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Sample records for photometric titration procedure

  1. A Full Automatic Device for Sampling Small Solution Volumes in Photometric Titration Procedure Based on Multicommuted Flow System

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Sivanildo S.; Vieira, Gláucia P.; Reis, Boaventura F.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, an automatic device to deliver titrant solution into a titration chamber with the ability to determine the dispensed volume of solution, with good precision independent of both elapsed time and flow rate, is proposed. A glass tube maintained at the vertical position was employed as a container for the titrant solution. Electronic devices were coupled to the glass tube in order to control its filling with titrant solution, as well as the stepwise solution delivering into the titration chamber. The detection of the titration end point was performed employing a photometer designed using a green LED (λ=545 nm) and a phototransistor. The titration flow system comprised three-way solenoid valves, which were assembled to allow that the steps comprising the solution container loading and the titration run were carried out automatically. The device for the solution volume determination was designed employing an infrared LED (λ=930 nm) and a photodiode. When solution volume delivered from proposed device was within the range of 5 to 105 μl, a linear relationship (R = 0.999) between the delivered volumes and the generated potential difference was achieved. The usefulness of the proposed device was proved performing photometric titration of hydrochloric acid solution with a standardized sodium hydroxide solution and using phenolphthalein as an external indicator. The achieved results presented relative standard deviation of 1.5%. PMID:18317510

  2. Automatic photometric titrations of calcium and magnesium in carbonate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, L.; Brannock, W.W.

    1955-01-01

    Rapid nonsubjective methods have been developed for the determination of calcium and magnesium in carbonate rocks. From a single solution of the sample, calcium is titrated directly, and magnesium is titrated after a rapid removal of R2O3 and precipitation of calcium as the tungstate. A concentrated and a dilute solution of disodium ethylenediamine tetraacetate are used as titrants. The concentrated solution is added almost to the end point, then the weak solution is added in an automatic titrator to determine the end point precisely.

  3. [Photometric micro-titration model of DPPH radicals scavenging activity and its application].

    PubMed

    Gao, Yun-tao; Wei, Wei; Ye, Li-qing; Li, Xiao-fen; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Hong-jiao; Yang, Lu; Yu, Jiao-jiao; Cha, Jia-wei

    2015-02-01

    In the present paper, the stoichiometric ratio (R) for the interreaction of DPPH radicals with the antoxidant was employed as a evaluation index for DPPH radicals scavenging activity of antioxidants. This evaluation index was related only with the stoichiometric relationship between DPPH radicals and the antioxidant, not the relationship with the initial DPPH amount and the volume of sample, which could offer a solution for the problem of poor comparability of EC50 under different conditions. A novel photometric micro-titration method was proposed for the determination of the stoichiometric ratio (R) for the interreaction of DPPH radicals with the antoxidant. The titration equation was established based on the absorbance difference (deltaA) of DPPH radicals in the titration process and the added amount of antoxidant. The stoichiometric ratio (R) for the reaction of DPPH radicals with the addition amount of antoxidant was determined by the titration equation obtained, while, the DPPH median elimination concentration (EC50) of antoxidant can be calculated by the stoichiometric ratio (R). The above photometric micro-titration model was verified using rutin as DPPH radicals scavenger. As experiment results, the stoichiometric ratio (R) of DPPH radicals to rutin was determined to be in the range of 1.817-1.846. The calculated value of EC50 was 1.196 x 10(-3), 2.392 x 10(-3), 4.819 x 10(-3) and 7.292 x 10(-3) mg x mL(-1) for 1.12 x 10(-7), 2.24 x 10(-7), 4.48 x 10(-7) and 6.72 x 10(-7) mol of the additon amount of DPPH radicals, respectively. The proposed method has better precision and reliability with smaller amount of sample than conventional method. While, the obtained stoichiometric ratio value (R) of rutin was employed to calculate the rutin median elimination concentration for DPPH EC50) according to the conditions as reported in the literatures, and the calculated results were consistent with that reported in the literatures. PMID:25970919

  4. Scopolamine Effects Under a Titrating-Delayed-Nonmatching-to-Position Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porritt, M.; Poling, A.

    2008-01-01

    In a study of working memory, the performance of rats under titrating-delayed-nonmatching- to-position (TDNMTP) procedures was examined. Overall accuracy and the number of trials completed were inversely related to titration value, whereas the highest delay attained was directly related to titration value. When given intraperitoneally,

  5. Scopolamine Effects Under a Titrating-Delayed-Nonmatching-to-Position Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porritt, M.; Poling, A.

    2008-01-01

    In a study of working memory, the performance of rats under titrating-delayed-nonmatching- to-position (TDNMTP) procedures was examined. Overall accuracy and the number of trials completed were inversely related to titration value, whereas the highest delay attained was directly related to titration value. When given intraperitoneally,…

  6. A new oxidimetric reagent: potassium dichromate in a strong phosphoric acid medium--VII. Photometric titration of vanadium(IV) and of cerium(III) alone and in mixtures with iroN(II).

    PubMed

    Rao, G G; Rao, P K

    1967-01-01

    Vanadium(IV) can be accurately titrated with potassium dichromate in media containing phosphoric acid of 3-12M concentration: the change in absorption of vanadium(IV) is followed in the region 660 mmicro using a red filter. It is more convenient to carry out the titration in 3M phosphoric acid because at higher concentrations chloride, nitrate, cerium(III) and manganese(II) may interfere. Photoelcetric titration is more convenient than potentiometric because the former can be made in a 3M phosphoric acid medium, whereas the latter is possible only in 12M phosphoric acid. The simultaneous differential photometric titration of iron(II) and vanadium(IV) is also possible. Conditions have been found for the photometric titration of cerium(III) and of cerium(III) plus iron(II). The titration is carried out (at 450 mmicro or with a blue filter) in about 10.5M phosphoric acid. Application of the method to a cerium mineral is considered. PMID:18960065

  7. Digital image-based titrations.

    PubMed

    Gaiao, Edvaldo da Nobrega; Martins, Valdomiro Lacerda; Lyra, Wellington da Silva; de Almeida, Luciano Farias; da Silva, Edvan Cirino; Araújo, Mário César Ugulino

    2006-06-16

    The exploitation of digital images obtained from a CCD camera (WebCam) as a novel instrumental detection technique for titration is proposed for the first time. Named of digital image-based (DIB) titration, it also requires, as a traditional titration (for example, spectrophotometric, potentiometric, conductimetric), a discontinuity in titration curves where there is an end point, which is associated to the chemical equivalence condition. The monitored signal in the DIB titration is a RGB-based value that is calculated, for each digital image, by using a proposed procedure based on the red, green, and blue colour system. The DIB titration was applied to determine HCl and H3PO4 in aqueous solutions and total alkalinity in mineral and tap waters. Its results were compared to the spectrophotometric (SPEC) titration and, by applying the paired t-test, no statistic difference between the results of both methods was verified at the 95% confidence level. Identical standard deviations were obtained by both titrations in the determinations of HCl and H3PO4, with a slightly better precision for DIB titration in the determinations of total alkalinity. The DIB titration shows to be an efficient and promising tool for quantitative chemical analysis and, as it employs an inexpensive device (WebCam) as analytical detector, it offers an economically viable alternative to titrations that need instrumental detection. PMID:17723410

  8. On the Atmospheric Extinction Reduction Procedure in Multiband Wide-Field Photometric Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, A.; Mironov, A.; Biryukov, A.; Kroussanova, N.; Prokhorov, M.; Beskin, G.; Karpov, S.; Bondar, S.; Ivanov, E.; Perkov, A.; Sasyuk, V.

    2015-06-01

    We propose an improved method for the atmospheric extinction reduction within optical photometry. Our method is based on the simultaneous multicolor observations of photometric standards. Such data are now available within the modern wide-field sky surveys and contain a large amount of information about instant atmospheric conditions. So, it became possible to estimate the extinction parameters on the basis of a quite short observational dataset and, hence, to trace the rapid stars twinkling accurately. Having been developed for a new MiniMegaTORTORa observational system, the proposed method can be adopted for a wide range of modern observational programs.

  9. Mineralization procedure for determination of copper in aerosols using photometric method based on copper-BPKQH complex

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia Sanchez, F.; Navas Diaz, A.; Medinilla, J. )

    1990-09-01

    A mineralization procedure is proposed for copper aerosols in which samples are mineralized by wet-ashing with HNO3 + HCIO4 mixture. Copper content is determined by a photometric method based on formation of a complex between copper and benzyl 2-pyridyl ketone 2-quinolylhydrazone (BPKQH). The influence of pH, ethanol content, and reagent concentration is studied. Copper determination at pH = 7.3, in the range 0.05 to 3 ppm is proposed. Mineralization with HNO3 is carried out in different conditions of evaporation (with or without dryness) and manipulation. Analysis of variance by the (ANOVA) single factor method shows that digestion conditions significantly increase the variability of results. Repeatability assays suggest that nitric acid alone gives low precision. Recovery assays reveal that the HNO3 digestion process causes copper loss by volatilization. Mineralization with HNO3 + HCIO4 is optimized on the basis of the accuracy and precision obtained. The ANOVA method suggests that mineralization conditions significantly increase total variability of results and also that results of the photometric method are not significantly different from those of the AAS method. The optimum mineralization procedure gave an RSD of 0.63% and a copper recovery of 98.4%. The combined digestion and quantification method was applied to determination of copper in aerosol samples obtained during leaf spraying operations of olive trees in the field.

  10. Microscale Titration in Schools Titration Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the requirements of the National Titration Competition and describes how a team in a local competition used the technique. Compares microscale titration to conventional titration. Outlines the benefits of employing microscale techniques. (DDR)

  11. [Special qualification of a photometric procedure for determination of salicylic acid in therapeutic drug monitoring].

    PubMed

    Martens, J; Meyer, F P

    1995-01-01

    A procedure for the determination of salicylic acid from human serum is presented. It is based on an acidic extraction, a basic reextraction and the detection of salicylic acid as its iron-III-complex by photometry. The procedure is quantitative over a wide range of linearity, easy to carry out and is especially suitable for therapeutic drug monitoring in the treatment of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:7886124

  12. An Environmental Friendly Procedure for Photometric Determination of Hypochlorite in Tap Water Employing a Miniaturized Multicommuted Flow Analysis Setup

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Sivanildo S.; Reis, Boaventura F.

    2011-01-01

    A photometric procedure for the determination of ClO− in tap water employing a miniaturized multicommuted flow analysis setup and an LED-based photometer is described. The analytical procedure was implemented using leucocrystal violet (LCV; 4,4′,4′′-methylidynetris (N,N-dimethylaniline), C25H31N3) as a chromogenic reagent. Solenoid micropumps employed for solutions propelling were assembled together with the photometer in order to compose a compact unit of small dimensions. After control variables optimization, the system was applied for the determination of ClO− in samples of tap water, and aiming accuracy assessment samples were also analyzed using an independent method. Applying the paired t-test between results obtained using both methods, no significant difference at the 95% confidence level was observed. Other useful features include low reagent consumption, 2.4 μg of LCV per determination, a linear response ranging from 0.02 up to 2.0 mg L−1  ClO−, a relative standard deviation of 1.0% (n = 11) for samples containing 0.2 mg L−1  ClO−, a detection limit of 6.0 μg L−1  ClO−, a sampling throughput of 84 determinations per hour, and a waste generation of 432 μL per determination. PMID:21747732

  13. Tracer-monitored flow titrations.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Milton K; Rocha, Diogo L; Rocha, Fábio R P; Zagatto, Elias A G

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility of implementing tracer-monitored titrations in a flow system is demonstrated. A dye tracer is used to estimate the instant sample and titrant volumetric fractions without the need for volume, mass or peak width measurements. The approach was applied to spectrophotometric flow titrations involving variations of sample and titrant flow-rates (i.e. triangle programmed technique) or concentration gradients established along the sample zone (i.e. flow injection system). Both strategies required simultaneous monitoring of two absorbing species, namely the titration indicator and the dye tracer. Mixing conditions were improved by placing a chamber with mechanical stirring in the analytical path aiming at to minimize diffusional effects. Unlike most of flow-based titrations, the innovation is considered as a true titration, as it does not require a calibration curve thus complying with IUPAC definition. As an application, acidity evaluation in vinegars involving titration with sodium hydroxide was selected. Phenolphthalein and brilliant blue FCF were used as indicator and dye tracer, respectively. Effects of sample volume, titrand/titrant concentrations and flow rates were investigated aiming at improved accuracy and precision. Results were reliable and in agreement with those obtained by a reference titration procedure. PMID:26703261

  14. Development of a simple desulfurization procedure for the determination of butyltins in complex sediment samples using gas chromatography-pulsed flame photometric detection.

    PubMed

    Bravo, M; Valenzuela, A; Quiroz, W; Pinto, M; Flores, M; Pinochet, H

    2010-05-15

    In this study a rapid solid phase extraction (SPE) procedure was developed to minimize the effect of different sulfur species for the determination of butyltin in sediments. The organosulfur species and organotins were firstly retained on C8 cartridges and then organotins were selectively eluted and analyzed by gas chromatography-pulsed flame photometric detection (GC-PFPD). Optimal conditions for the SPE procedure were obtained using an experimental design approach. The method's accuracy was established by analyzing a certified reference material (CRM), BCR-646 freshwater sediment. The experimental values were found to be in agreement with the assigned values for butyltins. Finally, complex sediment samples collected from a Chilean harbor were analyzed using this methodology to demonstrate its analytical potential for the determination of butyltin in environmental samples. PMID:20298890

  15. Video Observations Encompassing the 2002 Leonid Storm: First Results and a Revised Photometric Procedure for Video Meteor Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, William J.; Suggs, Robert M.; Swift, Wesley; Gural, Peter S.; Brown, Peter; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    During the 2001 Leonid storm, Marshall Space Flight Center, with the cooperation of the University of Western Ontario and the United States Air Force, deployed 6 teams of observers equipped with intensified video systems to sites located in North America, the Pacific, and Mongolia. The campaign was extremely successful, with the entire period of enhanced Leonid activity (over 16 hours) captured on video tape in a consistent manner. We present the first results from the analysis of this unique, 2 terabyte data set and discuss the problems involved in reducing large amounts of video meteor data. In particular, the question of how to determine meteor masses though photometric analysis will be re-examined, and new techniques will be proposed that eliminate some of the deficiencies suffered by the techniques currently employed in video meteor analysis.

  16. Titrated energy cardioversion of patients on digitalis.

    PubMed Central

    Hagemeijer, F; Van Houwe, E

    1975-01-01

    Elective cardioversion with titrated energy was carried out under diazepam anaesthesia (38 procedures) in 26 patients on digitalis who presented with supraventricular or ventricular arrhythmias. Low energy shocks were given to establish the absence of latent digitalis intoxication, not unmasked by previous carotid sinus massage, and to restore sinus rhythm with the lowest possible energy discharge. In the absence of digitalis overdosage, titrated energy cardioversion restored sinus rhythm, at least temporarily, without dangerous ventricular arrhythmias. In one patient this precaution was neglected: a shock of 200 Ws provoked ventricular tachycardia. We present experimental and clinical evidence for the safety and effectiveness of titrated energy cardioversion in patients on digitalis. Images PMID:1225345

  17. Gasometric titration for dimethylaluminum chloride analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Maligres, Peter; Eckenroad, Kyle; Simmons, Bryon

    2016-06-01

    A gasometric titration method was developed to quantitate active alkylaluminum content in dimethylaluminum chloride solution to perform the stoichiometry calculation for the reaction charge. The procedure was reproducible with good precision, and the results showed good correlation with ICP-MS method. The gasometric titration is a simple, inexpensive alternative to analysis via ICP-MS which provides more selective analysis of methylaluminum species without the need for inertion. PMID:27017569

  18. Simple sensor for potentiometric titrations

    SciTech Connect

    Selig, W.

    1982-01-01

    A sensor for potentiometric titrations was prepared by coating a spectroscopic graphite rod with a solution of poly(vinyl chloride) and dioctylphthalate in tetrahydrofuran. The reference was an Ag/AgCl single-junction electrode. The sensor was used in the following potentiometric titrations: (1) precipitation titrations, (2) acid-base titrations, (3) compleximetric titrations, and (4) redox titrations. A survey of its use in such titrations is presented. Preparation of the coated-graphite sensor is simple and rapid. Moreover, it is quite inexpensive. A limitation is its applicability in aqueous media only, because organic solvents will dissolve the membrane. 5 figures, 4 tables.

  19. Filtrates & Residues: Olfactory Titration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, John T.; Eddy, Roberta M.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an experiment that uses a unique acid-base indicator--the odor of raw onion--to indicate the end point of the titration of sodium hydroxide with hydrochloric acid. Allows the student to detect the completion of the neutralization reaction by olfaction rather than sight. (JRH)

  20. The Titration Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilner, Cary

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the development of concentration and organizational skills, patience, self-discipline, attention to detail, and appreciation for error analysis through an expanded titration project. Describes the various activities in the extended project and the materials and instructional support needed. Stresses the advantage to students in their…

  1. Colloid Titration--A Rapid Method for the Determination of Charged Colloid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ueno, Keihei; Kina, Ken'yu

    1985-01-01

    "Colloid titration" is a volumetric method for determining charged polyelectrolytes in aqueous solutions. The principle of colloid titration, reagents used in the procedure, methods of endpoint detection, preparation of reagent solutions, general procedure used, results obtained, and pH profile of colloid titration are considered. (JN)

  2. Acid Rain Analysis by Standard Addition Titration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ophardt, Charles E.

    1985-01-01

    The standard addition titration is a precise and rapid method for the determination of the acidity in rain or snow samples. The method requires use of a standard buret, a pH meter, and Gran's plot to determine the equivalence point. Experimental procedures used and typical results obtained are presented. (JN)

  3. Spectrophotometric Titration of a Mixture of Calcium and Magnesium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulton, Robert; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes a spectrophotometric titration experiment which uses a manual titration spectrophotometer and manually operated buret, rather than special instrumentation. Identifies the equipment, materials, and procedures needed for the completion of the experiment. Recommends the use of this experiment in introductory quantitative analysis

  4. Spectrophotometric Titration of a Mixture of Calcium and Magnesium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulton, Robert; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes a spectrophotometric titration experiment which uses a manual titration spectrophotometer and manually operated buret, rather than special instrumentation. Identifies the equipment, materials, and procedures needed for the completion of the experiment. Recommends the use of this experiment in introductory quantitative analysis…

  5. pH Static Titration: A Quasistatic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalowski, Tadeusz; Toporek, Marcin; Rymanowski, Maciej

    2007-01-01

    The pH-static titration is applicable to those systems where at least two types of reactions occur in comparable intensities. The commonalities in titrimetric procedure realized according to pH-static titration, irrespective of the kind of chemical processes occurring are discussed.

  6. Titration Curves: Fact and Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlain, John

    1997-01-01

    Discusses ways in which datalogging equipment can enable titration curves to be measured accurately and how computing power can be used to predict the shape of curves. Highlights include sources of error, use of spreadsheets to generate titration curves, titration of a weak acid with a strong alkali, dibasic acids, weak acid and weak base, and…

  7. Ion-selective electrodes in potentiometric titrations; a new method for processing and evaluating titration data.

    PubMed

    Granholm, Kim; Sokalski, Tomasz; Lewenstam, Andrzej; Ivaska, Ari

    2015-08-12

    A new method to convert the potential of an ion-selective electrode to concentration or activity in potentiometric titration is proposed. The advantage of this method is that the electrode standard potential and the slope of the calibration curve do not have to be known. Instead two activities on the titration curve have to be estimated e.g. the starting activity before the titration begins and the activity at the end of the titration in the presence of large excess of titrant. This new method is beneficial when the analyte is in a complexed matrix or in a harsh environment which affects the properties of the electrode and the traditional calibration procedure with standard solutions cannot be used. The new method was implemented both in a method of linearization based on the Grans's plot and in determination of the stability constant of a complex and the concentration of the complexing ligand in the sample. The new method gave accurate results when using titrations data from experiments with samples of known composition and with real industrial harsh black liquor sample. A complexometric titration model was also developed. PMID:26320956

  8. Photometric Performance of NICMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colina, L.; Holfeltz, S.; Ritchie, C.

    1998-07-01

    This review covers several aspects of NICMOS photometric performance including the selection of the primary spectrophotometric standards, the absolute calibration of NICMOS detectors and their photometric stability. Special issues like relative photometry across the detectors, intra-pixel sensitivity, red leaks and transformations between the HST and ground-based photometric systems are mentioned. Finally, a summary of the different sources of uncertainty when performing photometric measurements with NICMOS is presented.

  9. NICMOS Photometric Calibration Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viana, A. C.; de Jong, R. S.; Koekemoer, A. M.

    2009-06-01

    We present the details of the NICMOS Photometric Calibration Pipeline used to generate aperture photometry. We present an overview of the different corrections employed, explain components of the pipeline and also outline the types of photometric and statistical data products created. In de Jong et al. (in preparation) this photometry will be used to determine the photometric calibration constants stored in the PHOTTAB reference files.

  10. Sodium Determination Using Ion Selective Electrodes, Mohr Titration, and Test Strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S. Suzanne

    Sodium content of foods can be determined by various methods, including an ion selective electrode (ISE), the Mohr or Volhard titration procedure, or indicator test strips. These methods are official methods of analysis for numerous specific products. All these methods are faster and less expensive procedures than analysis by atomic absorption spectroscopy or inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. This experiment allows one to compare sodium analysis of several food products by ISE, Mohr titration, and Quantab® chloride titrators.

  11. Amperometric, Bipotentiometric, and Coulometric Titration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, John T.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses recent review articles in various kinds of titration. Also discusses new research in apparatus and methodology, acid-base reactions, precipitation and complexing reactions, oxidation-reduction reactions, and nomenclature. Cites 338 references. (CS)

  12. Titrating-Delay Matching-to-Sample in the Pigeon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kangas, Brian D.; Vaidya, Manish; Branch, Marc N.

    2010-01-01

    The titrating-delay matching-to-sample (TDMTS) procedure offers researchers an additional behavioral task thought to capture some important features of remembering. In this procedure, the delay between sample offset and comparison onset adjusts as a function of the subject's performance. Specifically, correct matches increase the delay and…

  13. Effects of Acute and Chronic Cocaine Administration on Titrating-Delay Matching-to-Sample Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kangas, Brian D.; Branch, Marc N.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of cocaine were examined under a titrating-delay matching-to-sample procedure. In this procedure, the delay between sample stimulus offset and comparison stimuli onset adjusts as a function of the subject's performance. Specifically, matches increase the delay and mismatches decrease the delay. Titrated delay values served as the…

  14. Titrating-delay matching-to-sample in the pigeon.

    PubMed

    Kangas, Brian D; Vaidya, Manish; Branch, Marc N

    2010-07-01

    The titrating-delay matching-to-sample (TDMTS) procedure offers researchers an additional behavioral task thought to capture some important features of remembering. In this procedure, the delay between sample offset and comparison onset adjusts as a function of the subject's performance. Specifically, correct matches increase the delay and incorrect matches decrease the delay, and steady-state titrated delays serve as the primary dependent measure. The present series of experiments investigated the effects of several procedural variables on performance in TDMTS procedures in an effort to elucidate better its features to allow for more precision in future use. Experiment 1 reports results from a parametric analysis of fixed-ratio response requirements on the sample key that indicated improved remembering in the form of higher daily titrated delay values as the requirement was increased. Experiment 2 investigated the extent to which the initial delay value in each session affected session-wide delay values. Results indicated that regardless of value of the initial delay, the subjects' performances adjusted the delay values in the direction of the known baseline delay-value levels. Experiment 3 manipulated the step size by which delay values were adjusted and the results indicated that larger step sizes increased both session-to-session variability and within-session range of titrated delay values, although the average values remained approximately the same. These results suggest that the TDMTS task serves as a promising procedure to study what many refer to as memory. PMID:21279163

  15. High-sensitivity titration microcalorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikov, A. A.; Grigoryev, S. V.; Chuikin, A. V.

    2015-02-01

    A differential titration microcalorimeter for studying intermolecular interactions in solutions has been designed. To increase the speed of the instrument, the dynamic correction method has been used. It has been shown that electrical calibration of the microcalorimeter is consistent with its chemical calibration. The use of the instrument for measuring the integral heats of dilution of 1-propanol has been demonstrated.

  16. Amperometric, Bipotentiometric, and Coulometric Titration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, John T.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature on amperometric, bipotentiometric, and coulometric titration methods examining: apparatus and methodology; acid-base reactions; precipitation and complexing reactions (considering methods involving silver, mercury, EDTA or analogous reagents, and other organic compounds); and oxidation-reduction reactions (considering methods

  17. Amperometric, Bipotentiometric, and Coulometric Titration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, John T.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature on amperometric, bipotentiometric, and coulometric titration methods examining: apparatus and methodology; acid-base reactions; precipitation and complexing reactions (considering methods involving silver, mercury, EDTA or analogous reagents, and other organic compounds); and oxidation-reduction reactions (considering methods…

  18. Determination of Acidity Constants by Gradient Flow-Injection Titration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conceicao, Antonio C. L.; Minas da Piedade, Manuel E.

    2006-01-01

    A three-hour laboratory experiment, designed for an advanced undergraduate course in instrumental analysis that illustrates the application of the gradient chamber flow-injection titration (GCFIT) method with spectrophotometric detection to determine acidity constants is presented. The procedure involves the use of an acid-base indicator to obtain

  19. Determination of Acidity Constants by Gradient Flow-Injection Titration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conceicao, Antonio C. L.; Minas da Piedade, Manuel E.

    2006-01-01

    A three-hour laboratory experiment, designed for an advanced undergraduate course in instrumental analysis that illustrates the application of the gradient chamber flow-injection titration (GCFIT) method with spectrophotometric detection to determine acidity constants is presented. The procedure involves the use of an acid-base indicator to obtain…

  20. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 425 - Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... concentrations determined by EPA test procedure 376.1 (see 40 CFR 136.3, Table IB, parameter 66 (49 FR 43234... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Potassium Ferricyanide Titration..., App. A Appendix A to Part 425—Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method Source The...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 425 - Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... concentrations determined by EPA test procedure 376.1 (see 40 CFR 136.3, Table IB, parameter 66 (49 FR 43234... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Potassium Ferricyanide Titration..., App. A Appendix A to Part 425—Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method Source The...

  2. THE ALHAMBRA PHOTOMETRIC SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Villegas, T. Aparicio; Alfaro, E. J.; Cabrera-Cano, J. E-mail: emilio@iaa.es

    2010-03-15

    This paper presents the characterization of the optical range of the ALHAMBRA photometric system, a 20 contiguous, equal-width, medium-band CCD system with wavelength coverage from 3500 A to 9700 A. The photometric description of the system is done by presenting the full response curve as a product of the filters, CCD, and atmospheric transmission curves, and using some first- and second-order moments of this response function. We also introduce the set of standard stars that defines the system, formed by 31 classic spectrophotometric standard stars which have been used in the calibration of other known photometric systems, and 288 stars, flux calibrated homogeneously, from the Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL). Based on the NGSL, we determine the transformation equations between Sloan Digital Sky Survey ugriz photometry and the ALHAMBRA photometric system, in order to establish some relations between both systems. Finally, we develop and discuss a strategy to calculate the photometric zero points of the different pointings in the ALHAMBRA project.

  3. The ALHAMBRA Photometric System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio Villegas, T.; Alfaro, E. J.; Cabrera-Caño, J.; Moles, M.; Benítez, N.; Perea, J.; del Olmo, A.; Fernández-Soto, A.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.; Husillos, C.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Broadhurst, T.; Castander, F. J.; Cepa, J.; Cerviño, M.; González Delgado, R. M.; Infante, L.; Márquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Martínez, V. J.; Prada, F.; Quintana, J. M.; Sánchez, S. F.

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents the characterization of the optical range of the ALHAMBRA photometric system, a 20 contiguous, equal-width, medium-band CCD system with wavelength coverage from 3500 Å to 9700 Å. The photometric description of the system is done by presenting the full response curve as a product of the filters, CCD, and atmospheric transmission curves, and using some first- and second-order moments of this response function. We also introduce the set of standard stars that defines the system, formed by 31 classic spectrophotometric standard stars which have been used in the calibration of other known photometric systems, and 288 stars, flux calibrated homogeneously, from the Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL). Based on the NGSL, we determine the transformation equations between Sloan Digital Sky Survey ugriz photometry and the ALHAMBRA photometric system, in order to establish some relations between both systems. Finally, we develop and discuss a strategy to calculate the photometric zero points of the different pointings in the ALHAMBRA project.

  4. Assembling and Using an LED-Based Detector to Monitor Absorbance Changes during Acid-Base Titrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Willy G.; Cavalheiro, Eder T. G.

    2015-01-01

    A simple photometric assembly based in an LED as a light source and a photodiode as a detector is proposed in order to follow the absorbance changes as a function of the titrant volume added during the course of acid-base titrations in the presence of a suitable visual indicator. The simplicity and low cost of the electronic device allow the

  5. Assembling and Using an LED-Based Detector to Monitor Absorbance Changes during Acid-Base Titrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Willy G.; Cavalheiro, E´der T. G.

    2015-01-01

    A simple photometric assembly based in an LED as a light source and a photodiode as a detector is proposed in order to follow the absorbance changes as a function of the titrant volume added during the course of acid-base titrations in the presence of a suitable visual indicator. The simplicity and low cost of the electronic device allow the…

  6. Colorblindness and Titrations with Visual Indicators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diehl, Harvey; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Discusses various issues related to colorblind students performing titrations with visual indicators. Includes tables showing precisions in the titration of a weak acid by colorblind students using phenolphthalein and thymolphthalein and in the titration of a weak base by colorblind persons using methyl red and bromcresol green. (JN)

  7. Toward Millimgagnitude Photometric Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dose, Eric

    2014-05-01

    Asteroid rotation, exoplanet transits, and similar measurements will increasingly call for photometric precisions better than about 10 millimagnitudes, often between nights and ideally between distant observers. The present work applies detailed spectral simulations to test popular photometric calibration practices, and to test new extensions of these practices. Using 107 synthetic spectra of stars of diverse colors, detailed atmospheric transmission spectra computed by solar-energy software, realistic spectra of popular astronomy gear, and the option of 3 sources of noise added at realistic millimagnitude levels, we find that certain adjustments to current calibration practices can help remove small systematic errors, especially for imperfect filters, high airmasses, and possibly passing thin cirrus clouds.

  8. Photometric Lunar Surface Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nefian, Ara V.; Alexandrov, Oleg; Morattlo, Zachary; Kim, Taemin; Beyer, Ross A.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate photometric reconstruction of the Lunar surface is important in the context of upcoming NASA robotic missions to the Moon and in giving a more accurate understanding of the Lunar soil composition. This paper describes a novel approach for joint estimation of Lunar albedo, camera exposure time, and photometric parameters that utilizes an accurate Lunar-Lambertian reflectance model and previously derived Lunar topography of the area visualized during the Apollo missions. The method introduced here is used in creating the largest Lunar albedo map (16% of the Lunar surface) at the resolution of 10 meters/pixel.

  9. FGS Photometric Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelan, Edmund

    2001-07-01

    This proposal will gather the data needed to verify/calibrate the time dependency of the FGS1r photometric response that was seen for the first time during a long duration {> 2000 sec} observation of the bright target {V=7.8} HD 209458 under GO proposal 9179 {PI Al Schultz}.

  10. Evaluation of the 5 and 8 pH point titration methods for monitoring anaerobic digesters treating solid waste.

    PubMed

    Vannecke, T P W; Lampens, D R A; Ekama, G A; Volcke, E I P

    2015-01-01

    Simple titration methods certainly deserve consideration for on-site routine monitoring of volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration and alkalinity during anaerobic digestion (AD), because of their simplicity, speed and cost-effectiveness. In this study, the 5 and 8 pH point titration methods for measuring the VFA concentration and carbonate system alkalinity (H2CO3*-alkalinity) were assessed and compared. For this purpose, synthetic solutions with known H2CO3*-alkalinity and VFA concentration as well as samples from anaerobic digesters treating three different kind of solid wastes were analysed. The results of these two related titration methods were verified with photometric and high-pressure liquid chromatography measurements. It was shown that photometric measurements lead to overestimations of the VFA concentration in the case of coloured samples. In contrast, the 5 pH point titration method provides an accurate estimation of the VFA concentration, clearly corresponding with the true value. Concerning the H2CO3*-alkalinity, the most accurate and precise estimations, showing very similar results for repeated measurements, were obtained using the 8 pH point titration. Overall, it was concluded that the 5 pH point titration method is the preferred method for the practical monitoring of AD of solid wastes due to its robustness, cost efficiency and user-friendliness. PMID:25224566

  11. Going Beyond, Going Further: The Preparation of Acid-Base Titration Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClendon, Michael

    1984-01-01

    Background information, list of materials needed, and procedures used are provided for a simple technique for generating mechanically plotted acid-base titration curves. The method is suitable for second-year high school chemistry students. (JN)

  12. Solid titration of octacalcium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Pan, H-B; Darvell, B W

    2009-01-01

    Octacalcium phosphate (OCP) is of considerable importance as a precursor in the formation of dental enamel and an intermediate phase in the precipitation of hydroxyapatite (HAp) in bone. However, agreement is poor on the solubility product (pK(sp)), possibly due to the formation of the more stable phase HAp. The system was investigated using solid titration, which has shown reliability in work on HAp and related fluoride minerals, with OCP in 100 mM KCl at 37.0 +/- 0.1 degrees C. The constitution of the end point precipitate was determined by X-ray diffraction and selected-electron area diffraction; the particle morphology and elements present were examined by high-resolution field emission scanning, transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. The titration curve for OCP was found for pH approximately 3.4-7.4. The precipitate was HAp at pH 3.6 and 4.5; no residual OCP or other phase was detected. Dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) was then found to form at pH 3.6 on further addition of OCP titrant after equilibrium had been achieved, possibly due to easier nucleation at lower pH. However, markedly crystalline HAp was formed in equilibrium for OCP titration with HAp seeding, verifying HAp as the more stable phase. A solubility isotherm for OCP was not obtained as HAp appears to be less soluble in the pH range studied. This adds weight to the view that HAp may be the most stable phase of all calcium phosphates, with further doubt being cast on DCPD being the most stable phase below pH 4.2. However, metastable DCPD may form in an Ostwald succession, depending on supersaturation and nucleation conditions. PMID:19556792

  13. Standard Asteroid Photometric Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piironen, J.; Lagerkvist, C.-I.; Torppa, J.; Kaasalainen, M.; Warner, B.

    2001-12-01

    The Asteroid Photometric Catalogue (APC) is now in its fifth update with over 8600 lightcurves of more than 1000 asteroids in the database. The APC also has references of over one thousand lightcurves not in digital format. The catalogue has been published by Uppsala University Observatory and is distributed by request (contact: classe@astro.uu.se). The new update also includes a list of known asteroid rotational periods and a CD-ROM containing all the existing digital data in the APC. The total number of observed lightcurves is growing rapidly, not the least because of the new state-of-the-art equipment and growing interest among amateur astronomers. The photometric database is now so large that the present format must be altered to facilitate a user-friendly on-line service for the down- and uploading of data. We are proposing (and have started to construct) a new Internet-based Standard Asteroid Photometric Catalogue (SAPC). The website is planned to open during the first half of the year 2002. In addition to the data files, the site would contain the index and guide to the catalogue, a web-form for reporting observations, and some general observing guidelines (e.g., on filters, timing, etc.). There would also be a list of asteroids for which more observations are needed, together with recommended observing periods. This would be accompanied by an up-to-date collection of physical asteroid models based on photometric data, as well as links to observer network pages and other sites that work in collaboration with the catalogue project. Our aim is to develop this site into a global standard service used by everyone involved in asteroid photometry.

  14. A Critical Assessment of Photometric Redshift Methods: A CANDELS Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlen, Tomas; Mobasher, Bahram; Faber, Sandra M.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Barro, Guillermo; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Finlator, Kristian; Fontana, Adriano; Gruetzbauch, Ruth; Johnson, Seth; Pforr, Janine; Salvato, Mara; Wiklind, Tommy; Wuyts, Stijn; Acquaviva, Viviana; Dickinson, Mark E.; Guo, Yicheng; Huang, Jiasheng; Huang, Kuang-Han; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Bell, Eric F.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Galametz, Audrey; Gawiser, Eric; Giavalisco, Mauro; Grogin, Norman A.; Hathi, Nimish; Kocevski, Dale; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Koo, David C.; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; McGrath, Elizabeth J.; Papovich, Casey; Peth, Michael; Ryan, Russell; Somerville, Rachel; Weiner, Benjamin; Wilson, Grant

    2013-10-01

    We present results from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) photometric redshift methods investigation. In this investigation, the results from 11 participants, each using a different combination of photometric redshift code, template spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and priors, are used to examine the properties of photometric redshifts applied to deep fields with broadband multi-wavelength coverage. The photometry used includes U-band through mid-infrared filters and was derived using the TFIT method. Comparing the results, we find that there is no particular code or set of template SEDs that results in significantly better photometric redshifts compared to others. However, we find that codes producing the lowest scatter and outlier fraction utilize a training sample to optimize photometric redshifts by adding zero-point offsets, template adjusting, or adding extra smoothing errors. These results therefore stress the importance of the training procedure. We find a strong dependence of the photometric redshift accuracy on the signal-to-noise ratio of the photometry. On the other hand, we find a weak dependence of the photometric redshift scatter with redshift and galaxy color. We find that most photometric redshift codes quote redshift errors (e.g., 68% confidence intervals) that are too small compared to that expected from the spectroscopic control sample. We find that all codes show a statistically significant bias in the photometric redshifts. However, the bias is in all cases smaller than the scatter; the latter therefore dominates the errors. Finally, we find that combining results from multiple codes significantly decreases the photometric redshift scatter and outlier fraction. We discuss different ways of combining data to produce accurate photometric redshifts and error estimates.

  15. Precipitation titration of perchlorate using new titrants

    SciTech Connect

    Selig, W.

    1980-05-01

    We have evaluated the following new titrants for the potentiometric precipitation titration of perchlorate: cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CETAC), cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CETAB), cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), and benzyldimethyltetradecylammonium chloride (BDTAC). Titrations were monitored with a fluoroborate ion-selective electrode (ISE) and a double-junction reference electrode. The titration system was controlled by a Tektronix 4051 graphics system. The perchlorate, nitrate, and calcium ISE may also be used to monitor emf's. 7 tables, 2 figures.

  16. pH and Titratable Acidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, George D.; Murphy, Patricia A.

    There are two interrelated concepts in food analysis that deal with acidity: pH and titratable acidity. Each of these quantities is analytically determined in separate ways and each has its own particular impact on food quality. Titratable acidity deals with measurement of the total acid concentration contained within a food (also called total acidity). This quantity is determined by exhaustive titration of intrinsic acids with a standard base. Titratable acidity is a better predictor of acid's impact on flavor than pH.

  17. Simultaneous determination of equivalence volumes and acid dissociation constants from potentiometric titration data.

    PubMed

    Papanastasiou, G; Ziogas, I

    1995-06-01

    New iterative methods for analysis of potentiometric titration data of (a) mixtures of weak monoprotic acids with their conjugate bases, (b) solutions of polyprotic (di- and triprotic) acids, and (c) mixtures of two diprotic acids are presented. These methods, using data exclusively resulting from the acidic region of the titration curve permits the accurate determination of the analytical concentration of one or more acids even if the titration is stopped well before the end point of the titration. For the titration of a solution containing a conjugate acid/base pair, the proposed procedure enables the extraction of the initial composition of the mixture, as well as the dissociation constant of the concerned acid. Thus, it is possible by this type of analysis to distinguish whether a weak acid has been contaminated by a strong base and define the extent of the contamination. On the other hand, for the titration of polyprotic acids, the proposed approach enables the extraction of the accurate values of the equivalence volume and the dissociation constants K(i) even when the ionization stages overlap. Finally, for the titration of a mixture of two diprotic acids the proposed procedure enables the determination of the composition of the mixture even if the sum of the concentrations of the acids is not known. This method can be used in the analysis of solutions containing two diastereoisomeric forms of a weak diprotic acid. The test of the proposed procedures by means of ideal and Monte Carlo simulated data revealed that these methods are fairly applicable even when the titration data are considerably obscured by 'noise' or contain an important systematic error. The proposed procedures were also successfully applied to experimental titration data. PMID:18966298

  18. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry of RNA

    PubMed Central

    Salim, Nilshad N.; Feig, Andrew L.

    2009-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a fast and robust method to study the physical basis of molecular interactions. A single well-designed experiment can provide complete thermodynamic characterization of a binding reaction, including Ka, ΔG, ΔH, ΔS and reaction stoichiometry (n). Repeating the experiment at different temperatures allows determination of the heat capacity change (ΔCP) of the interaction. Modern calorimeters are sensitive enough to probe even weak biological interactions making ITC a very popular method among biochemists. Although ITC has been applied to protein studies for many years, it is becoming widely applicable in RNA biochemistry as well, especially in studies which involve RNA folding and RNA-interactions with small molecules, proteins and with other RNAs. This review focuses on best practices for planning, designing, and executing effective ITC experiments when one or more of the reactants is an RNA. PMID:18835447

  19. Photometric properties of Mars soils analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.; Jost, B.; Beck, P.; Okubo, C.; McEwen, A. S.

    2013-10-01

    We have measured the bidirectional reflectance of analogs of dry, wet, and frozen Martian soils over a wide range of phase angles in the visible spectral range. All samples were produced from two geologic samples: the standard JSC Mars-1 soil simulant and Hawaiian basaltic sand. In a first step, experiments were conducted with the dry samples to investigate the effects of surface texture. Comparisons with results independently obtained by different teams with similar samples showed a satisfying reproducibility of the photometric measurements as well as a noticeable influence of surface textures resulting from different sample preparation procedures. In a second step, water was introduced to produce wet and frozen samples and their photometry investigated. Optical microscope images of the samples provided information about their microtexture. Liquid water, even in relatively low amount, resulted in the disappearance of the backscattering peak and the appearance of a forward-scattering peak whose intensity increases with the amount of water. Specular reflections only appeared when water was present in an amount large enough to allow water to form a film at the surface of the sample. Icy samples showed a wide variability of photometric properties depending on the physical properties of the water ice. We discuss the implications of these measurements in terms of the expected photometric behavior of the Martian surface, from equatorial to circum-polar regions. In particular, we propose some simple photometric criteria to improve the identification of wet and/or icy soils from multiple observations under different geometries.

  20. Symmetry Properties of Potentiometric Titration Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macca, Carlo; Bombi, G. Giorgio

    1983-01-01

    Demonstrates how the symmetry properties of titration curves can be efficiently and rigorously treated by means of a simple method, assisted by the use of logarithmic diagrams. Discusses the symmetry properties of several typical titration curves, comparing the graphical approach and an explicit mathematical treatment. (Author/JM)

  1. A Tabular Approach to Titration Calculations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Kieran F.

    2012-01-01

    Titrations are common laboratory exercises in high school and university chemistry courses, because they are easy, relatively inexpensive, and they illustrate a number of fundamental chemical principles. While students have little difficulty with calculations involving a single titration step, there is a significant leap in conceptual difficulty…

  2. The MUNI Photometric Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrastina, Marek; Zejda, Miloslav; Mikulášek, Zdeněk

    2012-04-01

    In the 1990s of the last century, CCD cameras became more reachable. Due to many advantages of CCD cameras, astronomers began using them as the primary detector for photometry of stellar objects. A typical observatory, which operates one telescope at a time, obtained 0.5 TB of raw data during two decades, that means one million about 500 kB-sized files. There are several observatories in the Czech Republic and Slovakia (taking into account all scientific, public as well as private ones). A rough estimate of the total amount of this photometric data is 10 TB, which could be a very interesting source of observational data. Unfortunately, these data are not available online. These data are stored in observatory archives in arbitrary format. Often it is not even possible to find requested data. We have decided to change this state by establishing a common archive of raw photometric data, which would be available online together with tools for searching, listing etc. We already defined the data format, file and directory structure of our archive. We developed sophisticated tools for archive maintenance as well. Our goal is to provide data storage with simple and straightforward access and we are ready to interconnect with the VO right after the IVOA Photometry Data Model will be released.

  3. Subpixel photometric stereo.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ping; Lin, Stephen; Quan, Long

    2008-08-01

    Conventional photometric stereo recovers one normal direction per pixel of the input image. This fundamentally limits the scale of recovered geometry to the resolution of the input image, and cannot model surfaces with subpixel geometric structures. In this paper, we propose a method to recover subpixel surface geometry by studying the relationship between the subpixel geometry and the reflectance properties of a surface. We first describe a generalized physically-based reflectance model that relates the distribution of surface normals inside each pixel area to its reflectance function. The distribution of surface normals can be computed from the reflectance functions recorded in photometric stereo images. A convexity measure of subpixel geometry structure is also recovered at each pixel, through an analysis of the shadowing attenuation. Then, we use the recovered distribution of surface normals and the surface convexity to infer subpixel geometric structures on a surface of homogeneous material by spatially arranging the normals among pixels at a higher resolution than that of the input image. Finally, we optimize the arrangement of normals using a combination of belief propagation and MCMC based on a minimum description length criterion on 3D textons over the surface. The experiments demonstrate the validity of our approach and show superior geometric resolution for the recovered surfaces. PMID:18566498

  4. Supernova Photometric Lightcurve Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi, Tayeb; Narayan, Gautham

    2016-01-01

    This is a preliminary report on photometric supernova classification. We first explore the properties of supernova light curves, and attempt to restructure the unevenly sampled and sparse data from assorted datasets to allow for processing and classification. The data was primarily drawn from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) simulated data, created for the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge. This poster shows a method for producing a non-parametric representation of the light curve data, and applying a Random Forest classifier algorithm to distinguish between supernovae types. We examine the impact of Principal Component Analysis to reduce the dimensionality of the dataset, for future classification work. The classification code will be used in a stage of the ANTARES pipeline, created for use on the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope alert data and other wide-field surveys. The final figure-of-merit for the DES data in the r band was 60% for binary classification (Type I vs II).Zaidi was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program (AST-1262829).

  5. The use of graphite electrodes in potentiometric titrations

    SciTech Connect

    Selig, W.S.

    1987-04-01

    The use of various types of graphite as indicator electrodes in potentiometry has been limited to acid-base and redox titrations. We have expanded the range of feasible titrations to: (1) precipitation titrations; (2) acid-base titrations; (3) compleximetric titrations; and (4) redox titrations. Graphite covered with an organic membrane containing poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) and a plasticizer is particularly useful in monitoring the endpoints of titrations in which insoluble ion-pairs are formed. The potentiometric titration of fluoride vs La(III) or Th(IV), or of sulfate vs Pb (II) or Ba(II), which can be monitored with a plain carbon rod, is discussed.

  6. Photometric stereo endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Parot, Vicente; Lim, Daryl; González, Germán; Traverso, Giovanni; Nishioka, Norman S.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. While color video endoscopy has enabled wide-field examination of the gastrointestinal tract, it often misses or incorrectly classifies lesions. Many of these missed lesions exhibit characteristic three-dimensional surface topographies. An endoscopic system that adds topographical measurements to conventional color imagery could therefore increase lesion detection and improve classification accuracy. We introduce photometric stereo endoscopy (PSE), a technique which allows high spatial frequency components of surface topography to be acquired simultaneously with conventional two-dimensional color imagery. We implement this technique in an endoscopic form factor and demonstrate that it can acquire the topography of small features with complex geometries and heterogeneous optical properties. PSE imaging of ex vivo human gastrointestinal tissue shows that surface topography measurements enable differentiation of abnormal shapes from surrounding normal tissue. Together, these results confirm that the topographical measurements can be obtained with relatively simple hardware in an endoscopic form factor, and suggest the potential of PSE to improve lesion detection and classification in gastrointestinal imaging. PMID:23864015

  7. Determination of penicillins by desulphurization with lead and edta titration.

    PubMed

    Hassan, S S; Zaki, M T; Eldesouki, M H

    1979-02-01

    A new, simple, accurate and rapid method is described for the determination of total penicillins in pharmaceutical preparations. The method is based on desulphurization with potassium plumbite whereby one mole of lead sulphide is formed per mole of penicillin. The excess of lead ions is titrated with EDTA at pH 4.5, with use of the lead ion-selective electrode. Results are reproducible within +/- 0.5% and compare favourably with those obtained by the procedures of the United States and British Pharmacopoeias. PMID:18962387

  8. Titration of vanadium(IV) with cerium(IV) sulphate, with ferroin as indicator, in aqueous alcohol as a facile reaction medium.

    PubMed

    Sriramam, K; Sastry, N R; Sastry, G S

    1982-08-01

    A new procedure for the titration of vanadium(IV) with cerium(IV) sulphate, with ferroin as indicator, in aqueous alcohol medium, is reported. The visual titration gives accurate results but potentiometric titration fails in this medium; this failure is attributed to the sluggish indicator electrode behaviour. Experimental conditions for preliminary quantitative photochemical reduction of vanadium(V) with alcohol have been established. PMID:18963212

  9. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry in the Student Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadso, Lars; Li, Yujing; Li, Xi

    2011-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the measurement of the heat produced by the stepwise addition of one substance to another. It is a common experimental technique, for example, in pharmaceutical science, to measure equilibrium constants and reaction enthalpies. We describe a stirring device and an injection pump that can be used with a

  10. Virtual Titrator: A Student-Oriented Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, David; Johnson, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Describes a titrator system, constructed from a computer-interfaced pH-meter, that was designed to increase student involvement in the process. Combines automatic data collection with real-time graphical display and interactive controls to focus attention on the process rather than on bits of data. Improves understanding of concepts and

  11. Effect of Spatial Titration on Task Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glowacki, Lawrence

    1976-01-01

    A reinforcement schedule and spatial titration method were used to determine task-reinforcement area separation most preferred and effective in two third-grade boys. Errors in task performance decreased task-reinforcement area separation, while correct responses in task performance increased task-reinforcement area separation. (Author)

  12. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry in the Student Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadso, Lars; Li, Yujing; Li, Xi

    2011-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the measurement of the heat produced by the stepwise addition of one substance to another. It is a common experimental technique, for example, in pharmaceutical science, to measure equilibrium constants and reaction enthalpies. We describe a stirring device and an injection pump that can be used with a…

  13. Titration Calculations with Computer Algebra Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lachance, Russ; Biaglow, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the symbolic algebraic solution of the titration equations for a diprotic acid, as obtained using "Mathematica," "Maple," and "Mathcad." The equilibrium and conservation equations are solved symbolically by the programs to eliminate the approximations that normally would be performed by the student. Of the three programs,…

  14. Potentiometric Titration of Industrial Samples—End-point Detection by Means of Wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubowska, M.; Baś, B.; Niewiara, E.; Reczyński, W.; Kubiak, W. W.

    2009-08-01

    A continuous wavelet transform with a specially defined dedicated mother wavelet is applied for data treatment as a signal-processing tool in a potentiometric titration. The inflection points of the titration curve are localized in one step of the calculations. The imperfection of signal, random noise, or spikes has no influence on the operation of the procedure. The proposed algorithm does not require any prior information about the nature or the type of analyte and/or the shape of the titration curve. Although the optimization of transformation parameters should be done, they may be chosen from a wide interval. The accuracy and precision of the proposed end-point estimation is examined on several simulated curves and instrumental potentiometric titrations. Under normal working conditions, analyte concentrations with variation coefficients between 1% and 5% have been determined. The procedure based on the wavelets provides an objective criterion for the determination of the end point. It can be reproduced and fully automated, thus contributing to a more versatile titration analysis.

  15. [Sources of error in the European Pharmacopoeia assay of halide salts of organic bases by titration with alkali].

    PubMed

    Kószeginé, S H; Ráfliné, R Z; Paál, T; Török, I

    2000-01-01

    A short overview has been given by the authors on the titrimetric assay methods of halide salts of organic bases in the pharmacopoeias of greatest importance. The alternative procedures introduced by the European Pharmacopoeia Commission some years ago to replace the non-aqueous titration with perchloric acid in the presence of mercuric acetate have also been presented and evaluated. The authors investigated the limits of applicability and the sources of systematic errors (bias) of the strongly preferred titration with sodium hydroxide in an alcoholic medium. To assess the bias due to the differences between the results calculated from the two inflexion points of the titration curves and the two real endpoints corresponding to the strong and weak acids, respectively, the mathematical analysis of the titration curve function was carried out. This bias, generally negligible when the pH change near the endpoint of the titration is more than 1 unit, is the function of the concentration, the apparent pK of the analyte and the ionic product of water (ethanol) in the alcohol-water mixtures. Using the validation data gained for the method with the titration of ephedrine hydrochloride the authors analysed the impact of carbon dioxide in the titration medium on the additive and proportional systematic errors of the method. The newly introduced standardisation procedure of the European Pharmacopoeia for the sodium hydroxide titrant to decrease the systematic errors caused by carbon dioxide has also been evaluated. PMID:11379027

  16. Catalytic thermometric titrations in non-aqueous solvents by coulometrically generated titrant.

    PubMed

    Vajgand, V J; Gaál, F F; Brusin, S S

    1970-05-01

    Catalytic thermometric titrations have been developed for tertiary amines and salts of organic acids in acetic and propionic anhydride with titrant coulometrically generated at a mercury and/or platinum anode, hydroquinone being added to the solution titrated if the platinum anode is used. The results obtained are compared with those obtained by coulometric titration with the end-point detected either photometrically or potentiometrically. On a élaboré des titrages thermométriques catalytiques pour les amines tertiaires et les sels d'acides organiques en anhydrides aétique et propionique avec l'agent de titrage engendré coulométriquement sur une anode de mercure et/ou platine, de l'hydroquinone étant ajoutée à la solution titrée si l'on emploie l'anode de platine. Les résultats obtenus sont comparés avec ceux obtenus par titrage coulométrique avec le point de fin de réaction détecté soit photométriquement soit potentioétriquement. PMID:18960753

  17. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 425 - Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... concentrations determined by EPA test procedure 376.1 (see 40 CFR 136.3, Table IB, parameter 66 (49 FR 43234... Method A Appendix A to Part 425 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED..., App. A Appendix A to Part 425—Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method Source The...

  18. Coulometric Titration of Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) with Spectrophotometric Endpoint Detection: An Experiment for the Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kathryn R.; Young, Vaneica Y.; Killian, Benjamin J.

    2011-01-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) is commonly used as an anticoagulant in blood-collection procedures. In this experiment for the instrumental analysis laboratory, students determine the quantity of EDTA in commercial collection tubes by coulometric titration with electrolytically generated Cu[superscript 2+]. The endpoint is detected

  19. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 425 - Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... concentrations determined by EPA test procedure 376.1 (see 40 CFR 136.3, Table IB, parameter 66 (49 FR 43234... swirl gently. Let stand for two minutes, add 10 ml. of a 30 percent zinc sulfate solution, and titrate... normality of the ferricyanide solution using the equation: ER25SE06.000 3. Preparation of 6M...

  20. Coulometric Titration of Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) with Spectrophotometric Endpoint Detection: An Experiment for the Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kathryn R.; Young, Vaneica Y.; Killian, Benjamin J.

    2011-01-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) is commonly used as an anticoagulant in blood-collection procedures. In this experiment for the instrumental analysis laboratory, students determine the quantity of EDTA in commercial collection tubes by coulometric titration with electrolytically generated Cu[superscript 2+]. The endpoint is detected…

  1. An Olfactory Indicator for Acid-Base Titrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flair, Mark N.; Setzer, William N.

    1990-01-01

    The use of an olfactory acid-base indicator in titrations for visually impaired students is discussed. Potential olfactory indicators include eugenol, thymol, vanillin, and thiophenol. Titrations performed with each indicator with eugenol proved to be successful. (KR)

  2. Photometric Redshifts of Submillimeter Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sukanya; Magnelli, Benjamin; McKee, Christopher F.; Lutz, Dieter; Berta, Stefano; Popesso, Paola; Pozzi, Francesca

    2013-08-01

    We use the photometric redshift method of Chakrabarti & McKee to infer photometric redshifts of submillimeter galaxies with far-IR (FIR) Herschel data obtained as part of the PACS Evolutionary Probe program. For the sample with spectroscopic redshifts, we demonstrate the validity of this method over a large range of redshifts (4 >~ z >~ 0.3) and luminosities, finding an average accuracy in (1 + z phot)/(1 + z spec) of 10%. Thus, this method is more accurate than other FIR photometric redshift methods. This method is different from typical FIR photometric methods in deriving redshifts from the light-to-gas mass (L/M) ratio of infrared-bright galaxies inferred from the FIR spectral energy distribution, rather than dust temperatures. To assess the dependence of our photometric redshift method on the data in this sample, we contrast the average accuracy of our method when we use PACS data, versus SPIRE data, versus both PACS and SPIRE data. We also discuss potential selection effects that may affect the Herschel sample. Once the redshift is derived, we can determine physical properties of infrared-bright galaxies, including the temperature variation within the dust envelope, luminosity, mass, and surface density. We use data from the GOODS-S field to calculate the star formation rate density (SFRD) of submillimeter bright sources detected by AzTEC and PACS. The AzTEC-PACS sources, which have a threshold 850 μm flux >~ 5 mJy, contribute 15% of the SFRD from all ultraluminous infrared galaxies (L IR >~ 1012 L ⊙), and 3% of the total SFRD at z ~ 2.

  3. Photometric Redshifts: 50 Years After

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budavári, Tamás

    2012-03-01

    Almost half a century has passed since Baum [1] first applied a novel method to a handful of galaxies. Using the mean spectral energy distribution (SED) of six bright ellipticals in the Virgo cluster, he could accurately estimate the redshifts of other clusters in a comparison that we today call SED fitting or, more generally, photometric redshifts. Owing to the expansion of the Universe, galaxies farther away appear to be redder. Their observed colors are a combination of this redshift and their intrinsic properties. Thanks to the latest detector technology, today we can undertake deep, multicolor surveys to probe statistically meaningful volumes. The yield of photometry in terms of the number of sources is over two orders of magnitude higher than what is achievable by (the more accurate) spectroscopic follow-ups. To exploit the information in the photometric data themselves, several new methods have been developed over the years. One particular successful example is the estimation of photometric redshifts. Baum's motivation for using photometric measurements instead of spectroscopy was the same back then as ours is now: to push the analyses to uncharted territories. His original idea has grown into a research area of its own, which is more important now than ever before. In this chapter, we look at some of the recent advancements of the field. In Section 15.2 we briefly highlight some of the original ideas and the current state of the art in estimating the photometric redshifts. Section 15.3 introduces a Bayesian framework for discussing the traditional methods within a unified context; it explicitly enumerates and identifies their (missing) ingredients. Section 15.4 aims to plant seeds for new ideas for future directions, and Section 15.5 offers some concluding remarks.

  4. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS OF SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, Sukanya; Magnelli, Benjamin; Lutz, Dieter; Berta, Stefano; Popesso, Paola; McKee, Christopher F.; Pozzi, Francesca

    2013-08-20

    We use the photometric redshift method of Chakrabarti and McKee to infer photometric redshifts of submillimeter galaxies with far-IR (FIR) Herschel data obtained as part of the PACS Evolutionary Probe program. For the sample with spectroscopic redshifts, we demonstrate the validity of this method over a large range of redshifts (4 {approx}> z {approx}> 0.3) and luminosities, finding an average accuracy in (1 + z{sub phot})/(1 + z{sub spec}) of 10%. Thus, this method is more accurate than other FIR photometric redshift methods. This method is different from typical FIR photometric methods in deriving redshifts from the light-to-gas mass (L/M) ratio of infrared-bright galaxies inferred from the FIR spectral energy distribution, rather than dust temperatures. To assess the dependence of our photometric redshift method on the data in this sample, we contrast the average accuracy of our method when we use PACS data, versus SPIRE data, versus both PACS and SPIRE data. We also discuss potential selection effects that may affect the Herschel sample. Once the redshift is derived, we can determine physical properties of infrared-bright galaxies, including the temperature variation within the dust envelope, luminosity, mass, and surface density. We use data from the GOODS-S field to calculate the star formation rate density (SFRD) of submillimeter bright sources detected by AzTEC and PACS. The AzTEC-PACS sources, which have a threshold 850 {mu}m flux {approx}> 5 mJy, contribute 15% of the SFRD from all ultraluminous infrared galaxies (L{sub IR} {approx}> 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }), and 3% of the total SFRD at z {approx} 2.

  5. Determination of carbonate carbon in geological materials by coulometric titration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engleman, E.E.; Jackson, L.L.; Norton, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    A coulometric titration is used for the determination of carbonate carbon in geological materials. Carbon dioxide is evolved from the sample by the addition of 2 M perchloric acid, with heating, and is determined by automated coulometric titration. The coulometric titration showed improved speed and precision with comparable accuracy to gravimetric and gasometric techniques. ?? 1985.

  6. Simple and Automated Coulometric Titration of Acid Using Nonisolated Electrodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntzleman, Thomas S.; Kenney, Joshua B.; Hasbrouck, Scott; Collins, Michael J.; Amend, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Coulometric titrations involve the quantification of analyte by measurements of current and time. In most coulometric titrations, the anode and cathode are placed in isolated cells that are connected by a salt bridge. By contrast, the experiments described here involve coulometric titrations (of acidic protons in solution) using a silver anode and…

  7. Simple and Automated Coulometric Titration of Acid Using Nonisolated Electrodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntzleman, Thomas S.; Kenney, Joshua B.; Hasbrouck, Scott; Collins, Michael J.; Amend, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Coulometric titrations involve the quantification of analyte by measurements of current and time. In most coulometric titrations, the anode and cathode are placed in isolated cells that are connected by a salt bridge. By contrast, the experiments described here involve coulometric titrations (of acidic protons in solution) using a silver anode and

  8. Digital movie-based on automatic titrations.

    PubMed

    Lima, Ricardo Alexandre C; Almeida, Luciano F; Lyra, Wellington S; Siqueira, Lucas A; Gaião, Edvaldo N; Paiva Junior, Sérgio S L; Lima, Rafaela L F C

    2016-01-15

    This study proposes the use of digital movies (DMs) in a flow-batch analyzer (FBA) to perform automatic, fast and accurate titrations. The term used for this process is "Digital movie-based on automatic titrations" (DMB-AT). A webcam records the DM during the addition of the titrant to the mixing chamber (MC). While the DM is recorded, it is decompiled into frames ordered sequentially at a constant rate of 26 frames per second (FPS). The first frame is used as a reference to define the region of interest (ROI) of 28×13pixels and the R, G and B values, which are used to calculate the Hue (H) values for each frame. The Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) is calculated between the H values of the initial frame and each subsequent frame. The titration curves are plotted in real time using the r values and the opening time of the titrant valve. The end point is estimated by the second derivative method. A software written in C language manages all analytical steps and data treatment in real time. The feasibility of the method was attested by application in acid/base test samples and edible oils. Results were compared with classical titration and did not present statistically significant differences when the paired t-test at the 95% confidence level was applied. The proposed method is able to process about 117-128 samples per hour for the test and edible oil samples, respectively, and its precision was confirmed by overall relative standard deviation (RSD) values, always less than 1.0%. PMID:26592600

  9. An improved photometric analysis of SX Aurigae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linnel, Albert P.; Peters, Geraldine J.; Polidan, Ronald S.

    1988-01-01

    A new analysis of existing photometric data on SX Aurigae is presented which changes current conclusions in the literature concerning the star. It is concluded, based on fitting of the continuous spectrum to Kurucz model atmospheres and simplex optimization procedure utilized, that the system consists of two normal main-sequence stars of spectral types B2 and slightly earlier than B5. The components are very close to the inner Roche limiting surface. The secondary component is unevolved, and the primary component is extremely close to contact with its inner Roche lobe. The evidence indicates that mass flow from the primary to the secondary has not yet begun. Allowing the bolometric albedo of the secondary to be a free parameter produces a solution with an excellent fit to the B, V data. The derived value, A2 = 0.40, disagrees with the theoretical value for radiative atmospheres and agrees with the value for convective equilibrium.

  10. Toward Millimagnitude Photometric Calibration (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dose, E.

    2014-12-01

    (Abstract only) Asteroid roation, exoplanet transits, and similar measurements will increasingly call for photometric precisions better than about 10 millimagnitudes, often between nights and ideally between distant observers. The present work applies detailed spectral simulations to test popular photometric calibration practices, and to test new extensions of these practices. Using 107 synthetic spectra of stars of diverse colors, detailed atmospheric transmission spectra computed by solar-energy software, realistic spectra of popular astronomy gear, and the option of three sources of noise added at realistic millimagnitude levels, we find that certain adjustments to current calibration practices can help remove small systematic errors, especially for imperfect filters, high airmasses, and possibly passing thin cirrus clouds.

  11. Overconfidence in photometric redshift estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittman, David; Bhaskar, Ramya; Tobin, Ryan

    2016-04-01

    We describe a new test of photometric redshift performance given a spectroscopic redshift sample. This test complements the traditional comparison of redshift differences by testing whether the probability density functions p(z) have the correct width. We test two photometric redshift codes, BPZ and EAZY, on each of two data sets and find that BPZ is consistently overconfident (the p(z) are too narrow) while EAZY produces approximately the correct level of confidence. We show that this is because EAZY models the uncertainty in its spectral energy distribution templates, and that post-hoc smoothing of the BPZ p(z) provides a reasonable substitute for detailed modelling of template uncertainties. Either remedy still leaves a small surplus of galaxies with spectroscopic redshift very far from the peaks. Thus, better modelling of low-probability tails will be needed for high-precision work such as dark energy constraints with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and other large surveys.

  12. Photometrics at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliams, J.Y.; Hill, R.A.; Hughes, R.L.

    1990-07-01

    This report highlights Sandia National Laboratories' work in the following areas: photometrics and optical development; still and time-lapse photography; real-time motion photography; high-speed photography; image-motion photography; schlieren photography; ultra-high-speed photography; electronic imaging; shuttered video and high-speed video; infrared imaging radiometry; exoatmospheric photography and videography; microdensitometry and image analysis; and optical system design and development.

  13. Coulometric Karl Fischer titration simplifies water content testing

    SciTech Connect

    Poynter, W.G. ); Barrios, R.J. )

    1994-04-11

    The well-known Karl Fischer method for analyzing water content of nonaqueous samples has been modified to facilitate field use. The conventional, visual-endpoint filtration has been altered to produce a coulometric, or electrochemical, procedure. The coulometric method has all the advantages of the original karl Fischer laboratory method, but can be packaged in a small, convenient module. The analysis takes little time and can be used in the field as well as the laboratory. The relatively new coulometric method is described in API Manual of Petroleum Measurement Standards (MPMS) Chapter 10.9 and in ASTM D 4928. The titration is gaining increasing acceptance in the petroleum industry, where it is used by production engineers, transporters, and processors. The paper describes this method.

  14. Photometric analysis of Abell 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla Bontà, Elena; Davies, Roger L.; Houghton, Ryan C. W.; D'Eugenio, Francesco; Corsini, Enrico M.; Méndez-Abreu, Jairo

    2013-07-01

    We carried out a photometric analysis of a sample of early-type galaxies in Abell~1689 at z = 0.183, using HST/ACS archive images in the rest-frame V band. We performed a two-dimensional photometric decomposition of each galaxy surface-brightness distribution using the GASP2D fitting algorithm (Méndez-Abreu et al. 2008). We adopted both a Sérsic and de Vaucouleurs law. S0 galaxies were analysed also taking into account a disc component described by an exponential law. The derived photometric parameters, together with the ones previously obtained with the curve of growth method (Houghton et al. 2012), will be used to analyse the Fundamental Plane of Abell 1689 and quantify how it is affected by the use of different decomposition techniques (Dalla Bontà et al. 2013, in preparation). The stellar velocity dispersions of the sample galaxies were derived by using GEMINI-N/GMOS and VLT/FLAMES (D'Eugenio et al. 2013) spectroscopic data.

  15. Cosmology with photometric redshift surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Chris; Bridle, Sarah

    2005-11-01

    We explore the utility of future photometric redshift imaging surveys for delineating the large-scale structure of the Universe, and assess the resulting constraints on the cosmological model. We perform the following two complementary types of analysis. (i) We quantify the statistical confidence and the accuracy with which such surveys will be able to detect and measure characteristic features in the clustering power spectrum such as the acoustic oscillations and the turnover, in a `model-independent' fashion. We show for example that a 10000-deg2 imaging survey with depth r= 22.5 and photometric redshift accuracy δz/(1 +z) = 0.03 will detect the acoustic oscillations with 99.9 per cent confidence, measuring the associated preferred cosmological scale with 2 per cent precision. Such a survey will also detect the turnover with 95 per cent confidence, determining the corresponding scale with 20 per cent accuracy. (ii) By assuming a Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model power spectrum we calculate the confidence with which a non-zero baryon fraction can be deduced from such future galaxy surveys. We quantify `wiggle detection' by calculating the number of standard deviations by which the baryon fraction is measured, after marginalizing over the shape parameter. This is typically a factor of 4 more significant (in terms of number of standard deviations) than the above `model-independent' result. For both analyses, we quantify the variation of the results with magnitude depth and photometric redshift precision, and discuss the prospects for obtaining the required performance with realistic future surveys. We conclude that the precision with which the clustering pattern may be inferred from future photometric redshift surveys will be competitive with contemporaneous spectroscopic redshift surveys, assuming that systematic effects can be controlled. We find that for equivalent wiggle detection power, a photometric redshift survey requires an area approximately 12[δz/(1 +z)]/0.03 times larger than a spectroscopic survey, for a given magnitude limit. We also note that an analysis of luminous red galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey may yield a marginal detection of acoustic oscillations in the imaging survey, in addition to that recently reported for the spectroscopic component.

  16. A titration schedule on a treadmill.

    PubMed

    Evans, W O

    1963-04-01

    A technique is presented utilizing a titration schedule to measure performance decrement as a function of continuing heavy muscular exertion. A treadmill is equipped with a reversible motor controlling the velocity control of the treadmill itself. This provides a constant acceleration of the treadmill unless a subject-controlled, spring loaded switch is depressed. If this switch is depressed, the treadmill decelerates at a constant rate. A subject is instructed to walk at maximum rate at all times, controlling the velocity of the treadmill with the switch. A performance record is obtained from a tachometer-generator on the treadmill delivering current to a recorder. PMID:16811277

  17. Soil water content by Karl Fischer titration

    SciTech Connect

    Prunty, L.; Zellis, M.K.; Bell, J.S.

    1997-12-31

    Specific analytical determination of water content is often desirable in contaminated soils. Karl Fischer (KF) titration is useful for this purpose, since it consumes only H{sub 2}O, even in the presence of other volatile substances. Although widely used for water content determination in industrial and food products, KF has been virtually ignored in soil and environmental science. Oven drying (OD), conversely, is considered the standard method of soil water determination, but is an indiscriminate determiner of all volatiles. The authors examined KF titration for soil water content determination. Two soil types were mixed with varying amounts of water and octane or toluene. The prepared samples containing water only, water and octane, and water and toluene were analyzed for volatile/moisture content using OD/KF analysis. Soil moisture values determined by the calibrated KF method (w{sub c}) compared favorably to those determined by OD (w{sub 0}) in terms of regression slope, intercept, correlation coefficient, and Student`s t. Regression slopes ranged from 0.980 to 1.009 while intercepts ranged from {minus}0.6 to 7.8 g kg{sup {minus}1}. Plots of the data show essentially a 1:1 correspondence of w{sub c} to w{sub o}.

  18. A photometric study of Enceladus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verbiscer, Anne J.; Veverka, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    We have supplemented Voyager imaging data from Enceladus (limited to phase angles of 13 deg-43 deg) with recent Earth-based CCD observations to obtain an improved determination of the Bond albedo, to construct an albedo map of the satellite, and to constrain parameters in Hapke's (1986) photometric equation. A major result is evidence of regional variations in the physical properties of Enceladus' surface. The average global photometric properties are described by single scattering albedo omega(sub 0) average = 0.998 +/- 0.001, macroscopic roughness parameter theta average = 6 +/- 1 deg, and Henyey-Greenstein asymmetry parameter g = -0.399 +/- 0.005. The value of theta average is smaller than the 14 deg found by fitting whole-disk data, which include all terrains on Enceladus. The opposition surge amplitude B(sub 0) = 0.21 +/- 0.07 and regolith compaction parameter h = 0.014 +/- 0.02 are loosely constrained by the scarcity of and uncertainty in near-opposition observations. From the solar phase curve we determine the geometric albedo of Enceladus p(sub v) = 0.99 +/- 0.06 and phase integral q = 0.92 +/- 0.05, which corresponds to a spherical albedo A = p(sub v)q = 0.91 +/- 0.1. Since the spectrum of Enceladus is fairly flat, we can approximate the Bond albedo A(sub B) with the spherical albedo. Our photometric analysis is summarized in terms of an albedo map which generally reproduces the satellite's observed lightcurve and indicates that normal reflectances range from 0.9 on the leading hemisphere to 1.4 on the trailing one. The albedo map also revels an albedo variation of 15% from longitudes 170 deg to 200 deg, corresponding to the boundary between the leading and trailing hemispheres.

  19. Photometric Redshifts in the Sloan Colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowards-Emmerd, D.; McKay, T. A.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, J. A.

    1999-05-01

    In the past few years, photometric redshifts have proven themselves to be a robust means of estimating redshifts. In the near future, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey will compile high-quality photometric data for 108 galaxies. Photometric redshifts will provide approximate distances to this enormous set of objects. In this poster, we describe results from a preliminary study of photometric redshift calibration on data in the SDSS colors. We present 5 color photometry for 2195 galaxies drawn from the Las Campanas Redshift Survey. Data was obtained on the Curtis Schmidt telescope at CTIO during Aug 97 and Feb/Mar 98 using filters nearly identical to the SDSS system. We also present photometric redshift predictions expressed as polynomial functions of galaxy colors and magnitudes derived from this training set. Finally, applications of photometric redshifts will be considered, including lensing studies, cosmology, and determination of fundamental astrophysical quantities. Support was provided by NSF grant #9703282.

  20. The Small IRAIT telescope. Photometric time-series during the polar night

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briguglio, R.; Tosti, G.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Bruntt, H.; Nesci, R.; Sabbatini, L.

    The Small IRAIT is a 25 cm telescope which was deployed and installed at Dome C, on the high antarctic plateau, in 2007. During the polar night an intensive photometric program was carried out: despite the harshness of the polar winter, the telescope worked in a semi-robotic way giving us a large amount of photometric data and precious informations about technology and procedures for polar missions.

  1. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Marriner, John; /Fermilab

    2012-06-29

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

  2. Coulometric titration of acids in non-aqueous solvents.

    PubMed

    Fritz, J S; Gainer, F E

    1968-09-01

    Coulometric titrations of mineral acids, sulphonic acids, carboxylic acids, enols, imides and phenols have been carried out in t-butanol or in acetone with electrically generated tetrabutylammonium hydroxide. Either a potentiometric titration or a visual indicator end-point may be used. The amount of acid titrated ranges from 10 to 60 muequiv, and the precision and accuracy of the method are excellent. PMID:18960387

  3. Photometric Detection of Extra-Solar Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatzes, Artie P.; Cochran, William D.

    2004-01-01

    This NASA Origins Program grant supported the TEMPEST Texas McDonald Photometric Extrasolar Search for Transits) program at McDonald Observatory, which searches for transits of extrasolar planets across the disks of their parent stars. The basic approach is to use a wide-field ground-based telescope (in our case the McDonald Observatory 0.76m telescope and it s Prime Focus Corrector) to search for transits of short period (1-15 day orbits) of close-in hot-Jupiter planets in orbit around a large sample of field stars. The next task is to search these data streams for possible transit events. We collected our first set of test data for this program using the 0.76 m PFC in the summer of 1998. From those data, we developed the optimal observing procedures, including tailoring the stellar density, exposure times, and filters to best-suit the instrument and project. In the summer of 1999, we obtained the first partial season of data on a dedicated field in the constellation Cygnus. These data were used to develop and refine the reduction and analysis procedures to produce high-precision photometry and search for transits in the resulting light curves. The TeMPEST project subsequently obtained three full seasons of data on six different fields using the McDonald Observatory 0.76m PFC.

  4. Classic and New Photometric Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, I. S.

    2006-08-01

    For many critical applications it is necessary to understand the limitations of the large-scale surveys in terms of photometric systematics and source confusion. The photometric surveys of the present and past employ a variety of different filter systems, even if nominally standard. Very often the fiducial colours of stars in a given survey are based on modelling from theoretical atmospheres or spectrophotometry rather than on observational data made with the same set of filters. The output of a particular detector is dependent, inter alia, on a precise knowledge of the transmission characteristics of the filters and the atmosphere. The filter manufacturing process itself is limited in precision. Measurements of transmission as a function of wavelength may not be available for the temperature at which a filter is used. For objects with smooth spectra and not suffering severe interstellar reddening, colour transformations are usually very successful. However, in studies of extincted regions, such as along the Galactic Plane, the calculation of reddening amounts can be heavily dependent on filter characteristics, not just their "effective wavelengths". Confusion will of course become significant according to source densities and pixel sizes. In heavily extincted areas, there is a danger of identifying nearby faint sources with distant ones observed at longer wavelengths where the extinction is less.

  5. Automated titration method for use on blended asphalts

    DOEpatents

    Pauli, Adam T.; Robertson, Raymond E.; Branthaver, Jan F.; Schabron, John F.

    2012-08-07

    A system for determining parameters and compatibility of a substance such as an asphalt or other petroleum substance uses titration to highly accurately determine one or more flocculation occurrences and is especially applicable to the determination or use of Heithaus parameters and optimal mixing of various asphalt stocks. In a preferred embodiment, automated titration in an oxygen gas exclusive system and further using spectrophotometric analysis (2-8) of solution turbidity is presented. A reversible titration technique enabling in-situ titration measurement of various solution concentrations is also presented.

  6. Workshop on the Strömvil Photometric System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, A. G. Davis; Straižys, V.; Høg, E.

    1999-12-01

    On October 6 - 8 a workshop on the Strömvil Photometric System was held in Vilnius and at the Moletai Observatory in Lithuania. Papers were given concerning the creation and use of the system, its special abilities to recognize stars of all spectral types and peculiarities even in the case of areas with high values of interstellar reddening. Reports were made on studies of synthetic photometry to investigate the classification properties of photometric systems. The photometric design of the planned GAIA orbiting observatory was outlined. Current observations being made in the system on the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope were described and plans for future work at this site were discussed. The members of the workshop agreed on the following recommendations: A. All the groups cooperating in Strömvil measures should use common observing and reduction procedures. In reduction this means using IRAF and DAOPHOT. B. A database will be set up at ITPA which will contain information from each observatory concerning the CCD chip(s) being used, the observers and the details of observations made at that site. Data on standard stars and regions as well as areas used for scientific studies will be included. C. Error ellipses (from studies with synthetic photometry calibrated in temperature and log g) will be calculated for the various systems being proposed for GAIA, for stars of V = 16 and 18 magnitude. The choice of a photometric system for GAIA should be based on the classification abilities of the system. Since the satellite will observe stars in areas which are heavily reddened the system must be able to correct for reddening effects. D. The Workshop members recommended that a meeting be held in 2000 to discuss the properties of photometric systems proposed for GAIA and the methods by which a choice of the final system for GAIA should be made.

  7. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry of Chiral Polymeric Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Werber, Liora; Preiss, Laura C; Landfester, Katharina; Muñoz-Espí, Rafael; Mastai, Yitzhak

    2015-09-01

    Chiral polymeric nanoparticles are of prime importance, mainly due to their enantioselective potential, for many applications such as catalysis and chiral separation in chromatography. In this article we report on the preparation of chiral polymeric nanoparticles by miniemulsion polymerization. In addition, we describe the use of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to measure the chiral interactions and the energetics of the adsorption of enantiomers from aqueous solutions onto chiral polymeric nanoparticles. The characterization of chirality in nano-systems is a very challenging task; here, we demonstrate that ITC can be used to accurately determine the thermodynamic parameters associated with the chiral interactions of nanoparticles. The use of ITC to measure the energetics of chiral interactions and recognition at the surfaces of chiral nanoparticles can be applied to other nanoscale chiral systems and can provide further insight into the chiral discrimination processes of nanomaterials. PMID:26094606

  8. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry to Characterize Enzymatic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Mazzei, Luca; Ciurli, Stefano; Zambelli, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a technique that measures the heat released or absorbed during a chemical reaction as an intrinsic probe to characterize any chemical process that involves heat changes spontaneously occurring during the reaction. The general features of this method to determine the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of enzymatic reactions (kcat, KM, ΔH) are described and discussed here together with some detailed applications to specific cases. ITC does not require any modification or labeling of the system under analysis, can be performed in solution, and needs only small amounts of enzyme. These properties make ITC an invaluable, powerful, and unique tool to extend the knowledge of enzyme kinetics to drug discovery. PMID:26794356

  9. Simultaneous multiple injection to perform titration and standard addition in mono-segmented flow analysis.

    PubMed

    Assali, M; Raimundo, I M; Facchin, I

    2001-01-01

    An automated system to perform titration and standard addition in monosegemented flow analysis by employing the simultaneous multiple injection is described. The system was controlled by aPC-AT-386 microcomputer through a home-made parallel interface, employing a diode array spectrophotometer as detector. Software was written in QuickBasic 4.5 to control the system and for data acquisition. A three-way solenoid valve was used in conjunction with a proportional injector to add the titrant solution or the standard solution to the sample, to carry out titration or standard addition, respectively. Only one standard solution was used in each procedure and different quantities of titrant or standard were added to the sample by controlling the time interval in which the solenoid valve was switched on. Titration and standard addition curves similar to those of the manual methods were obtained in both cases, since the sample dispersion was very low due to the air bubbles of the monosegment. The titration system was evaluated through the determination of Fe(II) with a KMnO4 standard solution in pharmaceutical preparations. The standard addition process was assessed by determining Cr(VI) in natural waters and domestic wastewater using the diphenylcarbazide method. The results obtained in both methodologies did not differ significantly from the reference methods at a 95% confidence level. PMID:18924880

  10. Technical Note: How long can seawater oxygen samples be stored before titration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lankhorst, M.; Chavez, G.; Nam, S. H.; Send, U.

    2014-10-01

    The concentration of dissolved oxygen in seawater is routinely measured using a standardized titration method that involves analysis shortly after the water sample has been collected. However, none of the existing procedural documents are specific about how soon after collection the titration has to be done. Here, we report on a small number of samples where duplicates were collected and one batch was titrated within days after collection, while the other batch was stored for several weeks before titration. In addition, for a subset of the samples a third batch was taken that was stored like the others but with a particular chemical already added before storage. Comparison between the batches confirms that there is no significant difference between the ones that were stored and the ones that were analyzed sooner, indicating that a month-long storage period is acceptable. The implication of this is that such oxygen samples do not necessarily have to be analyzed while still on the ship; instead, it is possible to transport them ashore for analysis there.

  11. Determination of nitric acid in highly radioactive solutions by the method of coulometric titration

    SciTech Connect

    Gromov, V.S.; Kuperman, A.Ya.; Smirnov, Yu.A.

    1988-11-01

    A procedure, a cell, and an electronic block have been developed for a long-distance determination of nitric acid in highly radioactive industrial solutions by coulometric titration under hot chamber conditions. A solution of a mixture of ammonium and potassium oxalates was used for the background and anoide electrolytes. This solution prevents the hydrolysis of the metal ions and appreciably decreases the rate of accumulation of the acid in the anode chamber of the cell. Titration with 0.1-0.5 A currents is carried out with internal generation of hydroxyl ions. The cell was prepared from a radiation-resistant and transparent material, poly(methyl methacrylate). The anode and cathode chambers were separated by a cellophane membrane, reinforced by a porous glass filter. By using the electronic coulometric block working together with a pH-meter (EV-74 or I-130) and with an automatic titration block (BAT-15), the titration can be carried out automatically, and the determination results can be obtained in a digital form.

  12. New chemical titration proposed for potassium mud testing

    SciTech Connect

    Zilch, H.E.

    1984-01-01

    An accurate and easy-to-use procedure for measuring the potassium ion concentration in drilling and completion fluids has been developed and successfully used in Union Oil Co. of California's drilling operations. This volumetric analysis is based on the quantitative conversion of soluble sodium tetraphenylboron to the insoluble potassium tetraphenylboron and back titration with a quaternary ammonium salt in the presence of Titan yellow (Clayton yellow) indicator. This gives an easy-to-read color change endpoint from milky white to intense pink. The procedure described here is as fast as flame emission analysis and as accurate as the gravimetric analysis. This method has been used for several years in the fertilizer industry with success, but is new to drilling operations, at least in this revised form. This method, adapted from the potash industry, is easier and more accurate than other methods. Results compare favorably (within 3%) with flame emision or atomic absorption methods. The NaTPB method is proposed as a replacement for the method described in API RP 13B.

  13. A photometric study of the Orion OB 1 association. 2: Photometric analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, W. H., Jr.; Hesser, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The procedures adopted for analysis of photometric data in terms of color excesses, intrinsic color indexes, absolute visual magnitudes, and rotational-velocity effects are discussed in detail for Orion association B-, intermediate (I)-, and AF-type stars. The effects of the nebular environment and a comparison of various calibrations of Balmer-line and four-color indexes are considered for the determination of individual absolute magnitudes for B-type stars. When absolute magnitudes of stars in the region of the Orion Nebula are determined from the beta index, emission mechanisms appear to spuriously brighten them. A detailed comparison of absolute magnitudes derived from Balmer-line indexes and MK spectral-type calibrations is presented. The data are also examined with regard to the effects of polarization and infrared excesses. The results suggest a complex combination of intracluster and circumstellar origins for these processes.

  14. Automatic Astrometric and Photometric Calibration with SCAMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertin, E.

    2006-07-01

    Astrometric and photometric calibrations have remained the most tiresome step in the reduction of large imaging surveys. I present a new software package, SCAMP which has been written to address this problem. SCAMP efficiently computes accurate astrometric and photometric solutions for any arbitrary sequence of FITS images in a completely automatic way. SCAMP is released under the GNU General Public Licence.

  15. SCAMP: Automatic Astrometric and Photometric Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertin, Emmanuel

    2010-10-01

    Astrometric and photometric calibrations have remained the most tiresome step in the reduction of large imaging surveys. SCAMP has been written to address this problem. The program efficiently computes accurate astrometric and photometric solutions for any arbitrary sequence of FITS images in a completely automatic way. SCAMP is released under the GNU General Public License.

  16. Photometric invariant stereo matching method.

    PubMed

    Gu, Feifei; Zhao, Hong; Zhou, Xiang; Li, Jinjun; Bu, Penghui; Zhao, Zixin

    2015-12-14

    A robust stereo matching method based on a comprehensive mathematical model for color formation process is proposed to estimate the disparity map of stereo images with noise and photometric variations. The band-pass filter with DoP kernel is firstly used to filter out noise component of the stereo images. Then the log-chromaticity normalization process is applied to eliminate the influence of lightning geometry. All the other factors that may influence the color formation process are removed through the disparity estimation process with a specific matching cost. Performance of the developed method is evaluated by comparing with some up-to-date algorithms. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate the robustness and accuracy of the method. PMID:26698970

  17. AGN clustering using photometric redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountrichas, G.

    2013-09-01

    The clustering properties of active galactic nuclei (AGN) are a powerful diagnostic of the mechanism that dominates the fuelling of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) across cosmic time. The problem is that current clustering analysis techniques depend heavily on spectroscopy for the AGN. I will present a new clustering method that does not require spectroscopy but uses photometric redshift probability distribution functions (PDFs) to determine the real-space correlation function of AGN. Results using this method will be shown for X-ray and IR selected sources and will be compared to the classical spectroscopic approach. This method will allow the optimal exploitation of the data of future and ongoing surveys (e.g. Pan-STARRS1, CANDELS, eROSITA).

  18. Quantitative Analysis of Sulfate in Water by Indirect EDTA Titration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belle-Oudry, Deirdre

    2008-01-01

    The determination of sulfate concentration in water by indirect EDTA titration is an instructive experiment that is easily implemented in an analytical chemistry laboratory course. A water sample is treated with excess barium chloride to precipitate sulfate ions as BaSO[subscript 4](s). The unprecipitated barium ions are then titrated with EDTA.

  19. Differential Binding Models for Direct and Reverse Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Isaac; Winnik, Mitchell A

    2016-03-10

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a technique to measure the stoichiometry and thermodynamics from binding experiments. Identifying an appropriate mathematical model to evaluate titration curves of receptors with multiple sites is challenging, particularly when the stoichiometry or binding mechanism is not available. In a recent theoretical study, we presented a differential binding model (DBM) to study calorimetry titrations independently of the interaction among the binding sites (Herrera, I.; Winnik, M. A. J. Phys. Chem. B 2013, 117, 8659-8672). Here, we build upon our DBM and show its practical application to evaluate calorimetry titrations of receptors with multiple sites independently of the titration direction. Specifically, we present a set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with the general form d[S]/dV that can be integrated numerically to calculate the equilibrium concentrations of free and bound species S at every injection step and, subsequently, to evaluate the volume-normalized heat signal (δQV = δq/dV) of direct and reverse calorimetry titrations. Additionally, we identify factors that influence the shape of the titration curve and can be used to optimize the initial concentrations of titrant and analyte. We demonstrate the flexibility of our updated DBM by applying these differentials and a global regression analysis to direct and reverse calorimetric titrations of gadolinium ions with multidentate ligands of increasing denticity, namely, diglycolic acid (DGA), citric acid (CIT), and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), and use statistical tests to validate the stoichiometries for the metal-ligand pairs studied. PMID:26889710

  20. A Closer Look at Acid-Base Olfactory Titrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neppel, Kerry; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.; Queen, Connie; Reed, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Olfactory titrations using raw onions and eugenol as acid-base indicators are reported. An in-depth investigation on olfactory titrations is presented to include requirements for potential olfactory indicators and protocols for using garlic, onions, and vanillin as acid-base olfactory indicators are tested.

  1. Titration of thiol groups in non-aqueous solvents.

    PubMed

    Verma, K K

    Thiols are titrated in acetone or dimethylformamide with sodium methoxide, employing visual end-point detection with Thymol Blue, Victoria Blue, p-hydroxyazobenzene or Azo Violet. Aromatic thiols are titrated in the presence of aliphatic thiols in acetone, with Thymol Blue as indicator. PMID:18961758

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Sulfate in Water by Indirect EDTA Titration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belle-Oudry, Deirdre

    2008-01-01

    The determination of sulfate concentration in water by indirect EDTA titration is an instructive experiment that is easily implemented in an analytical chemistry laboratory course. A water sample is treated with excess barium chloride to precipitate sulfate ions as BaSO[subscript 4](s). The unprecipitated barium ions are then titrated with EDTA.…

  3. Microscale pH Titrations Using an Automatic Pipet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flint, Edward B.; Kortz, Carrie L.; Taylor, Max A.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a microscale pH titration technique that utilizes an automatic pipet. A small aliquot (1-5 mL) of the analyte solution is titrated with repeated additions of titrant, and the pH is determined after each delivery. The equivalence point is determined graphically by either the second derivative method or a Gran plot. The pipet can be…

  4. Students' integration of multiple representations in a titration experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunze, Nicole M.

    A complete understanding of a chemical concept is dependent upon a student's ability to understand the microscopic or particulate nature of the phenomenon and integrate the microscopic, symbolic, and macroscopic representations of the phenomenon. Acid-base chemistry is a general chemistry topic requiring students to understand the topics of chemical reactions, solutions, and equilibrium presented earlier in the course. In this study, twenty-five student volunteers from a second semester general chemistry course completed two interviews. The first interview was completed prior to any classroom instruction on acids and bases. The second interview took place after classroom instruction, a prelab activity consisting of a titration calculation worksheet, a titration computer simulation, or a microscopic level animation of a titration, and two microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) titration experiments. During the interviews, participants were asked to define and describe acid-base concepts and in the second interview they also drew the microscopic representations of four stages in an acid-base titration. An analysis of the data showed that participants had integrated the three representations of an acid-base titration to varying degrees. While some participants showed complete understanding of acids, bases, titrations, and solution chemistry, other participants showed several alternative conceptions concerning strong acid and base dissociation, the formation of titration products, and the dissociation of soluble salts. Before instruction, participants' definitions of acid, base, and pH were brief and consisted of descriptive terms. After instruction, the definitions were more scientific and reflected the definitions presented during classroom instruction.

  5. Hydrogen-ion titrations of amino acids and proteins in solutions containing concentrated electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Fergg, F.; Kuehner, D.E.; Blanch, H.W.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1994-12-01

    This report describes a first attempt to quantify the net charge as a function of solution pH for lysozyme and {alpha}-chymotrypsin at 0.1 M, 1.0 M and 3.0 M ionic strength, (IS). The calculations are based on the residue (titratable group) pK{sub a}`s in the amino-acid sequence of the protein. To determine these pK{sub a}`s, a simple theory was used which assumes that the pK{sub a}`s are independent from each other in the protein and are equal to their pK{sub a} values in free amino-acid solution (Independent-Site Theory, IST). Residue pK{sub a}`s were obtained from amino-acid hydrogen-ion titrations at three different KCl concentrations corresponding to 0.1M, 1.0M and 3.0M ionic strength. After construction of a suitable apparatus, the experimental procedure and data reduction were computerized to perform a large number of titrations. Most measured pK{sub a}`s showed high reproducibility (the difference of pK{sub a} values observed between two experiments was less than 0.05). For IS = 0.1M, observed pK{sub a}`s agreed with literature values to within a few hundredths of a pH unit. Furthermore, the ionic-strength dependence of the pK{sub a}`s followed the trends reported in the literature, viz. pK{sub a} values decrease with increasing ionic strength until they reach a minimum at about IS = 0.5M. At still higher IS, pK{sub a}`s increase as the ionic strength rises to 3M. The known pK{sub a}`s of all titratable groups in a protein were used with the IST to give a first approximation of how the protein net charge varies with pH at high ionic strength. A comparison of the titration curves based on the IST with experimental lysozyme and {alpha}-chymotrypsin titration data indicates acceptable agreement at IS = 0.1M. However, comparison of measured and calculated titration curves at IS = 1M and IS = 3M indicates only quantitative agreement.

  6. 3-D Surface Visualization of pH Titration "Topos": Equivalence Point Cliffs, Dilution Ramps, and Buffer Plateaus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Garon C.; Hossain, Md Mainul; MacCarthy, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    3-D topographic surfaces ("topos") can be generated to visualize how pH behaves during titration and dilution procedures. The surfaces are constructed by plotting computed pH values above a composition grid with volume of base added in one direction and overall system dilution on the other. What emerge are surface features that

  7. 3-D Surface Visualization of pH Titration "Topos": Equivalence Point Cliffs, Dilution Ramps, and Buffer Plateaus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Garon C.; Hossain, Md Mainul; MacCarthy, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    3-D topographic surfaces ("topos") can be generated to visualize how pH behaves during titration and dilution procedures. The surfaces are constructed by plotting computed pH values above a composition grid with volume of base added in one direction and overall system dilution on the other. What emerge are surface features that…

  8. Titration of gold nanoparticles in phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Han-Wen; Schadt, Mark J; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2015-12-01

    In the organic-aqueous phase transfer process of gold nanoparticles, there are two types of distinctive interfaces involving hydrophilic and hydrophobic ligands, the understanding of which is important for the design of functional nanomaterials for analytical/bioanalytical applications and the control over the nanoparticles' nanoactivity and nanotoxicity in different phases. This report describes new findings of an investigation of the quantitative aspect of ligand ion pairing at the capping monolayer structure that drives the phase extraction of gold nanoparticles. Alkanethiolate-capped gold nanoparticles of 8 nm diameter with high size monodispersity (RSD ∼ 5%) were first derivatized by a ligand place exchange reaction with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid to form a mixed monolayer shell consisting of both hydrophobic (-CH3) and hydrophilic (-COOH) groups. It was followed by quantitative titration of the resulting nanoparticles with a cationic species (-NR4(+)) in a toluene phase, yielding ion pairing of -NR4(+) and -COO(-) on part of the capping monolayer. Analysis of the phase extraction allowed a quantitative determination of the percentage of ion pairing and structural changes in the capping monolayer on the nanoparticles. The results, along with morphological characterization, are discussed in terms of the interfacial structural changes and their implications on the rational design of surface-functionalized nanoparticles and fine tuning of the interfacial reactivity. PMID:26523548

  9. Photometric Studies of GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Cowardin, Heather M.; Barker, Edwin; Abercromby, Kira J.; Foreman, Gary; Horstman, Matt

    2009-01-01

    The photometric signature of a debris object can be useful in determining what the physical characteristics of a piece of debris are. We report on optical observations in multiple filters of debris at geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). Our sample is taken from GEO objects discovered in a survey with the University of Michigan's 0.6-m aperture Schmidt telescope MODEST (for Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), and then followed up in real-time with the SMARTS (Small and Medium Aperture Research Telescope System) 0.9-m at CTIO for orbits and photometry. Our goal is to determine 6 parameter orbits and measure colors for all objects fainter than R = 15 th magnitude that are discovered in the MODEST survey. At this magnitude the distribution of observed angular rates changes significantly from that of brighter objects. There are two objectives: 1. Estimate the orbital distribution of objects selected on the basis of two observational criteria: brightness (magnitude) and angular rates. 2. Obtain magnitudes and colors in standard astronomical filters (BVRI) for comparison with reflectance spectra of likely spacecraft materials. What is the faint debris likely to be? In this paper we report on the photometric results. For a sample of 50 objects, more than 90 calibrated sequences of R-B-V-I-R magnitudes have been obtained with the CTIO 0.9-m. For objects that do not show large brightness variations, the colors are largely redder than solar in both B-R and R-I. The width of the color distribution may be intrinsic to the nature of the surfaces, but also could be that we are seeing irregularly shaped objects and measuring the colors at different times with just one telescope. For a smaller sample of objects we have observed with synchronized CCD cameras on the two telescopes. The CTIO 0.9-m observes in B, and MODEST in R. The CCD cameras are electronically linked together so that the start time and duration of observations are the same to better than 50 milliseconds. Thus the B-R color is a true measure of the surface of the debris piece facing the telescopes for that observation. Any change in color reflects a real change in the debris surface.

  10. Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric telescope automation and observing software

    SciTech Connect

    Eric H. Neilsen, Jr. et al.

    2002-10-16

    The photometric telescope (PT) provides observations necessary for the photometric calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Because the attention of the observing staff is occupied by the operation of the 2.5 meter telescope which takes the survey data proper, the PT must reliably take data with little supervision. In this paper we describe the PT's observing program, MOP, which automates most tasks necessary for observing. MOP's automated target selection is closely modeled on the actions a human observer might take, and is built upon a user interface that can be (and has been) used for manual operation. This results in an interface that makes it easy for an observer to track the activities of the automating procedures and intervene with minimum disturbance when necessary. MOP selects targets from the same list of standard star and calibration fields presented to the user, and chooses standard star fields covering ranges of airmass, color, and time necessary to monitor atmospheric extinction and produce a photometric solution. The software determines when additional standard star fields are unnecessary, and selects survey calibration fields according to availability and priority. Other automated features of MOP, such as maintaining the focus and keeping a night log, are also built around still functional manual interfaces, allowing the observer to be as active in observing as desired; MOP's automated features may be used as tools for manual observing, ignored entirely, or allowed to run the telescope with minimal supervision when taking routine data.

  11. Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric telescope automation and observing software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilsen, Eric H., Jr.; Uomoto, Alan; Kent, Steven M.; Annis, James T.

    2002-12-01

    The photometric telescope (PT) provides observations necessary for the photometric calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Because the attention of the observing staff is occupied by the operation of the 2.5 meter telescope which takes the survey data proper, the PT must reliably take data with little supervision. In this paper we describe the PT's observing program, MOP, which automates most tasks necessary for observing. MOP's automated target selection is closely modeled on the actions a human observer might take, and is built upon a user interface that can be (and has been) used for manual operation. This results in an interface that makes it easy for an observer to track the activities of the automating procedures and intervene with minimum disturbance when necessary. MOP selects targets from the same list of standard star and calibration fields presented to the user, and chooses standard star fields covering ranges of airmass, color, and time necessary to monitor atmospheric extinction and produce a photometric solution. The software determines when additional standard star fields are unnecessary, and selects survey calibration fields according to availability and priority. Other automated features of MOP, such as maintaining the focus and keeping a night log, are also built around still functional manual interfaces, allowing the observer to be as active in observing as desired; MOP's automated features may be used as tools for manual observing, ignored entirely, or allowed to run the telescope with minimal supervision when taking routine data.

  12. Photometric theory for wide-angle phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usher, Peter D.

    1990-01-01

    An examination is made of the problem posed by wide-angle photographic photometry, in order to extract a photometric-morphological history of Comet P/Halley. Photometric solutions are presently achieved over wide angles through a generalization of an assumption-free moment-sum method. Standard stars in the field allow a complete solution to be obtained for extinction, sky brightness, and the characteristic curve. After formulating Newton's method for the solution of the general nonlinear least-square problem, an implementation is undertaken for a canonical data set. Attention is given to the problem of random and systematic photometric errors.

  13. Photometric theory for wide-angle phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, P. D.

    1990-07-01

    An examination is made of the problem posed by wide-angle photographic photometry, in order to extract a photometric-morphological history of Comet P/Halley. Photometric solutions are presently achieved over wide angles through a generalization of an assumption-free moment-sum method. Standard stars in the field allow a complete solution to be obtained for extinction, sky brightness, and the characteristic curve. After formulating Newton's method for the solution of the general nonlinear least-square problem, an implementation is undertaken for a canonical data set. Attention is given to the problem of random and systematic photometric errors.

  14. Rapid Clozapine Titration in Patients with Treatment Refractory Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Poyraz, Cana Aksoy; Özdemir, Armağan; Sağlam, Nazife Gamze Usta; Turan, Şenol; Poyraz, Burç Çağrı; Tomruk, Nesrin; Duran, Alaattin

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of rapid clozapine titration in patients with schizophrenia in hospital settings. We conducted a retrospective two-center cohort study to compare the safety and effectiveness of clozapine with different titration rates in treatment-refractory patients with schizophrenia. In the first center, clozapine was started at 25-50 mg followed by 50-100 mg as needed every 6 h on day 1, followed by increases of 50-100 mg/day. In the second center, titration was slower; clozapine initiated with 12.5-50 mg on day 1 followed by increases of 25-50 mg/day. The number of days between starting of clozapine until discharge was shorter in the rapid titration group (22.4 ± 8.72 vs 27.0 ± 10.5, p = 0.1). Number of days of total hospital stay were significantly shorter in the rapid titration group (29.6 ± 10.6 vs 41.2 ± 14.8, p = 0.002). Hypotension was more common in the rapid titration group and one patient had suspected myocarditis. Rapid clozapine titration appeared safe and effective. The length of stay following initiation of clozapine was shorter in the rapid-titration group, although this was not statistically significant. However starting clozapine earlier together with rapid titration has significantly shortened the length of hospital stay in patients with treatment refractory schizophrenia. PMID:26433727

  15. A Student-Designed Potentiometric Titration: Quantitative Determination of Iron(II) by Caro's Acid Titration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Joyce R.; Tucker, Sheryl A.; Acree, William E., Jr.; Sees, Jennifer A.; Hall, Lindsey H.

    1996-10-01

    A laboratory experiment involving the feasibility of using Caro's acid, H2SO5, as a titrant in the potentiometric determination of iron (II) is presented. Specific items considered in the experiment include (i) method of endpoint detection; (ii) shelf-life stability of titrant; (iii) accuracy, relative precision and experimental uncertainty; and (iv) which common cations and/or anions (if any) interfere with the titration. Typical student results gave iron (II) concentrations within 1-2 % of the "true" values. Of the 14 cation/anion pairs suggested in the paper, only time(II) was found to interfere with the quantitative determination of iron (II) using Caro's acid titrant.

  16. Photometric stereo without multiple images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drew, Mark S.

    1997-06-01

    Photometric stereo (PMS) recovers orientation vectors from a set of graylevel images. Under orthography, when the lights are unknown, and for a single uniform Lambertian surface, one can recover surface normals up to an unknown overall orthogonal transformation. The same situation obtains if, instead of three graylevel images, one uses a single RGB image taken with at least three point or extended colored lights impinging on the surface at once. Then using a robust technique and the constraints among the resulting three effective lighting vectors one can recover effective lights as well as normals, with no unknown rotation. However, in the case of a non-Lambertian object, PMS reduces to the idea of using a lookup table (LUT) based on a calibration sphere. Here, we show that a LUT can also be used in the many-colored- lights paradigm, eliminating the need for three separate images as in standard PMS. As well, we show how to transform a calibration sphere made of a particular material into a theoretical sphere for a cognate material similar in its specular properties but of a different color. In particular, we postulate that a LUT developed from one human's skin can be used for any other person; problems arising from shadows, hair, eyes, etc. are automatically eliminated using robust statistics. Results are shown using both synthetic and real images.

  17. Photometric properties of Triton hazes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, J.; Veverka, J.

    1994-01-01

    Voyager imaging observations of Triton have been used to investigate the characteristics of the atmospheric hazes on Triton at three wavelengths: violet (0.41 micrometers), blue (0.48 micrometers), and green (0.56 micrometers). The globally averaged optical depth is wavelength dependent, varying from 0.034 in green to 0.063 in violet. These photometric results are dominated by the properties of localized discrete clouds rather than by those of the thinner, more widespread haze known to occur on Triton. The cloud particles are bright, with single-scattering albedos near unity at all three wavelengths, suggestive of a transparent icy condensate. The asymmetry parameter (+0.6) and the wavelength dependence of the optical depth both indicate cloud particles 0.2-0.4 micrometers in radius. The clouds are concentrated at 50-60 deg S latitude, where opacities up to three times the global average are observed. This is the same latitude region where most of the evidence for current surface activity is found, suggesting that the clouds may be related to the plumes or at least to some process connected with the sublimation of the south polar cap. The effects of possible temporal variations in the haze opacity are examined. Increases in the haze opacity tend to redden Triton. However, the degree of reddening is not sufficient to explain the full range of observed changed in Triton over the past decade; variations in the surface properties appear to be necessary.

  18. Photometric Study of Uranian Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kesten, Philip R.

    1998-01-01

    The best summary of my work at NASA is expressed in the following abstract, submitted the Division for Planetary Science of the American Astronomical Society and to be presented at the annual meeting in Madison in October. We report photometric measurements of Uranian satellites Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel and Titania (10.4 Aug. 1995), and Neptune's satellite Triton (21.2 Sept. 1995) with the infrared camera (IRCAM) and standard J (1.13 - 1.42 microns), H (1.53 - 1.81 microns), and K (2.00 - 2.41 microns) filters at the 3.8-m UKIRT telescope on Mauna Kea. The individual images frames are 256 x 256 pixels with a platescale of .286 arcsec/pixel, resulting in a 1.22 arc min field of view. This summer brought the IR photometry measurements nearly to a close. As indicated by the abstract above, I will present this work at the annual DPS meeting in October. In anticipation of the opening of the new Carl Sagan Laboratory for Cosmochemisty, of which I will be a participating member, I also devoted a considerable fraction of the summer to learning the biochemistry which underlies the experiments to be conducted. To put the end of the summary close to the beginning, it was a most productive summer.

  19. Classic and new photometric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, I. S.

    Many large photometric surveys are based on new or unusual systems. The users of the information they provide need to be aware of certain pitfalls. This paper outlines some of them. Very often the stated fiducal colours of stars in a given survey are based on modelling from theoretical atmospheres or spectrophotometry rather than actual observational data made with the same set of filters. While models may be satisfactory at the initial stage of data interpretation, for refined studies they may prove inadequate. The output of a particular detector is dependent, inter alia, on its quantum efficiency, its fore-optics including filters, and the transparency of the Earth's atmosphere. These can virtually never be reproduced exactly between one installation and another. However, for objects with smooth spectra and not suffering severe interstellar reddening, colour transformations are usually reliable between systems with filters having similar central wavelengths and bandwidths. In studies of extincted regions, such as along the Galactic Plane, the calculation of reddening amounts can depend on detailed filter characteristics and not merely on their ``effective wavelengths". Confusion may become significant according to source densities and pixel sizes. In heavily extincted areas, there is a danger of identifying nearby faint sources with distant ones observed at longer wavelengths where the extinction is less. It is therefore necessary to understand the process that is used in cross-correlating the different images when cataloguing colours.

  20. Precision Photometric Redshifts Of Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, L.; Annis, J.

    2006-06-01

    Clusters of galaxies provide a means to achieve more precise photometric redshifts than achievable using individual galaxies simply because of the numbers of galaxies available in clusters. Here we examine the expectation that one can achieve root-N improvement using the N galaxies in a cluster. We extracted from a maxBCG SDSS cluster catalog 28,000 clusters and used SDSS DR4 spectra to find spectroscopic redshifts for the cluster. We examined both using the brightest cluster galaxy redshift as the proxy for the cluster and using the mean of a collection of galaxies within a given angular diameter and redshift (about the cluster photo-z) range. We find that the BCG provides a better estimate of the cluster redshift, to be understood in the context of a handful of spectra in the neighborhood of the cluster. We find that the cluster photo-z has an approximate root-N scaling behavior with the normalization for maxBCG techniques being 0.07. We predict what ``afterburner photo-z'' techniques, which use individual galaxy photo-z's good to 0.03-0.05, can achieve for cluster catalogs and for cluster cosmology.

  1. Catalogue-Wide Satellite Photometric Behavior Paradigms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejduk, M.

    2010-09-01

    Few categorization approaches for satellite photometric response as constructed from individual point-photometry measurements have been proposed; and as this is the largest and most typical photometry-collection approach, the discipline is in need of a taxonomy for the different photometric response types. The Joint Space Operations Center (JSpOC) photometric modeling approach offers an opportunity to define categories of response, as it calculates a number of parameters in applying both deterministic and stochastic models in order to predict expected satellite brightnesses. In examining these calculated parameters, a subset show promise in both identifying pathological cases and separating the more mainstream response into natural categories. A successive application of four nested tests is proposed in order to place satellites into basic photometric response types.

  2. Microscope Titration and Extraction of DNA from Liver.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Lois T.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes a simple and inexpensive, one-period activity to extract DNA to make the study of DNA less abstract. A microscope titration is used to determine when cells are ready for DNA extraction. (PR)

  3. A Titration Technique for Demonstrating a Magma Replenishment Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodder, A. P. W.

    1983-01-01

    Conductiometric titrations can be used to simulate subduction-setting volcanism. Suggestions are made as to the use of this technique in teaching volcanic mechanisms and geochemical indications of tectonic settings. (JN)

  4. Three-dimensional stereo by photometric ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, L.B.; Angelopoulou, E.

    1994-11-01

    We present a methodology for corresponding a dense set of points on an object surface from photometric values for three-dimensional stereo computation of depth. The methodology utilizes multiple stereo pairs of images, with each stereo pair being taken of the identical scene but under different illumination. With just two stereo pairs of images taken under two different illumination conditions, a stereo pair of ratio images can be produced, one for the ratio of left-hand images and one for the ratio of right-hand images. We demonstrate how the photometric ratios composing these images can be used for accurate correspondence of object points. Object points having the same photometric ratio with respect to two different illumination conditions constitute a well-defined equivalence class of physical constraints defined by local surface orientation relative to illumination conditions. We formally show that for diffuse reflection the photometric ratio is invariant to varying camera characteristics, surface albedo, and viewpoint and that therefore the same photometric ratio in both images of a stereo pair implies the same equivalence class of physical constraints. The correspondence of photometric ratios along epipolar lines in a stereo pair of images under different illumination conditions is a correspondence of equivalent physical constraints, and the determination of depth from stereo can be performed. Whereas illumination planning is required, our photometric-based stereo methodology does not require knowledge of illumination conditions in the actual computation of three-dimensional depth and is applicable to perspective views. This technique extends the stereo determination of three-dimensional depth to smooth featureless surfaces without the use of precisely calibrated lighting. We demonstrate experimental depth maps from a dense set of points on smooth objects of known ground-truth shape, determined to within 1% depth accuracy.

  5. PHOTOMETRIC ORBITS OF EXTRASOLAR PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Robert A.

    2009-09-10

    We define and analyze the photometric orbit (PhO) of an extrasolar planet observed in reflected light. In our definition, the PhO is a Keplerian entity with six parameters: semimajor axis, eccentricity, mean anomaly at some particular time, argument of periastron, inclination angle, and effective radius, which is the square root of the geometric albedo times the planetary radius. Preliminarily, we assume a Lambertian phase function. We study in detail the case of short-period giant planets (SPGPs) and observational parameters relevant to the Kepler mission: 20 ppm photometry with normal errors, 6.5 hr cadence, and three-year duration. We define a relevant 'planetary population of interest' in terms of probability distributions of the PhO parameters. We perform Monte Carlo experiments to estimate the ability to detect planets and to recover PhO parameters from light curves. We calibrate the completeness of a periodogram search technique, and find structure caused by degeneracy. We recover full orbital solutions from synthetic Kepler data sets and estimate the median errors in recovered PhO parameters. We treat in depth a case of a Jupiter body-double. For the stated assumptions, we find that Kepler should obtain orbital solutions for many of the 100-760 SPGP that Jenkins and Doyle estimate Kepler will discover. Because most or all of these discoveries will be followed up by ground-based radial velocity observations, the estimates of inclination angle from the PhO may enable the calculation of true companion masses: Kepler photometry may break the 'msin i' degeneracy. PhO observations may be difficult. There is uncertainty about how low the albedos of SPGPs actually are, about their phase functions, and about a possible noise floor due to systematic errors from instrumental and stellar sources. Nevertheless, simple detection of SPGPs in reflected light should be robust in the regime of Kepler photometry, and estimates of all six orbital parameters may be feasible in at least a subset of cases.

  6. Photometric Orbits of Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Robert A.

    2009-09-01

    We define and analyze the photometric orbit (PhO) of an extrasolar planet observed in reflected light. In our definition, the PhO is a Keplerian entity with six parameters: semimajor axis, eccentricity, mean anomaly at some particular time, argument of periastron, inclination angle, and effective radius, which is the square root of the geometric albedo times the planetary radius. Preliminarily, we assume a Lambertian phase function. We study in detail the case of short-period giant planets (SPGPs) and observational parameters relevant to the Kepler mission: 20 ppm photometry with normal errors, 6.5 hr cadence, and three-year duration. We define a relevant "planetary population of interest" in terms of probability distributions of the PhO parameters. We perform Monte Carlo experiments to estimate the ability to detect planets and to recover PhO parameters from light curves. We calibrate the completeness of a periodogram search technique, and find structure caused by degeneracy. We recover full orbital solutions from synthetic Kepler data sets and estimate the median errors in recovered PhO parameters. We treat in depth a case of a Jupiter body-double. For the stated assumptions, we find that Kepler should obtain orbital solutions for many of the 100-760 SPGP that Jenkins & Doyle estimate Kepler will discover. Because most or all of these discoveries will be followed up by ground-based radial velocity observations, the estimates of inclination angle from the PhO may enable the calculation of true companion masses: Kepler photometry may break the "msin i" degeneracy. PhO observations may be difficult. There is uncertainty about how low the albedos of SPGPs actually are, about their phase functions, and about a possible noise floor due to systematic errors from instrumental and stellar sources. Nevertheless, simple detection of SPGPs in reflected light should be robust in the regime of Kepler photometry, and estimates of all six orbital parameters may be feasible in at least a subset of cases.

  7. Zernike polynomials for photometric characterization of LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velázquez, J. L.; Ferrero, A.; Pons, A.; Campos, J.; Hernanz, M. L.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a method based on Zernike polynomials to characterize photometric quantities and descriptors of light emitting diodes (LEDs) from measurements of the angular distribution of the luminous intensity, such as total luminous flux, BA, inhomogeneity, anisotropy, direction of the optical axis and Lambertianity of the source. The performance of this method was experimentally tested for 18 high-power LEDs from different manufacturers and with different photometric characteristics. A small set of Zernike coefficients can be used to calculate all the mentioned photometric quantities and descriptors. For applications not requiring a great accuracy such as those of lighting design, the angular distribution of the luminous intensity of most of the studied LEDs can be interpolated with only two Zernike polynomials.

  8. Defining photometric peculiar type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    González-Gaitán, S.; Pignata, G.; Förster, F.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Bufano, F.; Galbany, L.; Hamuy, M.; De Jaeger, T.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Phillips, M. M.; Folatelli, G.; Anderson, J. P.

    2014-11-10

    We present a new photometric identification technique for SN 1991bg-like type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), i.e., objects with light curve characteristics such as later primary maxima and the absence of a secondary peak in redder filters. This method is capable of selecting this sub-group from the normal type Ia population. Furthermore, we find that recently identified peculiar sub-types such as SNe Iax and super-Chandrasekhar SNe Ia have photometric characteristics similar to 91bg-like SNe Ia, namely, the absence of secondary maxima and shoulders at longer wavelengths, and can also be classified with our technique. The similarity of these different SN Ia sub-groups perhaps suggests common physical conditions. This typing methodology permits the photometric identification of peculiar SNe Ia in large upcoming wide-field surveys either to study them further or to obtain a pure sample of normal SNe Ia for cosmological studies.

  9. Potentiometric titration and equivalent weight of humic acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pommer, A.M.; Breger, I.A.

    1960-01-01

    The "acid nature" of humic acid has been controversial for many years. Some investigators claim that humic acid is a true weak acid, while others feel that its behaviour during potentiometric titration can be accounted for by colloidal adsorption of hydrogen ions. The acid character of humic acid has been reinvestigated using newly-derived relationships for the titration of weak acids with strong base. Re-interpreting the potentiometric titration data published by Thiele and Kettner in 1953, it was found that Merck humic acid behaves as a weak polyelectrolytic acid having an equivalent weight of 150, a pKa of 6.8 to 7.0, and a titration exponent of about 4.8. Interdretation of similar data pertaining to the titration of phenol-formaldehyde and pyrogallol-formaldehyde resins, considered to be analogs for humic acid by Thiele and Kettner, leads to the conclusion that it is not possible to differentiate between adsorption and acid-base reaction for these substances. ?? 1960.

  10. Photometric diversity of terrains on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, J.; Veverka, J.; Helfenstein, P.; Lee, P.

    1994-01-01

    Voyager disk-resolved images of Triton in the violet (0.41 micrometers) and green (0.56 micrometer wavelengths have been analyzed to derive the photometric characteristics of terrains on Triton. Similar conclusions are found using two distinct but related definitions of photometric units, one based on color ratio and albedo properties (A. S. McEwen, 1990), the other on albedo and brightness ratios at different phase angles (P. Lee et al., 1992). A significant diversity of photometric behavior, much broader than that discovered so far on any other icy satellite, occurs among Triton's terrains. Remarkably, differences in photometric behavior do not correlate well with geologic terrain boundaries defined on the basis of surface morphology. This suggests that in most cases photometric properties on Triton are controlled by thin deposits superposed on underlying geologic units. Single scattering albedos are 0.98 or higher and asymmetry factors range from -0.35 to -0.45 for most units. The most distinct scattering behavior is exhibited by the reddish northern units already identified as the Anomalously Scattering Region (ASR), which scatters light almost isotropically with g = -0.04. In part due to the effects of Triton's clouds and haze, it is difficult to constrain the value of bar-theta, Hapke's macroscopic roughness parameter, precisely for Triton or to map differences in bar-theta among the different photometric terrains. However, our study shows that Triton must be relatively smooth, with bar-theta less than 15-20 degs and suggests that a value of 14 degs is appropriate. The differences in photometric characteristics lead to significantly different phase angle behavior for the various terrains. For example, a terrain (e.g., the ASR) that appears dark relative to another at low phase angles will reverse its contrast (become relatively brighter) at larger phase angles. The photometric parameters have been used to calculate hemispherical albedos for the units and to infer likely surface temperatures. Based on these results, we determine that all but the most southerly regions (i.e., mostly south of the equator) of the reddish northern terrains are likely to have been covered with deposits of nitrogen frost at the time of the Voyager flyby, in agreement with the suggestion from the photometry that these units are overlain by a thin veneer of material.

  11. Stellar cycles from photometric data: CoRoT stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira Lopes, C. E.; Leão, I. C.; de Freitas, D. B.; Canto Martins, B. L.; Catelan, M.; De Medeiros, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    Context. Until a few years ago, the amplitude variation in the photometric data had been explored to a limited extent mainly because of time resolution and photometric sensitivity limitations. This investigation is now possible thanks to the Kepler and CoRoT databases which provide a unique set of data for studying the nature of stellar variability cycles. Aims: The present study characterizes the amplitude variation in a sample of main-sequence stars with light curves collected using CoRoT exofield CCDs. Methods: We analyze potential stellar activity cycles by studying the variability amplitude over small boxes. The cycle periods and amplitudes were computed based on the Lomb-Scargle periodogram, harmonic fits, and visual inspection. As a first application of our approach, we considered the photometric data for 16 CoRoT FGK main sequence stars, revisited during the IRa01, LRa01 and LRa06 CoRoT runs. Results: The 16 CoRoT stars appear to follow the empirical relations between activity cycle periods (Pcyc) and the rotation period (Prot) found by previous works. In addition to the so-called A (active) and I (inactive) sequences previously identified, there is a possible third sequence, here named S (short-cycles) sequence. However, recovery fractions estimated from simulations suggest that only a half of our sample has confident cycle measurements. Therefore, more study is needed to verify our results, and Kepler data will clearly be useful for such a study. Overall, our procedure provides a key tool for exploring the CoRoT and Kepler databases to identify and characterize stellar cycle variability. The CoRoT space mission was developed and is operated by the French space agency CNES, with the participation of ESA's RSSD and Science Programmes, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Germany, and Spain.

  12. ASSESSMENT OF ATTENTION THRESHOLD IN RATS BY TITRATION OF VISUAL CUE DURATION DURING THE FIVE CHOICE SERIAL REACTION TIME TASK

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Thomas J.; Grigg, Amanda; Kim, Susy A.; Ririe, Douglas G.; Eisenach, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Background The 5 choice serial reaction time task (5CSRTT) is commonly used to assess attention in rodents. We sought to develop a variant of the 5CSRTT that would speed training to objective success criteria, and to test whether this variant could determine attention capability in each subject. New Method Fisher 344 rats were trained to perform a variant of the 5CSRTT in which the duration of visual cue presentation (cue duration) was titrated between trials based upon performance. The cue duration was decreased when the subject made a correct response, or increased with incorrect responses or omissions. Additionally, test day challenges were provided consisting of lengthening the intertrial interval and inclusion of a visual distracting stimulus. Results Rats readily titrated the cue duration to less than 1 sec in 25 training sessions or less (mean ± SEM, 22.9 ± 0.7), and the median cue duration (MCD) was calculated as a measure of attention threshold. Increasing the intertrial interval increased premature responses, decreased the number of trials completed, and increased the MCD. Decreasing the intertrial interval and time allotted for consuming the food reward demonstrated that a minimum of 3.5 sec is required for rats to consume two food pellets and successfully attend to the next trial. Visual distraction in the form of a 3 Hz flashing light increased the MCD and both premature and time out responses. Comparison with existing method The titration variant of the 5CSRTT is a useful method that dynamically measures attention threshold across a wide range of subject performance, and significantly decreases the time required for training. Task challenges produce similar effects in the titration method as reported for the classical procedure. Conclusions The titration 5CSRTT method is an efficient training procedure for assessing attention and can be utilized to assess the limit in performance ability across subjects and various schedule manipulations. PMID:25528113

  13. Photometric method for determination of acidity constants through integral spectra analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zevatskiy, Yuriy Eduardovich; Ruzanov, Daniil Olegovich; Samoylov, Denis Vladimirovich

    2015-04-01

    An express method for determination of acidity constants of organic acids, based on the analysis of the integral transmittance vs. pH dependence is developed. The integral value is registered as a photocurrent of photometric device simultaneously with potentiometric titration. The proposed method allows to obtain pKa using only simple and low-cost instrumentation. The optical part of the experimental setup has been optimized through the exclusion of the monochromator device. Thus it only takes 10-15 min to obtain one pKa value with the absolute error of less than 0.15 pH units. Application limitations and reliability of the method have been tested for a series of organic acids of various nature.

  14. Anion-exchange nanospheres as titration reagents for anionic analytes.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jingying; Xie, Xiaojiang; Bakker, Eric

    2015-08-18

    We present here anion-exchange nanospheres as novel titration reagents for anions. The nanospheres contain a lipophilic cation for which the counterion is initially Cl(-). Ion exchange takes place between Cl(-) in the nanospheres and a more lipophilic anion in the sample, such as ClO4(-) and NO3(-). Consecutive titration in the same sample solution for ClO4(-) and NO3(-) were demonstrated. As an application, the concentration of NO3(-) in spinach was successfully determined using this method. PMID:26201018

  15. A photometric model of the zodiacal light.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, F. E.

    1972-01-01

    An intercomparison of published photometric investigations of the zodiacal light and gegenschein is made, leading to a compilation of brightnesses over the entire sky in a reseau with 5-deg intervals. The results are given in absolute units. Several graphical representations illustrate the compilation.

  16. THE Pan-STARRS1 PHOTOMETRIC SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Tonry, J. L.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Hodapp, K. W.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Magnier, E. A.; Morgan, J. S.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Stubbs, C. W.; Shivvers, I. S.; Lykke, K. R.; Doherty, P.; Price, P. A.

    2012-05-10

    The Pan-STARRS1 survey is collecting multi-epoch, multi-color observations of the sky north of declination -30 Degree-Sign to unprecedented depths. These data are being photometrically and astrometrically calibrated and will serve as a reference for many other purposes. In this paper, we present our determination of the Pan-STARRS1 photometric system: g{sub P1}, r{sub P1}, i{sub P1}, z{sub P1}, y{sub P1}, and w{sub P1}. The Pan-STARRS1 photometric system is fundamentally based on the Hubble Space Telescope Calspec spectrophotometric observations, which in turn are fundamentally based on models of white dwarf atmospheres. We define the Pan-STARRS1 magnitude system and describe in detail our measurement of the system passbands, including both the instrumental sensitivity and atmospheric transmission functions. By-products, including transformations to other photometric systems, Galactic extinction, and stellar locus, are also provided. We close with a discussion of remaining systematic errors.

  17. Kohoutek, photometric photography experiment (S233)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, C. A.; Craven, P. D.

    1981-01-01

    The final results of the Skylab 4 experiment S233, Kohoutek photometric photography experiment, which undertook a series of visible light photographs suitable for photometry and for a photographic history of Comet Kohoutek are described. The experiment concept, the data reduction method, and the results obtained are discussed.

  18. System for clinical photometric stereo endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durr, Nicholas J.; González, Germán.; Lim, Daryl; Traverso, Giovanni; Nishioka, Norman S.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.; Parot, Vicente

    2014-02-01

    Photometric stereo endoscopy is a technique that captures information about the high-spatial-frequency topography of the field of view simultaneously with a conventional color image. Here we describe a system that will enable photometric stereo endoscopy to be clinically evaluated in the large intestine of human patients. The clinical photometric stereo endoscopy system consists of a commercial gastroscope, a commercial video processor, an image capturing and processing unit, custom synchronization electronics, white light LEDs, a set of four fibers with diffusing tips, and an alignment cap. The custom pieces that come into contact with the patient are composed of biocompatible materials that can be sterilized before use. The components can then be assembled in the endoscopy suite before use. The resulting endoscope has the same outer diameter as a conventional colonoscope (14 mm), plugs into a commercial video processor, captures topography and color images at 15 Hz, and displays the conventional color image to the gastroenterologist in real-time. We show that this system can capture a color and topographical video in a tubular colon phantom, demonstrating robustness to complex geometries and motion. The reported system is suitable for in vivo evaluation of photometric stereo endoscopy in the human large intestine.

  19. Philosophy and updating of the asteroid photometric catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnusson, Per; Barucci, M. Antonietta; Capria, M. T.; Dahlgren, Mats; Fulchignoni, Marcello; Lagerkvist, C. I.

    1992-01-01

    The Asteroid Photometric Catalogue now contains photometric lightcurves for 584 asteroids. We discuss some of the guiding principles behind it. This concerns both observers who offer input to it and users of the product.

  20. Optimal Filter Systems for Photometric Redshift Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benítez, N.; Moles, M.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Alfaro, E.; Broadhurst, T.; Cabrera-Caño, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cepa, J.; Cerviño, M.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.; Fernández-Soto, A.; González Delgado, R. M.; Infante, L.; Márquez, I.; Martínez, V. J.; Masegosa, J.; Del Olmo, A.; Perea, J.; Prada, F.; Quintana, J. M.; Sánchez, S. F.

    2009-02-01

    In the coming years, several cosmological surveys will rely on imaging data to estimate the redshift of galaxies, using traditional filter systems with 4-5 optical broad bands; narrower filters improve the spectral resolution, but strongly reduce the total system throughput. We explore how photometric redshift performance depends on the number of filters nf , characterizing the survey depth by the fraction of galaxies with unambiguous redshift estimates. For a combination of total exposure time and telescope imaging area of 270 hr m2, 4-5 filter systems perform significantly worse, both in completeness depth and precision, than systems with nf gsim 8 filters. Our results suggest that for low nf the color-redshift degeneracies overwhelm the improvements in photometric depth, and that even at higher nf the effective photometric redshift depth decreases much more slowly with filter width than naively expected from the reduction in the signal-to-noise ratio. Adding near-IR observations improves the performance of low-nf systems, but still the system which maximizes the photometric redshift completeness is formed by nine filters with logarithmically increasing bandwidth (constant resolution) and half-band overlap, reaching ~0.7 mag deeper, with 10% better redshift precision, than 4-5 filter systems. A system with 20 constant-width, nonoverlapping filters reaches only ~0.1 mag shallower than 4-5 filter systems, but has a precision almost three times better, δz = 0.014(1 + z) versus δz = 0.042(1 + z). We briefly discuss a practical implementation of such a photometric system: the ALHAMBRA Survey.

  1. Modified titrimetric determination of plutonium using photometric end-point detection

    SciTech Connect

    Baughman, W.J.; Dahlby, J.W.

    1980-04-01

    A method used at LASL for the accurate and precise assay of plutonium metal was modified for the measurement of plutonium in plutonium oxides, nitrate solutions, and in other samples containing large quantities of plutonium in oxidized states higher than +3. In this modified method, the plutonium oxide or other sample is dissolved using the sealed-reflux dissolution method or other appropriate methods. Weighed aliquots, containing approximately 100 mg of plutonium, of the dissolved sample or plutonium nitrate solution are fumed to dryness with an HC1O/sub 4/-H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ mixture. The dried residue is dissolved in dilute H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, and the plutonium is reduced to plutonium (III) with zinc metal. The excess zinc metal is dissolved with HCl, and the solution is passed through a lead reductor column to ensure complete reduction of the plutonium to plutonium (III). The solution, with added ferroin indicator, is then titrated immediately with standardized ceric solution to a photometric end point. For the analysis of plutonium metal solutions, plutonium oxides, and nitrate solutions, the relative standard deviation are 0.06, 0.08, and 0.14%, respectively. Of the elements most likely to be found with the plutonium, only iron, neptunium, and uranium interfere. Small amounts of uranium and iron, which titrate quantitatively in the method, are determined by separate analytical methods, and suitable corrections are applied to the plutonium value. 4 tables, 4 figures.

  2. Titration of Isolated Cell Walls of Lemna minor L 1

    PubMed Central

    Morvan, Claudine; Demarty, Maurice; Thellier, Michel

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical model has been built to bypass the equation of titration of the cell wall. This equation, which is an extension of the Henderson-Hasselbach equation, underlines the importance of the exchange constant, the ionic strength as well as the rate of neutralization. The model is restricted to the case when the ionization degree is equal to the neutralization degree. The shape of the titration curve is shown to be strongly dependent on the valency of the base used. Experimental results have shown that isolated cell walls bear at least two kinds of sites. The first sites which are titrated after a short time of equilibration are attributed to polyuronic acids (capacity: 0.3 milliequivalents per gram fresh cell walls). The second sites, are obtained after a long time of equilibration (capacity: 1.2 to 1.3 milliequivalents per gram, fresh cell walls). Titrations have been performed with different bases [KOH, NaOH, and Ca(OH)2] and under different ionic strengths. The results obtained with NaOH and KOH do not exhibit any difference of selectivity. Conversely, the sites have a much bigger affinity for the Ca2+ ions than for the monovalent ones. The apparent pKa of the uronic acids was estimated to lie between 3.0 and 3.4; this is consistent with the values obtained with polyuronic acid solutions. PMID:16660868

  3. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Can Provide Critical Thinking Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Dale E.; Goode, David R.; Seney, Caryn S.; Boatwright, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    College chemistry faculties might not have considered including isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) in their majors' curriculum because experimental data from this instrumental method are often analyzed via automation (software). However, the software-based data analysis can be replaced with a spreadsheet-based analysis that is readily

  4. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Can Provide Critical Thinking Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Dale E.; Goode, David R.; Seney, Caryn S.; Boatwright, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    College chemistry faculties might not have considered including isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) in their majors' curriculum because experimental data from this instrumental method are often analyzed via automation (software). However, the software-based data analysis can be replaced with a spreadsheet-based analysis that is readily…

  5. Potentiometric titration of gold, platinum, and some other precious metals

    SciTech Connect

    Selig, W.S.

    1991-02-04

    Gold, platinum, and several other platinum metals can be determined by titration with cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC). CPC forms a precipitate with AuCl{sub 4}{sup {minus}} and PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}}. Differentiation of AuCl{sub 4{minus}} and PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}} with this titrant is not possible; however, their sum can be determined. Titration with tetraphenylarsonium chloride at pH 1 is selective for tetrachloroaurate, which thus can be determined in the presence of hexachloroplatinate. Hexachloroosmate(IV), tetrachloroplatinite(II), tetrachloropalladate(II), hexachloropalladate(IV), and hexachloroiridate(IV) can also be determined potentiometrically vs. CPC. The indicating electrode is prepared by coating a spectroscopic graphite rod with a solution of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) and dioctylphthalate (DOP) in tetrahydrofuran (THF). Gold in gold cyanide plating baths and in potassium aurocyanide can be determined by potentiometric titration vs standard silver nitrate, using a silver ion-selective indicating electrode. The monovalent gold need not be converted to the trivalent state with aqua regia, resulting in a considerable saving of time and effort. Free cyanide and aurocyanide can be titrated sequentially by this method. Chloride does not interfere and can, in fact, also be sequentially determined. 17 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Photometric determination of a boron impurity in hydrochloric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Flyantikova, G.V.; Chekirda, T.N.

    1986-09-01

    Current methods for determining trace amounts of boron in hydrochloric acid can be time-consuming and difficult in the production of boron-free electrodes. The aim of this paper is to develop a procedure for the photometric determination of boron in hydrochloric acid using a simple method which is also readily reproducible. The authors describe the method as based on the evaporation of hydrochloric acid in the presence of mannitol, treatment of the dry residue with a solution of calcium hydroxide, calcined at 800/sup 0/C, and determination of boron in the form of a mixed ligand complex with H-resorcinol and fluorescein in ammonium acetate buffer solution with pH 5.5.

  7. Direct photometric determination of fluorides in potassium chloride and iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Dedkova, V.P.; Savvin, S.B.

    1985-05-01

    An attempt is made to apply the technique of determining fluorides with xylenol orange and sulfochlorophenol S as being the most sensitive in the analysis of of fiber optics. It is known that an increase of the sensitivity of the determination can be achieved on increasing the sample size of the substance to be analyzed, and the length of the absorbing layer. However, a high salt background may have a strong influence on the course of the reaction, and a supplementary of this effect is mad. Potassium chloride and iodide were selected as model compounds. A direct photometric procedure is proposed for determining fluorides in the samples, with a determination limit of 5 x 10/sup -6/%. Such a low determination limit is achieved by increasing the sample weight to 3 g, by increasing the length of the absorbing layer in the cell to 50 mm, and by using a highly sensitive reaction for determining fluorides with zirconium and xylenol orange.

  8. Production of first generation adenoviral vectors for preclinical protocols: amplification, purification and functional titration.

    PubMed

    Armendáriz-Borunda, Juan; Bastidas-Ramírez, Blanca Estela; Sandoval-Rodríguez, Ana; González-Cuevas, Jaime; Gómez-Meda, Belinda; García-Bañuelos, Jesús

    2011-11-01

    Gene therapy represents a promising approach in the treatment of several diseases. Currently, the ideal vector has yet to be designed; though, adenoviral vectors (Ad-v) have provided the most utilized tool for gene transfer due principally to their simple production, among other specific characteristics. Ad-v viability represents a critical variable that may be affected by storage or shipping conditions and therefore it is advisable to be assessed previously to protocol performance. The present work is unique in this matter, as the complete detailed process to obtain Ad-v of preclinical grade is explained. Amplification in permissive HEK-293 cells, purification in CsCl gradients in a period of 10 h, spectrophotometric titration of viral particles (VP) and titration of infectious units (IU), yielding batches of AdβGal, AdGFP, AdHuPA and AdMMP8, of approximately 10¹³-10¹⁴ VP and 10¹²-10¹³ IU were carried out. In vivo functionality of therapeutic AdHuPA and AdMMP8 was evidenced in rats presenting CCl₄-induced fibrosis, as more than 60% of fibrosis was eliminated in livers after systemic delivery through iliac vein in comparison with irrelevant AdβGal. Time required to accomplish the whole Ad-v production steps, including IU titration was 20 to 30 days. We conclude that production of Ad-v following standard operating procedures assuring vector functionality and the possibility to effectively evaluate experimental gene therapy results, leaving aside the use of high-cost commercial kits or sophisticated instrumentation, can be performed in a conventional laboratory of cell culture. PMID:21856222

  9. Titration of vanadium(IV) with cerium(IV) sulphate, with ferroin as indicator, in aqueous acetone as facile reaction medium An analytical and mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Sriramam, K; Sarma, B S; Sundar, B S; Sastry, N R

    1981-05-01

    A new procedure for the titration of vanadium(IV) with cerium(IV) sulphate, with ferroin as indicator, in aqueous acetone medium is reported. A differential determination of iron(II) and vanadium(IV) is also possible. A probable mechanism for the fast ferriin-vanadium(IV) reaction in acetone medium is given. PMID:18962923

  10. Photometric Standards for Non-Standard Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoot, John E.

    2015-05-01

    The AAVSO, professional collaborators, and research consortiums are increasingly requesting that photometric observations be submitted after they have been transformed onto 'standard' photometric systems. This greatly reduces the burden on the principal investigators in managing and merging data from many disparate contributors, but discourages many potential contributors who are unaware that their present equipment can make a valuable contribution. Many potential observers, amateurs, students and instructors are confused over what filters are required and what standards are best. This paper focuses on the best standards and observation methods for observers with one shot color cameras and those possessing monochrome CCD cameras with LRGB filter sets, the two most common configurations used in amateur and educational observatories. This paper examines which current standards best match common equipment and present effective ways for amateurs and students to reduce data to standard systems with common tools and a minimum of mathematical rigor.

  11. Astrophysical science with a spaceborne photometric telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granados, Arno F. (Editor); Borucki, William J. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The FRESIP Project (FRequency of Earth-Sized Inner Planets) is currently under study at NASA Ames Research Center. The goal of FRESIP is the measurement of the frequency of Earth-sized extra-solar planets in inner orbits via the photometric signature of a transit event. This will be accomplished with a spaceborne telescope/photometer capable of photometric precision of two parts in 100,000 at a magnitude of m(sub v) = 12.5. To achieve the maximum scientific value from the FRESIP mission, an astrophysical science workshop was held at the SETI Institute in Mountain View, California, November 11-12, 1993. Workshop participants were invited as experts in their field of astrophysical research and discussed the astrophysical science that can be achieved within the context of the FRESIP mission.

  12. SDSS data management and photometric quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivezić, Ž.; Lupton, R. H.; Schlegel, D.; Boroski, B.; Adelman-McCarthy, J.; Yanny, B.; Kent, S.; Stoughton, C.; Finkbeiner, D.; Padmanabhan, N.; Rockosi, C. M.; Gunn, J. E.; Knapp, G. R.; Strauss, M. A.; Richards, G. T.; Eisenstein, D.; Nicinski, T.; Kleinman, S. J.; Krzesinski, J.; Newman, P. R.; Snedden, S.; Thakar, A. R.; Szalay, A.; Munn, J. A.; Smith, J. A.; Tucker, D.; Lee, B. C.

    2004-10-01

    We summarize the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data acquisition and processing steps, and describe runQA, a pipeline designed for automated data quality assessment. In particular, we show how the position of the stellar locus in color-color diagrams can be used to estimate the accuracy of photometric zeropoint calibration to better than 0.01 mag in 0.03 deg2 patches. Using this method, we estimate that typical photometric zeropoint calibration errors for SDSS imaging data are not larger than ˜0.01 mag in the g, r, and i bands, 0.02 mag in the z band, and 0.03 mag in the u band (root-mean-scatter for zeropoint offsets).

  13. Stellar physics with the ALHAMBRA photometric system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio Villegas, T.; Alfaro, E. J.; Cabrera-Caño, J.; Moles, M.; Benítez, N.; Perea, J.; del Olmo, A.; Fernández-Soto, A.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Broadhurst, T.; Castander, F. J.; Cepa, J.; Cervio, M.; González Delgado, R. M.; Infante, L.; Márquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Martínez, V. J.; Prada, F.; Quintana, J. M.; Sánchez, S. F.

    2011-12-01

    The ALHAMBRA photometric system was specifically designed to perform a tomography of the Universe in some selected areas. Although mainly designed for extragalactic purposes, its 20 contiguous, equal-width, medium-band photometric system in the optical wavelength range, shows a great capacity for stellar classification. In this contribution we propose a methodology for stellar classification and physical parameter estimation (Teff, log g, [Fe/H], and color excess E(B - V)) based on 18 independent reddening-free Q-values from the ALHAMBRA photometry. Based on the theoretical Spectral library BaSeL 2.2, and applied to 288 stars from the Next Generation spectral Library (NGSL), we discuss the reliability of the method and its dependence on the extinction law used.

  14. Mimas - Photometric roughness and albedo map

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verbiscer, Anne J.; Veverka, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    The backscattering phase function asssociated with bright icy satellites may render Hapke's (1986) isotropic approximation to multiple scattering inadequate. A reanalysis is accordingly conducted here of the Voyager observations of Mimas, using a modification to Hapke's equation that accommodates anisotropic multiple scattering, in order to characterize the physical and photometric properties of the heavily cratered icy surface. The roughness parameter of Mimas is in this way redefined, and an accurate albedo map is obtained which deminstrates small latitudinal and longitudinal albedo variations.

  15. Photometric assessment of energy efficient torchieres

    SciTech Connect

    Page, Erik; Siminovitch, Michael

    1997-06-01

    Extensive development of designs and prototyping of energy efficient torchiere systems using compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) has led directly to the production of CFL torchieres by a major US manufacturer. This paper compares the electrical and photometric characteristics of one of the new CFL torchieres to standard tungsten halogen torchieres (halogen uplighters). Power assessments and gonio-photometric data indicate that the new CFL torchiere provides significant energy savings over the standard tungsten halogen torchiere while producing more luminous flux. The energy savings is jointly due to the high source efficacy of the CFLs and the poor performance . of the imported halogen lamps. The paper also presents results from a test site in the student dormitories at Stanford University where a torchiere "lamp swap" program was initiated in which students voluntarily traded their halogen torchieres for CFL torchieres. Out of the 500 torchieres involved in the lamp swap, a random sample of nearly 100 halogen lamps (seasoned in the field and considered to represent a typical population) were collected and photometrically and electrically characterized in the laboratory. These laboratory results indicate that the CFL torchieres use 65 watts to produce 25 percent more light than the 300 W tungsten halogen torchieres they are designed to replace. Additionally, the CFL torchieres have the benefit of a cooler lamp operating temperature, making them safer luminaires.

  16. A Blind Test of Hapke's Photometric Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfenstein, P.; Shepard, M. K.

    2003-01-01

    Hapke's bidirectional reflectance equation is a versatile analytical tool for predicting (i.e. forward modeling) the photometric behavior of a particulate surface from the observed optical and structural properties of its constituents. Remote sensing applications of Hapke s model, however, generally seek to predict the optical and structural properties of particulate soil constituents from the observed photometric behavior of a planetary surface (i.e. inverse-modeling). Our confidence in the latter approach can be established only if we ruthlessly test and optimize it. Here, we summarize preliminary results from a blind-test of the Hapke model using laboratory measurements obtained with the Bloomsburg University Goniometer (B.U.G.). The first author selected eleven well-characterized powder samples and measured the spectrophotometric behavior of each. A subset of twenty undisclosed examples of the photometric measurement sets were sent to the second author who fit the data using the Hapke model and attempted to interpret their optical and mechanical properties from photometry alone.

  17. Can Selforganizing Maps Accurately Predict Photometric Redshifts?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, Michael J.; Klose, Christian

    2012-01-01

    We present an unsupervised machine-learning approach that can be employed for estimating photometric redshifts. The proposed method is based on a vector quantization called the self-organizing-map (SOM) approach. A variety of photometrically derived input values were utilized from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey's main galaxy sample, luminous red galaxy, and quasar samples, along with the PHAT0 data set from the Photo-z Accuracy Testing project. Regression results obtained with this new approach were evaluated in terms of root-mean-square error (RMSE) to estimate the accuracy of the photometric redshift estimates. The results demonstrate competitive RMSE and outlier percentages when compared with several other popular approaches, such as artificial neural networks and Gaussian process regression. SOM RMSE results (using delta(z) = z(sub phot) - z(sub spec)) are 0.023 for the main galaxy sample, 0.027 for the luminous red galaxy sample, 0.418 for quasars, and 0.022 for PHAT0 synthetic data. The results demonstrate that there are nonunique solutions for estimating SOM RMSEs. Further research is needed in order to find more robust estimation techniques using SOMs, but the results herein are a positive indication of their capabilities when compared with other well-known methods

  18. Solution Equilibrium Titration for High-Throughput Affinity Estimation of Unpurified Antibodies and Antibody Fragments.

    PubMed

    Della Ducata, Daniela; Jaehrling, Jan; Hänel, Cornelia; Satzger, Marion; Wolber, Meike; Ostendorp, Ralf; Pabst, Stefan; Brocks, Bodo

    2015-12-01

    The generation of therapeutic antibodies with extremely high affinities down to the low picomolar range is today feasible with state-of-the art recombinant technologies. However, reliable and efficient identification of lead candidates with the desired affinity from a pool of thousands of antibody clones remains a challenge. Here, we describe a high-throughput procedure that allows reliable affinity screening of unpurified immunoglobulin G or antibody fragments. The method is based on the principle of solution equilibrium titration (SET) using highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence as a readout system. Because the binding partners are not labeled, the resulting KD represents a sound approximation of the real affinity. For screening, diluted bacterial lysates or cell culture supernatants are equilibrated with four different concentrations of a soluble target molecule, and unbound antibodies are subsequently quantified on 384-well Meso Scale Discovery (MSD) plates coated with the respective antigen. For determination of KD values from the resulting titration curves, fit models deduced from the law of mass action for 1:1 and 2:1 binding modes are applied to assess hundreds of interactions simultaneously. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated by comparing results from different screening campaigns from affinity optimization projects with results from detailed affinity characterization. PMID:26179403

  19. Graphic method for the determination of titration end-points.

    PubMed

    Ingman, F; Still, E

    1966-10-01

    An extension of Gran's method for the détermination of equivalence points in potentiometric acid-base titrations is presented. Equations are derived assuming that the stability constants of the reactions are known. The equations make it possible to locate the equivalence point with fair accuracy when acids with stability constants ranging from K(H)(HA) ~ 10(7) to K(H)(HA) ~ 10(10) are titrated. The limit of K(H)(HA) above which Gran's equations do not yield satisfactory results is about 10(7). Conditional constants and a-coefficients are used to extend the method to apply to more complex systems, where more than one species reacts with the titrant. PMID:18960023

  20. The Acid-Base Titration of a Very Weak Acid: Boric Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celeste, M.; Azevedo, C.; Cavaleiro, Ana M. V.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment based on the titration of boric acid with strong base in the presence of d-mannitol is described. Boric acid is a very weak acid and direct titration with NaOH is not possible. An auxiliary reagent that contributes to the release of protons in a known stoichiometry facilitates the acid-base titration. Students obtain the

  1. The Acid-Base Titration of a Very Weak Acid: Boric Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celeste, M.; Azevedo, C.; Cavaleiro, Ana M. V.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment based on the titration of boric acid with strong base in the presence of d-mannitol is described. Boric acid is a very weak acid and direct titration with NaOH is not possible. An auxiliary reagent that contributes to the release of protons in a known stoichiometry facilitates the acid-base titration. Students obtain the…

  2. Automated Potentiometric Titrations in KCl/Water-Saturated Octanol: Method for Quantifying Factors Influencing Ion-Pair Partitioning

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The knowledge base of factors influencing ion pair partitioning is very sparse, primarily because of the difficulty in determining accurate log PI values of desirable low molecular weight (MW) reference compounds. We have developed a potentiometric titration procedure in KCl/water-saturated octanol that provides a link to log PI through the thermodynamic cycle of ionization and partitioning. These titrations have the advantage of being independent of the magnitude of log P, while maintaining a reproducibility of a few hundredths of a log P in the calculated difference between log P neutral and log P ion pair (diff (log PN − I)). Simple model compounds can be used. The titration procedure is described in detail, along with a program for calculating pKa′′ values incorporating the ionization of water in octanol. Hydrogen bonding and steric factors have a greater influence on ion pairs than they do on neutral species, yet these factors are missing from current programs used to calculate log PI and log D. In contrast to the common assumption that diff (log PN − I) is the same for all amines, they can actually vary more than 3 log units, as in our examples. A major factor affecting log PI is the ability of water and the counterion to approach the charge center. Bulky substituents near the charge center have a negative influence on log PI. On the other hand, hydrogen bonding groups near the charge center have the opposite effect by lowering the free energy of the ion pair. The use of this titration method to determine substituent ion pair stabilization values (IPS) should bring about more accurate log D calculations and encourage species-specific QSAR involving log DN and log DI. This work also brings attention to the fascinating world of nature’s highly stabilized ion pairs. PMID:19265385

  3. Potentiometric titrations of rutile suspensions to 250 C

    SciTech Connect

    Machesky, M.L.; Wesolowski, D.J.; Palmer, D.A.; Ichiro-Hayashi, Ken

    1998-04-15

    A stirred hydrogen electrode concentration cell was used to conduct potentiometric titrations of rutile suspensions from 25 to 250 C in NaCl and tetramethylammonium chloride media (0.03 to 1.1 m). Hydrothermal pretreatment of the rutile improved titration reproducibility, decreased titration hysteresis, and facilitated determination of the point of zero net proton charge (pHznpc). These pHznpc values are 5.4, 5.1, 4.7, 4.4, 4.3 ({+-} 0.2 pH units), and 4.2 ({+-} 0.3 pH units) at 25, 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 C, respectively. The difference between these pHznpc values and 1/2 pK{sub w} (the neutral pH of water) is rather constant between 25 and 250 C ({minus} 1.45 {+-} 0.2). This constancy is useful for predictive purposes and, more fundamentally, may reflect similarities between the hydration behavior of surface hydroxyl groups and water. A three-layer, 1pKa surface complexation model with three adjustable parameters (two capacitance values and one counterion binding constant) adequately described all titration data. The most apparent trend in these data for pH values greater than the pHznpc was the increase in proton release (negative surface charge) with increasing temperature. This reflects more efficient screening by Na{sup +} relative to Cl{sup {minus}}. Replacing Na{sup +} with the larger tetramethylammonium cation for some conditions resulted in decreased proton release due to the less efficient screening of negative surface charge by this larger cation.

  4. Impact of Residual Inducer on Titratable Expression Systems

    PubMed Central

    Afroz, Taliman; Luo, Michelle L.; Beisel, Chase L.

    2015-01-01

    Inducible expression systems are widely employed for the titratable control of gene expression, yet molecules inadvertently present in the growth medium or synthesized by the host cells can alter the response profile of some of these systems. Here, we explored the quantitative impact of these residual inducers on the apparent response properties of inducible systems. Using a simple mathematical model, we found that the presence of residual inducer shrinks the apparent dynamic range and causes the apparent Hill coefficient to converge to one. We also found that activating systems were more sensitive than repressing systems to the presence of residual inducer and the response parameters were most heavily dependent on the original Hill coefficient. Experimental interrogation of common titratable systems based on an L-arabinose inducible promoter or a thiamine pyrophosphate-repressing riboswitch in Escherichia coli confirmed the predicted trends. We finally found that residual inducer had a distinct effect on all-or-none systems, which exhibited increased sensitivity to the added inducer until becoming fully induced. Our findings indicate that residual inducer or repressor alters the quantitative response properties of titratable systems, impacting their utility for scientific discovery and pathway engineering. PMID:26348036

  5. Photometric redshifts and k-corrections for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mill, Ana Laura; Duplancic, Fernanda; García Lambas, Diego; Sodré, Laerte, Jr.

    2011-05-01

    We present a catalogue of galaxy photometric redshifts and k-corrections for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS-DR7), available on the World Wide Web. The photometric redshifts were estimated with an artificial neural network using five ugriz bands, concentration indices and Petrosian radii in the g and r bands. We have explored our redshift estimates with different training sets, thus concluding that the best choice for improving redshift accuracy comprises the main galaxy sample (MGS), the luminous red galaxies and the galaxies of active galactic nuclei covering the redshift range 0 < z≤ 0.3. For the MGS, the photometric redshift estimates agree with the spectroscopic values within rms = 0.0227. The distribution of photometric redshifts derived in the range 0 < zphot≤ 0.6 agrees well with the model predictions. k-corrections were derived by calibration of the K-CORRECT_V4.2 code results for the MGS with the reference-frame (z= 0.1) (g-r) colours. We adopt a linear dependence of k-corrections on redshift and (g-r) colours that provide suitable distributions of luminosity and colours for galaxies up to redshift zphot= 0.6 comparable to the results in the literature. Thus, our k-correction estimate procedure is a powerful, low computational time algorithm capable of reproducing suitable results that can be used for testing galaxy properties at intermediate redshifts using the large SDSS data base.

  6. Monitoring the photometric behavior of OmegaCAM with Astro-WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdoes Kleijn, G. A.; Kuijken, K. H.; Valentijn, E. A.; Boxhoorn, D. R.; Begeman, K. G.; Deul, E. R.; Helmich, E. M.; Rengelink, R.

    2013-01-01

    The OmegaCAM wide-field optical imager is the sole instrument on the VLT Survey Telescope at ESO's Paranal Observatory. The instrument, as well as the telescope, have been designed for surveys with very good, natural seeing-limited image quality over a 1 square degree field. OmegaCAM was commissioned in 2011 and has been observing three ESO Public Surveys in parallel since October 15, 2011. We use the Astro-WISE information system to monitor the calibration of the observatory and to produce the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS). Here we describe the photometric monitoring procedures in Astro-WISE and give a first impression of OmegaCAM's photometric behavior as a function of time. The long-term monitoring of the observatory goes hand in hand with the KiDS survey production in Astro-WISE. KiDS is observed under partially non-photometric conditions. Based on the first year of OmegaCAM operations it is expected that a ˜ 1-2 % photometric homogeneity will be achieved for KiDS.

  7. Semi-supervised learning for photometric supernova classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Joseph W.; Homrighausen, Darren; Freeman, Peter E.; Schafer, Chad M.; Poznanski, Dovi

    2012-01-01

    We present a semi-supervised method for photometric supernova typing. Our approach is to first use the non-linear dimension reduction technique diffusion map to detect structure in a data base of supernova light curves and subsequently employ random forest classification on a spectroscopically confirmed training set to learn a model that can predict the type of each newly observed supernova. We demonstrate that this is an effective method for supernova typing. As supernova numbers increase, our semi-supervised method efficiently utilizes this information to improve classification, a property not enjoyed by template-based methods. Applied to supernova data simulated by Kessler et al. to mimic those of the Dark Energy Survey, our methods achieve (cross-validated) 95 per cent Type Ia purity and 87 per cent Type Ia efficiency on the spectroscopic sample, but only 50 per cent Type Ia purity and 50 per cent efficiency on the photometric sample due to their spectroscopic follow-up strategy. To improve the performance on the photometric sample, we search for better spectroscopic follow-up procedures by studying the sensitivity of our machine-learned supernova classification on the specific strategy used to obtain training sets. With a fixed amount of spectroscopic follow-up time, we find that, despite collecting data on a smaller number of supernovae, deeper magnitude-limited spectroscopic surveys are better for producing training sets. For supernova Ia (II-P) typing, we obtain a 44 per cent (1 per cent) increase in purity to 72 per cent (87 per cent) and 30 per cent (162 per cent) increase in efficiency to 65 per cent (84 per cent) of the sample using a 25th (24.5th) magnitude-limited survey instead of the shallower spectroscopic sample used in the original simulations. When redshift information is available, we incorporate it into our analysis using a novel method of altering the diffusion map representation of the supernovae. Incorporating host redshifts leads to a 5 per cent improvement in Type Ia purity and 13 per cent improvement in Type Ia efficiency. A web service for the supernova classification method used in this paper can be found at .

  8. Depression May Reduce Adherence during CPAP Titration Trial

    PubMed Central

    Law, Mandy; Naughton, Matthew; Ho, Sally; Roebuck, Teanau; Dabscheck, Eli

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Depression is a risk factor for medication non-compliance. We aimed to identify if depression is associated with poorer adherence during home-based autotitrating continuous positive airway pressure (autoPAP) titration. Design: Mixed retrospective-observational study. Setting: Academic center. Participants: Two-hundred forty continuous positive airway pressure-naïve obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. Measurements: Patients underwent approximately 1 week of home-based autoPAP titration with adherence data downloaded from the device. Electronic hospital records were reviewed in a consecutive manner for inclusion. Three areas of potential predictors were examined: (i) demographics and clinical factors, (ii) disease severity, and (iii) device-related variables. Depression and anxiety were assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Scores on the subscales were categorized as normal or clinical diagnoses of depression (≥ 8) and anxiety (≥ 11). The primary outcome variable was the mean hours of autoPAP used per night. Results: Patients were diagnosed with OSA by either attended polysomnography (n = 73, AHI 25.5[15.1-41.5]) or unattended home oximetry (n = 167, ODI3 34.0[22.4-57.4]) and had home-based autoPAP titration over 6.2 ± 1.2 nights. Mean autoPAP use was 4.5 ± 2.4 hours per night. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that depression and lower 95th percentile pressures significantly predicted lesser hours of autoPAP use (R2 = 0.19, p < 0.001). Significantly milder OSA in those requiring lower pressures may have confounded the relationship between 95th percentile pressure and autoPAP use. Conclusion: Depression was independently associated with poorer adherence during home-based autoPAP titration. Depression may be a potential target for clinicians and future research aimed at enhancing adherence to autoPAP therapy. Citation: Law M; Naughton M; Ho S; Roebuck T; Dabscheck E. Depression may reduce adherence during CPAP titration trial. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(2):163-169. PMID:24532999

  9. The Definitive Johnson Kron-Cousins UBVRI Photometric System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landolt, Arlo U.; Clem, James L.

    2015-08-01

    The defining characteristics and a brief history of the Johnson Kron-Cousins UBVRI photometric system will be reviewed, and recent observational efforts to extend the UBVRI standard star network, both in magnitude and sky coverage, presented. The current incarnation of this network now comprises more than 50,000 photometric standards distributed around the sky in three declination zones centered on -50 degrees, the celestial equator, and +50 degrees. The majority of these standards encompass the magnitude range of ~9 < V <~ 22, and the color index range of ~ -0.3 < B-V <~ +2. The standard error of the mean in the photometry is less than 0.005 magnitudes in BVRI and 0.015 magn. in U. Relations have been developed to permit conversion between the UBVRI and SDSS ugriz photometric systems, thereby enhancing the versatility of both photometric systems. Several uses of the UBVRI photometric system, and its synergy with other photometric systems, will be noted.

  10. Photometric solutions of some contact ASAS binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gezer, İ.; Bozkurt, Z.

    2016-04-01

    We present the first light curve solution of 6 contact binary systems which are chosen from the ASAS catalog. The photometric elements and the estimated absolute parameters of all systems are obtained with the light curve analyses. We calculated the values of degree of contact for the systems. The location of the targets on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and the mass-radius plane is compared to the other well-known contact binaries and the evolutionary status of the systems are also discussed.

  11. Photometric reverberation mapping of Markarian 279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachev, R.; Strigachev, A.; Semkov, E.; Boeva, S.; Peneva, S.; Ibryamov, S.; Stoyanov, K.; Spassov, B.; Tsvetkova, S.; Mihov, B.; Latev, G.; Dimitrov, D.

    By using standard broad-band VRI photometry we were able to discriminate the variations of the broad hydrogen alpha line from the continuum variations for the active galaxy Mkn 279. Cross-correlating both light curves enabled us to determine the time lag of the broad line variations behind the continuum and thus to determine the BLR size (about 8 light days). Our preliminary results are rather consistent with the spectroscopic reverberation mapping results (about 12/17 days). This study is a part of an ambitious program to perform photometric reverberation mapping and determine BLR sizes (respectively - the central black hole masses) for more that 100 nearby AGN.

  12. A photometric study of Saturn's F Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Showalter, Mark R.; Pollack, James B.; Ockert, Maureen E.; Doyle, Laurance R.; Dalton, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    The Saturn F Ring's radially integrated brightness has been measured over a wide range of phase angles from Voyager images; in order to model the resultant phase curve, the ring population has been divided into a dust regime and one of larger bodies, and while single scattering properties of small particles are modeled by semiempirical nonspherical/randomly oriented particles, those of large bodies are based on the photometric behavior of satellites. It is suggested that the dust in the envelope arises from micrometeoroid impacts into the large core particles, and then migrates inward.

  13. Photometric study of the eclipsing binary ET Psc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özalp, G. Z.; Özkardeş, B.

    2016-03-01

    We present the photometric solution of the eclipsing binary ET Psc (GSC 00608-00490). The ASAS V-band photometric data of the system was modelled using the Wilson-Devinney method. The result shows that the eclipsing pair could be classified as A-subtype of W UMa-type binary system. The absolute dimensions of the system were also estimated based on the photometric solution.

  14. SCREEN photometric property detection system based on area CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fu-cai; Ye, Wei; Xu, Yu; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Yu-wei

    2011-08-01

    The photometric property detection of screen display is crucial for screen display quality test. Traditional photometry detection technologies were based on photoelectric sensors such as silicon photocell, photo-electric multiplier and CdS, which can detect only some isolated points. To break the limitation of randomness, incompleteness and detection accuracy in current technologies, we designed a screen photometric detection system based on area CCD. The system consists of photometric image sensor, photometric image acquisition hardware and photometric image analyzing software. The photometric image sensor, which adopts optical lens, optical filters and area CCD, adapts its spectrum response property to fit the spectrum luminous efficiency curve V (λ) by adjusting the thickness and quantity of appropriate optical filters. photometric image acquisition hardware adopts the DSP as a core processor to drive the area CCD, to sample, acquire , process and save the image from image sensor, to transmit the image to computer. For real-time performance of transmitting, the hardware system adopts the transmission protocol of USB2.0. The uploaded image will be processed by photometric image analyzing software, and then displayed in real time with detection results. The screen photometric detection technology based on area CCD can detect specifications of the whole screen such as luminance, contrast, onoff ratio and uniformity, breaks the limitation of randomness and incompleteness in current detection technology, exactly and fully reflects the integrated display quality of the whole screen. According to the test results, the accuracy of this system has reached the accuracy level one in China.

  15. Design and testing of a new microcalorimetric vessel for use with living cellular systems and in titration experiments.

    PubMed

    Nordmark, M G; Laynez, J; Schön, A; Suurkuusk, J; Wadsö, I

    1984-12-01

    A new microcalorimetric vessel primarily intended for use with living cellular systems and in titration experiments has been designed and tested. The vessel, which forms a modular system, fits into an ampoule measuring cylinder of the LKB 'BioActivity Monitor'. It can be used with different sample cups, volume 1-3 ml, and can be equipped with different types of stirrer and sample holders for cellular materials. Experiments can be performed with or without medium perfusing through the vessel. Small quantities of reagents can be added to the sample compartment during the measurements. Stepwise calorimetric titrations can be performed by an automatic procedure. Test experiments reported include results of measurements with human T-lymphoma cells in stirred suspension and melanoma cells adhered to a polystyrene film in a stirred perfusing medium. Results from titration experiments where N-acetyl-D-alanine was bound to ristocetin A are reported, delta G degree' = -16.5 +/- 0.2 kJ mol-1 and delta H degree' = -32.1 +/- 0.4 kJ mol-1. PMID:6397499

  16. Ceres photometric properties from VIR on Dawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarniello, M.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Ammannito, E.; Capaccioni, F.; Capria, M. T.; Carrozzo, F. G.; Fonte, S.; Frigeri, A.; Giardino, M.; Longobardo, A.; Magni, G.; Palomba, E.; Raponi, A.; Tosi, F.; Zambon, F.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.; Li, J.-Y.

    2015-10-01

    Dawn spacecraft [1] entered orbit around Ceres on 6 March 2015. During the approach phase to this dwarf planet and later, through the Survey, High Altitude Mapping (HAMO) and Low Altitude Mapping Orbits (LAMO), the Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIR) will perform detailed observations of the surface of the body. VIR [2] is an imaging spectrometer onboard the Dawn mission and it is composed of two spectral channels: the visible (VIS) covering the 0.25 μm - 1.0 μm wavelength range and the infrared (IR) for the 0.95 μm - 5.0 μm interval. During the various phases of the mission, the surface of Ceres will be observed under different observation geometries. The measured signal is then affected by photometric issues that need to be minimized in order to exploit the intrinsic spectral variability of the surface, thus allowing the direct comparison between acquisitions taken under different observation conditions. In order to accomplish this task we perform a photometric reduction of the dataset by means of a simplified Hapke model, following the approach of [3].

  17. Characterization of Sea Lettuce Surface Functional Groups by Potentiometric Titrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebling, A. M.; Schijf, J.

    2008-12-01

    In pursuit of our ultimate goal to better understand the prodigious capacity of the marine macroalga Ulva lactuca (sea lettuce) for adsorbing a broad range of dissolved trace metals from seawater, we performed an initial characterization of its surface functional groups. Specifically, the number of distinct functional groups as well as their individual bulk concentrations and acid dissociation constants (pKas) were determined by potentiometric titrations in NaCl solutions of various ionic strengths (I = 0.01-5.0 M), under inert nitrogen atmosphere at 25°C. Depending on the ionic strength, Ulva samples were manually titrated down to pH 2 or 3 with 1 N HCl and then up to pH 10 with 1 N NaOH in steps of 0.1-0.2 units, continuously monitoring pH with a glass combination electrode. Titrations of a dehydrated Ulva standard reference material (BCR-279) were compared with fresh Ulva tissue cultured in our laboratory. A titration in filtered natural seawater was also compared with one in an NaCl solution of equal ionic strength. Equilibrium constants for the ionization of water in NaCl solutions as a function of ionic strength were obtained from the literature. Fits to the titration data ([H]T vs. pH) were performed with the FITEQL4.0 computer code using non-electrostatic 3-, 4-, and 5-site models, either by fixing ionic strength at its experimental value or by allowing it to be extrapolated to zero, while considering all functional group pKas and bulk concentrations as adjustable parameters. Since pKas and bulk concentrations were found to be strongly correlated, the latter were also fixed in some cases to further constrain the pKas. Whereas these calculations are currently ongoing, preliminary results point to three, possibly four, functional groups with pKas of about 4.1, 6.3, and 9.5 at I = 0. Bulk concentrations of the three groups are very similar, about 5-6×10-4 mol/g based on dry weight, which suggests that all are homogeneously distributed over the surface and probably part of a single macromolecular scaffold. Fresh Ulva tissue appears to contain the same three functional groups but at lower concentrations, based on wet weight. The titration in natural seawater was largely dominated by the non-carbonate alkalinity of the solution and could not be robustly modeled. Results of fits with ionic strengths fixed at their experimental values indicate that the pKas of all three groups display prominent Debije-Hückel-type behavior, hence that these acid dissociation reactions involve a different mechanism than metal-proton exchange reactions on mineral surfaces, whose distribution coefficients (i.e., equilibrium constants) generally show a weak ionic strength dependence.

  18. A titration model for evaluating calcium hydroxide removal techniques

    PubMed Central

    PHILLIPS, Mark; McCLANAHAN, Scott; BOWLES, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Objective Calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) has been used in endodontics as an intracanal medicament due to its antimicrobial effects and its ability to inactivate bacterial endotoxin. The inability to totally remove this intracanal medicament from the root canal system, however, may interfere with the setting of eugenol-based sealers or inhibit bonding of resin to dentin, thus presenting clinical challenges with endodontic treatment. This study used a chemical titration method to measure residual Ca(OH)2 left after different endodontic irrigation methods. Material and Methods Eighty-six human canine roots were prepared for obturation. Thirty teeth were filled with known but different amounts of Ca(OH)2 for 7 days, which were dissolved out and titrated to quantitate the residual Ca(OH)2 recovered from each root to produce a standard curve. Forty-eight of the remaining teeth were filled with equal amounts of Ca(OH)2 followed by gross Ca(OH)2 removal using hand files and randomized treatment of either: 1) Syringe irrigation; 2) Syringe irrigation with use of an apical file; 3) Syringe irrigation with added 30 s of passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI), or 4) Syringe irrigation with apical file and PUI (n=12/group). Residual Ca(OH)2 was dissolved with glycerin and titrated to measure residual Ca(OH)2 left in the root. Results No method completely removed all residual Ca(OH)2. The addition of 30 s PUI with or without apical file use removed Ca(OH)2 significantly better than irrigation alone. Conclusions This technique allowed quantification of residual Ca(OH)2. The use of PUI (with or without apical file) resulted in significantly lower Ca(OH)2 residue compared to irrigation alone. PMID:25760272

  19. Interaction between bisphenol A and tannic Acid: Spectroscopic titration approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omoike, Anselm; Brandt, Benjamin

    2011-06-01

    The interaction between tannic acid (TA) and bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine disruptor, was studied by absorption and fluorescence titration techniques. The binding constants and corresponding thermodynamic parameters at different temperatures (294, 296, 298, 300 and 303 K) were determined. The intrinsic fluorescence of BPA was strongly quenched by TA and the quenching mechanism is attributed to static quenching. The thermodynamic data revealed that the formation of TA-BPA complex was exothermic, entropic-driven, and spontaneous. Furthermore, hydrogen and van der Waals interactions seem to be the major driving forces for the formation of the nonfluorescent TA-BPA complex.

  20. A novel approach for high precision rapid potentiometric titrations: Application to hydrazine assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, P.; Malathi, N.; Ananthanarayanan, R.; Praveen, K.; Murali, N.

    2011-11-01

    We propose a high precision rapid personal computer (PC) based potentiometric titration technique using a specially designed mini-cell to carry out redox titrations for assay of chemicals in quality control laboratories attached to industrial, R&D, and nuclear establishments. Using this technique a few microlitre of sample (50-100 μl) in a total volume of ˜2 ml solution can be titrated and the waste generated after titration is extremely low comparing to that obtained from the conventional titration technique. The entire titration including online data acquisition followed by immediate offline analysis of data to get information about concentration of unknown sample is completed within a couple of minutes (about 2 min). This facility has been created using a new class of sensors, viz., pulsating sensors developed in-house. The basic concept in designing such instrument and the salient features of the titration device are presented in this paper. The performance of the titration facility was examined by conducting some of the high resolution redox titrations using dilute solutions--hydrazine against KIO3 in HCl medium, Fe(II) against Ce(IV) and uranium using Davies-Gray method. The precision of titrations using this innovative approach lies between 0.048% and 1.0% relative standard deviation in different redox titrations. With the evolution of this rapid PC based titrator it was possible to develop a simple but high precision potentiometric titration technique for quick determination of hydrazine in nuclear fuel dissolver solution in the context of reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel in fast breeder reactors.

  1. Asteroid models from the Lowell photometric database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ďurech, J.; Hanuš, J.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Vančo, R.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Information about shapes and spin states of individual asteroids is important for the study of the whole asteroid population. For asteroids from the main belt, most of the shape models available now have been reconstructed from disk-integrated photometry by the lightcurve inversion method. Aims: We want to significantly enlarge the current sample (~350) of available asteroid models. Methods: We use the lightcurve inversion method to derive new shape models and spin states of asteroids from the sparse-in-time photometry compiled in the Lowell Photometric Database. To speed up the time-consuming process of scanning the period parameter space through the use of convex shape models, we use the distributed computing project Asteroids@home, running on the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) platform. This way, the period-search interval is divided into hundreds of smaller intervals. These intervals are scanned separately by different volunteers and then joined together. We also use an alternative, faster, approach when searching the best-fit period by using a model of triaxial ellipsoid. By this, we can independently confirm periods found with convex models and also find rotation periods for some of those asteroids for which the convex-model approach gives too many solutions. Results: From the analysis of Lowell photometric data of the first 100 000 numbered asteroids, we derived 328 new models. This almost doubles the number of available models. We tested the reliability of our results by comparing models that were derived from purely Lowell data with those based on dense lightcurves, and we found that the rate of false-positive solutions is very low. We also present updated plots of the distribution of spin obliquities and pole ecliptic longitudes that confirm previous findings about a non-uniform distribution of spin axes. However, the models reconstructed from noisy sparse data are heavily biased towards more elongated bodies with high lightcurve amplitudes. Conclusions: The Lowell Photometric Database is a rich and reliable source of information about the spin states of asteroids. We expect hundreds of other asteroid models for asteroids with numbers larger than 100 000 to be derivable from this data set. More models will be able to be reconstructed when Lowell data are merged with other photometry. Tables 1 and 2 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/587/A48

  2. Analysis of Photometric Uncertainties in the OGLE-IV Galactic Bulge Microlensing Survey Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skowron, J.; Udalski, A.; Kozłowski, S.; Szymański, M. K.; Mróz, P.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Poleski, R.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pawlak, M.; Soszyński, I.

    2016-01-01

    We present a statistical assessment of both, observed and reported, photometric uncertainties in the OGLE-IV Galactic bulge microlensing survey data. This dataset is widely used for the detection of variable stars, transient objects, discovery of microlensing events, and characterization of the exo-planetary systems. Large collections of RR Lyr stars and Cepheids discovered by the OGLE project toward the Galactic bulge provide light curves based on this dataset. We describe the method of analysis, and provide the procedure, which can be used to update preliminary photometric uncertainties, provided with the light curves, to the ones reflecting the actual observed scatter at a given magnitude and for a given CCD detector of the OGLE-IV camera. This is of key importance for data modeling, in particular, for the correct estimation of the goodness of fit.

  3. Photometric calibration of the J-PLUS and J-PAS surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, J.; Gruel, N.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.; Moles, M.; Chioare Díaz-Martín, M.; Lamadrid, J. L.

    2013-05-01

    The Observatorio Astrofísico de Javalambre (OAJ, Teruel) will be the location of a large étendue 255cm telescope (JST/T250) that will carry out a multiband (57 filters) 8000 deg^2 sky survey: The Javalambre PAU-Astrophysical Survey (J-PAS). To maximize the time on target of the telescope, a preliminary survey (J-PLUS) will be carried out with an auxiliary 83cm telescope (JAST/T80) that will image the same area beforehand in 12 filters. In addition, atmospheric extinction will be measured with a dedicated extinction monitor (EXCALIBUR). This poster outline the procedure designed to calibrate the exposures of J-PAS to achieve the required photometric accuracy (uncertainty <2%) needed to obtain precise photometric redshifts of millions of galaxies with the scientific goal of measuring the Acoustic Baryonic Oscillations.

  4. [Alkalimetric titrations of salts of organic bases in the Pharmacopoeia].

    PubMed

    Bezáková, Zelmíra; Stankovičová, Mária

    2013-12-01

    Modified methods - alkalimetry in ethanol 70% with a defined small volume of hydrochloric acid 0.01 mol/l added to the solution of the sample before the titration and alkalimetry in ethanol 70% or ethanol 96% alone with potentiometric end-point detection for the assay of halide salts of 11 organic N-bases has been investigated. The results were compared to those obtained by the method of the European Pharmacopoeia 7th Ed. (Ph. Eur. 7th Ed.). The Ph. Eur. 7th Ed. use for 8 investigated substances alkalimetry in alcohol 96 % with a defined small volume of hydrochloric acid 0.01 mol/l (5 ml) with potentiometric end-point detection: Cinchocaine hydrochloride, Codeine hydrochloride dihydrate, Ethylmorphine hydrochloride, Lidocaine hydrochloride, Papaverine hydrochloride, Pilocarpine hydrochloride, Quinine hydrochloride, Tetracaine hydrochloride. Our results revealed that the Ph. Eur. 7th Ed. method did not work for 5 drugs from this group: Cinchocaine hydrochloride, Ethylmorphine hydrochloride, Papaverine hydrochloride, Pilocarpine hydrochloride and Tetracaine hydrochloride. In the group of investigated substances we included also drugs with the character of weak organic bases for which Ph. Eur. 7th Ed. prescribed different methods for their assay: Thiamine hydrochloride and Pyridoxine hydrochloride - acidimetric titration in non-aqueous solvents with perchloric acid and Procaine hydrochloride - determination of primary aromatic amino-nitrogen (Ph. Eur. 7th Ed., chapter 2.5.8). PMID:24393115

  5. A microfabrication-based approach to quantitative isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Jia, Yuan; Lin, Qiao

    2016-04-15

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) directly measures heat evolved in a chemical reaction to determine equilibrium binding properties of biomolecular systems. Conventional ITC instruments are expensive, use complicated design and construction, and require long analysis times. Microfabricated calorimetric devices are promising, although they have yet to allow accurate, quantitative ITC measurements of biochemical reactions. This paper presents a microfabrication-based approach to integrated, quantitative ITC characterization of biomolecular interactions. The approach integrates microfabricated differential calorimetric sensors with microfluidic titration. Biomolecules and reagents are introduced at each of a series of molar ratios, mixed, and allowed to react. The reaction thermal power is differentially measured, and used to determine the thermodynamic profile of the biomolecular interactions. Implemented in a microdevice featuring thermally isolated, well-defined reaction volumes with minimized fluid evaporation as well as highly sensitive thermoelectric sensing, the approach enables accurate and quantitative ITC measurements of protein-ligand interactions under different isothermal conditions. Using the approach, we demonstrate ITC characterization of the binding of 18-Crown-6 with barium chloride, and the binding of ribonuclease A with cytidine 2'-monophosphate within reaction volumes of approximately 0.7 µL and at concentrations down to 2mM. For each binding system, the ITC measurements were completed with considerably reduced analysis times and material consumption, and yielded a complete thermodynamic profile of the molecular interaction in agreement with published data. This demonstrates the potential usefulness of our approach for biomolecular characterization in biomedical applications. PMID:26655185

  6. Measuring the Kinetics of Molecular Association by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Vander Meulen, Kirk A; Horowitz, Scott; Trievel, Raymond C; Butcher, Samuel E

    2016-01-01

    The real-time power response inherent in an isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiment provides an opportunity to directly analyze association kinetics, which, together with the conventional measurement of thermodynamic quantities, can provide an incredibly rich description of molecular binding in a single experiment. Here, we detail our application of this method, in which interactions occurring with relaxation times ranging from slightly below the instrument response time constant (12.5s in this case) to as large as 600s can be fully detailed in terms of both the thermodynamics and kinetics. In a binding titration scenario, in the most general case an injection can reveal an association rate constant (kon). Under more restrictive conditions, the instrument time constant-corrected power decay following each injection is simply an exponential decay described by a composite rate constant (kobs), from which both kon and the dissociation rate constant (koff) can be extracted. The data also support the viability of this exponential approach, for kon only, for a slightly larger set of conditions. Using a bimolecular RNA folding model and a protein-ligand interaction, we demonstrate and have internally validated this approach to experiment design, data processing, and error analysis. An updated guide to thermodynamic and kinetic regimes accessible by ITC is provided. PMID:26794355

  7. Photometric determination of trace quantities of phenol in hydrophilic extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Korenman, Ya.I.; Ermolaeva, T.N.; Kuchmenko, T.A.; Mishina, A.V.

    1994-03-10

    An extraction-photometric method has been developed for determination of trace quantities of phenol in aqueous solutions. Phenol is extracted with hydrophilic solvents (aliphatic alcohols C{sub 2}-C{sub 4}, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone) followed by photometric analysis of the extract.

  8. Development of a photometric system for continuous flow analysis.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, S S; Bansod, Baban K S; Singh, Anirudh K; Chand, G; Ganju, A K

    2003-01-01

    Most chemical analyses carried out in a clinical laboratory are colorimetric. An improved photometric system is described where a tungsten lamp is the light source, a photo-diode is the detector and a microcontroller 8051 is used for processing and displaying absorbances. The performance characteristics of the instrument are reported. The parameters investigated are photometric linearity, precision and instrumental drift. PMID:18924716

  9. 40 CFR 60.648 - Optional procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hydrogen sulfide in acid gas-Tutwiler Procedure. 1 60.648 Section 60.648 Protection of Environment... procedure for measuring hydrogen sulfide in acid gas—Tutwiler Procedure. 1 1 Gas Engineers Handbook, Fuel.... In principle, this method consists of titrating hydrogen sulfide in a gas sample directly with...

  10. Estimating Photometric Redshifts Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Nicholas; Freitas, Alex; Serjeant, Stephen

    Photometry is used as a cheap and easy way to estimate redshifts of galaxies, which would otherwise require considerable amounts of expensive telescope time. However, the analysis of photometric redshift datasets is a task where it is sometimes difficultto achievea high classification accuracy. This work presents a custom Genetic Algorithm (GA) for mining the Hubble Deep Field North (HDF-N) datasets to achieve accurate IF-THEN classification rules. This kind of knowledge representation has the advantage of being intuitively comprehensible to the user, facilitating astronomers' interpretation of discovered knowledge. The GA is tested againstthe state of the art decision tree algorithm C5.0 [Rulequest, 2005] in two datasets, achieving better classification accuracy and simplerrule sets in both datasets.

  11. Monitoring Symbiotic Stars for Photometric Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doughty, Caitlin; Lutz, Julie H.

    2015-01-01

    Seven new symbiotic star systems, discovered by spectroscopic follow-up of candidates from the IPHAS survey, have been photometrically observed for evidence of variability on the order of weeks to months. The IPHAS survey identified a number of symbiotic stars through analysis of their red colors and H-alpha emission, however, none of their other properties or behaviors were studied. The seven targets were monitored during the summers of 2013 and 2014 at the University of Washington's Manastash Ridge Observatory, each along with a unique set of five comparison stars using the H-alpha and Sloan r' and i' filters. The data from 2013 demonstrated variation of several targets by a few tenths of a magnitude in the H-alpha filter and large variations of almost one magnitude in the Sloan r' and i' filters. The 2014 observing season is ongoing, and the results will be presented in the accompanying poster.

  12. Time-Series Photometric Surveys: Some Musings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, S. B.

    We live in the era of large astronomical surveys aimed at collecting high photometric precision, high time resolution, and long term (near) continuous observations. Such surveys discover many variable sources and their study has led to new paradigms in observational astronomy. Periodic variables have a long and venerable history in astronomy being highly useful as distance ladders, to investigate stellar interior physics and to map out Galactic structure. However, typically less than 10% of all variable sources are periodic and a detailed understanding of the majority of variables, the non-periodic sources, is lacking. What can we learn from non-periodic variables? Are there alternative techniques or types of study that may help elucidate their true nature? This talk will attempt to provide a short review of our understanding of variable sources and provide some suggestions for a methodology toward the study of non-variable astronomical sources.

  13. High-speed photometric imaging of elves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santeler, C.; Moore, R. C.

    2011-12-01

    A new high-speed photometric array is used to analyze the properties of optical emissions associated with elves, including the expansion rate and luminosity as a function of time. The new instrument samples 8 channels at 2.5 MHz with 14-bit resolution and streams data to a 12 TB RAID array, enabling continuous operation during thunderstorm activity. In order to leverage the full bandwidth of the system, a particular observational geometry is required. The array is aimed vertically at the overlying ionosphere in order to detect elves produced by lightning flashes ~50 to 100 km distant. We address the issue of cloud coverage by choosing among several favorable observation locations on the night of the storm. This paper provides a summary of observations performed in Florida during the winter and the summer of 2011.

  14. PHOTCAL: The IRAF photometric calibration package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, L. E.; Gigoux, P.

    1992-01-01

    The IRAF photmetric calibration package PHOTCAL is discussed. PHOTCAL is a set of tasks designed to derive the transformation from the instrumental photometric system to the standard photometric system, and apply the transformation to the observations. The PHOTCAL package contains tasks for: (1) creating and/or editing standard star catalogs and observations catalogs, (2) creating, checking and editing the configuration file which specifies the format of the standard star and observations catalogs and the form of the transformation equations, (3) solving the transformation equations interactively or non-iteractively using non-linear least squares fitting routines, and (4) applying the transformation to the observations. PHOTCAL standard star and observations catalogs are simple text files, whose columns are delimited by whitespace, and whose first column contains the star names. This format makes it relatively easy to interface the output of non-IRAF photometry programs as well as the output of the IRAF APPHOT and DAOPHOT photometry packages to PHOTCAL. PHOTCAL maintains a standard star catalog directory for the convenience of the user, but users can easily create their own standard star catalogs and/or define their own standard star catalog directory. Separate observations files produced by APPHOT, DAOPHOT or a user program containing data for stellar fields taken through different filters, can be combined into observations catalogs using one of the PHOTCAL preprocessor tasks. The input configuration file required by PHOTCAL is a text file, consisting of a series of instructions written by the user in a mini-language understood by the PHOTCAL parser. These instructions: (1) assign names to the input data columns in the standard star and observations catalogs, (2) assign names and initial values to the parameters to be fit, (3) define and describe how to solve the transformation equations. The mini-language approach permits great flexibility in the format of the input catalogs and the form of the transformation equations.

  15. Photometric Properties of Enceladus' South Polar Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annex, Andrew; Verbiscer, A. J.; Helfenstein, P.

    2012-10-01

    Cassini images reveal in exquisite detail the complex and varied terrains within the geologically active south pole of Enceladus. The region is dominated by four parallel rifts or sulci, informally known as tiger stripes, from which plumes comprised primarily of water vapor erupt [1,2]. The rich data set of Cassini images acquired at high spatial resolution (< 0.5 km/pixel) and a variety of viewing and illumination geometries enables the quantitative analysis of surface scattering properties through disk-resolved photometry. Here we investigate the photometric properties of individual terrain units [3] through fits of the Hapke photometric model [4] to data acquired in the clear (CL1 CL2), UV3, GRN, and IR3 filters, centered at 0.61, 0.34, 0.57, and 0.93 μm, respectively. Terrain units include the tiger stripe smooth and platy plank formations, tiger stripe medial dorsum structures, relict tiger stripe structures, south pole funiscular (ropy) plains, south pole lateral fold-and-wedge formations, and the south pole reticulated plains. Despite the constant, ubiquitous infall of plume particles onto the surface, differences in scattering properties, texture, and albedo among terrain units can be discerned. Work supported by NASA's Cassini Data Analysis Program. [1] Porco et al. 2006 Science 311, 1393-1401. [2] Hansen et al. 2008 Nature 456, 477-479. [3] Spencer et al. 2009 in Saturn from Cassini-Huygens (M. K. Dougherty et al. Eds.) 683-724. [4] Hapke 2002 Icarus 157, 523-534.

  16. Photometric microlensing and stellar mass determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samadi, R.

    Microlensing was suggested for stellar mass determination of nearby stars by several authors (e.g. Paczynski 1995 and Miralada-Escude 1996). There are two aspects in gravitational microlensing: photometry and astrometry. Here only the photometric aspect -i.e. magnification of a background source by a stellar lens- will be considered. The first study in this domain was done by Paczy?ski (1995). An attempt to investigate some observational constraints (Alard et al. 1996), takes its origin in this study. It will be shown here that blending of the source by the lens, not only induces a degeneracy which has been pointed out by Wozniak and Paczynski (1997) and can be removed by measuring the flux of the source outside the microlensing event, but also strongly reduces the photometric cross section as well as the duration of microlensing events. The expected number of events decreases strongly with blending. Blending effects can be reduced by selecting faint lens candidates. Unfortunately however, it is difficult to monitor a sufficient number of lens candidates per night, and restricting oneself to nearby and high proper motion objects would lead to a very small number of lens candidates. In the case of short duration events, the light curve must be sampled at short time intervals. When sampling daily, the condition is very strong and the expected rate of events very small. Observing from space would increase significantly the rate, but this gain is still insufficient. We conclude that the event rate will be very small and that the project does not seem to be feasible at least under current observing conditions and even in the near future.

  17. Multiband photometric decomposition of nuclear stellar disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, L.; Cesetti, M.; Corsini, E. M.; Pizzella, A.; Dalla Bont, E.; Sarzi, M.; Bertola, F.

    2010-07-01

    Context. Small, bright stellar disks with scale lengths of a few tens of parsec are known to reside in the center of galaxies. They are believed to have formed in a dissipational process as the end result of star formation in gas either accreted during a merging (or acquisition) event or piled up by the secular evolution of a nuclear bar. Only a few of them have been studied in detail to date. Aims: Using archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging, we investigate the photometric parameters of the nuclear stellar disks hosted by three early-type galaxies in the Virgo cluster, NGC 4458, NGC 4478, and NGC 4570, to constrain the process that forms their stars. Methods: The central surface brightness, scale length, inclination, and position angle of the nuclear disks were derived by adopting the photometric decomposition method introduced by Scorza & Bender and assuming the disks to be infinitesimally thin and exponential. Results: The location, orientation, and size of the nuclear disks is the same in all the images obtained with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 and Advanced Camera for Surveys and available in the HST Science Archive. The scale length, inclination, and position angle of each disk are constant within the errors in the observed U, B, V, and I passbands, independently of their values and the properties of the host spheroid. Conclusions: We interpret the absence of color gradients in the stellar population of the nuclear disks as the signature that star formation homogeneously occurred along their length. An inside-out formation scenario is, instead, expected to produce color gradients and is therefore ruled out.

  18. Systemic errors in quantitative polymerase chain reaction titration of self-complementary adeno-associated viral vectors and improved alternative methods.

    PubMed

    Fagone, Paolo; Wright, J Fraser; Nathwani, Amit C; Nienhuis, Arthur W; Davidoff, Andrew M; Gray, John T

    2012-02-01

    Self-complementary AAV (scAAV) vector genomes contain a covalently closed hairpin derived from a mutated inverted terminal repeat that connects the two monomer single-stranded genomes into a head-to-head or tail-to-tail dimer. We found that during quantitative PCR (qPCR) this structure inhibits the amplification of proximal amplicons and causes the systemic underreporting of copy number by as much as 10-fold. We show that cleavage of scAAV vector genomes with restriction endonuclease to liberate amplicons from the covalently closed terminal hairpin restores quantitative amplification, and we implement this procedure in a simple, modified qPCR titration method for scAAV vectors. In addition, we developed and present an AAV genome titration procedure based on gel electrophoresis that requires minimal sample processing and has low interassay variability, and as such is well suited for the rigorous quality control demands of clinical vector production facilities. PMID:22428975

  19. Sailing on the "C": A Vitamin Titration with a Twist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowa, S.; Kondo, A. E.

    2003-05-01

    The experiment takes the traditional redox titration of vitamin C using iodine with starch as an indicator, and presents it to the student as a challenge in guided-inquiry format. Two versions, with different levels of difficulty, are provided, to accommodate students with varying levels of problem-solving skills. The "challenge" is both quantitative and qualitative: if you were an eighteenth-century sea captain packing for a voyage to the New World, would you take oranges, lemons, limes, or grapefruits to prevent your crew from getting scurvy? The challenge ties in history, nutrition, and health with chemistry, and provides students an opportunity to work with familiar food products in the laboratory.

  20. Development and certification of an automated differential titration photocalorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubarev, Yu. A.; Lebedeva, N. Sh.; V'yugin, A. I.; Golubev, S. N.

    2015-04-01

    An automated differential titration photocalorimeter (ADTPC) has been designed for investigating photoinduced processes. This instrument provides means to record thermal and spectral (absorbance) changes in a calorimetric cell. Metrological characteristics of the described ADTPC are detection limit, 0.001 J with a reproducibility of 0.0002 J or better; short-duration noise level, ±5 rel. units; long-duration noise level, ±29 rel. units. ADTPC has been certified against the heats of mixing of solvents and the heat of neutralization reaction between tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane and HCl. The photocalorimetric unit of the device has additionally been certified against the heat of photolysis of K3[Fe(C2O4)3] and the heat of isomerization of azobenzene in heptane. Within the claimed errors, the heats measured with ADTPC are in agreement with the values recommended for the above systems.

  1. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry: Assisted Crystallization of RNA-Ligand Complexes.

    PubMed

    Da Veiga, Cyrielle; Mezher, Joelle; Dumas, Philippe; Ennifar, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The success rate of nucleic acids/ligands co-crystallization can be significantly improved by performing preliminary biophysical analyses. Among suitable biophysical approaches, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is certainly a method of choice. ITC can be used in a wide range of experimental conditions to monitor in real time the formation of the RNA- or DNA-ligand complex, with the advantage of providing in addition the complete binding profile of the interaction. Following the ITC experiment, the complex is ready to be concentrated for crystallization trials. This chapter describes a detailed experimental protocol for using ITC as a tool for monitoring RNA/small molecule binding, followed by co-crystallization. PMID:26227041

  2. Ultrasensitivity by Molecular Titration in Spatially Propagating Enzymatic Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Semenov, Sergey N.; Markvoort, Albert J.; Gevers, Wouter B.L.; Piruska, Aigars; de Greef, Tom F.A.; Huck, Wilhelm T.S.

    2013-01-01

    Delineating design principles of biological systems by reconstitution of purified components offers a platform to gauge the influence of critical physicochemical parameters on minimal biological systems of reduced complexity. Here we unravel the effect of strong reversible inhibitors on the spatiotemporal propagation of enzymatic reactions in a confined environment in vitro. We use micropatterned, enzyme-laden agarose gels which are stamped on polyacrylamide films containing immobilized substrates and reversible inhibitors. Quantitative fluorescence imaging combined with detailed numerical simulations of the reaction-diffusion process reveal that a shallow gradient of enzyme is converted into a steep product gradient by addition of strong inhibitors, consistent with a mathematical model of molecular titration. The results confirm that ultrasensitive and threshold effects at the molecular level can convert a graded input signal to a steep spatial response at macroscopic length scales. PMID:23972857

  3. Polarographic determination and aqueous potentiometric titration of cimetidine in tablets.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Pérez, A; Hernández-Méndez, J; Fuentes de Frutos, J E

    1985-01-01

    A method is described which uses the direct current (dc) polarographic behavior of cimetidine in a strong acid solution to determine this compound. The diffusional characteristics of the reduction wave of cimetidine in 1M HCl (about -0.8 V vs SCE) are shown, and their analytical usefulness was studied. This polarographic method was used to determine cimetidine in standard solutions ranging from 4 to 80 micrograms/mL with a coefficient of variation of 1.3%, and was further applied to the determination of cimetidine in tablets. The results obtained by the dc polarographic method agree with those obtained by an aqueous potentiometric titration of cimetidine with HClO4 and estimation of the end point by the Gran graphic method. PMID:4055626

  4. Preparation To Minimize Buffer Mismatch in Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Experiments.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xuelin; Lockless, Steve W

    2016-05-17

    There is a growing need to study ligand binding to proteins in native or complex solution using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). For example, it is desirable to measure ligand binding to membrane proteins in more native lipid-like environments such as bicelles, where ligands can access both sides of the membrane in a homogeneous environment. A critical step to obtain high signal-to-noise is matching the reaction chamber solution to the ligand solution, typically through a final dialysis or gel filtration step. However, to obtain reproducible bicelles, the lipid concentrations must be carefully controlled which eliminates the use of dialysis that can disrupt these parameters. Here, we report and validate a rapid preparation ITC (RP-ITC) approach to measure ligand binding without the need for a dialysis step. This general approach is used to quantify ion binding to a K(+) channel embedded in bicelles and can be applied to complex, less defined systems. PMID:27092566

  5. QUANTIFYING PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT ERRORS IN THE ABSENCE OF SPECTROSCOPIC REDSHIFTS

    SciTech Connect

    Quadri, Ryan F.; Williams, Rik J.

    2010-12-10

    Much of the science that is made possible by multiwavelength redshift surveys requires the use of photometric redshifts. But as these surveys become more ambitious, and as we seek to perform increasingly accurate measurements, it becomes crucial to take proper account of the photometric redshift uncertainties. Ideally the uncertainties can be directly measured using a comparison with spectroscopic redshifts, but this may yield misleading results since spectroscopic samples are frequently small and not representative of the parent photometric samples. We present a simple and powerful empirical method to constrain photometric redshift uncertainties in the absence of spectroscopic redshifts. Close pairs of galaxies on the sky have a significant probability of being physically associated and therefore of lying at nearly the same redshift. The difference in photometric redshifts in close pairs is therefore a measure of the redshift uncertainty. Some observed close pairs will arise from chance projections along the line of sight, but it is straightforward to perform a statistical correction for this effect. We demonstrate the technique using both simulated data and actual observations, and discuss how its usefulness can be limited by the presence of systematic photometric redshift errors. Finally, we use this technique to show how photometric redshift accuracy can depend on galaxy type.

  6. Extracting Hα flux from photometric data in the J-PLUS survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilella-Rojo, G.; Viironen, K.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Cenarro, A. J.; Varela, J.; Díaz-García, L. A.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.; Ederoclite, A.; Marín-Franch, A.; Moles, M.

    2015-08-01

    Aims: We present the main steps that will be taken to extract Hα emission flux from Javalambre Photometric Local Universe Survey (J-PLUS) photometric data. Methods: For galaxies with z ≲ 0.015, the Hα+[N ii] emission is covered by the J-PLUS narrow-band filter F660. We explore three different methods to extract the Hα + [N ii] flux from J-PLUS photometric data: a combination of a broad-band and a narrow-band filter (r' and F660), two broad-band and a narrow-band filter (r', i' and F660), and an SED-fitting based method using eight photometric points. To test these methodologies, we simulated J-PLUS data from a sample of 7511 SDSS spectra with measured Hα flux. Based on the same sample, we derive two empirical relations to correct the derived Hα+[N ii] flux from dust extinction and [N ii] contamination. Results: We find that the only unbiased method is the SED-fitting based method. The combination of two filters underestimates the measurements of the Hα + [N ii] flux by 22%, while the three filters method are underestimated by 9%. We study the error budget of the SED-fitting based method and find that, in addition to the photometric error, our measurements have a systematic uncertainty of 4.3%. Several sources contribute to this uncertainty: the differences between our measurement procedure and that used to derive the spectroscopic values, the use of simple stellar populations as templates, and the intrinsic errors of the spectra, which were not taken into account. Apart from that, the empirical corrections for dust extinction and [N ii] contamination add an extra uncertainty of 14%. Conclusions: Given the J-PLUS photometric system, the best methodology to extract Hα + [N ii] flux is the SED-fitting based method. Using this method, we are able to recover reliable Hα fluxes for thousands of nearby galaxies in a robust and homogeneous way. Moreover, each stage of the process (emission line flux, dust extinction correction, and [N ii] decontamination) can be decoupled and improved in the future. This method ensures reliable Hα measurements for many studies of galaxy evolution, from the local star formation rate density, to 2D studies in spatially well-resolved galaxies or the study of environmental effects, up to mr' = 21.8 (AB; 3σ detection of Hα+[N ii] emission).

  7. A photometric search for transiting planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baliber, Nairn Reese

    In the decade since the discovery of the first planet orbiting a main-sequence star other than the Sun, more than 160 planets have been detected in orbit around other stars, most of them discovered by measuring the velocity of the reflexive motion of their parent stars caused by the gravitational pull of the planets. These discoveries produced a population of planets much different to the ones in our Solar System and created interest in other methods to detect these planets. One such method is searching for transits, the slight photometric dimming of stars caused by a close-orbiting, Jupiter-sized planet passing between a star and our line of sight once per orbit. We report results from TeMPEST, the Texas, McDonald Photometric Extrasolar Search for Transits, a transit survey conducted with the McDonald Observatory 0.76 m Prime Focus Corrector (PFC). We monitored five fields of stars in the plane of the Milky Way over the course of two and a half years. We created a photometry pipeline to perform high-precision differential photometry on all of the images, and used a software detection algorithm to detect transit signals in the light curves. Although no transits were found, we calculated our detection probability by determining the fraction of the stars monitored by TeMPEST which were suitable to show transits, measuring the probability of detecting transit signals based on the temporal coverage of our fields, and measuring our detection efficiency by inserting false transits into TeMPEST data to see what fraction could be recovered by our automatic detection software. We conclude that in our entire data set, we generated an effective sample of 2660 stars, a sample in which if any star is showing a transit, it would have been detected. We found no convincing transits in our data, but current statistics from radial velocity surveys indicate that only one in about 1300 of these stars should be showing transits. These numbers are consistent with the lack of transits produced by TeMPEST and the small number of transits generated by other surveys. We therefore discuss methods by which a transit survey's effective sample may be increased to make such surveys productive in a reasonable amount of time.

  8. One Moon, many measurements 2: Photometric corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besse, S.; Yokota, Y.; Boardman, J.; Green, R.; Haruyama, J.; Isaacson, P.; Mall, U.; Matsunaga, T.; Ohtake, M.; Pieters, C.; Staid, M.; Sunshine, J.; Yamamoto, S.

    2013-09-01

    Observations of the lunar surface within the past 10 years have been made with various lunar remote sensing instruments, the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) onboard the Chandrayaan-1 mission, the Spectral Profiler (SP), the Multiband Imager (MI), the Terrain Camera (TC) onboard the SELENE mission, and the ground based USGS Robotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) for some of them. The lunar phase functions derived from these datasets, which are used in the photometric modeling to correct for the various illumination conditions of the data, are compared to assess their differences and similarity in order to improve interpretations of lunar surface spectra. The phase functions are found to be similar across various phase angles except in the 0-20° range. Differences across the 0-20° range likely result from two different inputs in the photometric modeling of the M3 and SP data: (1) M3 has larger emission angles due to the characteristics of the instrument and the attitude of the spacecraft, and (2) M3 viewing geometry was derived from the local topography whereas SP used a spherical Moon (no topography). The combination of these two different inputs affects the phase function at small phase angles where shadows play a more substantial role, with spatial resolution differences between M3 and SP being another possible source for the differences. SP data are found to be redder (i.e., steeper slope with increasing wavelengths) than MI, M3 and ROLO. Finally, the M3 overall reflectance is also found to be lower than that the other instruments (i.e., MI, SP, and ROLO), generally at least 10% darker than MI. These differences can be observed at local scales in specific examples at hundreds of meters resolutions. At regional and global scales, the same differences are found, which demonstrates the overall stability of the various datasets. The observations from M3, TC, SP and MI are very stable and agree well; however caution should be used when making interpretations based on the spectral slope of SP data or on the absolute reflectance of M3 data.

  9. Voyager photometry of Triton - Haze and surface photometric properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, J.; Helfenstein, P.; Verbiscer, A.; Veverka, J.

    1991-01-01

    The Voyager whole-disk observations of Triton at 0.41, 0.48, and 0.56 micron filter wavelengths are analyzed using a model which combines an improved version of Hapke's photometric equation with a thin atmospheric haze layer in the appropriate spherical geometry. The model is shown to describe accurately the phase curves over a range of phase angles and to agree with disk-resolved brightness scans along the photometric equator and mirror meridian. According to the model, the photometric parameters of Triton's regolith are reasonably typical of icy satellites, except for the extremely high (close to unity) single-scattering albedo.

  10. Photometric Imaging of the Moon from the Robotic Lunar Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. M.; Kieffer, H. H.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the calibration program for the NASA Earth Observing System (part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise), the U.S. Geological Survey operates the Robotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO). The ROLO project is designed to produce a photometric model of the nearside lunar surface for all phase and libration angles visible from Flagstaff [2]. Goals for this photometric model are 2.5 % absolute and 1.0% relative uncertainty. Although the model is principally intended to produce radiance images of the Moon for use in calibration of Earth-orbiting spacecraft, the ROLO data and model will also provide important information for studies of the lunar soil. Instrumentation: An astronomical observatory dedicated to the radiometry of the Moon has been constructed on the campus of the U.S. Geological Survey Flagstaff Field Station in Arizona. Two separate camera systems are attached to a single telescope mount and boresighted to the same pointing direction. The visible/near infrared (VNIR) camera uses a 512 x 512 pixel CCD and 23 intermediate width interference filters for wavelength selection. The shortwave infrared (SWIR) camera uses a 256 x 256 pixel cooled-HgCdTe infrared array and nine intermediate-width interference filters. Table I and Fig. I provide information on the instrumental passbands. Separate 20-cm-diameter Ritchey-Cretien telescopes are provided for the two cameras. The optics are designed to image the entire Moon within each camera's field of view, resulting in instrument pixel scales of 4 and 8 arcsec /pixel (about 7.4 and 15 km/pixel for the sub-Earth point on the Moon) for VNIR and SWIR respectively. Detailed information on the instrumentation can be found in Anderson et al. Observations: Routine imaging has been in progress since late 1995 for VNIR and late 1997 for SWIR, and is expected to continue through at least 2002. ROLO observes the Moon every clear night between the first and last quarter phases of the moon. On such nights, the Moon is imaged through all 32 filters at half-hour intervals during the time that the Moon is above the 60 deg. zenith angle. Observations of standard stars to measure atmospheric extinction and detector responsivity drifts occupy the remainder of the nighttime. Measurements of the dark current and detector bias levels are made during the dusk and dawn periods for VNIR and throughout the night for SWIR. Flat field corrections and absolute radiance calibrations are provided through observations of a Spectralon plate illuminated by a NIST-traceable 1000 W FEL lamp. Raw data are converted to ISIS cubes and stored on CD-ROM. Detailed information on the observing procedure is also found. As the development of data-reduction software for the ROLO project progresses and additional data are accumulated, the raw data are repeatedly processed into a calibrated form. Corrections for instrument response characteristics, photon scattering processes, and atmospheric extinction are applied to the raw lunar images to produce exoatmospheric radiance images of the Moon. These images are then transformed to a fixed selenographic-grid projection designed to accommodate all of the possible viewing geometries of the ROLO telescope. A preliminary discussion of results for the total irradiance of the Moon derived from ROLO VNIR images acquired through April 1998 was published by Kieffer and Anderson. At that time, difficulties in adequately determining the atmospheric extinction limited the accuracy of the derived lunar irradiance values. Significant improvements in the reduction software have been developed since that time and measurement scatter is expected to be reduced to approximately = or <2% for the data-processing run planned for the summer of 1999. As of June 1999 , ROLO has acquired over 2200 cubes of raw Moon images with VNIR and over 1200 cubes with SWIR. By 2002, ROLO expects to have acquired roughly 3500 images of the Moon through each VNIR filter and nearly 3000 images through each SWIR filter, or more than 100,000 absolutely calibrated images of the Moon. These data are used to create photometric models of the lunar surface that are position, phase, and wavelength dependent. Kieffer and Anderson and Grant et al. provide examples of calibrating spacecraft instruments with existing ROLO data. The dataset will also provide a wealth of information about the geological properties of the lunar surface. The photometric function of many thousands of points on the Moon will be measured for phase angles between 2 and 90 deg for wavelengths within 0.35-2.4 micron. Absolute and normalized color ratios and their phase-angle dependence will enable detailed studies of the mineral abundances of the Lunar soil. Information on the photometric function dependence on phase and wavelength will aid investigations of the surface particulate structure of the soil. Additional information contained in original.

  11. Statistical classification techniques for photometric supernova typing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newling, J.; Varughese, M.; Bassett, B.; Campbell, H.; Hlozek, R.; Kunz, M.; Lampeitl, H.; Martin, B.; Nichol, R.; Parkinson, D.; Smith, M.

    2011-07-01

    Future photometric supernova surveys will produce vastly more candidates than can be followed up spectroscopically, highlighting the need for effective classification methods based on light curves alone. Here we introduce boosting and kernel density estimation techniques which have minimal astrophysical input, and compare their performance on 20 000 simulated Dark Energy Survey light curves. We demonstrate that these methods perform very well provided a representative sample of the full population is used for training. Interestingly, we find that they do not require the redshift of the host galaxy or candidate supernova. However, training on the types of spectroscopic subsamples currently produced by supernova surveys leads to poor performance due to the resulting bias in training, and we recommend that special attention be given to the creation of representative training samples. We show that given a typical non-representative training sample, S, one can expect to pull out a representative subsample of about 10 per cent of the size of S, which is large enough to outperform the methods trained on all of S.

  12. The Accuracy of WFPC2 Photometric Zeropoints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyer, I.; Richardson, M.; Whitmore, B. C.; Lubin, L. M.

    The accuracy of WFPC2 photometric zeropoints is examined using two methods. The first approach compares the zeropoints from five sources: Holtzman (1995), the HST Data Handbook (1995 and 2002 versions), and Dolphin (both 2000 and 2002 versions). We find the mean scatter between the different studies to be: 0.043 mag for F336W, 0.034 mag for F439W, 0.016 mag for F555W, and 0.018 mag for F814W. The second approach is a comparison of WFPC2 observations of NGC2419 with ground-based photometry from Stetson (from his website) and Saha et al. (private communication). The tentative agreement between these comparisons is similar to the historical zeropoint comparisons. Hence we conclude that the true uncertainty of WFPC2 zeropoints is currently about 0.02-0.03 magnitudes. Since Poisson statistics would predict that 1% absolute accuracy should be attainable, we conclude that there are still systematic error sources which have not yet been identified.

  13. The Accuracy of WFPC2 Photometric Zeropoints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyer, I.; Richardson, M.; Whitmore, B.; Lubin, L.

    2004-07-01

    The accuracy of WFPC2 photometric zeropoints is examined using two methods. The first approach compares the zeropoints from five sources: Holtzman (1995), the HST Data Handbook (1995 and 2002 versions), and Dolphin (both 2000 and 2002 versions). We find the rms scatter between the different studies to be: 0.043 mag for F336W, 0.034 mag for F439W, 0.016 mag for F555W, and 0.018 mag for F814W. The second approach is a comparison of WFPC2 observations of NGC2419 with ground-based photometry from Stetson (from his website) and Saha et al. (private communication). The agreement between these comparisons is similar to the historical zeropoint comparisons. Hence we conclude that the true uncertainty of WFPC2 zeropoints is currently about 0.02-0.04 magnitudes, with some dependence on filter. The largest errors seen are 0.07 magnitudes. Since Poisson statistics would predict that 1% absolute accuracy should be attainable, we conclude that there are still systematic error sources which have not yet been identified.

  14. The Accuracy of WFPC2 Photometric Zeropoints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyer, I.; Richardson, M.; Whitmore, B.; Lubin, L.

    2002-12-01

    The accuracy of WFPC2 photometric zeropoints is examined using two methods. The first approach compares the zeropoints from five sources: Holtzman (1995), the HST Data Handbook (1995 and 2002 versions), and Dolphin (both 2000 and 2002 versions). We find the mean scatter between the different studies to be: 0.043 mag for F336W, 0.034 mag for F439W, 0.016 mag for F555W, and 0.018 mag for F814W. The second approach is a comparison of WFPC2 observations of NGC2419 with ground-based photometry from Stetson (from his website) and Saha et al. (private communication). The agreement between these comparisons is similar to the historical zeropoint comparisons. Hence we conclude that the true uncertainty of WFPC2 zeropoints is currently about 0.02-0.04 magnitudes. Since Poisson statistics would predict that 1% absolute accuracy should be attainable, we conclude that there are still systematic error sources which have not yet been identified.

  15. Improving Photometric Redshift Accuracy and Computational Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speagle, Josh S.; Capak, Peter L.; Masters, Daniel; Steinhardt, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    Deriving high-quality photometric redshifts is necessary for extracting physical information from large-scale extragalactic surveys, but is computationally difficult. Although current grid-based template-fitting provide a sufficient level of accuracy for most purposes, they spend the majority of time for any given object (>99%) sampling regions of extremely low probability, are inefficient at exploring the relevant high-dimensional parameter space at fine resolution, and encourage a fundamental 'discretizing' of the space. We present preliminary results from a new MCMC-based algorithm that is able to use information on the entirety of parameter space and is designed to perform well even in extremely 'bumpy' spaces, yet at the same time is ~50 times more efficient than traditional grid-based approaches and easily parallelizable. We also explore machine learning-driven improvements to both the decision-making process as well as improvements in the input models that might allow substantial improvements in our determination of star formation histories and extinction curves for high-redshift galaxies.

  16. Photometric Monitoring of Quasars with Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unwin, Stephen C.; Wehrle, A. E.; Wiita, P. J.; Revalski, M.; Silano, D.; Sprague, D.; Di Lorenzo, P.

    2013-01-01

    We have observed the photometric variability of four flat-spectrum radio quasars, and one radio galaxy (Cyg A) with Kepler, since mid-2010. Kepler’s ability to observe uninterrupted for very extended durations provides a unique opportunity to obtain very long time sequences on active galactic nuclei, something that is hard to do even with dedicated ground-based telescope networks. It allows us to examine these light curves for variability on timescales from hours to weeks, and to probe the physical processes involved in accretion around the central black hole and the organization of some of that energy into jets that ultimately power double-lobed radio sources. Kepler was designed to detect exoplanet transits of stars, and the data analysis pipeline is highly optimized for that purpose. We cannot use the standard analysis tools for the quasi-random variability in quasars, so we re-analysed the raw data, and overcame some of the challenges in calibrating these light curves. We briefly discuss some of the issues in producing calibrated light curves for long timescales. For each quasar we computed power spectra, and found power-law slopes of around -2 for most. Although sensitive to quasi-periodic variations, we did not find any convincing evidence for periodicity in any of our targets. This research was carried out, in part, at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Copyright 2012. California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  17. Photometric decomposition of mergers in disk galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Mezcua, M.; Mediavilla, E.; Lobanov, A. P.; Karouzos, M.

    2014-03-20

    Several observational studies and numerical simulations suggest that mergers must contribute to the evolution of galaxies; however, the role that they play is not yet fully understood. In this paper we study a sample of 52 double nucleus disk galaxies that are considered as candidates for a minor merger event. The luminosity of each of the nuclei and their relative separation are derived from a multi-component photometric fit of the galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey optical images. We find that the nuclei in most of the sources have projected separations ≤4 kpc. The ratio of nuclear luminosities indicates that most of the systems are likely in the coalescence stage of a major merger. This is supported by the existence of a single galaxy disk in 65% of the systems studied and the finding of a correlation between nuclear luminosity and host luminosity for the single-disk systems: those sources fitted with as single disk are in a more evolved stage of the merger and present an enhancement of the nuclear luminosity compared to the double-disk systems, as expected from simulations of galaxy mergers. Finally, we identify a sample of 19 double nucleus disk galaxies in which the two nuclei are physically separated by ≤1 kpc and constitute thus a sample of sub-kpc binary active galactic nucleus candidates.

  18. Robust, Error-Tolerant Photometric Projector Compensation.

    PubMed

    Grundhöfer, Anselm; Iwai, Daisuke

    2015-12-01

    We propose a novel error tolerant optimization approach to generate a high-quality photometric compensated projection. The application of a non-linear color mapping function does not require radiometric pre-calibration of cameras or projectors. This characteristic improves the compensation quality compared with related linear methods if this approach is used with devices that apply complex color processing, such as single-chip digital light processing projectors. Our approach consists of a sparse sampling of the projector's color gamut and non-linear scattered data interpolation to generate the per-pixel mapping from the projector to camera colors in real time. To avoid out-of-gamut artifacts, the input image's luminance is automatically adjusted locally in an optional offline optimization step that maximizes the achievable contrast while preserving smooth input gradients without significant clipping errors. To minimize the appearance of color artifacts at high-frequency reflectance changes of the surface due to usually unavoidable slight projector vibrations and movement (drift), we show that a drift measurement and analysis step, when combined with per-pixel compensation image optimization, significantly decreases the visibility of such artifacts. PMID:26390454

  19. Photometric Searches for Extra-Solar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, J.

    1998-05-01

    Three indirect search strategies for extra-Solar planets share the common element of requiring precision photometry of randomly placed targets spread over a wide field of view. The three methods are: [1] Infrared (2 to 20 mu m) gravitational ``nano''-lensing of background Galactic Center stars (the richest star field in the Galaxy) by planets in orbit around foreground Galactic disk stars at wavelengths where most of the Galactic disk and bulge can be seen. [2] Transits of giant planets in 51 Peg type orbits that produce of order 1% amplitude occultations lasting a few hours and separated in time by days to months (0.5 to 2mu m). [3] The detection of the infrared (2 to 20 mu m) flare or ``lava lake'' produced by proto-planet collisions in evolving debris disks around young stars in regions of recent star formation. Though ultimately these experiments are best performed in space, observations from Antarctica, and from long duration balloons provide a viable stepping stone to develop the required technology and to obtain preliminary results. I will review the site and instrumentation requirements for these photometric search methods and discuss ``flexible feed array'' multiplex strategies which permit the efficient targeting a sparse population of randomly distributed objects over a large field of view.

  20. Detecting Photometric Variability of Hypervelocity Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginsburg, Idan; Brown, Warren; Wegner, Gary

    2012-02-01

    "Hypervelocity stars" (HVSs) have sufficient velocity to escape the Milky Way. HVSs are found in the halo but thought to be produced by the massive black hole at the Galactic Center. The fact that HVSs have traveled over 50 kpc from the Galactic Center, allows us to measure the dark matter that surrounds the Milky Way. Yet, we are missing a key piece of information: the nature and distance of these HVSs. We request 4 nights of WIYN 3.5m imaging to measure the photometric variability and constrain the nature of 14 HVSs. This will allow for determining whether HVSs are main sequence stars, in which case they have effective temperatures that make them excellent candidates for being slowly pulsating B stars. Very importantly, this will also allow accurate distance estimates which will leverage our Hubble Space Telescope proper motion measurements. Only by knowing the HVSs' distances and full space trajectories can we firmly establish their nature and measure the distribution of dark matter in the Galaxy; mapped by the HVSs' trajectories out of the Galactic Center.

  1. BROADBAND PHOTOMETRIC REVERBERATION MAPPING OF NGC 4395

    SciTech Connect

    Edri, Haim; Rafter, Stephen E.; Kaspi, Shai; Behar, Ehud; Chelouche, Doron E-mail: shai@physics.technion.ac.il E-mail: doron@sci.haifa.ac.il

    2012-09-01

    We present results of broadband photometric reverberation mapping (RM) to measure the radius of the broad-line region, and subsequently the black hole mass (M{sub BH}), in the nearby, low-luminosity active galactic nuclei NGC 4395. Using the Wise Observatory's 1 m telescope equipped with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey g', r', and i' broadband filters, we monitored NGC 4395 for nine consecutive nights and obtained three light curves each with over 250 data points. The g' and r' bands include time variable contributions from H{beta} and H{alpha}, respectively, plus continuum. The i' band is free of broad lines and covers exclusively continuum. We show that by looking for a peak in the difference between the cross-correlation and the auto-correlation functions for all combinations of filters, we can get a reliable estimate of the time lag necessary to compute M{sub BH}. We measure the time lag for H{alpha} to be 3.6 {+-} 0.8 hr, comparable to previous studies using the line-resolved spectroscopic RM method. We argue that this lag implies a black hole mass of M{sub BH} = (4.9 {+-} 2.6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }.

  2. FUV-visible photometric imaging of aurorae

    SciTech Connect

    Tobiska, W.K.; Gladstone, G.R.; Chakrabarti, S.; Link, R.; Shepherd, M.G.; McConnell, J.C.; Schmidtke, G.; Stasek, G.

    1993-10-01

    Photometric images of 130.4-, 337.1-, 391.4-, and 557.7-nm auroral airglow emission are presented for November 16, 1980, and December 9, 1981. Unique observations and new data reduction techniques allow 360{degrees} imaging of the local auroral emissions on both days and a view of spatial and temporal variability. The 1980 aurorae, one nonpulsating and one pulsating, are located in the morning sector. The authors find that the 1980 diffuse, nonpulsating aurora was located < 75 km from the rocket in a northern location with respect to the rocket and was produced by electrons with a characteristic energy of 200-300 eV. The pulsating aurora was located > 75 km in a western location and was produced by electrons with a characteristic energy of 2-3 keV. Both the near (northern) and far (western) aurorae had motion and size characteristics consistent with northeasterly drift rates of 200-500 m s{sup {minus}1} and 30-50 km in size, respectively. The 1981 flight observed a stable arch in the evening sector. The arc was produced by electrons with a characteristic energy of 1-3 keV and had a probable 1/e width of approximately 75 km. For both flights, the 557.7/391.4 and 337.1/391.4 ratios were approximately constant. 24 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Simultaneous Estimation of Photometric Redshifts and SED Parameters: Improved Techniques and a Realistic Error Budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acquaviva, Viviana; Raichoor, Anand; Gawiser, Eric

    2015-05-01

    We seek to improve the accuracy of joint galaxy photometric redshift estimation and spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting. By simulating different sources of uncorrected systematic errors, we demonstrate that if the uncertainties in the photometric redshifts are estimated correctly, so are those on the other SED fitting parameters, such as stellar mass, stellar age, and dust reddening. Furthermore, we find that if the redshift uncertainties are over(under)-estimated, the uncertainties in SED parameters tend to be over(under)-estimated by similar amounts. These results hold even in the presence of severe systematics and provide, for the first time, a mechanism to validate the uncertainties on these parameters via comparison with spectroscopic redshifts. We propose a new technique (annealing) to re-calibrate the joint uncertainties in the photo-z and SED fitting parameters without compromising the performance of the SED fitting + photo-z estimation. This procedure provides a consistent estimation of the multi-dimensional probability distribution function in SED fitting + z parameter space, including all correlations. While the performance of joint SED fitting and photo-z estimation might be hindered by template incompleteness, we demonstrate that the latter is “flagged” by a large fraction of outliers in redshift, and that significant improvements can be achieved by using flexible stellar populations synthesis models and more realistic star formation histories. In all cases, we find that the median stellar age is better recovered than the time elapsed from the onset of star formation. Finally, we show that using a photometric redshift code such as EAZY to obtain redshift probability distributions that are then used as priors for SED fitting codes leads to only a modest bias in the SED fitting parameters and is thus a viable alternative to the simultaneous estimation of SED parameters and photometric redshifts.

  4. A Laser-Pointer-Based Spectrometer for Endpoint Detection of EDTA Titrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahm, Christopher E.; Hall, James W.; Mattioni, Brian E.

    2004-01-01

    A laser spectrometer for the ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid (EDTA) titration of magnesium or calcium ions that is designed around a handheld laser pointer as the source and a photoresistor as the detector is developed. Findings show that the use of the spectrometer reduces the degree of uncertainty and error in one part of the EDTA titrations,

  5. A Laser-Pointer-Based Spectrometer for Endpoint Detection of EDTA Titrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahm, Christopher E.; Hall, James W.; Mattioni, Brian E.

    2004-01-01

    A laser spectrometer for the ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid (EDTA) titration of magnesium or calcium ions that is designed around a handheld laser pointer as the source and a photoresistor as the detector is developed. Findings show that the use of the spectrometer reduces the degree of uncertainty and error in one part of the EDTA titrations,…

  6. Photometric Techniques for Exploring Multiple Populations in Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jay

    2015-03-01

    The advent of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the development of new photometric algorithms that take advantage of its stable observing platform above the atmosphere have allowed us to study the populations in globular clusters with very high precision.

  7. Molecular Titration Promotes Oscillations and Bistability in Minimal Network Models with Monomeric Regulators.

    PubMed

    Cuba Samaniego, Christian; Giordano, Giulia; Kim, Jongmin; Blanchini, Franco; Franco, Elisa

    2016-04-15

    Molecular titration is emerging as an important biochemical interaction mechanism within synthetic devices built with nucleic acids and the CRISPR/Cas system. We show that molecular titration in the context of feedback circuits is a suitable mechanism to enhance the emergence of oscillations and bistable behaviors. We consider biomolecular modules that can be inhibited or activated by input monomeric regulators; the regulators compete with constitutive titrating species to determine the activity of their target. By tuning the titration rate and the concentration of titrating species, it is possible to modulate the delay and convergence speed of the transient response, and the steepness and dead zone of the stationary response of the modules. These phenomena favor the occurrence of oscillations when modules are interconnected to create a negative feedback loop; bistability is favored in a positive feedback interconnection. Numerical simulations are supported by mathematical analysis showing that the capacity of the closed loop systems to exhibit oscillations or bistability is structural. PMID:26797494

  8. Integration and global analysis of isothermal titration calorimetry data for studying macromolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Brautigam, Chad A; Zhao, Huaying; Vargas, Carolyn; Keller, Sandro; Schuck, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a powerful and widely used method to measure the energetics of macromolecular interactions by recording a thermogram of differential heating power during a titration. However, traditional ITC analysis is limited by stochastic thermogram noise and by the limited information content of a single titration experiment. Here we present a protocol for bias-free thermogram integration based on automated shape analysis of the injection peaks, followed by combination of isotherms from different calorimetric titration experiments into a global analysis, statistical analysis of binding parameters and graphical presentation of the results. This is performed using the integrated public-domain software packages NITPIC, SEDPHAT and GUSSI. The recently developed low-noise thermogram integration approach and global analysis allow for more precise parameter estimates and more reliable quantification of multisite and multicomponent cooperative and competitive interactions. Titration experiments typically take 1-2.5 h each, and global analysis usually takes 10-20 min. PMID:27055097

  9. Dose titration of BAF312 attenuates the initial heart rate reducing effect in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Legangneux, Eric; Gardin, Anne; Johns, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Aim Previous studies have shown transient decreases in heart rate (HR) following administration of sphingosine 1‐phosphate (S1P) receptor modulators including BAF312. This study was conducted to determine whether dose titration of BAF312 reduces or eliminates these effects. Methods Fifty‐six healthy subjects were randomized 1:1:1:1 to receive BAF312 in one of two dose titration (DT) regimens (DT1 and DT2: 0.25–10 mg over 9–10 days), no titration (10 mg starting dose) or placebo. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic parameters were assessed. Results Neither DT1 nor DT2 resulted in clinically significant bradycardia or atrioventricular conduction effects. Both titration regimens showed a favourable difference on each of days 1–12 vs. the non‐titration regimen on day 1 for HR effects (P < 0.0001). On day 1, the geometric mean ratio of the fraction from the previous day in minimum daily HR between DT1 and non‐titration was 1.18 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13, 1.23) and 1.14 (95% CI 1.09, 1.18) for DT2 (both P < 0.05) with significant differences noted through to day 12. Non‐titration HRs showed considerable separation from placebo throughout the study. There was no statistically significant reduction in HR vs. placebo on day 1 in either titration regimen. On days 3–7 subjects in DT1 and DT2 experienced minor reductions in HR vs. placebo (approximately 5 beats min−1; P ≤ 0.0001). From days 9–12, HRs in both titration regimens were comparable with placebo. Conclusion Both titration regimens effectively attenuated the initial bradyarrhythmia observed on day 1 of treatment with BAF312 10 mg. PMID:22845008

  10. The Unusual Photometric Variability of the PMS Star GM Cep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semkov, E. H.; Ibryamov, S. I.; Peneva, S. P.; Milanov, T. R.; Stoyanov, K. A.; Stateva, I. K.; Kjurkchieva, D. P.; Dimitrov, D. P.; Radeva, V. S.

    2015-03-01

    Results from UBVRI photometric observations of the pre-main sequence star GM Cep obtained in the period 2011 April-2014 August are reported in the paper. Presented data are a continuation of our photometric monitoring of the star started in 2008. GM Cep is located in the field of the young open cluster Trumpler 37 and over the past years it has been an object of intense photometric and spectral studies. The star shows a strong photometric variability interpreted as a possible outburst from EXor type in previous studies. Our photometric data for a period of over six years show a large amplitude variability (ΔV ~ 2.3 mag) and several deep minimums in brightness are observed. The analysis of the collected multicolour photometric data show the typical of UX Ori variables a colour reversal during the minimums in brightness. The observed decreases in brightness have a different shape, and evidences of periodicity are not detected. At the same time, high amplitude rapid variations in brightness typical for the classical T Tauri stars also present on the light curve of GM Cep. The spectrum of GM Cep shows the typical of classical T Tauri stars wide Hα emission line and absorption lines of some metals. We calculate the outer radius of the Hα emitting region as 10.4 ± 0.5 R⊙ and the accretion rate as 1.8 × 10- 7 M⊙ yr- 1.

  11. Photometric Survey for Asynchronous Binary Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravec, P.

    2005-05-01

    Asynchronous binary asteroids have been found to be abundant among fast- spinning near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) smaller than 2 km in diameter; Pravec et al. (2005, Icarus, submitted) derived that 15 +/- 4 % of NEAs in the size range 0.3 to 2 km are binary with the secondary-to-primary mean diameter ratio >=0.18. The early re-sults from the surveys of the Vesta family and the Hungaria group (Ryan et al., 2004, Planet. Space Sci. 42, 1093; 2004, Bull. Amer. Astron. Society 36, 1181; Warner et al., 2005, IAU Circ. 8511) suggest that the popula-tion extends beyond the region of terrestrial planets, but with characteristics shifted to larger sizes and longer periods; the four known binaries in the Vesta family/Hungaria group are 3 to 6 km large and they have primary rotation periods in a range of 3 to ~4 h, i.e., on the tail of the distribution of primary rotation periods of NEAs. The comparison suggests that formation and evolution mechanisms of asynchronous NEA and main-belt binaries may be similar and are related to their fast spins and rubble-pile structure. None of the current theories of their formation of evolution, however, explains the observed properties of both NEA and main- belt asynchronous bina-ries in full. We have established a collaborative observational program, called "Photometric Survey for Asynchro-nous Binary Asteroids" to discover and describe asynchronous binaries over a range of heliocentric distances from NEAs through Mars-crossers to inner main-belt asteroids. One new binary Amor asteroid, 2005 AB has been found during the first few months of the survey operation (Reddy et al., 2005, IAU Circ. 8483), and we have obtained follow-up data for two other binary systems. I outline the motivations, the technique, and the strategy of the Survey.

  12. Photometric reverberation mapping of 3C 120

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozo Nuñez, F.; Ramolla, M.; Westhues, C.; Bruckmann, C.; Haas, M.; Chini, R.; Steenbrugge, K.; Murphy, M.

    2012-09-01

    We present the results of a five month monitoring campaign of the local active galactic nuclei (AGN) 3C 120. Observations with a median sampling of two days were conducted with the robotic 15 cm telescope VYSOS-6 located near Cerro Armazones in Chile. Broad band (B, V) and narrow band (NB) filters were used in order to measure fluxes of the AGN and the Hβ broad line region (BLR) emission line. The NB flux is constituted by about 50% continuum and 50% Hβ emission line. To disentangle line and continuum flux, a synthetic Hβ light curve was created by subtracting a scaled V-band light curve from the NB light curve. Here we show that the Hβ emission line responds to continuum variations with a rest frame lag of 23.6 ± 1.69 days. We estimate a virial mass of the central black hole MBH = 57 ± 27 × 106 M⊙, by combining the obtained lag with the velocity dispersion of a single contemporaneous spectrum. Using the flux variation gradient method, we determined the host galaxy subtracted rest frame 5100 Å luminosity at the time of our monitoring campaign with an uncertainty of 10% (LAGN = (6.94 ± 0.71) × 1043 erg s-1). Compared with recent spectroscopic reverberation results, 3C 120 shifts in the RBLR - LAGN diagram remarkably close to the theoretically expected relation of R ∝ L0.5. Our results demonstrate the performance of photometric AGN reverberation mapping, in particular for efficiently determining the BLR size and the AGN luminosity. Table 5 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  13. Predicting proton titration in cationic micelle and bilayer environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, Brian H.; Eike, David M.; Murch, Bruce P.; Koenig, Peter H.; Shen, Jana K.

    2014-08-01

    Knowledge of the protonation behavior of pH-sensitive molecules in micelles and bilayers has significant implications in consumer product development and biomedical applications. However, the calculation of pKa's in such environments proves challenging using traditional structure-based calculations. Here we apply all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics with explicit ions and titratable water to calculate the pKa of a fatty acid molecule in a micelle of dodecyl trimethylammonium chloride and liquid as well as gel-phase bilayers of diethyl ester dimethylammonium chloride. Interestingly, the pKa of the fatty acid in the gel bilayer is 5.4, 0.4 units lower than that in the analogous liquid bilayer or micelle, despite the fact that the protonated carboxylic group is significantly more desolvated in the gel bilayer. This work illustrates the capability of all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics in capturing the delicate balance in the free energies of desolvation and Coulombic interactions. It also shows the importance of the explicit treatment of ions in sampling the protonation states. The ability to model dynamics of pH-responsive substrates in a bilayer environment is useful for improving fabric care products as well as our understanding of the side effects of anti-inflammatory drugs.

  14. Enzyme kinetics determined by single-injection isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Transtrum, Mark K; Hansen, Lee D; Quinn, Colette

    2015-04-01

    The purposes of this paper are (a) to examine the effect of calorimeter time constant (τ) on heat rate data from a single enzyme injection into substrate in an isothermal titration calorimeter (ITC), (b) to provide information that can be used to predict the optimum experimental conditions for determining the rate constant (k2), Michaelis constant (KM), and enthalpy change of the reaction (ΔRH), and (c) to describe methods for evaluating these parameters. We find that KM, k2 and ΔRH can be accurately estimated without correcting for the calorimeter time constant, τ, if (k2E/KM), where E is the total active enzyme concentration, is between 0.1/τ and 1/τ and the reaction goes to at least 99% completion. If experimental conditions are outside this domain and no correction is made for τ, errors in the inferred parameters quickly become unreasonable. A method for fitting single-injection data to the Michaelis-Menten or Briggs-Haldane model to simultaneously evaluate KM, k2, ΔRH, and τ is described and validated with experimental data. All four of these parameters can be accurately inferred provided the reaction time constant (k2E/KM) is larger than 1/τ and the data include enzyme saturated conditions. PMID:25497059

  15. Chicken (Gallus gallus) hemolytic complement: optimal conditions for its titration.

    PubMed

    Barta, O; Barta, V

    1975-01-01

    The effect of pH, ionic strength, cation concentration, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid trisodium salt (Na3EDTA), time and temperature were studied to determine the optimal conditions for titrating the hemolytic complement (C) activity in sera of chicken (Gallus gallus). Swine erythrocytes (E) sensitized with rabbit antibodies were the most sensitive, while chicken serum had a smaller amount of "natural" antibody against them than against red blood cells from other five species tested. The highest titers of chicken C, when tested with swine sensitized E, were detected when isotonic NaCl-barbital buffer was used as diluent, having the ionic strength of 0.15, conductance of 11 millimhos/cm at 20 degrees C. However, maximal chicken C titers detected with sensitized rabbit E were obtained at ionic strength of 0.07 to 0.11 depending on pH. A final concentration of 1 X 10(-3) M of Mg2+ and 3 X 10(-4) M of Ca2+ and pH 8 were optimal in both cases. The temperature of 30 degrees C and time of 60 minutes were appropriate to reveal the maximal titers.. PMID:241720

  16. Liposome/Graphene Oxide Interaction Studied by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Po-Jung Jimmy; Wang, Feng; Liu, Juewen

    2016-03-15

    The interaction between graphene oxide (GO) and lipid bilayers is important for fundamental surface science and many applications. In this work, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), cryo-TEM, and fluorescence spectroscopy were used to study the adsorption of three types of liposomes. Heat release was observed when GO was mixed with zwitterionic DOPC liposomes, while heat absorption occurred with cationic DOTAP liposomes. For comparison, anionic DOPG liposomes released heat when mixed with DOTAP. DOPC was adsorbed as intact liposomes, but DOTAP ruptured and induced stacking and folding of GO sheets. This study suggests the release of more water molecules from the GO surface when mixed with DOTAP liposomes. This can be rationalized by the full rupture of the DOTAP liposomes interacting with the whole GO surface, including hydrophobic regions, while DOPC liposomes only interact with a small area on GO near the edge, which is likely to be more hydrophilic. This interesting biointerfacial observation has enhanced our fundamental understanding of lipid/GO interactions. PMID:26908113

  17. Probing lectin-mucin interactions by isothermal titration microcalorimetry.

    PubMed

    Dam, Tarun K; Brewer, C Fred

    2015-01-01

    Isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC) can directly determine the thermodynamic binding parameters of biological molecules including affinity constant, binding stoichiometry, and heat of binding (enthalpy) and indirectly the entropy and free energy of binding. ITC has been extensively used to study the binding of lectins to mono- and oligosaccharides, but limited applications to lectin-glycoprotein interactions. Inherent experimental challenges to ITC include sample precipitation during the experiment and relative high amount of sample required, but careful design of experiments can minimize these problems and allow valuable information to be obtained. For example, the thermodynamics of binding of lectins to multivalent globular and linear glycoproteins (mucins) have been described. The results are consistent with a dynamic binding mechanism in which lectins bind and jump from carbohydrate to carbohydrate epitope in these molecules leading to increased affinity. Importantly, the mechanism of binding of lectins to mucins appears similar to that for a variety of protein ligands binding to DNA. Recent results also show that high affinity lectin-mucin cross-linking interactions are driven by favorable entropy of binding that is associated with the bind and jump mechanism. The results suggest that the binding of ligands to biopolymers, in general, may involve a common mechanism that involves enhanced entropic effects that facilitate binding interactions. PMID:25253134

  18. Predicting proton titration in cationic micelle and bilayer environments

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, Brian H.; Shen, Jana K.; Eike, David M.; Murch, Bruce P.; Koenig, Peter H.

    2014-08-28

    Knowledge of the protonation behavior of pH-sensitive molecules in micelles and bilayers has significant implications in consumer product development and biomedical applications. However, the calculation of pK{sub a}’s in such environments proves challenging using traditional structure-based calculations. Here we apply all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics with explicit ions and titratable water to calculate the pK{sub a} of a fatty acid molecule in a micelle of dodecyl trimethylammonium chloride and liquid as well as gel-phase bilayers of diethyl ester dimethylammonium chloride. Interestingly, the pK{sub a} of the fatty acid in the gel bilayer is 5.4, 0.4 units lower than that in the analogous liquid bilayer or micelle, despite the fact that the protonated carboxylic group is significantly more desolvated in the gel bilayer. This work illustrates the capability of all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics in capturing the delicate balance in the free energies of desolvation and Coulombic interactions. It also shows the importance of the explicit treatment of ions in sampling the protonation states. The ability to model dynamics of pH-responsive substrates in a bilayer environment is useful for improving fabric care products as well as our understanding of the side effects of anti-inflammatory drugs.

  19. Hot Biological Catalysis: Isothermal Titration Calorimetry to Characterize Enzymatic Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Mazzei, Luca; Ciurli, Stefano; Zambelli, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a well-described technique that measures the heat released or absorbed during a chemical reaction, using it as an intrinsic probe to characterize virtually every chemical process. Nowadays, this technique is extensively applied to determine thermodynamic parameters of biomolecular binding equilibria. In addition, ITC has been demonstrated to be able of directly measuring kinetics and thermodynamic parameters (kcat, KM, ΔH) of enzymatic reactions, even though this application is still underexploited. As heat changes spontaneously occur during enzymatic catalysis, ITC does not require any modification or labeling of the system under analysis and can be performed in solution. Moreover, the method needs little amount of material. These properties make ITC an invaluable, powerful and unique tool to study enzyme kinetics in several applications, such as, for example, drug discovery. In this work an experimental ITC-based method to quantify kinetics and thermodynamics of enzymatic reactions is thoroughly described. This method is applied to determine kcat and KM of the enzymatic hydrolysis of urea by Canavalia ensiformis (jack bean) urease. Calculation of intrinsic molar enthalpy (ΔHint) of the reaction is performed. The values thus obtained are consistent with previous data reported in literature, demonstrating the reliability of the methodology. PMID:24747990

  20. A survey of the year 2007 literature on applications of isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Bjelić, Sasa; Jelesarov, Ilian

    2008-01-01

    Elucidation of the energetic principles of binding affinity and specificity is a central task in many branches of current sciences: biology, medicine, pharmacology, chemistry, material sciences, etc. In biomedical research, integral approaches combining structural information with in-solution biophysical data have proved to be a powerful way toward understanding the physical basis of vital cellular phenomena. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a valuable experimental tool facilitating quantification of the thermodynamic parameters that characterize recognition processes involving biomacromolecules. The method provides access to all relevant thermodynamic information by performing a few experiments. In particular, ITC experiments allow to by-pass tedious and (rarely precise) procedures aimed at determining the changes in enthalpy and entropy upon binding by van't Hoff analysis. Notwithstanding limitations, ITC has now the reputation of being the "gold standard" and ITC data are widely used to validate theoretical predictions of thermodynamic parameters, as well as to benchmark the results of novel binding assays. In this paper, we discuss several publications from 2007 reporting ITC results. The focus is on applications in biologically oriented fields. We do not intend a comprehensive coverage of all newly accumulated information. Rather, we emphasize work which has captured our attention with originality and far-reaching analysis, or else has provided ideas for expanding the potential of the method. PMID:18729242

  1. A photometric model for asteroid (21) Lutetia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasselmann, P.; Leyrat, C.; Fornasier, S.; Barucci, M.; Lazzaro, D.

    2014-07-01

    (21) Lutetia has been successfully observed (July 10, 2010) by the ESA Rosetta spacecraft during its journey toward the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (Sierks et al. 2011, Coradini et al. 2011). All the available data show intriguing characteristics with a complex surface composition interpretation (Barucci et al. 2012). The quite high mean density estimation (3.4±0.3, Pätzold et al. 2011) together with the unmatching density derived from the most probable surface compositions raise a hypothesis of (21) Lutetia having a metal core (Weiss et al 2012). The surface geology of (21) Lutetia is also highly complex with significant interactions between ancient and more recent structures (Thomas et al; 2012). The large craters and lineaments show that the object was heavily battered in the past, probably losing almost all of its crust in the process (Massironi et al 2012). If (21) Lutetia is a partially differentiated asteroid with an impact-stripped crust, a complete study of variegations might help in elucidating this event. Regions or strips of different albedo might indicate heavier- or lighter-battered surface histories. Albedo variations have been detected by Leyrat et al. (2012) in the visible wavelengths. In this work, we present a deeper analysis of the Lutetia photometric properties. For such analysis, a full set of pipelines was developed in the Python 2.7.6 language. Images obtained by the OSIRIS cameras, NAC and WAC, were used alongside the shape model provided by L. Jorda to derive for each facet the luminance angles and the correct I/F. The pipeline takes image pixels and matches with facets on different observational conditions. Facets are iteratively fitted by a phase function and a disk function. Several phase functions were tested as Akimov (1976), Kaasalainen (Kaasalainen et al. 2003), Schroder (Schroder et al; 2013) and polynomial and were implemented; for disk function, McEwen (1991), Akimov and Minnaert (1941) were used. The method can be also applicable for any body with resolved images and precise shape model. As a result, all phase and topological effects are removed and equigonal albedo maps (Shkuratov et al. 2011) were retrieved showing (21) Lutetia real variegations. Images close to the opposition surge, off linear regime, were handled with the Akimov or Kaasalainen functions. The obtained results will be presented and discussed, in particular maps with a distribution of opposition surge properties, such as angular width and amplitude of the surge. The opposition parameters give additional information about the grain-size distribution and grain transparency, and were only retrieved for facets with I/F of phase angles lower than 3 degrees.

  2. Photometric Studies of GEO Orbital Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Rodriquez-Cowardin, Heather M.; Barker, Ed; Abercromby, Kira J.; Foreman, Gary; Horstman, Matt

    2009-01-01

    The photometric signature of a debris object can be useful in determining what the physical characteristics of a piece of debris are. We report on optical observations in multiple filters of debris at geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). Our sample is taken from GEO objects discovered in a survey with the University of Michigan's 0.6-m aperture Schmidt telescope MODEST (for Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), and then followed up in real-time with the Cerro Tololo Inter- American Observatory (CTIO) 0.9-m for orbits and photometry. Our goal is to determine 6 parameter orbits and measure colors for all objects fainter than R=15th magnitude that are discovered in the MODEST survey. At this magnitude the distribution of observed angular rates changes significantly from that of brighter objects. There are two objectives: 1. Estimate the orbital distribution of objects selected on the basis of two observational criteria: brightness (magnitude) and angular rates. 2. Obtain magnitudes and colors in standard astronomical filters (BVRI) for comparison with reflectance spectra of likely spacecraft materials. What is the faint debris likely to be? More than 90 calibrated sequences of R-B-V-I-R magnitudes for a sample of 50 objects have been obtained with the CTIO 0.9-m. For objects that do not show large brightness variations, the colors are largely redder than solar in both B-R and R-I. The width of the color distribution may be intrinsic to the nature of the surfaces, but also could be that we are seeing irregularly shaped objects and measuring the colors at different times with just one telescope. For a smaller sample of objects we have observed with synchronized CCD cameras on the two telescopes. The CTIO 0.9-m observes in B, and MODEST in R. The CCD cameras are electronically linked together so that the start time and duration of observations are the same to better than 50 milliseconds. Thus the B-R color is a true measure of the surface of the debris piece facing the telescopes for that observation. Any change in color reflects a real change in the debris surface. We will compare our observations with models and laboratory measurements of selected surfaces.

  3. Optical Photometric Observations of GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Rodriquez-Cowardin, Heather M.; Barker, Edwin S.; Abercromby, Kira J.; Kelecy, Thomas M.; Horstman, Matt

    2010-01-01

    We report on a continuing program of optical photometric measurements of faint orbital debris at geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). These observations can be compared with laboratory studies of actual spacecraft materials in an effort to determine what the faint debris at GEO may be. We have optical observations from Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile of two samples of debris: 1. GEO objects discovered in a survey with the University of Michigan's 0.6-m aperture Curtis-Schmidt telescope MODEST (for Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), and then followed up in real-time with the CTIO/SMARTS 0.9-m for orbits and photometry. Our goal is to determine 6 parameter orbits and measure colors for all objects fainter than R = 15 t11 magnitude that are discovered in the MODEST survey. 2. A smaller sample of high area to mass ratio (AMR) objects discovered independently, and acquired using predictions from orbits derived from independent tracking data collected days prior to the observations. Our optical observations in standard astronomical BVRI filters are done with either telescope, and with the telescope tracking the debris object at the object's angular rate. Observations in different filters are obtained sequentially. We have obtained 71 calibrated sequences of R-B-V-I-R magnitudes. A total of 66 of these sequences have 3 or more good measurements in all filters (not contaminated by star streaks or in Earth's shadow). Most of these sequences show brightness variations, but a small subset has observed brightness variations consistent with that expected from observational errors alone. The majority of these stable objects are redder than a solar color in both B-R and R-I. There is no dependence on color with brightness. For a smaller sample of objects we have observed with synchronized CCD cameras on the two telescopes. The CTIO 0.9-m observes in B, and MODEST in R. The CCD cameras are electronically linked together so that the start time and duration of observations are the same to better than 50 milliseconds. Thus, the B-R color is a true measure of the surface of the debris piece facing the telescopes for that observation. Any change in color reflects a real change in the debris surface. We will compare our observations with models and laboratory measurements of selected surfaces.

  4. Photometric Studies of Orbital Debris at GEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Cowardin, Heather M.; Barker, Ed; Abercromby, Kira J.; Foreman, Gary; Hortsman, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Orbital debris represents a significant and increasing risk to operational spacecraft. Here we report on photometric observations made in standard BVRI filters at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in an effort to determine the physical characteristics of optically faint debris at geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). Our sample is taken from GEO objects discovered in a survey with the University of Michigan s 0.6-m Curtis-Schmidt telescope (known as MODEST, for Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), and then followed up in real-time with the CTIO/SMARTS 0.9-m for orbits and photometry. For a sample of 50 objects, calibrated sequences in RB- V-I-R filters have been obtained with the CTIO/SMARTS 0.9-m. For objects that do not show large brightness variations, the colors are largely redder than solar in both B-R and R-I. The width of the color distribution may be intrinsic to the nature of the surfaces, but also could imply that we are seeing irregularly shaped objects and measuring the colors at different times with just one telescope. For irregularly shaped objects tumbling at unknown orientations and rates, such sequential filter measurements using one telescope are subject to large errors for interpretation. If all observations in all filters in a particular sequence are of the same surface at the same solar and viewing angles, then the colors are meaningful. Where this is not the case, interpretation of the observed colors is impossible. For a smaller sample of objects we have observed with synchronized CCD cameras on the two telescopes. The CTIO/SMARTS 0.9-m observes in B, and the Schmidt in R. The CCD cameras are electronically linked together so that the start time and duration of observations are both the same to better than 50 milliseconds. Now the observed B-R color is a true measure of the scattered illuminated area of the debris piece for that observation.

  5. Photometric calibrations for 21st century science

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, Stephen; Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth; Deustua, Susana E.; Smith, J.Allyn; Adelman, Saul; Allam, Sahar S.; Baptista, Brian; Bohlin, Ralph C.; Clem, James L.; Conley, Alex; Edelstein, Jerry; /UC, Berkeley, Space Sci. Dept. /NOAO, Tucson

    2009-02-01

    The answers to fundamental science questions in astrophysics, ranging from the history of the expansion of the universe to the sizes of nearby stars, hinge on our ability to make precise measurements of diverse astronomical objects. As our knowledge of the underlying physics of objects improves along with advances in detectors and instrumentation, the limits on our capability to extract science from measurements is set, not by our lack of understanding of the nature of these objects, but rather by the most mundane of all issues: the precision with which we can calibrate observations in physical units. In principle, photometric calibration is a solved problem - laboratory reference standards such as blackbody furnaces achieve precisions well in excess of those needed for astrophysics. In practice, however, transferring the calibration from these laboratory standards to astronomical objects of interest is far from trivial - the transfer must reach outside the atmosphere, extend over 4{pi} steradians of sky, cover a wide range of wavelengths, and span an enormous dynamic range in intensity. Virtually all spectrophotometric observations today are calibrated against one or more stellar reference sources, such as Vega, which are themselves tied back to laboratory standards in a variety of ways. This system's accuracy is not uniform. Selected regions of the electromagnetic spectrum are calibrated extremely well, but discontinuities of a few percent still exist, e.g., between the optical and infrared. Independently, model stellar atmospheres are used to calibrate the spectra of selected white dwarf stars, e.g. the HST system, but the ultimate accuracy of this system should be verified against laboratory sources. Our traditional standard star systems, while sufficient until now, need to be improved and extended in order to serve future astrophysics experiments. This white paper calls for a program to improve upon and expand the current networks of spectrophotometrically calibrated stars to provide precise calibration with an accuracy of equal to and better than 1% in the ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum, with excellent sky coverage and large dynamic range.

  6. Photometric constraints on binary asteroid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheirich, Peter

    2015-08-01

    To date, about 50 binary NEAs, 20 Mars-crossing and 80 small MB asteroids are known. We observe also a population of about 200 unbound asteroid systems (asteroid pairs). I will review the photometric observational data we have for the best observed cases and compare them with theories of binary and paired asteroids evolution.The observed characteristics of asteroid systems suggest their formation by rotational fission of parent rubble-pile asteroids after being spun up by the YORP effect. The angular momentum content of binary asteroids is close to critical. The orientations of satellite orbits of observed binary systems are non-random; the orbital poles concentrate near the obliquities of 0 and 180 degrees, i.e., near the YORP asymptotic states.Recently, a significant excess of retrograde satellite orbits was detected, which is not yet explained characteristic.An evolution of binary system depend heavily on the BYORP effect. If BYORP is contractive, the primary and secondary could end in a tidal-BYORP equilibrium. Observations of mutual events between binary components in at least four apparitions are needed for BYORP to be revealed by detecting a quadratic drift in mean anomaly of the satellite. I will show the observational evidence of single-synchronous binary asteroid with tidally locked satellite (175706 1996 FG3), i.e, with the quadratic drift equal to zero, and binary asteroid with contracting orbit (88710 2001 SL9), with positive value of the quadratic drift (the solution for the quadratic drift is ambiguous so far, with possible values of 5 and 8 deg/yr2).The spin configuration of the satellite play a crucial role in the evolution of the system under the influence of the BYORP effect. I will show that the rotational lightcurves of the satellites show that most of them have small libration amplitudes (up to 20 deg.), with a few interesting exceptions.Acknowledgements: This work has been supported by the Grant Agency of the Czech Republic, Grant P209/12/0229, and by the Ministry of Education of the Czech Republic, Grant LG12001.

  7. On the physical meaning of the isothermal titration calorimetry measurements in calorimeters with full cells.

    PubMed

    Grolier, Jean-Pierre E; del Río, Jose Manuel

    2009-12-01

    We have performed a detailed study of the thermodynamics of the titration process in an isothermal titration calorimeter with full cells. We show that the relationship between the enthalpy and the heat measured is better described in terms of the equation Delta H = W(inj) + Q (where W(inj) is the work necessary to carry out the titration) than in terms of DeltaH = Q. Moreover, we show that the heat of interaction between two components is related to the partial enthalpy of interaction at infinite dilution of the titrant component, as well as to its partial volume of interaction at infinite dilution. PMID:20054472

  8. On the Physical Meaning of the Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Measurements in Calorimeters with Full Cells

    PubMed Central

    Grolier, Jean-Pierre E.; del Río, Jose Manuel

    2009-01-01

    We have performed a detailed study of the thermodynamics of the titration process in an isothermal titration calorimeter with full cells. We show that the relationship between the enthalpy and the heat measured is better described in terms of the equation Δ H = Winj + Q (where Winj is the work necessary to carry out the titration) than in terms of ΔH = Q. Moreover, we show that the heat of interaction between two components is related to the partial enthalpy of interaction at infinite dilution of the titrant component, as well as to its partial volume of interaction at infinite dilution. PMID:20054472

  9. Comparison of methods for accurate end-point detection of potentiometric titrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villela, R. L. A.; Borges, P. P.; Vyskočil, L.

    2015-01-01

    Detection of the end point in potentiometric titrations has wide application on experiments that demand very low measurement uncertainties mainly for certifying reference materials. Simulations of experimental coulometric titration data and consequential error analysis of the end-point values were conducted using a programming code. These simulations revealed that the Levenberg-Marquardt method is in general more accurate than the traditional second derivative technique used currently as end-point detection for potentiometric titrations. Performance of the methods will be compared and presented in this paper.

  10. Experimental parameters in the photometric analysis of uranium in TBP-dodecane solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, D.T.; Strain, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    A systematic study of the direct colorimetric determination of uranium in tributyl phosphate-dodecane solutions has been made. A number of parameters, including HNO{sub 3}, TBP, mono- and dibutyl phosphate concentrations, temperature, and extent of solvent degradation, have been investigated to determine what effect they have on the accuracy of uranium analysis. The procedure, based on the absorbance of UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.2TBP at 416 nm, was found to be independent of HNO{sub 3} concentration and is not significantly affected by fluctuations in the concentration of TBP, MBP, and DBP under normal operating conditions. Phase separation occurs in hydrated organic samples at elevated temperatures; however, the accuracy of the photometric method is essentially independent of temperature fluctuations if the absorbance at 550 nm is used to correct 416-nm absorbance for sample opacity. Significant positive bias in assay results is observed in organic streams when spent TBP is recycled through the reprocessing facility. The absorbance from solvent coloration, produced by the presence of TBP nitrification products, must be subtracted from the total 416-nm absorbance to obtain an accurate analysis of uranium under these process conditions. The operating range of the procedure, using a 0.5-cm photometric cell, is 1 to 100 g/l U, with an estimated accuracy of +-0.5 g/l U.

  11. H, G1, G2 photometric phase function extended to low-accuracy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penttilä, A.; Shevchenko, V. G.; Wilkman, O.; Muinonen, K.

    2016-04-01

    We introduce a constrained nonlinear least-squares algorithm to be used in estimating the parameters in the H, G1, G2 phase function. As the algorithm works directly in the magnitude space, it will surpass the possible bias problem that may be present in the existing H ,G1 ,G2 fit procedure when applied to low-accuracy observations with large magnitude variations. With constraints on the photometric phase-curve shape parameters G1 and G2, it guarantees a physically reasonable phase-curve estimate. With a new data set of 93 asteroids, we re-assess the two-parameter version of the H ,G1 ,G2 function. Finally, we introduce a one-parameter version of the phase function that can give a suggestion of the asteroids taxonomic group based only on its phase curve. A statistical model selection procedure is presented that can automatically select between the different versions of the photometric phase functions. An online tool that implements these algorithms is introduced.

  12. Photometric Calibrators for the Second-Generation Palomar Sky Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, Brian; Bucciarelli, Beatrice; Garcia Yus, Jorge; Loomis, Charles; Alessandro, Spagna; Greene, Gretchen

    2006-08-01

    The latest GSC-II release (GSC2.3) includes positions, proper motions, photographic photometry (blue J, red F and near-IR N), and star/non-star classification of nearly 1 billion objects to a limiting magnitude of J~eq 22 and F~eq 20.5. Besides its obvious applications for telescope operations and space missions planning, the all-sky astro-photometric properties of GSC-II make it a highly valuable tool for a wide range of astrophysical investigations and data mining. A major effort toward the construction of such a catalog has been the collection of ad-hoc photometric sequences (a total of ~ 1780) for the linearization of the density-to-intensity response of each survey plate; this is summarized by the realization of the CCD-based, photometric catalogue GSPC-II. More details on the GSC- II and GSPC-II, and their releases, can bee found at www- gsss.stsci.edu/Catalogs/Catalogs.htm With this proposal we are addressing the remaining 100 fields still lacking photometric calibrators. Eighty of them were targets of a previous KPNO proposal (ID 2005B-0139), but did not get proper data due to uncooperative weather; most of the twenty southern sequences need re- observations because they are of poor photometric quality.

  13. Photometric redshifts for the SDSS Data Release 12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Róbert; Dobos, László; Budavári, Tamás; Szalay, Alexander S.; Csabai, István

    2016-04-01

    We present the methodology and data behind the photometric redshift database of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12 (SDSS DR12). We adopt a hybrid technique, empirically estimating the redshift via local regression on a spectroscopic training set, then fitting a spectrum template to obtain K-corrections and absolute magnitudes. The SDSS spectroscopic catalog was augmented with data from other, publicly available spectroscopic surveys to mitigate target selection effects. The training set is comprised of 1, 976, 978 galaxies, and extends up to redshift z ≈ 0.8, with a useful coverage of up to z ≈ 0.6. We provide photometric redshifts and realistic error estimates for the 208, 474, 076 galaxies of the SDSS primary photometric catalog. We achieve an average bias of overline{Δ z_{norm}} = 5.84 × 10^{-5}, a standard deviation of σ(Δznorm) = 0.0205, and a 3σ outlier rate of Po = 4.11% when cross-validating on our training set. The published redshift error estimates and photometric error classes enable the selection of galaxies with high quality photometric redshifts. We also provide a supplementary error map that allows additional, sophisticated filtering of the data.

  14. Assessing Coupled Protein Folding and Binding Through Temperature-Dependent Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Debashish; Bastidas, Monique; Lawrence, Chad W; Noid, William G; Showalter, Scott A

    2016-01-01

    Broad interest in the thermodynamic driving forces of coupled macromolecular folding and binding is motivated by the prevalence of disorder-to-order transitions observed when intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) bind to their partners. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is one of the few methods available for completely evaluating the thermodynamic parameters describing a protein-ligand binding event. Significantly, when the effective ΔH° for the coupled folding and binding process is determined by ITC in a temperature series, the constant-pressure heat capacity change (ΔCp) associated with these coupled equilibria is experimentally accessible, offering a unique opportunity to investigate the driving forces behind them. Notably, each of these molecular-scale events is often accompanied by strongly temperature-dependent enthalpy changes, even over the narrow temperature range experimentally accessible for biomolecules, making single temperature determinations of ΔH° less informative than typically assumed. Here, we will document the procedures we have adopted in our laboratory for designing, executing, and globally analyzing temperature-dependent ITC studies of coupled folding and binding in IDP interactions. As a biologically significant example, our recent evaluation of temperature-dependent interactions between the disordered tail of FCP1 and the winged-helix domain from Rap74 will be presented. Emphasis will be placed on the use of publically available analysis programs written in MATLAB that facilitate quantification of the thermodynamic forces governing IDP interactions. Although motivated from the perspective of IDPs, the experimental design principles and data fitting procedures presented here are general to the study of most noncooperative ligand binding equilibria. PMID:26794349

  15. Some Tungsten Oxidation-Reduction Chemistry: A Paint Pot Titration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickering, Miles; Monts, David L.

    1982-01-01

    Reports an oxidation-reduction experiment using tungsten, somewhat analogous to the classical student experiment involving oxidation-reduction of vanadium. Includes experimental procedures, results, and toxicity/cost of tungsten compounds. (Author/JN)

  16. Iron Analysis by Redox Titration. A General Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Samuel; DeVoe, Howard

    1988-01-01

    Describes a simplified redox method for total iron analysis suitable for execution in a three-hour laboratory period by general chemistry students. Discusses materials, procedures, analyses, and student performance. (CW)

  17. Photometric Calibration of Consumer Video Cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suggs, Robert; Swift, Wesley, Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Equipment and techniques have been developed to implement a method of photometric calibration of consumer video cameras for imaging of objects that are sufficiently narrow or sufficiently distant to be optically equivalent to point or line sources. Heretofore, it has been difficult to calibrate consumer video cameras, especially in cases of image saturation, because they exhibit nonlinear responses with dynamic ranges much smaller than those of scientific-grade video cameras. The present method not only takes this difficulty in stride but also makes it possible to extend effective dynamic ranges to several powers of ten beyond saturation levels. The method will likely be primarily useful in astronomical photometry. There are also potential commercial applications in medical and industrial imaging of point or line sources in the presence of saturation.This development was prompted by the need to measure brightnesses of debris in amateur video images of the breakup of the Space Shuttle Columbia. The purpose of these measurements is to use the brightness values to estimate relative masses of debris objects. In most of the images, the brightness of the main body of Columbia was found to exceed the dynamic ranges of the cameras. A similar problem arose a few years ago in the analysis of video images of Leonid meteors. The present method is a refined version of the calibration method developed to solve the Leonid calibration problem. In this method, one performs an endto- end calibration of the entire imaging system, including not only the imaging optics and imaging photodetector array but also analog tape recording and playback equipment (if used) and any frame grabber or other analog-to-digital converter (if used). To automatically incorporate the effects of nonlinearity and any other distortions into the calibration, the calibration images are processed in precisely the same manner as are the images of meteors, space-shuttle debris, or other objects that one seeks to analyze. The light source used to generate the calibration images is an artificial variable star comprising a Newtonian collimator illuminated by a light source modulated by a rotating variable neutral- density filter. This source acts as a point source, the brightness of which varies at a known rate. A video camera to be calibrated is aimed at this source. Fixed neutral-density filters are inserted in or removed from the light path as needed to make the video image of the source appear to fluctuate between dark and saturated bright. The resulting video-image data are analyzed by use of custom software that determines the integrated signal in each video frame and determines the system response curve (measured output signal versus input brightness). These determinations constitute the calibration, which is thereafter used in automatic, frame-by-frame processing of the data from the video images to be analyzed.

  18. Extraction preconcentration and photometric determination of chlorophenols and naphthols in aqueous media

    SciTech Connect

    Korenman, Ya.I.; Kalinkina, S.P.; Sukhanov, P.T.

    1994-11-01

    Mono- and bicyclic hydroxy compounds (phenol, chlorophenols, naphthols, and naphtholsulfonic acids) are industrial toxicants; these compounds occur in waste water from the production of dyestuffs, polymer materials, perfumes, drugs, varnishes, paints, and pesticides. Phenol, chlorophenols, and naphthols are carcinogenic toxicants; they may constitute a threat to living organisms in reservoirs and biologically active silts. The presence of these compounds changes the oxygen balance of water basins. The maximum permissible concentration of these compounds in water varies from 10{sup {minus}1} (naphthols) to 10{sup {minus}4} mg/L (chlorophenols). For the reliable determination of microquantities of toxicants in water, we proposed procedures that include extraction by lower alcohols, organic acids, and hexane or hexane-hexanol solutions of solvotropic reagents (dialkyl phthalates and trialkyl phthalates). A set of extraction photometric procedures has been developed for the total and selective determination of microquantities of phenol and naphthol toxicants in aqueous media.

  19. Titration of Alanine Monitored by NMR Spectroscopy: A Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Francis J.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The experiment described here involves simultaneous monitoring of pH and NMR chemical shifts during an aqueous titration of alpha- and beta-alanine. This experiment is designed for use in an undergraduate biochemistry course. (MR)

  20. Reversible and irreversible changes in hydrogen ion titration curves of melanins.

    PubMed

    McGinness, J E; Crippa, P R; Kirkpatrick, D S; Proctor, P H

    1979-01-01

    Hydrogen ion titration curves obtained on melanins prepared and modified differently show recognizable differences. Melanin prepared with NaOH exhibits irreversible loss of functional groups in the base range once titrated acidic. Melanin prepared with NH4OH shows two main branches selected by incubation at an extreme pH for 24 h. Longer exposure reveals other curves but they disappear once a 24-h schedule of titration is resumed. The existence of two major pH branches appears consistent with the oxidation-reduction properties of melanins. These results demonstrate the ability to obtain a reproducible feature in the hydrogen ion titration curves. Thus it is finally possible to quantitate CO2 adsorbed to melanin in solution at basic pH. PMID:43543

  1. Simple home-made sensors for potentiometric titrations. [Nitroform CH(NO/sub 2/)/sub 3/

    SciTech Connect

    Selig, W.

    1982-04-01

    A sensor for potentiometric titrations was prepared by coating a spectroscopic graphite rod with a solution of poly(vinyl chloride) and dioctyphthalate in tetrahydrofuran. The reference electrode was an Ag/AgCl single-junction electrode. The sensor was used in precipitation, acid-base, compleximetric, and redox titrations. Preparation of the coated-graphite sensor is simple and rapid. Moreover, it is quite inexpensive. A limitation is its applicability in aqueous media only, because organic solvents will dissolve the membrane. Various uncoated types of graphite have also been investigated as sensors, particularly in two applications of interest in the analysis of propellants: the titration of nitroform and perchlorate. Obviously, these sensors can be used also in nonaqueous, or partially nonaqueous media. These sensors may also find use in the potentiometric titration of fluoride vs La(III) or Th(IV).

  2. First photometric study of W UMa binary star LU Lac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, W.-P.; Qian, S.-B.; Zhao, E.-G.; Jiang, L.-Q.

    2014-08-01

    LU Lac is a neglected W UMa binary star in photometric investigations. In this paper, we present BVRI CCD photometric light curves obtained on one night in 2012. The first photometric solutions of this system are computed by using the Wilson-Devinney code. It is shown that LU Lac is a marginal contact W-type system with a degree of contact factor of f=8.9%, a mass ratio of q=2.085 and a high inclination of i=82°.20. From the first analyses of orbital period changes, we found the period variation of the system includes an oscillation (A3=0.0125 days and T3=51.92 years). The cyclic change may be attributed to the light-travel time effect through the presence of a third body.

  3. Photometric Analysis in the Kepler Science Operations Center Pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twicken, Joseph D.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Wu, Hayley; Jenkins, Jon M.; Girouard, Forrest; Klaus, Todd C.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the Photometric Analysis (PA) software component and its context in the Kepler Science Operations Center (SOC) pipeline. The primary tasks of this module are to compute the photometric flux and photocenters (centroids) for over 160,000 long cadence (thirty minute) and 512 short cadence (one minute) stellar targets from the calibrated pixels in their respective apertures. We discuss the science algorithms for long and short cadence PA: cosmic ray cleaning; background estimation and removal; aperture photometry; and flux-weighted centroiding. We discuss the end-to-end propagation of uncertainties for the science algorithms. Finally, we present examples of photometric apertures, raw flux light curves, and centroid time series from Kepler flight data. PA light curves, centroid time series, and barycentric timestamp corrections are exported to the Multi-mission Archive at Space Telescope [Science Institute] (MAST) and are made available to the general public in accordance with the NASA/Kepler data release policy.

  4. Photometric redshift techniques of quasars in big-data era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanxia

    2015-08-01

    With the availability of the huge amounts of data from ground- and space-based large multiband photometric surveys, photometric redshifts provide an estimate for the distance of an astronomical object and have become a crucial tool for extragalactic astronomy and cosmology. Various phtometric redshift approaches are in bloom. Their performance and efficiency not only depend on completeness and quality of data, but also on the volume of data. The increase of data volume lead to different choice of techniques. We present various data mining methods used for photometric redshift estimation of quasars and compare their advantages and disadvantages. In the big-data era, the methods fit for large-scale data are in great requirement.

  5. Metallicity calibration and photometric parallax estimation: I. UBV photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunçel Güçtekin, S.; Bilir, S.; Karaali, S.; Ak, S.; Ak, T.; Bostancı, Z. F.

    2016-06-01

    We present metallicity and photometric parallax calibrations for the F and G type dwarfs with photometric, astrometric and spectroscopic data. The sample consists of 168 dwarf stars covering the colour, iron abundance and absolute magnitude intervals 0.30<(B-V)0<0.68 mag, -2.0<[Fe/H]<0.4 dex and 3.4< MV<6.0 mag, respectively. The means and standard deviations of the metallicity and absolute magnitude residuals are small, i.e. <Δ[Fe/H]_{res}rangle=0 and σ=0.134 dex, and <Δ (MV)_{res}rangle=0 and σ=0.174 mag, respectively, which indicate accurate metallicity and photometric parallax estimations.

  6. Physical characterization of asteroid surfaces from photometric analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfenstein, P.; Veverka, J.

    1989-01-01

    The feasibility of using photometric models like Hapke's (1981, 1984, 1986) equation for deriving physical properties of asteroids from photometric observations is discussed. Using data for Ceres and Vesta, it is shown that the incomplete phase-angle coverage limits the reliable determination of Hapke's photometric parameters from asteroid disk-integrated phase curves (the second limitation is the nonsphericity of many asteroids). However, within this limitations, certain trends among asteroids can be compared. It is shown that there is a general similarity among the Hapke's parameters other than the h parameter, which characterizes the width of the opposition surge in terms of soil structure (porosity, particle-size distribution, and the rate of compaction with depth), derived for similar objects, e.g., average C asteroids and Ceres, and average S asteroids, 1982 Apollo, and Vesta.

  7. Photometric Variability and Rotation in Magnetic White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrie, K. A.; Burleigh, M. R.; Brinkworth, C. S.; Marsh, T. R.

    2010-11-01

    We present a search for long term (months-years) photometric variability in a sample of ten isolated magnetic white dwarfs using observations taken with the Liverpool Robotic Telescope between March 2005 and January 2007. These stars had previously been found to be photometrically stable on short (hours-one week) timescales [1]. We construct differential light curves for each target and then use CLEAN and Lomb-Scargle periodograms to determine any periodicity that may be present. Photometric variability is detected in two of the targets during the observed timescale-G 240-72 and G 227-28. We find no variability in the remaining eight targets above the 1% level. Finally, we search for any correlations between the spin periods and intrinsic physical properties of magnetic white dwarfs, such as the magnetic field strength, temperature, mass and age.

  8. ANNz: Estimating Photometric Redshifts Using Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collister, Adrian A.; Lahav, Ofer

    2004-04-01

    We introduce ANNz, a freely available software package for photometric redshift estimation using artificial neural networks. ANNz learns the relation between photometry and redshift from an appropriate training set of galaxies for which the redshift is already known. Where a large and representative training set is available, ANNz is a highly competitive tool when compared with traditional template-fitting methods. The ANNz package is demonstrated on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 1, and for this particular data set the rms redshift error in the range 0<~z<~0.7 is σrms=0.023. Nonideal conditions (spectroscopic sets that are small or brighter than the photometric set for which redshifts are required) are simulated, and the impact on the photometric redshift accuracy is assessed.2

  9. Effects of photometric geometry on spectral reflectance measurements. [celestial bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veverka, J.; Gradie, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Progress is reported in obtaining valuable results needed for the full interpretation of the spectral reflectance curves of solar system objects. The degree to which photometric geometry affects spectral reflectance curves was demonstrated. Various forms of photometric functions were compared and a function adequate for describing the scattering properties of low and moderately reflecting materials was developed and applied in a study of the phase coefficients of various materials, as well as in a study of how the shape of a body affects the spectral reflectance properties. The adequacy of the photometric function for Mars-like analogs was studied. The goniometer system is being converted to a computer driven mode. As soon as computer controls are integrated in the goniometer, the phase dependence 0.95 micron feature in meteorite spectra is scheduled to begin.

  10. CALIBRATING PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTIONS WITH CROSS-CORRELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, A. E.

    2010-12-01

    The next generation of proposed galaxy surveys will increase the number of galaxies with photometric redshift identifications by two orders of magnitude, drastically expanding both the redshift range and detection threshold from the current state of the art. Obtaining spectra for a fair subsample of these new data could be cumbersome and expensive. However, adequate calibration of the true redshift distribution of galaxies is vital to tapping the potential of these surveys to illuminate the processes of galaxy evolution and to constrain the underlying cosmology and growth of structure. We examine here an alternative to direct spectroscopic follow-up: calibration of the redshift distribution of photometric galaxies via cross-correlation with an overlapping spectroscopic survey whose members trace the same density field. We review the theory, develop a pipeline to implement the method, apply it to mock data from N-body simulations, and examine the properties of this redshift distribution estimator. We demonstrate that the method is generally effective, but the estimator is weakened by two main factors. One is that the correlation function of the spectroscopic sample must be measured in many bins along the line of sight, which renders the measurement noisy and interferes with high-quality reconstruction of the photometric redshift distribution. Also, the method is not able to disentangle the photometric redshift distribution from redshift dependence in the bias of the photometric sample. We establish the impact of these factors using our mock catalogs. We conclude that it may still be necessary to spectroscopically follow up a fair subsample of the photometric survey data. Nonetheless, it is significant that the method has been successfully implemented on mock data, and with further refinement it may appreciably decrease the number of spectra that will be needed to calibrate future surveys.

  11. Photometric Redshifts for Galaxies in the GOODS Southern Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobasher, B.; Idzi, R.; Benítez, N.; Cimatti, A.; Cristiani, S.; Daddi, E.; Dahlen, T.; Dickinson, M.; Erben, T.; Ferguson, H. C.; Giavalisco, M.; Grogin, N. A.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Mignoli, M.; Moustakas, L. A.; Nonino, M.; Rosati, P.; Schirmer, M.; Stern, D.; Vanzella, E.; Wolf, C.; Zamorani, G.

    2004-01-01

    We use extensive multiwavelength photometric data from the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey to estimate photometric redshifts for a sample of 434 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the Chandra Deep Field-South. Using the Bayesian method, which incorporates redshift/magnitude priors, we estimate photometric redshifts for galaxies in the range 18photometric redshifts for several special subclasses of objects. The results for extremely red objects are more accurate than those for the sample as a whole, with σ=0.051 and very few outliers (3%). Photometric redshifts for active galaxies, identified from their X-ray emission, have a dispersion of σ=0.104, with 10% outlier fraction, similar to that for normal galaxies. Employing a redshift/magnitude prior in this process seems to be crucial in improving the agreement between photometric and spectroscopic redshifts. Based on observations taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. This work is supported by NASA through grant GO09583.01-96A. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile (ESO programmes 168.A-0485, 170.A-0788, 64.O-0643, 66.A-0572, 68.A-0544, 164.O-0561, 169.A-0725, 267.A-5729 66.A-0451, 68.A-0375 164.O-0561, 267.A-5729, 169.A-0725, and 64.O-0621).

  12. Improvement of end-point detection in the non-aqueous titration of sulphacetamide sodium.

    PubMed

    Soliman, S A; Belal, S; Bediar, M

    1984-04-01

    The sluggish end-point in the non-aqueous titration of sulphacetamide sodium in glacial acetic acid can be improved by addition of acetic anhydride to the titration medium, and selective determination of sulphacetamide sodium in presence of phenylephrine hydrochloride in eye drops then becomes possible. A mixture of sulphacetamide sodium and the antihistamine drug phenyltoloxamine dihydrogen citrate can also be analysed. PMID:18963589

  13. Theoretical autophotogrammetry. I - The method of the photometric potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wildey, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The present work presents preliminary efforts at a mathematical formulation of a photogrammetric method suitable for computerized processing. A theory is derived for the extraction of surface topography from stereometric pairs of photographs. The theory can be applied to either convergent or near-orthographic-projection stereo. Scene brightness is treated as a scalar function defined on a general surface embedded in ordinary three-dimensional space (the actual topography). Correspondence of points is based on adjustments leading to photometric equivalence, while the adjustments are based on the local value of the photometric gradient.

  14. Unusual properties of crocodilian ovomacroglobulin shown in its methylamine treatment and sulfhydryl titration

    SciTech Connect

    Arakawa, H.; Osada, T.; Ikai, A.

    1986-02-01

    The inhibitory activity of chicken and crocodilian ovomacroglobulins against trypsin was measured before and after their incubation with methylamine. The result for crocodilian ovomacroglobulin showed that methylamine treatment destroyed half of its activity, in unique contrast to human alpha 2-macroglobulin and chicken ovomacroglobulin for which methylamine either destroys the inhibitory activity of the former completely or does not affect that of the latter at all. Free sulfhydryl groups of chicken and crocodilian ovomacroglobulins were titrated with 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) before and after incubation with trypsin. Prior to the incubation with trypsin the chicken and crocodilian proteins respectively had 0 and 1 titratable sulfhydryl per molecule of Mr 720,000. After treatment with trypsin the crocodilian protein had 3.5-4 titratable sulfhydryls, whereas there were no titratable sulfhydryls in the chicken protein. After denaturation of the crocodilian protein in sodium dodecyl sulfate at 100 degrees C the number of titratable sulfhydryls was 4. Chicken ovomacroglobulin again did not have an appreciable number of titratable sulfhydryls under similar denaturing conditions. Incubation of crocodilian protein with (14C)methylamine showed an incorporation of at least 2 mol of methylamine per molecule. The result indicated the presence of three intramolecular thiol ester bonds in crocodilian ovomacroglobulin with differential stability against external perturbations.

  15. SHARDS: An Optical Spectro-photometric Survey of Distant Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-González, Pablo G.; Cava, Antonio; Barro, Guillermo; Villar, Víctor; Cardiel, Nicolás; Ferreras, Ignacio; Rodríguez-Espinosa, José Miguel; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Balcells, Marc; Cenarro, Javier; Cepa, Jordi; Charlot, Stéphane; Cimatti, Andrea; Conselice, Christopher J.; Daddi, Emmanuele; Donley, Jennifer; Elbaz, David; Espino, Néstor; Gallego, Jesús; Gobat, R.; González-Martín, Omaira; Guzmán, Rafael; Hernán-Caballero, Antonio; Muñoz-Tuñón, Casiana; Renzini, Alvio; Rodríguez-Zaurín, Javier; Tresse, Laurence; Trujillo, Ignacio; Zamorano, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    We present the Survey for High-z Absorption Red and Dead Sources (SHARDS), an ESO/GTC Large Program carried out using the OSIRIS instrument on the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). SHARDS is an ultra-deep optical spectro-photometric survey of the GOODS-N field covering 130 arcmin2 at wavelengths between 500 and 950 nm with 24 contiguous medium-band filters (providing a spectral resolution R ~ 50). The data reach an AB magnitude of 26.5 (at least at a 3σ level) with sub-arcsec seeing in all bands. SHARDS' main goal is to obtain accurate physical properties of intermediate- and high-z galaxies using well-sampled optical spectral energy distributions (SEDs) with sufficient spectral resolution to measure absorption and emission features, whose analysis will provide reliable stellar population and active galactic nucleus (AGN) parameters. Among the different populations of high-z galaxies, SHARDS' principal targets are massive quiescent galaxies at z > 1, whose existence is one of the major challenges facing current hierarchical models of galaxy formation. In this paper, we outline the observational strategy and include a detailed discussion of the special reduction and calibration procedures which should be applied to the GTC/OSIRIS data. An assessment of the SHARDS data quality is also performed. We present science demonstration results on the detection and study of emission-line galaxies (star-forming objects and AGNs) at z = 0-5. We also analyze the SEDs for a sample of 27 quiescent massive galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the range 1.0 < z <~ 1.4. We discuss the improvements introduced by the SHARDS data set in the analysis of their star formation history and stellar properties. We discuss the systematics arising from the use of different stellar population libraries, typical in this kind of study. Averaging the results from the different libraries, we find that the UV-to-MIR SEDs of the massive quiescent galaxies at z = 1.0-1.4 are well described by an exponentially decaying star formation history with scale τ = 100-200 Myr, age around 1.5-2.0 Gyr, solar or slightly sub-solar metallicity, and moderate extinction, A(V) ~ 0.5 mag. We also find that galaxies with masses above M* are typically older than lighter galaxies, as expected in a downsizing scenario of galaxy formation. This trend is, however, model dependent, i.e., it is significantly more evident in the results obtained with some stellar population synthesis libraries, and almost absent in others.

  16. SHARDS: AN OPTICAL SPECTRO-PHOTOMETRIC SURVEY OF DISTANT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo G.; Cava, Antonio; Barro, Guillermo; Villar, Victor; Cardiel, Nicolas; Espino, Nestor; Gallego, Jesus; Ferreras, Ignacio; Rodriguez-Espinosa, Jose Miguel; Balcells, Marc; Cepa, Jordi; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Cenarro, Javier; Charlot, Stephane; Cimatti, Andrea; Conselice, Christopher J.; Daddi, Emmanuele; Elbaz, David; Gobat, R. [Laboratoire AIM-Paris-Saclay, CEA and others

    2013-01-01

    We present the Survey for High-z Absorption Red and Dead Sources (SHARDS), an ESO/GTC Large Program carried out using the OSIRIS instrument on the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). SHARDS is an ultra-deep optical spectro-photometric survey of the GOODS-N field covering 130 arcmin{sup 2} at wavelengths between 500 and 950 nm with 24 contiguous medium-band filters (providing a spectral resolution R {approx} 50). The data reach an AB magnitude of 26.5 (at least at a 3{sigma} level) with sub-arcsec seeing in all bands. SHARDS' main goal is to obtain accurate physical properties of intermediate- and high-z galaxies using well-sampled optical spectral energy distributions (SEDs) with sufficient spectral resolution to measure absorption and emission features, whose analysis will provide reliable stellar population and active galactic nucleus (AGN) parameters. Among the different populations of high-z galaxies, SHARDS' principal targets are massive quiescent galaxies at z > 1, whose existence is one of the major challenges facing current hierarchical models of galaxy formation. In this paper, we outline the observational strategy and include a detailed discussion of the special reduction and calibration procedures which should be applied to the GTC/OSIRIS data. An assessment of the SHARDS data quality is also performed. We present science demonstration results on the detection and study of emission-line galaxies (star-forming objects and AGNs) at z = 0-5. We also analyze the SEDs for a sample of 27 quiescent massive galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the range 1.0 < z {approx}< 1.4. We discuss the improvements introduced by the SHARDS data set in the analysis of their star formation history and stellar properties. We discuss the systematics arising from the use of different stellar population libraries, typical in this kind of study. Averaging the results from the different libraries, we find that the UV-to-MIR SEDs of the massive quiescent galaxies at z = 1.0-1.4 are well described by an exponentially decaying star formation history with scale {tau} = 100-200 Myr, age around 1.5-2.0 Gyr, solar or slightly sub-solar metallicity, and moderate extinction, A(V) {approx} 0.5 mag. We also find that galaxies with masses above M* are typically older than lighter galaxies, as expected in a downsizing scenario of galaxy formation. This trend is, however, model dependent, i.e., it is significantly more evident in the results obtained with some stellar population synthesis libraries, and almost absent in others.

  17. Sulfur in graphite by combustion-iodometric titration method

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The method covers the determination of sulfur in graphite in the concentration range of 1 to 200 ..mu..g/g in a l-g sample or 5 to 1000 ..mu..g/g in a 0.2-g sample. The method includes a discussion of interferences, apparatus, reagents and materials, procedure, calculations, and precision. (JMT)

  18. Photometric NO/sub x/ analyzer helps surpass EPA standards

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.H.

    1983-10-01

    A photometric analyzer helped Monsanto Company of Pensacola, Florida reduce stack emissions to a point where an observer could not tell the difference between a shutdown and normal plant operation. Oxides of nitrogen output levels have been kept within 200 ppm at typical production rates, well within EPA limits.

  19. The ALHAMBRA survey: Accurate photometric merger fractions from PDF analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Sanjuan, C.; Cenarro, A. J..; Varela, J.; Viironen, K.; ALHAMBRA Team

    2015-05-01

    The estimation of the merger fraction in photometric surveys is limited by the large uncertainty in the photometric redshift compared with the velocity difference in kinematical close pairs (less than 500 km s^{-1}). Several efforts have conducted to deal with this limitation and we present the latest improvements. Our new method (i) provides a robust estimation of the merger fraction by using full probability distribution functions (PDFs) instead of Gaussian distributions, as in previous work; (ii) takes into account the dependence of the luminosity on redshift in both the selection of the samples and the definition of major/minor mergers; and (iii) deals with partial PDFs to define ``red" (E/S0 templates) and ``blue" (spiral/starburst templates) samples without apply any colour selection. We highlight our new method with the estimation of the merger fraction at z < 1 in the ALHAMBRA photometric survey. We find that our merger fractions and rates nicely agree with those from previous spectroscopic work. This new method will be capital for current and future large photometric surveys such as DES, SHARDS, J-PAS, or LSST.

  20. Sidereal Photometric Astrometry as Efficient Initial Search for Spin Vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slivan, Stephen M.

    2014-10-01

    I describe how to use the Sidereal Photometric Astrometry method of spin vector determination (Drummond et al., 1988) to identify the specific plausible candidate combinations of sidereal periods and pole solution regions that are consistent with a lightcurve epoch data set, to use as initial inputs to the convex inversion method of shape determination (Kaasalainen et al., 2001).

  1. Spectroscopic and photometric monitoring of southern post-AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pooley, D. J.; Cottrell, P. L.; Pollard, K. R.; Albrow, M. D.

    2004-05-01

    We present the results of contemporaneous photometric and spectroscopic monitoring of 20 post-AGB stars from Mt John University Observatory. Photometric measures were carried our suing Johnson BV and Cousins RI filters, and the radial velocity measurements were acquired using spectra from an echelle spectrograph. Our program spanned five years and the stars covered a range of spectral types from B to K in order to investigate the behavior of post-AGB stars as they evolve away from the AGB. A number of stars proved to be variable inways incompatible with post-AGB models and are reclassified. Periodicities are presented for a number of stars. Photometrically, HD 70379 was found to be pulsating in two modes with periods of 85 and 97 d. The radial velocities also varied, with the peak amplitude occurring when the photometry was also changing most. AI CMi presented three different types of spectra associated with photometric brightness, with varying strengths of narrow emission lines and molecular bandheads. The Hα profiles in almost all of the stars show evidence of emission which varies on time scales of days to months. The Na D line profiles are generally complex showing between 4 and 7 components due to both circumstellar and interstellar material.

  2. Classical variables in the era of space photometric missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnár, L.; Plachy, E.; Szabó, R.; Benkő, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    The space photometric missions like CoRoT and Kepler transformed our view of pulsating stars, including the well-known RR Lyrae and Cepheid classes. The K2, TESS and PLATO missions will expand these investigations to larger sample sizes and to specific stellar populations.

  3. The Young Solar Analogs Project: Initial Photometric Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saken, Jon M.; Gray, R. O.; Corbally, C. J.

    2013-06-01

    Since 2007 we have been conducting spectroscopic monitoring of the Ca II H & K lines and G-band for a sample of 31 YSAs in order to better understand their activity cycles and variations, as well as the effects of young stars on their solar systems. The targets cover the spectral range of stars most likely to contain Earth analogs, F8-K2, and a broad enough range of ages, 0.3 Gyr - 1.5 Gyr, to investigate how activity level changes with stellar age. These studies are already showing possible evidence for activity cycles, large variations in starspot activity, and flaring events. In order to obtain a more complete picture of the nature of the stars' activity and examine the correlations between stellar brightness and chromospheric activity, we have started a complimentary campaign of photometric monitoring of these targets in Johnson B, V, and R, Stromgren v and H-alpha, with the use of a small robotic telescope dedicated to this project. This poster will present some results from the first year of photometric monitoring, focusing on the correlations between the photometric bands, and between the photometric and spectroscopic data, as well as an investigation of short-term (1-2 minutes) spectroscopic variations using data obtained earlier this year on the 1.8 m Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope (VATT).

  4. PROTOTYPE CORRELATION MASK FLAME PHOTOMETRIC DETECTOR FOR MEASURING SULFUR DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A prototype flame photometric detector system (FPD) to measure gaseous sulfur compounds was fabricated using a previously developed correlation mask optical system and a new flame housing. Also, a new burner for the FPD system was optimized to view the excited molecular sulfur em...

  5. Photometric anomalies of the lunar surface: Results from Clementine data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreslavsky, M. A.; Shkuratov, Y. G.

    2003-03-01

    We mapped the photometric characteristics of the lunar surface for several small areas using Clementine UVVIS camera images. The maps of the phase function steepness showed several anomalous sites. Several small fresh impact craters have anomalous halos in these maps. The phase function within the halos is less steep than for the surrounding mare surface. We interpret these halos to be due to geologically recent impact-caused alteration of the equilibrium millimeter-scale regolith structure. This equilibrium structure is established through micrometeoritic bombardment at a geologically short timescale. An anomaly of the same signature was found at the Apollo 15 landing site. We interpret it as being a result of the regolith structure alteration with the lander jets. A unique photometric anomaly not correlated with albedo was found within the Reiner Gamma Formation. We suggest that this anomaly is genetically related to the formation, which indicates its young age. This favors the impact hypothesis for the nature of the Reiner Gamma Formation. Our study showed that mapping of photometric characteristics is a new powerful tool in studies of the surfaces of atmosphereless bodies. Future photometric studies of the Moon with existing and new data sets are promising for a search for traces of recent seismic events, studies of the recent population of meteoroids in the inner solar system, an advance in the understanding of swirls, etc.

  6. Titration and Spectroscopic Measurements of Poultry Litter pH Buffering Capacity.

    PubMed

    Cassity-Duffey, Kate; Cabrera, Miguel; Mowrer, Jake; Kissel, David

    2015-07-01

    The pH value of poultry litter is affected by nitrification, mineralization, and the addition of acidifying chemicals, all acting on the poultry litter pH buffering capacity (pHBC). Increased understanding of poultry litter pHBC will aid in modeling NH volatilization from surface-applied poultry litter as well as estimating rates of alum applications. Our objectives were to (i) determine the pHBC of a wide range of poultry litters; (ii) assess the accuracy of near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) for determining poultry litter pHBC; and (iii) demonstrate the use of poultry litter pHBC to increase the accuracy of alum additions. Litter pHBC was determined by titration and calculated from linear and sigmoidal curves. For the 37 litters measured, linear pHBC ranged from 187 to 537 mmol (pH unit) kg dry litter. The linear and sigmoidal curves provided accurate predictions of pHBC, with most > 0.90. Results from NIRS analysis showed that the linear pHBC expressed on an "as is" water content basis had a NIRS coefficient of calibration (developed using a modified partial least squares procedure) of 0.90 for the 37 poultry litters measured. Using the litter pHBC, an empirical model was derived to determine the amount of alum needed to create a target pH. The model performed well in the range of pH 6.5 to 7.5 (RMSE = 0.07) but underpredicted the amount of alum needed to reach pH <6. The lack of model performance at pH <6 was probably due to Al reacting with organic matter in the poultry litter, which prevented its hydrolysis. PMID:26437110

  7. Adventures in the World of Pulsating Variable Stars: Multisite Photometric Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, R.

    2004-06-01

    Advantages of photometric multisite campaigns are discussed, then published or prospective results of four - preceding and ongoing - observing runs are presented. Prospects and limits of photometric observations carried out from Hungary with small (~ 1m) telescopes are also outlined.

  8. Catalogue of Large Magellanic Cloud star clusters observed in the Washington photometric system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palma, T.; Gramajo, L. V.; Clariá, J. J.; Lares, M.; Geisler, D.; Ahumada, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    Aims: The main goal of this study is to compile a catalogue of the fundamental parameters of a complete sample of 277 star clusters (SCs) of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) observed in the Washington photometric system. A set of 82 clusters was recently studied by our team. Methods: All the clusters' parameters such as radii, deprojected distances, reddenings, ages, and metallicities were obtained by applying essentially the same procedures, which are briefly described here. We used empirical cumulative distribution functions to examine age, metallicity and deprojected distance distributions for different cluster subsamples of the catalogue. Results: Our new sample of 82 additional clusters represents about a 40% increase in the total number of LMC SCs observed to date in the Washington photometric system. In particular, we report here the fundamental parameters obtained for the first time for 42 of these clusters. We found that single LMC SCs are typically older than multiple SCs. Both single and multiple SCs exhibit asymmetrical distributions in log (age). We compared cluster ages derived through isochrone fittings obtained using different models of the Padova group. Although ages obtained using recent isochrones are consistent in general terms, we found that there is some disagreement in the obtained values and their uncertainties.

  9. A Photometric Observing Program at the VATT: Setting Up a Calibration Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis Philip, A. G.; Boyle, R. P.; Janusz, R.

    2009-05-01

    Philip and Boyle have been making Strömgren and then Strömvil photometric observations of open and globular clusters at the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope located on Mt. Graham in Arizona. Our aim is to obtain CCD photometric indices good to 0.01 magnitude. Indices of this quality can later be analyzed to yield estimates of temperature, luminosity and metallicity. But we have found that the CCD chip does not yield photometry of this quality without further corrections. Our most observed cluster is the open cluster, M 67. This cluster is also very well observed in the literature. We took the best published values and created a set of "standard" stars for our field. Taking our CCD results we could calculate deltas, as a function of position on the chip, which we then applied to all the CCD frames that we obtained. With this procedure we were able to obtain the precision of 0.01 magnitudes in all the fields that we observed. When we started we were able to use the "A" two-inch square Strömgren four-color set from KPNO. Later the Vatican Observatory bought a set of 3.48 inch square Strömgren filters, The Vatican Observatory had a set of circular Vilnius filters There was also an X filter. These eight filters made our Strömvil set.

  10. Simultaneous Estimation of Photometric Redshifts and SED Parameters: Improved Techniques and a Realistic Error Budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acquaviva, Viviana; Raichoor, Anand; Gawiser, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of recent work seeking to improve the accuracy of joint galaxy photometric redshift estimation and spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting. By simulating different sources of uncorrected systematic errors, we show that if the uncertainties on the photometric redshifts are estimated correctly, so are those on the other SED fitting parameters, such as stellar mass, stellar age, and dust reddening. Furthermore, we find that if the redshift uncertainties are over(under)-estimated, the uncertainties in SED parameters will be over(under)-estimated by similar amounts. These results hold even in the presence of severe systematics and provide, for the first time, a mechanism to validate the uncertainties on these parameters via comparison with spectroscopic redshifts. We show that template incompleteness, a major cause of inaccuracy in this process, is ``flagged" by a large fraction of outliers in redshift and that it can be corrected by using more flexible stellar population models. We propose a new technique (annealing) to re-calibrate the joint uncertainties in the photo-z and SED fitting parameters without compromising the performance of the SED fitting + photo-z estimation. This procedure provides a consistent estimation of the multidimensional probability distribution function in SED fitting + z parameter space, including all correlations.

  11. A photometric mode identification method, including an improved non-adiabatic treatment of the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupret, M.-A.; De Ridder, J.; De Cat, P.; Aerts, C.; Scuflaire, R.; Noels, A.; Thoul, A.

    2003-02-01

    We present an improved version of the method of photometric mode identification of Heynderickx et al. (\\cite{hey}). Our new version is based on the inclusion of precise non-adiabatic eigenfunctions determined in the outer stellar atmosphere according to the formalism recently proposed by Dupret et al. (\\cite{dup}). Our improved photometric mode identification technique is therefore no longer dependent on ad hoc parameters for the non-adiabatic effects. It contains the complete physical conditions of the outer atmosphere of the star, provided that rotation does not play a key role. We apply our method to the two slowly pulsating B stars HD 74560 and HD 138764 and to the beta Cephei star EN (16) Lac. Besides identifying the degree l of the pulsating stars, our method is also a tool for improving the knowledge of stellar interiors and atmospheres, by imposing constraints on parameters such as the metallicity and the mixing-length parameter alpha (a procedure we label non-adiabatic asteroseismology). The non-adiabatic eigenfunctions needed for the mode identification are available upon request from the authors.

  12. Exploring the SDSS Photometric Galaxies with Clustering Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mubdi; Mendez, Alexander J.; Ménard, Brice; Scranton, Ryan; Schmidt, Samuel J.; Morrison, Christopher B.; Budavári, Tamás

    2016-04-01

    We apply clustering-based redshift inference to all extended sources from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric catalogue, down to magnitude r = 22. We map the relationships between colours and redshift, without assumption of the sources' spectral energy distributions (SED). We identify and locate star-forming, quiescent galaxies, and AGN, as well as colour changes due to spectral features, such as the 4000 Å break, redshifting through specific filters. Our mapping is globally in good agreement with colour-redshift tracks computed with SED templates, but reveals informative differences, such as the need for a lower fraction of M-type stars in certain templates. We compare our clustering-redshift estimates to photometric redshifts and find these two independent estimators to be in good agreement at each limiting magnitude considered. Finally, we present the global clustering-redshift distribution of all Sloan extended sources, showing objects up to z ˜ 0.8. While the overall shape agrees with that inferred from photometric redshifts, the clustering redshift technique results in a smoother distribution, with no indication of structure in redshift space suggested by the photometric redshift estimates (likely artifacts imprinted by their spectroscopic training set). We also infer a higher fraction of high redshift objects. The mapping between the four observed colours and redshift can be used to estimate the redshift probability distribution function of individual galaxies. This work is an initial step towards producing a general mapping between redshift and all available observables in the photometric space, including brightness, size, concentration, and ellipticity.

  13. Photometric Reverberation Mapping using a Meter-class Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Carla June; Joner, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    For the past several decades, mass estimates for supermassive black holes hosted by active galactic nuclei (AGNs) have been made using the reverberation mapping (RM) technique. This methodology has produced consistent results and has been used to establish several relations that link the characteristics of the host galaxy to the mass of the central black hole. Despite this success, there are less than 50 AGNs with black hole masses derived from RM. This low number is generally attributed to the difficulties in coordinating large blocks of telescope time for making the simultaneous photometric and spectroscopic observations. In addition, the spectroscopic observations generally require several months of nightly observations with moderate to large size telescopes.We have made photometric observations of several AGNs in selected filters in order to evaluate a photometric methodology for determining the lag time between the variations observed in the continuum and the response signal that is seen coming from the broad-line region (BLR) gas. This time delay represents the mean light travel time to the BLR, and is therefore a measurement of the mean BLR radius. In traditional RM campaigns, this time lag is combined with a measure of the width of the broad line to determine the velocity of the gas and then make a virial estimate of the black hole mass. We investigate results obtained using photometric time lags and a single epoch spectroscopic measurement of the line width in order to estimate the mass of the central black hole.We present results from our photometric observations of several target AGNs made with the West Mountain Observatory 0.9 m reflector during the spring and summer of 2014.This research was supported by the College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences at Brigham Young University as well as through a fellowship from the NASA Rocky Mountain Space Grant Consortium.

  14. Characterization of a photometric anomaly in lunar Mare Nubium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korokhin, Viktor; Shkuratov, Yuriy; Kaydash, Vadym; Basilevsky, Alexander; Rohachova, Larysa; Velikodsky, Yuri; Opanasenko, Nickolay; Videen, Gorden; Stankevich, Dmitry; Kaluhina, Olena

    2016-03-01

    A novel approach of constructing photometrically seamless mosaics of reflectance, color-ratios, and phase-curve slopes using LROC WAC images has been developed, which can be used to map the photometric parameters of the lunar surface. The approach takes into account both geometric corrections with data on local topography and photometric conjunctions using our simple photometric model. New mosaics obtained with the technique allow more reliable studies of structural and chemical characteristics of the lunar surface. This approach has been applied to analyze the photometric anomaly (21.6 S, 17.7 W, ~40 km in size) in Mare Nubium detected earlier with our Earth-based observations. For each point of the scene the parameters were calculated using the least-square method for several tens of source WAC images. Clementine mosaics also were used in the analysis, e.g., in order to estimate the parameter of maturity degree Is/FeO. The anomaly has low FeO and TiO2 abundance and reveals a higher slope of the phase function than surroundings. Thermal data from LRO Diviner measurements do not show anomalies in this region. We consider this area as a shallow flooding of an elevated formation of highland composition, the material of which could have been excavated and mixed up with upper layers of the lunar surface through meteoroid impacts. The anomalous behavior of the phase function can be explained by the difference of surface structure in the anomaly and surrounding regions on the scale of less than several centimeters. This may be due to larger quantities of small fragments of rocks and clumps on the surface and/or the presence of agglomerates having open structure.

  15. Precision Cosmology with a New Probabilistic Photometric Redshifts Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco Kind, Matias; Brunner, R. J.

    2013-06-01

    A complete understanding of both dark energy and dark matter remains one of most important challenges in astrophysics today. Recent theoretical and numerical computations have made important progress in quantifying the role of these dark components on the formation and evolution of galaxies through cosmic time, but observational verification of these predictions and the development of new, more stringent constraints has not kept pace. It is in this context that, photometric redshifts have become more important with the growth of large imaging surveys, such as DES and LSST, that have been designed to address this issue. But their basic implementation has not changed significantly from their original development, as most techniques provide a single photometric redshift estimate and an associated error for the an extragalactic source. In this work, we present a unique and powerful solution that leverages the full information contained in the photometric data to address this cosmological challenge with a new approach that provides accurate photometric redshift probability density functions (PDF) for galaxies. This new approach, which scales efficiently to massive data, efficiently combines standard template fitting techniques with powerful machine learning methods. Included in this framework is our recently developed technique entitled Trees for PhotoZ (TPZ); a new, robust, parallel photometric redshift code that uses prediction trees and random forests to generate photo-z PDFs in a reliable and fast manner. In addition, our approach also provides ancillary information about the internal structure of the data, including the relative importance of variables used during the redshift estimation, an identification of areas in the training sample that provide poor predictions, and an accurate outlier rejection method. We will also present current results of this approach on a variety of datasets and discuss, by using specific examples, how the full photo-z PDF can be incorporated into galaxy clustering analysis enhancing the cosmological measurements, such as the angular power spectrum or the galaxy redshift distribution, to accelerate the cosmological discovery process and improve our knowledge of the Universe.

  16. Planck 2013 results. VIII. HFI photometric calibration and mapmaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bertincourt, B.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Filliard, C.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Lellouch, E.; Leonardi, R.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Maurin, L.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Moreno, R.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rusholme, B.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Techene, S.; Terenzi, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the methods used to produce photometrically calibrated maps from the Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) cleaned, time-ordered information. HFI observes the sky over a broad range of frequencies, from 100 to 857 GHz. To obtain the best calibration accuracy over such a large range, two different photometric calibration schemes have to be used. The 545 and 857 GHz data are calibrated by comparing flux-density measurements of Uranus and Neptune with models of their atmospheric emission. The lower frequencies (below 353 GHz) are calibrated using the solar dipole. A component of this anisotropy is time-variable, owing to the orbital motion of the satellite in the solar system. Photometric calibration is thus tightly linked to mapmaking, which also addresses low-frequency noise removal. By comparing observations taken more than one year apart in the same configuration, we have identified apparent gain variations with time. These variations are induced by non-linearities in the read-out electronics chain. We have developed an effective correction to limit their effect on calibration. We present several methods to estimate the precision of the photometric calibration. We distinguish relative uncertainties (between detectors, or between frequencies) and absolute uncertainties. Absolute uncertainties lie in the range from 0.54% to 10% from 100 to 857 GHz. We describe the pipeline used to produce the maps from the HFI timelines, based on the photometric calibration parameters, and the scheme used to set the zero level of the maps a posteriori. We also discuss the cross-calibration between HFI and the SPIRE instrument on board Herschel. Finally we summarize the basic characteristics of the set of HFI maps included in the 2013 Planck data release.

  17. Pan-STARRS1 variability of XMM-COSMOS AGN. I. Impact on photometric redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simm, T.; Saglia, R.; Salvato, M.; Bender, R.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Draper, P. W.; Flewelling, H.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Magnier, E. A.; Metcalfe, N.; Tonry, J. L.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2015-12-01

    Aims: Upcoming large area sky surveys like Euclid and eROSITA, which are dedicated to studying the role of dark energy in the expansion history of the Universe and the three-dimensional mass distribution of matter, crucially depend on accurate photometric redshifts. The identification of variable sources, such as active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and the achievable redshift accuracy for varying objects are important in view of the science goals of the Euclid and eROSITA missions. Methods: We probe AGN optical variability for a large sample of X-ray-selected AGNs in the XMM-COSMOS field, using the multi-epoch light curves provided by the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) 3π and Medium Deep Field surveys. To quantify variability we employed a simple statistic to estimate the probability of variability and the normalized excess variance to measure the variability amplitude. Utilizing these two variability parameters, we defined a sample of varying AGNs for every PS1 band. We investigated the influence of variability on the calculation of photometric redshifts by applying three different input photometry sets for our fitting procedure. For each of the five PS1 bands gP1, rP1, iP1, zP1, and yP1, we chose either the epochs minimizing the interval in observing time, the median magnitude values, or randomly drawn light curve points to compute the redshift. In addition, we derived photometric redshifts using PS1 photometry extended by GALEX/IRAC bands. Results: We find that the photometry produced by the 3π survey is sufficient to reliably detect variable sources provided that the fractional variability amplitude is at least ~3%. Considering the photometric redshifts of variable AGNs, we observe that minimizing the time spacing of the chosen points yields superior photometric redshifts in terms of the percentage of outliers (33%) and accuracy (0.07), outperforming the other two approaches. Drawing random points from the light curve gives rise to typically 57% of outliers and an accuracy of ~0.4. Adding GALEX/IRAC bands for the redshift determination weakens the influence of variability. Although the redshift quality generally improves when adding these bands, we still obtain not less than 26% of outliers and an accuracy of 0.05 at best, therefore variable sources should receive a flag stating that their photometric redshifts may be low quality. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgThe catalogues of variable AGNs are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/584/A106

  18. Photometric studies: from natural granular surface materials in laboratory to lunar regolith from orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souchon, A. L.; Pinet, P. C.; Chevrel, S. D.; Daydou, Y. H.; Baratoux, D.

    2011-10-01

    We apply Hapke's photometric model (1993) on both terrestrial natural granular surface samples and multiangular data of the lunar surface acquired by SMART-1/AMIE camera, using the photometric parameters derived from well-characterized volcanic materials in laboratory as benchmarks to help better understand photometric results from orbital data.

  19. The Mobile Insulin Titration Intervention (MITI) for Insulin Glargine Titration in an Urban, Low-Income Population: Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Natalie; Nilo, Annielyn; Singer, Karyn; Bernik, Lidia S; Etiebet, Mary-Ann; Fang, Yixin; Cho, James; Natarajan, Sundar

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients on insulin glargine typically visit a clinician to obtain advice on how to adjust their insulin dose. These multiple clinic visits can be costly and time-consuming, particularly for low-income patients. It may be feasible to achieve insulin titration through text messages and phone calls with patients instead of face-to-face clinic visits. Objective The objectives of this study are to (1) evaluate if the Mobile Insulin Titration Intervention (MITI) is clinically effective by helping patients reach their optimal dose of insulin glargine, (2) determine if the intervention is feasible within the setting and population, (3) assess patient satisfaction with the intervention, and (4) measure the costs associated with this intervention. Methods This is a pilot study evaluating an approach to insulin titration using text messages and phone calls among patients with insulin-dependent type 2 diabetes in the outpatient medical clinic of Bellevue Hospital Center, a safety-net hospital in New York City. Patients will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio to either the MITI arm (texting/phone call intervention) or the usual-care arm (in-person clinic visits). Using a Web-based platform, weekday text messages will be sent to patients in the MITI arm, asking them to text back their fasting blood glucose values. In addition to daily reviews for alarm values, a clinician will rereview the texted values weekly, consult our physician-approved titration algorithm, and call the patients with advice on how to adjust their insulin dose. The primary outcome will be whether or not a patient reaches his/her optimal dose of insulin glargine within 12 weeks. Results Recruitment for this study occurred between June 2013 and December 2014. We are continuing to collect intervention and follow-up data from our patients who are currently enrolled. The results of our data analysis are expected to be available in 2015. Conclusions This study explores the use of widely-available text messaging and voice technologies for insulin titration. We aim to show that remote insulin titration is clinically effective, feasible, satisfactory, and cost saving for low-income patients in a busy, urban clinic. Trial Registration Trial Registration: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01879579; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01879579 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6WUEgjZUO). PMID:25794243

  20. Radial velocity variations of photometrically quiet, chromospherically inactive Kepler stars: A link between RV jitter and photometric flicker

    SciTech Connect

    Bastien, Fabienne A.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pepper, Joshua; Wright, Jason T.; Aigrain, Suzanne; Basri, Gibor; Johnson, John A.; Howard, Andrew W.; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.

    2014-02-01

    We compare stellar photometric variability, as measured from Kepler light curves by Basri et al., with measurements of radial velocity (RV) rms variations of all California Planet Search overlap stars. We newly derive rotation periods from the Kepler light curves for all of the stars in our study sample. The RV variations reported herein range from less than 4 to 135 m s{sup –1}, yet the stars all have amplitudes of photometric variability less than 3 mmag, reflecting the preference of the RV program for chromospherically 'quiet' stars. Despite the small size of our sample, we find with high statistical significance that the RV rms manifests strongly in the Fourier power spectrum of the light curve: stars that are noisier in RV have a greater number of frequency components in the light curve. We also find that spot models of the observed light curves systematically underpredict the observed RV variations by factors of ∼2-1000, likely because the low-level photometric variations in our sample are driven by processes not included in simple spot models. The stars best fit by these models tend to have simpler light curves, dominated by a single relatively high-amplitude component of variability. Finally, we demonstrate that the RV rms behavior of our sample can be explained in the context of the photometric variability evolutionary diagram introduced by Bastien et al. We use this diagram to derive the surface gravities of the stars in our sample, revealing many of them to have moved off the main sequence. More generally, we find that the stars with the largest RV rms are those that have evolved onto the 'flicker floor' sequence in that diagram, characterized by relatively low amplitude but highly complex photometric variations which grow as the stars evolve to become subgiants.

  1. THE PHOTOMETRIC CLASSIFICATION SERVER FOR Pan-STARRS1

    SciTech Connect

    Saglia, R. P.; Bender, R.; Seitz, S.; Senger, R.; Snigula, J.; Phleps, S.; Wilman, D.; Tonry, J. L.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Heasley, J. N.; Kaiser, N.; Magnier, E. A.; Morgan, J. S.; Greisel, N.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Klement, R. J.; Rix, H.-W.; Smith, K.; Green, P. J.; and others

    2012-02-20

    The Pan-STARRS1 survey is obtaining multi-epoch imaging in five bands (g{sub P1} r{sub P1} i{sub P1} z{sub P1} y{sub P1}) over the entire sky north of declination -30 deg. We describe here the implementation of the Photometric Classification Server (PCS) for Pan-STARRS1. PCS will allow the automatic classification of objects into star/galaxy/quasar classes based on colors and the measurement of photometric redshifts for extragalactic objects, and will constrain stellar parameters for stellar objects, working at the catalog level. We present tests of the system based on high signal-to-noise photometry derived from the Medium-Deep Fields of Pan-STARRS1, using available spectroscopic surveys as training and/or verification sets. We show that the Pan-STARRS1 photometry delivers classifications and photometric redshifts as good as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry to the same magnitude limits. In particular, our preliminary results, based on this relatively limited data set down to the SDSS spectroscopic limits, and therefore potentially improvable, show that stars are correctly classified as such in 85% of cases, galaxies in 97%, and QSOs in 84%. False positives are less than 1% for galaxies, Almost-Equal-To 19% for stars, and Almost-Equal-To 28% for QSOs. Moreover, photometric redshifts for 1000 luminous red galaxies up to redshift 0.5 are determined to 2.4% precision (defined as 1.48 Multiplication-Sign Median|z{sub phot} - z{sub spec}|/(1 + z)) with just 0.4% catastrophic outliers and small (-0.5%) residual bias. For bluer galaxies up to the same redshift, the residual bias (on average -0.5%) trend, percentage of catastrophic failures (1.2%), and precision (4.2%) are higher, but still interestingly small for many science applications. Good photometric redshifts (to 5%) can be obtained for at most 60% of the QSOs of the sample. PCS will create a value-added catalog with classifications and photometric redshifts for eventually many millions of sources.

  2. A photometric method for the estimation of the oil yield of oil shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cuttitta, Frank

    1951-01-01

    A method is presented for the distillation and photometric estimation of the oil yield of oil-bearing shales. The oil shale is distilled in a closed test tube and the oil extracted with toluene. The optical density of the toluene extract is used in the estimation of oil content and is converted to percentage of oil by reference to a standard curve. This curve is obtained by relating the oil yields determined by the Fischer assay method to the optical density of the toluene extract of the oil evolved by the new procedure. The new method gives results similar to those obtained by the Fischer assay method in a much shorter time. The applicability of the new method to oil-bearing shale and phosphatic shale has been tested.

  3. A sounding rocket spectroheliometer for photometric studies at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths. [Skylab Apollo Telescope Mount calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.; Chambers, R. M.; Dentremont, A. M.; Lanham, N. W.; Reeves, E. M.

    1975-01-01

    Construction and mode of operation are described for a sounding rocket spectroheliometer used to establish the sensitivity of the EUV spectroheliometer on the Skylab Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM). The sounding rocket instrument was calibrated immediately before and after two flights and the calibration was transferred when the rocket and ATM instruments simultaneously measured the average intensity emitted by a quiet area of the solar disk. Descriptions are presented for the payload assembly and flight sequence, the optical system (telescope, spectrometer, and pointing reference camera), the vacuum pumping system, and the instrument electronics. Results obtained from the two flights in August and December 1973 are discussed, which included unambiguous determinations of the absolute intensity emitted by a region of the quiet solar disk over the wavelength range from 1350 to 300 A on two separate occasions and the establishment of photometric accuracy to that of laboratory calibration procedures.

  4. Derivation of sky quality indicators from photometrically calibrated all-sky image mosaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duriscoe, Dan M.; Moore, Chadwick A.; Luginbuhl, Christian B.

    2015-08-01

    A large database of high resolution all-sky measurements of V-band night sky brightness at sites in U.S. National Parks and astronomical observatories is utilized to describe sky quality over a wide geographic area. Mosaics of photometrically calibrated V-band imagery are processed with a semi-automated procedure to reveal the effects of artificial sky glow through graphical presentation and numeric indicators of artificial sky brightness. Comparison with simpler methods such as the use of the Unihedron SQM and naked eye limiting magnitude reveal that areas near the horizon, which are not typically captured with single-channel measurements, contribute significantly to the indicators maximum vertical illuminance, maximum sky luminance, and average all-sky luminance. Distant sources of sky glow may represent future threats to areas of the sky nearer the zenith. Timely identification and quantification of these threats may allow mitigating strategies to be implemented.

  5. Ionophore-based ion-exchange emulsions as novel class of complexometric titration reagents.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jingying; Xie, Xiaojiang; Bakker, Eric

    2014-10-28

    Complexometric titrations rely on a drastic change of the pM value at the equivalence point with a water soluble chelator forming typically 1 : 1 complexes of high stability. The available chemical toolbox of suitable chelating compounds is unfortunately limited because many promising complexing agents are not water soluble. We introduce here a novel class of complexometric titration reagents, a suspension of polymeric nanospheres whose hydrophobic core is doped with lipophilic ion-exchanger and a selective complexing agent (ionophore). The emulsified nanospheres behave on the basis of heterogeneous ion exchange equilibria where the initial counter ion of the ion-exchanger is readily displaced from the emulsion for the target ion that forms a stable complex in the nanosphere core. Two different examples are shown with Ca(2+) and Pb(2+) as target ions. The lack of protonatable groups on the calcium receptor allows one to perform Ca(2+) titration without pH control. PMID:25205536

  6. Determination of zirconium by amperometric titration of excess complexone III with bismuth nitrate at a bismuth electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Kozulina, M.M.; Lepin, Y.K.; Songina, O.A.

    1985-10-01

    Among the various methods for determining zirconium is the amperometric titration of excess EDTA with bismuth nitrate. Such a titration was first used with a dropping mercury electrode. Here the authors investigate the conditions for titrating with a bismuth indicator electrode because a number of difficulties -current oscillation, mercury toxicity -- arise in work with the dropping mercury electrode. It is determined that the bismuth indicator electrode can in fact be used to determine zirconium by inverse amperometric titration of excess EDTA with bismuth nitrate.

  7. Clozapine-induced myocarditis may be associated with rapid titration: A case report verified with autopsy.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Nitin; de Leon, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Clozapine-induced myocarditis is a poorly understood, rare, potentially fatal adverse drug reaction with absolute risks ranging from 7 to 34 per 1000 in Australia and 0.07-0.6 per 1000 in other countries. Hypersensitivity reactions have been postulated including some cases probably associated with rapid titrations. This case describes a 50-year-old African-American man with schizoaffective disorder, naïve to clozapine, who probably died from clozapine-induced myocarditis. He was started on 25 mg/day of clozapine and received 1625 mg over 14 days, prior to his death on day 15. The autopsy found predominantly lymphocytic infiltrate of the perivascular soft tissue and myocardium of the ventricles, with occasional eosinophils. Using the Liverpool ADR Causality Assessment Tool, it was deemed probable that the patient's death was secondary to myocarditis. The patient had fulminant death with no obvious changes in vital signs. Neither C-reactive protein nor troponin was measured, but it is unlikely that the results would have arrived in time to prevent the patient's death. Age, rapid titration, and concomitant use of valproate contributed to this case, which was probably an idiosyncratic adverse drug reaction associated with rapid titration. Lamotrigine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome also appears to be an idiosyncratic adverse drug reaction associated with rapid titration, but its incidence has been remarkably reduced since the recommended starting lamotrigine dose was reduced and corrected by the effect of inhibitors such as valproate. Similarly, clozapine-induced myocarditis incidence probably can be reduced with the use of slow titrations, including even slower titrations for patients with lower ability to metabolize clozapine, such as those taking valproate. PMID:26681239

  8. Photometric study of the pulsating, eclipsing binary OO DRA

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. B.; Deng, L. C.; Tian, J. F.; Wang, K.; Yan, Z. Z.; Luo, C. Q.; Sun, J. J.; Liu, Q. L.; Xin, H. Q.; Zhou, Q.; Luo, Z. Q.

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive photometric study of the pulsating, eclipsing binary OO Dra. Simultaneous B- and V-band photometry of the star was carried out on 14 nights. A revised orbital period and a new ephemeris were derived from the data. The first photometric solution of the binary system and the physical parameters of the component stars are determined. They reveal that OO Dra could be a detached system with a less-massive secondary component nearly filling its Roche lobe. By subtracting the eclipsing light changes from the data, we obtained the intrinsic pulsating light curves of the hotter, massive primary component. A frequency analysis of the residual light yields two confident pulsation modes in both B- and V-band data with the dominant frequency detected at 41.865 c/d. A brief discussion concerning the evolutionary status and the pulsation nature of the binary system is finally given.

  9. Galaxy clustering with photometric surveys using PDF redshift information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asorey, J.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Brunner, R. J.; Thaler, J.

    2016-06-01

    Photometric surveys produce large-area maps of the galaxy distribution, but with less accurate redshift information than is obtained from spectroscopic methods. Modern photometric redshift (photo-z) algorithms use galaxy magnitudes, or colours, that are obtained through multiband imaging to produce a probability density function (PDF) for each galaxy in the map. We used simulated data to study the effect of using different photo-z estimators to assign galaxies to redshift bins in order to compare their effects on angular clustering and galaxy bias measurements. We found that if we use the entire PDF, rather than a single-point (mean or mode) estimate, the deviations are less biased, especially when using narrow redshift bins. When the redshift bin widths are Δz = 0.1, the use of the entire PDF reduces the typical measurement bias from 5 per cent, when using single point estimates, to 3 per cent.

  10. Photometric Reverberation Mapping with a Small Aperture Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, Carol E.; Rivera, Noah I.; Thackeray-Lacko, Beverly; Powers, Randy M.; Stuckey, Harrison; Watson, Rene; Hood, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    We present photometric observations of a sample of bright, broad-line AGN in order to monitor variability and verify their black hole masses using the photometric reverberation mapping technique. Observations were taken, primarily remotely, using the 20-inch telescope at the Murillo Family Observatory, a campus-based observatory located on the outskirts of the Southern California metro area, in both monitored and automated mode nightly in BVRI over a period of 2-5 months. We will show the viability of such a technique for small-aperture telescopes in bright-sky locations and discuss the possibilities of extending this program in the future. We also note that undergraduate students (both from 4-year and community colleges) have been and will continue to be instrumental in the success of similar research programs at CSUSB.

  11. Galaxy clustering with photometric surveys using PDF redshift information

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Asorey, J.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Brunner, R. J.; Thaler, J.

    2016-03-28

    Here, photometric surveys produce large-area maps of the galaxy distribution, but with less accurate redshift information than is obtained from spectroscopic methods. Modern photometric redshift (photo-z) algorithms use galaxy magnitudes, or colors, that are obtained through multi-band imaging to produce a probability density function (PDF) for each galaxy in the map. We used simulated data to study the effect of using different photo-z estimators to assign galaxies to redshift bins in order to compare their effects on angular clustering and galaxy bias measurements. We found that if we use the entire PDF, rather than a single-point (mean or mode) estimate, the deviations are less biased, especially when using narrow redshift bins. When the redshift bin widths aremore » $$\\Delta z=0.1$$, the use of the entire PDF reduces the typical measurement bias from 5%, when using single point estimates, to 3%.« less

  12. KEPLER MISSION DESIGN, REALIZED PHOTOMETRIC PERFORMANCE, AND EARLY SCIENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, David G.; Borucki, William J.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Basri, Gibor; Marcy, Geoffrey; Batalha, Natalie M.; Brown, Timothy M.; Caldwell, Douglas; DeVore, Edna; Jenkins, Jon; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Joergen; Cochran, William D.; Dunham, Edward W.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Gould, Alan; Kondo, Yoji; Monet, David

    2010-04-20

    The Kepler Mission, launched on 2009 March 6, was designed with the explicit capability to detect Earth-size planets in the habitable zone of solar-like stars using the transit photometry method. Results from just 43 days of data along with ground-based follow-up observations have identified five new transiting planets with measurements of their masses, radii, and orbital periods. Many aspects of stellar astrophysics also benefit from the unique, precise, extended, and nearly continuous data set for a large number and variety of stars. Early results for classical variables and eclipsing stars show great promise. To fully understand the methodology, processes, and eventually the results from the mission, we present the underlying rationale that ultimately led to the flight and ground system designs used to achieve the exquisite photometric performance. As an example of the initial photometric results, we present variability measurements that can be used to distinguish dwarf stars from red giants.

  13. Galaxy clustering with photometric surveys using PDF redshift information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asorey, J.; Kind, M. Carrasco; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Brunner, R. J.; Thaler, J.

    2016-03-01

    Photometric surveys produce large-area maps of the galaxy distribution, but with less accurate redshift information than is obtained from spectroscopic methods. Modern photometric redshift (photo-z) algorithms use galaxy magnitudes, or colors, that are obtained through multi-band imaging to produce a probability density function (PDF) for each galaxy in the map. We used simulated data to study the effect of using different photo-z estimators to assign galaxies to redshift bins in order to compare their effects on angular clustering and galaxy bias measurements. We found that if we use the entire PDF, rather than a single-point (mean or mode) estimate, the deviations are less biased, especially when using narrow redshift bins. When the redshift bin widths are Δz = 0.1, the use of the entire PDF reduces the typical measurement bias from 5%, when using single point estimates, to 3%.

  14. DNF - Galaxy photometric redshift by Directional Neighbourhood Fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vicente, J.; Sánchez, E.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.

    2016-04-01

    Wide field images taken in several photometric bands allow simultaneous measurement of redshifts for thousands of galaxies. A variety of algorithms to make this measurement have appeared in the last few years, the majority of which can be classified as either template or training based methods. Among the latter, nearest neighbour estimators stand out as one of the most successful, in terms of both precision and the quality of error estimation. In this paper we describe the DNF (Directional Neighbourhood Fitting) algorithm based on the following: a new neighbourhood metric (Directional Neighbourhood), a photo-z estimation strategy (Neighbourhood Fitting) and a method for generating the photo-z probability distribution function. We compare DNF with other well-known empirical photometric redshift tools using different public datasets (SSDS, VVDS and PHAT). DNF achieves high quality results with reliable error.

  15. New photometric investigation of eclipsing binary NSVS 10653195

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Qian, S.-B.; Liao, W.-P.; Zhang, J.; Liu, N.-P.; Wang, J.-J.

    2015-11-01

    New CCD photometric light curves of the low-mass binary system NSVS 10653195 are presented. Our complete B, V, Rc and Ic-band light curves show a remarkable out-eclipsing distortion. This phenomenon suggests that the components of the system may be active. The photometric solutions with star-spot were derived by using the 2013 version of the Wilson-Devinney (WD) code. Based on all available times of light minimum, we analyzed the orbital period changes. The O-C diagram reveals that the period of NSVS 10653195 is decreasing at a rate of dP / dt = - 2.79 ×10-7 days yr-1 , which is probably caused by angular momentum loss.

  16. Photometric and spectroscopic observations of SN 1995D.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadakane, K.

    A summary of photometric observations of SN 1995D, carried out at Osaka Kyoiku University using a 50-cm reflector and a CCD camera, is presented. Spectroscopic data were obtained at the Okayama Astrophysical Observatory at the phase of its optical maximum. Photometric observations had begun 10 days before the maximum and well defined light curves were obtained in V, R, and I bands. From the initial declining rate in the V band, the absolute magnitude of the SN and the distance modulus of the parent galaxy (NGC 2962) is estimated. The author suggests that similar observations of Type Ia supernovae by observers at public observatories can make significant contributions in determining the Hubble constant H0.

  17. An Independent Evaluation of the Galex Photometric Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holberg, Jay B.

    "A direct and independent verification of the GALEX image-mode photometric calibration is proposed using archive observations of an ensemble of DA white dwarfs. The proposed method involves synthetic photometry and has already been successfully employed for SDSS ugriz bands. The results of this determination will directly relate GALEX magnitudes to the most recent realization of HST photometric scale (Bohlin 2007) as well as the SDSS ugriz magnitudes. This method has the ability to conduct a first order evaluation of the wavelength dependence of the pre-flight imaging-mode band passes. The proposed effort is not intended to replace or supplant the existing GALEX calibration but to evaluate any differences between observed and predicted fluxes."

  18. Observational Tests to Detect Photometric Reverberation in H-alpha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joner, Michael D.; Carroll, Carla

    2014-06-01

    We present photometric observations of several AGN that were secured with the 0.9-m telescope located at the West Mountain Observatory that is operated by Brigham Young University. The new observations use standard BVR filters along with several custom filters that are part of a red shifted H-alpha set. Light curves are presented for several of the targets along with a summary of the analysis made to detect lag times between the continuum and broad emission line flux as evidence for photometric reverberation. Plans are presented for future research that will continue along these lines.We thank the Department of Physics and Astronomy along with the College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences at Brigham Young University for continued support of the research work being done at the West Mountain Observatory.

  19. The photometric period of the recurrent Nova T Pyxidis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Landolt, Arlo U.; Vogt, Nikolaus; Buckley, David; Warner, Brian; Walker, Alistair R.; Bond, Howard E.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents 1713 photometric measurements of T Pyx from 1966 to 1990. The light curve of T Pyx shows roughly sinusoidal variations with a typical amplitude of 0.09 mag and a time scale of 2 hr. Discrete Fourier transforms of data from individual nights and runs reveal a highly significant periodic modulation. This modulation is proven to be coherent only on time scales shorter than from 6 d to under 1 d. The present period for the modulation is 0.07616 +/- 0.00017 d. Since other stars have variable photometric periods (possibly related to the superhump phenomenon) which are slightly different from the orbital period, an orbital period of about 0.073 d for T Pyx is suggested.

  20. Using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry to Determine Thermodynamic Parameters of Protein–Glycosaminoglycan Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Amit K.; Rösgen, Jörg; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    It has now become increasingly clear that a complete atomic description of how biomacromolecules recognize each other requires knowledge not only of the structures of the complexes but also of how kinetics and thermodynamics drive the binding process. In particular, such knowledge is lacking for protein–glycosaminoglycan (GAG) complexes. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the only technique that can provide various thermodynamic parameters—enthalpy, entropy, free energy (binding constant), and stoichiometry—from a single experiment. Here we describe different factors that must be taken into consideration in carrying out ITC titrations to obtain meaningful thermodynamic data of protein–GAG interactions. PMID:25325962

  1. Non-aqueous titration of quinine and quinidine sulphates by use of barium perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Zakhari, N; Ibrahim, F; Kovar, K A

    1989-07-01

    A simple non-aqueous titration method has been devised for determining the sulphates of quinine and quinidine. The sulphate is precipitated by addition of excess of barium perchlorate solution in acetic and the liberated alkaloid is then titrated in 1:2 anhydrous acetic-dioxan mixture, with an acetic acid solution of perchloric acid. The end-point is determined either visually with Crystal Violet as indicator or potentiometrically with a glass-Ag/AgCl combination electrode. The method is accurate, precise and suitable for routine analysis of pure materials and tablets. PMID:18964803

  2. Selective two-step titration of thorium by sulfate displacement of the diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid complex

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefer, P.

    1980-07-01

    Thorium and other metals are complexed with excess diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) at pH 1.4, the excess DTPA is titrated with Bi(III) to a xylenol orange end point, sulfate is added to complex Th(IV), and the displaced DTPA again is titrated with Bi(III). Of 61 metal ions and nonmetal anions tested, only Ga(III), Sc(III), tungstate, citrate, oxalate, and thiosulfate interfere seriously. Lesser interferences are In(III), Zr(IV), V(IV), and permanganate. The standard deviation is 2 ..mu..g for 56 to 840 ..mu..g Th.

  3. The Canada-France Deep Fields-Photometric Redshift Survey: An Investigation of Galaxy Evolution Using Photometric Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodwin, Mark

    2004-02-01

    Progress in the study of galaxy evolution has traditionally followed from improvements in spectroscopic measurement techniques and subsequent groundbreaking surveys. The advent of large format CCD detectors, coupled with the demonstrated success of the photometric redshift method, has given rise to a new, potentially very powerful alternative. It has, in fact, motivated the present detailed investigation of the potential of photometric redshift surveys to complement, or in some cases, supersede traditional spectroscopic surveys in galaxy evolution studies. This Thesis describes a new deep, wide-field, multi-colour imaging survey, 10 times deeper and 30 times larger than its spectroscopic predecessor, the Canada-France Redshift Survey (CFRS). Highly accurate photometric redshifts, calibrated using hundreds of spectroscopic CFRS galaxies, were measured for tens of thousands of objects, with typical dispersions of only sigma/(1+z) < 0.06 to I(AB) = 24 for z < 1.3. A new Bayesian method to measure the galaxy redshift distribution is developed. The accuracy of the method, which incorporates the full redshift likelihood function of each galaxy in an iterative analysis, is demonstrated in extensive Monte Carlo simulations. I(AB) and R(AB) redshift distributions, along with the run of median redshifts, are measured in various magnitude ranges, with special attention given to quantifying both random and systematic errors. We measure the evolution of galaxy correlations with redshift, a primary observable of the structure formation process, correcting for the dilutive effect of photometric redshift errors on the clustering signal. The high z ~ 3 correlation amplitude seen in this work provides compelling evidence for the biased galaxy formation paradigm. The measured galaxy correlations from 0 < z < 3 are in excellent agreement with the findings of the largest, state-of-the-art spectroscopic studies. For the 1- and 2-point statistics of the galaxy distribution studied in this Thesis, the measurement accuracy is limited not by the photometric redshift error, but rather by the effect of cosmic variance, whose contribution to the total error budget is dominant. Therefore, future studies will be well served by adopting the photometric redshift approach, the efficiency of which will enable them to survey the hundreds or thousands of square degrees required to obtain a fair sample of the Universe.

  4. Artificial neural networks for quasar selection and photometric redshift determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yèche, Ch.; Petitjean, P.; Rich, J.; Aubourg, E.; Busca, N.; Hamilton, J.-Ch.; Le Goff, J.-M.; Paris, I.; Peirani, S.; Pichon, Ch.; Rollinde, E.; Vargas-Magaña, M.

    2010-11-01

    Context. Baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO) and their effects on the matter power spectrum can be studied using the Lyman-α absorption signature of the matter density field along quasar (QSO) lines of sight. A measurement sufficiently accurate to provide useful cosmological constraints requires the observation of ~105 quasars in the redshift range 2.2 < z < 3.5 over ~8000 deg2. Such a survey is planned by the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) project of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III). Aims: We assess one of the challenges for this project, that of building from five-band imaging data a list of targets that contains the largest number of quasars in the required redshift range. In practice, we perform a stellar rejection of more than two orders of magnitude with a selection efficiency for quasars better than 50% to magnitudes as bright as g ~ 22. Methods: To obtain an appropriate target list and estimate quasar redshifts, we develop artificial neural networks (ANNs) with a multilayer perceptron architecture. The input variables are photometric measurements, i.e., the object magnitudes and their errors in the five bands (ugriz) of the SDSS photometry. The ANN developed for target selection provides a continuous output variable between 0 for non-quasar point-like objects to 1 for quasars. A second ANN estimates the QSO redshift z using the photometric information. Results: For target selection, we achieve a non-quasar point-like object rejection of 99.6% and 98.5% for a quasar efficiency of, respectively, 50% and 85%, comparable to the performances of traditional methods. The photometric redshift precision is on the order of 0.1 over the region relevant to BAO studies. These statistical methods, developed in the context of the BOSS project, can easily be extended to any quasar selection and/or determination of their photometric redshift.

  5. PhotoRApToR: PHOTOmetric Research APplication TO Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brescia, Massimo

    2014-08-01

    PhotoRApToR (PHOTOmetric Research APplication TO Redshifts) solves regression and classification problems and is specialized for photo-z estimation. PhotoRApToR offers data table manipulation capabilities and 2D and 3D graphics tools for data visualization; it also provides a statistical report for both classification and regression experiments. The code is written in Java; the machine learning model is in C++ to increase the core execution speed.

  6. Photometric analysis of Galactic Stellar Clusters in VVV Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauro, F.; Moni Bidin, C.; Cohen, R. E.; Geisler, D.; Villanova, S.; Chené, A. N.

    2014-10-01

    We show the preliminary results of the study of the structure of the Horizontal Branch of Liller 1 and some results from the Calcium Triplet method using Ks magnitude applied to several Galactic Globular clusters using data from the VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea Survey (Minniti et al. 2010) and obtained with GeMS/GSAOI. The data are extracted with the new automatic VVV-SkZ_pipeline photometric pipeline (Mauro et al. 2013).

  7. Solvent extraction-photometric determination of chromium in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Kamburova, M.; Aleksandrov, A.

    1995-12-01

    In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to the problem of the pollution of the biosphere. Chromium is known to be among the most hazardous and highly toxic pollutants. The widespread use of chromium in the national economy increases its level in the environment; therefore, a detailed study of the behavior of chromium in environmental samples has become necessary. In this work, the authors developed a solvent extraction-photometric method for determining chromium in soil using a tetrazolium salt.

  8. The photometric method of extrasolar planet detection revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Alan; Doyle, Laurance R.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the geometry concerning the photometric method of extrasolar planet detection, i.e., the detection of dimunition of a parent star's brightness during a planetary transit. Under the assumption that planetary orbital inclinations can be defined by a Gaussian with a sigma of 10 deg centered on the parent star's equatorial plane, Monte Carlo simulations suggest that for a given star observed at an inclination of exactly 90 deg, the probability of at least one Earth-sized or larger planet being suitably placed for transits is approximately 4%. This probability drops to 3% for a star observed at an inclination of 80 deg, and is still approximately 0.5% for a star observed at an inclination of 60 deg. If one can select 100 stars with a pre-determined inclination equal or greater than 80 deg, the probability of at least one planet being suitably configured for transits is 95%. The majority of transit events are due to planets in small-a orbits similar to the Earth and Venus; thus, the photometric method in principle is the method best suited for the detection of Earthlike planets. The photometric method also allows for testing whether or not planets can exist within binary systems. This can ge done by selecting binary systems observed at high orbital inclinations, both eclipsing binaries and wider visual binaries. For a 'real-world' example, we look at the alpha Centauri system (i = 79.2 deg). If we assume that the equatorial planes of both components coincide with the system's orbital plane, Monte Carlo simulations suggest that the probability of at least one planet (of either component) being suitably configured for transits is approximately 8%. In conclusion, we present a non-exhaustive list of solar-type stars, both single and within binary systems, which exhibit a high equatorial inclination. These objects may be considered as preliminary candidates for planetary searches via the photometric method.

  9. Photometric recording of transmembrane potential in outer hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Oghalai, John S; Saggau, Peter; Rabbitt, Richard D; Brownell, William E

    2008-01-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) are polarized epithelial cells that have mechanoelectrical transduction channels within their apical stereocilia and produce electromotile force along their lateral wall. Phase shifts, or time delays, in the transmembrane voltage occurring at different axial locations along the cell may contribute to our understanding of how these cells operate at auditory frequencies. We developed a method to optically measure the phase of the OHC transmembrane potential using the voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) di-8-ANEPPS. The exit aperture of a fibre-optic light source was driven in two dimensions so that a 24 μm spot of excitation light could be positioned along the length of the OHC. We used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique in the current-clamp mode to stimulate the OHC at the base. The photometric response and the voltage response were monitored with a photodetector and patch-clamp amplifier, respectively. The photometric response was used to measure the regional changes in the membrane potential in response to maintained (dc) and sinusoidal (ac) current stimuli applied at the base of the cell. We used a neutral density filter to lower the excitation light intensity and reduce phototoxicity. A sensitive detector and lock-in amplifier were used to measure the small ac VSD signal. This permitted measurements of the ac photometric response below the noise floor of the static fluorescence. The amplitude and phase components of the photometric response were recorded for stimuli up to 800 Hz. VSD data at 400–800 Hz show the presence of a small phase delay between the stimulus voltage at the base of the cell and the local membrane potential measured along the lateral wall. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that OHCs exhibit inhomogeneous membrane potentials that vary with position in analogy with the voltage in nerve axons. PMID:16705263

  10. Some photometric techniques for atmosphereless solar system bodies.

    PubMed

    Lumme, K; Peltoniemi, J; Irvine, W M

    1990-01-01

    We discuss various photometric techniques and their absolute scales in relation to the information that can be derived from the relevant data. We also outline a new scattering model for atmosphereless bodies in the solar system and show how it fits Mariner 10 surface photometry of the planet Mercury. It is shown how important the correct scattering law is while deriving the topography by photoclinometry. PMID:11538682

  11. Photometric recording of transmembrane potential in outer hair cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Oghalai, John S.; Saggau, Peter; Rabbitt, Richard D.; Brownell, William E.

    2006-06-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) are polarized epithelial cells that have mechanoelectrical transduction channels within their apical stereocilia and produce electromotile force along their lateral wall. Phase shifts, or time delays, in the transmembrane voltage occurring at different axial locations along the cell may contribute to our understanding of how these cells operate at auditory frequencies. We developed a method to optically measure the phase of the OHC transmembrane potential using the voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) di-8-ANEPPS. The exit aperture of a fibre-optic light source was driven in two dimensions so that a 24 µm spot of excitation light could be positioned along the length of the OHC. We used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique in the current-clamp mode to stimulate the OHC at the base. The photometric response and the voltage response were monitored with a photodetector and patch-clamp amplifier, respectively. The photometric response was used to measure the regional changes in the membrane potential in response to maintained (dc) and sinusoidal (ac) current stimuli applied at the base of the cell. We used a neutral density filter to lower the excitation light intensity and reduce phototoxicity. A sensitive detector and lock-in amplifier were used to measure the small ac VSD signal. This permitted measurements of the ac photometric response below the noise floor of the static fluorescence. The amplitude and phase components of the photometric response were recorded for stimuli up to 800 Hz. VSD data at 400-800 Hz show the presence of a small phase delay between the stimulus voltage at the base of the cell and the local membrane potential measured along the lateral wall. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that OHCs exhibit inhomogeneous membrane potentials that vary with position in analogy with the voltage in nerve axons.

  12. Photometric Observation of 3024 Hainan, 3920 Aubignan, and 5951 Alicemonet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bin, Li; Zhao, Haibin; Hand, Xianming L.; Liu, Wenjuan; Sun, Luming; Shi, Jingjing; Gao, Shan, Zhou, Hongyan

    2013-01-01

    Three minor planets were measured photometrically between 2012 September 4 and 21 using the SARA (Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy) South telescope, located in Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. The following synodic periods were found: 3024 Hainan, P = 11.785 ± 0.005 h; 3920 Aubignan, P = 4.4762 ± 0.0005 h; and 5951 Alicemonet, P = 3.8871 ± 0.0005 h.

  13. Studies of Template-based Photometric Classification of Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asimacopoulos, Leia; Londo, Stephen; Macaluso, Joseph; Cunningham, John; Kuhlmann, Steve; Kovacs, Eve

    2016-01-01

    We study photometric classification of Type Ia (SNIa) and core collapse (SNcc) supernovae using a combination of simulated data from DES and real data from SDSS. We increase the number of core collapse templates from the eight commonly used to type SDSS supernovae (PSNID) to forty-five currently available in SNANA. These are implemented in the SNCosmo analysis package. Our goal is to study the accuracy in identifying all types of supernovae as a function of numbers and types of templates.

  14. A sparse Gaussian process framework for photometric redshift estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almosallam, Ibrahim A.; Lindsay, Sam N.; Jarvis, Matt J.; Roberts, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate photometric redshifts are a lynchpin for many future experiments to pin down the cosmological model and for studies of galaxy evolution. In this study, a novel sparse regression framework for photometric redshift estimation is presented. Synthetic data set simulating the Euclid survey and real data from SDSS DR12 are used to train and test the proposed models. We show that approaches which include careful data preparation and model design offer a significant improvement in comparison with several competing machine learning algorithms. Standard implementations of most regression algorithms use the minimization of the sum of squared errors as the objective function. For redshift inference, this induces a bias in the posterior mean of the output distribution, which can be problematic. In this paper, we directly minimize the target metric Δz = (zs - zp)/(1 + zs) and address the bias problem via a distribution-based weighting scheme, incorporated as part of the optimization objective. The results are compared with other machine learning algorithms in the field such as artificial neural networks (ANN), Gaussian processes (GPs) and sparse GPs. The proposed framework reaches a mean absolute Δz = 0.0026(1 + zs), over the redshift range of 0 ≤ zs ≤ 2 on the simulated data, and Δz = 0.0178(1 + zs) over the entire redshift range on the SDSS DR12 survey, outperforming the standard ANNz used in the literature. We also investigate how the relative size of the training sample affects the photometric redshift accuracy. We find that a training sample of >30 per cent of total sample size, provides little additional constraint on the photometric redshifts, and note that our GP formalism strongly outperforms ANNz in the sparse data regime for the simulated data set.

  15. The wavelength dependence and an interpretation of the photometric parameters of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, W. R.; Meador, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    The photometric function developed by Meador and Weaver has been used with photometric data from the bright desert areas of Mars to determine the wavelength dependence of the three photometric parameters of that function and to provide some predictions about the physical properties of the surface. Knowledge of the parameters permits the brightness of these areas of Mars to be determined for scattering geometry over the wavelength range of 0.45 to 0.70 micrometer. The changes in the photometric parameters with wavelength are shown to be consistent with qualitative theoretical predictions, and the predictions of surface properties are shown to be consistent with conditions that might exist in these regions of Mars. The photometric function is shown to have good potential as a diagnostic tool for the determination of surface properties, and the consistency of the behavior of the photometric parameters is shown to be good support for the validity of the photometric function.

  16. PHOTOMETRIC STUDY OF THE POSSIBLE COOL QUADRUPLE SYSTEM PY VIRGINIS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, L. Y.; Qian, S. B.; Liu, N. P.; Liu, L.; Jiang, L. Q.

    2013-02-01

    Complete CCD photometric light curves in BV(RI){sub c} bands obtained in 2012 for the short-period close binary system PY Virginis are presented. A new photometric analysis with the Wilson-Van Hamme code shows that PY Vir is an A-type marginal contact binary system. The absolute parameters of PY Vir are derived using spectroscopic and photometric solutions. Combining new determined times of minimum light with others published in the literature, the O - C diagram of the binary star is investigated. A periodic variation, with a period of 5.22({+-}0.05) years and an amplitude of 0.0075({+-}0.0004) days, was discovered. Since the spectrum of a third component has been detected by Rucinski et al., we consider this cyclic period oscillation to be the result of the light-time effect due to the presence of a third body. This third component may also be a binary itself. Therefore, PY Vir should be a quadruple system composed of two cool-type binary systems. This system is a good astrophysical laboratory to study the formation and evolution of close binaries and multiple systems.

  17. The extinction law from photometric data: linear regression methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascenso, J.; Lombardi, M.; Lada, C. J.; Alves, J.

    2012-04-01

    Context. The properties of dust grains, in particular their size distribution, are expected to differ from the interstellar medium to the high-density regions within molecular clouds. Since the extinction at near-infrared wavelengths is caused by dust, the extinction law in cores should depart from that found in low-density environments if the dust grains have different properties. Aims: We explore methods to measure the near-infrared extinction law produced by dense material in molecular cloud cores from photometric data. Methods: Using controlled sets of synthetic and semi-synthetic data, we test several methods for linear regression applied to the specific problem of deriving the extinction law from photometric data. We cover the parameter space appropriate to this type of observations. Results: We find that many of the common linear-regression methods produce biased results when applied to the extinction law from photometric colors. We propose and validate a new method, LinES, as the most reliable for this effect. We explore the use of this method to detect whether or not the extinction law of a given reddened population has a break at some value of extinction. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (ESO programmes 069.C-0426 and 074.C-0728).

  18. ArborZ: PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS USING BOOSTED DECISION TREES

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdes, David W.; Sypniewski, Adam J.; McKay, Timothy A.; Hao, Jiangang; Weis, Matthew R.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Busha, Michael T.

    2010-06-01

    Precision photometric redshifts will be essential for extracting cosmological parameters from the next generation of wide-area imaging surveys. In this paper, we introduce a photometric redshift algorithm, ArborZ, based on the machine-learning technique of boosted decision trees. We study the algorithm using galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and from mock catalogs intended to simulate both the SDSS and the upcoming Dark Energy Survey. We show that it improves upon the performance of existing algorithms. Moreover, the method naturally leads to the reconstruction of a full probability density function (PDF) for the photometric redshift of each galaxy, not merely a single 'best estimate' and error, and also provides a photo-z quality figure of merit for each galaxy that can be used to reject outliers. We show that the stacked PDFs yield a more accurate reconstruction of the redshift distribution N(z). We discuss limitations of the current algorithm and ideas for future work.

  19. Photometric metallicity map of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Samyaday; Subramaniam, Annapurni; Cole, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    We have estimated a metallicity map of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using the Magellanic Cloud Photometric Survey (MCPS) and Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE III) photometric data. This is a first of its kind map of metallicity up to a radius of 4°-5°, derived using photometric data and calibrated using spectroscopic data of Red Giant Branch (RGB) stars. We identify the RGB in the V, (V - I) colour-magnitude diagrams of small subregions of varying sizes in both data sets. We use the slope of the RGB as an indicator of the average metallicity of a subregion, and calibrate the RGB slope to metallicity using spectroscopic data for field and cluster red giants in selected subregions. The average metallicity of the LMC is found to be [Fe/H] = -0.37 dex (σ[Fe/H] = 0.12) from MCPS data, and [Fe/H] = -0.39 dex (σ[Fe/H] = 0.10) from OGLE III data. The bar is found to be the most metal-rich region of the LMC. Both the data sets suggest a shallow radial metallicity gradient up to a radius of 4 kpc (-0.049 ± 0.002 dex kpc-1 to -0.066 ± 0.006 dex kpc-1). Subregions in which the mean metallicity differs from the surrounding areas do not appear to correlate with previously known features; spectroscopic studies are required in order to assess their physical significance.

  20. Photometric observations of a polychromatic laser guide star.

    PubMed

    Foy, R; Tallon, M; Tallon-Bosc, I; Thiébaut, E; Vaillant, J; Foy, F C; Robert, D; Friedman, H; Biraben, F; Grynberg, G; Gex, J P; Mens, A; Migus, A; Weulersse, J M; Butler, D J

    2000-12-01

    We report the photometric observation of a polychromatic laser guide star (PLGS) using the AVLIS laser at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The process aims at providing a measurement of the tilt of the incoming wave front at a telescope induced by atmospheric turbulence. It relies on the two-photon coherent excitation of the 4D5/2 energy level of sodium atoms in the mesosphere. We used two laser beams at 589 and 569 nm, with a maximum total average output power of approximately 350 W. For the purpose of photometric calibration, a natural star was observed simultaneously through the same instrument as the PLGS at the focus of the LLNL 50-cm telescope. Photometric measurements of the 330-nm return flux confirm our previous theoretical studies that the PLGS process should allow us at a later stage to correct for the tilt at wavelengths as short as approximately 1 microm at good astronomical sites. They show also that, at saturation of two-photon coherent absorption in the mesosphere, the backscattered flux increases by a factor of approximately 2 when the pulse repetition rate decreases by a factor of 3 at constant average power. This unexpected behavior is briefly discussed. PMID:11140483

  1. Combining spectroscopic and photometric surveys: Same or different sky?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, Martin; Gaztañaga, Enrique

    2015-08-01

    This paper looks at the combined constraints from a photometric and spectroscopic survey. These surveys will measure cosmology using weak lensing (WL), galaxy clustering, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and redshift space distortions (RSD). We find, contrary to some findings in the recent literature, that overlapping surveys can give important benefits when measuring dark energy. We therefore try to clarify the status of this issue with a full forecast of two stage-IV surveys using a new approach to properly account for covariance between the different probes in the overlapping samples. The benefit of the overlapping survey can be traced back to two factors: additional observables and sample variance cancellation. Both needs to be taken into account and contribute equally when combining 3D power spectrum and 2D correlations for lensing. With an analytic example we also illustrate that for optimal constraints, one should minimize the (Pearson) correlation coefficient between cosmological and nuisance parameters and maximize the one among nuisance parameters (e.g. galaxy bias) in the two samples. This can be achieved by increasing the overlap between the spectroscopic and photometric surveys. We show how BAO, WL and RSD contribute to this benefit and also look at some other survey designs, such as photometric redshift errors and spectroscopic density.

  2. A comprehensive photometric study of the eclipsing binary EP Aurigae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.-L.; Wei, J.-Y.; Yang, Y.-G.; Li, K.; Zhang, X.-B.

    2015-02-01

    We present new observations for the eclipsing binary EP Aurigae, which were performed by using three small telescopes in China from 2003 December to 2014 January. With the updated 2003 version of the Wilson-Devinney code, the photometric elements were deduced from three sets of light curves. Based on all available eclipsing times, the orbital period changes were investigated. It is discovered that the (O-C) curve may show an existence of light-time effect due to an unseen third body, which was weakly identified by the photometric solution. The modulated period and amplitude of the cyclic variation are P3=71.2(±8.0) yr and A=0.0101(±0.0008) day, respectively. In the co-planar orbit with the binary system, the mass of the third body is M3=0.18(±0.02) M⊙. The photometric results imply that EP Aur is an Algol-type binary with a mass ratio of q=0.831(±0.004). Its primary component almost fills its Roche lobe. Therefore, EP Aur may consist of a normal main-sequence star and a cool Roche-lobe filling subgiant, which may be undergoing rapid mass transfer.

  3. Long-term photometric behaviour of outbursting AM CVn systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitan, David; Groot, Paul J.; Prince, Thomas A.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Laher, Russ; Ofek, Eran O.; Sesar, Branimir; Surace, Jason

    2015-01-01

    The AM CVn systems are a class of He-rich, post-period minimum, semidetached, ultracompact binaries. Their long-term light curves have been poorly understood due to the few systems known and the long (hundreds of days) recurrence times between outbursts. We present combined photometric light curves from the Lincoln Near Earth Asteroid Research, Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey, and Palomar Transient Factory synoptic surveys to study the photometric variability of these systems over an almost 10 yr period. These light curves provide a much clearer picture of the outburst phenomena that these systems undergo. We characterize the photometric behaviour of most known outbursting AM CVn systems and establish a relation between their outburst properties and the systems' orbital periods. We also explore why some systems have only shown a single outburst so far and expand the previously accepted phenomenological states of AM CVn systems. We conclude that the outbursts of these systems show evolution with respect to the orbital period, which can likely be attributed to the decreasing mass transfer rate with increasing period. Finally, we consider the number of AM CVn systems that should be present in modelled synoptic surveys.

  4. Photometric redshifts of 5000 Xray selected Stripe 82 sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasnim Ananna, Tonima; Salvato, Mara; Urry, C. Megan; LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Stripe 82X Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We present preliminary spectroscopic and photometric redshifts of 5000 X-ray-selected AGN sources from our Stripe 82X survey, which is designed to study rare high-redshift and/or high-luminosity AGN like the luminous quasars identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey but also including heavily reddened AGN not identified as such in SDSS. The sample covers a total of 31.3 deg2 in Stripe 82, a combination of 15.6 deg2 XMM AO13 data, 10.6 deg2 XMM AO10 and archival data, and 7.4 deg2 archival Chandra data. About 80% of the newly discovered X-ray sources have an optical counterpart in the co-added SDSS data; of these, roughly half have spectroscopic redshifts. We derived estimates of the photometric redshifts for the rest, using multiwavelength photometry from GALEX, SDSS, UKIDSS, VISTA, 2MASS, Spitzer, and WISE. The photometric redshifts will be used to determine the fraction of obscured black hole growth at high redshift and/or high luminosity, as well as to derive the evolving X-ray luminosity function and to measure AGN clustering in several redshift slices — information vital to understanding the co-evolution of galaxies and their central black holes.

  5. The uBVI Photometric System. II. Standard Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Michael H.; Bond, Howard E.

    2005-06-01

    Paper I of this series described the design of a CCD-based photometric system that is optimized for ground-based measurements of the size of the Balmer discontinuity in stellar spectra. This ``uBVI'' system combines the Thuan-Gunn u filter with the standard Johnson-Kron-Cousins BVI filters and can be used to discover luminous yellow supergiants in extragalactic systems and post-asymptotic giant branch stars in globular clusters and galactic halos. In the present paper we use uBVI observations obtained on 54 nights with 0.9 m telescopes at Kitt Peak and Cerro Tololo to construct a catalog of standardized u magnitudes for standard stars taken from the 1992 catalog of Landolt. We describe the selection of our 14 Landolt fields and give details of the photometric reductions, including red leak and extinction corrections, transformation of all the observations onto a common magnitude system, and the establishment of the photometric zero point. We present a catalog of u magnitudes of 103 stars suitable for use as standards. We show that data obtained with other telescopes can be transformed to our standard system with better than 1% accuracy.

  6. Can Self-Organizing Maps Accurately Predict Photometric Redshifts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, M. J.; Klose, C. D.

    2012-03-01

    We present an unsupervised machine-learning approach that can be employed for estimating photometric redshifts. The proposed method is based on a vector quantization called the self-organizing-map (SOM) approach. A variety of photometrically derived input values were utilized from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey's main galaxy sample, luminous red galaxy, and quasar samples, along with the PHAT0 data set from the Photo-z Accuracy Testing project. Regression results obtained with this new approach were evaluated in terms of root-mean-square error (RMSE) to estimate the accuracy of the photometric redshift estimates. The results demonstrate competitive RMSE and outlier percentages when compared with several other popular approaches, such as artificial neural networks and Gaussian process regression. SOM RMSE results (using Δz = zphot - zspec) are 0.023 for the main galaxy sample, 0.027 for the luminous red galaxy sample, 0.418 for quasars, and 0.022 for PHAT0 synthetic data. The results demonstrate that there are nonunique solutions for estimating SOM RMSEs. Further research is needed in order to find more robust estimation techniques using SOMs, but the results herein are a positive indication of their capabilities when compared with other well-known methods.

  7. Calibration of LSST Instrumental and Atmospheric Photometric Passbands

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, David L.; Axelrod, T.; Barrau, Aurelien; Baumont, Sylvain; Blondin, Stephane; Claver, Chuck; Gorecki, Alexia; Ivezic, Zeljko; Jones, Lynne; Krabbendam, Victor; Liang, Ming; Saha, Abhijit; Smith, Allyn; Smith, R.Chris; Stubbs, Christopher W.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2011-07-06

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will continuously image the entire sky visible from Cerro Pachon in northern Chile every 3-4 nights throughout the year. The LSST will provide data for a broad range of science investigations that require better than 1% photometric precision across the sky (repeatability and uniformity) and a similar accuracy of measured broadband color. The fast and persistent cadence of the LSST survey will significantly improve the temporal sampling rate with which celestial events and motions are tracked. To achieve these goals, and to optimally utilize the observing calendar, it will be necessary to obtain excellent photometric calibration of data taken over a wide range of observing conditions - even those not normally considered 'photometric'. To achieve this it will be necessary to routinely and accurately measure the full optical passband that includes the atmosphere as well as the instrumental telescope and camera system. The LSST mountain facility will include a new monochromatic dome illumination projector system to measure the detailed wavelength dependence of the instrumental passband for each channel in the system. The facility will also include an auxiliary spectroscopic telescope dedicated to measurement of atmospheric transparency at all locations in the sky during LSST observing. In this paper, we describe these systems and present laboratory and observational data that illustrate their performance.

  8. A PHOTOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF SEVENTEEN BINARY STARS USING SPECKLE IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, James W.; Baptista, Brian J.; Horch, Elliott P.; Franz, Otto; Van Altena, William F. E-mail: bbapti@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: Otto.Franz@lowell.edu

    2009-11-15

    Magnitude differences obtained from speckle imaging are used in combination with other data in the literature to place the components of binary star systems on the H-R diagram. Isochrones are compared with the positions obtained, and a best-fit isochrone is determined for each system, yielding both masses of the components as well as an age range consistent with the system parameters. Seventeen systems are studied, 12 of which were observed with the 0.6 m Lowell-Tololo Telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory and six of which were observed with the WIYN 3.5 m Telescope (The WIYN Observatory is a joint facility of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Indiana University, Yale University, and the National Optical Astronomy Observatories) at Kitt Peak. One system was observed from both sites. In comparing photometric masses to mass information from orbit determinations, we find that the photometric masses agree very well with the dynamical masses, and are generally more precise. For three systems, no dynamical masses exist at present, and therefore the photometrically determined values are the first mass estimates derived for these components.

  9. Computer-aided photometric analysis of dynamic digital bioluminescent images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorski, Zbigniew; Bembnista, T.; Floryszak-Wieczorek, J.; Domanski, Marek; Slawinski, Janusz

    2003-04-01

    The paper deals with photometric and morphologic analysis of bioluminescent images obtained by registration of light radiated directly from some plant objects. Registration of images obtained from ultra-weak light sources by the single photon counting (SPC) technique is the subject of this work. The radiation is registered by use of a 16-bit charge coupled device (CCD) camera "Night Owl" together with WinLight EG&G Berthold software. Additional application-specific software has been developed in order to deal with objects that are changing during the exposition time. Advantages of the elaborated set of easy configurable tools named FCT for a computer-aided photometric and morphologic analysis of numerous series of quantitatively imperfect chemiluminescent images are described. Instructions are given how to use these tools and exemplified with several algorithms for the transformation of images library. Using the proposed FCT set, automatic photometric and morphologic analysis of the information hidden within series of chemiluminescent images reflecting defensive processes in poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd) leaves affected by a pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea is revealed.

  10. Photometric and polarimetric mapping of water turbidity and water depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halajian, J.; Hallock, H.

    1973-01-01

    A Digital Photometric Mapper (DPM) was used in the Fall of 1971 in an airborne survey of New York and Boston area waters to acquire photometric, spectral and polarimetric data. The object of this study is to analyze these data with quantitative computer processing techniques to assess the potential of the DPM in the measurement and regional mapping of water turbidity and depth. These techniques have been developed and an operational potential has been demonstrated. More emphasis is placed at this time on the methodology of data acquisition, analysis and display than on the quantity of data. The results illustrate the type, quantity and format of information that could be generated operationally with the DPM-type sensor characterized by high photometric stability and fast, accurate digital output. The prototype, single-channel DPM is suggested as a unique research tool for a number of new applications. For the operational mapping of water turbidity and depth, the merits of a multichannel DPM coupled with a laser system are stressed.

  11. Calibration of the MEarth Photometric System: Optical Magnitudes and Photometric Metallicity Estimates for 1802 Nearby M-Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmann, Jason A.; Irwin, Jonathan M.; Charbonneau, David; Newton, Elisabeth R.

    2016-02-01

    The MEarth Project is a photometric survey systematically searching the smallest stars near the Sun for transiting rocky planets. Since 2008, MEarth has taken approximately two million images of 1844 stars suspected to be mid-to-late M dwarfs. We have augmented this survey by taking nightly exposures of photometric standard stars and have utilized this data to photometrically calibrate the MEarth system, identify photometric nights, and obtain an optical magnitude with 1.5% precision for each M dwarf system. Each optical magnitude is an average over many years of data, and therefore should be largely immune to stellar variability and flaring. We combine this with trigonometric distance measurements, spectroscopic metallicity measurements, and 2MASS infrared magnitude measurements in order to derive a color-magnitude-metallicity relation across the mid-to-late M dwarf spectral sequence that can reproduce spectroscopic metallicity determinations to a precision of 0.1 dex. We release optical magnitudes and metallicity estimates for 1567 M dwarfs, many of which did not have an accurate determination of either prior to this work. For an additional 277 stars without a trigonometric parallax, we provide an estimate of the distance, assuming solar neighborhood metallicity. We find that the median metallicity for a volume-limited sample of stars within 20 pc of the Sun is [Fe/H] = -0.03 ± 0.008, and that 29/565 of these stars have a metallicity of [Fe/H] = -0.5 or lower, similar to the low-metallicity distribution of nearby G dwarfs. When combined with the results of ongoing and future planet surveys targeting these objects, the metallicity estimates presented here will be important for assessing the significance of any putative planet-metallicity correlation.

  12. Titration of a Solid Acid Monitored by X-Ray Diffraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dungey, Keenan E.; Epstein, Paul

    2007-01-01

    An experiment is described to introduce students to an important class of solid-state reactions while reinforcing concepts of titration by using a pH meter and a powder X-ray diffractometer. The experiment was successful in teaching students the abstract concepts of solid-state structure and diffraction by applying the diffraction concepts learned

  13. Charge Density Quantification of Polyelectrolyte Polysaccharides by Conductometric Titration: An Analytical Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farris, Stefano; Mora, Luigi; Capretti, Giorgio; Piergiovanni, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    An easy analytical method for determination of the charge density of polyelectrolytes, including polysaccharides and other biopolymers, is presented. The basic principles of conductometric titration, which is used in the pulp and paper industry as well as in colloid and interface science, were adapted to quantify the charge densities of a

  14. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry and Macromolecular Visualization for the Interaction of Lysozyme and Its Inhibitors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Chin-Chuan; Jensen, Drake; Boyle, Tiffany; O'Brien, Leah C.; De Meo, Cristina; Shabestary, Nahid; Eder, Douglas J.

    2015-01-01

    To provide a research-like experience to upper-division undergraduate students in a biochemistry teaching laboratory, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is employed to determine the binding constants of lysozyme and its inhibitors, N-acetyl glucosamine trimer (NAG[subscript 3]) and monomer (NAG). The extremely weak binding of lysozyme/NAG is

  15. Single-experiment displacement assay for quantifying high-affinity binding by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Krainer, Georg; Keller, Sandro

    2015-04-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the gold standard for dissecting the thermodynamics of a biomolecular binding process within a single experiment. However, reliable determination of the dissociation constant (KD) from a single titration is typically limited to the range 100 μM>KD>1 nM. Interactions characterized by a lower KD can be assessed indirectly by so-called competition or displacement assays, provided that a suitable competitive ligand is available whose KD falls within the directly accessible window. However, this protocol is limited by the fact that it necessitates at least two titrations to characterize one high-affinity inhibitor, resulting in considerable consumption of both sample material and time. Here, we introduce a fast and efficient ITC displacement assay that allows for the simultaneous characterization of both a high-affinity ligand and a moderate-affinity ligand competing for the same binding site on a receptor within a single experiment. The protocol is based on a titration of the high-affinity ligand into a solution containing the moderate-affinity ligand bound to the receptor present in excess. The resulting biphasic binding isotherm enables accurate and precise determination of KD values and binding enthalpies (ΔH) of both ligands. We discuss the theoretical background underlying the approach, demonstrate its practical application to metal ion chelation, explore its potential and limitations with the aid of simulations and statistical analyses, and elaborate on potential applications to protein-inhibitor interactions. PMID:25461813

  16. Thermodynamic analysis of Bacillus subtilis endospore protonation using isothermal titration calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrold, Zoë R.; Gorman-Lewis, Drew

    2013-05-01

    Bacterial proton and metal adsorption reactions have the capacity to affect metal speciation and transport in aqueous environments. We coupled potentiometric titration and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) analyses to study Bacillus subtilis spore-proton adsorption. We modeled the potentiometric data using a four and five-site non-electrostatic surface complexation model (NE-SCM). Heats of spore surface protonation from coupled ITC analyses were used to determine site specific enthalpies of protonation based on NE-SCMs. The five-site model resulted in a substantially better model fit for the heats of protonation but did not significantly improve the potentiometric titration model fit. The improvement observed in the five-site protonation heat model suggests the presence of a highly exothermic protonation reaction circa pH 7 that cannot be resolved in the less sensitive potentiometric data. From the log Ks and enthalpies we calculated corresponding site specific entropies. Log Ks and site concentrations describing spore surface protonation are statistically equivalent to B. subtilis cell surface protonation constants. Spore surface protonation enthalpies, however, are more exothermic relative to cell based adsorption suggesting a different bonding environment. The thermodynamic parameters defined in this study provide insight on molecular scale spore-surface protonation reactions. Coupled ITC and potentiometric titrations can reveal highly exothermic, and possibly endothermic, adsorption reactions that are overshadowed in potentiometric models alone. Spore-proton adsorption NE-SCMs derived in this study provide a framework for future metal adsorption studies.

  17. Monitoring unfractionated heparin therapy: relationship between eight anti-Xa assays and a protamine titration assay.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, S; Theaker, J; Preston, F E

    2000-03-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that heparin assays, such as anti-activated factor X (anti-Xa) assays, can be successfully substituted for activated partial thromboplastin time for heparin dosage monitoring. A number of different assays are available and the relationship between results with different techniques is largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to assess the relationship between heparin assays by protamine titration and anti-Xa assays. Samples were collected from 43 patients receiving unfractionated heparin (UFH). In each sample, the heparin level was determined using a protamine titration assay and eight commercially available anti-Xa assays. The mean heparin level by protamine titration was 0.31 U/ml. Mean anti-Xa activity results ranged from 0.40 to 0.42 IU/ml for the three clotting-based assays, and from 0.32 to 0.40 IU/ml for five chromogenic assays. Thus mean results of different anti-Xa assays varied by up to 30%. The range of anti-Xa activity equivalent, on average, to 0.2-0.4 U/ml by protamine titration, considered to be the therapeutic range, was approximately 0.25-0.5 IU/ml, depending on the assay. The relationship between results of clotting and chromogenic methods was similar irrespective of whether or not warfarin-induced prolongation of international normalized ratios was present. PMID:10759006

  18. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry and Macromolecular Visualization for the Interaction of Lysozyme and Its Inhibitors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Chin-Chuan; Jensen, Drake; Boyle, Tiffany; O'Brien, Leah C.; De Meo, Cristina; Shabestary, Nahid; Eder, Douglas J.

    2015-01-01

    To provide a research-like experience to upper-division undergraduate students in a biochemistry teaching laboratory, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is employed to determine the binding constants of lysozyme and its inhibitors, N-acetyl glucosamine trimer (NAG[subscript 3]) and monomer (NAG). The extremely weak binding of lysozyme/NAG is…

  19. Solvatochromic Dyes as pH-Independent Indicators for Ionophore Nanosphere-Based Complexometric Titrations.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jingying; Xie, Xiaojiang; Bakker, Eric

    2015-12-15

    For half a century, complexometric titrations of metal ions have been performed with water-soluble chelators and indicators that typically require careful pH control. Very recently, ion-selective nanosphere emulsions were introduced that exhibit ion-exchange properties and are doped with lipophilic ionophores originally developed for chemical ion sensors. They may serve as novel, highly selective and pH independent complexometric reagents. While ion optode emulsions have been demonstrated as useful indicators for such titrations, they exhibit a pH cross-response that unfortunately complicates the identification of the end point. Here, we present pH-independent optode nanospheres as indicators for complexometric titrations, with calcium as an initial example. The nanospheres incorporate an ionic solvatochromic dye (SD), ion exchanger and ionophore. The solvatochromic dye will be only expelled from the core of the nanosphere into the aqueous solution at the end point at which point it results in an optical signal change. The titration curves are demonstrated to be pH-independent and with sharper end points than with previously reported chromoionophore-based optical nanospheres as indicator. The calcium concentration in mineral water was successfully determined using this method. PMID:26595520

  20. Beta-blocker titration failure is independent of severity of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Anthonio, R L; van Veldhuisen, D J; Breekland, A; Crijns, H J; van Gilst, W H

    2000-02-15

    In the present study, predictors of complicated initiation of beta blockade in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy was studied. We found that generally accepted measures of severity of heart failure are not predictable, whereas low systolic blood pressure (< or =120 mm Hg) was the strongest predictor for problematic (up)titration. PMID:10728963

  1. The titration curve of insulin in the presence of various bivalent metal ions

    PubMed Central

    Graae, John

    1968-01-01

    1. Titration curves of insulin in the presence and absence of various metal ions are reported. 2. The difference in base consumption with and without the metal ions is compared with calculated curves. 3. These experiments suggest that in dilute solutions Zn2+ and Cu2+ ions are bound to α-amino groups. PMID:5637362

  2. Tested Demonstrations: Comparison of Strong Acid and Weak Acid Titration Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    A lecture demonstration is presented for comparing titration curves. A plot of pH vs volume of strong base is produced by connecting the external output of a pH meter to a strip recorder. Thus, pH is recorded as a function of time. (BB)

  3. ELECTROKINETIC PHENOMENA : VII. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ELECTRIC MOBILITY, CHARGE, TITRATION CURVE, AND OPTICAL ROTATION OF PROTEIN.

    PubMed

    Abramson, H A; Grossman, E B

    1932-05-20

    The specific rotation of egg albumin, gliadin, and gelatin (40 degrees C.) is discussed in connection with available data on (a) mobility, (b) titration curve, and (c) osmotic pressure. It seems likely that the change in specific rotation with pH of protein solutions is proportional to the change in net charge. PMID:19872669

  4. Performing Titration Analyses for Water Quality. Module 17. Vocational Education Training in Environmental Health Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consumer Dynamics Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This module, one of 25 on vocational education training for careers in environmental health occupations, contains self-instructional materials on performing titration analysis for water quality. Following guidelines for students and instructors and an introduction that explains what the student will learn are three lessons: (1) naming each part of…

  5. Titration of Monoprotic Acids with Sodium Hydroxide Contaminated by Sodium Carbonate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalowski, Tadeusz

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the effects of using carbon dioxide contaminated sodium hydroxide solution as a titrant for a solution of a weak monoprotic acid and the resulting distortion of the titration curve in comparison to one obtained when an uncontaminated titrant is used. (CW)

  6. Charge Density Quantification of Polyelectrolyte Polysaccharides by Conductometric Titration: An Analytical Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farris, Stefano; Mora, Luigi; Capretti, Giorgio; Piergiovanni, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    An easy analytical method for determination of the charge density of polyelectrolytes, including polysaccharides and other biopolymers, is presented. The basic principles of conductometric titration, which is used in the pulp and paper industry as well as in colloid and interface science, were adapted to quantify the charge densities of a…

  7. The Simulation of an Oxidation-Reduction Titration Curve with Computer Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteley, Richard V., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Although the simulation of an oxidation/reduction titration curve is an important exercise in an undergraduate course in quantitative analysis, that exercise is frequently simplified to accommodate computational limitations. With the use of readily available computer algebra systems, however, such curves for complicated systems can be generated…

  8. Subsite binding energies of an exo-polygalacturonase using isothermal titration calorimetry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermodynamic parameters for binding of a series of galacturonic acid oligomers to an exo-polygalacturonase, RPG16 from Rhizopus oryzae, were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. Binding of oligomers varying in chain length from two to five galacturonic acid residues is an exothermic proc...

  9. Avian influenza virus isolation, propagation and titration in embryonated chicken eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza (AI) virus is usually isolated, propagated, and titrated in embryonated chickens eggs (ECE). Most any sample type can be accommodated for culture with appropriate processing. Isolation may also be accomplished in cell culture particularly if mammalian lineage isolates are suspected, ...

  10. Titration of a Solid Acid Monitored by X-Ray Diffraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dungey, Keenan E.; Epstein, Paul

    2007-01-01

    An experiment is described to introduce students to an important class of solid-state reactions while reinforcing concepts of titration by using a pH meter and a powder X-ray diffractometer. The experiment was successful in teaching students the abstract concepts of solid-state structure and diffraction by applying the diffraction concepts learned…

  11. The Quantitative Resolution of a Mixture of Group II Metal Ions by Thermometric Titration with EDTA. An Analytical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert L.; Popham, Ronald E.

    1983-01-01

    Presents an experiment in thermometric titration used in an analytic chemistry-chemical instrumentation course, consisting of two titrations, one a mixture of calcium and magnesium, the other of calcium, magnesium, and barium ions. Provides equipment and solutions list/specifications, graphs, and discussion of results. (JM)

  12. Sequential titration of iron(II) and vanadium(IV) mixtures with cerium(IV) sulphate, with ferroins as indicators.

    PubMed

    Sriramam, K; Sarma, B S; Sastry, N R; Prasad, A R

    1982-08-01

    The titration of vanadium(IV) with cerium(IV) sulphate, with nitroferroin as indicator, is proposed. Unlike ferroin, the indicator does not need a catalyst in this system. By suitable choice of experimental conditions iron(II) can be titrated first to a ferroin end-point and then vanadium(IV) to a nitroferroin end-point. PMID:18963213

  13. Acid-base titrations for polyacids: Significance of the pK sub a and parameters in the Kern equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meites, L.

    1978-01-01

    A new method is suggested for calculating the dissociation constants of polyvalent acids, especially polymeric acids. In qualitative form the most significant characteristics of the titration curves are demonstrated and identified which are obtained when titrating the solutions of such acids with a standard base potentiometrically.

  14. Direct Sensing of Total Acidity by Chronopotentiometric Flash Titrations at Polymer Membrane Ion-Selective Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Gemene, Kebede L.; Bakker, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Polymer membrane ion-selective electrodes containing lipophilic ionophores are traditionally interrogated by zero current potentiometry, which, ideally, gives information on the sample activity of ionic species. It is shown here that a discrete cathodic current pulse across an H+-selective polymeric membrane doped with the ionophore ETH 5294 may be used for the chronopotentiometric detection of pH in well buffered samples. However, a reduction in the buffer capacity leads to large deviations from the expected Nernstian response slope. This is explained by the local depletion of hydrogen ions at the sample-membrane interface as a result of the galvanostatically imposed ion flux in direction of the membrane. This depletion is found to be a function of the total acidity of the sample and can be directly monitored chronopotentiometrically in a flash titration experiment. The subsequent application of a baseline potential pulse reverses the extraction process of the current pulse, allowing one to interrogate the sample with minimal perturbation. In one protocol, total acidity is found to be proportional to the magnitude of applied current at the flash titration endpoint. More conveniently, the square root of the flash titration endpoint time observed at a fixed applied current is a linear function of the total acid concentration. This suggests that it is possible to perform rapid localized pH titrations at ion-selective electrodes without the need for volumetric titrimetry. The technique is explored here for acetic acid, MES and citric acid with promising results. Polymeric membrane electrodes on the basis of poly(vinyl chloride) plasticized with o-nitrophenyloctylether in a 1:2 mass ratio may be used for the detection of acids of up to ca. 1 mM concentration, with flash titration times on the order of a few seconds. Possible limitations of the technique are discussed, including variations of the acid diffusion coefficients and influence of electrical migration. PMID:18370399

  15. Direct sensing of total acidity by chronopotentiometric flash titrations at polymer membrane ion-selective electrodes.

    PubMed

    Gemene, Kebede L; Bakker, Eric

    2008-05-15

    Polymer membrane ion-selective electrodes containing lipophilic ionophores are traditionally interrogated by zero current potentiometry, which, ideally, gives information on the sample activity of ionic species. It is shown here that a discrete cathodic current pulse across an H (+)-selective polymeric membrane doped with the ionophore ETH 5294 may be used for the chronopotentiometric detection of pH in well-buffered samples. However, a reduction in the buffer capacity leads to large deviations from the expected Nernstian response slope. This is explained by the local depletion of hydrogen ions at the sample-membrane interface as a result of the galvanostatically imposed ion flux in direction of the membrane. This depletion is found to be a function of the total acidity of the sample and can be directly monitored chronopotentiometrically in a flash titration experiment. The subsequent application of a baseline potential pulse reverses the extraction process of the current pulse, allowing one to interrogate the sample with minimal perturbation. In one protocol, total acidity is found to be proportional to the magnitude of applied current at the flash titration end point. More conveniently, the square root of the flash titration end point time observed at a fixed applied current is a linear function of the total acid concentration. This suggests that it is possible to perform rapid localized pH titrations at ion-selective electrodes without the need for volumetric titrimetry. The technique is explored here for acetic acid, MES and citric acid with promising results. Polymeric membrane electrodes based on poly(vinyl chloride) plasticized with o-nitrophenyl octyl ether in a 1:2 mass ratio may be used for the detection of acids of up to ca. 1 mM concentration, with flash titration times on the order of a few seconds. Possible limitations of the technique are discussed, including variations of the acid diffusion coefficients and influence of electrical migration. PMID:18370399

  16. Cluster membership probabilities from proper motions and multi-wavelength photometric catalogues. I. Method and application to the Pleiades cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarro, L. M.; Bouy, H.; Berihuete, A.; Bertin, E.; Moraux, E.; Bouvier, J.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Barrado, D.; Solano, E.

    2014-03-01

    Context. With the advent of deep wide surveys, large photometric and astrometric catalogues of literally all nearby clusters and associations have been produced. The unprecedented accuracy and sensitivity of these data sets and their broad spatial, temporal and wavelength coverage make obsolete the classical membership selection methods that were based on a handful of colours and luminosities. We present a new technique designed to take full advantage of the high dimensionality (photometric, astrometric, temporal) of such a survey to derive self-consistent and robust membership probabilities of the Pleiades cluster. Aims: We aim at developing a methodology to infer membership probabilities to the Pleiades cluster from the DANCe multidimensional astro-photometric data set in a consistent way throughout the entire derivation. The determination of the membership probabilities has to be applicable to censored data and must incorporate the measurement uncertainties into the inference procedure. Methods: We use Bayes' theorem and a curvilinear forward model for the likelihood of the measurements of cluster members in the colour-magnitude space, to infer posterior membership probabilities. The distribution of the cluster members proper motions and the distribution of contaminants in the full multidimensional astro-photometric space is modelled with a mixture-of-Gaussians likelihood. Results: We analyse several representation spaces composed of the proper motions plus a subset of the available magnitudes and colour indices. We select two prominent representation spaces composed of variables selected using feature relevance determination techniques based in Random Forests, and analyse the resulting samples of high probability candidates. We consistently find lists of high probability (p > 0.9975) candidates with ≈1000 sources, 4 to 5 times more than obtained in the most recent astro-photometric studies of the cluster. Conclusions: Multidimensional data sets require statistically sound multivariate analysis techniques to fully exploit their scientific information content. Proper motions in particular are, as expected, critical for the correct separation of contaminants. The methodology presented here is ready for application in data sets that include more dimensions, such as radial and/or rotational velocities, spectral indices, and variability. Membership probability catalogs for the DANCe Pleiades data are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/563/A45

  17. Probable swirls detected as photometric anomalies in Oceanus Procellarum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkuratov, Yu.; Kaydash, V.; Gerasimenko, S.; Opanasenko, N.; Velikodsky, Yu.; Korokhin, V.; Videen, G.; Pieters, C.

    2010-07-01

    Images of the lunar nearside obtained by telescopes of Maidanak Observatory (Uzbekistan) and Simeiz Observatory (Crimea, Ukraine) equipped with Canon CMOS cameras and Sony CCD LineScan camera were used to study photometric properties of the lunar nearside in several spectral bands. A wide range of lunar phase angles was covered, and the method of phase ratios to assess the steepness of the phase function at different phase angles is applied. We found several areas with photometric anomalies in the south-west portion of the lunar disk that we refer to as Oceanus Procellarum anomalies. The areas being unique on the lunar nearside do not obey the inverse correlation between albedo and phase-curve slope, demonstrating high phase-curve slopes at intermediate albedo. Low-Sun images acquired with Lunar Orbiter IV and Apollo-16 cameras do not reveal anomalous topography of the regions, at least for scales larger than several tens of meters. The areas also do not have any thermal inertia, radar (70 and 3.8 cm), magnetic, or chemical/mineral peculiarities. On the other hand they exhibit a polarimetric signature that we interpret to be due to the presence of a porous regolith upper layer consisting of dust particles. The anomalies may be interpreted as regions of very fresh shallow regolith disturbances caused by impacts of meteoroid swarms consisting of rather small impactors. This origin is similar to one of the hypotheses for the origin of lunar swirls like the Reiner-γ formation. The photometric difference between the shallow and pervasive (Reiner-γ class) swirls is that the latter appear to have a significant amount of immature soils in the upper surface layers.

  18. Measuring redshift-space distortions using photometric surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Ashley J.; Percival, Will J.; Crocce, Martín; Cabré, Anna; Gaztañaga, Enrique

    2011-08-01

    We outline how redshift-space distortions (RSD) can be measured from the angular correlation function, w(θ), of galaxies selected from photometric surveys. The natural degeneracy between RSD and galaxy bias can be minimized by comparing results from bins with top-hat galaxy selection in redshift, and bins based on the radial position of galaxy pair centres. This comparison can also be used to test the accuracy of the photometric redshifts. The presence of RSD will be clearly detectable with the next generation of photometric redshift surveys. We show that the Dark Energy Survey (DES) will be able to measure f(z)σ8(z) to a 1σ accuracy of (17 ×b) per cent, using galaxies drawn from a single narrow redshift slice centred at z= 1. Here b is the linear bias, and f is the logarithmic rate of change of the linear growth rate with respect to the scalefactor. Extending to measurements of w(θ) for a series of bins of width 0.02(1 +z) over 0.5 < z < 1.4 will measure γ to a 1σ accuracy of 0.25, given the model f=Ωm(z)γ, and assuming a linear bias model that evolves such that b= 0.5 +z (and fixing other cosmological parameters). The accuracy of our analytic predictions is confirmed using mock catalogues drawn from simulations conducted by the Marenostrum Institut de Ciències de l'Espai Simulations (MICE) collaboration.

  19. Photometric Properties of Ceres and Comparisons with Previous HST Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.-Y.; Nathues, A.; Le Corre, L.; Reddy, V.; Sykes, M. V.; Hoffmann, M.; Mottola, S.; Schröder, S. E.; Longobardo, A.; Ciarniello, M.; McFadden, L. A.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2015-10-01

    NASA's Dawn spacecraft entered the first science orbit around its second target, dwarf planet Ceres, in April 2015. The photometric properties of Ceres not only reveal clues about the physical state of the regolith, surface composition, and geological history, but also are important for correcting the data collected under various observing and illumination geometries to a common geometry to facilitate the interpretations of all photometric and spectral data. The Dawn data collected during its approach to Ceres cover phase angles from a few degrees to ~155º, and almost cover the full range of incidence angles and emission angles from 0º to 90º, making an excellent dataset for studying the spectrophotometric properties of Ceres. We report the analysis of the photometric properties of Ceres in the visible wavelengths using the Framing Camera (FC) [1] data through all seven color filters and one clear filter, acquired during the approach and the Survey orbit of the mission. Although previous studies [2-4] suggested a remarkably uniform surface of Ceres, the images collected by Dawn during its approach to the target at a scale of a few km/pixel revealed some small but extremely bright spots and regions, with albedos up to >4 times the average albedo of Ceres, representing the highest contrast so far observed in all asteroids imaged from close distances by spacecraft missions. These bright spots should be geologically young, and might be related to the episodic water sublimation activity of Ceres [5-7]. We performed detailed comparisons of the albedos of these bright spots between previous Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations and the Dawn observations that span about 10 years to search for any possible changes. By the time of preparing this abstract, the Dawn FChas collected images at pixel scale down to 2.1 km/pixel. By June 2015, the data with a scale of 0.4 km/pixel will have been collected during the Survey Orbit phase.

  20. COSMOLOGY WITH PHOTOMETRIC SURVEYS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Yan; Cooray, Asantha; Chen Xuelei

    2010-02-01

    We discuss the extent to which photometric measurements alone can be used to identify Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) and to determine the redshift and other parameters of interest for cosmological studies. We fit the light curve data of the type expected from a survey such as the one planned with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and also remove the contamination from the core-collapse SNe to SNIa samples. We generate 1000 SNIa mock flux data for each of the LSST filters based on existing design parameters, then use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis to fit the redshift, apparent magnitude, stretch factor, and the phase of the SNIa. We find that the model fitting works adequately well when the true SNe redshift is below 0.5, while at z < 0.2 the accuracy of the photometric data is almost comparable with spectroscopic measurements of the same sample. We discuss the contamination of Type Ib/c (SNIb/c) and Type II supernova (SNII) on the SNIa data set. We find that it is easy to distinguish the SNII through the large chi{sup 2} mismatch when fitting to photometric data with Ia light curves. This is not the case for SNIb/c. We implement a statistical method based on the Bayesian estimation in order to statistically reduce the contamination from SNIb/c for cosmological parameter measurements from the whole SNe sample. The proposed statistical method also evaluates the fraction of the SNIa in the total SNe data set, which provides a valuable guide to establish the degree of contamination.

  1. Space-based photometric precision from ground-based telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, Peter C.; Mcgraw, John T.; Ackermann, Mark R.; Hines, Dean C.; Hull, Anthony B.; Rossmann, Lisa; Zirzow, Daniel C.; Brown, Steven W.; Cramer, Claire E.; Fraser, Gerald T.; Lykke, Keith R.; Smith, Allan W.; Stubbs, Christopher W.; Woodward, John T.

    2010-07-01

    Ground-based telescopes supported by lidar and spectrophotometric auxiliary instrumentation can attain space-based precision for all-sky photometry, with uncertainties dominated by fundamental photon counting statistics. Earth's atmosphere is a wavelength-, directionally- and time-dependent turbid refractive element for every ground-based telescope, and is the primary factor limiting photometric measurement precision. To correct accurately for the transmission of the atmosphere requires direct measurements of the wavelength-dependent transmission in the direction and at the time that the supported photometric telescope is acquiring its data. While considerable resources have been devoted to correcting the effects of the atmosphere on angular resolution, the effects on precision photometry have largely been ignored. We describe the facility-class lidar that observes the stable stratosphere, and a spectrophotometer that observes NIST absolutely calibrated standard stars, the combination of which enables fundamentally statistically limited photometric precision. This inexpensive and replicable instrument suite provides the lidar-determined monochromatic absolute transmission of Earth's atmosphere at visible and near-infrared wavelengths to 0.25% per airmass and the wavelengthdependent transparency to less than 1% uncertainty per minute. The atmospheric data are merged to create a metadata stream that allows throughput corrections from data acquired at the time of the scientific observations to be applied to broadband and spectrophotometric scientific data. This new technique replaces the classical use of nightly mean atmospheric extinction coefficients, which invoke a stationary and plane-parallel atmosphere. We demonstrate application of this instrument suite to stellar photometry, and discuss the enhanced value of routinely provably precise photometry obtained with existing and future ground-based telescopes.

  2. KINEMATIC AND PHOTOMETRIC EVIDENCE FOR A BAR IN NGC 2683

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Zagursky, Matthew J.; McGaugh, Stacy S. E-mail: mzagursk@umd.edu

    2009-10-15

    We present optical long-slit and SparsePak Integral Field Unit emission line spectroscopy along with optical broadband and near-IR images of the edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 2683. We find a multi-valued, figure-of-eight velocity structure in the inner 45'' of the long-slit spectrum and twisted isovelocity contours in the velocity field. We also find, regardless of wavelength, that the galaxy isophotes are boxy. We argue that taken together, these kinematic and photometric features are evidence for the presence of a bar in NGC 2683. We use our data to constrain the orientation and strength of the bar.

  3. Tracing the sound horizon scale with photometric redshift surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnero-Rosell, A.; Sánchez, E.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztañaga, E.; de Simoni, F.; Crocce, M.; Cabré, A.; Fosalba, P.; Alonso, D.

    2011-11-01

    We propose a novel method for the extraction of the baryonic acoustic oscillation scale in galaxy photometric surveys. The evolution of this scale can be used as a standard ruler in order to constrain cosmological parameters. The method consists in parametrize the angular correlation function ω(θ), with a simple analitical expresion, in order to extract the sound horizon scale. The method has been tested in the MICE simulation, one of the largest N-body simulation to date. We have considered projection effects, non-linearities and observational effects in our analysis, obtaining errors in cosmological parameters in agreement with what is expected in new generation surveys.

  4. A Photometric Study of Starspot Evolution on HIP 106231

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Robert O.; Roettenbacher, R. M.

    2006-12-01

    HIP 106231 (LO Pegasi) is a single K8 young solar analog with a 10.17-hour rotation period. Prior Doppler imaging and photometric studies have established the presence of a polar spot with projections down to middle latitudes. BVRI CCD images of the star were obtained on the nights of July 16, 17 and 18 and August 3, 5 and 6, 2006. Aperture photometry was performed to generate light curves. The light curves were inverted to produce surface maps via an algorithm which makes no a priori assumptions regarding the number of spots or their shapes. We present maps illustrating spot evolution over the observation period.

  5. Real time swallowing measurement system by using photometric stereo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujino, Masahiro; Kato, Kunihito; Mura, Emi; Nagai, Hajime

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a measurement system to evaluate the swallowing by estimating the movement of the thyroid cartilage. We developed a measurement system based on the vision sensor in order to achieve the noncontact and non-invasive sensor. The movement of the subject's thyroid cartilage is tracked by the three dimensional information of the surface of the skin measured by the photometric stereo. We constructed a camera system that uses near-IR light sources and three camera sensors. We conformed the effectiveness of the proposed system by experiments.

  6. Some illumination models for industrial applications of photometric stereo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quéau, Yvain; Durou, Jean-Denis

    2015-04-01

    Among the possible sources of error in 3D-reconstruction using the photometric stereo technique, lighting modeling is often neglected, though it can create a dramatic large-scale bias. In this paper, after recalling the physical definition of a primary Lambertian source (isotropic lightings), we show how to derive a lighting model for several real-world scenarios, including directional lightings, nearby sources and extended planar illuminants. Finally, we show how to calibrate general spatially-varying lightings within a plane, in the case where explicitly modeling the lightings would be tedious.

  7. A photometric function for diffuse reflection by particulate materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, W. E.; Weaver, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    A photometric function is proposed to describe the diffuse reflection of radiation by particulate materials. Both multiple scattering and the dominant effects of particle shadowing are included and the function is verified by comparisons with the photometries of laboratory surfaces. Brightness measurements of planetary and other diffusely scattering surfaces can be used to calculate the brightness for geometries other than those used in the measurements and for which the Minnaert function does not apply. The measurements also can be directly related to such surface characteristics as particle size, single-particle albedo, and compactness.

  8. Femtosecond broadband fluorescence upconversion spectroscopy: Improved setup and photometric correction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.-X.; Wuerth, C.; Resch-Genger, U.; Zhao, L.; Ernsting, N. P.; Sajadi, M.

    2011-06-15

    A setup for fluorescence upconversion spectroscopy (FLUPS) is described which has 80 fs temporal response (fwhm) for emission in the spectral range 425-750 nm. Broadband phase matching is achieved with tilted gate pulses at 1340 nm. Background from harmonics of the gate pulse is removed and sensitivity increased compared to previous designs. Photometric calibration of the upconversion process is performed with a set of fluorescent dyes. For Coumarin 153 in methanol the peak position, bandwidth, and asymmetry depending on delay time are reported.

  9. Photometric properties of lunar terrains derived from Hapke's equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfenstein, P.; Veverka, J.

    1987-11-01

    The fitting of Hapke's (1986) photometric parameters to the lunar disk-integrated visual lightcurve, as well as to disk-resolved data of Shorthill et al. (1969) for dark, average, and bright lunar terrains, leads to computational results from the disk-integrated results for the nearside geometric albedo and phase integral that are consistent with those of earlier investigations. The angular width of the opposition surge, which is noted to be greatest in dark terrains, can be accounted for in terms of modest differences in regolith particle-size distributions that could be associated with regolith maturation.

  10. A new investigation of photometric changes in RW Persei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Edward C.; Schaefer, Bradley E.; Fried, Robert E.; Lines, Richard; Lines, Helen

    1992-01-01

    New photoelectric observations of RW Per were obtained, and photometric solutions were carried out for these data, for earlier photoelectric observations, and for archival photographic observations. It is concluded that no third light exists in this binary, and that the original nodal variation explanation for historical changes in the depth of primary eclipse is therefore incorrect. A revised nodal variation hypothesis is suggested. It is also noted that these changes could have been produced by a gradual increase in the polar radius of the hot star, perhaps related to a change in that star's rotational velocity.

  11. Probing dark energy with lensing magnification in photometric surveys.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Michael D

    2014-02-14

    I present an estimator for the angular cross correlation of two tracers of the cosmological large-scale structure that utilizes redshift information to isolate separate physical contributions. The estimator is derived by solving the Limber equation for a reweighting of the foreground tracer that nulls either clustering or lensing contributions to the cross correlation function. Applied to future photometric surveys, the estimator can enhance the measurement of gravitational lensing magnification effects to provide a competitive independent constraint on the dark energy equation of state. PMID:24580685

  12. First photometric lightcurve observations from the Evelyn L. Egan Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauerbach, Michael; Bennett, Thomas

    2005-06-01

    The first photometric lightcurve results from the Evelyn L. Egan Observatory [MPC Code H72] are reported. Despite a wildfire on campus and four land falling hurricanes, we were able to obtain detailed lightcurve measurements over a period of several nights for two main-belt asteroids: 287 Nephthys and 479 Caprera. The following synodic periods and amplitudes were determined: 287 Nephthys: 7.6065h±0.0002h with an amplitude of 0.20m; 479 Caprera: 9.4250h±0.0003h with an amplitude of 0.11m.

  13. Optical and photometric studies of Earth orbiting small space objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selim, I. M.; El-Hameed, Afaf M. Abd; Bakhtigaraev, N. S.; Attia, Gamal F.

    2016-03-01

    Variations of light curves for space objects are investigated. Optical observations and photometric measurements for small space debris on highly elliptical orbits (HEO) and geostationary orbits (GEO) are used to determine their orbital parameters. Light curves of small space debris with various area-to-mass ratios and orbital characteristics are discussed. Tracking of some objects shows very rapid brightness variations related to perturbations of the orbital parameters. Changes in brightness and equatorial coordinates of the studied objects are found in observational data. Our results allow improving the accuracy of space debris orbital elements.

  14. Photometric and spectral observations of the Supernova 1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelaya, J. A.; Vid'Machenko, A. P.

    1988-06-01

    Photometric (UBVR) and spectral observations of Supernova 1987A in the LMC obtained at the Bolivian-Soviet observatory near Tarija, Bolivia during April-August, 1987 are presented. A spectrophotopolarimeter mounted at the Cassegrain (F = 7.5 m) focus of the Zeiss 60-cm reflector was used. It was found that, for Supernova 1987A, the UV part of the spectrum was weakened during March 7-July 9, 1987. There was a simultaneous increase in brightness, and hydrogen emission lines characteristic of type II supernovae were present.

  15. Kernel PCA for Type Ia supernovae photometric classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, E. E. O.; de Souza, R. S.

    2013-03-01

    The problem of supernova photometric identification will be extremely important for large surveys in the next decade. In this work, we propose the use of kernel principal component analysis (KPCA) combined with k = 1 nearest neighbour algorithm (1NN) as a framework for supernovae (SNe) photometric classification. The method does not rely on information about redshift or local environmental variables, so it is less sensitive to bias than its template fitting counterparts. The classification is entirely based on information within the spectroscopic confirmed sample and each new light curve is classified one at a time. This allows us to update the principal component (PC) parameter space if a new spectroscopic light curve is available while also avoids the need of re-determining it for each individual new classification. We applied the method to different instances of the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge (SNPCC) data set. Our method provides good purity results in all data sample analysed, when signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) ≥ 5. Therefore, we can state that if a sample as the post-SNPCC was available today, we would be able to classify ≈15 per cent of the initial data set with purity ≳90 per cent (D7+SNR3). Results from the original SNPCC sample, reported as a function of redshift, show that our method provides high purity (up to ≈97 per cent), especially in the range of 0.2 ≤ z < 0.4, when compared to results from the SNPCC, while maintaining a moderate figure of merit (≈0.25). This makes our algorithm ideal for a first approach to an unlabelled data set or to be used as a complement in increasing the training sample for other algorithms. We also present results for SNe photometric classification using only pre-maximum epochs, obtaining 63 per cent purity and 77 per cent successful classification rates (SNR ≥ 5). In a tougher scenario, considering only SNe with MLCS2k2 fit probability >0.1, we demonstrate that KPCA+1NN is able to improve the classification results up to >95 per cent (SNR ≥ 3) purity without the need of redshift information. Results are sensitive to the information contained in each light curve, as a consequence, higher quality data points lead to higher successful classification rates. The method is flexible enough to be applied to other astrophysical transients, as long as a training and a test sample are provided.

  16. Space plasma physics: atmospheric emissions photometric imaging experiment.

    PubMed

    Mende, S B; Swenson, G R; Clifton, K S

    1984-07-13

    The atmospheric emissions photometric imaging experiment was flown on Spacelab 1 to study faint natural and artificial atmospheric emission phenomena. The instrument imaged optical emission in the region 2000 to 7500 angstroms with a television system consisting of two optical channels, one wide-angle and one telephoto. A third optical channel imaged onto the photochathode of a microchannel plate photomultiplier tube that has 100 discrete anodes. A hand-held image intensifier camera with an objective grating permitted spectral analysis of the earth's airglow and the shuttle glow. Preliminary data show magnesium ion emission features in the lower ionosphere as well as the spececraft glow spectrum. PMID:17837937

  17. Infrared Imaging, Spectroscopic, and Photometric Studies of Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrz, Robert D.

    1997-01-01

    We have continued our program of infrared (IR) photometric, imaging, spectroscopic, and polarimetric temporal observations of comets to study the properties of comet dust and comet nuclei. During the first two years we digitized our IR data base on P/Halley and other recent comets to facilitate further analysis and comparison with other data bases, and found compelling evidence for the emission of a burst of small grains from P/Halley's nucleus at perihelion. We reported imaging and photometric observations of Comets Austin 1990 V and Swift-Tuttle 1992. The Swift-Tuttle 1992t observations included IR photometry, several 7-14 micron long-slit spectra of the coma and a time-sequence of more than 150 10 micron broadband images of the coma. An analysis of near-IR images of the inner coma of P/Halley obtained on three consecutive nights in 1986 March showed sunwardjets. We completed our analysis of IR imaging spectrosco-photometric data on comets. We also obtained observations of Comets Hyakutake 1996 B2 and Hale/Bopp 1995 01. We obtained infrared imaging, photometric, spectroscopic and polarimetric temporal observations of bright comets using a network of five telescopes, with emphasis on simultaneous observations of comets at many wavelengths with different instruments. Our program offers several unique advantages: 1) rapid observational response to new comets with dedicated infrared telescopes; 2) observations within a few degrees of the sun when comets are near perihelion and 3) access to advanced infrared array imagers and spectrometers. In particular, reduction, analysis, publication and archiving of our Jupiter/sl-9 and Comet Hyakutake infrared data received special emphasis. Instrumentation development included installation of the latest version of the innovative FORTH telescope control and a data acquisition system that enables us to control three telescopes remotely by telephone from anywhere in the world for comet observations in broad daylight. We have acquired more than 3000 256x256 images totaling nearly two gigabytes of data detailing the near-IR development of the impact sites of the S-L9 fragments on Jupiter. These data were obtained using the University of Rochester Imaging IR Camera at the cassegrain focus of the 92" at WIRO. The WIRO data set covers 8 days and is, to our knowledge, one of the most extensive observational records of the S-L/Jupiter encounter obtained by any ground-based telescope. This program benefitted from the compilation during these last few months of an upgrade to the data acquisition program at WIRO with support of this NASA contract.

  18. Dust in emission nebulae of the LMC derived from photometric reddening of stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greve, A.; van Genderen, A. M.; Laval, A.

    1990-10-01

    VBLUW photometric observations of stars in emission nebulae of the LMC are reported. The luminosities and extinctions of the stars are derived. Agreement is found between the average photometric extinctions of the nebulae and the extinctions derived from the Balmer line decrement measured by Caplan and Deharveng (1985 and 1986). The photometric extinctions are shown in the CO map of the LMC (Cohen et al., 1988).

  19. Documentation for the machine-readable version of photometric data for nearby stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A computer list of all photometric systems (of those considered), in which each star was measured is provided. The file is a subset of a much larger and more comprehensive compilation, which lists all measured photoelectric photometric systems for any star that has been measured in at least one photoelectric system. In addition to the photometric system identifications, cross identifications to the Henry Draper and Durchmusterung catalogs and apparent visual magnitudes are included.

  20. Unraveling the thermodynamics and kinetics of RNA assembly: surface plasmon resonance, isothermal titration calorimetry, and circular dichroism.

    PubMed

    Hoogstraten, Charles G; Sumita, Minako; White, Neil A

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms and driving forces of the assembly of RNA tertiary structure are a topic of much current interest. In several systems, including our own work in the docking transition of the hairpin ribozyme, intramolecular RNA tertiary folding has been converted into an intermolecular binding event, allowing the full power of contemporary biophysical techniques to be brought to bear on the analysis. We review the use of three such methods: circular dichroism to isolate the binding of multivalent cations coupled to tertiary assembly, surface plasmon resonance to determine the rates of association and dissociation, and isothermal titration calorimetry to dissect the thermodynamic contributions to RNA assembly events. We pay particular attention to practical aspects of these studies, such as careful preparation of samples with fixed free concentrations of cations in order to avoid errors due to ion depletion effects that are common in RNA systems. Examples of applications from our own work with the hairpin ribozyme are shown. Distinctions among the data handling procedures for the various techniques used and solution conditions encountered are also discussed. PMID:25432758

  1. Applications of isothermal titration calorimetry in pure and applied research--survey of the literature from 2010.

    PubMed

    Ghai, Rajesh; Falconer, Robert J; Collins, Brett M

    2012-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a biophysical technique for measuring the formation and dissociation of molecular complexes and has become an invaluable tool in many branches of science from cell biology to food chemistry. By measuring the heat absorbed or released during bond formation, ITC provides accurate, rapid, and label-free measurement of the thermodynamics of molecular interactions. In this review, we survey the recent literature reporting the use of ITC and have highlighted a number of interesting studies that provide a flavour of the diverse systems to which ITC can be applied. These include measurements of protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions required for macromolecular assembly, analysis of enzyme kinetics, experimental validation of molecular dynamics simulations, and even in manufacturing applications such as food science. Some highlights include studies of the biological complex formed by Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin C3 and the murine T-cell receptor, the mechanism of membrane association of the Parkinson's disease-associated protein α-synuclein, and the role of non-specific tannin-protein interactions in the quality of different beverages. Recent developments in automation are overcoming limitations on throughput imposed by previous manual procedures and promise to greatly extend usefulness of ITC in the future. We also attempt to impart some practical advice for getting the most out of ITC data for those researchers less familiar with the method. PMID:22213449

  2. Photometric Mapping of Asteroid (4) Vesta from HST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianyang; McFadden, L. A.; Thomas, P. C.; Mutchler, M.; Parker, J. W.; Young, E. F.; Russell, C. T.; Sykes, M. V.; Schmidt, B.

    2007-10-01

    We obtained 96 disk-resolved images of the target of NASA's Dawn mission, asteroid (4) Vesta, from HST's WFPC2 PC camera. The observation was planned such that complete rotational coverage over the 5.34 hr rotational period was acquired through 4 filters centered at 0.439, 0.673, 0.953, and 1.042 microns. The sub-Earth latitude at Vesta of 18-19 deg S during the observation and Earth- Vesta distance of 1.17-1.18 AU, enable mapping of the southern hemisphere at a pixel scale of 38 km/pixel. These maps will complement the previous HST mapping in 1994 (Binzel et al. 1997) that mapped more northern latitudes. The rotational lightcurve shows a single peak, consistent with the albedo dominated origin. Color variations over the four observed wavelengths are suggested by the slightly different shapes of lightcuves. Preliminary disk-resolved photometric modeling and mapping have been performed using the shape model of Vesta (Thomas et al. 1997). The albedo variation is about 10% at all filters, consistent with the light curve amplitude. The distribution of albedo is slightly bi-modal, with two peaks at about +3% and -5% of the average. We report preliminary results of the photometric analysis and mapping as well as some mineralogical interpretations from the maps.

  3. Photometric Analysis of the Overcontact Binary CW Cas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. J.; Qian, S. B.; He, J. J.; Li, L. J.; Zhao, E. G.

    2014-11-01

    New CCD photometric observations of overcontact binary CW Cas were carried out in 2004 and 2011. In particular, the light curve obtained in 2004 shows a remarkable O'Connell effect. Compared with light curves in different observing seasons, variations were found. These variations can be explained by dark spot activities on the surface of at least one component. Using the Wilson-Devinney code with a spot model, we find that the photometric solutions confirm CW Cas is a shallow W-subtype overcontact binary with a spotted massive component. Our new determined times of minimum light together with the others published in the literature were analyzed to find a change of orbital period. From the O - C curves, the period of the system shows a cyclic period change (P 3 = 69.9 yr, A 3 = 0.03196 days) superposed on the linear increase. The cyclic variation, if explained as the light-travel time effect, reveals the presence of a tertiary companion.

  4. Chemically peculiar stars identified in large photometric surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paunzen, Ernst; Netopil, Martin; Bernhard, Klaus; Hümmerich, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The chemically peculiar (CP) stars of the upper main sequence are mainly characterized by strong overabundances of heavy elements. Two subgroups (CP2 and CP4) have strong local magnetic fields which make them interesting targets for astrophysical studies. This star group, in general, is often used for the analysis of stellar formation and evolution in the context of diffusion as well as meridional circulation. The overabundant elements in CP2/4 star atmospheres are concentrated into large spot regions that persist for decades to centuries. Periodic variations of the brightness, spectrum, and magnetic field are observed. The stars are slow rotators and it is believed that the slow rotation is owed to the strong magnetic field. Recent and future surveys that aim to obtain photometric time series are ideally suited to provide a detailed view of the stars' rotational behaviour. We present our efforts to analyze the rotational periods of CP stars and to identify new candidates in the Kepler, SuperWASP, and ASAS-3 surveys, but also in the photometric data that were extracted as valuable by-product of the STEREO satellite mission.

  5. DETECTION OF KOI-13.01 USING THE PHOTOMETRIC ORBIT

    SciTech Connect

    Shporer, Avi; Jenkins, Jon M.; Seader, Shawn E.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Thompson, Susan E.; Twicken, Joseph D.; Still, Martin D.

    2011-12-15

    We use the KOI-13 transiting star-planet system as a test case for the recently developed BEER algorithm, aimed at identifying non-transiting low-mass companions by detecting the photometric variability induced by the companion along its orbit. Such photometric variability is generated by three mechanisms: the beaming effect, tidal ellipsoidal distortion, and reflection/heating. We use data from three Kepler quarters, from the first year of the mission, while ignoring measurements within the transit and occultation, and show that the planet's ephemeris is clearly detected. We fit for the amplitude of each of the three effects and use the beaming effect amplitude to estimate the planet's minimum mass, which results in M{sub p} sin i = 9.2 {+-} 1.1 M{sub J} (assuming the host star parameters derived by Szabo et al.). Our results show that non-transiting star-planet systems similar to KOI-13.01 can be detected in Kepler data, including a measurement of the orbital ephemeris and the planet's minimum mass. Moreover, we derive a realistic estimate of the amplitudes uncertainties, and use it to show that data obtained during the entire lifetime of the Kepler mission of 3.5 years will allow detecting non-transiting close-in low-mass companions orbiting bright stars, down to the few Jupiter mass level. Data from the Kepler Extended Mission, if funded by NASA, will further improve the detection capabilities.

  6. Photometric study of HD 155555C in the ? Pictoris Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, Sergio; Millward, Mervyn; Bradstreet, David H.

    2015-05-01

    We are carrying out a series of photometric monitoring to measure the rotation periods of members in the young ? Pictoris Association, as part of the RACE-OC project (Rotation and ACtivity Evolution in Open Clusters). In this paper, we present the results for HD 155555C which is believed to be physically associated to the spectroscopic binary V824 Ara (HD 155555) and thus constituting a triple system. We collected B, V, and R-band photometric data timeseries and discovered from periodogram analysis the rotation period P = 4.43 d. Combined with stellar radius and projected rotational velocity, we find this star almost equator-on with an inclination i ? 90 . The rotational properties of HD 155555C fit well into the period distribution of other ? Pic members, giving further support to the suggested membership to the association and to its physical association to V824 Ara. A comparison with pre-main-sequence isochrones from various models allows us to estimate an age of 20 15 Myr for this triple system.

  7. Spectrometric and photometric study of the eclipsing variable AM Leo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorda, S. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    The results of quasi-simultaneous spectroscopic and photometric observations of a W UMatype eclipsing variable star AM Leo are presented. The observations were carried out with a 1.2-m telescope equipped with a high-resolution echelle spectrometer, and a telescope-reflector ( D = 0.45m) of the Kourovka Astronomical Observatory of Ural Federal University. New values of semi-amplitudes of the radial velocity curves of the components, K 1 = 109.6kms-1 and K 2 = 252.4kms-1 and the systemic radial velocity V 0 =-9.3 kms-1 are obtained, comparable to the data published in the literature. The semi-amplitude of the radial velocity curve of a more massive component K 1 and the mass ratio of the components q = 0.412 appeared to be slightly smaller than the values obtained by other authors. An assumption wasmade that a possible reason of this is the presence of hot and/or cold spots on the surface of the components, shifting the effective center of brightness of the visible disk of the component with respect to its center of mass position. It was shown that the AM Leo light curve variations on the time scales of one and more days, registered within the photometric part of the study may be described by the choice of appropriate model of the spot structure.

  8. Quantifying photometric observing conditions on Paranal using an IR camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerber, Florian; Querel, Richard R.; Hanuschik, Reinhard

    2014-08-01

    A Low Humidity and Temperature Profiling (LHATPRO) microwave radiometer, manufactured by Radiometer Physics GmbH (RPG), is used to monitor sky conditions over ESO's Paranal observatory in support of VLT science operations. In addition to measuring precipitable water vapour (PWV) the instrument also contains an IR camera measuring sky brightness temperature at 10.5 μm. Due to its extended operating range down to -100 °C it is capable of detecting very cold and very thin, even sub-visual, cirrus clouds. We present a set of instrument flux calibration values as compared with a detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) of the IR camera zenith-looking sky brightness data measured above Paranal taken over the past two years. We show that it is possible to quantify photometric observing conditions and that the method is highly sensitive to the presence of even very thin clouds but robust against variations of sky brightness caused by effects other than clouds such as variations of precipitable water vapour. Hence it can be used to determine photometric conditions for science operations. About 60 % of nights are free of clouds on Paranal. More work will be required to classify the clouds using this technique. For the future this approach might become part of VLT science operations for evaluating nightly sky conditions.

  9. Kernel Regression Techniques for Enhancing Spitzer Photometric Precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingalls, James G.; Krick, Jessica; Carey, Sean; Grillmair, Carl J.; Lowrance, Patrick; Glaccum, William; Laine, Seppo; Surace, Jason Anthony

    2015-08-01

    The Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) on the Spitzer Space Telescope has been used to measure < 0.01% temporal variations in the fluxes of exoplanet systems. The IRAC PSF at both 3.6 and 4.5 μm is undersampled and thus the detector arrays show variations of as much as 8% in sensitivity as the center of the PSF moves across a pixel due to normal spacecraft motions. This is the largest source of correlated noise in IRAC photometry. We describe the latest progress towards an independent calibration of the intra-pixel gain that does not rely on the measurements to be calibrated. The technique begins with: (1) localizing the sub-pixel position of a point source using Spitzer’s Pointing Calibration and Reference Sensor (PCRS); and (2) harnessing a “training set” of many thousands of densely spaced photometric measurements of a non-variable star. Kernel regression, where the training data are nonlinearly combined based on a distance metric for each data point, leads to significant improvements in photometric precision over our previous gridded method. The distance metric we use was derived from a supervised learning algorithm to minimize regression error. We conclude that these results rival the precision obtained with self-calibration techniques, but do not risk the removal of astrophysical signals.

  10. Photometric Stereo Using Sparse Bayesian Regression for General Diffuse Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ikehata, Satoshi; Wipf, David; Matsushita, Yasuyuki; Aizawa, Kiyoharu

    2014-09-01

    Most conventional algorithms for non-Lambertian photometric stereo can be partitioned into two categories. The first category is built upon stable outlier rejection techniques while assuming a dense Lambertian structure for the inliers, and thus performance degrades when general diffuse regions are present. The second utilizes complex reflectance representations and non-linear optimization over pixels to handle non-Lambertian surfaces, but does not explicitly account for shadows or other forms of corrupting outliers. In this paper, we present a purely pixel-wise photometric stereo method that stably and efficiently handles various non-Lambertian effects by assuming that appearances can be decomposed into a sparse, non-diffuse component (e.g., shadows, specularities, etc.) and a diffuse component represented by a monotonic function of the surface normal and lighting dot-product. This function is constructed using a piecewise linear approximation to the inverse diffuse model, leading to closed-form estimates of the surface normals and model parameters in the absence of non-diffuse corruptions. The latter are modeled as latent variables embedded within a hierarchical Bayesian model such that we may accurately compute the unknown surface normals while simultaneously separating diffuse from non-diffuse components. Extensive evaluations are performed that show state-of-the-art performance using both synthetic and real-world images. PMID:26352234

  11. A PHOTOMETRICALLY AND MORPHOLOGICALLY VARIABLE INFRARED NEBULA IN L483

    SciTech Connect

    Connelley, Michael S.; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Fuller, Gary A.

    2009-03-15

    We present narrow and broad K-band observations of the Class 0/I source IRAS 18148-0440 that span 17 years. The infrared nebula associated with this protostar in the L483 dark cloud is both morphologically and photometrically variable on a timescale of only a few months. This nebula appears to be an infrared analog to other well known optically visible variable nebulae associated with young stars, such as Hubble's Variable Nebula. Along with Cepheus A, this is one of the first large variable nebulae to be found that is only visible in the infrared. The variability of this nebula is most likely due to changing illumination of the cloud rather than any motion of the structure in the nebula. Both morphological and photometric changes are observed on a timescale only a few times longer than the light crossing time of the nebula, suggesting very rapid intrinsic changes in the illumination of the nebula. Our narrowband observations also found that H{sub 2} knots are found nearly twice as far to the east of the source as to its west, and that H{sub 2} emission extends farther east of the source than the previously known CO outflow.

  12. USING COLORS TO IMPROVE PHOTOMETRIC METALLICITY ESTIMATES FOR GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, N. E.; Soderberg, A. M.; Levesque, E. M.

    2013-10-01

    There is a well known correlation between the mass and metallicity of star-forming galaxies. Because mass is correlated with luminosity, this relation is often exploited, when spectroscopy is not available, to estimate galaxy metallicities based on single band photometry. However, we show that galaxy color is typically more effective than luminosity as a predictor of metallicity. This is a consequence of the correlation between color and the galaxy mass-to-light ratio and the recently discovered correlation between star formation rate (SFR) and residuals from the mass-metallicity relation. Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopy of ∼180, 000 nearby galaxies, we derive 'LZC relations', empirical relations between metallicity (in seven common strong line diagnostics), luminosity, and color (in 10 filter pairs and four methods of photometry). We show that these relations allow photometric metallicity estimates, based on luminosity and a single optical color, that are ∼50% more precise than those made based on luminosity alone; galaxy metallicity can be estimated to within ∼0.05-0.1 dex of the spectroscopically derived value depending on the diagnostic used. Including color information in photometric metallicity estimates also reduces systematic biases for populations skewed toward high or low SFR environments, as we illustrate using the host galaxy of the supernova SN 2010ay. This new tool will lend more statistical power to studies of galaxy populations, such as supernova and gamma-ray burst host environments, in ongoing and future wide-field imaging surveys.

  13. Photometric Redshift with Bayesian Priors on Physical Properties of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masayuki

    2015-03-01

    We present a proof-of-concept analysis of photometric redshifts with Bayesian priors on physical properties of galaxies. This concept is particularly suited for upcoming/on-going large imaging surveys, in which only several broadband filters are available and it is hard to break some of the degeneracies in the multi-color space. We construct model templates of galaxies using a stellar population synthesis code and apply Bayesian priors on physical properties such as stellar mass and star formation rate. These priors are a function of redshift and they effectively evolve the templates with time in an observationally motivated way. We demonstrate that the priors help reduce the degeneracy and deliver significantly improved photometric redshifts. Furthermore, we show that a template error function, which corrects for systematic flux errors in the model templates as a function of rest-frame wavelength, delivers further improvements. One great advantage of our technique is that we simultaneously measure redshifts and physical properties of galaxies in a fully self-consistent manner, unlike the two-step measurements with different templates often performed in the literature. One may rightly worry that the physical priors bias the inferred galaxy properties, but we show that the bias is smaller than systematic uncertainties inherent in physical properties inferred from the spectral energy distribution fitting and hence is not a major issue. We will extensively test and tune the priors in the on-going Hyper Suprime-Cam survey and will make the code publicly available in the future.

  14. Photometric analysis of the overcontact binary CW Cas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. J.; Qian, S. B.; He, J. J.; Li, L. J.; Zhao, E. G.

    2014-11-01

    New CCD photometric observations of overcontact binary CW Cas were carried out in 2004 and 2011. In particular, the light curve obtained in 2004 shows a remarkable O'Connell effect. Compared with light curves in different observing seasons, variations were found. These variations can be explained by dark spot activities on the surface of at least one component. Using the Wilson-Devinney code with a spot model, we find that the photometric solutions confirm CW Cas is a shallow W-subtype overcontact binary with a spotted massive component. Our new determined times of minimum light together with the others published in the literature were analyzed to find a change of orbital period. From the O – C curves, the period of the system shows a cyclic period change (P {sub 3} = 69.9 yr, A {sub 3} = 0.03196 days) superposed on the linear increase. The cyclic variation, if explained as the light-travel time effect, reveals the presence of a tertiary companion.

  15. CCD and photon-counting photometric observations of peculiar asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulvio, D.; Blanco, C.; Cigna, M.; Gandolfi, D.

    The photometric observational programme of main-belt asteroids undertaken, since 1980, at the Physics and Astronomy Department of Catania University, mainly by using photoelectric acquisition, has been extended to the Near-Earth Objects, because of the importance of their study to improve the knowledge of the mechanics and the physics of the inner Solar System. The wideness of the observational programme was pursued by using an expressly built CCD camera having a Kodak 4200 detector 2048x2048 pixel class 1, front-illuminated chip with 9 mu m pixel-size, equipped with BVRI Johnson filters. New observations of 4 Vesta, 27 Euterpe, 173 Ino, 182 Elsa, 849 Ara (carried out at M.G. Fracastoro Station of Catania Astrophysical Observatory), 984 Gretia, 3199 Nefertiti and 2004 UE (carried out at Asiago Station of Padova Astronomical Observatory) are presented. The improvement of the rotational period value (for 182 Elsa and 2004 UE it is the first determination), of the lightcurve amplitude and of the B-V colour index was obtained. For 4 Vesta indications on surface mineralogic morphology are deduced from the UBV photometric behaviour while for 182 Elsa, the H-G magnitude relation was carried out.

  16. A laboratory measurement of CCD photometric and dimensional stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffington, Andrew; Hudson, Hugh S.; Booth, Corwin H.

    1990-01-01

    The sun exhibits periodic and quasi-periodic variability in its total luminosity, which provides information about its internal structure and dynamics. Variability ranges from a few minutes to many-year time scales, with amplitudes as small as a few ppm in the milliHz band. Extension of this analysis to a large sample of outer stars would be interesting: a panoramic detector such as a CCD could record many stars at once. To meet this objective, a ppm time-series differential precision is required. Laboratory CCD photometric measurements presented here are promising for such an instrument. Normalizing the response from a portion of the CCD area removes most of the individual-frame variability. When a trend attributed to a thermal transient in the CCD dewar is removed, the individual-frame photometric precision is about 0.0001, limited by photoelectron counting statistics. The time-series power spectrum is flat within the desired frequency domain. Analysis of the dimensional stability of the CCD within the same data set indicates better than ppm performance, when first-order bulk motion and magnification changes are removed.

  17. Active learning applied for photometric redshift estimation of quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Bo; Zhang, Yanxia; Zhao, Yongheng

    2015-08-01

    For a long time the quasars’ photometric redshifts have been estimated by learning from all available training dataset. In the scenario of big data, the amount of available data is huge and the dataset may include noise. Consequently, a major research challenge is to design a learning process that gains the most informative data from the available dataset in terms of optimal learning of the underlying relationships. By filtering out noisy data and redundant data, the optimal learning can improve both estimation accuracy and speed. Towards this objective, in this study we figure out an active learning approach that automatically learns a series of suppport vector regression models based on small size of different sampling data chunks. These models are applied on a validation dataset. By active learning, those validation data with estimation results vary in a certain range are regarded as the informative data and are aggregated in multiple training datasets. Next, the aggregated training datasets are combined into an ensemble estimator through averaging and then applied on a test dataset. Our experimental results on SDSS data show that the proposed method is helpful to improve quasars’ photometric redshift estimation accuracy.

  18. Photometric Redshift and Classification for the XMM-COSMOS Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvato, M.; Hasinger, G.; Ilbert, O.; Zamorani, G.; Brusa, M.; Scoville, N. Z.; Rau, A.; Capak, P.; Arnouts, S.; Aussel, H.; Bolzonella, M.; Buongiorno, A.; Cappelluti, N.; Caputi, K.; Civano, F.; Cook, R.; Elvis, M.; Gilli, R.; Jahnke, K.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Impey, C. D.; Lamareille, F.; Le Floc'h, E.; Lilly, S.; Mainieri, V.; McCarthy, P.; McCracken, H.; Mignoli, M.; Mobasher, B.; Murayama, T.; Sasaki, S.; Sanders, D. B.; Schiminovich, D.; Shioya, Y.; Shopbell, P.; Silverman, J.; Smolčić, V.; Surace, J.; Taniguchi, Y.; Thompson, D.; Trump, J. R.; Urry, M.; Zamojski, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present photometric redshifts and spectral energy distribution (SED) classifications for a sample of 1542 optically identified sources detected with XMM in the COSMOS field. Our template fitting classifies 46 sources as stars and 464 as nonactive galaxies, while the remaining 1032 require templates with an active galactic nucleus (AGN) contribution. High accuracy in the derived photometric redshifts was accomplished as the result of (1) photometry in up to 30 bands with high-significance detections, (2) a new set of SED templates, including 18 hybrids covering the far-UV to mid-infrared, which have been constructed by the combination of AGNs and nonactive galaxies templates, and (3) multiepoch observations that have been used to correct for variability (most important for type 1 AGNs). The reliability of the photometric redshifts is evaluated using the subsample of 442 sources with measured spectroscopic redshifts. We achieved an accuracy of σ _{Δ z/(1+z_spec)} = 0.014 for i* AB < 22.5 (σ _{Δ z/(1+z_spec)} ˜ 0.015 for i* AB < 24.5). The high accuracies were accomplished for both type 2 (where the SED is often dominated by the host galaxy) and type 1 AGNs and QSOs out to z = 4.5. The number of outliers is a large improvement over previous photometric redshift estimates for X-ray-selected sources (4.0% and 4.8% outliers for i* AB < 22.5 and i* AB < 24.5, respectively). We show that the intermediate band photometry is vital to achieving accurate photometric redshifts for AGNs, whereas the broad SED coverage provided by mid-infrared (Spitzer/IRAC) bands is important to reduce the number of outliers for normal galaxies. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. Also based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under NASA contract 1407. Also based on data collected at: the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan; the XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA member states and NASA; the European Southern Observatory under Large Program 175.A-0839, Chile; Kitt Peak National Observatory, Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, which are operated by AURA under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation; and the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope with MegaPrime/MegaCam operated as a joint project by the CFHT Corporation, CEA/DAPNIA, the NRC and CADC of Canada, the CNRS of France, TERAPIX and the University of Hawaii.

  19. Intraoperative management of heart-lung interactions: "from hypothetical prediction to improved titration".

    PubMed

    Ouattara, A; Dewitte, A; Rozé, H

    2014-01-01

    Extensive literature describes the suitability of dynamic parameters to predict responsiveness in fluid. However, based on heart-lung interactions, these parameters can have serious limitations, including the use of protective lung ventilation. Although the latter seems to be beneficial for healthy patients undergoing high-risk surgery, the intraoperative interpretation of dynamic parameters to predict fluid responsiveness can be hazardous. In this context, the attending physician could, alternatively, titrate the need of fluids with a small fluid challenge, which remains unaffected by low tidal volume, the presence of arrhythmia, or the presence of spontaneous ventilation. When intraoperative prediction of fluid responsiveness is required in mechanically ventilated patients, "improved" titration should be preferred to a hypothetical prediction. PMID:25127853

  20. Standard test method for aluminum in iron ores by complexometric titration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This method covers the determination of aluminum in iron ores, concentrates, and agglomerates in the concentration range from 0.25 to 5% aluminium. The sample is fused in a zirconium crucible with a mixed flux of sodium carbonate and sodium peroxide. The fused mass is dissolved in dilute hydrochloric acid. The R/sub 2/O/sub 3/ hydroxides are precipitated with ammonia and redissolved in hydrochloric acid. Iron, titanium, etc., are removed with cupferron and chloroform. The aqueous phase is treated with nitric and perchloric acids and evaporated to dryness. After dissolving in dilute hydrochloric acid, the solution is filtered, and the filtrate is treated with an excess of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). The excess EDTA is titrated with a standard zinc solution using xylenol orange indicator. Ammonium fluoride is added to release the EDTA bound to aluminum. This EDTA is then titrated with standard zinc solution, and the percent aluminum is calculated.

  1. Determinations of Carbon Dioxide by Titration: New Experiments for General, Physical, and Quantitative Analysis Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossno, S. K.; Kalbus, L. H.; Kalbus, G. E.

    1996-02-01

    The determination of mixtures containing NaOH and Na2CO3 or Na2CO3 and NaHCO3 by titration is a common experiment in a Quantitative Analysis course. This determination can be adapted for the analysis of CO2 within a sample. The CO2 is released and absorbed in a solution containing excess NaOH. Titration with standard HCl leads to the determination of CO2 present in the sample. A number of interesting experiments in Quantitative Analysis, General and/or Physical Chemistry have been developed. Among these are the following determinations: CO2 content in carbonated beverages, carbonate and bicarbonate in various real life samples, and the molecular weight of CO2.

  2. An automatic system for acidity determination based on sequential injection titration and the monosegmented flow approach.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Joanna; Wójtowicz, Marzena; Gawenda, Nadzieja; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2011-06-15

    An automatic sequential injection system, combining monosegmented flow analysis, sequential injection analysis and sequential injection titration is proposed for acidity determination. The system enables controllable sample dilution and generation of standards of required concentration in a monosegmented sequential injection manner, sequential injection titration of the prepared solutions, data collecting, and handling. It has been tested on spectrophotometric determination of acetic, citric and phosphoric acids with sodium hydroxide used as a titrant and phenolphthalein or thymolphthalein (in the case of phosphoric acid determination) as indicators. Accuracy better than |4.4|% (RE) and repeatability better than 2.9% (RSD) have been obtained. It has been applied to the determination of total acidity in vinegars and various soft drinks. The system provides low sample (less than 0.3 mL) consumption. On average, analysis of a sample takes several minutes. PMID:21641455

  3. Volumetric determination of uranium titanous sulfate as reductant before oxidimetric titration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wahlberg, J.S.; Skinner, D.L.; Rader, L.F., Jr.

    1957-01-01

    Need for a more rapid volumetric method for the routine determination of uranium in uranium-rich materials has led to the development of a method that uses titanous sulfate as a reductant before oxidimetric titration. Separation of the hydrogen sulfide group is not necessary. Interfering elements precipitated by cupferron are removed by automatic filtrations made simultaneously rather than by the longer chloroform extraction method. Uranium is reduced from VI to IV by addition of an excess of titanous sulfate solution, cupric ion serving as an indicator by forming red metallic copper when reduction is complete. The copper is reoxidized by addition of mercuric perchlorate. The reduced uranium is then determined by addition of excess ferric sulfate and titration with ceric sulfate. The method has proved to be rapid, accurate, and economical.

  4. Positive End-expiratory Pressure Titration after Alveolar Recruitment Directed by Electrical Impedance Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Long, Yun; Liu, Da-Wei; He, Huai-Wu; Zhao, Zhan-Qi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a real-time bedside monitoring tool, which can reflect dynamic regional lung ventilation. The aim of the present study was to monitor regional gas distribution in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) during positive-end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) titration using EIT. Methods: Eighteen ARDS patients under mechanical ventilation in Department of Critical Care Medicine of Peking Union Medical College Hospital from January to April in 2014 were included in this prospective observational study. After recruitment maneuvers (RMs), decremental PEEP titration was performed from 20 cmH2O to 5 cmH2O in steps of 3 cmH2O every 5–10 min. Regional over-distension and recruitment were monitored with EIT. Results: After RMs, patient with arterial blood oxygen partial pressure (PaO2) + carbon dioxide partial pressure (PaCO2) >400 mmHg with 100% of fractional inspired oxygen concentration were defined as RM responders. Thirteen ARDS patients was diagnosed as responders whose PaO2 + PaCO2 were higher than nonresponders (419 ± 44 mmHg vs. 170 ± 73 mmHg, P < 0.0001). In responders, PEEP mainly increased recruited pixels in dependent regions and over-distended pixels in nondependent regions. PEEP alleviated global inhomogeneity of tidal volume and end-expiratory lung volume. PEEP levels without significant alveolar derecruitment and over-distension were identified individually. Conclusions: After RMs, PEEP titration significantly affected regional gas distribution in lung, which could be monitored with EIT. EIT has the potential to optimize PEEP titration. PMID:26021494

  5. Reduction of sample volume and waste generation in acid/base titrations using microelectrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1996-03-22

    The Analytical Development Section (ADS) has developed microelectrode methods for use with pH titrations and pH determinations. These microelectrode methods offer increased sensitivity and enable analyses to be done with smaller sample and buffer volumes than are used with standard size electrodes. This report establishes the technical validity of the methods and describes the application of these methods to decreased detection limits, decreased waste generation, and decreased radiation exposure.

  6. Acid-base titrations using microfluidic paper-based analytical devices.

    PubMed

    Karita, Shingo; Kaneta, Takashi

    2014-12-16

    Rapid and simple acid-base titration was accomplished using a novel microfluidic paper-based analytical device (?PAD). The ?PAD was fabricated by wax printing and consisted of ten reservoirs for reaction and detection. The reaction reservoirs contained various amounts of a primary standard substance, potassium hydrogen phthalate (KHPth), whereas a constant amount of phenolphthalein was added to all the detection reservoirs. A sample solution containing NaOH was dropped onto the center of the ?PAD and was allowed to spread to the reaction reservoirs where the KHPth neutralized it. When the amount of NaOH exceeded that of the KHPth in the reaction reservoirs, unneutralized hydroxide ion penetrated the detection reservoirs, resulting in a color reaction from the phenolphthalein. Therefore, the number of the detection reservoirs with no color change determined the concentration of the NaOH in the sample solution. The titration was completed within 1 min by visually determining the end point, which required neither instrumentation nor software. The volumes of the KHPth and phenolphthalein solutions added to the corresponding reservoirs were optimized to obtain reproducible and accurate results for the concentration of NaOH. The ?PADs determined the concentration of NaOH at orders of magnitude ranging from 0.01 to 1 M. An acid sample, HCl, was also determined using Na2CO3 as a primary standard substance instead of KHPth. Furthermore, the ?PAD was applicable to the titrations of nitric acid, sulfuric acid, acetic acid, and ammonia solutions. The ?PADs were stable for more than 1 month when stored in darkness at room temperature, although this was reduced to only 5 days under daylight conditions. The analysis of acidic hot spring water was also demonstrated in the field using the ?PAD, and the results agreed well with those obtained by classic acid-base titration. PMID:25423320

  7. Comparison of ozone determinations by ultraviolet photometry and gas-phase titration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demore, W. B.; Patapoff, M.

    1976-01-01

    A comparison of ozone determinations based on ultraviolet absorption photometry and gas-phase titration (GPT) shows good agreement between the two methods. Together with other results, these findings indicate that three candidate reference methods for ozone, UV photometry, IR photometry, and GPT are in substantial agreement. However, the GPT method is not recommended for routine use by air pollution agencies for calibration of ozone monitors because of susceptibility to experimental error.

  8. Escherichia coli strains that allow antibiotic-free plasmid selection and maintenance by repressor titration

    PubMed Central

    Cranenburgh, Rocky M.; Hanak, Julian A. J.; Williams, Steven G.; Sherratt, David J.

    2001-01-01

    We report the construction of two novel Escherichia coli strains (DH1lacdapD and DH1lacP2dapD) that facilitate the antibiotic-free selection and stable maintenance of recombinant plasmids in complex media. They contain the essential chromosomal gene, dapD, under the control of the lac operator/promoter. Unless supplemented with IPTG (which induces expression of dapD) or DAP, these cells lyse. However, when the strains are transformed with a multicopy plasmid containing the lac operator, the operator competitively titrates the LacI repressor and allows expression of dapD from the lac promoter. Thus transformants can be isolated and propagated simply by their ability to grow on any medium by repressor titration selection. No antibiotic resistance genes or other protein expressing sequences are required on the plasmid, and antibiotics are not necessary for plasmid selection, making these strains a valuable tool for therapeutic DNA and recombinant protein production. We describe the construction of these strains and demonstrate plasmid selection and maintenance by repressor titration, using the new pORT plasmid vectors designed to facilitate recombinant DNA exploitation. PMID:11222777

  9. Prediction of aluminum, uranium, and co-contaminants precipitation and adsorption during titration of acidic sediments.

    PubMed

    Tang, Guoping; Luo, Wensui; Watson, David B; Brooks, Scott C; Gu, Baohua

    2013-06-01

    Batch and column recirculation titration tests were performed with contaminated acidic sediments. A generic geochemical model was developed combining precipitation, cation exchange, and surface complexation reactions to describe the observed pH and metal ion concentrations in experiments with or without the presence of CO2. Experimental results showed a slow pH increase due to strong buffering by Al hydrolysis and precipitation and CO2 uptake. The cation concentrations generally decreased at higher pH than those observed in previous tests without CO2. Using amorphous Al(OH)3 and basaluminite precipitation reactions and a cation exchange selectivity coefficient K(Na\\Al) of 0.3, the model approximately described the observed (1) pH titration curve, (2) Ca, Mg, and Mn concentration by cation exchange, and (3) U concentrations by surface complexation with Fe hydroxides at pH < 5 and with liebigite (Ca2UO2(CO3)3·10H2O) precipitation at pH > 5. The model indicated that the formation of aqueous carbonate complexes and competition with carbonate for surface sites could inhibit U and Ni adsorption and precipitation. Our results suggested that the uncertainty in basaluminite solubility is an important source of prediction uncertainty and ignoring labile solid phase Al underestimates the base requirement in titration of acidic sediments. PMID:23641798

  10. Role of DNA binding sites and slow unbinding kinetics in titration-based oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karapetyan, Sargis; Buchler, Nicolas E.

    2015-12-01

    Genetic oscillators, such as circadian clocks, are constantly perturbed by molecular noise arising from the small number of molecules involved in gene regulation. One of the strongest sources of stochasticity is the binary noise that arises from the binding of a regulatory protein to a promoter in the chromosomal DNA. In this study, we focus on two minimal oscillators based on activator titration and repressor titration to understand the key parameters that are important for oscillations and for overcoming binary noise. We show that the rate of unbinding from the DNA, despite traditionally being considered a fast parameter, needs to be slow to broaden the space of oscillatory solutions. The addition of multiple, independent DNA binding sites further expands the oscillatory parameter space for the repressor-titration oscillator and lengthens the period of both oscillators. This effect is a combination of increased effective delay of the unbinding kinetics due to multiple binding sites and increased promoter ultrasensitivity that is specific for repression. We then use stochastic simulation to show that multiple binding sites increase the coherence of oscillations by mitigating the binary noise. Slow values of DNA unbinding rate are also effective in alleviating molecular noise due to the increased distance from the bifurcation point. Our work demonstrates how the number of DNA binding sites and slow unbinding kinetics, which are often omitted in biophysical models of gene circuits, can have a significant impact on the temporal and stochastic dynamics of genetic oscillators.

  11. Protein-salt binding data from potentiometric titrations of lysozyme in aqueous solutions containing KCl

    SciTech Connect

    Engmann, J.; Blanch, H.W.; Prausnitz, J.M. |

    1997-03-01

    An existing method for potentiometric titrations of proteins was improved, tested and applied to titrations of the enzyme hen-egg-white lysozyme in aqueous solutions containing KCl at ionic strengths from 0.1 M to 2.0 M at 25 C. Information about the protein`s net charge dependence on pH and ionic strength were obtained and salt binding numbers for the system were calculated using a linkage concept. For the pH range 2.5--11.5, the net charge slightly but distinctly increases with increasing ionic strength between 0.1 M and 2.0 M. The differences are most distinct in the pH region below 5. Above pH 11.35, the net charge decreases with increasing ionic strength. Preliminary calculation of binding numbers from titration curves at 0.1 M and 1.0 M showed selective association of chloride anions and expulsion of potassium ions at low pH. Ion-binding numbers from this work will be used to evaluate thermodynamic properties and to correlate crystallization or precipitation phase-equilibrium data in terms of a model based on the integral-equation theory of fluids which is currently under development.

  12. Statistical mechanical model of coupled transcription from multiple promoters due to transcription factor titration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rydenfelt, Mattias; Cox, Robert Sidney, III; Garcia, Hernan; Phillips, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) with regulatory action at multiple promoter targets is the rule rather than the exception, with examples ranging from the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) in E. coli that regulates hundreds of different genes simultaneously to situations involving multiple copies of the same gene, such as plasmids, retrotransposons, or highly replicated viral DNA. When the number of TFs heavily exceeds the number of binding sites, TF binding to each promoter can be regarded as independent. However, when the number of TF molecules is comparable to the number of binding sites, TF titration will result in correlation (promoter entanglement) between transcription of different genes. We develop a statistical mechanical model which takes the TF titration effect into account and use it to predict both the level of gene expression for a general set of promoters and the resulting correlation in transcription rates of different genes. Our results show that the TF titration effect could be important for understanding gene expression in many regulatory settings.

  13. Utilizing the virus-induced blocking of apoptosis in an easy baculovirus titration method

    PubMed Central

    Niarchos, Athanasios; Lagoumintzis, George; Poulas, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Baculovirus-mediated protein expression is a robust experimental technique for producing recombinant higher-eukaryotic proteins because it combines high yields with considerable post-translational modification capabilities. In this expression system, the determination of the titer of recombinant baculovirus stocks is important to achieve the correct multiplicity of infection for effective amplification of the virus and high expression of the target protein. To overcome the drawbacks of existing titration methods (e.g., plaque assay, real-time PCR), we present a simple and reliable assay that uses the ability of baculoviruses to block apoptosis in their host cells to accurately titrate virus samples. Briefly, after incubation with serial dilutions of baculovirus samples, Sf9 cells were UV irradiated and, after apoptosis induction, they were viewed via microscopy; the presence of cluster(s) of infected cells as islets indicated blocked apoptosis. Subsequently, baculovirus titers were calculated through the determination of the 50% endpoint dilution. The method is simple, inexpensive, and does not require unique laboratory equipment, consumables or expertise; moreover, it is versatile enough to be adapted for the titration of every virus species that can block apoptosis in any culturable host cells which undergo apoptosis under specific conditions. PMID:26490731

  14. Trade-offs in Engineering Sugar Utilization Pathways for Titratable Control

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Titratable systems are common tools in metabolic engineering to tune the levels of enzymes and cellular components as part of pathway optimization. For nonmodel microorganisms with limited genetic tools, inducible sugar utilization pathways offer built-in titratable systems. However, these pathways can exhibit undesirable single-cell behaviors that hamper the uniform and tunable control of gene expression. Here, we applied mathematical modeling and single-cell measurements of l-arabinose utilization in Escherichia coli to systematically explore how sugar utilization pathways can be altered to achieve desirable inducible properties. We found that different pathway alterations, such as the removal of catabolism, constitutive expression of high-affinity or low-affinity transporters, or further deletion of the other transporters, came with trade-offs specific to each alteration. For instance, sugar catabolism improved the uniformity and linearity of the response at the cost of requiring higher sugar concentrations to induce the pathway. Within these alterations, we also found that a uniform and linear response could be achieved with a single alteration: constitutively expressing the high-affinity transporter. Equivalent modifications to the d-xylose utilization pathway yielded similar responses, demonstrating the applicability of our observations. Overall, our findings indicate that there is no ideal set of typical alterations when co-opting natural utilization pathways for titratable control and suggest design rules for manipulating these pathways to advance basic genetic studies and the metabolic engineering of microorganisms for optimized chemical production. PMID:24735079

  15. Automated spectrophotometric analyzer for rapid single-point titration of seawater total alkalinity.

    PubMed

    Li, Quanlong; Wang, Fengzhen; Wang, Zhaohui Aleck; Yuan, Dongxing; Dai, Minhan; Chen, Jinshun; Dai, Junwei; Hoering, Katherine A

    2013-10-01

    An automated analyzer was developed to achieve fast, precise, and accurate measurements of seawater total alkalinity (AT) based on single-point titration and spectrophotometric pH detection. The single-point titration was carried out in a circulating loop, which allowed the titrant (hydrochloric acid and bromocresol green solution) and a seawater sample to mix at a constant volume ratio. The dissolved CO2 in the sample-titrant mixture was efficiently removed by an inline CO2 remover, which consists of a gas-permeable tubing (Teflon AF2400) submerged in a sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution. The pH of the mixture was then measured with a custom-made spectrophotometric detection system. The analyzer was calibrated against multiple certified reference materials (CRMs) with different AT values. The analyzer features a sample throughput time of 6.5 min with high precision (0.33-0.36 ?mol kg(-1); n = 48) and accuracy (-0.33 0.99 ?mol kg(-1); n = 10). Intercomparison to a traditional open-cell AT titrator showed overall good agreement of 0.88 2.03 ?mol kg(-1) (n = 22). The analyzer achieved excellent stability without recalibration over 11 days, during which time 320 measurements were made with a total running time of over 40 h. Because of its small size, low power consumption requirements, and its ability to be automated, the new analyzer can be adapted for underway and in situ measurements. PMID:23968512

  16. Role of DNA binding sites and slow unbinding kinetics in titration-based oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Karapetyan, Sargis; Buchler, Nicolas E.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic oscillators, such as circadian clocks, are constantly perturbed by molecular noise arising from the small number of molecules involved in gene regulation. One of the strongest sources of stochasticity is the binary noise that arises from the binding of a regulatory protein to a promoter in the chromosomal DNA. In this study, we focus on two minimal oscillators based on activator titration and repressor titration to understand the key parameters that are important for oscillations and for overcoming binary noise. We show that the rate of unbinding from the DNA, despite traditionally being considered a fast parameter, needs to be slow to broaden the space of oscillatory solutions. The addition of multiple, independent DNA binding sites further expands the oscillatory parameter space for the repressor-titration oscillator and lengthens the period of both oscillators. This effect is a combination of increased effective delay of the unbinding kinetics due to multiple binding sites and increased promoter ultrasensitivity that is specific for repression. We then use stochastic simulation to show that multiple binding sites increase the coherence of oscillations by mitigating the binary noise. Slow values of DNA unbinding rate are also effective in alleviating molecular noise due to the increased distance from the bifurcation point. Our work demonstrates how the number of DNA binding sites and slow unbinding kinetics, which are often omitted in biophysical models of gene circuits, can have a significant impact on the temporal and stochastic dynamics of genetic oscillators. PMID:26764732

  17. Direct spectrophotometric detection of the endpoint in metachromatic titration of polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumbi, B.; Ngila, J. C.; Ndungu, P. G.

    Polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (poly-DADMAC) is a water soluble polymer that easily ionizes when dissolved in water. This cationic polyelectrolyte is mainly used as a flocculant within the water treatment industry, but little is known of its toxicological properties or its fate in the environment. It is often assumed that the polyelectrolyte sorbs onto solid surfaces in the water treatment stream and may be removed with the sludge or by a sand bed filter; which may not always be the case. In any event, reliable analytical techniques are needed for the determination of poly-DADMAC in matrices of environmental relevance. Metachromatic polyelectrolyte titration was used to quantify poly-DADMAC in model and tap water samples. We compared a routine visual titration method with a direct spectrophotometric technique that uses a dip probe, spectrometer, and computer. The direct spectrophotometric technique allowed for the determination of titration curves at 634 nm and 510 nm, whereby the later value has never been successfully utilised in the literature. The method simplifies the data analysis, and our recovery and matrix interference experiments demonstrate that the method is accurate, precise, and robust. The detection limit for this method was 0.1 mg L-1 in model water and 0.5 mg L-1 in tap water. The limit of quantification for both water matrices was 0.5 mg L-1.

  18. Calorimetry, activity, and micro-FTIR analysis of CO chemisorption, titration, and oxidation on supported Pt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sermon, Paul A.; Self, Valerie A.; Vong, Mariana S. W.; Wurie, Alpha T.

    1990-01-01

    The value of in situ analysis on CO chemisorption, titration and oxidation over supported Pt catalysts using calorimetry, catalytic and micro-FTIR methods is illustrated using silica- and titania-supported samples. Isothermal CO-O and O2-CO titrations have not been widely used on metal surfaces and may be complicated if some oxide supports are reduced by CO titrant. However, they can illuminate the kinetics of CO oxidation on metal/oxide catalysts since during such titrations all O and CO coverages are scanned as a function of time. There are clear advantages in following the rates of the catalyzed CO oxidation via calorimetry and gc-ms simultaneously. At lower temperatures the evidence they provide is complementary. CO oxidation and its catalysis of CO oxidation have been extensively studied with hysteresis and oscillations apparent, and the present results suggest the benefits of a combined approach. Silica support porosity may be important in defining activity-temperature hysteresis. FTIR microspectroscopy reveals the chemical heterogeneity of the catalytic surfaces used; it is interesting that the evidence with regard to the dominant CO surface species and their reactivities with regard to surface oxygen for present oxide-supported Pt are different from those seen on graphite-supported Pt.

  19. Titration of biologically active amyloid-β seeds in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Morales, Rodrigo; Bravo-Alegria, Javiera; Duran-Aniotz, Claudia; Soto, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Experimental evidence in animal models suggests that misfolded Amyloid-β (Aβ) spreads in disease following a prion-like mechanism. Several properties characteristics of infectious prions have been shown for the induction of Aβ aggregates. However, a detailed titration of Aβ misfolding transmissibility and estimation of the minimum concentration of biologically active Aβ seeds able to accelerate pathological changes has not yet been performed. In this study, brain extracts from old tg2576 animals were serially diluted and intra-cerebrally injected into young subjects from the same transgenic line. Animals were sacrificed several months after treatment and brain slices were analyzed for amyloid pathology. We observed that administration of misfolded Aβ was able to significantly accelerate amyloid deposition in young mice, even when the original sample was diluted a million times. The titration curve obtained in this experiment was compared to the natural Aβ load spontaneously accumulated by these mice overtime. Our findings suggest that administration of the largest dose of Aβ seeds led to an acceleration of pathology equivalent to over a year. These results show that active Aβ seeds present in the brain can seed amyloidosis in a titratable manner, similarly as observed for infectious prions. PMID:25879692

  20. Utilizing the virus-induced blocking of apoptosis in an easy baculovirus titration method.

    PubMed

    Niarchos, Athanasios; Lagoumintzis, George; Poulas, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Baculovirus-mediated protein expression is a robust experimental technique for producing recombinant higher-eukaryotic proteins because it combines high yields with considerable post-translational modification capabilities. In this expression system, the determination of the titer of recombinant baculovirus stocks is important to achieve the correct multiplicity of infection for effective amplification of the virus and high expression of the target protein. To overcome the drawbacks of existing titration methods (e.g., plaque assay, real-time PCR), we present a simple and reliable assay that uses the ability of baculoviruses to block apoptosis in their host cells to accurately titrate virus samples. Briefly, after incubation with serial dilutions of baculovirus samples, Sf9 cells were UV irradiated and, after apoptosis induction, they were viewed via microscopy; the presence of cluster(s) of infected cells as islets indicated blocked apoptosis. Subsequently, baculovirus titers were calculated through the determination of the 50% endpoint dilution. The method is simple, inexpensive, and does not require unique laboratory equipment, consumables or expertise; moreover, it is versatile enough to be adapted for the titration of every virus species that can block apoptosis in any culturable host cells which undergo apoptosis under specific conditions. PMID:26490731

  1. Dense photometric stereo: a Markov random field approach.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tai-Pang; Tang, Kam-Lun; Tang, Chi-Keung; Wong, Tien-Tsin

    2006-11-01

    We address the problem of robust normal reconstruction by dense photometric stereo, in the presence of complex geometry, shadows, highlight, transparencies, variable attenuation in light intensities, and inaccurate estimation in light directions. The input is a dense set of noisy photometric images, conveniently captured by using a very simple set-up consisting of a digital video camera, a reflective mirror sphere, and a handheld spotlight. We formulate the dense photometric stereo problem as a Markov network and investigate two important inference algorithms for Markov Random Fields (MRFs)--graph cuts and belief propagation--to optimize for the most likely setting for each node in the network. In the graph cut algorithm, the MRF formulation is translated into one of energy minimization. A discontinuity-preserving metric is introduced as the compatibility function, which allows alpha-expansion to efficiently perform the maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation. Using the identical dense input and the same MRF formulation, our tensor belief propagation algorithm recovers faithful normal directions, preserves underlying discontinuities, improves the normal estimation from one of discrete to continuous, and drastically reduces the storage requirement and running time. Both algorithms produce comparable and very faithful normals for complex scenes. Although the discontinuity-preserving metric in graph cuts permits efficient inference of optimal discrete labels with a theoretical guarantee, our estimation algorithm using tensor belief propagation converges to comparable results, but runs faster because very compact messages are passed and combined. We present very encouraging results on normal reconstruction. A simple algorithm is proposed to reconstruct a surface from a normal map recovered by our method. With the reconstructed surface, an inverse process, known as relighting in computer graphics, is proposed to synthesize novel images of the given scene under user-specified light source and direction. The synthesis is made to run in real time by exploiting the state-of-the-art graphics processing unit (GPU). Our method offers many unique advantages over previous relighting methods and can handle a wide range of novel light sources and directions. PMID:17063687

  2. Photometric Properties of the Most Massive High-Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Brant; Li, Yuexing; Cox, Thomas J.; Hernquist, Lars; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2007-09-01

    We calculate the observable properties of the most massive high-redshift galaxies in the hierarchical formation scenario where stellar spheroid and supermassive black hole growth are fueled by gas-rich mergers. Combining high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations of the hierarchical formation of a z~6 quasar, stellar population synthesis models, template active galactic nucleus (AGN) spectra, prescriptions for interstellar and intergalactic absorption, and the response of modern telescopes, the photometric evolution of galaxies destined to host z~6 quasars is modeled at redshifts z~4-14. These massive galaxies, with enormous stellar masses of M*~1011.5-1012 Msolar and star formation rates of SFR~103-104 Msolar yr-1 at z>~7, satisfy a variety of photometric selection criteria based on Lyman break techniques, including V-band dropouts at z>~5, i-band dropouts at z>~6, and z-band dropouts at z>~7. The observability of the most massive high-redshift galaxies is assessed and compared with a wide range of existing and proposed photometric surveys, including the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS)/Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), National Optical Astronomy Observatory Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS), UKIRT Infared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS), Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) Shallow Survey, Ultradeep Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA), Dark Universe Explorer (DUNE), Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS), Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP). Massive stellar spheroids descended from z~6 quasars will likely be detected at z~4 by existing surveys, but owing to their low number densities the discovery of quasar progenitor galaxies at z>7 will likely require future surveys of large portions of the sky (>~0.5%) at wavelengths λ>~1 μm. The detection of rare, starbursting, massive galaxies at redshifts z>~6 would provide support for the hierarchical formation of the earliest quasars and characterize the primitive star formation histories of the most luminous elliptical galaxies.

  3. Photometric classification of quasars from RCS-2 using Random Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, D.; Barrientos, L. F.; Pichara, K.; Anguita, T.; Murphy, D. N. A.; Gilbank, D. G.; Gladders, M. D.; Yee, H. K. C.; Hsieh, B. C.; López, S.

    2015-12-01

    The classification and identification of quasars is fundamental to many astronomical research areas. Given the large volume of photometric survey data available in the near future, automated methods for doing so are required. In this article, we present a new quasar candidate catalog from the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey 2 (RCS-2), identified solely from photometric information using an automated algorithm suitable for large surveys. The algorithm performance is tested using a well-defined SDSS spectroscopic sample of quasars and stars. The Random Forest algorithm constructs the catalog from RCS-2 point sources using SDSS spectroscopically-confirmed stars and quasars. The algorithm identifies putative quasars from broadband magnitudes (g, r, i, z) and colors. Exploiting NUV GALEX measurements for a subset of the objects, we refine the classifier by adding new information. An additional subset of the data with WISE W1 and W2 bands is also studied. Upon analyzing 542 897 RCS-2 point sources, the algorithm identified 21 501 quasar candidates with a training-set-derived precision (the fraction of true positives within the group assigned quasar status) of 89.5% and recall (the fraction of true positives relative to all sources that actually are quasars) of 88.4%. These performance metrics improve for the GALEX subset: 6529 quasar candidates are identified from 16 898 sources, with a precision and recall of 97.0% and 97.5%, respectively. Algorithm performance is further improved when WISE data are included, with precision and recall increasing to 99.3% and 99.1%, respectively, for 21 834 quasar candidates from 242 902 sources. We compiled our final catalog (38 257) by merging these samples and removing duplicates. An observational follow up of 17 bright (r < 19) candidates with long-slit spectroscopy at DuPont telescope (LCO) yields 14 confirmed quasars. The results signal encouraging progress in the classification of point sources with Random Forest algorithms to search for quasars within current and future large-area photometric surveys. Full Tables 1-3 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/584/A44

  4. J-PLUS: The Javalambre Photometric Local Universe Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenarro, Javier; Marin-Franch, Antonio; Moles, Mariano; Cristobal-Hornillos, David; Mendes de Oliveira, Claudia; Sodre, Laerte

    2015-08-01

    The Javalambre-Photometric Local Universe Survey, J-PLUS (www.j-plus.es), is defined to observe 8500 deg2 of the sky visible from the Javalambre Observatory (Teruel, Spain) with the panoramic camera T80Cam at the JAST/T80 telescope, using a set of 12 broad, intermediate and narrow band optical filters. The Project is particularly designed to carry out the photometric calibration of J-PAS (http://j-pas.org). For this reason, some J-PLUS filters are located at key stellar spectral features that allow to retrieve very accurate spectral energy distributions for more than 5 millions of stars in our Galaxy. Beyond the calibration goals, the unusually large FOV of T80Cam, 2deg2, together with the unique width and location of some filters, turn the J-PLUS Project into a powerful 3D view of the nearby Universe, mapping more than 20 millions of galaxies with reliable distance determinations and a similar number of stars of the Milky Way halo. At a rate of 100 gigabytes of data per night, J-PLUS will provide unprecedented multi-color images of the Universe to address a wide variety of astrophysical questions related with cosmology, large scale structure, galaxy clusters, 2D stellar populations and star formation studies in galaxies, the discovery of high redshift galaxies at specific redshift slices, quasars, supernovae, Milky Way science and structure, and minor bodies in the Solar System. In addition, the repetition of the whole area over time in certain filters will allow to face variability studies in the time domain.Complementing J-PLUS, a replica of the JAST/T80 telescope, T80Cam and the J-PLUS filters have been installed at the CTIO, allowing to extend the project to the Southern Hemisphere. J-PLUS together with the southern extension, S-PLUS, constitute an All-sky Photometric Local Universe Survey whose details and scientific applications are the bulk of the present talk.

  5. A critical assessment of the Hapke photometric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkuratov, Y.; Kaydash, V.; Korokhin, V.; Velikodsky, Y.; Petrov, D.; Zubko, E.; Stankevich, D.; Videen, G.

    2012-12-01

    The photometric model developed by Hapke is commonly used to study surface structure and composition of atmosphereless celestial bodies using photometric measurements. However, this model has shortcomings that weaken its applications. For instance, some of the model parameters are empirical and mutually dependent. Moreover, the photometric model is eclectic and approximate; e.g., (1) the model simultaneously considers the single-scattering phase-function as backscattering and isotropic when describing, respectively, incoherent and coherent multiple scattering, which is physically impossible; (2) the approximation of the incoherent multiple scattering function takes into account the function anisotropy for the incident and emergent angles, but ignores the anisotropy for the azimuth angle that is of equal importance; (3) the model also ignores the dependence of the shadow-hiding effect of particles and coherent-backscattering enhancement on illuminating/viewing geometry, accounting only for the phase-angle component; (4) the azimuthal dependence of the shadow-hiding effect on random topographies is introduced ad hoc and is not verified; moreover, the shadow phase function may produce a non-physical maximum at large angles of viewing. We test the Hapke model using a computer simulation of ray-tracing in particulate surfaces, showing significant differences between the Hapke model and the ray-tracing results. We also apply the Hapke model to the interpretation of laboratory photometry of several well-characterized powdered samples measured in two wavelengths. The samples were measured in three states: as particles in air, as a particulate surface formed by freely spilled particles, and after compressing the particulate surface. The Hapke model parameters were completely inconsistent in the interpretation of these laboratory data. Our attempt to map the Hapke parameters using a series of telescopic calibrated images of the Moon acquired at different phase angles demonstrates that the model does not provide a physically meaningful distribution of its parameters. We also suggest that the small increase of the circular polarization ratio μC at decreasing phase angle (<10°), which is observed for lunar samples, is not evidence of the coherent-backscattering effect of the Moon. We suggest that Clementine observations carried out with the UV-Vis and NIR cameras demonstrate that the coherent-backscattering effect exists only for bright lunar surface areas with albedo higher than 30%.

  6. Star Counts Redivivus. IV. Density Laws through Photometric Parallaxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, M. H.; Majewski, S. R.; Reid, I. N.; Thompson, I. B.

    2002-10-01

    In an effort to more precisely define the spatial distribution of Galactic field stars, we present an analysis of the photometric parallaxes of stars in seven Kapteyn selected areas. Our photometry database covers ~14.9 deg2 and contains over 130,000 stars, of which approximately 70,000 are in a color range (0.4<=R-I<=1.5) for which relatively unambiguous photometric parallaxes can be derived. We discuss our photometry pipeline, our method of determining photometric parallaxes, and our analysis efforts. We also address the affects of Malmquist bias, subgiant/giant contamination, metallicity, and binary stars upon the derived density laws. The affect of binary stars is the most significant of these biases-a binary star fraction of 50% could result in derived scale heights that are 80% of the actual values. We find that while the disklike populations of the Milky Way are easily constrained in a simultaneous analysis of all seven fields, no good simultaneous solution for the halo is found. We have applied halo density laws taken from other studies and find that the Besanon flattened power-law halo model (c/a=0.6,?~r-2.75) produces the best fit to our data. With this halo, the thick disk has a scale height of 750 pc with an 8.5% normalization to the old disk. The old-disk scale height is ~280-300 pc for our early-type (5.8<=MR<6.8) dwarfs and rises to ~ 350 pc for our late-type (8.8<=MR<=10.2) dwarf stars. Corrected for a binary fraction of 50%, these scale heights are 940 and 350-375 pc, respectively. Even with this model, there are systematic discrepancies between the observed and predicted density distributions-discrepancies apparent only at the faint magnitudes reached by our survey. Specifically, our model produces density overpredictions in the inner Galaxy and density underpredictions in the outer Galaxy. A possible escape from this dilemma is offered by modeling the stellar halo as a two-component system, as favored by studies of blue horizontal branch/RR Lyrae stars and recent analyses of the kinematics of metal-poor stars. In this paradigm, the halo has a flattened inner distribution and a roughly spherical but substructured outer distribution. Further reconciliation could be provided by a flared thick disk, a structure consistent with a merger origin for that population.

  7. Accuracy and precision of protein-ligand interaction kinetics determined from chemical shift titrations.

    PubMed

    Markin, Craig J; Spyracopoulos, Leo

    2012-12-01

    NMR-monitored chemical shift titrations for the study of weak protein-ligand interactions represent a rich source of information regarding thermodynamic parameters such as dissociation constants (K ( D )) in the micro- to millimolar range, populations for the free and ligand-bound states, and the kinetics of interconversion between states, which are typically within the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale. We recently developed two chemical shift titration methods wherein co-variation of the total protein and ligand concentrations gives increased precision for the K ( D ) value of a 1:1 protein-ligand interaction (Markin and Spyracopoulos in J Biomol NMR 53: 125-138, 2012). In this study, we demonstrate that classical line shape analysis applied to a single set of (1)H-(15)N 2D HSQC NMR spectra acquired using precise protein-ligand chemical shift titration methods we developed, produces accurate and precise kinetic parameters such as the off-rate (k ( off )). For experimentally determined kinetics in the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale, k ( off )~3,000s(-1) in this work, the accuracy of classical line shape analysis was determined to be better than 5% by conducting quantum mechanical NMR simulations of the chemical shift titration methods with the magnetic resonance toolkit GAMMA. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the experimental precision for k ( off ) from line shape analysis of NMR spectra was determined to be 13%, in agreement with the theoretical precision of 12% from line shape analysis of the GAMMA simulations in the presence of noise and protein concentration errors. In addition, GAMMA simulations were employed to demonstrate that line shape analysis has the potential to provide reasonably accurate and precise k ( off ) values over a wide range, from 100 to 15,000s(-1). The validity of line shape analysis for k ( off ) values approaching intermediate exchange (~100s(-1)), may be facilitated by more accurate K ( D ) measurements from NMR-monitored chemical shift titrations, for which the dependence of K ( D ) on the chemical shift difference (??) between free and bound states is extrapolated to ??=0. The demonstrated accuracy and precision for k ( off ) will be valuable for the interpretation of biological kinetics in weakly interacting protein-protein networks, where a small change in the magnitude of the underlying kinetics of a given pathway may lead to large changes in the associated downstream signaling cascade. PMID:23086713

  8. 21 CFR 862.2160 - Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2160 Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use....

  9. 21 CFR 862.2160 - Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2160 Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use....

  10. 21 CFR 862.2160 - Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2160 Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use....

  11. 21 CFR 862.2160 - Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2160 Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use....

  12. 21 CFR 862.2160 - Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2160 Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use....

  13. Automatic satellite tracking system for the NASA Satellite Photometric Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mucklow, Glenn H.

    1980-01-01

    The development of an Automatic TV Tracking System for NASA's mobile 61 cm aperture Satellite Photometric Observatory is described. The analysis techniques used to match the FOV and resolutions to changing seeing conditions are covered in details. Theoretical reasons for such matching of general interest are discussed. It is shown that the energy density in a satellite image is 11 times greater during good seeing conditions than during typical seeing conditions. The Z7987 image tube is shown to be able to detect 16th magnitude objects under ideal seeing conditions using only 8 percent of the light collected by the main telescope. Experimental results show that the SPO equipped with a Z7987 camera can track a satellite at any orbital velocity with less than 0.14 mr accuracy using the DBA Series 606 TV Tracker. The manual system used prior to the installation of the Automatic TV Tracking System could maintain track at 1.1 mr accuracy for comparison.

  14. Proposal of photometric reverberation mapping with BOOTES-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Wei-Min; Wang, Chuan-Jun; Fan, Yu-Feng; Bai, Jin-Ming; Xin, Yu-Xin; Castro-Tirado, Alberto Javier; Guziy, Sergiy

    2014-12-01

    Reverberation mapping(RM) is a powerful technique to measure the mass of black holes in the active galactic nuclei(AGN). Yet the classical RM programs, which uses spectroscopy to monitor emission lines from the broad line region(BLR), are generally limited only for very supermassive black holes with large 2m-calss telescopes. In recent years, a breakthrough is remarkably achieved with photometric RM technique, which opens the door to efficiently measure the BLR size and host-subtracted AGN luminosity even with small telescopes. Considering the availability of other BOOTES telescopes around the world, we could further consider to propose international collaborations as one of the long-term monitoring programs for small telescopes.

  15. Topography Dependent Photometric Correction of SELENE Multispectral Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steutel, D.; Ohtake, M.

    2003-12-01

    The SELENE mission to the Moon in 2005 includes the Multiband Imager (MI) [1], a visible/near-infrared imaging spectrometer, and the Terrain Camera (TC), a 10m panchromatic stereoimager for global topography. The ˜1TB of TC data will take years to reduce; initial photometric correction of MI data will not include the effect of topography. We present a method for prioritizing analysis of TC data so topography can be included in photometric correction of MI data at the earliest time to regions of the lunar surface where the effects of topography are most significant. We have calculated the general quantified dependence of photometric correction on incidence angle, emission angle, phase angle, and local topographic slopes. To calculate photometric correction we use the method used for Clementine [2,3] with the following corrections: The factor of 2 is included in the XL function (see [3]), P(α ,g) = (1-g2)/(1+g2+2gcos(α ))1.5, and g1 = D*R30 + E. In order to predict the topography of the Moon to determine the regional distribution of local slopes at the resolution of MI (20m and 62m), we performed a fractal analysis on existing topographic data derived from Clementine LIDAR [4], Earth-based radar of Tycho crater [5], and Apollo surface-based stereoimagery [6]. The fractal parameter H, which describes the relationship between scale and roughness, is 0.65+/-0.02, 0.64+/-0.01, and 0.69+/-0.06 [6] at the 20-75km, 150m-1.5km, and 0.1-10mm scales, respectively. Based on the consistency of H at these disparate scales, we interpolate H=0.65+/-0.03 (a weighted average) at the 20m and 62m scales of the MI cameras. The second fractal parameter, σ (L0), is calculated from Clementine LIDAR data for overlapping 3x3 degree segments over the lunar surface. From this, we predict local topographic slopes for all regions on the Moon -60° to +60° at the 20m and 62m scales based on H=0.65 and σ (L0) as determined for each pixel. These results allow us to prioritize TC data analysis to maximize the scientific return from MI data during the first years of data analysis. This work was supported by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science and the National Science Foundation's East Asia Summer Institutes. References: [1] Ohtake, M. LPSC XXXIV, abs 1976, 2003. [2] McEwen, A.S. LPSC XXVII, 841-842, 1996. [3] McEwen, A. et al. LPSC XXIX, abs 1466, 1998. [4] Smith, D.E. et al., JGR, 102(E1), 1591-1611, 1997. [5] Margot, J.-L. et al. JGR, 104(E5), 11875-11882, 1999. [6] Helfenstein, P. & M.K. Shepard. Icarus, 141, 107-131, 1999.

  16. Fifth image and photometric variability in 2237 + 0305 ('Einstein Cross')

    SciTech Connect

    Racine, R. Montreal, Universite, Montreal Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Corp., Kamuela, HI )

    1991-08-01

    The paper describes the morphological and photometric characteristics of the gravitational mirage 2237 + 0305, obtained by combining CCD frames in R and I taken with HRCam at the CFHT in a 0.4 arcsec (FWHM) observation on August 23, 1990. High S/N images of the 2237 + 0305 provided precise positions and relative magnitudes for the four brighter components and for the galaxy core, and new information on the light distribution in the lensing galaxy core was obtained. Compared with Yee's (1988) photometry, the present data show components B brighter by 0.25 mag and C fainter by 0.15 mag, while the brightness of A and D and the colors of all four images are unchanged. Possible reason for the variability trends of the four components are discussed. 19 refs.

  17. A photometric study of the eclipsing binary RX Hercules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffreys, K. W.

    1980-01-01

    A new photoelectric light curve of RX Hercules, a binary system with similar components, has been analyzed using Wood's computer model. RX Her, using Popper's spectroscopic mass ratio of q = 0.8472, turned out to be composed of a dimmer AO component and a larger B9.5 component. This detached system, upon analysis of the residuals in secondary minimum, shows some asymmetry during ingress which then disappears just before secondary minimum. The eccentricity e = 0.022 determined in this study is a little larger than previously published values of e = 0.018. In combination with the spectroscopic analysis of Popper, and ubvy data of Olson and Hill and Hilditch new photometric elements for RX Her were found.

  18. The first decade of RR Lyrae space photometric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, L.

    2016-05-01

    Space-based photometric telescopes stirred up stellar astrophysics in the last decade, and RR Lyrae stars have not been an exception from that either. The long, quasi-continuous, high-precision data from MOST, CoRoT and Kepler revealed a wealth of new insights about this well-known variable class. One of the most surprising mysteries turned out to be the apparent omnipresence of a common additional mode in all RRd and RRc stars. Moreover, fundamental- mode stars seem to populate two distinct classes, one of which is characterized by the presence of additional modes and/or modulation, and another limited to strict single-mode pulsation. The presence of additional modes and multiple modulations in RRab stars allowed us to construct Petersen diagrams for these parameters: while the pulsation modes show clear structures according to period ratios, there seems to be no relation between the modulation periods themselves.

  19. A photometric and spectrographic study of BP Pegasi

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.; Mcnamara, D.H.; Joner, M.D. Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT )

    1989-11-01

    Photometric (uvby beta) and spectrographic observations of the dwarf Cepheid BP Peg are discussed. The observations are used to derive a reddening value of E(b-y) = 0.067 m. An effective temperature of 7470 K, a mean surface gravity, log g = 3.85, and a Fe/H abundance ratio of - 0.08 are obtained. Pulsation theory and stellar model sequences yield M(bol) = 1.4 m, mass = 1.85 solar masses, and age = 1.3 X 10 to the 9th yrs. Also, the radial-velocity data show a mean radial velocity of - 30 km/s and a total velocity range of 36 km/s. 14 refs.

  20. Photometric observations of the energetics of small solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, J. K.; Chapman, G. A.

    1990-01-01

    The energetics of small solar active regions was investigated using for the analysis the photometric solar images taken from July 29 to September 6, 1984 with the San Fernando Observatory's 28-cm vacuum telescope, vacuum spectroheliograph, and dual 512 element Reticon linear diode arrays. Ten small newly formed regions were observed, whose entire sunspot evolution apparently occurred within the observed disk crossing. Seven of these showed a net energy excess of a few times 10 to the 33th ergs during this time. These results are discussed in connection with the 0.1 percent decline in solar irradiance observed by the SMM/ACRIM and Nimbus 7/ERB radiometers between 1980 and 1986.

  1. A LARGE AND FAINT PHOTOMETRIC CATALOG ON THE ECLIPTIC

    SciTech Connect

    Buie, Marc W.; Trilling, David E.; Wasserman, Lawrence H.; Crudo, Richard A. E-mail: david.trilling@nau.edu E-mail: rcrudo@gmail.com

    2011-06-01

    A photometric catalog, developed for the calibration of the Deep Ecliptic Survey, is presented. The catalog contains 213,272 unique sources that were measured in V and R filters and transformed to the Johnson-Cousins systems using the Landolt standard catalog. All of the sources lie within 6{sup 0} of the ecliptic and cover all longitudes except for the densest stellar regions nearest the galactic center. Seventeen percent of the sources in the catalog are derived from three or more nights of observation. The catalog contains sources as faint as R {approx}19 but the largest fraction fall in the R {approx}15-16 (V {approx}16-17) mag range. All magnitude bins down to R = 19 have a significant fraction of objects with uncertainties {<=}0.1 mag.

  2. Photometric and polarimetric properties of the Bruderheim chondritic meteorite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, W. G.; Hilgeman, T.; Veverka, J.; Noland, M.

    1973-01-01

    Study of the spectral, photometric, and polarimetric properties of the Bruderheim olivine-hypersthene chondritic meteorite. This meteorite is representative of the most common meteoritic material recovered on earth, and, hence, could also be the most common in interplanetary space. Yet, comparison with astronomical data indicates that none of the asteroids in the main belt for which adequate observations exist can be matched with Bruderheim properties. Only the surface of the Apollo asteroid Icarus does, in light of polarization and photometry data, appear to be consistent with an ordinary chondrite composition. This suggests the possibility that this material, although common in earth-crossing orbits, is rare as a surface constituent in the main asteroid belt.

  3. A Probabilistic Approach to Classifying Supernovae UsingPhotometric Information

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsova, Natalia V.; Connolly, Brian M.

    2006-12-14

    This paper presents a novel method for determining the probability that a supernova candidate belongs to a known supernova type (such as Ia, Ibc, IIL, etc.), using its photometric information alone. It is validated with Monte Carlo, and both space- and ground-based data. We examine the application of the method to well-sampled as well as poorly sampled supernova light curves and investigate to what extent the best currently available supernova models can be used for typing supernova candidates. Central to the method is the assumption that a supernova candidate belongs to a group of objects that can be modeled; we therefore discuss possible ways of removing anomalous or less well understood events from the sample. This method is particularly advantageous for analyses where the purity of the supernova sample is of the essence, or for those where it is important to know the number of the supernova candidates of a certain type (e.g., in supernova rate studies).

  4. GAz: a genetic algorithm for photometric redshift estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Robert; Fairbairn, Malcolm; Seeburn, Navin

    2015-05-01

    We present a new approach to the problem of estimating the redshift of galaxies from photometric data. The approach uses a genetic algorithm combined with non-linear regression to model the 2SLAQ LRG data set with SDSS DR7 photometry. The genetic algorithm explores the very large space of high order polynomials while only requiring optimization of a small number of terms. We find a σrms = 0.0408 ± 0.0006 for redshifts in the range 0.4 < z < 0.7. These results are competitive with the current state-of-the-art but can be presented simply as a polynomial which does not require the user to run any code. We demonstrate that the method generalizes well to other data sets and redshift ranges by testing it on SDSS DR11 and on simulated data. For other data sets or applications the code has been made available at https://github.com/rbrthogan/GAz.

  5. Photometric and spectroscopic properties of Type II-P supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faran, T.; Poznanski, D.; Filippenko, A. V.; Chornock, R.; Foley, R. J.; Ganeshalingam, M.; Leonard, D. C.; Li, W.; Modjaz, M.; Nakar, E.; Serduke, F. J. D.; Silverman, J. M.

    2014-07-01

    We study a sample of 23 Type II plateau supernovae (SNe II-P), all observed with the same set of instruments. Analysis of their photometric evolution confirms that their typical plateau duration is 100 d with little scatter, showing a tendency to get shorter for more energetic SNe. We examine the claimed correlation between the luminosity and the rise time from explosion to plateau. We analyse their spectra, measuring typical ejecta velocities, and confirm that they follow a well-behaved power-law decline. We find indications of high-velocity material in the spectra of six of our SNe. We test different dust-extinction correction methods by asking the following - does the uniformity of the sample increase after the application of a given method? A reasonably behaved underlying distribution should become tighter after correction. No method we tested made a significant improvement.

  6. New Asteroid Shape Models Derived from the Lowell Photometric Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durech, Josef; Hanus, J.; Vanco, R.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Bowell, E.

    2013-10-01

    Asteroid shapes and spin states can be derived from their disk-integrated sparse-in-time photometry by the lightcurve inversion method. A huge amount of sparse photometry is provided by current all-sky surveys. However, the data from surveys suffer from large random and systematic errors. Oszkiewicz et al. (2011, JQSRT 112, 1919) partly removed the systematic trends in the photometry reported to the MPC and created the so-called 'Lowell photometric database'. The database consists of re-calibrated photometry for about 500,000 asteroids, with typically hundreds of brightness measurements per object. Bowell et al. (M&PS, submitted) used this database to analyze brightness variations with ecliptic longitude and estimated spin-axis longitudes for about 350,000 asteroids. In our work, we processed data for the first 10,000 numbered asteroids with the lightcurve inversion method (Kaasalainen et al., 2001, Icarus 153,37) using an enormous computational power of Asteroids@home (http://asteroidsathome.net) - a distributed computing project built on the BOINC platform. More than 10,000 users have joined the project and their computers were used for the time-consuming search for the sidereal rotation period in the sparse data. Although the photometric accuracy of the Lowell data is low 0.2 mag), we were able to find unique models for several hundred asteroids. We will present the first results based on the statistical analysis of the sample (distribution of spin vectors, for example) and we will also discuss the relevance of our approach to Gaia, LSST, ATLAS, and other future sources of asteroid photometry with sparse sampling.

  7. Photometric and kinematic studies of extragalactic globular cluster systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowell, Jessica

    Globular clusters (GCs) are old, luminous, compact collections of stars found in galaxy halos that formed during the early stages of galaxy formation. Because of this, GCs serve as excellent tracers of the formation, structure, and merger history of their host galaxies. My dissertation will examine both the photometric and kinematic properties of GC systems and their relationship to their host galaxies. In the first section, I will present the analysis of the GC systems of two spiral galaxies, NGC 891 and NGC 1055. I will discuss the photometric methods used to detect GCs using wide-field BVR imaging and to quantify the global properties of the system such as the total number of GCs and their radial distribution. My results for these two GC systems were compared to those of other galaxies. I will also present the results of spectroscopic follow-up for two giant galaxies: the S0 galaxy NGC 4594 (M104), and the elliptical galaxy NGC 3379 (M105). I measured the radial velocities of GCs in these two galaxies, and combined them with published results to determine the mass distribution and mass-to-light (M/L) ratio profile for each galaxy out to large effective radius (7-9 Re). For both galaxies, I found that the M/L profiles increase with radius and do not flatten, which suggests that the dark matter halos in these galaxies extend to the edge of my data. I also looked for evidence of rotation in the GC systems, and found that neither system exhibits significant rotation around the host galaxy. I examined the velocity dispersion profile of each GC system and found kinematic differences between the red and blue GC subpopulations. Finally, I compared my results to mass estimates for these galaxies from other kinematic tracers and considered them in the context of galaxy formation models.

  8. RSO Characterization from Photometric Data Using Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, M.; Klem, B.; Gorman, J.

    Object characterization is the description of a resident space object (RSO), its capabilities and its behavior. While astrometric data has been used extensively for object detection, location, and characterization, photometric data has been less widely applied and remains a promising area for improving RSO characterization. RSO characteristics which may influence changes in light intensity with respect to changes in viewing angle or orientation signature include geometry, orientation, components material properties, stability and other characteristics. However, most RSO characterization is presently performed manually and on an individual basis by space analysts and there is a need for efficient and automated methods to perform characterization. This paper discusses the application of machine learning techniques to characterization of RSOs in the geosynchronous altitude regime using photometric data. We develop simulated signatures in the visible spectral band of three basic RSO types, with variations in object orientation, material characteristics, size and attitude and attempt to recover these properties through object characterization techniques. We generate observations by sampling noisy measurements from the simulated signature. Next, we extract a set of features from the observations and train machine learning algorithms to classify the signatures. We consider the effectiveness of a set of binary classifiers trained to individually recognize separate cases. The results of each classifier are combined together to produce a final output characterization of an input observation. Experiments with varying levels of noise are presented, and we evaluate models with respect to classification accuracy and other criteria. The end result of this process is a unique methodology for exploiting the use usefulness and applicability of machine learning to an important space sensing and identification process. This material is based upon work supported by the United States Air Force under Contract No. FA9453-14-M-0153.

  9. Surface reconstruction from photometric normals with reference height measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Lindsay W.

    2015-06-01

    In the dome imaging system at UCL, sets of pixel-registered images can be captured, with a different direction of illumination for each image. A new method has been developed to estimate surface normals more accurately by solving the photometric normal equations as a regression over a set of illumination angles and intensities selected from the subset corresponding to the diffuse component of reflection from the object surface (the 'body colour'). The gradients are integrated to reconstruct a digital terrain map, using a Fourier transform to regularise (i.e. enforce integrability of) the gradients in the frequency domain. This yields a 3D surface that is continuous but distorted over the whole area with the height greatly amplified. The problem is that although the gradients give a good representation of the spatial frequencies in the surface, right up to the Nyquist frequency, they are not accurate for very low frequencies of a few cycles over the full object diameter. Such frequencies are represented in the Fourier plane by only a few sample points close to the (shifted) origin. Errors in these frequencies can result in 'curl' or 'heave' in the baseplane, even though the superimposed higher spatial frequencies may be accurate. The solution is to replace the inaccurate low frequencies of the photometric normals by the more accurate low frequencies of a surface constructed from a few known heights. This is conveniently achieved from the values measured by a digital height gauge by interpolating to produce a smooth `hump' and then transforming into the frequency domain by an FFT.

  10. Photometric Separation of Stellar Properties Using SDSS Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Lenz, D.D.; Newberg, H.J.; Rosner, R.; Richards, G.T.; Stoughton, C.

    1998-12-01

    Using synthetic photometry of Kurucz model spectra, we explore the colors of stars as a function of temperature, metallicity, and surface gravity with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) filters, {ital u}{prime}{ital g}{prime}{ital r}{prime}{ital i}{prime}{ital z}{prime}. The synthetic colors show qualitative agreement with the few published observations in these filters. We find that the locus of synthetic stars is basically two-dimensional for 4500 {lt} {ital T} {lt} 8000 K, which precludes simultaneous color separation of the three basic stellar characteristics we consider. Colors including {ital u}{prime} contain the most information about normal stellar properties; measurements in this filter are also important for selecting white dwarfs. We identify two different subsets of the locus in which the loci separate by either metallicity or surface gravity. For 0.5 {lt} {ital g}{prime} {minus} {ital r}{prime} {lt} 0.8 (corresponding roughly to G stars), the locus separates by metallicity; for photometric error of a few percent, we estimate metallicity to within {approximately}0.5 dex in this range. In the range {minus}0.15 {lt} {ital g}{prime} {minus} {ital r}{prime} {lt} 0.00 (corresponding roughly to A stars), the locus shows separation by surface gravity. In both cases, we show that it is advantageous to use more than two colors when determining stellar properties by color. Strategic observations in SDSS filters are required to resolve the source of a {approximately}5{percent} discrepancy between synthetic colors of Gunn-Stryker stars, Kurucz models, and external determinations of the metallicities and surface gravities. The synthetic star colors can be used to investigate the properties of any normal star and to construct analytic expressions for the photometric prediction of stellar properties in special cases. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1998.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  11. Miniature photometric stereo system for textile surface structure reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorpas, Dimitris; Kampouris, Christos; Malassiotis, Sotiris

    2013-04-01

    In this work a miniature photometric stereo system is presented, targeting the three-dimensional structural reconstruction of various fabric types. This is a supportive module to a robot system, attempting to solve the well known "laundry problem". The miniature device has been designed for mounting onto the robot gripper. It is composed of a low-cost off-the-shelf camera, operating in macro mode, and eight light emitting diodes. The synchronization between image acquisition and lighting direction is controlled by an Arduino Nano board and software triggering. The ambient light has been addressed by a cylindrical enclosure. The direction of illumination is recovered by locating the reflection or the brightest point on a mirror sphere, while a flatfielding process compensates for the non-uniform illumination. For the evaluation of this prototype, the classical photometric stereo methodology has been used. The preliminary results on a large number of textiles are very promising for the successful integration of the miniature module to the robot system. The required interaction with the robot is implemented through the estimation of the Brenner's focus measure. This metric successfully assesses the focus quality with reduced time requirements in comparison to other well accepted focus metrics. Besides the targeting application, the small size of the developed system makes it a very promising candidate for applications with space restrictions, like the quality control in industrial production lines or object recognition based on structural information and in applications where easiness in operation and light-weight are required, like those in the Biomedical field, and especially in dermatology.

  12. Simultaneous Photometric and Spectroscopic Observations of Young Solar Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saken, Jon M.; Gray, R. O.; Corbally, C. J.

    2012-05-01

    This poster will present some preliminary results, focusing on the relationship between chromospheric activity level and stellar brightness, from our long-term monitoring campaign conducting simultaneous spectroscopic and photometric observations of young stellar analogs (YSAs). Since 2007 we have been conducting spectroscopic monitoring of the Ca II H & K lines for a sample of 31 YSAs in order to better understand their activity cycles and variations, as well as the effects of young stars on their solar systems. The targets cover the spectral range of stars most likely to contain Earth analogs, F8-K2, and a broad enough range of ages, 0.3 Gyr - 1.5 Gyr, to investigate how activity level changes with stellar age. These studies are already showing possible evidence for activity cycles, large variations in starspot activity, and flaring events. In order to obtain a more complete picture of the nature of the stars' activity and examine the correlations between stellar brightness and chromospheric activity, we recently began simultaneous photometric observations of the stars in Johnson B, V and R. Some stars, such as the Sun, show a positive correlation with brightness and activity level. Yet the Lowell Observatory SSS project showed that many G0-G2 type YSAs show a negative correlation. Of particular interest for our project is the determination of which stars show either a positive or negative correlation and characterizing how this changes with stellar age. Results from the first season of observations are presented here. Starting this year we will be adding two new instruments to provide improved temporal coverage and additional data in Stromgren v and Hα. Support provided by the NSF.

  13. Carbon Stars In Andromeda. II. Demographics and Photometric Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guhathakurta, Puragra; Hamren, K.; Dorman, C.; Toloba, E.; Seth, A.; Dalcanton, J.; Nayak, A.; PHAT Collaboration; SPLASH Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    This is the second of two talks about a sample of newly-discovered carbon stars in the Andromeda galaxy (M31). As explained in the first talk, these stars were identified on the basis of their spectroscopic characteristics using Keck/DEIMOS spectra obtained as part of the Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo (SPLASH) survey. We explore the physical properties of strong and weak carbon stars using photometric data from a Hubble Space Telescope Multi-Cycle Treasury program: Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT). The PHAT data set includes deep photometry in six filters: two in the ultraviolet, two in the optical, and two in the near infrared. The carbon stars appear to be in the asymptotic giant branch stage of their evolution as evidenced by the fact that they lie above the tip of the red giant branch and are cleanly separated from normal (i.e., oxygen-rich) giants in color-magnitude diagrams. We study the spatial distribution of carbon stars in M31 and use kinematics to determine whether they belong to M31's thin disk, thick disk, or spheroid. These carbon stars serve as highly visible tracers of the intermediate-mass, intermediate-age stellar population in M31; they are important markers in the study of the star-formation history of the galaxy. This research was part of the SPLASH and PHAT collaboration. We are grateful to the National Science Foundation and NASA for funding support. AN's participation was under the auspices of UCSC's Science Internship Program.

  14. Determination of the intrinsic redox potentials of FeS centers of respiratory complex I from experimental titration curves

    PubMed Central

    Medvedev, Emile S.; Couch, Vernon A.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, Euro et al. [Biochem. 47, 3185 (2008)] have reported titration data for seven of nine FeS redox centers of complex I from E. coli. There is a significant uncertainty in the assignment of the titration data. Four of the titration curves were assigned to N1a, N1b, N6b, and N2 centers; one curve either to N3 or N7; one more either to N4 or N5; and the last one denoted Nx could not be assigned at all. In addition, the assignment of the titration data to N6b/N6a pair is also uncertain. In this paper, using our calculated interaction energies [Couch et al. BBA 1787, 1266 (2009)], we perform statistical analysis of these data, considering a variety of possible assignments, find the best fit, and determine the intrinsic redox potentials of the centers. The intrinsic potentials could be determined with uncertainty of less than ±10 mV at 95% confidence level for best fit assignments. We also find that the best agreement between theoretical and experimental titration curves is obtained with the N6b-N2 interaction equal to 71±14 or 96±26 mV depending on the N6b/N6a titration data assignment, which is stronger than was expected and may indicate a close distance of N2 center to the membrane surface. PMID:20513348

  15. Treatment discontinuation and tolerability as a function of dose and titration of duloxetine in the treatment of major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Eiji; Shirakawa, Osamu; Satoi, Yoichi; Marangell, Lauren B; Escobar, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We sought to better understand how dose and titration with duloxetine treatment may impact tolerability and treatment discontinuation in patients with major depressive disorder. Patients and methods We investigated Phase III duloxetine trials. Group 1 was a single placebo-controlled study with a 20 mg initial dose and a slow titration to 40 and 60 mg. Group 2 was a single study with a 40 mg initial dose and final “active” doses of 40 and 60 mg (5 mg control group), with 1-week titration. Group 3 consisted of eight placebo-controlled studies with starting doses of 40, 60, and 80 mg/day with minimal titration (final dose 40–120 mg/day). Tolerability was measured by rate of discontinuation due to adverse events (DCAE). Results The DCAE in Group 1 were 3.6% in the 60 mg group, 3.3% in the 40 mg group, and 3.2% in the placebo group. In Group 2, the DCAE were 15.0% in the 60 mg group, 8.1% in the 40 mg group, and 4.9% in the 5 mg group. In Group 3, the DCAE were 9.7% and 4.2% in the duloxetine and placebo groups, respectively. Conclusion This study suggests that starting dose and titration may have impacted tolerability and treatment discontinuation. A lower starting dose of duloxetine and slower titration may contribute to improving treatment tolerability for patients with major depressive disorder. PMID:26811681

  16. Direct Measurement of Trace Elemental Mercury in Hydrocarbon Matrices by Gas Chromatography with Ultraviolet Photometric Detection.

    PubMed

    Gras, Ronda; Luong, Jim; Shellie, Robert A

    2015-11-17

    We introduce a technique for the direct measurement of elemental mercury in light hydrocarbons such as natural gas. We determined elemental mercury at the parts-per-trillion level with high precision [<3% RSD (n = 20 manual injection)] using gas chromatography with ultraviolet photometric detection (GC-UV) at 254 nm. Our approach requires a small sample volume (1 mL) and does not rely on any form of sample preconcentration. The GC-UV separation employs an inert divinylbenzene porous layer open tubular column set to separate mercury from other components in the sample matrix. We incorporated a 10-port gas-sampling valve in the GC-UV system, which enables automated sampling, as well as back flushing capability to enhance system cleanliness and sample throughput. Total analysis time is <2 min, and the procedure is linear over a range of 2-83 ?g/m(3) [correlation coefficient of R(2) = 0.998] with a measured recovery of >98% over this range. PMID:26456880

  17. Estimating metallicities with isochrone fits to photometric data of open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, H.; Oliveira, A. F.; Dias, W. S.; Caetano, T. C.

    2014-10-01

    The metallicity is a critical parameter that affects the correct determination of stellar cluster's fundamental characteristics and has important implications in Galactic and Stellar evolution research. Fewer than 10% of the 2174 currently catalogued open clusters have their metallicity determined in the literature. In this work we present a method for estimating the metallicity of open clusters via non-subjective isochrone fitting using the cross-entropy global optimization algorithm applied to UBV photometric data. The free parameters distance, reddening, age, and metallicity are simultaneously determined by the fitting method. The fitting procedure uses weights for the observational data based on the estimation of membership likelihood for each star, which considers the observational magnitude limit, the density profile of stars as a function of radius from the center of the cluster, and the density of stars in multi-dimensional magnitude space. We present results of [Fe/H] for well-studied open clusters based on distinct UBV data sets. The [Fe/H] values obtained in the ten cases for which spectroscopic determinations were available in the literature agree, indicating that our method provides a good alternative to estimating [Fe/H] by using an objective isochrone fitting. Our results show that the typical precision is about 0.1 dex.

  18. Humic substance charge determination by titration with a flexible cationic polyelectrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Wen-Feng; Norde, Willem; Koopal, Luuk K.

    2011-10-01

    The anionic charge of humic substances (HS) plays a major role in the interaction of HS with other components. Therefore, the potential of the polyelectrolyte titration technique to obtain the charge density of HS in simple 1-1 electrolyte solutions has been investigated. Titrations are carried out with an automatic titrator combined with the "Mütek particle charge detector" which allows determination of the Mütek potential and the pH as a function of the added amount of titrant which is a solution of poly-diallyldimethylammonium chloride (polyDADMAC), a cationic strong polyelectrolyte. When the Mütek potential reverses its sign the iso-electric point (IEP) of the polyDADMAC-HS complex is reached. The polyDADMAC/HS mass ratio at the IEP gives information on the HS charge density and from the pH changes in solution an estimate of the charge regulation in the HS-polyDADMAC complex can be obtained. In general, for polyDADMAC-HS complexes an increase in the dissociation of the acid groups of HS is found (charge regulation). The charge regulation decreases with increasing concentration of 1-1 background electrolyte. Cation incorporation can be neglected at 1-1 electrolyte concentrations ⩽ 1 mmol L -1 and a 1-1 stoichiometry exists between the polyDADMAC and HS charge. However, at these low salt concentrations the charge regulation is substantial. A detailed analysis of purified Aldrich humic acid (PAHA) at pH 5 and a range of KCl concentrations reveals that the anionic charge of PAHA in the complex increases at 5 mmol L -1 KCl by 30% and at 150 mmol L -1 KCl by 12%. On the other hand, increasing amounts of K + become incorporated in the complex: at 5 mmol L -1 KCl 5% and at 150 mmol L -1 KCl 24% of the PAHA charge is balanced by K +. By comparing at pH 5 the mass ratios polyDADMAC/PAHA in the complex at the IEP with the theoretical mass ratios of polyDADMAC/PAHA required to neutralize PAHA in the absence of charge regulation and K + incorporation, it is found that at 50 mmol L -1 KCl the extra negative charge due to the interaction between polyDADMAC and PAHA is just compensated by K + incorporation in the complex. Therefore, a pseudo 1-1 stoichiometry exists at about 50 mmol L -1 1-1 electrolyte concentration and only at this salt concentration polyDADMAC titrations and conventional proton titrations give identical results. Most likely this is also true for other HA samples and other pH values. For FA further study is required to reveal the conditions for which polyDADMAC and proton titrations give identical results.

  19. Sweat conductivity and chloride titration for cystic fibrosis diagnosis in 3834 subjects.

    PubMed

    Lezana, José Luis; Vargas, Mario H; Karam-Bechara, José; Aldana, Ruth S; Furuya, María E Y

    2003-03-01

    Sweat test is the standard for cystic fibrosis (CF) diagnosis. Conductivity is an alternative method not yet approved, in spite of its good correlation with chloride concentration. The aim was to assess the capacity of sweat conductivity to discriminate between CF and non-CF subjects. Automated measurements of conductivity and chloride concentration were carried out on the same sweat samples from subjects with clinical suspicion of CF. Sweat samples from 3,834 subjects, median age 1.8 years (range 1 month-54 years) were analysed, and those with chloride titration >60 mmol/l were considered as CF patients (n=294). Conductivity median values in CF and non-CF subjects were 111 mmol/l (82-148) and 36 mmol/l (12-89), respectively. The Spearman correlation between chloride titration and conductivity was r=0.60 (P<0.001). The receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve showed very high agreement between two methods. The best conductivity cut-off value to diagnose CF was > or =90 mmol/l (sensitivity 99.7%, specificity 100%, positive and negative predictive values of 100% and 99.97%, respectively, and kappa=0.998). Likewise, the best conductivity cut-off value to exclude CF was <75 mmol/l. The sweat conductivity method showed good correlation with chloride titration, and accurately discriminated between subjects with and without CF. In accordance with this, CF diagnosis might be confirmed for conductivity values > or =90 mmol/l and excluded for <75 mmol/l. Values between 75 and 89 mmol/l should correspond to an equivocal range. However, more studies are needed to confirm the role of conductivity in definitive CF diagnosis. PMID:15463838

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Titration of Polyoxocations in Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Rustad, James R.

    2005-09-01

    The aqueous complex ion Al30O8(OH)56(H2O)26 18+(Al30) has a variety of bridging and terminal amphoteric surface functional groups which deprotonate over a pH range of 4–7. Their relative degree of protonation is calculated here from a series of molecular dynamics simulations in what appear to be the first molecular dynamics simulations of an acidometric titration. In these simulations, a model M30O8(OH)56(H2O)26 18+ ion is embedded in aqueous solution and titrated with hydroxide ions in the presence of a charge-compensating background of perchlorate ions. Comparison with titration of a model M13O4(OH)24(H2O)12 7+ reveals that the M30 ion is more acidic than the M13 ion due to the presence of acidic nH2O functional groups. The higher acidities of the functional groups on the M30 ion appear to result from enhanced hydration. Metal–oxygen bond lengths are calculated for the ion in solution, an isolated ion in the gas phase, and in its crystalline hydrate sulfate salt. Gas-phase and crystalline bond lengths do not correlate well with those calculated in solution. The acidities do not relate in any simple way to the number of metals coordinating the surface functional group or the M-O bond length. Moreover, the calculated acidity in solution does not correlate with proton affinities calculated for the isolated ion in the absence of solvent. It is concluded that the search for simple indicators of structure–reactivity relationships at the level of individual reactive sites faces major limitations, unless specific information on the hydration states of the functional groups is available.