raetz, St.; Schmidt, T. O. B.; Mugrauer, M.; Young, N.; Bertoldi, F.; Roell, T.; Eisenbeiss, T.; Hohle, M. M.; Va?ko, M.; Ginski, C.; Rammo, W.; Moualla, M.; Broeg, C.

    2009-05-01

    We report new photometric observations of the ˜ 200 000 year old naked weak-line run-away T Tauri star Par 1724, located north of the Trapezium cluster in Orion. We observed in the broad band filters B, V, R, and I using the 90 cm Dutch telescope on La Silla, the 80 cm Wendelstein telescope, and a 25 cm telescope of the University Observatory Jena in Großschwabhausen near Jena. The photometric data in V and R are consistent with a ˜ 5.7 day rotation period due to spots, as observed before between 1960ies and 2000. Also, for the first time, we present evidence for a long-term 9 or 17.5 year cycle in photometric data (V band) of such a young star, a cycle similar to that to of the Sun and other active stars. Based on observations obtained with telescopes of the University Observatory Jena, which is operated by the Astrophysical Institute of the Friedrich-Schiller-University; a telescope of the University Observatory Munich on Mount Wendelstein, the 0.9m ESO-Dutch telescope on La Silla, Chile, and with the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) project (www.astrouw.edu.pl/asas).

  15. Calibration of LSST Instrumental and Atmospheric Photometric Passbands

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, David L.; Axelrod, T.; Barrau, Aurelien; Baumont, Sylvain; Blondin, Stephane; Claver, Chuck; Gorecki, Alexia; Ivezic, Zeljko; Jones, Lynne; Krabbendam, Victor; Liang, Ming; Saha, Abhijit; Smith, Allyn; Smith, R.Chris; Stubbs, Christopher W.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2011-07-06

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will continuously image the entire sky visible from Cerro Pachon in northern Chile every 3-4 nights throughout the year. The LSST will provide data for a broad range of science investigations that require better than 1% photometric precision across the sky (repeatability and uniformity) and a similar accuracy of measured broadband color. The fast and persistent cadence of the LSST survey will significantly improve the temporal sampling rate with which celestial events and motions are tracked. To achieve these goals, and to optimally utilize the observing calendar, it will be necessary to obtain excellent photometric calibration of data taken over a wide range of observing conditions - even those not normally considered 'photometric'. To achieve this it will be necessary to routinely and accurately measure the full optical passband that includes the atmosphere as well as the instrumental telescope and camera system. The LSST mountain facility will include a new monochromatic dome illumination projector system to measure the detailed wavelength dependence of the instrumental passband for each channel in the system. The facility will also include an auxiliary spectroscopic telescope dedicated to measurement of atmospheric transparency at all locations in the sky during LSST observing. In this paper, we describe these systems and present laboratory and observational data that illustrate their performance.

  16. The extinction law from photometric data: linear regression methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascenso, J.; Lombardi, M.; Lada, C. J.; Alves, J.

    2012-04-01

    Context. The properties of dust grains, in particular their size distribution, are expected to differ from the interstellar medium to the high-density regions within molecular clouds. Since the extinction at near-infrared wavelengths is caused by dust, the extinction law in cores should depart from that found in low-density environments if the dust grains have different properties. Aims: We explore methods to measure the near-infrared extinction law produced by dense material in molecular cloud cores from photometric data. Methods: Using controlled sets of synthetic and semi-synthetic data, we test several methods for linear regression applied to the specific problem of deriving the extinction law from photometric data. We cover the parameter space appropriate to this type of observations. Results: We find that many of the common linear-regression methods produce biased results when applied to the extinction law from photometric colors. We propose and validate a new method, LinES, as the most reliable for this effect. We explore the use of this method to detect whether or not the extinction law of a given reddened population has a break at some value of extinction. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (ESO programmes 069.C-0426 and 074.C-0728).

  17. ArborZ: Photometric Redshifts Using Boosted Decision Trees

    E-print Network

    Gerdes, David W; McKay, Timothy A; Hao, Jiangang; Weis, Matthew R; Wechsler, Risa H; Busha, Michael T

    2009-01-01

    Precision photometric redshifts will be essential for extracting cosmological parameters from the next generation of wide-area imaging surveys. In this paper we introduce a photometric redshift algorithm, ArborZ, based on the machine-learning technique of Boosted Decision Trees. We study the algorithm using galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and from mock catalogs intended to simulate both the SDSS and the upcoming Dark Energy Survey. We show that it improves upon the performance of existing algorithms. Moreover, the method naturally leads to the reconstruction of a full probability density function (PDF) for the photometric redshift of each galaxy, not merely a single "best estimate" and error, and also provides a photo-z quality figure-of-merit for each galaxy that can be used to reject outliers. We show that the stacked PDFs yield a more accurate reconstruction of the redshift distribution N(z). We discuss limitations of the current algorithm and ideas for future work.

  18. ArborZ: Photometric Redshifts Using Boosted Decision Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerdes, David W.; Sypniewski, Adam J.; McKay, Timothy A.; Hao, Jiangang; Weis, Matthew R.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Busha, Michael T.

    2010-06-01

    Precision photometric redshifts will be essential for extracting cosmological parameters from the next generation of wide-area imaging surveys. In this paper, we introduce a photometric redshift algorithm, ArborZ, based on the machine-learning technique of boosted decision trees. We study the algorithm using galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and from mock catalogs intended to simulate both the SDSS and the upcoming Dark Energy Survey. We show that it improves upon the performance of existing algorithms. Moreover, the method naturally leads to the reconstruction of a full probability density function (PDF) for the photometric redshift of each galaxy, not merely a single "best estimate" and error, and also provides a photo-z quality figure of merit for each galaxy that can be used to reject outliers. We show that the stacked PDFs yield a more accurate reconstruction of the redshift distribution N(z). We discuss limitations of the current algorithm and ideas for future work.

  19. Computer-aided photometric analysis of dynamic digital bioluminescent images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorski, Zbigniew; Bembnista, T.; Floryszak-Wieczorek, J.; Domanski, Marek; Slawinski, Janusz

    2003-04-01

    The paper deals with photometric and morphologic analysis of bioluminescent images obtained by registration of light radiated directly from some plant objects. Registration of images obtained from ultra-weak light sources by the single photon counting (SPC) technique is the subject of this work. The radiation is registered by use of a 16-bit charge coupled device (CCD) camera "Night Owl" together with WinLight EG&G Berthold software. Additional application-specific software has been developed in order to deal with objects that are changing during the exposition time. Advantages of the elaborated set of easy configurable tools named FCT for a computer-aided photometric and morphologic analysis of numerous series of quantitatively imperfect chemiluminescent images are described. Instructions are given how to use these tools and exemplified with several algorithms for the transformation of images library. Using the proposed FCT set, automatic photometric and morphologic analysis of the information hidden within series of chemiluminescent images reflecting defensive processes in poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd) leaves affected by a pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea is revealed.

  20. Photometric and polarimetric mapping of water turbidity and water depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halajian, J.; Hallock, H.

    1973-01-01

    A Digital Photometric Mapper (DPM) was used in the Fall of 1971 in an airborne survey of New York and Boston area waters to acquire photometric, spectral and polarimetric data. The object of this study is to analyze these data with quantitative computer processing techniques to assess the potential of the DPM in the measurement and regional mapping of water turbidity and depth. These techniques have been developed and an operational potential has been demonstrated. More emphasis is placed at this time on the methodology of data acquisition, analysis and display than on the quantity of data. The results illustrate the type, quantity and format of information that could be generated operationally with the DPM-type sensor characterized by high photometric stability and fast, accurate digital output. The prototype, single-channel DPM is suggested as a unique research tool for a number of new applications. For the operational mapping of water turbidity and depth, the merits of a multichannel DPM coupled with a laser system are stressed.

  1. A PHOTOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF SEVENTEEN BINARY STARS USING SPECKLE IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, James W.; Baptista, Brian J.; Horch, Elliott P.; Franz, Otto; Van Altena, William F. E-mail: bbapti@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: Otto.Franz@lowell.edu

    2009-11-15

    Magnitude differences obtained from speckle imaging are used in combination with other data in the literature to place the components of binary star systems on the H-R diagram. Isochrones are compared with the positions obtained, and a best-fit isochrone is determined for each system, yielding both masses of the components as well as an age range consistent with the system parameters. Seventeen systems are studied, 12 of which were observed with the 0.6 m Lowell-Tololo Telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory and six of which were observed with the WIYN 3.5 m Telescope (The WIYN Observatory is a joint facility of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Indiana University, Yale University, and the National Optical Astronomy Observatories) at Kitt Peak. One system was observed from both sites. In comparing photometric masses to mass information from orbit determinations, we find that the photometric masses agree very well with the dynamical masses, and are generally more precise. For three systems, no dynamical masses exist at present, and therefore the photometrically determined values are the first mass estimates derived for these components.

  2. Detector driver systems and photometric estimates for RIMAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toy, Vicki L.; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Lyness, Eric I.; Muench, Marius; Robinson, Frederick D.; Lotkin, Gennadiy N.; Capone, John I.; Veilleux, Sylvain; Moseley, Samuel H.; Gehrels, Neil A.; Vogel, Stuart N.

    2014-07-01

    The Rapid infrared IMAger-Spectrometer (RIMAS) is a rapid gamma-ray burst afterglow instrument that will provide photometric and spectroscopic coverage of the Y, J, H, and K bands. RIMAS separates light into two optical arms, YJ and HK, which allows for simultaneous coverage in two photometric bands. RIMAS utilizes two 2048 x 2048 pixel Teledyne HgCdTe (HAWAII-2RG) detectors along with a Spitzer Legacy Indium- Antimonide (InSb) guiding detector in spectroscopic mode to position and keep the source on the slit. We describe the software and hardware development for the detector driver and acquisition systems. The HAWAII- 2RG detectors simultaneously acquire images using Astronomical Research Cameras, Inc. driver, timing, and processing boards with two C++ wrappers running assembly code. The InSb detector clocking and acquisition system runs on a National Instruments cRIO-9074 with a Labview user interface and clocks written in an easily alterable ASCII file. We report the read noise, linearity, and dynamic range of our guide detector. Finally, we present RIMAS's estimated instrument efficiency in photometric imaging mode (for all three detectors) and expected limiting magnitudes. Our efficiency calculations include atmospheric transmission models, filter models, telescope components, and optics components for each optical arm.

  3. ArborZ: PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS USING BOOSTED DECISION TREES

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdes, David W.; Sypniewski, Adam J.; McKay, Timothy A.; Hao, Jiangang; Weis, Matthew R.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Busha, Michael T.

    2010-06-01

    Precision photometric redshifts will be essential for extracting cosmological parameters from the next generation of wide-area imaging surveys. In this paper, we introduce a photometric redshift algorithm, ArborZ, based on the machine-learning technique of boosted decision trees. We study the algorithm using galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and from mock catalogs intended to simulate both the SDSS and the upcoming Dark Energy Survey. We show that it improves upon the performance of existing algorithms. Moreover, the method naturally leads to the reconstruction of a full probability density function (PDF) for the photometric redshift of each galaxy, not merely a single 'best estimate' and error, and also provides a photo-z quality figure of merit for each galaxy that can be used to reject outliers. We show that the stacked PDFs yield a more accurate reconstruction of the redshift distribution N(z). We discuss limitations of the current algorithm and ideas for future work.

  4. A comprehensive photometric study of the eclipsing binary EP Aurigae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.-L.; Wei, J.-Y.; Yang, Y.-G.; Li, K.; Zhang, X.-B.

    2015-02-01

    We present new observations for the eclipsing binary EP Aurigae, which were performed by using three small telescopes in China from 2003 December to 2014 January. With the updated 2003 version of the Wilson-Devinney code, the photometric elements were deduced from three sets of light curves. Based on all available eclipsing times, the orbital period changes were investigated. It is discovered that the (O-C) curve may show an existence of light-time effect due to an unseen third body, which was weakly identified by the photometric solution. The modulated period and amplitude of the cyclic variation are P3=71.2(±8.0) yr and A=0.0101(±0.0008) day, respectively. In the co-planar orbit with the binary system, the mass of the third body is M3=0.18(±0.02) M?. The photometric results imply that EP Aur is an Algol-type binary with a mass ratio of q=0.831(±0.004). Its primary component almost fills its Roche lobe. Therefore, EP Aur may consist of a normal main-sequence star and a cool Roche-lobe filling subgiant, which may be undergoing rapid mass transfer.

  5. Photometric metallicity map of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Samyaday; Subramaniam, Annapurni; Cole, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    We have estimated a metallicity map of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using the Magellanic Cloud Photometric Survey (MCPS) and Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE III) photometric data. This is a first of its kind map of metallicity up to a radius of 4°-5°, derived using photometric data and calibrated using spectroscopic data of Red Giant Branch (RGB) stars. We identify the RGB in the V, (V - I) colour-magnitude diagrams of small subregions of varying sizes in both data sets. We use the slope of the RGB as an indicator of the average metallicity of a subregion, and calibrate the RGB slope to metallicity using spectroscopic data for field and cluster red giants in selected subregions. The average metallicity of the LMC is found to be [Fe/H] = -0.37 dex (?[Fe/H] = 0.12) from MCPS data, and [Fe/H] = -0.39 dex (?[Fe/H] = 0.10) from OGLE III data. The bar is found to be the most metal-rich region of the LMC. Both the data sets suggest a shallow radial metallicity gradient up to a radius of 4 kpc (-0.049 ± 0.002 dex kpc-1 to -0.066 ± 0.006 dex kpc-1). Subregions in which the mean metallicity differs from the surrounding areas do not appear to correlate with previously known features; spectroscopic studies are required in order to assess their physical significance.

  6. Photometric observations of a polychromatic laser guide star.

    PubMed

    Foy, R; Tallon, M; Tallon-Bosc, I; Thiébaut, E; Vaillant, J; Foy, F C; Robert, D; Friedman, H; Biraben, F; Grynberg, G; Gex, J P; Mens, A; Migus, A; Weulersse, J M; Butler, D J

    2000-12-01

    We report the photometric observation of a polychromatic laser guide star (PLGS) using the AVLIS laser at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The process aims at providing a measurement of the tilt of the incoming wave front at a telescope induced by atmospheric turbulence. It relies on the two-photon coherent excitation of the 4D5/2 energy level of sodium atoms in the mesosphere. We used two laser beams at 589 and 569 nm, with a maximum total average output power of approximately 350 W. For the purpose of photometric calibration, a natural star was observed simultaneously through the same instrument as the PLGS at the focus of the LLNL 50-cm telescope. Photometric measurements of the 330-nm return flux confirm our previous theoretical studies that the PLGS process should allow us at a later stage to correct for the tilt at wavelengths as short as approximately 1 microm at good astronomical sites. They show also that, at saturation of two-photon coherent absorption in the mesosphere, the backscattered flux increases by a factor of approximately 2 when the pulse repetition rate decreases by a factor of 3 at constant average power. This unexpected behavior is briefly discussed. PMID:11140483

  7. Combining spectroscopic and photometric surveys: Same or different sky?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, Martin; Gaztañaga, Enrique

    2015-08-01

    This paper looks at the combined constraints from a photometric and spectroscopic survey. These surveys will measure cosmology using weak lensing (WL), galaxy clustering, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and redshift space distortions (RSD). We find, contrary to some findings in the recent literature, that overlapping surveys can give important benefits when measuring dark energy. We therefore try to clarify the status of this issue with a full forecast of two stage-IV surveys using a new approach to properly account for covariance between the different probes in the overlapping samples. The benefit of the overlapping survey can be traced back to two factors: additional observables and sample variance cancellation. Both needs to be taken into account and contribute equally when combining 3D power spectrum and 2D correlations for lensing. With an analytic example we also illustrate that for optimal constraints, one should minimize the (Pearson) correlation coefficient between cosmological and nuisance parameters and maximize the one among nuisance parameters (e.g. galaxy bias) in the two samples. This can be achieved by increasing the overlap between the spectroscopic and photometric surveys. We show how BAO, WL and RSD contribute to this benefit and also look at some other survey designs, such as photometric redshift errors and spectroscopic density.

  8. Photometric metallicity map of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    E-print Network

    Choudhury, Samyaday; Cole, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    We have estimated a metallicity map of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using the Magellanic Cloud Photometric Survey (MCPS) and Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE III) photometric data. This is a first of its kind map of metallicity up to a radius of 4 - 5 degrees, derived using photometric data and calibrated using spectroscopic data of Red Giant Branch (RGB) stars. We identify the RGB in the V, (V$-$I) colour magnitude diagrams of small subregions of varying sizes in both data sets. We use the slope of the RGB as an indicator of the average metallicity of a subregion, and calibrate the RGB slope to metallicity using spectroscopic data for field and cluster red giants in selected subregions. The average metallicity of the LMC is found to be [Fe/H] = $-$0.37 dex ($\\sigma$[Fe/H] = 0.12) from MCPS data, and [Fe/H] = $-$0.39 dex ($\\sigma$[Fe/H] = 0.10) from OGLE III data. The bar is found be the most metal-rich region of the LMC. Both the data sets suggest a shallow radial metallicity gradient up to...

  9. Determination of thermodynamic potentials and the aggregation number for micelles with the mass-action model by isothermal titration calorimetry: A case study on bile salts.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Niels Erik; Westh, Peter; Holm, René

    2015-09-01

    The aggregation number (n), thermodynamic potentials (?G, ?H, ?S) and critical micelle concentration (CMC) for 6 natural bile salts were determined on the basis of both original and previously published isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) data. Different procedures to estimate parameters of micelles with ITC were compared to a mass-action model (MAM) of reaction type: n?S?Mn. This analysis can provide guidelines for future ITC studies of systems behaving in accordance with this model such as micelles and proteins that undergo self-association to oligomers. Micelles with small aggregation numbers, as those of bile salts, are interesting because such small aggregates cannot be characterized as a separate macroscopic phase and the widely applied pseudo-phase model (PPM) is inaccurate. In the present work it was demonstrated that the aggregation number of micelles was constant at low concentrations enabling determination of the thermodynamic potentials by the MAM. A correlation between the aggregation number and the heat capacity was found, which implies that the dehydrated surface area of bile salts increases with the aggregation number. This is in accordance with Tanford's principles of opposing forces where neighbouring molecules in the aggregate are better able to shield from the surrounding hydrophilic environment when the aggregation number increases. PMID:25978555

  10. High-precision, automated integration of multiple isothermal titration calorimetric thermograms: new features of NITPIC.

    PubMed

    Scheuermann, Thomas H; Brautigam, Chad A

    2015-04-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) has become a standard and widely available tool to measure the thermodynamic parameters of macromolecular associations. Modern applications of the method, including global analysis and drug screening, require the acquisition of multiple sets of data; sometimes these data sets number in the hundreds. Therefore, there is a need for quick, precise, and automated means to process the data, particularly at the first step of data analysis, which is commonly the integration of the raw data to yield an interpretable isotherm. Herein, we describe enhancements to an algorithm that previously has been shown to provide an automated, unbiased, and high-precision means to integrate ITC data. These improvements allow for the speedy and precise serial integration of an unlimited number of ITC data sets, and they have been implemented in the freeware program NITPIC, version 1.1.0. We present a comprehensive comparison of the performance of this software against an older version of NITPIC and a current version of Origin, which is commonly used for integration. The new methods recapitulate the excellent performance of the previous versions of NITPIC while speeding it up substantially, and their precision is significantly better than that of Origin. This new version of NITPIC is therefore well suited to the serial integration of many ITC data sets. PMID:25524420

  11. Improving the prediction ability of FT-MIR spectroscopy to assess titratable acidity in cow's milk.

    PubMed

    Calamari, Luigi; Gobbi, Laura; Bani, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the potential application of Fourier transform mid-infrared spectroscopy (FT-MIR) for the determination of titratable acidity (TA) in cow's milk. The prediction model was developed on 201 samples collected from cows in early and late lactation, and was successively used to predict TA on samples collected from cows in early lactation and in samples with high somatic cell count. The root mean square error of cross-validation of the model by using external validation dataset was 0.09 °Soxhlet-Henkel/50 mL. Applying the model on milk samples from cows in early lactation or with high somatic cell count, the root mean square error of prediction was 0.163 °Soxhlet-Henkel/50 mL, with a RER and RPD of 23.9 and 5.1, respectively. Our results seem to indicate that FT-MIR can be used in individual milk samples to accurately predict TA, and has the potential to be adopted to measure routinely the TA of milk. PMID:26304375

  12. Thermodynamic profiling of peptide membrane interactions by isothermal titration calorimetry: a search for pores and micelles.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, J R; Andresen, T L

    2011-07-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are known to interact strongly with negatively charged lipid membranes, initially by peripheral insertion of the peptide into the bilayer, which for some antimicrobial peptides will be followed by pore formation, and successive solubilization of the membranes resulting in mixed peptide-lipid micelles. We have investigated the mode of action of the antimicrobial peptide mastoparan-X using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). The results show that mastoparan-X induces a range of structural transitions of POPC/POPG (3:1) lipid membranes at different peptide/lipid ratios. It has been established that ITC can be used as a fast method for localizing membrane transitions and when combined with DLS and cryo-TEM can elucidate structural changes, including the threshold for pore formation and micellation. Cryo-TEM was employed to confirm the structural changes associated with the thermodynamic transitions found by ITC. The pore-formation process has furthermore been investigated in detail and the thermodynamic parameters of pore formation have been characterized using a system-specific temperature where the enthalpy of peptide partitioning becomes zero (T(zero)). This allows for an exclusive study of the pore-formation process. The use of ITC to find T(zero) allows for characterization of the thermodynamic parameters of secondary processes on lipid membranes. PMID:21723819

  13. Leverage principle of retardation signal in titration of double protein via chip moving reaction boundary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liu-Xia; Cao, Yi-Ren; Xiao, Hua; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Shao-Rong; Meng, Qing-Hua; Fan, Liu-Yin; Cao, Cheng-Xi

    2016-03-15

    In the present work we address a simple, rapid and quantitative analytical method for detection of different proteins present in biological samples. For this, we proposed the model of titration of double protein (TDP) and its relevant leverage theory relied on the retardation signal of chip moving reaction boundary electrophoresis (MRBE). The leverage principle showed that the product of the first protein content and its absolute retardation signal is equal to that of the second protein content and its absolute one. To manifest the model, we achieved theoretical self-evidence for the demonstration of the leverage principle at first. Then relevant experiments were conducted on the TDP-MRBE chip. The results revealed that (i) there was a leverage principle of retardation signal within the TDP of two pure proteins, and (ii) a lever also existed within these two complex protein samples, evidently demonstrating the validity of TDP model and leverage theory in MRBE chip. It was also showed that the proposed technique could provide a rapid and simple quantitative analysis of two protein samples in a mixture. Finally, we successfully applied the developed technique for the quantification of soymilk in adulterated infant formula. The TDP-MRBE opens up a new window for the detection of adulteration ratio of the poor food (milk) in blended high quality one. PMID:26414025

  14. Isothermal titration calorimetry determination of individual rate constants of trypsin catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, César; Condado-Morales, Itzel; Olguin, Luis F; Costas, Miguel

    2015-06-15

    Determination of individual rate constants for enzyme-catalyzed reactions is central to the understanding of their mechanism of action and is commonly obtained by stopped-flow kinetic experiments. However, most natural substrates either do not fluoresce/absorb or lack a significant change in their spectra while reacting and, therefore, are frequently chemically modified to render adequate molecules for their spectroscopic detection. Here, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was used to obtain Michaelis-Menten plots for the trypsin-catalyzed hydrolysis of several substrates at different temperatures (278-318K): four spectrophotometrically blind lysine and arginine N-free esters, one N-substituted arginine ester, and one amide. A global fitting of these data provided the individual rate constants and activation energies for the acylation and deacylation reactions, and the ratio of the formation and dissociation rates of the enzyme-substrate complex, leading also to the corresponding free energies of activation. The results indicate that for lysine and arginine N-free esters deacylation is the rate-limiting step, but for the N-substituted ester and the amide acylation is the slowest step. It is shown that ITC is able to produce quality kinetic data and is particularly well suited for those enzymatic reactions that cannot be measured by absorption or fluorescence spectroscopy. PMID:25823683

  15. Single-strand DNA translation initiation step analyzed by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Damian, Luminita; Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, F-31077 Toulouse; IUB, School of Engineering and Science, D-28727 Bremen ; Marty-Detraves, Claire; Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, F-31077 Toulouse ; Winterhalter, Mathias; Fournier, Didier; Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, F-31077 Toulouse ; Paquereau, Laurent; Universite de Toulouse, UPS, IPBS, F-31077 Toulouse

    2009-07-31

    Is single-strand DNA translatable? Since the 60s, the question still remains whether or not DNA could be directly translated into protein. Some discrepancies in the results were reported about functional translation of single-strand DNA but all results converged on a similar behavior of RNA and ssDNA in the initiation step. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry method was used to determine thermodynamic constants of interaction between single-strand DNA and S30 extract of Escherichia coli. Our results showed that the binding was not affected by the nature of the template tested and the dissociation constants were in the same range when ssDNA (K{sub d} = 3.62 {+-} 2.1 x 10{sup -8} M) or the RNA corresponding sequence (K{sub d} = 2.7 {+-} 0.82 x 10{sup -8} M) bearing SD/ATG sequences were used. The binding specificity was confirmed by antibiotic interferences which block the initiation complex formation. These results suggest that the limiting step in translation of ssDNA is the elongation process.

  16. Prefibrillar Formation Conditions of ?-Lactoglobulin by Titration and Chaotropes Urea and KSCN Under Thermal Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babcock, Jeremiah; Valdez, Rolando; Brancaleon, Lorenzo

    2009-10-01

    The harmful growth of toxic oligomers in the formation of protein amyloid fibrils have been connected to degenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Huntington's diseases. Understanding the fundamental mechanisms behind protein unfolding and subsequent fibrillogenesis may provide a way to stop the process from occurring. The purpose of this study was to identify favorable fibril growth conditions for a globular model protein ?-lactoglobulin using the chaotropes urea and KSCN, along with titration of a pH 7.04 phosphate buffer solution at 40 ^oC over five days. Time-resolved and steady-state fluorescence was used to examine the shift in emission of the tryptophan amino acids over the applied denaturation ranges. BLG, a dimer in native form, monomerized and partially unfolded at 5 M Urea, 2 M KSCN and at pH 2 in phosphate buffer in vitro. Exposure of the solutions to continuous heat over time caused a increase in the lifetimes and red shift in the emission spectra, indicating the possible beginning of nucleation. The study has provided a base for continuation of the study of oligomerization and subsequent fibrillation of BLG, which may provide a fundamental mechanism of formation transferable to other proteins in vivo.

  17. TiTrATE: A Novel, Evidence-Based Approach to Diagnosing Acute Dizziness and Vertigo.

    PubMed

    Newman-Toker, David E; Edlow, Jonathan A

    2015-08-01

    Diagnosing dizziness can be challenging, and the consequences of missing dangerous causes, such as stroke, can be substantial. Most physicians use a diagnostic paradigm developed more than 40 years ago that focuses on the type of dizziness, but this approach is flawed. This article proposes a new paradigm based on symptom timing, triggers, and targeted bedside eye examinations (TiTrATE). Patients fall into 1 of 4 major syndrome categories, each with its own differential diagnosis and set of targeted examination techniques that help make a specific diagnosis. Following an evidence-based approach could help reduce the frequency of misdiagnosis of serious causes of dizziness. In the spirit of the flipped classroom, the editors of this Neurologic Clinics issue on emergency neuro-otology have assembled a collection of unknown cases to be accessed electronically in multimedia format. By design, cases are not linked with specific articles, to avoid untoward cueing effects for the learner. The cases are real and are meant to demonstrate and reinforce lessons provided in this and subsequent articles. In addition to pertinent elements of medical history, cases include videos of key examination findings. PMID:26231273

  18. Chain stiffness, salt valency, and concentration influences on titration curves of polyelectrolytes: Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnal, Fabrice; Stoll, Serge

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations have been used to study two different models of a weak linear polyelectrolyte surrounded by explicit counterions and salt particles: (i) a rigid rod and (ii) a flexible chain. We focused on the influence of the pH, chain stiffness, salt concentration, and valency on the polyelectrolyte titration process and conformational properties. It is shown that chain acid-base properties and conformational properties are strongly modified when multivalent salt concentration variation ranges below the charge equivalence. Increasing chain stiffness allows to minimize intramolecular electrostatic monomer interactions hence improving the deprotonation process. The presence of di and trivalent salt cations clearly promotes the chain degree of ionization but has only a limited effect at very low salt concentration ranges. Moreover, folded structures of fully charged chains are only observed when multivalent salt at a concentration equal or above charge equivalence is considered. Long-range electrostatic potential is found to influence the distribution of charges along and around the polyelectrolyte backbones hence resulting in a higher degree of ionization and a lower attraction of counterions and salt particles at the chain extremities.

  19. Elucidation of ionic interactions in the protic ionic liquid solutions by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Rai, Gitanjali; Kumar, Anil

    2014-04-17

    The strong hydrogen-bonded network noted in protic ionic liquids (PILs) may lead to stronger interactions of the ionic entities of PILs with solvents (water, methanol, ethylene glycol, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), N,N'-dimethylformamide (DMF)) as compared with those of aprotic ionic liquids (APILs). The PILs used in this work are 1-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, 2-methylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate, and N-methylpyrrolodinium tetrafluoroborate in comparison to 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, which is classified as an APIL. In this work, the excess partial molar enthalpy, H(E)IL obtained from isothermal calorimetric titrations at 298.15 K is used to probe the nature of interactions of the PIL cations with solvent molecules against those present in APIL-solvent systems. This work also reports interesting flip-flopping in the thermal behavior of these PIL-solvent systems depending upon the structure of the cationic ring of a PIL. In some cases, these flip-flops are the specific fingerprints for specific PILs in a common solvent environment. The excess partial molar enthalpy at infinite dilution, H(E,?)IL, of these PILs bears a critical dependence on the solvent properties. An analysis of relative apparent molar enthalpies, ?L, of the PIL solutions by the ion interaction model of Pitzer yields important information on ionic interactions of these systems. PMID:24650134

  20. Prediction of uranium and technetium sorption during titration of contaminated acidic groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fan; Parker, Jack C.; Watson, David B; Jardine, Philip M; Gu, Baohua

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates uranium and technetium sorption onto aluminum and iron hydroxides during titration of acidic groundwater. The contaminated groundwater exhibits oxic conditions with high concentrations of NO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, U, Tc, and various metal cations. More than 90% of U and Tc was removed from the aqueous phase as Al and Fe precipitated above pH 5.5, but was partially resolublized at higher pH values. An equilibrium hydrolysis and precipitation reaction model adequately described variations in aqueous concentrations of metal cations. An anion exchange reaction model was incorporated to simulate sulfate, U and Tc sorption onto variably charged (pH-dependent) Al and Fe hydroxides. Modeling results indicate that competitive sorption/desorption on mixed mineral phases needs to be considered to adequately predict U and Tc mobility. The model could be useful for future studies of the speciation of U, Tc and co-existing ions during pre- and post-groundwater treatment practices.

  1. A Universal Method for Fishing Target Proteins from Mixtures of Biomolecules using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.; Sun, Q; Kini, R; Sivaraman, J

    2008-01-01

    The most challenging tasks in biology include the identification of (1) the orphan receptor for a ligand, (2) the ligand for an orphan receptor protein, and (3) the target protein(s) for a given drug or a lead compound that are critical for the pharmacological or side effects. At present, several approaches are available, including cell- or animal-based assays, affinity labeling, solid-phase binding assays, surface plasmon resonance, and nuclear magnetic resonance. Most of these techniques are not easy to apply when the target protein is unknown and the compound is not amenable to labeling, chemical modification, or immobilization. Here we demonstrate a new universal method for fishing orphan target proteins from a complex mixture of biomolecules using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) as a tracking tool. We took snake venom, a crude mixture of several hundred proteins/peptides, as a model to demonstrate our proposed ITC method in tracking the isolation and purification of two distinct target proteins, a major component and a minor component. Identities of fished out target proteins were confirmed by amino acid sequencing and inhibition assays. This method has the potential to make a significant advancement in the area of identifying orphan target proteins and inhibitor screening in drug discovery and characterization.

  2. Volumetric determination of uranium using titanous sulfate as reductant before oxidimetric titration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wahlberg, James S.; Skinner, Dwight L.; Rader, Lewis F.

    1956-01-01

    A new method for determining uranium in samples containing 0.05 percent or more U3O8, using titanous sulfate as reducing agent, is much shorter, faster, and has fewer interferences than conventional methods using reductor columns. The sample is dissolved with sulfuric, nitric, perchloric, and hydrofluoric acids. Elements that would otherwise form insoluble fluorides are kept in solution by complexing the fluoride ion with boric acid. A precipitation is made with cupferron to remove interfering elements. The solution is filtered to remove the precipitated cupferrates instead of extracting them with chloroform as is usually done. Filtration is preferred to extraction because any niobium that may be in solution forms an insoluble cupferrate that may be removed by filtering but is very difficult to extract with chloroform. Excess cupferron is destroyed by oxidizing with nitric and perchloric acids, and evaporating to dense fumes of sulfuric acid. The uranium is reduced to U(IV) by the addition of titanous sulfate, with cupric sulfate used as an indicator of the completeness of the reduction. Metallic copper is formed when all the uranium is reduced. The reduced copper is then reoxidized by the addition of mercuric perchlorate, an excess of ferric sulfate added, and the solution titrated immediately with standard ceric sulfate with ferroin as an indicator. Precision of the method compared favorable with methods in common use, both for uranium ores and for most types of uranium-rich materials.

  3. Probing the binding of procyanidin B3 to human serum albumin by isothermal titration calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangrong; Yan, Yunhui

    2015-02-01

    Proanthocyanidins are a mixture of monomers, oligomers, and polymers of flavan-3-ols that are widely distributed in the plant kingdom. One of the most widely studied proanthocyanidins is procyanidin B3. In this study, the interaction between procyanidin B3 and human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Thermodynamic investigations reveal that the hydrogen bond and van der Waals force are the major binding forces in the binding of procyanidin B3 to HSA. The binding of procyanidin B3 to HSA is driven by favorable enthalpy and unfavorable entropy. The obtained binding constant for procyanidin B3 with HSA is in the intermediate range and the equilibrium fraction of unbound procyanidin B3 fu > 90% at the physiological concentration of HSA shows that procyanidin B3 can be stored and transported from the circulatory system to reach its target site. The stoichiometric binding number n approximately equals to 1, suggesting that one molecule of procyanidin B3 combines with one molecule of HSA and no more procyanidin B3 binding to HSA occurs at the concentration used in this study.

  4. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Peptide Ligands Explored by Competition Assay and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Reille-Seroussi, Marie; Gaucher, Jean-François; Desole, Claudia; Gagey-Eilstein, Nathalie; Brachet, Franck; Broutin, Isabelle; Vidal, Michel; Broussy, Sylvain

    2015-08-25

    The v114* cyclic peptide has been identified as a tight vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) ligand. Here we report on the use of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), 96-well plate competition assay, and circular dichroism (CD) to explore the binding determinants of a new set of related peptides. Anti-VEGF antibodies are currently used in the clinic for regulating angiogenesis in cancer and age-related macular degeneration treatment. In this context, our aim is to develop smaller molecular entities with high affinity for the growth factor by a structure activity relationship approach. The cyclic disulfide peptide v114* was modified in several ways, including truncation, substitution, and variation of the size and nature of the cycle. The results indicated that truncation or substitution of the four N-terminal amino acids did not cause severe loss in affinity, allowing potential peptide labeling. Increase of the cycle size or substitution of the disulfide bridge with a thioether linkage drastically decreased the affinity, due to an enthalpy penalty. The leucine C-terminal residue positively contributed to affinity. Cysteine N-terminal acetylation induced favorable ??G° and ??H° of binding, which correlated with free peptide CD spectra changes. We also propose a biochemical model to extrapolate Ki from IC50 values measured in the displacement assay. These calculated Ki correlate well with the Kd values determined by extensive direct and reverse ITC measurements. PMID:26222917

  5. EVOLUTION OF GALAXY LUMINOSITY FUNCTION USING PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, B. H. F.; Pellegrini, P. S.; Da Costa, L. N.; Maia, M. A. G.; Ogando, R. L. C.; De Simoni, F.; Benoist, C.; Makler, M.; Mesquita, A. A. E-mail: pssp@linea.gov.br E-mail: maia@linea.gov.br E-mail: fsimoni@linea.gov.br E-mail: martin@cbpf.br

    2011-08-15

    We examine the impact of using photometric redshifts for studying the evolution of both the global galaxy luminosity function (LF) and that for different galaxy types. To this end, we compare the LFs obtained using photometric redshifts from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) D1 field with those from the spectroscopic survey VIMOS VLT Deep Survey (VVDS) comprising {approx}4800 galaxies. We find that for z {<=} 2.0, in the interval of magnitudes considered by this survey, the LFs obtained using photometric and spectroscopic redshifts show a remarkable agreement. This good agreement led us to use all four Deep fields of the CFHTLS comprising {approx}386,000 galaxies to compute the LF of the combined fields and directly estimate the error in the parameters based on the field-to-field variation. We find that the characteristic absolute magnitude M* of Schechter fits fades by {approx}0.7 mag from z {approx} 1.8 to z {approx} 0.3, while the characteristic density {phi}* increases by a factor of {approx}4 in the same redshift interval. We use the galaxy classification provided by the template fitting program used to compute photometric redshifts and split the sample into galaxy types. We find that these Schechter parameters evolve differently for each galaxy type, an indication that their evolution is a combination of several effects: galaxy merging, star formation quenching, and mass assembly. All these results are compatible with those obtained by different spectroscopic surveys such as VVDS, DEEP2, and zCosmos, which reinforces the fact that photometric redshifts can be used to study galaxy evolution, at least for the redshift bins adopted so far. This is of great interest since future very large imaging surveys containing hundreds of millions of galaxies will allow us to obtain important precise measurements to constrain the evolution of the LF and to explore the dependence of this evolution on morphology and/or color helping constrain the mechanisms of galaxy evolution.

  6. Cluster membership probabilities from proper motions and multi-wavelength photometric catalogues. I. Method and application to the Pleiades cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarro, L. M.; Bouy, H.; Berihuete, A.; Bertin, E.; Moraux, E.; Bouvier, J.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Barrado, D.; Solano, E.

    2014-03-01

    Context. With the advent of deep wide surveys, large photometric and astrometric catalogues of literally all nearby clusters and associations have been produced. The unprecedented accuracy and sensitivity of these data sets and their broad spatial, temporal and wavelength coverage make obsolete the classical membership selection methods that were based on a handful of colours and luminosities. We present a new technique designed to take full advantage of the high dimensionality (photometric, astrometric, temporal) of such a survey to derive self-consistent and robust membership probabilities of the Pleiades cluster. Aims: We aim at developing a methodology to infer membership probabilities to the Pleiades cluster from the DANCe multidimensional astro-photometric data set in a consistent way throughout the entire derivation. The determination of the membership probabilities has to be applicable to censored data and must incorporate the measurement uncertainties into the inference procedure. Methods: We use Bayes' theorem and a curvilinear forward model for the likelihood of the measurements of cluster members in the colour-magnitude space, to infer posterior membership probabilities. The distribution of the cluster members proper motions and the distribution of contaminants in the full multidimensional astro-photometric space is modelled with a mixture-of-Gaussians likelihood. Results: We analyse several representation spaces composed of the proper motions plus a subset of the available magnitudes and colour indices. We select two prominent representation spaces composed of variables selected using feature relevance determination techniques based in Random Forests, and analyse the resulting samples of high probability candidates. We consistently find lists of high probability (p > 0.9975) candidates with ?1000 sources, 4 to 5 times more than obtained in the most recent astro-photometric studies of the cluster. Conclusions: Multidimensional data sets require statistically sound multivariate analysis techniques to fully exploit their scientific information content. Proper motions in particular are, as expected, critical for the correct separation of contaminants. The methodology presented here is ready for application in data sets that include more dimensions, such as radial and/or rotational velocities, spectral indices, and variability. Membership probability catalogs for the DANCe Pleiades data are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/563/A45

  7. Civil Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byer, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Briefly reviews the historical development of civil procedure (the rules that dictate how a civil case can proceed through the courts) and identifies some of its main components. Discusses procedures such as subject matter jurisdiction, personal jurisdiction, venue, discovery, motions practice, pleadings, pretrial conference, and trials. (MJP)

  8. Theoretical considerations and a simple method for measuring alkalinity and acidity in low-pH waters by gran titration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barringer, J.L.; Johnsson, P.A.

    1996-01-01

    Titrations for alkalinity and acidity using the technique described by Gran (1952, Determination of the equivalence point in potentiometric titrations, Part II: The Analyst, v. 77, p. 661-671) have been employed in the analysis of low-pH natural waters. This report includes a synopsis of the theory and calculations associated with Gran's technique and presents a simple and inexpensive method for performing alkalinity and acidity determinations. However, potential sources of error introduced by the chemical character of some waters may limit the utility of Gran's technique. Therefore, the cost- and time-efficient method for performing alkalinity and acidity determinations described in this report is useful for exploring the suitability of Gran's technique in studies of water chemistry.

  9. The Mobile Insulin Titration Intervention (MITI) for Insulin Adjustment in an Urban, Low-Income Population: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Natalie; Nilo, Annielyn; Singer, Karyn; Bernik, Lidia S; Etiebet, Mary-Ann; Fang, Yixin; Cho, James; Natarajan, Sundar

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes patients are usually started on a low dose of insulin and their dose is adjusted or “titrated” according to their blood glucose levels. Insulin titration administered through face-to-face visits with a clinician can be time consuming and logistically burdensome for patients, especially those of low socioeconomic status (SES). Given the wide use of mobile phones among this population, there is the potential to use short message service (SMS) text messaging and phone calls to perform insulin titration remotely. Objective The goals of this pilot study were to (1) evaluate if our Mobile Insulin Titration Intervention (MITI) intervention using text messaging and phone calls was effective in helping patients reach their optimal insulin glargine dose within 12 weeks, (2) assess the feasibility of the intervention within our clinic setting and patient population, (3) collect data on the cost savings associated with the intervention, and (4) measure patient satisfaction with the intervention. Methods This was a pilot study evaluating an intervention for patients requiring insulin glargine titration in the outpatient medical clinic of Bellevue Hospital Center in New York City. Patients in the intervention arm received weekday SMS text messages from a health management platform requesting their fasting blood glucose values. The clinic’s diabetes nurse educator monitored the texted responses on the platform website each weekday for alarm values. Once a week, the nurse reviewed the glucose values, consulted the MITI titration algorithm, and called patients to adjust their insulin dose. Patients in the usual care arm continued to receive their standard clinic care for insulin titration. The primary outcome was whether a patient reached his/her optimal insulin glargine dose within 12 weeks. Results A total of 61 patients consented and were randomized into the study. A significantly greater proportion of patients in the intervention arm reached their optimal insulin glargine dose than patients in the usual care arm (88%, 29/33 vs 37%, 10/27; P<.001). Patients responded to 84.3% (420/498) of the SMS text messages requesting their blood glucose values. The nurse reached patients within 2 attempts or by voicemail 91% of the time (90/99 assigned calls). When patients traveled to the clinic, they spent a median of 45 minutes (IQR 30-60) on travel and 39 minutes (IQR 30-64) waiting prior to appointments. A total of 61% (37/61) of patients had appointment copays. After participating in the study, patients in the intervention arm reported higher treatment satisfaction than those in the usual care arm. Conclusions MITI is an effective way to help low-SES patients reach their optimal insulin glargine dose using basic SMS text messaging and phone calls. The intervention was feasible and patients were highly satisfied with their treatment. The intervention was cost saving in terms of time for patients, who were able to have their insulin titrated without multiple clinic appointments. Similar interventions should be explored to improve care for low-SES patients managing chronic disease. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01879579; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01879579 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6YZik33L3). PMID:26187303

  10. Polypyrrole-calcion film as a membrane and solid-contact in an indicator electrode for potentiometric titrations.

    PubMed

    Blaz, T; Migdalski, J; Lewenstam, A

    2000-06-21

    This paper shows the application of conducting polymers (CPs) for constructing potentiometric indicator electrodes. Two types of polypyrrole (PPy)-based calcium sensors are presented, one sensor with PPy-calcion film as the active part and the other sensor with PPy-calcion as a solid-state contact coated with a conventional membrane selective towards calcium ions. It is shown that the PPy-calcion film, due to the complexing properties of calcion ensuring high loading of the film with calcium, is sufficiently selective to be used as the active part or as a mediating layer of the indicator electrode. The electrode, with PPy-calcion film as the active part, was used as the indicator electrode in potentiometric titrations of calcium in mixed solvents, where conventional PVC-based electrode can not be used. For the first time, the practical applicability of PPy-based electrodes in titrations is demonstrated. PMID:18967991

  11. Label-Free Determination of the Dissociation Constant of Small Molecule-Aptamer Interaction by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Marc; Suess, Beatrix

    2016-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a powerful label-free technique to determine the binding constant as well as thermodynamic parameters of a binding reaction and is therefore well suited for the analysis of small molecule-RNA aptamer interaction. We will introduce you to the method and present a protocol for sample preparation and the calorimetric measurement. A detailed note section will point out useful tips and pitfalls. PMID:26552820

  12. A nine-point pH titration method to determine low-concentration VFA in municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ai, Hainan; Zhang, Daijun; Lu, Peili; He, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    Characterization of volatile fatty acid (VFA) in wastewater is significant for understanding the wastewater nature and the wastewater treatment process optimization based on the usage of Activated Sludge Models (ASMs). In this study, a nine-point pH titration method was developed for the determination of low-concentration VFA in municipal wastewater. The method was evaluated using synthetic wastewater containing VFA with the concentration of 10-50 mg/l and the possible interfering buffer systems of carbonate, phosphate and ammonium similar to those in real municipal wastewater. In addition, the further evaluation was conducted through the assay of real wastewater using chromatography as reference. The results showed that the recovery of VFA in the synthetic wastewater was 92%-102 and the coefficient of variance (CV) of reduplicate measurements 1.68%-4.72%. The changing content of the buffering substances had little effect on the accuracy of the method. Moreover, the titration method was agreed with chromatography in the determination of VFA in real municipal wastewater with R(2)= 0.9987 and CV =1.3-1.7. The nine-point pH titration method is capable of satisfied determination of low-concentration VFA in municipal wastewater. PMID:21330700

  13. Geochemical modeling of reactions and partitioning of trace metals and radionuclides during titration of contaminated acidic sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fan; Parker, Jack C.; Brooks, Scott C; Watson, David B; Jardine, Philip M; Gu, Baohua

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated sorption of uranium and technetium onto aluminum and iron hydroxides during titration of a contaminated groundwater using both Na hydroxide and carbonate as titrants. The contaminated groundwater has a low pH of 3.8 and high concentrations of NO3-, SO42-, Al, Ca, Mg, Mn, trace metals such as Ni and Co, and radionuclides such as U and Tc. During titration, most Al and Fe were precipitated out at pH above ~4.5. U as well as Tc was found to be removed from aqueous phase at pH below ~5.5, but to some extent released at higher pH values. An earlier geochemical equilibrium reaction path model that considered aqueous complexation and precipitation/dissolution reactions predicted mineral precipitation and adequately described concentration variations of Al, Fe and some other metal cations, but failed to predict sulfate, U and Tc concentrations during titration. Previous studies have shown that Fe- and Al-oxyhydroxides strongly sorb dissolved sulfate, U and Tc species. Therefore, an anion exchange model was developed for the sorption of sulfate, U and Tc onto Al and Fe hydroxides. With the additional consideration of the anion exchange reactions, concentration profiles of sulfate, U and Tc were more accurately predicted. Results of this study indicate that consideration of complex reactions such as sorption/desorption on mixed mineral phases, in addition to hydrolysis and precipitation, could improve the prediction of various contaminants during pre- and post-groundwater treatment practices.

  14. Binding of Cu(II) ions to peptides studied by fluorescence spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Makowska, Joanna; ?amoj?, Krzysztof; Wyrzykowski, Dariusz; Uber, Dorota; Wierzbicka, Ma?gorzata; Wiczk, Wies?aw; Chmurzy?ski, Lech

    2016-01-15

    Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching measurements supported by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) were used to study the interactions of Cu(2+) with four peptides. Two of them were taken from the N-terminal part of the FBP28 protein (formin binding protein) WW domain: Tyr-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asp-Gly-Lys-Thr-Tyr-NH2 (D9) and its mutant Tyr-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asn-Gly-Lys-Thr-Tyr-NH2 (D9_M) as well as two mutated peptides from the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G derived from Streptococcus: Asp-Val-Ala-Thr-Tyr-Thr-NH2 (J1) and Glu-Val-Ala-Thr-Tyr-Thr-NH2 (J2). The measurements were carried out at 298.15K in 20mM 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer solution with a pH of 6. The fluorescence of all peptides was quenched by Cu(2+) ions. The stoichiometry, conditional stability constants and thermodynamic parameters for the interactions of the Cu(2+) ions with D9 and D9_M were determined from the calorimetric data. The values of the conditional stability constants were additionally determined from fluorescence quenching measurements and compared with those obtained from calorimetric studies. There was a good correlation between data obtained from the two techniques. On the other hand, the studies revealed that J1 and J2 do not exhibit an affinity towards metal ions. The obtained results prove that fluorescence quenching experiments may be successfully used in order to determine stability constants of complexes with fluorescent ligands. Finally, based on the obtained results, the coordinating properties of the peptides towards the Cu(2+) ions are discussed. PMID:26363471

  15. Indirect Back-Titration ELISA: A New Format for Estimation of Human Tissue Kallikreins.

    PubMed

    Nasim, Faiz-Ul-Hassan; Ejaz, Samina; Ashraf, Muhammad; Ahmad, Gulzar

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is either based on sandwich, competitive, or inhibition type of format. However, these formats need 2 or 3 monoclonal antibodies (moAB) to estimate 1 antigen. To get a cost-effective, high throughput, ELISA for estimation of human tissue kallikreins we have now developed an indirect, back-titration style, Time Resolved ImmunoFluorometric (TRIF) ELISA that uses only 1 antigen-specific moAB and a general polyclonal antibody. Polystyrene microtiter plate wells coated with a capture antibody, a mouse moAB prepared against a specific human tissue kallikrein are allowed to interact either with the corresponding pure antigen, as the calibrator, or with the corresponding antigen present in a biological fluid or tissue extract. The detection antibody, anti-mouse IgG conjugated with alkaline phosphatase, is added to find the antigen-free immobilized capture moAB. Conjugated enzyme is allowed to hydrolyze diflunisal phosphate to produce a highly fluorescent complex. The fluorescence measured in TRIF mode corresponds to the antigen-free immobilized capture moAB and is used to quantify antigen-bound capture moAB. The detection antibody binds with the antigen-free capture moAB and strength of the signal correlates inversely with the amount of antigen bound to the capture moAB. With a minimum detection level of 20 ng/L the assay has no cross-reactivity with several test molecules. The method is sensitive, specific, applicable to a variety of biological samples, and cost-effective as it uses only 1 moAB and a polyclonal antibody. Using this assay, a single epitope can be estimated without purification. PMID:26180936

  16. Binding of Cu(II) ions to peptides studied by fluorescence spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowska, Joanna; ?amoj?, Krzysztof; Wyrzykowski, Dariusz; Uber, Dorota; Wierzbicka, Ma?gorzata; Wiczk, Wies?aw; Chmurzy?ski, Lech

    2016-01-01

    Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching measurements supported by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) were used to study the interactions of Cu2 + with four peptides. Two of them were taken from the N-terminal part of the FBP28 protein (formin binding protein) WW domain: Tyr-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asp-Gly-Lys-Thr-Tyr-NH2 (D9) and its mutant Tyr-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asn-Gly-Lys-Thr-Tyr-NH2 (D9_M) as well as two mutated peptides from the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G derived from Streptococcus: Asp-Val-Ala-Thr-Tyr-Thr-NH2 (J1) and Glu-Val-Ala-Thr-Tyr-Thr-NH2 (J2). The measurements were carried out at 298.15 K in 20 mM 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer solution with a pH of 6. The fluorescence of all peptides was quenched by Cu2 + ions. The stoichiometry, conditional stability constants and thermodynamic parameters for the interactions of the Cu2 + ions with D9 and D9_M were determined from the calorimetric data. The values of the conditional stability constants were additionally determined from fluorescence quenching measurements and compared with those obtained from calorimetric studies. There was a good correlation between data obtained from the two techniques. On the other hand, the studies revealed that J1 and J2 do not exhibit an affinity towards metal ions. The obtained results prove that fluorescence quenching experiments may be successfully used in order to determine stability constants of complexes with fluorescent ligands. Finally, based on the obtained results, the coordinating properties of the peptides towards the Cu2 + ions are discussed.

  17. Heat or Insulation: Behavioral Titration of Mouse Preference for Warmth or Access to a Nest

    PubMed Central

    Gaskill, Brianna N.; Gordon, Christopher J.; Pajor, Edmond A.; Lucas, Jeffrey R.; Davis, Jerry K.; Garner, Joseph P.

    2012-01-01

    In laboratories, mice are housed at 20–24°C, which is below their lower critical temperature (?30°C). This increased thermal stress has the potential to alter scientific outcomes. Nesting material should allow for improved behavioral thermoregulation and thus alleviate this thermal stress. Nesting behavior should change with temperature and material, and the choice between nesting or thermotaxis (movement in response to temperature) should also depend on the balance of these factors, such that mice titrate nesting material against temperature. Naïve CD-1, BALB/c, and C57BL/6 mice (36 male and 36 female/strain in groups of 3) were housed in a set of 2 connected cages, each maintained at a different temperature using a water bath. One cage in each set was 20°C (Nesting cage; NC) while the other was one of 6 temperatures (Temperature cage; TC: 20, 23, 26, 29, 32, or 35°C). The NC contained one of 6 nesting provisions (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10g), changed daily. Food intake and nest scores were measured in both cages. As the difference in temperature between paired cages increased, feed consumption in NC increased. Nesting provision altered differences in nest scores between the 2 paired temperatures. Nest scores in NC increased with increasing provision. In addition, temperature pairings altered the difference in nest scores with the smallest difference between locations at 26°C and 29°C. Mice transferred material from NC to TC but the likelihood of transfer decreased with increasing provision. Overall, mice of different strains and sexes prefer temperatures between 26–29°C and the shift from thermotaxis to nest building is seen between 6 and 10 g of material. Our results suggest that under normal laboratory temperatures, mice should be provided with no less than 6 grams of nesting material, but up to 10 grams may be needed to alleviate thermal distress under typical temperatures. PMID:22479340

  18. Titrating the cost of plant toxins against predators: determining the tipping point for foraging herbivores.

    PubMed

    Nersesian, Carolyn L; Banks, Peter B; McArthur, Clare

    2011-07-01

    1. Foraging herbivores must deal with plant characteristics that inhibit feeding and they must avoid being eaten. Principally, toxins limit food intake, while predation risk alters how long animals are prepared to harvest resources. Each of these factors strongly affects how herbivores use food patches, and both constraints can pose immediate proximate costs and long-term consequences to fitness. 2. Using a generalist mammalian herbivore, the common brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula), our aim was to quantitatively compare the influence of plant toxin and predation risk on foraging decisions. 3. We performed a titration experiment by offering animals a choice between non-toxic food at a risky patch paired with food with one of five toxin concentrations at a safe patch. This allowed us to identify the tipping point, where the cost of toxin in the safe food patch was equivalent to the perceived predation risk in the alternative patch. 4. At low toxin concentration, animals ate more from the safe than the risky patch. As toxin concentration increased at the safe patch, intake shifted until animals ate mainly from the risky patch. This shift was associated with behavioural changes: animals spent more time and fed longer at the risky patch, while vigilance increased at both risky and safe patches. 5. Our results demonstrate that the variation in toxin concentration, which occurs intraspecifically among plants, can critically influence the relative cost of predation risk on foraging. We show that herbivores quantify, compare and balance these two different but proximate costs, altering their foraging patterns in the process. This has potential ecological and evolutionary implications for the production of plant defence compounds in relation to spatial variation in predation risk to herbivores. PMID:21366564

  19. Building Evacuation Procedures General Procedures

    E-print Network

    Krovi, Venkat

    Bell Hall Building Evacuation Procedures General Procedures: It is the personal responsibility of all occupants of University buildings to immediately exit the building when the fire alarm is activated. Remaining in the building is unacceptable, regardless of the reason. Occupants should exit from

  20. Building Evacuation Procedures General Procedures

    E-print Network

    Krovi, Venkat

    Davis Hall Building Evacuation Procedures General Procedures: It is the personal responsibility of all occupants of University buildings to immediately exit the building when the fire alarm is activated. Remaining in the building is unacceptable, regardless of the reason. Occupants should exit from

  1. Probable swirls detected as photometric anomalies in Oceanus Procellarum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkuratov, Yu.; Kaydash, V.; Gerasimenko, S.; Opanasenko, N.; Velikodsky, Yu.; Korokhin, V.; Videen, G.; Pieters, C.

    2010-07-01

    Images of the lunar nearside obtained by telescopes of Maidanak Observatory (Uzbekistan) and Simeiz Observatory (Crimea, Ukraine) equipped with Canon CMOS cameras and Sony CCD LineScan camera were used to study photometric properties of the lunar nearside in several spectral bands. A wide range of lunar phase angles was covered, and the method of phase ratios to assess the steepness of the phase function at different phase angles is applied. We found several areas with photometric anomalies in the south-west portion of the lunar disk that we refer to as Oceanus Procellarum anomalies. The areas being unique on the lunar nearside do not obey the inverse correlation between albedo and phase-curve slope, demonstrating high phase-curve slopes at intermediate albedo. Low-Sun images acquired with Lunar Orbiter IV and Apollo-16 cameras do not reveal anomalous topography of the regions, at least for scales larger than several tens of meters. The areas also do not have any thermal inertia, radar (70 and 3.8 cm), magnetic, or chemical/mineral peculiarities. On the other hand they exhibit a polarimetric signature that we interpret to be due to the presence of a porous regolith upper layer consisting of dust particles. The anomalies may be interpreted as regions of very fresh shallow regolith disturbances caused by impacts of meteoroid swarms consisting of rather small impactors. This origin is similar to one of the hypotheses for the origin of lunar swirls like the Reiner-? formation. The photometric difference between the shallow and pervasive (Reiner-? class) swirls is that the latter appear to have a significant amount of immature soils in the upper surface layers.

  2. Photometric Properties of Ceres and Comparisons with Previous HST Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.-Y.; Nathues, A.; Le Corre, L.; Reddy, V.; Sykes, M. V.; Hoffmann, M.; Mottola, S.; Schröder, S. E.; Longobardo, A.; Ciarniello, M.; McFadden, L. A.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2015-10-01

    NASA's Dawn spacecraft entered the first science orbit around its second target, dwarf planet Ceres, in April 2015. The photometric properties of Ceres not only reveal clues about the physical state of the regolith, surface composition, and geological history, but also are important for correcting the data collected under various observing and illumination geometries to a common geometry to facilitate the interpretations of all photometric and spectral data. The Dawn data collected during its approach to Ceres cover phase angles from a few degrees to ~155º, and almost cover the full range of incidence angles and emission angles from 0º to 90º, making an excellent dataset for studying the spectrophotometric properties of Ceres. We report the analysis of the photometric properties of Ceres in the visible wavelengths using the Framing Camera (FC) [1] data through all seven color filters and one clear filter, acquired during the approach and the Survey orbit of the mission. Although previous studies [2-4] suggested a remarkably uniform surface of Ceres, the images collected by Dawn during its approach to the target at a scale of a few km/pixel revealed some small but extremely bright spots and regions, with albedos up to >4 times the average albedo of Ceres, representing the highest contrast so far observed in all asteroids imaged from close distances by spacecraft missions. These bright spots should be geologically young, and might be related to the episodic water sublimation activity of Ceres [5-7]. We performed detailed comparisons of the albedos of these bright spots between previous Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations and the Dawn observations that span about 10 years to search for any possible changes. By the time of preparing this abstract, the Dawn FChas collected images at pixel scale down to 2.1 km/pixel. By June 2015, the data with a scale of 0.4 km/pixel will have been collected during the Survey Orbit phase.

  3. Space-based photometric precision from ground-based telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, Peter C.; Mcgraw, John T.; Ackermann, Mark R.; Hines, Dean C.; Hull, Anthony B.; Rossmann, Lisa; Zirzow, Daniel C.; Brown, Steven W.; Cramer, Claire E.; Fraser, Gerald T.; Lykke, Keith R.; Smith, Allan W.; Stubbs, Christopher W.; Woodward, John T.

    2010-07-01

    Ground-based telescopes supported by lidar and spectrophotometric auxiliary instrumentation can attain space-based precision for all-sky photometry, with uncertainties dominated by fundamental photon counting statistics. Earth's atmosphere is a wavelength-, directionally- and time-dependent turbid refractive element for every ground-based telescope, and is the primary factor limiting photometric measurement precision. To correct accurately for the transmission of the atmosphere requires direct measurements of the wavelength-dependent transmission in the direction and at the time that the supported photometric telescope is acquiring its data. While considerable resources have been devoted to correcting the effects of the atmosphere on angular resolution, the effects on precision photometry have largely been ignored. We describe the facility-class lidar that observes the stable stratosphere, and a spectrophotometer that observes NIST absolutely calibrated standard stars, the combination of which enables fundamentally statistically limited photometric precision. This inexpensive and replicable instrument suite provides the lidar-determined monochromatic absolute transmission of Earth's atmosphere at visible and near-infrared wavelengths to 0.25% per airmass and the wavelengthdependent transparency to less than 1% uncertainty per minute. The atmospheric data are merged to create a metadata stream that allows throughput corrections from data acquired at the time of the scientific observations to be applied to broadband and spectrophotometric scientific data. This new technique replaces the classical use of nightly mean atmospheric extinction coefficients, which invoke a stationary and plane-parallel atmosphere. We demonstrate application of this instrument suite to stellar photometry, and discuss the enhanced value of routinely provably precise photometry obtained with existing and future ground-based telescopes.

  4. Spectroscopic versus Photometric Metallicities: Milky Way Dwarf Spheroidal Companions as a Test Case

    E-print Network

    Lianou, Sophia; Koch, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Aims. The method of deriving photometric metallicities using red giant branch stars is applied to resolved stellar populations under the common assumption that they mainly consist of single-age old stellar populations. We explore the effect of the presence of mixed-age stellar populations on deriving photometric metallicities. Methods. We use photometric data sets for the five Galactic dwarf spheroidals Sculptor, Sextans, Carina, Fornax, and Leo II in order to derive their photometric metallicity distribution functions from their resolved red giant branches using isochrones of the Dartmouth Stellar Evolutionary Database. We compare the photometric metallicities with published spectroscopic metallicities based on the analysis of the near-infrared Ca triplet (Ca T), both on the metallicity scale of Carretta & Gratton and on the scale defined by the Dartmouth isochrones. In addition, we compare the photometric metallicities with published spectroscopic metallicities based on spectral synthesis and medium-res...

  5. Using gamma regression for photometric redshifts of survey galaxies

    E-print Network

    Elliott, J; Krone-Martins, A; Cameron, E; Ishida, E E O; Hilbe, J

    2015-01-01

    Machine learning techniques offer a plethora of opportunities in tackling big data within the astronomical community. We present the set of Generalized Linear Models as a fast alternative for determining photometric redshifts of galaxies, a set of tools not commonly applied within astronomy, despite being widely used in other professions. With this technique, we achieve catastrophic outlier rates of the order of ~1%, that can be achieved in a matter of seconds on large datasets of size ~1,000,000. To make these techniques easily accessible to the astronomical community, we developed a set of libraries and tools that are publicly available.

  6. A photometric function for diffuse reflection by particulate materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, W. E.; Weaver, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    A photometric function is proposed to describe the diffuse reflection of radiation by particulate materials. Both multiple scattering and the dominant effects of particle shadowing are included and the function is verified by comparisons with the photometries of laboratory surfaces. Brightness measurements of planetary and other diffusely scattering surfaces can be used to calculate the brightness for geometries other than those used in the measurements and for which the Minnaert function does not apply. The measurements also can be directly related to such surface characteristics as particle size, single-particle albedo, and compactness.

  7. Real time swallowing measurement system by using photometric stereo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujino, Masahiro; Kato, Kunihito; Mura, Emi; Nagai, Hajime

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a measurement system to evaluate the swallowing by estimating the movement of the thyroid cartilage. We developed a measurement system based on the vision sensor in order to achieve the noncontact and non-invasive sensor. The movement of the subject's thyroid cartilage is tracked by the three dimensional information of the surface of the skin measured by the photometric stereo. We constructed a camera system that uses near-IR light sources and three camera sensors. We conformed the effectiveness of the proposed system by experiments.

  8. KINEMATIC AND PHOTOMETRIC EVIDENCE FOR A BAR IN NGC 2683

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Zagursky, Matthew J.; McGaugh, Stacy S. E-mail: mzagursk@umd.edu

    2009-10-15

    We present optical long-slit and SparsePak Integral Field Unit emission line spectroscopy along with optical broadband and near-IR images of the edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 2683. We find a multi-valued, figure-of-eight velocity structure in the inner 45'' of the long-slit spectrum and twisted isovelocity contours in the velocity field. We also find, regardless of wavelength, that the galaxy isophotes are boxy. We argue that taken together, these kinematic and photometric features are evidence for the presence of a bar in NGC 2683. We use our data to constrain the orientation and strength of the bar.

  9. Monitoring the Behavior of Star Spots Using Photometric Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannidis, P.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2015-01-01

    We use high accuracy photometric data to monitor the behavior of star spots . We develop an algorithm to determine the size and longitude of spots or spot groups, using Kepler light curves . Our algorithm separates the light curve in rotational-period sized intervals and calculates the size and longitude of the star spots by using limb darkened spot crossing models. The results can then be used to identify populations of spots, active regions on the stellar surface, mean spot lifetimes or even evidence for activity cycle evidences. To check the efficiency of our code we calculate the spot positions and sizes for the planet host star Kepler-210 .

  10. Infrared Imaging, Spectroscopic, and Photometric Studies of Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrz, Robert D.

    1997-01-01

    We have continued our program of infrared (IR) photometric, imaging, spectroscopic, and polarimetric temporal observations of comets to study the properties of comet dust and comet nuclei. During the first two years we digitized our IR data base on P/Halley and other recent comets to facilitate further analysis and comparison with other data bases, and found compelling evidence for the emission of a burst of small grains from P/Halley's nucleus at perihelion. We reported imaging and photometric observations of Comets Austin 1990 V and Swift-Tuttle 1992. The Swift-Tuttle 1992t observations included IR photometry, several 7-14 micron long-slit spectra of the coma and a time-sequence of more than 150 10 micron broadband images of the coma. An analysis of near-IR images of the inner coma of P/Halley obtained on three consecutive nights in 1986 March showed sunwardjets. We completed our analysis of IR imaging spectrosco-photometric data on comets. We also obtained observations of Comets Hyakutake 1996 B2 and Hale/Bopp 1995 01. We obtained infrared imaging, photometric, spectroscopic and polarimetric temporal observations of bright comets using a network of five telescopes, with emphasis on simultaneous observations of comets at many wavelengths with different instruments. Our program offers several unique advantages: 1) rapid observational response to new comets with dedicated infrared telescopes; 2) observations within a few degrees of the sun when comets are near perihelion and 3) access to advanced infrared array imagers and spectrometers. In particular, reduction, analysis, publication and archiving of our Jupiter/sl-9 and Comet Hyakutake infrared data received special emphasis. Instrumentation development included installation of the latest version of the innovative FORTH telescope control and a data acquisition system that enables us to control three telescopes remotely by telephone from anywhere in the world for comet observations in broad daylight. We have acquired more than 3000 256x256 images totaling nearly two gigabytes of data detailing the near-IR development of the impact sites of the S-L9 fragments on Jupiter. These data were obtained using the University of Rochester Imaging IR Camera at the cassegrain focus of the 92" at WIRO. The WIRO data set covers 8 days and is, to our knowledge, one of the most extensive observational records of the S-L/Jupiter encounter obtained by any ground-based telescope. This program benefitted from the compilation during these last few months of an upgrade to the data acquisition program at WIRO with support of this NASA contract.

  11. Some illumination models for industrial applications of photometric stereo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quéau, Yvain; Durou, Jean-Denis

    2015-04-01

    Among the possible sources of error in 3D-reconstruction using the photometric stereo technique, lighting modeling is often neglected, though it can create a dramatic large-scale bias. In this paper, after recalling the physical definition of a primary Lambertian source (isotropic lightings), we show how to derive a lighting model for several real-world scenarios, including directional lightings, nearby sources and extended planar illuminants. Finally, we show how to calibrate general spatially-varying lightings within a plane, in the case where explicitly modeling the lightings would be tedious.

  12. Photometric and spectral properties of some T Tauri stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, J. W.; Hubbard, R. P.; Gallagher, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    Photometric and spectroscopic data have been obtained for selected T Tauri members of the Taurus-Aurigae cloud and the Orion complex. A correlation between the intensity ratio of calcium and hydrogen emission lines and the infrared excess at 3.5 microns is found for these stars, which indicates a causal relationship between 'chromospheric activity' and emission processes in the circumstellar shells. It is argued that a comparison with properties of well-studied novae could lead to a better understanding of the physical structure of T Tauri stars.

  13. Kinematic and Photometric Evidence for a Bar in NGC 2683

    E-print Network

    de Naray, Rachel Kuzio; McGaugh, Stacy S

    2009-01-01

    We present optical long-slit and SparsePak Integral Field Unit emission line spectroscopy along with optical broadband and near IR images of the edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 2683. We find a multi-valued, figure-of-eight velocity structure in the inner 45 arcsec of the long-slit spectrum and twisted isovelocity contours in the velocity field. We also find, regardless of wavelength, that the galaxy isophotes are boxy. We argue that taken together, these kinematic and photometric features are evidence for the presence of a bar in NGC 2683. We use our data to constrain the orientation and strength of the bar.

  14. Photometric Stellar Parameters for Asteroseismology and Galactic Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, Luca

    Asteroseismology has the capability of delivering stellar properties which would otherwise be inaccessible, such as radii, masses and thus ages of stars. When coupling this information with classical determinations of stellar parameters, such as metallicities, effective temperatures and angular diameters, powerful new diagnostics for both stellar and Galactic studies can be obtained. I review how different photometric systems and filters carry important information on classical stellar parameters, the accuracy at which these parameters can be derived, and summarize some of the calibrations available in the literature for late-type stars. Recent efforts in combining classical and asteroseismic parameters are discussed, and the uniqueness of their intertwine is highlighted.

  15. PHOTOMETRICALLY TRIGGERED KECK SPECTROSCOPY OF FERMI BL LACERTAE OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Michael S.; Romani, Roger W.

    2013-11-01

    We report on Keck spectra of 10 Fermi blazars. J0622+3326, previously unobserved, is shown to be a flat-spectrum radio quasar at redshift z = 1.062. The others are known BL Lac type objects that have resisted previous attempts to secure redshifts. Using a photometric monitoring campaign with the 0.76 m Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope at Lick Observatory, we identified epochs when the relativistic jet emission was fainter than usual, thus triggering the Keck spectroscopy. This strategy gives improved sensitivity to stars and ionized gas in the host galaxy, thereby providing improved redshift constraints for seven of these sources.

  16. Derivation of stellar integrated flux from photometric indexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, D. E.; Petford, A. D.

    1991-10-01

    Relationships between stellar integrated fluxes and the photometric indices B, V, I, K are discussed. Formulas based on a recent database of measured integrated fluxes are derived; these may be used to determine integrated fluxes for interstellar extinction A(v) = 0.0 from sets of values of V and V - K, or V and B - V, or R and R - I. A representation with an accuracy of the order of 2 percent or better is attainable. A table of corrections for interstellar extinction is given.

  17. Cosmetic Procedures

    MedlinePLUS

    Explore Cosmetic Procedures Dental Implants Dental implants replace the roots of lost teeth. A dental implant–along with a ... positions and what future movement is possible. Your cosmetic dentist now has many options available, from conventional ...

  18. Design, construction, and calibration of an isothermal titration calorimeter and its application in the study of the adsorption of phenolic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Piraján, Juan Carlos; Giraldo, Liliana

    2012-01-01

    An isothermal calorimetric titration was designed and built, and some of the results obtained are presented here. For this purpose, a Calvet heat-conducting microcalorimeter was developed and connected to a titration unit built for this experiment to record titration thermograms. The microcalorimeter was electrically calibrated to establish its sensitivity and reproducibility, obtaining K = 13.56 ± 0.21 W V-1. Additionally, the equipment was tested using the heat of neutralisation for the tris-hydroxymethyl-aminomethane-HCl (THAM-HCl) system, obtaining ?H = -30.92 ± 0.03 kJ mol-1. The unit was assembled to obtain titration heats and the corresponding thermodynamic variables (?H, ?G, ?S, and Ke) with a system of phenolic derivatives-activated carbon (synthesised from potato peel).

  19. Documentation for the machine-readable version of photometric data for nearby stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A computer list of all photometric systems (of those considered), in which each star was measured is provided. The file is a subset of a much larger and more comprehensive compilation, which lists all measured photoelectric photometric systems for any star that has been measured in at least one photoelectric system. In addition to the photometric system identifications, cross identifications to the Henry Draper and Durchmusterung catalogs and apparent visual magnitudes are included.

  20. Active learning applied for photometric redshift estimation of quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Bo; Zhang, Yanxia; Zhao, Yongheng

    2015-08-01

    For a long time the quasars’ photometric redshifts have been estimated by learning from all available training dataset. In the scenario of big data, the amount of available data is huge and the dataset may include noise. Consequently, a major research challenge is to design a learning process that gains the most informative data from the available dataset in terms of optimal learning of the underlying relationships. By filtering out noisy data and redundant data, the optimal learning can improve both estimation accuracy and speed. Towards this objective, in this study we figure out an active learning approach that automatically learns a series of suppport vector regression models based on small size of different sampling data chunks. These models are applied on a validation dataset. By active learning, those validation data with estimation results vary in a certain range are regarded as the informative data and are aggregated in multiple training datasets. Next, the aggregated training datasets are combined into an ensemble estimator through averaging and then applied on a test dataset. Our experimental results on SDSS data show that the proposed method is helpful to improve quasars’ photometric redshift estimation accuracy.

  1. DETECTION OF KOI-13.01 USING THE PHOTOMETRIC ORBIT

    SciTech Connect

    Shporer, Avi; Jenkins, Jon M.; Seader, Shawn E.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Thompson, Susan E.; Twicken, Joseph D.; Still, Martin D.

    2011-12-15

    We use the KOI-13 transiting star-planet system as a test case for the recently developed BEER algorithm, aimed at identifying non-transiting low-mass companions by detecting the photometric variability induced by the companion along its orbit. Such photometric variability is generated by three mechanisms: the beaming effect, tidal ellipsoidal distortion, and reflection/heating. We use data from three Kepler quarters, from the first year of the mission, while ignoring measurements within the transit and occultation, and show that the planet's ephemeris is clearly detected. We fit for the amplitude of each of the three effects and use the beaming effect amplitude to estimate the planet's minimum mass, which results in M{sub p} sin i = 9.2 {+-} 1.1 M{sub J} (assuming the host star parameters derived by Szabo et al.). Our results show that non-transiting star-planet systems similar to KOI-13.01 can be detected in Kepler data, including a measurement of the orbital ephemeris and the planet's minimum mass. Moreover, we derive a realistic estimate of the amplitudes uncertainties, and use it to show that data obtained during the entire lifetime of the Kepler mission of 3.5 years will allow detecting non-transiting close-in low-mass companions orbiting bright stars, down to the few Jupiter mass level. Data from the Kepler Extended Mission, if funded by NASA, will further improve the detection capabilities.

  2. Mapping extinction using GALEX and SDSS photometric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorthy, Preethi; Gudennavar, S. B.; Murthy, Jayant

    2013-06-01

    The primary objective of this work is to create an all sky extinction map of the Milky Way galaxy. We have cross-matched the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS data release 8) photometric observations with that of Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX data release 6). This provides a wide range of wavelength coverage from Far Ultra-Violet through the optical spectrum and gives one unique SDSS source for every GALEX source. We discuss a sample of ˜32000 objects in the north galactic pole (?75° latitude) from this combined database. The Castelli and Kurucz Atlas was fit to the photometric observations of each star, best fit being determined using a chi-square test. Best fit parameters provide the spectral type and extinction towards each of the objects. The shift in magnitude obtained during the best-fit can be used to determine the distance to each of the stars. With this data, a comprehensive extinction map can be made for the high-latitude objects and later extended to all-sky.

  3. A Photometric Catalogue of Southern Emission-Line Stars

    E-print Network

    De Winter, D; Maira, A; Djie, A; Redondo, I; Eiroa, C; Molster, F J; Tjin, H R E

    2001-01-01

    We present a catalogue of previously unpublished optical and infrared photometry for a sample of 162 emission-line objects and shell stars visible from the southern hemisphere. The data were obtained between 1978 and 1997 in the Walraven (WULBV), Johnson/Cousins (UBV(RI)_c) and ESO and SAAO near-infrared (JHKLM) photometric systems. Most of the observed objects are Herbig Ae/Be (HAeBe) stars or HAeBe candidates appearing in the list of HAeBe candidates of Th\\'e et al. (1994), although several B[e] stars, LBVs and T Tauri are also included in our sample. For many of the stars the data presented here are the first photo-electric measurements in the literature. The resulting catalogue consists of 1809 photometric measurements. Optical variability was detected in 66 out of the 116 sources that were observed more than once. 15 out of the 50 stars observed multiple times in the infrared showed variability at 2.2 microns (K band).

  4. A Photometric Catalogue of Southern Emission-Line Stars

    E-print Network

    D. de Winter; M. E. van den Ancker; A. Maira; P. S. Thé; H. R. E. Tjin A Djie; I. Redondo; C. Eiroa; F. J. Molster

    2001-10-22

    We present a catalogue of previously unpublished optical and infrared photometry for a sample of 162 emission-line objects and shell stars visible from the southern hemisphere. The data were obtained between 1978 and 1997 in the Walraven (WULBV), Johnson/Cousins (UBV(RI)_c) and ESO and SAAO near-infrared (JHKLM) photometric systems. Most of the observed objects are Herbig Ae/Be (HAeBe) stars or HAeBe candidates appearing in the list of HAeBe candidates of Th\\'e et al. (1994), although several B[e] stars, LBVs and T Tauri are also included in our sample. For many of the stars the data presented here are the first photo-electric measurements in the literature. The resulting catalogue consists of 1809 photometric measurements. Optical variability was detected in 66 out of the 116 sources that were observed more than once. 15 out of the 50 stars observed multiple times in the infrared showed variability at 2.2 microns (K band).

  5. A Photometrically and Morphologically Variable Infrared Nebula in L483

    E-print Network

    Michael Connelley; Klaus Hodapp; Gary Fuller

    2008-11-07

    We present narrow and broad K-band observations of the Class 0/I source IRAS 18148-0440 that span 17 years. The infrared nebula associated with this protostar in the L483 dark cloud is both morphologically and photometrically variable on a time scale of only a few months. This nebula appears to be an infrared analogue to other well-known optically visible variable nebulae associated with young stars, such as Hubble's Variable Nebula. Along with Cepheus A, this is one of the first large variable nebulae to be found that is only visible in the infrared. The variability of this nebula is most likely due to changing illumination of the cloud rather than any motion of the structure in the nebula. Both morphological and photometric changes are observed on a time scale only a few times longer than the light crossing time of the nebula, suggesting very rapid intrinsic changes in the illumination of the nebula. Our narrow-band observations also found that H_2 knots are found nearly twice as far to the east of the source as to its west, and that H_2 emission extends farther east of the source than the previously known CO outflow.

  6. Photometric amplitudes and phases of nonradial oscillation in rotating stars

    E-print Network

    J. Daszynska-Daszkiewicz; W. A. Dziembowski; A. A. Pamyatnykh; M. -J. Goupil

    2002-06-07

    Effects of rotational mode coupling on photometric parameters of stellar oscillations are studied. At moderate rotation rates, a strong coupling between modes of spherical harmonic degree, $\\ell$, differing by 2 and of the same azimuthal order, $m$, takes place if the frequencies are close. This is a common situation amongst main sequence pulsators. Numerical results for a sequence of $\\beta$ Cephei star models are reported for the two- and three-mode couplings. One consequence of mode coupling is that modes of higher degree should be considered in photometric mode identification. Modes with nominal degree $\\ell>2$ acquire substantial $\\ell\\le2$ components and therefore are more likely to reach detectable amplitudes. Coupled mode positions in the amplitude ratio - phase difference diagrams, based on multicolour photometry, become both aspect- and $m$-dependent. Examples of the mode path in the diagram with varying aspect are given. The diagrams remain a useful tool for mode identification in rotating stars but the tool must be used with care.

  7. A PHOTOMETRIC METALLICITY ESTIMATE OF THE VIRGO STELLAR OVERDENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    An, Deokkeun; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Terndrup, Donald M.; Masseron, Thomas; Beers, Timothy C.; Lee, Young Sun; Delahaye, Franck

    2009-12-10

    We determine photometric metal abundance estimates for individual main-sequence stars in the Virgo Overdensity (VOD), which covers almost 1000 deg{sup 2} on the sky, based on a calibration of the metallicity sensitivity of stellar isochrones in the gri filter passbands using field stars with well-determined spectroscopic metal abundances. Despite the low precision of the method for individual stars, we derive [Fe/H] = -2.0 +- 0.1(internal) +- 0.5(systematic) for the metal abundance of the VOD from photometric measurements of 0.7 million stars in the northern Galactic hemisphere with heliocentric distances from approx10 kpc to approx20 kpc. The metallicity of the VOD is indistinguishable, within DELTA[Fe/H] <= 0.2, from that of field halo stars covering the same distance range. This initial application suggests that the Sloan Digital Sky Survey gri passbands can be used to probe the properties of main-sequence stars beyond approx10 kpc, complementing studies of nearby stars from more metallicity-sensitive color indices that involve the u passband.

  8. Quantifying photometric observing conditions on Paranal using an IR camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerber, Florian; Querel, Richard R.; Hanuschik, Reinhard

    2014-08-01

    A Low Humidity and Temperature Profiling (LHATPRO) microwave radiometer, manufactured by Radiometer Physics GmbH (RPG), is used to monitor sky conditions over ESO's Paranal observatory in support of VLT science operations. In addition to measuring precipitable water vapour (PWV) the instrument also contains an IR camera measuring sky brightness temperature at 10.5 ?m. Due to its extended operating range down to -100 °C it is capable of detecting very cold and very thin, even sub-visual, cirrus clouds. We present a set of instrument flux calibration values as compared with a detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) of the IR camera zenith-looking sky brightness data measured above Paranal taken over the past two years. We show that it is possible to quantify photometric observing conditions and that the method is highly sensitive to the presence of even very thin clouds but robust against variations of sky brightness caused by effects other than clouds such as variations of precipitable water vapour. Hence it can be used to determine photometric conditions for science operations. About 60 % of nights are free of clouds on Paranal. More work will be required to classify the clouds using this technique. For the future this approach might become part of VLT science operations for evaluating nightly sky conditions.

  9. A Photometric Metallicity Estimate of the Virgo Stellar Overdensity

    E-print Network

    An, Deokkeun; Beers, Timothy C; Pinsonneault, Marc H; Terndrup, Donald M; Delahaye, Franck; Lee, Young Sun; Masseron, Thomas; Yanny, Brian

    2009-01-01

    We determine photometric metal abundance estimates for individual main-sequence stars in the Virgo Overdensity (VOD), which covers almost 1000 deg^2 on the sky, based on a calibration of the metallicity sensitivity of stellar isochrones in the gri filter passbands using field stars with well-determined spectroscopic metal abundances. Despite the low precision of the method for individual stars, we derive [Fe/H] = -2.0 +/-0.1 (internal) +/-0.5 (systematic) for the metal abundance of the VOD from photometric measurements of 0.7 million stars in the Northern Galactic hemisphere with heliocentric distances from ~10 kpc to ~20 kpc. The metallicity of the VOD is indistinguishable, within Delta [Fe/H] < 0.2, from that of field halo stars covering the same distance range. This initial application suggests that the SDSS gri passbands can be used to probe the properties of main-sequence stars beyond ~10 kpc, complementing studies of nearby stars from more metallicity-sensitive color indices that involve the u passba...

  10. A PHOTOMETRICALLY AND MORPHOLOGICALLY VARIABLE INFRARED NEBULA IN L483

    SciTech Connect

    Connelley, Michael S.; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Fuller, Gary A.

    2009-03-15

    We present narrow and broad K-band observations of the Class 0/I source IRAS 18148-0440 that span 17 years. The infrared nebula associated with this protostar in the L483 dark cloud is both morphologically and photometrically variable on a timescale of only a few months. This nebula appears to be an infrared analog to other well known optically visible variable nebulae associated with young stars, such as Hubble's Variable Nebula. Along with Cepheus A, this is one of the first large variable nebulae to be found that is only visible in the infrared. The variability of this nebula is most likely due to changing illumination of the cloud rather than any motion of the structure in the nebula. Both morphological and photometric changes are observed on a timescale only a few times longer than the light crossing time of the nebula, suggesting very rapid intrinsic changes in the illumination of the nebula. Our narrowband observations also found that H{sub 2} knots are found nearly twice as far to the east of the source as to its west, and that H{sub 2} emission extends farther east of the source than the previously known CO outflow.

  11. Photometric analysis of the overcontact binary CW Cas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. J.; Qian, S. B.; He, J. J.; Li, L. J.; Zhao, E. G.

    2014-11-01

    New CCD photometric observations of overcontact binary CW Cas were carried out in 2004 and 2011. In particular, the light curve obtained in 2004 shows a remarkable O'Connell effect. Compared with light curves in different observing seasons, variations were found. These variations can be explained by dark spot activities on the surface of at least one component. Using the Wilson-Devinney code with a spot model, we find that the photometric solutions confirm CW Cas is a shallow W-subtype overcontact binary with a spotted massive component. Our new determined times of minimum light together with the others published in the literature were analyzed to find a change of orbital period. From the O – C curves, the period of the system shows a cyclic period change (P {sub 3} = 69.9 yr, A {sub 3} = 0.03196 days) superposed on the linear increase. The cyclic variation, if explained as the light-travel time effect, reveals the presence of a tertiary companion.

  12. USING COLORS TO IMPROVE PHOTOMETRIC METALLICITY ESTIMATES FOR GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, N. E.; Soderberg, A. M.; Levesque, E. M.

    2013-10-01

    There is a well known correlation between the mass and metallicity of star-forming galaxies. Because mass is correlated with luminosity, this relation is often exploited, when spectroscopy is not available, to estimate galaxy metallicities based on single band photometry. However, we show that galaxy color is typically more effective than luminosity as a predictor of metallicity. This is a consequence of the correlation between color and the galaxy mass-to-light ratio and the recently discovered correlation between star formation rate (SFR) and residuals from the mass-metallicity relation. Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopy of ?180, 000 nearby galaxies, we derive 'LZC relations', empirical relations between metallicity (in seven common strong line diagnostics), luminosity, and color (in 10 filter pairs and four methods of photometry). We show that these relations allow photometric metallicity estimates, based on luminosity and a single optical color, that are ?50% more precise than those made based on luminosity alone; galaxy metallicity can be estimated to within ?0.05-0.1 dex of the spectroscopically derived value depending on the diagnostic used. Including color information in photometric metallicity estimates also reduces systematic biases for populations skewed toward high or low SFR environments, as we illustrate using the host galaxy of the supernova SN 2010ay. This new tool will lend more statistical power to studies of galaxy populations, such as supernova and gamma-ray burst host environments, in ongoing and future wide-field imaging surveys.

  13. J-PLUS: The Javalambre Photometric Local Universe Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenarro, Javier; Marin-Franch, Antonio; Moles, Mariano; Cristobal-Hornillos, David; Mendes de Oliveira, Claudia; Sodre, Laerte

    2015-08-01

    The Javalambre-Photometric Local Universe Survey, J-PLUS (www.j-plus.es), is defined to observe 8500 deg2 of the sky visible from the Javalambre Observatory (Teruel, Spain) with the panoramic camera T80Cam at the JAST/T80 telescope, using a set of 12 broad, intermediate and narrow band optical filters. The Project is particularly designed to carry out the photometric calibration of J-PAS (http://j-pas.org). For this reason, some J-PLUS filters are located at key stellar spectral features that allow to retrieve very accurate spectral energy distributions for more than 5 millions of stars in our Galaxy. Beyond the calibration goals, the unusually large FOV of T80Cam, 2deg2, together with the unique width and location of some filters, turn the J-PLUS Project into a powerful 3D view of the nearby Universe, mapping more than 20 millions of galaxies with reliable distance determinations and a similar number of stars of the Milky Way halo. At a rate of 100 gigabytes of data per night, J-PLUS will provide unprecedented multi-color images of the Universe to address a wide variety of astrophysical questions related with cosmology, large scale structure, galaxy clusters, 2D stellar populations and star formation studies in galaxies, the discovery of high redshift galaxies at specific redshift slices, quasars, supernovae, Milky Way science and structure, and minor bodies in the Solar System. In addition, the repetition of the whole area over time in certain filters will allow to face variability studies in the time domain.Complementing J-PLUS, a replica of the JAST/T80 telescope, T80Cam and the J-PLUS filters have been installed at the CTIO, allowing to extend the project to the Southern Hemisphere. J-PLUS together with the southern extension, S-PLUS, constitute an All-sky Photometric Local Universe Survey whose details and scientific applications are the bulk of the present talk.

  14. Photometric classification of quasars from RCS-2 using Random Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, D.; Barrientos, L. F.; Pichara, K.; Anguita, T.; Murphy, D. N. A.; Gilbank, D. G.; Gladders, M. D.; Yee, H. K. C.; Hsieh, B. C.; López, S.

    2015-12-01

    The classification and identification of quasars is fundamental to many astronomical research areas. Given the large volume of photometric survey data available in the near future, automated methods for doing so are required. In this article, we present a new quasar candidate catalog from the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey 2 (RCS-2), identified solely from photometric information using an automated algorithm suitable for large surveys. The algorithm performance is tested using a well-defined SDSS spectroscopic sample of quasars and stars. The Random Forest algorithm constructs the catalog from RCS-2 point sources using SDSS spectroscopically-confirmed stars and quasars. The algorithm identifies putative quasars from broadband magnitudes (g, r, i, z) and colors. Exploiting NUV GALEX measurements for a subset of the objects, we refine the classifier by adding new information. An additional subset of the data with WISE W1 and W2 bands is also studied. Upon analyzing 542 897 RCS-2 point sources, the algorithm identified 21 501 quasar candidates with a training-set-derived precision (the fraction of true positives within the group assigned quasar status) of 89.5% and recall (the fraction of true positives relative to all sources that actually are quasars) of 88.4%. These performance metrics improve for the GALEX subset: 6529 quasar candidates are identified from 16 898 sources, with a precision and recall of 97.0% and 97.5%, respectively. Algorithm performance is further improved when WISE data are included, with precision and recall increasing to 99.3% and 99.1%, respectively, for 21 834 quasar candidates from 242 902 sources. We compiled our final catalog (38 257) by merging these samples and removing duplicates. An observational follow up of 17 bright (r < 19) candidates with long-slit spectroscopy at DuPont telescope (LCO) yields 14 confirmed quasars. The results signal encouraging progress in the classification of point sources with Random Forest algorithms to search for quasars within current and future large-area photometric surveys. Full Tables 1-3 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/584/A44

  15. Development of a new certified reference material of diosgenin using mass balance approach and Coulometric titration method.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ningbo; Zhang, Baoxi; Hu, Fan; Du, Hui; Du, Guanhua; Gao, Zhaolin; Lu, Yang

    2014-12-01

    Certified reference materials (CRMs) can be used as a valuable tool to validate the trueness of measurement methods and to establish metrological traceability of analytical results. Diosgenin has been selected as a candidate reference material. Characterization of the material relied on two different methods, mass balance method and Coulometric titration method (CT). The certified value of diosgenin CRM is 99.80% with an expanded uncertainty of 0.37% (k=2). The new CRM of diosgenin can be used to validate analytical methods, improve the accuracy of measurement data and control the quality of diosgenin in relevant pharmaceutical formulations. PMID:25174784

  16. Electrooxidation of iodide in the presence of 4-hydroxycoumarin: application to a simple coulometric titration of 4-hydroxycoumarin.

    PubMed

    Nematollahi, Davood; Hamzehloei, Ali; Hesari, Mehdi; Rahimi, Javad

    2003-06-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of iodide ion in the presence of 4-hydroxycoumarin (1) was studied using cyclic voltammetry and controlled-potential coulometry. The result indicates that the resulting iodine takes part in a halogenation reaction and reacts with 4-hydroxycoumarin (1). According to the obtained results, a new and simple coulometric titration method with potentiometric end-point detection for the determination of 4-hydroxycoumarin (1) is presented. In the presented method, 2-200 micromol of 4-hydroxycoumarin (1) was successfully determined. PMID:12834239

  17. A Brief Survey of Patients' First Impression after CPAP Titration Predicts Future CPAP Adherence: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Balachandran, Jay S.; Yu, Xiaohong; Wroblewski, Kristen; Mokhlesi, Babak

    2013-01-01

    Background: CPAP adherence patterns are often established very early in the course of therapy. Our objective was to quantify patients' perception of CPAP therapy using a 6-item questionnaire administered in the morning following CPAP titration. We hypothesized that questionnaire responses would independently predict CPAP adherence during the first 30 days of therapy. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the CPAP perception questionnaires of 403 CPAP-naïve adults who underwent in-laboratory titration and who had daily CPAP adherence data available for the first 30 days of therapy. Responses to the CPAP perception questionnaire were analyzed for their association with mean CPAP adherence and with changes in daily CPAP adherence over 30 days. Results: Patients were aged 52 ± 14 years, 53% were women, 54% were African American, the mean body mass index (BMI) was 36.3 ± 9.1 kg/m2, and most patients had moderate-severe OSA. Four of 6 items from the CPAP perception questionnaire— regarding difficulty tolerating CPAP, discomfort with CPAP pressure, likelihood of wearing CPAP, and perceived health benefit—were significantly correlated with mean 30-day CPAP adherence, and a composite score from these 4 questions was found to be internally consistent. Stepwise linear regression modeling demonstrated that 3 variables were significant and independent predictors of reduced mean CPAP adherence: worse score on the 4-item questionnaire, African American race, and non-sleep specialist ordering polysomnogram and CPAP therapy. Furthermore, a worse score on the 4-item CPAP perception questionnaire was consistently associated with decreased mean daily CPAP adherence over the first 30 days of therapy. Conclusions: In this pilot study, responses to a 4-item CPAP perception questionnaire administered to patients immediately following CPAP titration independently predicted mean CPAP adherence during the first 30 days. Further prospective validation of this questionnaire in different patient populations is warranted. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 207. Citation: Balachandran JS; Yu X; Wroblewski K; Mokhlesi B. A brief survey of patients' first impression after CPAP titration predicts future CPAP adherence: a pilot study. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(3):199-205. PMID:23493772

  18. 21 CFR 862.2160 - Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2160 Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use....

  19. 21 CFR 862.2160 - Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2160 Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use....

  20. 21 CFR 862.2160 - Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2160 Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use....

  1. PHOTOMETRIC ACCURACY OF DECONVOLVED SIMULATED ASTRONOMICAL IMAGES Stephen R. McNeil

    E-print Network

    Masci, Frank

    PHOTOMETRIC ACCURACY OF DECONVOLVED SIMULATED ASTRONOMICAL IMAGES Stephen R. McNeil Department ABSTRACT A study of the photometric accuracy of deconvolved astronomical images was undertaken by processing two simulated images with several well-known algorithms. The simulations consisted of an image

  2. PREDICTING THE YIELDS OF PHOTOMETRIC SURVEYS FOR TRANSITING EXTRASOLAR PLANETS Thomas G. Beatty1

    E-print Network

    Gaudi, B. Scott

    PREDICTING THE YIELDS OF PHOTOMETRIC SURVEYS FOR TRANSITING EXTRASOLAR PLANETS Thomas G. Beatty1: photometric Online material: color figures 1. INTRODUCTION There are four ways by which extrasolar planets have been detected. The first method to unambiguously detect an extrasolar planet was pulsar timing

  3. 21 CFR 862.2160 - Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2160 Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use....

  4. 21 CFR 862.2160 - Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2160 Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use....

  5. Direct Measurement of Trace Elemental Mercury in Hydrocarbon Matrices by Gas Chromatography with Ultraviolet Photometric Detection.

    PubMed

    Gras, Ronda; Luong, Jim; Shellie, Robert A

    2015-11-17

    We introduce a technique for the direct measurement of elemental mercury in light hydrocarbons such as natural gas. We determined elemental mercury at the parts-per-trillion level with high precision [<3% RSD (n = 20 manual injection)] using gas chromatography with ultraviolet photometric detection (GC-UV) at 254 nm. Our approach requires a small sample volume (1 mL) and does not rely on any form of sample preconcentration. The GC-UV separation employs an inert divinylbenzene porous layer open tubular column set to separate mercury from other components in the sample matrix. We incorporated a 10-port gas-sampling valve in the GC-UV system, which enables automated sampling, as well as back flushing capability to enhance system cleanliness and sample throughput. Total analysis time is <2 min, and the procedure is linear over a range of 2-83 ?g/m(3) [correlation coefficient of R(2) = 0.998] with a measured recovery of >98% over this range. PMID:26456880

  6. Pan-STARRS1 variability of XMM-COSMOS AGN. I. Impact on photometric redshifts

    E-print Network

    Simm, T; Salvato, M; Bender, R; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K C; Draper, P W; Flewelling, H; Kaiser, N; Kudritzki, R -P; Magnier, E A; Metcalfe, N; Tonry, J L; Wainscoat, R J; Waters, C

    2015-01-01

    [Abbreviated] Upcoming large area sky surveys like EUCLID and eROSITA crucially depend on accurate photometric redshifts (photo-z). The identification of variable sources, such as AGNs, and the achievable redshift accuracy for varying objects are important in view of the science goals of the EUCLID and eROSITA missions. We probe AGN optical variability for a large sample of X-ray-selected AGNs in the XMM-COSMOS field, using the light curves provided by the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) 3pi and MDF04 surveys. Utilizing two different variability parameters, we defined a sample of varying AGNs for every PS1 band. We investigated the influence of variability on the calculation of photo-z by applying three different input photometry sets for our fitting procedure. For each of the five PS1 bands, we chose either the epochs minimizing the interval in observing time, the median magnitude values, or randomly drawn light curve points to compute the redshift. In addition, we derived photo-z using PS1 photometry extended by GALEX/IR...

  7. Flash photometric experiments on the photochemical cycle of bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Dencher, N; Wilms, M

    1975-05-30

    The photochemical reaction cycle of bacteriorhodopsin was investigated by means of flash photometric methods. Three different intermediates with absorption maxima at about 630 nm, 411 nm, and 646 nm could be detected. Kinetic data of the occurrence of these intermediates were obtained from isolated purple membrane in different mediums and from intact halobacteria. An activation energy of 14.1 +/- 0.4 kcal-mol-1 and of about 19 kcal-mol-1 for formation of bacteriorhodopsin 411 and of bacteriorhodopsin 565, resp., was calculated. pH-changes in the medium caused by the reaction cycle of bacteriorhodopsin were detected by use of the pH-indicator bromocresol green. PMID:10022

  8. GAz: a genetic algorithm for photometric redshift estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Robert; Fairbairn, Malcolm; Seeburn, Navin

    2015-05-01

    We present a new approach to the problem of estimating the redshift of galaxies from photometric data. The approach uses a genetic algorithm combined with non-linear regression to model the 2SLAQ LRG data set with SDSS DR7 photometry. The genetic algorithm explores the very large space of high order polynomials while only requiring optimization of a small number of terms. We find a ?rms = 0.0408 ± 0.0006 for redshifts in the range 0.4 < z < 0.7. These results are competitive with the current state-of-the-art but can be presented simply as a polynomial which does not require the user to run any code. We demonstrate that the method generalizes well to other data sets and redshift ranges by testing it on SDSS DR11 and on simulated data. For other data sets or applications the code has been made available at https://github.com/rbrthogan/GAz.

  9. A Probabilistic Approach to Classifying Supernovae UsingPhotometric Information

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsova, Natalia V.; Connolly, Brian M.

    2006-12-14

    This paper presents a novel method for determining the probability that a supernova candidate belongs to a known supernova type (such as Ia, Ibc, IIL, etc.), using its photometric information alone. It is validated with Monte Carlo, and both space- and ground-based data. We examine the application of the method to well-sampled as well as poorly sampled supernova light curves and investigate to what extent the best currently available supernova models can be used for typing supernova candidates. Central to the method is the assumption that a supernova candidate belongs to a group of objects that can be modeled; we therefore discuss possible ways of removing anomalous or less well understood events from the sample. This method is particularly advantageous for analyses where the purity of the supernova sample is of the essence, or for those where it is important to know the number of the supernova candidates of a certain type (e.g., in supernova rate studies).

  10. DNF - Galaxy photometric redshift by Directional Neighbourhood Fitting

    E-print Network

    De Vicente, Juan; Sevilla, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Wide field images taken in several photometric bands allow the measurement of redshifts for thousands of galaxies simultaneously. A variety of algorithms have appeared in the last few years which make this measurement. The majority of them can be classified either as template or as training based methods. Among the latter, Nearest Neighbour estimators stand out as one of the most successful both in terms of pre- cision and quality of error estimation. In this paper we describe the DNF algorithm which is based on a new neighbourhood metric (Directional Neighbourhood), a photo- z estimation strategy (Neighbourhood fitting) and a probability distribution function generation method. DNF provides a leading edge performance with reliable errors.

  11. Fifth image and photometric variability in 2237 + 0305 ('Einstein Cross')

    SciTech Connect

    Racine, R. Montreal, Universite, Montreal Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Corp., Kamuela, HI )

    1991-08-01

    The paper describes the morphological and photometric characteristics of the gravitational mirage 2237 + 0305, obtained by combining CCD frames in R and I taken with HRCam at the CFHT in a 0.4 arcsec (FWHM) observation on August 23, 1990. High S/N images of the 2237 + 0305 provided precise positions and relative magnitudes for the four brighter components and for the galaxy core, and new information on the light distribution in the lensing galaxy core was obtained. Compared with Yee's (1988) photometry, the present data show components B brighter by 0.25 mag and C fainter by 0.15 mag, while the brightness of A and D and the colors of all four images are unchanged. Possible reason for the variability trends of the four components are discussed. 19 refs.

  12. Photometrical Research of GSS ?INTELSAT 10-02?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhov, P. P.; Karpenko, G. F.; Epishev, V. P.; Motrunych, I. I.

    On example of the studies the obtained coordinate and photometrical data GSS ?Intelsat 10-02? is shown as possible surveillance with the help of ground-based optical facilities dynamic state satellite and his behaviors on orbit. The analysis of variation character of the light curves in B,V,R filters, time intervals between the flashes, the color indexes variation shows that the systems of stabilization of the platform, the transceiving antennas and the solar panels worked in operating normal mode during the dates of observation. The solar panels orientation relative to the Sun maintains well enough, rotated practically along the equtor plane tracking the Sun's path (the Earth's rotation). Orientation to axis of the rotation of the platform practically remains to be unchanged to direction on the centre of the masses of the Earth.

  13. GAz: A Genetic Algorithm for Photometric Redshift Estimation

    E-print Network

    Hogan, Robert; Seeburn, Navin

    2014-01-01

    We present a new approach to the problem of estimating the redshift of galaxies from photometric data. The approach uses a genetic algorithm combined with non-linear regression to model the 2SLAQ LRG data set with SDSS DR7 photometry. The genetic algorithm explores the very large space of high order polynomials while only requiring optimisation of a small number of terms. We find a $\\sigma_{\\text{rms}}=0.0408\\pm 0.0006$ for redshifts in the range $0.4

  14. The LINEAR Photometric Database: Time Domain Information for SDSS Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veyette, Mark; Becker, A. C.; Bozic, H.; Carroll, P.; Champey, P.; Draper, Z.; Evans, N.; Filbrandt, A.; Fowler, J.; Gailey, J.; Galin, M.; Ivezic, Z.; Jennings, Z.; Kelley, J.; Kroflin, A.; Laws, C.; Lewarch, E.; Loebman, S.; Mayorga, L.; Mesaric, M.; Morgan, D. P.; Munk, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Palaversa, L.; Patel, M.; Ruzdjak, D.; Schmidt, S.; Sesar, B.; Srdoc, G.; Steakley, K.; Stuart, J. S.; Sudar, D.; Vrbanec, D.; Westman, D. B.; Wheaton, S.; Wozniak, P.

    2012-01-01

    We announce a public database of over 5 billion photometric measurements for about 25 million objects, mostly stars with V<18, obtained by the asteroid survey LINEAR (available through the SkyDot website, skydot.lanl.gov). With 200 observations per object on average, LINEAR data provide time domain information for the brightest 4 magnitudes of SDSS survey objects. By combining information from these databases we have selected and visually classified some 200,000 candidate variable stars. Guided by these classifications, we selected the largest available sample of candidate field SX Phe stars (blue straggler halo stars) and demonstrated its low contamination through follow up observations at a number of telescopes in Croatia and the U.S. We have also constructed samples of several thousand distant RR Lyrae stars, as well as several thousand eclipsing binary stars, and are currently investigating the statistical properties of these data.

  15. Photometric studies of ? Scuti stars. I. IP Virginis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joner, Michael D.; Hintz, Eric G.; Collier, Matthew W.

    1998-01-01

    We report 15 new times of maximum light for the ? Scuti star IP Virginis (formerly known as SA 106?1024). An analysis of all times of maximum light indicates that IP Vir has been decreasing in period at a constant rate of ? days day?1. Evidence is also presented that IP Vir is a double?mode variable with a period ratio of . This period ratio predicts a [Fe/H] value of ?0.3. From photometric (uvby?) observations, we find a foreground reddening of .008 mag and a metallicity of [Fe/H] = +0.05. It is shown that [Fe/H] = ?0.3 is most likely the correct value. Intrinsic ? and c1?values, plotted in a model atmosphere grid, indicate a mean effective temperature, K, and a mean surface gravity, . All of these physical parameters support Landolt's initial conclusion that IP Vir is an ordinary ? Sct star.

  16. Automatic satellite tracking system for the NASA Satellite Photometric Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mucklow, Glenn H.

    1980-01-01

    The development of an Automatic TV Tracking System for NASA's mobile 61 cm aperture Satellite Photometric Observatory is described. The analysis techniques used to match the FOV and resolutions to changing seeing conditions are covered in details. Theoretical reasons for such matching of general interest are discussed. It is shown that the energy density in a satellite image is 11 times greater during good seeing conditions than during typical seeing conditions. The Z7987 image tube is shown to be able to detect 16th magnitude objects under ideal seeing conditions using only 8 percent of the light collected by the main telescope. Experimental results show that the SPO equipped with a Z7987 camera can track a satellite at any orbital velocity with less than 0.14 mr accuracy using the DBA Series 606 TV Tracker. The manual system used prior to the installation of the Automatic TV Tracking System could maintain track at 1.1 mr accuracy for comparison.

  17. A LARGE AND FAINT PHOTOMETRIC CATALOG ON THE ECLIPTIC

    SciTech Connect

    Buie, Marc W.; Trilling, David E.; Wasserman, Lawrence H.; Crudo, Richard A. E-mail: david.trilling@nau.edu E-mail: rcrudo@gmail.com

    2011-06-01

    A photometric catalog, developed for the calibration of the Deep Ecliptic Survey, is presented. The catalog contains 213,272 unique sources that were measured in V and R filters and transformed to the Johnson-Cousins systems using the Landolt standard catalog. All of the sources lie within 6{sup 0} of the ecliptic and cover all longitudes except for the densest stellar regions nearest the galactic center. Seventeen percent of the sources in the catalog are derived from three or more nights of observation. The catalog contains sources as faint as R {approx}19 but the largest fraction fall in the R {approx}15-16 (V {approx}16-17) mag range. All magnitude bins down to R = 19 have a significant fraction of objects with uncertainties {<=}0.1 mag.

  18. Reconstructing the galaxy density field with photometric redshifts: I. Methodology and validation on stellar mass functions

    E-print Network

    Malavasi, Nicola; Cucciati, Olga; Bardelli, Sandro; Cimatti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Measuring environment for large numbers of distant galaxies is still an open problem, for which we need galaxy positions and redshifts. Photometric redshifts are more easily available for large numbers of galaxies, but at the price of larger uncertainties than spectroscopic ones. In this work we study how photometric redshifts affect the measurement of galaxy environment and how this may limit an analysis of the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF) in different environments. Using mock galaxy catalogues, we measured the environment with a fixed aperture method, using each galaxy's true and photometric redshifts. We varied the fixed aperture volume parameters and the photometric redshift uncertainties. We then computed GSMF as a function of redshift and environment. We found that only when using high-precision photometric redshifts with $\\sigma_{\\Delta z/(1+z)} \\le 0.01$, the most extreme environments can be reconstructed in a fairly accurate way, with a fraction $\\ge 60\\div 80\\%$ of galaxies placed in the corr...

  19. Carbon Stars In Andromeda. II. Demographics and Photometric Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guhathakurta, Puragra; Hamren, K.; Dorman, C.; Toloba, E.; Seth, A.; Dalcanton, J.; Nayak, A.; PHAT Collaboration; SPLASH Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    This is the second of two talks about a sample of newly-discovered carbon stars in the Andromeda galaxy (M31). As explained in the first talk, these stars were identified on the basis of their spectroscopic characteristics using Keck/DEIMOS spectra obtained as part of the Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo (SPLASH) survey. We explore the physical properties of strong and weak carbon stars using photometric data from a Hubble Space Telescope Multi-Cycle Treasury program: Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT). The PHAT data set includes deep photometry in six filters: two in the ultraviolet, two in the optical, and two in the near infrared. The carbon stars appear to be in the asymptotic giant branch stage of their evolution as evidenced by the fact that they lie above the tip of the red giant branch and are cleanly separated from normal (i.e., oxygen-rich) giants in color-magnitude diagrams. We study the spatial distribution of carbon stars in M31 and use kinematics to determine whether they belong to M31's thin disk, thick disk, or spheroid. These carbon stars serve as highly visible tracers of the intermediate-mass, intermediate-age stellar population in M31; they are important markers in the study of the star-formation history of the galaxy. This research was part of the SPLASH and PHAT collaboration. We are grateful to the National Science Foundation and NASA for funding support. AN's participation was under the auspices of UCSC's Science Internship Program.

  20. Photometric and kinematic studies of extragalactic globular cluster systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowell, Jessica

    Globular clusters (GCs) are old, luminous, compact collections of stars found in galaxy halos that formed during the early stages of galaxy formation. Because of this, GCs serve as excellent tracers of the formation, structure, and merger history of their host galaxies. My dissertation will examine both the photometric and kinematic properties of GC systems and their relationship to their host galaxies. In the first section, I will present the analysis of the GC systems of two spiral galaxies, NGC 891 and NGC 1055. I will discuss the photometric methods used to detect GCs using wide-field BVR imaging and to quantify the global properties of the system such as the total number of GCs and their radial distribution. My results for these two GC systems were compared to those of other galaxies. I will also present the results of spectroscopic follow-up for two giant galaxies: the S0 galaxy NGC 4594 (M104), and the elliptical galaxy NGC 3379 (M105). I measured the radial velocities of GCs in these two galaxies, and combined them with published results to determine the mass distribution and mass-to-light (M/L) ratio profile for each galaxy out to large effective radius (7-9 Re). For both galaxies, I found that the M/L profiles increase with radius and do not flatten, which suggests that the dark matter halos in these galaxies extend to the edge of my data. I also looked for evidence of rotation in the GC systems, and found that neither system exhibits significant rotation around the host galaxy. I examined the velocity dispersion profile of each GC system and found kinematic differences between the red and blue GC subpopulations. Finally, I compared my results to mass estimates for these galaxies from other kinematic tracers and considered them in the context of galaxy formation models.

  1. The photometric evolution of dissolving star clusters I: First predictions

    E-print Network

    Henny J. G. L. M. Lamers; Peter Anders; Richard de Grijs

    2006-01-26

    We calculated the broad-band photometric evolution of unresolved star clusters, including the preferential loss of low-mass stars due to mass segregation. The stellar mass function of a cluster evolves due to three effects: (a) the evolution of massive stars; (b) early tidal effects reduce the mass function independently of the stellar mass; (c) after mass segregation has completed, tidal effects preferentially remove the lowest-mass stars from the cluster. Results: (1) During the first ~40% of the lifetime of a cluster the cluster simply gets fainter due to the loss of stars by tidal effects. (2) Between ~40 and ~80% of its lifetime the cluster gets bluer due to the loss of low-mass stars. This will result in an underestimate of the age of clusters if standard cluster evolution models are used (0.15 -- 0.5 dex). (3) After ~80% of the total lifetime of a cluster it will rapidly get redder. This is because stars at the low-mass end of the main sequence, which are preferentially lost, are bluer than the AGB stars that dominate the light at long wavelengths, resulting in an age overestimate. (4) Clusters with mass segregation and the preferential loss of low-mass stars evolve along almost the same tracks in colour-colour diagrams as clusters without mass segregation. Therefore it will be difficult to distinguish this effect from that due to the cluster age for unresolved clusters, unless the total lifetime of the clusters can be estimated. (5) The changes in the colour evolution of unresolved clusters due to the preferential loss of low-mass stars will affect the determination of the SFHs. (6) The preferential loss of low-mass stars might explain the presence of old (~13 Gyr) clusters in NGC 4365 which are photometrically disguised as intermediate-age clusters (2 - 5 Gyr). [Abridged

  2. Miniature photometric stereo system for textile surface structure reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorpas, Dimitris; Kampouris, Christos; Malassiotis, Sotiris

    2013-04-01

    In this work a miniature photometric stereo system is presented, targeting the three-dimensional structural reconstruction of various fabric types. This is a supportive module to a robot system, attempting to solve the well known "laundry problem". The miniature device has been designed for mounting onto the robot gripper. It is composed of a low-cost off-the-shelf camera, operating in macro mode, and eight light emitting diodes. The synchronization between image acquisition and lighting direction is controlled by an Arduino Nano board and software triggering. The ambient light has been addressed by a cylindrical enclosure. The direction of illumination is recovered by locating the reflection or the brightest point on a mirror sphere, while a flatfielding process compensates for the non-uniform illumination. For the evaluation of this prototype, the classical photometric stereo methodology has been used. The preliminary results on a large number of textiles are very promising for the successful integration of the miniature module to the robot system. The required interaction with the robot is implemented through the estimation of the Brenner's focus measure. This metric successfully assesses the focus quality with reduced time requirements in comparison to other well accepted focus metrics. Besides the targeting application, the small size of the developed system makes it a very promising candidate for applications with space restrictions, like the quality control in industrial production lines or object recognition based on structural information and in applications where easiness in operation and light-weight are required, like those in the Biomedical field, and especially in dermatology.

  3. RSO Characterization from Photometric Data Using Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, M.; Klem, B.; Gorman, J.

    Object characterization is the description of a resident space object (RSO), its capabilities and its behavior. While astrometric data has been used extensively for object detection, location, and characterization, photometric data has been less widely applied and remains a promising area for improving RSO characterization. RSO characteristics which may influence changes in light intensity with respect to changes in viewing angle or orientation signature include geometry, orientation, components material properties, stability and other characteristics. However, most RSO characterization is presently performed manually and on an individual basis by space analysts and there is a need for efficient and automated methods to perform characterization. This paper discusses the application of machine learning techniques to characterization of RSOs in the geosynchronous altitude regime using photometric data. We develop simulated signatures in the visible spectral band of three basic RSO types, with variations in object orientation, material characteristics, size and attitude and attempt to recover these properties through object characterization techniques. We generate observations by sampling noisy measurements from the simulated signature. Next, we extract a set of features from the observations and train machine learning algorithms to classify the signatures. We consider the effectiveness of a set of binary classifiers trained to individually recognize separate cases. The results of each classifier are combined together to produce a final output characterization of an input observation. Experiments with varying levels of noise are presented, and we evaluate models with respect to classification accuracy and other criteria. The end result of this process is a unique methodology for exploiting the use usefulness and applicability of machine learning to an important space sensing and identification process. This material is based upon work supported by the United States Air Force under Contract No. FA9453-14-M-0153.

  4. Ion chromatography of cations using indirect photometric of fluorometric detection

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Copper(II) and cerium(III) were compared as mobile phase counter-ions with a strong cation exchange column for indirect photometric chromatography (IPC). Sample ion retention time was found to be dependent upon both counter-ion size and charge, as well as mobile phase ionic strength. Detection limits of all sample ions were found to be highly dependent on the molar absorptivity of the counter-ion at the wavelength of detection. At 254nm, a cerium(III) mobile phase provided detection limits at least 100 times lower than did a copper(II) mobile phase. The detection limit of sodium was about 4 ppb, corresponding to 3.5 pmoles, using a Ce(III) mobile phase. Cerium(III) was used as a mobile phase counter-ion with a strong cation exchange column using indirect fluorescence detection. Separation of the alkali metal ions along with the ammonium ion was achieved with baseline resolution. The detection limit of sodium was 3 ppb, corresponding to 2.6 pmoles. Separation and quantitation of sodium, ammonium, and potassium ions in diluted urine was straightforward. In contrast, using indirect UV detection, interference from the sample matrix was a problem. IPC using a cerium(III) mobile phase was used to determine sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium ions in milk and infant formulas. Separation was complete within 17 minutes. No interference from the sample matrix was noted. Good agreement between the IPC results and atomic absorption spectroscopy was found. Several complexes of chromium(III) were studied as mobile phase candidates for indirect photometric chromatography. A complex of tris(bipyridine)chromium(III) possessed the required spectral properties of an IPC counterion, but proved to be somewhat labile in either water or methanol but not acetonitrile.

  5. Simultaneous Photometric and Spectroscopic Observations of Young Solar Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saken, Jon M.; Gray, R. O.; Corbally, C. J.

    2012-05-01

    This poster will present some preliminary results, focusing on the relationship between chromospheric activity level and stellar brightness, from our long-term monitoring campaign conducting simultaneous spectroscopic and photometric observations of young stellar analogs (YSAs). Since 2007 we have been conducting spectroscopic monitoring of the Ca II H & K lines for a sample of 31 YSAs in order to better understand their activity cycles and variations, as well as the effects of young stars on their solar systems. The targets cover the spectral range of stars most likely to contain Earth analogs, F8-K2, and a broad enough range of ages, 0.3 Gyr - 1.5 Gyr, to investigate how activity level changes with stellar age. These studies are already showing possible evidence for activity cycles, large variations in starspot activity, and flaring events. In order to obtain a more complete picture of the nature of the stars' activity and examine the correlations between stellar brightness and chromospheric activity, we recently began simultaneous photometric observations of the stars in Johnson B, V and R. Some stars, such as the Sun, show a positive correlation with brightness and activity level. Yet the Lowell Observatory SSS project showed that many G0-G2 type YSAs show a negative correlation. Of particular interest for our project is the determination of which stars show either a positive or negative correlation and characterizing how this changes with stellar age. Results from the first season of observations are presented here. Starting this year we will be adding two new instruments to provide improved temporal coverage and additional data in Stromgren v and H?. Support provided by the NSF.

  6. Waiting ages for atmospheric oxygen: A titration hourglass and the oxidation of the solid Earth. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catling, D. C.; Claire, M.; Zahnle, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric O2 increased from less than 1 ppm to 0.2-2% at 2.45-2.22 Ga in the Great Oxidation Event (GOE). A minority opinion is that the GOE happened close to the time when oxygenic photosynthesis originated but evidence from the concentration of redox-sensitive elements in shales and their isotopes, as well as the setting and morphology of stromatolites supports the consensus view that oxygenic photosynthesis had originated by 2.8-2.7 Ga. Models show that O2 can be consumed rapidly by reductants in the Archean so that the air can remain anoxic even after photosynthesis began pumping out O2. Why did the world ultimately shift away from this balance? What conditions were needed to oxygenate the atmosphere in addition to oxygenic photosynthesis? A general principle is that a shift to an oxic environment from a reducing one requires net export of reductant. In planetary science, for example, the oxidation of the surfaces and atmospheres of other planets or satellites is universally attributed to the escape of hydrogen to space. Hydrogen escape explains the redness of Mars, several characteristics of the atmosphere of Venus, and the presence of tenuous O2 atmospheres on Ganymede, Europa, Rhea and Dione. For the Earth's rise of oxygen, many ideas focus on a decline in mantle or seafloor reductant fluxes (driven by internal geologic evolution) to the point where these fluxes were surpassed by biogenic oxygen fluxes. But for such a shift (without a role for hydrogen escape), the surface still has to export net reductant to the mantle. Such net export depends on the ratio of subducted ferric iron versus reduced carbon during the Archean, which remains poorly constrained. Over a decade ago, we proposed that rapid escape of hydrogen to space from the pre-GOE atmosphere would have gradually oxidized the Earth's surface and crust, accompanied by falling levels of atmospheric CH4 [1]. The idea is that Earth underwent a redox titration. A point would be reached where O2 became more stable than competing reducing gases, such as CH4 and H2. In this scheme, the delay in the rise of oxygen by several hundred million years is the time it takes to oxidize the outer portions of the solid Earth to the point when the atmosphere flipped redox state. We also speculate that hydrogen escape may be associated with continental growth. As the Archean continents grew, they would have accumulated excess oxygen in their minerals at the tempo of hydrogen escape. The ferric oxide concentration in average continents is an order of magnitude greater than in the mantle. Continental growth supplied reducing power to the surface environment that became intertwined with the carbon cycle and photosynthesis. Thus, 'granitoid' material may be a consequence of increased oxygen fugacity in weathered subducted materials (cf. ref. 2). If so, continents are, in part, a response to surface oxidation rather than vice versa. Moreover, continental growth would necessarily slow once hydrogen escape rates were throttled by the GOE. [1] Catling et al. (2001) Science 293, 839 [2] Jagoutz (2013) Terra Nova 25, 95

  7. SNIa detection in the SNLS photometric analysis using Morphological Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, A.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Lanusse, F.; Neveu, J.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Starck, J.-L.

    2015-04-01

    Detection of supernovae (SNe) and, more generally, of transient events in large surveys can provide numerous false detections. In the case of a deferred processing of survey images, this implies reconstructing complete light curves for all detections, requiring sizable processing time and resources. Optimizing the detection of transient events is thus an important issue for both present and future surveys. We present here the optimization done in the SuperNova Legacy Survey (SNLS) for the 5-year data deferred photometric analysis. In this analysis, detections are derived from stacks of subtracted images with one stack per lunation. The 3-year analysis provided 300,000 detections dominated by signals of bright objects that were not perfectly subtracted. Allowing these artifacts to be detected leads not only to a waste of resources but also to possible signal coordinate contamination. We developed a subtracted image stack treatment to reduce the number of non SN-like events using morphological component analysis. This technique exploits the morphological diversity of objects to be detected to extract the signal of interest. At the level of our subtraction stacks, SN-like events are rather circular objects while most spurious detections exhibit different shapes. A two-step procedure was necessary to have a proper evaluation of the noise in the subtracted image stacks and thus a reliable signal extraction. We also set up a new detection strategy to obtain coordinates with good resolution for the extracted signal. SNIa Monte-Carlo (MC) generated images were used to study detection efficiency and coordinate resolution. When tested on SNLS 3-year data this procedure decreases the number of detections by a factor of two, while losing only 10% of SN-like events, almost all faint ones. MC results show that SNIa detection efficiency is equivalent to that of the original method for bright events, while the coordinate resolution is improved.

  8. PROPERTIES OF SATELLITE GALAXIES IN THE SDSS PHOTOMETRIC SURVEY: LUMINOSITIES, COLORS, AND PROJECTED NUMBER DENSITY PROFILES

    SciTech Connect

    Lares, M.; Lambas, D. G.; Dominguez, M. J.

    2011-07-15

    We analyze photometric data in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS-DR7) to infer statistical properties of faint satellites associated with isolated bright galaxies (M{sub r} < -20.5) in the redshift range 0.03 < z < 0.1. The mean projected radial number density profile shows an excess of companions in the photometric sample around the primaries, with approximately a power-law shape that extends up to {approx_equal} 700 kpc. Given this overdensity signal, a suitable background subtraction method is used to study the statistical properties of the population of bound satellites, down to magnitude M{sub r} = -14.5, in the projected radial distance range 100 < r{sub p} /kpc < 3(R{sub vir}). The maximum projected distance corresponds to the range 470-660 kpc for the different samples. We have also considered a color cut consistent with the observed colors of spectroscopic satellites in nearby galaxies so that distant redshifted galaxies do not dominate the statistics. We have tested the implementation of this background subtraction procedure using a mock catalog derived from the Millennium simulation semianalytic galaxy catalog based on a {Lambda} cold dark matter model. We find that the method is effective in reproducing the true projected radial satellite number density profile and luminosity distributions, providing confidence in the results derived from SDSS data. We find that the spatial extent of satellite systems is larger for bright, red primaries. Also, we find a larger spatial distribution of blue satellites. For the different samples analyzed, we derive the average number of satellites and their luminosity distributions down to M{sub r} = -14.5. The mean number of satellites depends very strongly on host luminosity. Bright primaries (M{sub r} < -21.5) host on average {approx}6 satellites with M{sub r} < -14.5. This number is reduced for primaries with lower luminosities (-21.5 < M{sub r} < -20.5) which have less than one satellite per host. We provide Schechter function fits to the luminosity distributions of satellite galaxies where the resulting faint-end slopes equal to 1.3 {+-} 0.2, consistent with the universal value. This shows that satellites of bright primaries lack an excess population of faint objects, in agreement with the results in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies.

  9. Dynamic titration: determination of dissociation constants for noncovalent complexes in multiplexed format using HPLC-ESI-MS.

    PubMed

    Frycák, Petr; Schug, Kevin A

    2008-03-01

    With recent growth in fields such as life sciences and supramolecular chemistry, there has been an ever increasing need for high-throughput methods that would permit determination of binding affinities for noncovalent complexes of various host-guest systems. These are traditionally measured by titration experiments where concentration-dependent signals of species participating in solution-based binding equilibria are monitored by methods such as UV-vis spectrophotometry, calorimetry, or nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. Here we present a new titration technique that unifies and allows chromatographic separation of guests with determination of dissociation constants by electrospray mass spectrometry in a multiplexed format. A theoretical model has been derived that describes the complex formation for the guests eluted from a chromatographic column when hosts are admixed postcolumn. The model takes possible competition equilibria into account; i.e., it can deal with unresolved peaks of guests with the possible addition of multiple hosts in one experiment. This on-line workflow makes determination of binding affinities for large libraries of compounds possible. The potential of the method is demonstrated on the determination of dissociation constants for complexes of beta- and gamma-cyclodextrins with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs ibuprofen, naproxen, and flurbiprofen. PMID:18237190

  10. An Explicit Formulation Approach for the Analysis of Calcium Binding to EF-Hand Proteins Using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry

    PubMed Central

    Keeler, Camille; Poon, Gregory; Kuo, Ivana Y.; Ehrlich, Barbara E.; Hodsdon, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    We present an improved and extended version of a recently proposed mathematical approach for modeling isotherms of ligand-to-macromolecule binding from isothermal titration calorimetry. Our approach uses ordinary differential equations, solved implicitly and numerically as initial value problems, to provide a quantitative description of the fraction bound of each competing member of a complex mixture of macromolecules from the basis of general binding polynomials. This approach greatly simplifies the formulation of complex binding models. In addition to our generalized, model-free approach, we have introduced a mathematical treatment for the case where ligand is present before the onset of the titration, essential for data analysis when complete removal of the binding partner may disrupt the structural and functional characteristics of the macromolecule. Demonstration programs playable on a freely available software platform are provided. Our method is experimentally validated with classic calcium (Ca2+) ion-selective potentiometry and isotherms of Ca2+ binding to a mixture of chelators with and without residual ligand present in the reaction vessel. Finally, we simulate and compare experimental data fits for the binding isotherms of Ca2+ binding to its canonical binding site (EF-hand domain) of polycystin 2, a Ca2+-dependent channel with relevance to polycystic kidney disease. PMID:24359756

  11. An explicit formulation approach for the analysis of calcium binding to EF-hand proteins using isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Camille; Poon, Gregory; Kuo, Ivana Y; Ehrlich, Barbara E; Hodsdon, Michael E

    2013-12-17

    We present an improved and extended version of a recently proposed mathematical approach for modeling isotherms of ligand-to-macromolecule binding from isothermal titration calorimetry. Our approach uses ordinary differential equations, solved implicitly and numerically as initial value problems, to provide a quantitative description of the fraction bound of each competing member of a complex mixture of macromolecules from the basis of general binding polynomials. This approach greatly simplifies the formulation of complex binding models. In addition to our generalized, model-free approach, we have introduced a mathematical treatment for the case where ligand is present before the onset of the titration, essential for data analysis when complete removal of the binding partner may disrupt the structural and functional characteristics of the macromolecule. Demonstration programs playable on a freely available software platform are provided. Our method is experimentally validated with classic calcium (Ca(2+)) ion-selective potentiometry and isotherms of Ca(2+) binding to a mixture of chelators with and without residual ligand present in the reaction vessel. Finally, we simulate and compare experimental data fits for the binding isotherms of Ca(2+) binding to its canonical binding site (EF-hand domain) of polycystin 2, a Ca(2+)-dependent channel with relevance to polycystic kidney disease. PMID:24359756

  12. Surfactant/detergent titration analysis method and apparatus for machine working fluids, surfactant-containing wastewater and the like

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Douglas D. (Knoxville, TN); Hiller, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is an improved method and related apparatus for quantitatively analyzing machine working fluids and other aqueous compositions such as wastewater which contain various mixtures of cationic, neutral, and/or anionic surfactants, soluble soaps, and the like. The method utilizes a single-phase, non-aqueous, reactive titration composition containing water insoluble bismuth nitrate dissolved in glycerol for the titration reactant. The chemical reaction of the bismuth ion and glycerol with the surfactant in the test solutions results in formation of micelles, changes in micelle size, and the formation of insoluble bismuth soaps. These soaps are quantified by physical and chemical changes in the aqueous test solution. Both classical potentiometric analysis and turbidity measurements have been used as sensing techniques to determine the quantity of surfactant present in test solutions. This method is amenable to the analysis of various types of new, in-use, dirty or decomposed surfactants and detergents. It is a quick and efficient method utilizing a single-phase reaction without needing a separate extraction from the aqueous solution. It is adaptable to automated control with simple and reliable sensing methods. The method is applicable to a variety of compositions with concentrations from about 1% to about 10% weight. It is also applicable to the analysis of waste water containing surfactants with appropriate pre-treatments for concentration.

  13. Surfactant/detergent titration analysis method and apparatus for machine working fluids, surfactant-containing wastewater and the like

    DOEpatents

    Smith, D.D.; Hiller, J.M.

    1998-02-24

    The present invention is an improved method and related apparatus for quantitatively analyzing machine working fluids and other aqueous compositions such as wastewater which contain various mixtures of cationic, neutral, and/or anionic surfactants, soluble soaps, and the like. The method utilizes a single-phase, non-aqueous, reactive titration composition containing water insoluble bismuth nitrate dissolved in glycerol for the titration reactant. The chemical reaction of the bismuth ion and glycerol with the surfactant in the test solutions results in formation of micelles, changes in micelle size, and the formation of insoluble bismuth soaps. These soaps are quantified by physical and chemical changes in the aqueous test solution. Both classical potentiometric analysis and turbidity measurements have been used as sensing techniques to determine the quantity of surfactant present in test solutions. This method is amenable to the analysis of various types of new, in-use, dirty or decomposed surfactants and detergents. It is a quick and efficient method utilizing a single-phase reaction without needing a separate extraction from the aqueous solution. It is adaptable to automated control with simple and reliable sensing methods. The method is applicable to a variety of compositions with concentrations from about 1% to about 10% weight. It is also applicable to the analysis of waste water containing surfactants with appropriate pre-treatments for concentration. 1 fig.

  14. Effectiveness of ultra-rapid dose titration of clozapine for treatment-resistant bipolar mania: case series

    PubMed Central

    Turan, ?enol; Demirel, Ömer Faruk; Usta Sa?lam, Nazife Gamze; Y?ld?z, Naz?m; Duran, Alaattin

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of severe and refractory manic episodes in hospital settings can occasionally be very difficult. In particular, severely excited patients showing aggressive, hostile, impulsive behaviours frequently require physical restraint and seclusion, high doses of antipsychotics and benzodiazepines, and sometimes, electroconvulsive therapy. Hospital stay is generally prolonged and such patients cause great emotional distress for other patients in the ward and clinical staff involved in their care. Here we report on three patients with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder and one patient with a diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder bipolar subtype, all of whom were hospitalized for severe manic episodes with psychotic features. These patients were extremely difficult to manage in the ward as no response could be obtained in the first week of treatment despite high doses of antipsychotics and benzodiazepine administration. The introduction and rapid titration of clozapine proved remarkably effective and was well tolerated in the acute management of these patients. We observed that clozapine had a superior and fast mood stabilization effect with rapid titration and could be extremely helpful in the management of such patients. PMID:26301080

  15. Estimating iron and aluminum content of acid mine discharge from a north-central Pennsylvania coal field by use of acidity titration curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ott, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    Determination of acidity provides a value that denotes the quantitative capacity of the sample water to neutralize a strong base to a particular pH. However, much additional information can be obtained from this determination if a titration curve is constructed from recorded data of titrant increments and their corresponding pH values. The curve can be used to identify buffer capabilities, the acidity with respect to any pH value within the curve limit, and, in the case of acid mine drainage from north-central Pennsylvania, the identification and estimation of the concentration of dissolved ferrous iron, ferric iron, and aluminum. Through use of titration curves, a relationship was observed for the acid mine drainage between: (1) the titratable acidity (as milligrams per liter calcium carbonate) to pH 4.0 and the concentration of dissolved ferric iron; and (2) the titratable acidity (as milligrams per liter calcium carbonate) from pH 4.0 to 5.0 and the concentration of dissolved aluminum. The presence of dissolved ferrous iron can be detected by the buffering effect exhibited in the area between pH 5.5 to 7.5. The concentration of ferrous iron is estimated by difference between the concentrations of ferric iron in an oxidized and unoxidized sample. Interferences in any of the titrations from manganese, magnesium, and aluminate, appear to be negligible within the pH range of interest.

  16. Empirically Interrelating Stellar Magnetic Activity, Photometric Variability and Radial Velocity “Jitter” to Enhance Planet Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastien, Fabienne A.

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic activity of Sun-like stars, which can manifest as short time scale photometric and radial velocity (RV) variability, adds to the difficulty of detecting planets, particularly those in the Earth mass range: RV jitter can wash out the very small RV signal of such planets, and photometric “noise” caused by stellar activity can similarly preclude the detection of the tiny transit signature that a planet like ours would produce. Hence, in order to successfully detect Earth-like planets, via either the transit or RV method, the exoplanet community needs a way to characterize the photometric and RV stability of a star in advance. Many studies have examined pair-wise relationships between the magnetic activity, photometric variability and RV jitter of stars. We expand upon this work by using as our foundation the high quality photometric data from NASA's Kepler mission, supplemented by archival Keck RV measurements and our own Ca II H&K magnetic activity measurements, aiming to empirically interrelate all three quantities for both dwarf and evolved Sun-like stars. We find that some of the low level photometric variability correlates poorly with magnetic activity and instead traces granulation, yielding a simple tool to measure surface gravity with a precision of 0.1 dex. We tie the RV jitter of magnetically inactive stars (stars with observed RV jitter ranging from ~3m/s to 135.5m/s but with photometric variations of less than 3 mmag) to the Fourier complexity of the light curve, finding that higher frequency photometric variations drive the RV jitter. Finally, we present initial comparisons between magnetic activity, as traced by Ca II H&K measurements, and other measures of photometric variability, as well as ongoing and future applications of our work.

  17. Increasing the Detection Limit of the Parkinson Disorder through a Specific Surface Chemistry Applied onto Inner Surface of the Titration Well

    PubMed Central

    Mille, Caroline; Debarnot, Dominique; Zorzi, Willy; Moualij, Benaïssa El; Coudreuse, Arnaud; Legeay, Gilbert; Quadrio, Isabelle; Perret-Liaudet, Armand; Poncin-Epaillard, Fabienne

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this paper was to illustrate the enhancement of the sensitivity of ELISA titration for neurodegenerative proteins by reducing nonspecific adsorptions that could lead to false positives. This goal was obtained thanks to the association of plasma and wet chemistries applied to the inner surface of the titration well. The polypropylene surface was plasma-activated and then, dip-coated with different amphiphilic molecules. These molecules have more or less long hydrocarbon chains and may be charged. The modified surfaces were characterized in terms of hydrophilic—phobic character, surface chemical groups and topography. Finally, the coated wells were tested during the ELISA titration of the specific antibody capture of the ?-synuclein protein. The highest sensitivity is obtained with polar (? = 35°), negatively charged and smooth inner surface. PMID:24955533

  18. Increasing the Detection Limit of the Parkinson Disorder through a Specific Surface Chemistry Applied onto Inner Surface of the Titration Well.

    PubMed

    Mille, Caroline; Debarnot, Dominique; Zorzi, Willy; El Moualij, Benaïssa; Coudreuse, Arnaud; Legeay, Gilbert; Quadrio, Isabelle; Perret-Liaudet, Armand; Poncin-Epaillard, Fabienne

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this paper was to illustrate the enhancement of the sensitivity of ELISA titration for neurodegenerative proteins by reducing nonspecific adsorptions that could lead to false positives. This goal was obtained thanks to the association of plasma and wet chemistries applied to the inner surface of the titration well. The polypropylene surface was plasma-activated and then, dip-coated with different amphiphilic molecules. These molecules have more or less long hydrocarbon chains and may be charged. The modified surfaces were characterized in terms of hydrophilic-phobic character, surface chemical groups and topography. Finally, the coated wells were tested during the ELISA titration of the specific antibody capture of the ?-synuclein protein. The highest sensitivity is obtained with polar (? = 35°), negatively charged and smooth inner surface. PMID:24955533

  19. Kepler Input Catalog: Photometric Calibration and Stellar Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Timothy M.; Latham, David W.; Everett, Mark E.; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.

    2011-10-01

    We describe the photometric calibration and stellar classification methods used by the Stellar Classification Project to produce the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). The KIC is a catalog containing photometric and physical data for sources in the Kepler mission field of view; it is used by the mission to select optimal targets. Four of the visible-light (g, r, i, z) magnitudes used in the KIC are tied to Sloan Digital Sky Survey magnitudes; the fifth (D51) is an AB magnitude calibrated to be consistent with Castelli & Kurucz (CK) model atmosphere fluxes. We derived atmospheric extinction corrections from hourly observations of secondary standard fields within the Kepler field of view. For these filters and extinction estimates, repeatability of absolute photometry for stars brighter than magnitude 15 is typically 2%. We estimated stellar parameters {T eff, log (g), log (Z), E B - V } using Bayesian posterior probability maximization to match observed colors to CK stellar atmosphere models. We applied Bayesian priors describing the distribution of solar-neighborhood stars in the color-magnitude diagram, in log (Z), and in height above the galactic plane. Several comparisons with samples of stars classified by other means indicate that for 4500 K <=T eff <= 6500 K, our classifications are reliable within about ±200 K and 0.4 dex in log (g) for dwarfs, with somewhat larger log (g) uncertainties for giants. It is difficult to assess the reliability of our log (Z) estimates, but there is reason to suspect that it is poor, particularly at extreme T eff. Comparisons between the CK models and observed colors are generally satisfactory with some exceptions, notably for stars cooler than 4500 K. Of great importance for the Kepler mission, for T eff <= 5400 K, comparison with asteroseismic results shows that the distinction between main-sequence stars and giants is reliable with about 98% confidence. Larger errors in log (g) occur for warmer stars, for which our filter set provides inadequate gravity diagnostics. The KIC is available through the MAST data archive.

  20. KEPLER INPUT CATALOG: PHOTOMETRIC CALIBRATION AND STELLAR CLASSIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Timothy M.; Latham, David W.; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Everett, Mark E. E-mail: latham@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: everett@noao.edu

    2011-10-15

    We describe the photometric calibration and stellar classification methods used by the Stellar Classification Project to produce the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). The KIC is a catalog containing photometric and physical data for sources in the Kepler mission field of view; it is used by the mission to select optimal targets. Four of the visible-light (g, r, i, z) magnitudes used in the KIC are tied to Sloan Digital Sky Survey magnitudes; the fifth (D51) is an AB magnitude calibrated to be consistent with Castelli and Kurucz (CK) model atmosphere fluxes. We derived atmospheric extinction corrections from hourly observations of secondary standard fields within the Kepler field of view. For these filters and extinction estimates, repeatability of absolute photometry for stars brighter than magnitude 15 is typically 2%. We estimated stellar parameters {l_brace}T{sub eff}, log (g), log (Z), E{sub B-V}{r_brace} using Bayesian posterior probability maximization to match observed colors to CK stellar atmosphere models. We applied Bayesian priors describing the distribution of solar-neighborhood stars in the color-magnitude diagram, in log (Z), and in height above the galactic plane. Several comparisons with samples of stars classified by other means indicate that for 4500 K {<=}T{sub eff} {<=} 6500 K, our classifications are reliable within about {+-}200 K and 0.4 dex in log (g) for dwarfs, with somewhat larger log (g) uncertainties for giants. It is difficult to assess the reliability of our log (Z) estimates, but there is reason to suspect that it is poor, particularly at extreme T{sub eff}. Comparisons between the CK models and observed colors are generally satisfactory with some exceptions, notably for stars cooler than 4500 K. Of great importance for the Kepler mission, for T{sub eff} {<=} 5400 K, comparison with asteroseismic results shows that the distinction between main-sequence stars and giants is reliable with about 98% confidence. Larger errors in log (g) occur for warmer stars, for which our filter set provides inadequate gravity diagnostics. The KIC is available through the MAST data archive.