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Sample records for photonic crystal fibre

  1. Photonic crystal fibres in biomedical investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Skibina, Yu S; Tuchin, Valerii V; Beloglazov, V I; Shteinmaeer, G; Betge, I L; Wedell, R; Langhoff, N

    2011-04-30

    The state of the art in the field of design and study of photonic crystal fibres for biomedical applications is considered and some original results recently obtained by the authors are presented. Optical properties of the fibres that offer prospects of their wide application as biological sensors, 'labs-on-a-chip', and facilities of electromagnetic radiation control in a wide range of wavelengths aimed at designing novel biomedical instrumentation are considered (optical technologies in biophysics and medicine)

  2. Photon irradiation response of photonic crystal fibres and flat fibres at radiation therapy doses.

    PubMed

    Hashim, S; Ibrahim, S A; Che Omar, S S; Alajerami, Y S M; Saripan, M I; Noor, N M; Ung, N M; Mahdiraji, G A; Bradley, D A; Alzimami, K

    2014-08-01

    Radiation effects of photon irradiation in pure Photonic Crystal Fibres (PCF) and Flat fibres (FF) are still much less investigated in thermoluminescense dosimetry (TLD). We have reported the TL response of PCF and FF subjected to 6 MV photon irradiation. The proposed dosimeter shows good linearity at doses ranging from 1 to 4 Gy. The small size of these detectors points to its use as a dosimeter at megavoltage energies, where better tissue-equivalence and the Bragg-Gray cavity theory prevails. PMID:24858954

  3. Flying particle sensors in hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, D. S.; Schmidt, O. A.; Euser, T. G.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2015-07-01

    Optical fibre sensors make use of diverse physical effects to measure parameters such as strain, temperature and electric field. Here we introduce a new class of reconfigurable fibre sensor, based on a ‘flying-particle’ optically trapped inside a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre and illustrate its use in electric field and temperature sensing with high spatial resolution. The electric field distribution near the surface of a multi-element electrode is measured with a resolution of ∼100 μm by monitoring changes in the transmitted light signal due to the transverse displacement of a charged silica microparticle trapped within the hollow core. Doppler-based velocity measurements are used to map the gas viscosity, and thus the temperature, along a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre. The flying-particle approach represents a new paradigm in fibre sensors, potentially allowing multiple physical quantities to be mapped with high positional accuracy over kilometre-scale distances.

  4. Nonlinear Optics and Solitons in Photonic Crystal Fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skryabin, Dmitry V.; Wadsworth, William J.

    The fibre optics revolution in communication technologies followed the 1950's demonstration of the glass fibres with dielectric cladding [1]. Transmission applications of fibre optics have become a dominant modern day technology not least because nonlinearities present in - or introduced into - glass and enhanced by the tight focusing of the fibre modes allow for numerous light processing techniques, such as amplification, frequency conversion, pulse shaping, and many others. For these reasons, and because of the rich fundamental physics behind it, nonlinear fibre optics has become a blossoming discipline in its own right [1]. The 1990's witnessed another important development in fibre optics. Once again it came from a new approach to the fibre cladding, comprising a periodic pattern of air holes separated by glass membranes forming a photonic crystal structure [2, 3]. This prompted the name Photonic Crystal Fibres (PCFs). The fascinating story behind the invention of PCF and research into various fibre designs can be found, e.g., in [4]. Our aim here is to review the role played by PCFs in nonlinear and quantum optics, which is becoming the mainstream of the PCF related research and applications. Our focus will be on the areas where PCFs have brought to life effects and applications which were previously difficult, impossible to observe or simply not thought about.

  5. [INVITED] New perspectives in photonic crystal fibre sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villatoro, Joel; Zubia, Joseba

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we analyse the recent advances on sensors based on photonic crystal fibres(PCFs) and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. Some innovative approaches to overcome the main limitations of PCF sensors are also analysed. In addition, we discuss some opportunities and challenges in PCF sensing for the coming years.

  6. Guidance in Kagome-like photonic crystal fibres I: analysis of an ideal fibre structure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Pearce, Greg J; Birks, Timothy A; Bird, David M

    2011-03-28

    Propagation of light in a square-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibre is analysed as a model of guidance in a class of photonic crystal fibres that exhibit broad-band guidance without photonic bandgaps. A scalar governing equation is used and analytic solutions based on transfer matrices are developed for the full set of modes. It is found that an exponentially localised fundamental mode exists for a wide range of frequencies. These analytic solutions of an idealised structure will form the basis for analysis of guidance in a realistic structure in a following paper. PMID:21451720

  7. Self-phase modulation of femtosecond pulses in hollow photonic-crystal fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Konorov, Stanislav O; Zheltikov, Aleksei M; Sidorov-Biryukov, D A; Bugar, I; Chorvat, D J; Beloglazov, V I; Skibina, N B; Shcherbakov, Andrei V; Chorvat, D; Mel'nikov, L A

    2004-01-31

    Self-phase modulation of femtosecond laser pulses in hollow-core photonic-crystal fibres is experimentally studied. Photonic-crystal fibres allowing single-mode waveguide regimes of nonlinear-optical interactions to be implemented with maximum transmission for 800-nm femtosecond pulses are designed and fabricated. A radical enhancement of self-phase modulation is demonstrated for submicrojoule femtosecond pulses of Ti:sapphire-laser radiation propagating through hollow photonic-crystal fibres. (optical fibres)

  8. Guidance in Kagome-like photonic crystal fibres II: perturbation theory for a realistic fibre structure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Bird, David M

    2011-03-28

    A perturbation theory is developed that treats a localised mode embedded within a continuum of states. The method is applied to a model rectangular hollow-core photonic crystal fibre structure, where the basic modes are derived from an ideal, scalar model and the perturbation terms include vector effects and structural difference between the ideal and realistic structures. An expression for the attenuation of the fundamental mode due to interactions with cladding modes is derived, and results are presented for a rectangular photonic crystal fibre structure. Attenuations calculated in this way are in good agreement with numerical simulations. The origin of the guidance in our model structure is explained through this quantitative analysis. Further perspectives are obtained through investigating the influence of fibre parameters on the attenuation. PMID:21451721

  9. An ion trap built with photonic crystal fibre technology.

    PubMed

    Lindenfelser, F; Keitch, B; Kienzler, D; Bykov, D; Uebel, P; Schmidt, M A; Russell, P St J; Home, J P

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a surface-electrode ion trap fabricated using techniques transferred from the manufacture of photonic-crystal fibres. This provides a relatively straightforward route for realizing traps with an electrode structure on the 100 micron scale with high optical access. We demonstrate the basic functionality of the trap by cooling a single ion to the quantum ground state, allowing us to measure a heating rate from the ground state of 787 ± 24 quanta/s. Variation of the fabrication procedure used here may provide access to traps in this geometry with trap scales between 100 μm and 10 μm. PMID:25832211

  10. An ion trap built with photonic crystal fibre technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenfelser, F. Keitch, B.; Kienzler, D.; Home, J. P.; Bykov, D.; Uebel, P.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2015-03-15

    We demonstrate a surface-electrode ion trap fabricated using techniques transferred from the manufacture of photonic-crystal fibres. This provides a relatively straightforward route for realizing traps with an electrode structure on the 100 micron scale with high optical access. We demonstrate the basic functionality of the trap by cooling a single ion to the quantum ground state, allowing us to measure a heating rate from the ground state of 787 ± 24 quanta/s. Variation of the fabrication procedure used here may provide access to traps in this geometry with trap scales between 100 μm and 10 μm.

  11. Numerical simulation of photonic-crystal tellurite-tungstate glass fibres used in parametric fibre devices

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, V O; Plotnichenko, V G; Nazaryants, V O; Dianov, Evgenii M

    2006-01-31

    Using the MIT Photonic-Bands Package to calculate fully vectorial definite-mode eigenmodes of Maxwell's equations with periodic boundary conditions in a plane-wave basis, light propagation is simulated in fibres formed by point defects in two-dimensional periodic lattices of cylindrical holes in a glass or of glass tubes. The holes and gaps between tubes are assumed filled with air. Single-site hexagonal and square lattices are considered, which were most often studied both theoretically and experimentally and are used to fabricate silica photonic-crystal fibres. As a defect, a single vacancy is studied - the absent lattice site (one hole in a glass or one of the tubes are filled with the same glass) and a similar vacancy with nearest neighbours representing holes of a larger diameter. The obtained solutions are analysed by the method of effective mode area. The dependences of the effective refractive index and dispersion of the fundamental mode on the geometrical parameters of a fibre are found. The calculations are performed for tellurite-tungstate 80TeO{sub 2}-20WO{sub 3} glass fibres taking into account the frequency dispersion of the refractive index. (optical fibres)

  12. Broadband single-photon-level memory in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprague, M. R.; Michelberger, P. S.; Champion, T. F. M.; England, D. G.; Nunn, J.; Jin, X.-M.; Kolthammer, W. S.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.; Walmsley, I. A.

    2014-04-01

    Storing information encoded in light is critical for realizing optical buffers for all-optical signal processing and quantum memories for quantum information processing. These proposals require efficient interaction between atoms and a well-defined optical mode. Photonic crystal fibres can enhance light-matter interactions and have engendered a broad range of nonlinear effects; however, the storage of light has proven elusive. Here, we report the first demonstration of an optical memory in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre. We store gigahertz-bandwidth light in the hyperfine coherence of caesium atoms at room temperature using a far-detuned Raman interaction. We demonstrate a signal-to-noise ratio of 2.6:1 at the single-photon level and a memory efficiency of 27 +/- 1%. Our results demonstrate the potential of a room-temperature fibre-integrated optical memory for implementing local nodes of quantum information networks.

  13. Optical harmonic generation in hollow-core photonic-crystal fibres: analysis of optical losses and phase-matching conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Naumov, A N; Zheltikov, Aleksei M

    2002-02-28

    We consider hollow-core fibres with a microstructure photonic-crystal cladding, which open a unique opportunity of implementing nonlinear-optical interactions of waveguide modes with transverse sizes on the order of several microns in the gas phase. Phase-matching conditions for optical harmonic generation can be improved in higher waveguide modes of hollow-core photonic-crystal fibres by optimising parameters of the gas medium filling the fibre and characteristics of the fibre. (optical fibres)

  14. Extending of flat normal dispersion profile in all-solid soft glass nonlinear photonic crystal fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siwicki, Bartłomiej; Kasztelanic, Rafał; Klimczak, Mariusz; Cimek, Jarosław; Pysz, Dariusz; Stępień, Ryszard; Buczyński, Ryszard

    2016-06-01

    The bandwidth of coherent supercontinuum generated in optical fibres is strongly determined by the all-normal dispersion characteristic of the fibre. We investigate all-normal dispersion limitations in all-solid oxide-based soft glass photonic crystal fibres with various relative inclusion sizes and lattice constants. The influence of material dispersion on fibre dispersion characteristics for a selected pair of glasses is also examined. A relation between the material dispersion of the glasses and the fibre dispersion has been described. We determined the parameters which limit the maximum range of flattened all-normal dispersion profile achievable for the considered pair of heavy-metal-oxide soft glasses.

  15. In-line microfluidic integration of photonic crystal fibres as a highly sensitive refractometer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chuang; Tse, Ming-Leung Vincent; Liu, Zhengyong; Guan, Bai-Ou; Zhang, A Ping; Lu, Chao; Tam, Hwa-Yaw

    2014-11-01

    Photonic crystal fibres appear to be an ideal platform for the realisation of novel optofluidic devices and sensors due to their waveguide nature and microstructured architecture. In this paper, we present the fabrication and characterisation of an in-line photonic crystal fibre microfluidic refractometer enabled by a C-shaped fibre. The C-shaped fibre spliced in-between the photonic crystal fibre and the single-mode fibre allows simultaneous in-line optical signal delivery and analyte fluid feeding. Through an arc discharge pre-treatment technique, we successfully achieve selective exploitation of only the central two channels of the photonic crystal fibre for microfluidic sensing. After constructing a Sagnac interferometer, a highly sensitive refractometer with a sensitivity of 8699 nm per RIU was achieved experimentally; this agrees very well with the theoretical value of 8675 nm per RIU. As a demonstration for label-free optical sensing application, the refractometer was used to measure the concentration of NaCl solution with a sensitivity of 15.08 nm/(1 wt%) and a detection limit of 2.3 × 10(-3) wt% (23 ppm). PMID:25142213

  16. Compact, stable and efficient all-fibre gas cells using hollow-core photonic crystal fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benabid, F.; Couny, F.; Knight, J. C.; Birks, T. A.; Russell, P. St J.

    2005-03-01

    Gas-phase materials are used in a variety of laser-based applications-for example, in high-precision frequency measurement, quantum optics and nonlinear optics. Their full potential has however not been realized because of the lack of a suitable technology for creating gas cells that can guide light over long lengths in a single transverse mode while still offering a high level of integration in a practical and compact set-up or device. As a result, solid-phase materials are still often favoured, even when their performance compares unfavourably with gas-phase systems. Here we report the development of all-fibre gas cells that meet these challenges. Our structures are based on gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibres, in which we have recently demonstrated substantially enhanced stimulated Raman scattering, and which exhibit high performance, excellent long-term pressure stability and ease of use. To illustrate the practical potential of these structures, we report two different devices: a hydrogen-filled cell for efficient generation of rotational Raman scattering using only quasi-continuous-wave laser pulses; and acetylene-filled cells, which we use for absolute frequency-locking of diode lasers with very high signal-to-noise ratios. The stable performance of these compact gas-phase devices could permit, for example, gas-phase laser devices incorporated in a `credit card' or even in a laser pointer.

  17. Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of atoms in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okaba, Shoichi; Takano, Tetsushi; Benabid, Fetah; Bradley, Tom; Vincetti, Luca; Maizelis, Zakhar; Yampol'Skii, Valery; Nori, Franco; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2014-06-01

    Unlike photons, which are conveniently handled by mirrors and optical fibres without loss of coherence, atoms lose their coherence via atom-atom and atom-wall interactions. This decoherence of atoms deteriorates the performance of atomic clocks and magnetometers, and also hinders their miniaturization. Here we report a novel platform for precision spectroscopy. Ultracold strontium atoms inside a kagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibre are transversely confined by an optical lattice to prevent atoms from interacting with the fibre wall. By confining at most one atom in each lattice site, to avoid atom-atom interactions and Doppler effect, a 7.8-kHz-wide spectrum is observed for the 1S0-3P1(m=0) transition. Atoms singly trapped in a magic lattice in hollow-core photonic crystal fibres improve the optical depth while preserving atomic coherence time.

  18. Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of atoms in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    PubMed Central

    Okaba, Shoichi; Takano, Tetsushi; Benabid, Fetah; Bradley, Tom; Vincetti, Luca; Maizelis, Zakhar; Yampol'skii, Valery; Nori, Franco; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    Unlike photons, which are conveniently handled by mirrors and optical fibres without loss of coherence, atoms lose their coherence via atom–atom and atom–wall interactions. This decoherence of atoms deteriorates the performance of atomic clocks and magnetometers, and also hinders their miniaturization. Here we report a novel platform for precision spectroscopy. Ultracold strontium atoms inside a kagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibre are transversely confined by an optical lattice to prevent atoms from interacting with the fibre wall. By confining at most one atom in each lattice site, to avoid atom–atom interactions and Doppler effect, a 7.8-kHz-wide spectrum is observed for the 1S0−3P1(m=0) transition. Atoms singly trapped in a magic lattice in hollow-core photonic crystal fibres improve the optical depth while preserving atomic coherence time. PMID:24934478

  19. Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of atoms in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre.

    PubMed

    Okaba, Shoichi; Takano, Tetsushi; Benabid, Fetah; Bradley, Tom; Vincetti, Luca; Maizelis, Zakhar; Yampol'skii, Valery; Nori, Franco; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    Unlike photons, which are conveniently handled by mirrors and optical fibres without loss of coherence, atoms lose their coherence via atom-atom and atom-wall interactions. This decoherence of atoms deteriorates the performance of atomic clocks and magnetometers, and also hinders their miniaturization. Here we report a novel platform for precision spectroscopy. Ultracold strontium atoms inside a kagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibre are transversely confined by an optical lattice to prevent atoms from interacting with the fibre wall. By confining at most one atom in each lattice site, to avoid atom-atom interactions and Doppler effect, a 7.8-kHz-wide spectrum is observed for the (1)S0-(3)P1(m=0) transition. Atoms singly trapped in a magic lattice in hollow-core photonic crystal fibres improve the optical depth while preserving atomic coherence time. PMID:24934478

  20. Transmission spectra and optical losses of infiltration-modified hollow photonic-crystal fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Konorov, Stanislav O; Serebryannikov, E E; Zheltikova, D A; Mitrokhin, V P; Sidorov-Biryukov, D A; Fedotov, Andrei B; Zheltikov, Aleksei M; Kilin, Sergei Ya

    2005-09-30

    Transmission spectra and optical losses of hollow photonic-crystal fibres (PCFs) filled with liquid-phase materials are studied. For hollow PCFs with a cladding period of about 5 {mu}m and a core diameter of about 50 {mu}m, infiltration with water increases optical losses by approximately two orders of magnitude relative to the optical losses of the same PCF before infiltration. (optical fibres)

  1. Transient dynamic distributed strain sensing using photonic crystal fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samad, Shafeek A.; Hegde, G. M.; Roy Mahapatra, D.; Hanagud, S.

    2014-02-01

    A technique to determine the strain field in one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal (PC) involving high strain rate, high temperature around shock or ballistic impact is proposed. Transient strain sensing is important in aerospace and other structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. We consider a MEMS based smart sensor design with photonic crystal integrated on a silicon substrate for dynamic strain correlation. Deeply etched silicon rib waveguides with distributed Bragg reflectors are suitable candidates for miniaturization of sensing elements, replacing the conventional FBG. Main objective here is to investigate the effect of non-uniform strain localization on the sensor output. Computational analysis is done to determine the static and dynamic strain sensing characteristics of the 1D photonic crystal based sensor. The structure is designed and modeled using Finite Element Method. Dynamic localization of strain field is observed. The distributed strain field is used to calculated the PC waveguide response. The sensitivity of the proposed sensor is estimated to be 0.6 pm/μɛ.

  2. Photonic crystal fibre enables short-wavelength two-photon laser scanning fluorescence microscopy with fura-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Gail; Riis, Erling

    2004-10-01

    We report on a novel and compact reliable laser source capable of short-wavelength two-photon laser scanning fluorescence microscopy based on soliton self-frequency shift effects in photonic crystal fibre. We demonstrate the function of the system by performing two-photon microscopy of smooth muscle cells and cardiac myocytes from the rat pulmonary vein and Chinese hamster ovary cells loaded with the fluorescent calcium indicator fura-2/AM.

  3. The use of hollow-core photonic crystal fibres as biological sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Malinin, A V; Skibina, Yu S; Tuchin, Valerii V; Chainikov, M V; Beloglazov, V I; Silokhin, I Yu; Zanishevskaya, A A; Dubrovskii, V A; Dolmashkin, A A

    2011-04-30

    The results of development and study of a new type of a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre with radially increasing diameter of capillaries in the structured cladding are presented. The waveguide possesses a specific transmission spectrum and can be used as an efficient analyser of biological media. (optical technologies in biophysics and medicine)

  4. Thermoluminescence Response of Ge-Doped Cylindrical-, Flat- and Photonic Crystal Silica-Fibres to Electron and Photon Radiation.

    PubMed

    Entezam, A; Khandaker, M U; Amin, Y M; Ung, N M; Bradley, D A; Maah, J; Safari, M J; Moradi, F

    2016-01-01

    Study has been made of the thermoluminescence (TL) response of silica-based Ge-doped cylindrical, flat and photonic crystal fibres (referred to herein as PCF-collapsed) to electron (6, 12 and 20 MeV) and photon (6, 10 MV) irradiation and 1.25 MeV γ-rays, for doses from 0.1 Gy to 100 Gy. The electron and photon irradiations were delivered through use of a Varian Model 2100C linear accelerator located at the University of Malaya Medical Centre and γ-rays delivered from a 60Co irradiator located at the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL), Malaysian Nuclear Agency. Tailor-made to be of various dimensions and dopant concentrations (6-10% Ge), the fibres were observed to provide TL yield linear with radiation dose, reproducibility being within 1-5%, with insensitivity to energy and angular variation. The sensitivity dependency of both detectors with respect to field size follows the dependency of the output factors. For flat fibres exposed to 6 MV X-rays, the 6% Ge-doped fibre provided the greatest TL yield while PCF-collapsed showed a response 2.4 times greater than that of the 6% Ge-doped flat fibres. The response of cylindrical fibres increased with core size. The fibres offer uniform response, high spatial resolution and sensitivity, providing the basis of promising TL systems for radiotherapy applications. PMID:27149115

  5. Thermoluminescence Response of Ge-Doped Cylindrical-, Flat- and Photonic Crystal Silica-Fibres to Electron and Photon Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Entezam, A.; Khandaker, M. U.; Amin, Y. M.; Ung, N. M.; Bradley, D. A.; Maah, J.; Safari, M. J.; Moradi, F.

    2016-01-01

    Study has been made of the thermoluminescence (TL) response of silica-based Ge-doped cylindrical, flat and photonic crystal fibres (referred to herein as PCF-collapsed) to electron (6, 12 and 20 MeV) and photon (6, 10 MV) irradiation and 1.25 MeV γ-rays, for doses from 0.1 Gy to 100 Gy. The electron and photon irradiations were delivered through use of a Varian Model 2100C linear accelerator located at the University of Malaya Medical Centre and γ-rays delivered from a 60Co irradiator located at the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL), Malaysian Nuclear Agency. Tailor-made to be of various dimensions and dopant concentrations (6–10% Ge), the fibres were observed to provide TL yield linear with radiation dose, reproducibility being within 1–5%, with insensitivity to energy and angular variation. The sensitivity dependency of both detectors with respect to field size follows the dependency of the output factors. For flat fibres exposed to 6 MV X-rays, the 6% Ge-doped fibre provided the greatest TL yield while PCF-collapsed showed a response 2.4 times greater than that of the 6% Ge-doped flat fibres. The response of cylindrical fibres increased with core size. The fibres offer uniform response, high spatial resolution and sensitivity, providing the basis of promising TL systems for radiotherapy applications. PMID:27149115

  6. Photochemistry on soft-glass hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubillas, Ana M.; Jiang, Xin; Euser, Tijmen G.; Taccardi, Nicola; Etzold, Bastian J. M.; Wasserscheid, Peter; Russell, Philip St. J.

    2014-05-01

    Hollow-core photonic crystal fibre (HC-PCF) offers strong light confinement and long interaction lengths in an optofluidic channel. These unique advantages have motivated its recent use as a highly efficient and versatile microreactor for liquid-phase photochemistry and catalysis. In this work, we use a soft-glass HC-PCF to carry out photochemical experiments in a high-index solvent such as toluene. The high-intensity and strong confinement in the fibre is demonstrated to enhance the performance of a proof-of-principle photolysis reaction.

  7. Fabrication of silica hollow core photonic crystal fibres for Er:YAG surgical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urich, Artur; Maier, Robert R. J.; Knight, Jonathan C.; Mangan, Brian J.; Renshaw, Steven; Hand, Duncan P.; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    In this work we present the fabrication of silica hollow core photonic crystal fibres (HC-PCF) with guidance at 2.94μm. As light is confined inside the hollow core with a very small overlap of the guided E-M wave with the fibre material, the high intrinsic loss of silica at these mid-infrared wavelengths can be overcome. The band gap effect is achieved by a periodic structure made out of air and fused silica. As silica is bio-inert, chemically stable and mechanically robust, these fibres have potential advantages over other multi-component, non-silica optical fibres designed to guide in this wavelength regime. These fibres have a relatively small diameter, low bend sensitivity and single-mode like guidance which are ideal conditions for delivering laser light down a highly flexible fibre. Consequently they provide a potential alternative to existing surgical laser delivery methods such as articulated arms and lend themselves to endoscopy and other minimally invasive surgical procedures. In particular, we present the characterisation and performance of these fibres at 2.94 μm, the wavelength of an Er:YAG laser. This laser is widely used in surgery since the wavelength overlaps with an absorption band of water which results in clean, non-cauterised cuts. However, the practical implementation of these types of fibres for surgical applications is a significant challenge. Therefore we also report on progress made in developing hermetically sealed end tips for these hollow core fibres to avoid contamination. This work ultimately prepares the route towards a robust, practical delivery system for this wavelength.

  8. Materials growth and processing in the capillaries of photonic crystal fibres: towards the lab-in-a-fibre protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konidakis, Ioannis; Konstantaki, Maria; Pissadakis, Stavros

    2014-03-01

    We review results on the growth of glassy and crystalline materials inside photonics crystal fibres (PCFs), seeking specific sensing and light confining properties. Initial results refer to the infiltration of silver metaphosphate (AgPO3) glass inside PCFs, and the subsequent thermal poling of those composite PCFs for attaining plasmon resonance characteristics. Accordingly, the wet chemistry growth and characterization of crystalline ZnO layers inside PCFs is shown also. Finally, the use of laser etching technique for the inscription of relief periodic Bragg gratings on the capillary walls of a solid core, all silica glass PCF that exhibited demarcation temperatures near 1200 °C is presented. Ongoing work refers to the exploitation of the aforementioned PCFs for developing sensing, bio-sensing and actuating optofluidic devices.

  9. Refinement and design of rare earth doped photonic crystal fibre amplifier using an ANN approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mescia, Luciano; Fornarelli, Girolamo; Magarielli, Donato; Prudenzano, Francesco; De Sario, Marco; Vacca, Francesco

    2011-10-01

    A number of numerical and analytical methods with different complexity can be exploited to analyse fibre amplifiers. Conventional approaches make the refinement and design of the devices extremely time consuming, especially when several design parameters have to be simultaneously optimised to obtain the desired performance in terms of gain and noise figure. In order to tackle this issue, a method based on an artificial neural network to perform the refinement and design of erbium doped photonic crystal fibre amplifiers is proposed in this paper. The capability of the neural network to capture the nonlinear functional link among the physical and geometrical characteristics of the fibre amplifier and its gain and noise figure is exploited. In the refinement it is employed to determine the optimal values of the parameters maximising the gain. In the design, it is used to develop an inverse problem solver in order to determine the values of the parameters corresponding to the known values of gain. Numerical results show that the proposed approach finds the refinement/design parameters in good accordance with respect to the conventional one.

  10. Reinforced concrete structural corrosion monitoring using Hi-Bi photonic crystal fibres in a fiber loop structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, M.; McCague, C.; Fabian, M.; Jaroszewicz, L.; Mergo, P.; Lopez-Amo, M.; Grattan, K. T. V.; Sun, T.

    2014-05-01

    A novel sensing approach has been developed for in-situ corrosion monitoring of steel in reinforced concrete structures, using a fibre loop interferometer sensor system based on a Hi-Bi photonic crystal fibre (PCF). To do so an accurate fibre alignment procedure has been implemented in order to improve the performance of the sensor system embedded into the concrete structure when it is subjected to an accelerated corrosion test. The positive results obtained have confirmed the effectiveness of such a sensor system for applications in structural health monitoring.

  11. Analysis of a highly birefringent asymmetric photonic crystal fibre based on a surface plasmon resonance sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Wang, Famei; Zheng, Shijie; Sun, Tao; Lv, Jingwei; Liu, Qiang; Yang, Lin; Mu, Haiwei; Chu, Paul K.

    2016-07-01

    A highly birefringent photonic crystal fibre is proposed and characterized based on a surface plasmon resonance sensor. The birefringence of the sensor is numerically analyzed by the finite-element method. In the numerical simulation, the resonance wavelength can be directly positioned at this birefringence abrupt change point and the depth of the abrupt change of birefringence reflects the intensity of excited surface plasmon. Consequently, the novel approach can accurately locate the resonance peak of the system without analyzing the loss spectrum. Simulated average sensitivity is as high as 1131 nm/RIU, corresponding to a resolution of 1 × 10-4 RIU in this sensor. Therefore, results obtained via the approach not only show polarization independence and less noble metal consumption, but also reveal better performance in terms of accuracy and computation efficiency.

  12. Temporal localized structures in photonic crystal fibre resonators and their spontaneous symmetry-breaking instability.

    PubMed

    Bahloul, L; Cherbi, L; Hariz, A; Tlidi, M

    2014-10-28

    We investigate analytically and numerically the formation of temporal localized structures (TLSs) in an all photonic crystal fibre resonator. These dissipative structures consist of isolated or randomly distributed peaks in a uniform background of the intensity profile. The number of peaks and their temporal distribution are determined solely by the initial conditions. They exhibit multistability behaviour for a finite range of parameters. A weakly nonlinear analysis is performed in the neighbourhood of the first threshold associated with the modulational instability. We consider the regime where the instability is not degenerate. We show that fourth-order dispersion affects the threshold associated with the formation of bright TLSs. We estimate both analytically and numerically the linear and nonlinear corrections to the velocity of moving temporal structures induced by spontaneous broken reflection symmetry mediated by third-order dispersion. Finally, we show that third-order dispersion affects the threshold associated with the moving TLSs. PMID:25246684

  13. Optimal design of broadband photonic crystal fibre long-period gratings for evanescent absorption sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanka, Jiri

    2010-04-01

    An index-guiding solid core photonic crystal fibre (PCF) is numerically optimized to achieve through an inscribed long period grating (LPG) broadband coupling between the fundamental mode (LP01) and the first-order symmetric cladding (LP02-like) mode. The vectorial finite element method and the Nelder-Mead simplex method are used for the optimization of the PCF to get for LP01-LP02 mode coupling the phase matching curve with the dispersion turning point located in the center of a selected range of resonant wavelengths. The bandwidth of a LPG close to the dispersion turning point, where the resonance condition is nearly matched for multiple wavelengths, is large. An evanescent power overlap of the LP02 cladding mode with the PCF's air holes is an order of magnitude higher then that of the LP01 mode. We optimize the PCF with only five rings of hexagonally arrayed air holes. By enlarging the air holes in the outmost ring the LP02 mode confinement loss is reduced to a negligible value which allows to lengthen the cladding mode interaction length with an analyte infiltrated into the air holes.

  14. Supercontinuum generation by using photonic crystal fibres made from borosilicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chillcce, E. F.; Ramos-Gonzales, R. E.; Cruz, Flavio C.; Cordeiro, C. M. B.; Barbosa, L. C.

    2011-05-01

    In this work, we present results of broadband emissions ranging from 800 to 1500 nm generated by using Photonic Crystal Fibres (PCFs) made from borosilicate glasses. The borosilicate PCFs, fabricated by the Stack-and-Draw technique, consist of five hollow ring periods around the solid core. The solid core is based on the lead-doped borosilicate glass. The PCFs with their external diameters ranging from about 3.8 to 6 microns were excited with a commercial pulsed diode laser (wavelength at 1065 nm, Power <100mW). The PCF length used to generate broadband emissions was less than a meter. The Optical Attenuation of these PCFs was measured via the Cut-Back method and their Dispersion Spectra were calculated by using the Finite Element Method (FEM) and the scanning electronic microscope images. Finally, we believe that short borosilicate PCFs with lead-doped cores (related to high non-linear properties) may be used in broadband emissions, supercontinuum generations or other non-linear applications.

  15. Ge and B doped collapsed photonic crystal optical fibre, a potential TLD material for low dose measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozaila, Z. Siti; Alyahyawi, Amjad; Khandaker, M. U.; Amin, Y. M.; Bradley, D. A.; Maah, M. J.

    2016-09-01

    Offering a number of advantageous features, tailor-made silica-based fibres are attracting attention as thermoluminesence (TL) dosimeters. We have performed a detailed study of the TL properties of Ge-doped and Ge-B-doped collapsed photonic crystal fibres (PCFc), most particularly with regard to their potential use for the environmental and X-ray diagnostic dose monitoring. Extrinsic doping and defects generated by strain at the fused inner walls of the collapsed fibres result in the PCFc-Ge-B and PCFc-Ge fibres producing markedly greater TL response than that of the phosphor-based dosimeter TLD-100, by some 9 and 7×, respectively. The linearity of TL yield has been investigated for X-ray doses from 0.5 mGy to 10 mGy. For a dose of 1 Gy, the energy response of the PCFs and TLD-100 has been studied using X-rays generated at accelerating potentials from 20 kVp through to 200 kVp and for the 1.25 MeV mean gamma-ray energy from 60Co. The effective atomic number , Zeffof PCFc-Ge and PCFc-Ge-B was estimated to be 12.5 and 14.4, respectively. Some 35 days post-irradiation, fading of the stored TL signal from PCFc-Ge-B and PCFc-Ge were found to be ∼15% and 20% respectively, with mean loss in TL emission of 0.4-0.5% per day. The present doped-silica collapsed PCFs provide greatly improved TLD performance compared to that of previous fibre designs and phosphor-based TLD-100.

  16. Multisoliton supercontinuum from a photonic-crystal fibre as a source of frequency-tunable megawatt femtosecond pulses in the infrared

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, I V; Fedotov, Andrei B; Zheltikov, Aleksei M; Voronin, A A; Shevandin, V S; Dukel'skii, K V

    2009-07-31

    We demonstrate a new method of generation of frequency-tunable megawatt femtosecond pulses in the infrared based on multisoliton supercontinuum generation in a large-mode-area photonic-crystal fibre (PCF) followed by the temporal compression of the PCF output. Photonic-crystal fibres with a core area of about 710 {mu}m{sup 2} are employed to convert microjoule femtosecond laser pulses with a spectrum centred at 1.39 {mu}m into pulses with a central wavelength of 1520 nm, a pulse width of 210 fs, and a peak power of about 1 MW. (special issue devoted to the 80th birthday of S.A. Akhmanov)

  17. Integration of a 3D hydrogel matrix within a hollow core photonic crystal fibre for DNA probe immobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutowska, Monika S.; Garcia Gunning, Fatima C.; Kivlehan, Francine; Moore, Eric; Brennan, Des; Galvin, Paul; Ellis, Andrew D.

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the integration of a 3D hydrogel matrix within a hollow core photonic crystal fibre (HC-PCF). In addition, we also show the fluorescence of Cy5-labelled DNA molecules immobilized within the hydrogel formed in two different types of HC-PCF. The 3D hydrogel matrix is designed to bind with the amino groups of biomolecules using an appropriate cross-linker, providing higher sensitivity and selectivity than the standard 2D coverage, enabling a greater number of probe molecules to be available per unit area. The HC-PCFs, on the other hand, can be designed to maximize the capture of fluorescence to improve sensitivity and provide longer interaction lengths. This could enable the development of fibre-based point-of-care and remote systems, where the enhanced sensitivity would relax the constraints placed on sources and detectors. In this paper, we will discuss the formation of such polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels within a HC-PCF, including their optical properties such as light propagation and auto-fluorescence.

  18. Delivery of high energy Er:YAG pulsed laser light at 2.94 µm through a silica hollow core photonic crystal fibre.

    PubMed

    Urich, A; Maier, R R J; Mangan, B J; Renshaw, S; Knight, J C; Hand, D P; Shephard, J D

    2012-03-12

    In this paper the delivery of high power Er:YAG laser pulses through a silica hollow core photonic crystal fibre is demonstrated. The Er:YAG wavelength of 2.94 µm is well beyond the normal transmittance of bulk silica but the unique hollow core guidance allows silica to guide in this regime. We have demonstrated for the first time the ability to deliver high energy pulses through an all-silica fibre at 2.94 µm. These silica fibres are mechanically and chemically robust, biocompatible and have low sensitivity to bending. A maximum pulse energy of 14 mJ at 2.94 µm was delivered through the fibre. This, to our knowledge, is the first time a silica hollow core photonic crystal fibre has been shown to transmit 2.94 μm laser light at a fluence exceeding the thresholds required for modification (e.g. cutting and drilling) of hard biological tissue. Consequently, laser delivery systems based on these fibres have the potential for the realization of novel, minimally-invasive surgical procedures. PMID:22418551

  19. Liquid crystal assisted optical fibres.

    PubMed

    Wahle, M; Kitzerow, H-S

    2014-01-13

    Microstructured fibres which consist of a circular step index core and a liquid crystal inclusion running parallel to this core are investigated. The attenuation and electro-optic effects of light coupled into the core are measured. Coupled mode theory is used to study the interaction of core modes with the liquid crystal inclusion. The experimental and theoretical results show that these fibres can exhibit attenuation below 0.16 dB cm(-1) in off-resonant wavelength regions and still have significant electro-optic effects which can lead to a polarisation extinction of 6 dB cm(-1). PMID:24514987

  20. Photonic crystal light source

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Bur, James A.

    2004-07-27

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  1. Function photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiang-Yao; Zhang, Bai-Jun; Yang, Jing-Hai; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Ba, Nuo; Wu, Yi-Heng; Wang, Qing-Cai

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we present a new kind of function photonic crystals (PCs), whose refractive index is a function of space position. Conventional PCs structure grows from two materials, A and B, with different dielectric constants εA and εB. Based on Fermat principle, we give the motion equations of light in one-dimensional, two-dimensional and three-dimensional function photonic crystals. For one-dimensional function photonic crystals, we give the dispersion relation, band gap structure and transmissivity, and compare them with conventional photonic crystals, and we find the following: (1) For the vertical and non-vertical incidence light of function photonic crystals, there are band gap structures, and for only the vertical incidence light, the conventional PCs have band gap structures. (2) By choosing various refractive index distribution functions n( z), we can obtain more wider or more narrower band gap structure than conventional photonic crystals.

  2. Wall modified photonic crystal fibre capillaries as porous layer open tubular columns for in-capillary micro-extraction and capillary chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kazarian, Artaches A; Sanz Rodriguez, Estrella; Deverell, Jeremy A; McCord, James; Muddiman, David C; Paull, Brett

    2016-01-28

    Wall modified photonic crystal fibre capillary columns for in-capillary micro-extraction and liquid chromatographic separations is presented. Columns contained 126 internal parallel 4 μm channels, each containing a wall bonded porous monolithic type polystyrene-divinylbenzene layer in open tubular column format (PLOT). Modification longitudinal homogeneity was monitored using scanning contactless conductivity detection and scanning electron microscopy. The multichannel open tubular capillary column showed channel diameter and polymer layer consistency of 4.2 ± 0.1 μm and 0.26 ± 0.02 μm respectively, and modification of 100% of the parallel channels with the monolithic polymer. The modified multi-channel capillaries were applied to the in-capillary micro-extraction of water samples. 500 μL of water samples containing single μg L(-1) levels of polyaromatic hydrocarbons were extracted at a flow rate of 10 μL min(-1), and eluted in 50 μL of acetonitrile for analysis using HPLC with fluorescence detection. HPLC LODs were 0.08, 0.02 and 0.05 μg L(-1) for acenaphthene, anthracene and pyrene, respectively, with extraction recoveries of between 77 and 103%. The modified capillaries were also investigated briefly for direct application to liquid chromatographic separations, with the retention and elution of a standard protein (cytochrome c) under isocratic conditions demonstrated, proving chromatographic potential of the new column format, with run-to-run retention time reproducibility of below 1%. PMID:26755132

  3. Dispersion in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzens, Jeremy

    2005-11-01

    Investigations on the dispersive properties of photonic crystals, modified scattering in ring-resonators, monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers and advanced data processing techniques for the finite-difference time-domain method are presented. Photonic crystals are periodic mesoscopic arrays of scatterers that modify the propagation properties of electromagnetic waves in a similar way as "natural" crystals modify the properties of electrons in solid-state physics. In this thesis photonic crystals are implemented as planar photonic crystals, i.e., optically thin semiconductor films with periodic arrays of holes etched into them, with a hole-to-hole spacing of the order of the wavelength of light in the dielectric media. Photonic crystals can feature forbidden frequency ranges (the band-gaps) in which light cannot propagate. Even though most work on photonic crystals has focused on these band-gaps for application such as confinement and guiding of light, this thesis focuses on the allowed frequency regions (the photonic bands) and investigates how the propagation of light is modified by the crystal lattice. In particular the guiding of light in bulk photonic crystals in the absence of lattice defects (the self-collimation effect) and the angular steering of light in photonic crystals (the superprism effect) are investigated. The latter is used to design a planar lightwave circuit for frequency domain demultiplexion. Difficulties such as efficient insertion of light into the crystal are resolved and previously predicted limitations on the resolution are circumvented. The demultiplexer is also fabricated and characterized. Monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers by means of resonantly enhanced grating couplers is investigated. The grating coupler is designed to bend light through a ninety-degree angle and is characterized with the finite-difference time-domain method. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers are

  4. Efficient single photon source based on μ-fibre-coupled tunable microcavity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Min; Lim, Hee-Jin; Schneider, Christian; Maier, Sebastian; Höfling, Sven; Kamp, Martin; Lee, Yong-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Efficient and fast on-demand single photon sources have been sought after as critical components of quantum information science. We report an efficient and tunable single photon source based on an InAs quantum dot (QD) embedded in a photonic crystal cavity coupled with a highly curved μ-fibre. Exploiting evanescent coupling between the μ-fibre and the cavity, a high collection efficiency of 23% and Purcell-enhanced spontaneous emissions are observed. In our scheme, the spectral position of a resonance can be tuned by as much as 1.5 nm by adjusting the contact position of the μ-fibre, which increases the spectral coupling probability between the QD and the cavity mode. Taking advantage of the high photon count rate and the tunability, the collection efficiencies and the decay rates are systematically investigated as a function of the QD–cavity detuning. PMID:26391607

  5. Efficient single photon source based on μ-fibre-coupled tunable microcavity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Min; Lim, Hee-Jin; Schneider, Christian; Maier, Sebastian; Höfling, Sven; Kamp, Martin; Lee, Yong-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Efficient and fast on-demand single photon sources have been sought after as critical components of quantum information science. We report an efficient and tunable single photon source based on an InAs quantum dot (QD) embedded in a photonic crystal cavity coupled with a highly curved μ-fibre. Exploiting evanescent coupling between the μ-fibre and the cavity, a high collection efficiency of 23% and Purcell-enhanced spontaneous emissions are observed. In our scheme, the spectral position of a resonance can be tuned by as much as 1.5 nm by adjusting the contact position of the μ-fibre, which increases the spectral coupling probability between the QD and the cavity mode. Taking advantage of the high photon count rate and the tunability, the collection efficiencies and the decay rates are systematically investigated as a function of the QD-cavity detuning. PMID:26391607

  6. Tunable electrochromic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuai, Su-Lan; Bader, Georges; Ashrit, P. V.

    2005-05-01

    Photonic crystals based on the electrochromic phenomenon have been fabricated and proposed for band gap tuning. Electrochromic tungsten trioxide (WO3) inverse opals have been fabricated by polystyrene colloidal crystal templating. The WO3 matrix was obtained through a dip-infiltrating sol-gel process, with subsequent removal of the polymer microspheres by calcination. Scanning electron micrographs confirm the ordering of the hexagonal macroporous structure. The reflection spectra show two pronounced Bragg diffraction peaks. By inserting lithium into the crystals, the first reflection peak shifts gradually toward shorter wavelength for 36 nm, while the second reflection peak shifts toward longer wavelength for about 28 nm. This should be of great interest for photonic device applications.

  7. Photonic Crystal Nanocavity Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Axel

    2001-03-01

    Two- and three-dimensional microfabricated mirrors are generally referred to as photonic bandgap (PBG) crystals, and can be lithographically constructed to match a given frequency to confine light to very small volumes.1 For mirrors matching light emission at 1550nm, the lattice parameter a should correspond to 500nm, and the radius of the holes should be 180nm. By combining the slab waveguide design from microdisk lasers with the concept of microfabricating Bragg reflectors around a 2-D Fabry-Perot structure, we arrive at the design for ultra-small sub-3 optical nanocavity photonic crystal lasers. The mode volume in these laser cavities can be as small as 2.5 cubic half wavelengths or 0.03m3, and spontaneous emission in the cavity can be very efficiently coupled into the lasing mode. This efficient coupling in turn results in significant advantages of these nanocavity lasers over devices with larger mode volumes, as high modulation speed and very low threshold power light emission are expected. If the photonic crystal is designed appropriately and is not too porous, it is also possible to efficiently guide light within the perforated slab and to minimize diffraction losses. This waveguiding within a photonic crystal provides us with an opportunity to couple light from one cavity to another, or into connecting waveguides. By creating two-dimensional photonic crystals, which are microfabricated into InGaAsP slabs, we have recently defined the smallest lasers to date. When combined with high index contrast slabs in which light can be efficiently guided, microfabricated two-dimensional photonic bandgap mirrors provide the geometries needed to confine light into extremely small volumes with high Q.1,2,3,4 Two-dimensional Fabry-Perot resonators with microfabricated mirrors are formed when defects are introduced into the periodic photonic bandgap structure. It is then possible to tune these cavities lithographically by changing the precise geometry of the microstructures

  8. Matched cascade of bandgap-shift and frequency-conversion using stimulated Raman scattering in a tapered hollow-core photonic crystal fibre.

    PubMed

    Beaudou, B; Couny, F; Wang, Y Y; Light, P S; Wheeler, N V; Gérôme, F; Benabid, F

    2010-06-01

    We report on a novel means which lifts the restriction of the limited optical bandwidth of photonic bandgap hollow-core photonic crystal fiber on generating high order stimulated Raman scattering in gaseous media. This is based on H(2)-filled tapered HC-PCF in which the taper slope is matched with the effective length of Raman process. Raman orders outside the input-bandwidth of the HC-PCF are observed with more than 80% quantum-conversion using a compact, low-power 1064 nm microchip laser. The technique opens prospects for efficient sources in spectral regions that are poorly covered by currently existing lasers such as mid-IR. PMID:20588364

  9. Slotted photonic crystal biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scullion, Mark Gerard

    Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them result in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This thesis presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which engender higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the peak of optical mode within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. High sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than most competing devices in the literature. Initial tests with cellular material for real applications was also performed, and shown to be of promise. In addition, groundwork to make an integrated device that includes the spectrometer function was also carried out showing that slotted photonic crystals themselves can be used for on-chip wavelength specific filtering and spectroscopy, whilst gas-free microvalves for automation were also developed. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study.

  10. Hydrophobic photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Limin; Birks, T A; Loh, W H

    2011-12-01

    We propose and demonstrate hydrophobic photonic crystal fibers (PCFs). A chemical surface treatment for making PCFs hydrophobic is introduced. This repels water from the holes of PCFs, so that their optical properties remain unchanged even when they are immersed in water. The combination of a hollow core and a water-repellent inner surface of the hydrophobic PCF provides an ultracompact dissolved-gas sensor element, which is demonstrated for the sensing of dissolved ammonia gas. PMID:22139276

  11. Slotted photonic crystal sensors.

    PubMed

    Scullion, Mark G; Krauss, Thomas F; Di Falco, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them results in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This review article presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which provide higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the optical mode peak within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. Higher sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than possible with most competing devices reported in the literature. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study. PMID:23503295

  12. Slotted Photonic Crystal Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Scullion, Mark G.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Di Falco, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them results in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This review article presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which provide higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the optical mode peak within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. Higher sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than possible with most competing devices reported in the literature. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study. PMID:23503295

  13. Light propagation mechanism switching in a liquid crystal infiltrated microstructured polymer optical fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutkowska, K. A.; Milenko, K.; Chojnowska, O.; Dąbrowski, R.; Woliński, T. R.

    2015-12-01

    In this work studies on propagation properties of a microstructured polymer optical fibre infiltrated with a nematic liquid crystal are presented. Specifically, the influence of an infiltration method on the LC molecular alignment inside fibre air-channels and, thus, on light guidance is discussed. Switching between propagation mechanisms, namely the transition from modified total internal reflection (mTIR) to the photonic bandgap effect obtained by varying external temperature is also demonstrated.

  14. Photonic Crystal Laser Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M

    2003-05-21

    Photonic crystals have great potential for use as laser-driven accelerator structures. A photonic crystal is a dielectric structure arranged in a periodic geometry. Like a crystalline solid with its electronic band structure, the modes of a photonic crystal lie in a set of allowed photonic bands. Similarly, it is possible for a photonic crystal to exhibit one or more photonic band gaps, with frequencies in the gap unable to propagate in the crystal. Thus photonic crystals can confine an optical mode in an all-dielectric structure, eliminating the need for metals and their characteristic losses at optical frequencies. We discuss several geometries of photonic crystal accelerator structures. Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) are optical fibers which can confine a speed-of-light optical mode in vacuum. Planar structures, both two- and three-dimensional, can also confine such a mode, and have the additional advantage that they can be manufactured using common microfabrication techniques such as those used for integrated circuits. This allows for a variety of possible materials, so that dielectrics with desirable optical and radiation-hardness properties can be chosen. We discuss examples of simulated photonic crystal structures to demonstrate the scaling laws and trade-offs involved, and touch on potential fabrication processes.

  15. Natural photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneron, Jean Pol; Simonis, Priscilla

    2012-10-01

    Photonic structures appeared in nature several hundred millions years ago. In the living world, color is used for communication and this important function strongly impacts the individual chances of survival as well as the chances to reproduce. This has a statistical influence on species populations. Therefore, because they are involved in evolution, natural color-generating structures are - from some point of view - highly optimized. In this short review, a survey is presented of the development of natural photonic crystal-type structures occurring in insects, spiders, birds, fishes and other marine animals, in plants and more, from the standpoint of light-waves propagation. One-, two-, and three-dimensional structures will be reviewed with selected examples.

  16. Photonic crystal microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhokhov, A. A.; Masalov, V. M.; Sukhinina, N. S.; Matveev, D. V.; Dolganov, P. V.; Dolganov, V. K.; Emelchenko, G. A.

    2015-11-01

    Spherical samples of photonic crystals formed by colloidal SiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized. Synthesis of microspheres from 160 nm, 200 nm and 430 nm diameter colloidal nanoparticles was performed over a wide size range, from 5 μm to 50 μm. The mechanism of formation of void microparticles exceeding 50 μm is discussed. The spectral measurements verified the association of the spectra with the peaks of selective reflection from the cubic lattice planes. The microparticle morphology is characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  17. Optics of globular photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, V S

    2007-05-31

    The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the optical properties of globular photonic crystals - new physical objects having a crystal structure with the lattice period exceeding considerably the atomic size, are presented. As globular photonic crystals, artificial opal matrices consisting of close-packed silica globules of diameter {approx}200 nm were used. The reflection spectra of these objects characterising the parameters of photonic bands existing in these crystals in the visible spectral region are presented. The idealised models of the energy band structure of photonic crystals investigated in the review give analytic dispersion dependences for the group velocity and the effective photon mass in a globular photonic crystal. The characteristics of secondary emission excited in globular photonic crystals by monochromatic and broadband radiation are presented. The results of investigations of single-photon-excited delayed scattering of light observed in globular photonic crystals exposed to cw UV radiation and radiation from a repetitively pulsed copper vapour laser are presented. The possibilities of using globular photonic crystals as active media for lasing in different spectral regions are considered. It is proposed to use globular photonic crystals as sensitive sensors in optoelectronic devices for molecular analysis of organic and inorganic materials by the modern methods of laser spectroscopy. The results of experimental studies of spontaneous and stimulated globular scattering of light are discussed. The conditions for observing resonance and two-photon-excited delayed scattering of light are found. The possibility of accumulation and localisation of the laser radiation energy inside a globular photonic crystal is reported. (review)

  18. Photonic crystal and photonic wire device structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Rue, Richard; Sorel, Marc; Johnson, Nigel; Rahman, Faiz; Ironside, Charles; Cronin, Lee; Watson, Ian; Martin, Robert; Jin, Chongjun; Pottier, Pierre; Chong, Harold; Gnan, Marco; Jugessur, Aju; Camargo, Edilson; Erwin, Grant; Md Zain, Ahmad; Ntakis, Iraklis; Hobbs, Lois; Zhang, Hua; Armenise, Mario; Ciminelli, Caterina; Coquillat, Dominique

    2005-09-01

    Photonic devices that exploit photonic crystal (PhC) principles in a planar environment continue to provide a fertile field of research. 2D PhC based channel waveguides can provide both strong confinement and controlled dispersion behaviour. In conjunction with, for instance, various electro-optic, thermo-optic and other effects, a range of device functionality is accessible in very compact PhC channel-guide devices that offer the potential for high-density integration. Low enough propagation losses are now being obtained with photonic crystal channel-guide structures that their use in real applications has become plausible. Photonic wires (PhWs) can also provide strong confinement and low propagation losses. Bragg-gratings imposed on photonic wires can provide dispersion and frequency selection in device structures that are intrinsically simpler than 2D PhC channel guides--and can compete with them under realistic conditions.

  19. Photonic Crystal Nanolaser Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Shota; Otsuka, Shota; Hachuda, Shoji; Endo, Tatsuro; Imai, Yasunori; Nishijima, Yoshiaki; Misawa, Hiroaki; Baba, Toshihiko

    High-performance and low-cost sensors are critical devices for high-throughput analyses of bio-samples in medical diagnoses and life sciences. In this paper, we demonstrate photonic crystal nanolaser sensor, which detects the adsorption of biomolecules from the lasing wavelength shift. It is a promising device, which balances a high sensitivity, high resolution, small size, easy integration, simple setup and low cost. In particular with a nanoslot structure, it achieves a super-sensitivity in protein sensing whose detection limit is three orders of magnitude lower than that of standard surface-plasmon-resonance sensors. Our investigations indicate that the nanoslot acts as a protein condenser powered by the optical gradient force, which arises from the strong localization of laser mode in the nanoslot.

  20. Spherical colloidal photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuanjin; Shang, Luoran; Cheng, Yao; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Colloidal photonic crystals (PhCs), periodically arranged monodisperse nanoparticles, have emerged as one of the most promising materials for light manipulation because of their photonic band gaps (PBGs), which affect photons in a manner similar to the effect of semiconductor energy band gaps on electrons. The PBGs arise due to the periodic modulation of the refractive index between the building nanoparticles and the surrounding medium in space with subwavelength period. This leads to light with certain wavelengths or frequencies located in the PBG being prohibited from propagating. Because of this special property, the fabrication and application of colloidal PhCs have attracted increasing interest from researchers. The most simple and economical method for fabrication of colloidal PhCs is the bottom-up approach of nanoparticle self-assembly. Common colloidal PhCs from this approach in nature are gem opals, which are made from the ordered assembly and deposition of spherical silica nanoparticles after years of siliceous sedimentation and compression. Besides naturally occurring opals, a variety of manmade colloidal PhCs with thin film or bulk morphology have also been developed. In principle, because of the effect of Bragg diffraction, these PhC materials show different structural colors when observed from different angles, resulting in brilliant colors and important applications. However, this angle dependence is disadvantageous for the construction of some optical materials and devices in which wide viewing angles are desired. Recently, a series of colloidal PhC materials with spherical macroscopic morphology have been created. Because of their spherical symmetry, the PBGs of spherical colloidal PhCs are independent of rotation under illumination of the surface at a fixed incident angle of the light, broadening the perspective of their applications. Based on droplet templates containing colloidal nanoparticles, these spherical colloidal PhCs can be

  1. Configurable silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Prorok, Stefan; Petrov, Alexander; Eich, Manfred; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2013-12-23

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the mode cut off of a photonic crystal waveguide can be trimmed with high accuracy by electron beam bleaching of a chromophore doped polymer cladding. Using this method, configurable waveguides are realized, which allow for spatially resolved changes of the photonic crystal's effective lattice constant as small as 7.6 pm. We show three different examples how to take advantage of configurable photonic crystal waveguides: Shifting of the complete transmission spectrum, definition of cavities with high quality factor, and tuning of existing cavities.

  2. Multicolor photonic crystal laser array

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jeremy B; Brener, Igal; Subramania, Ganapathi S; Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2015-04-28

    A multicolor photonic crystal laser array comprises pixels of monolithically grown gain sections each with a different emission center wavelength. As an example, two-dimensional surface-emitting photonic crystal lasers comprising broad gain-bandwidth III-nitride multiple quantum well axial heterostructures were fabricated using a novel top-down nanowire fabrication method. Single-mode lasing was obtained in the blue-violet spectral region with 60 nm of tuning (or 16% of the nominal center wavelength) that was determined purely by the photonic crystal geometry. This approach can be extended to cover the entire visible spectrum.

  3. Configurable silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prorok, Stefan; Petrov, Alexander; Eich, Manfred; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2013-12-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the mode cut off of a photonic crystal waveguide can be trimmed with high accuracy by electron beam bleaching of a chromophore doped polymer cladding. Using this method, configurable waveguides are realized, which allow for spatially resolved changes of the photonic crystal's effective lattice constant as small as 7.6 pm. We show three different examples how to take advantage of configurable photonic crystal waveguides: Shifting of the complete transmission spectrum, definition of cavities with high quality factor, and tuning of existing cavities.

  4. Graphene chiral liquid crystals and macroscopic assembled fibres

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhen; Gao, Chao

    2011-01-01

    Chirality and liquid crystals are both widely expressed in nature and biology. Helical assembly of mesophasic molecules and colloids may produce intriguing chiral liquid crystals. To date, chiral liquid crystals of 2D colloids have not been explored. As a typical 2D colloid, graphene is now receiving unprecedented attention. However, making macroscopic graphene fibres is hindered by the poor dispersibility of graphene and by the lack of an assembly method. Here we report that soluble, chemically oxidized graphene or graphene oxide sheets can form chiral liquid crystals in a twist-grain-boundary phase-like model with simultaneous lamellar ordering and long-range helical frustrations. Aqueous graphene oxide liquid crystals were continuously spun into metres of macroscopic graphene oxide fibres; subsequent chemical reduction gave the first macroscopic neat graphene fibres with high conductivity and good mechanical performance. The flexible, strong graphene fibres were knitted into designed patterns and into directionally conductive textiles. PMID:22146390

  5. Spatial filtering with photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Maigyte, Lina; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2015-03-15

    Photonic crystals are well known for their celebrated photonic band-gaps—the forbidden frequency ranges, for which the light waves cannot propagate through the structure. The frequency (or chromatic) band-gaps of photonic crystals can be utilized for frequency filtering. In analogy to the chromatic band-gaps and the frequency filtering, the angular band-gaps and the angular (spatial) filtering are also possible in photonic crystals. In this article, we review the recent advances of the spatial filtering using the photonic crystals in different propagation regimes and for different geometries. We review the most evident configuration of filtering in Bragg regime (with the back-reflection—i.e., in the configuration with band-gaps) as well as in Laue regime (with forward deflection—i.e., in the configuration without band-gaps). We explore the spatial filtering in crystals with different symmetries, including axisymmetric crystals; we discuss the role of chirping, i.e., the dependence of the longitudinal period along the structure. We also review the experimental techniques to fabricate the photonic crystals and numerical techniques to explore the spatial filtering. Finally, we discuss several implementations of such filters for intracavity spatial filtering.

  6. Experimental study of photonic crystal triangular lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Ruhu; Qin, Bo; Jin, Chongjun

    1999-06-01

    Triangular lattice photonic crystal behaving in the electromagnetic zones constructed from fused silica cylinders in styrofoam is fabricated. The transmission spectra of the photonic crystal with and without defects are measured. On this basis, the defect modes of photonic crystal were studied, and the potential applications of the photonic crystal are discussed.

  7. Ultrastructural observation of single-crystal apatite fibres.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Mamoru; Porter, Alexandra E; Best, Serena M; Bonfield, William

    2005-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) has been widely used as a biomaterial for substituting human hard tissues such as bone. By altering the morphology of HAp crystals, novel properties may be produced by controlling the orientation of the crystal planes. Apatite fibres were successfully synthesized by precipitation from aqueous solutions containing Ca(NO(3))(2), (NH(4))(2)HPO(4), urea and HNO(3). The products were composed of carbonate-containing apatite fibres with preferred orientation along the {h00} planes. Examination of individual fibres using transmission electron microscopy showed that the as-synthesized apatite fibres were highly strained single crystals with the c-axis orientation parallel to the long axis of the fibre. The crushed fibres consisted of domains that were preferentially oriented with the c-axis parallel to the long axis of the fibres. When the apatite fibres were heated to 800, 1000 and 1200 degrees C for 1h, the domains were removed and grain boundaries, dislocations and voids were formed. PMID:15621231

  8. Determining crystal growth kinetic parameters using optical fibre sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerkamp, M.; Lamb, D. W.; Lye, P. G.

    2012-12-01

    The capability of an 'intrinsic exposed core optical fibre sensor' (IECOFS) as a monitoring device of scale formation has been evaluated. The IECOFS has been used to measure kinetics parameters of calcium carbonate heterogeneous crystal growth such as the activation energy, the crystal growth rate and the induction time. The IECOFS was able to evaluate crystal growth inhibition through the use of chemical inhibitors.

  9. Manufacturing method of photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Park, In Sung; Lee, Tae Ho; Ahn, Jin Ho; Biswas, Rana; Constant, Kristen P.; Ho, Kai-Ming; Lee, Jae-Hwang

    2013-01-29

    A manufacturing method of a photonic crystal is provided. In the method, a high-refractive-index material is conformally deposited on an exposed portion of a periodic template composed of a low-refractive-index material by an atomic layer deposition process so that a difference in refractive indices or dielectric constants between the template and adjacent air becomes greater, which makes it possible to form a three-dimensional photonic crystal having a superior photonic bandgap. Herein, the three-dimensional structure may be prepared by a layer-by-layer method.

  10. Diamond based photonic crystal microcavities.

    PubMed

    Tomljenovic-Hanic, S; Steel, M J; de Sterke, C Martijn; Salzman, J

    2006-04-17

    Diamond based technologies offer a material platform for the implementation of qubits for quantum computing. The photonic crystal architecture provides the route for a scalable and controllable implementation of high quality factor (Q) nanocavities, operating in the strong coupling regime for cavity quantum electrodynamics. Here we compute the photonic band structures and quality factors of microcavities in photonic crystal slabs in diamond, and compare the results with those of the more commonly-used silicon platform. We find that, in spite of the lower index contrast, diamond based photonic crystal microcavities can exhibit quality factors of Q=3.0x10(4), sufficient for proof of principle demonstrations in the quantum regime. PMID:19516502

  11. Photonic bandgap single-mode optical fibre with ytterbium-doped silica glass core

    SciTech Connect

    Egorova, O N; Semenov, S L; Vel'miskin, V V; Dianov, Evgenii M; Salganskii, M Yu; Yashkov, M V; Gur'yanov, Aleksei N

    2011-01-24

    A photonic bandgap fibre with an ytterbium-doped silica glass core is fabricated and investigated. The possibility of implementing single-mode operation of such fibres in a wide spectral range at a large (above 20 {mu}m) mode field diameter makes them promising for fibre lasers and amplifiers. To ensure a high quality of the beam emerging from the fibre, particular attention is paid to increasing the optical homogeneity of the ytterbium-doped core glass. (optical fibres)

  12. All-silica, large mode area, single mode photonic bandgap fibre with Fabry-Perot resonant structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Várallyay, Zoltán; Kovács, Péter

    2016-03-01

    All-silica, photonic crystal fibres consisting of a low index, silica core surrounded by higher index inclusions embedded in a silica matrix to form a photonic bandgap cladding were numerically analysed. The aim of the investigations was to modify the guiding properties of the fibre by introducing resonant structural entities. These structural modifications are realised by altering the refractive index of certain high index inclusions in the photonic crystal cladding resulting in mode coupling between the core mode and the mode propagated in the modified index region. This results in an increased effective core area of the fundamental core mode and consequently decreased nonlinearity as well as modified effective index compared to the effective index of the unmodified structure and resonant dispersion profile that can be used for pulse compression or optical delay purposes.

  13. Photonic crystal scene projector development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. A.; Burckel, B.; Caulfield, J.; Cogan, S.; Massie, M.; Lamott, R.; Snyder, D.; Rapp, R.

    2010-04-01

    This paper describes results from the Extremely High Temperature Photonic Crystal System Technology (XTEMPS) program. The XTEMPS program is developing projector technology based on photonic crystals capable of high dynamic range, multispectral emission from SWIR to LWIR, and realistic band widths. These Photonics Crystals (PhC) are fabricated from refractory materials to provide high radiance and long device lifetime. Cyan is teamed with Sandia National Laboratories, to develop photonics crystals designed for realistic scene projection systems and Nova sensors to utilize their advanced Read In Integrated Circuit (RIIC). PhC based emitters show improved in-band output power efficiency when compared to broad band "graybody" emitters due to the absence of out-of-band emission. Less electrical power is required to achieve high operating temperature, and the potential for nonequilibrium pumping exists. Both effects boost effective radiance output. Cyan has demonstrated pixel designs compatible with Nova's medium format RIIC, ensuring high apparent output temperatures, modest drive currents, and low operating voltages of less than five volts. Unit cell pixel structures with high radiative efficiency have been demonstrated, and arrays using PhC optimized for up to four spectral bands have been successfully patterned.

  14. Photonic crystal surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chua, Song Liang; Lu, Ling; Soljacic, Marin

    2015-06-23

    A photonic-crystal surface-emitting laser (PCSEL) includes a gain medium electromagnetically coupled to a photonic crystal whose energy band structure exhibits a Dirac cone of linear dispersion at the center of the photonic crystal's Brillouin zone. This Dirac cone's vertex is called a Dirac point; because it is at the Brillouin zone center, it is called an accidental Dirac point. Tuning the photonic crystal's band structure (e.g., by changing the photonic crystal's dimensions or refractive index) to exhibit an accidental Dirac point increases the photonic crystal's mode spacing by orders of magnitudes and reduces or eliminates the photonic crystal's distributed in-plane feedback. Thus, the photonic crystal can act as a resonator that supports single-mode output from the PCSEL over a larger area than is possible with conventional PCSELs, which have quadratic band edge dispersion. Because output power generally scales with output area, this increase in output area results in higher possible output powers.

  15. Optical Magnetometer Incorporating Photonic Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulikov, Igor; Florescu, Lucia

    2007-01-01

    According to a proposal, photonic crystals would be used to greatly increase the sensitivities of optical magnetometers that are already regarded as ultrasensitive. The proposal applies, more specifically, to a state-of-the-art type of quantum coherent magnetometer that exploits the electromagnetically-induced-transparency (EIT) method for determining a small change in a magnetic field indirectly via measurement of the shift, induced by that change, in the hyperfine levels of resonant atoms exposed to the field.

  16. Photonic bandgap guiding into a composite AgPO3-glass/silica microstructured optical fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konidakis, Ioannis; Zito, Gianluigi; Pissadakis, Stavros

    2012-04-01

    Infiltration of glass matrices inside Photonic Crystals Fibres (PCFs) for achieving photonic bandgap (PBG) guidance and expand devices development capabilities has been recently demonstrated. Herein, we report the fabrication of an all-solid PBG guiding PCF by suction-assisted infiltration of molten silver-metaphosphate (AgPO3) glass into the air capillaries of a commercial solid core PCF. The relatively low viscosity of the AgPO3 glass melt permitted infiltration at ~ 700 °C inside an annealing oven apparatus by applying suction with the use of a standard mechanical vacuum pump, while its low glass transition temperature of ~ 190 °C allows structural relaxations at temperatures close to ambient and the formation of high quality glass strands inside the silica structure of the PCF. The AgPO3/silica PCF was characterized by means of its transmission spectrum that showed PBG guidance over the measurement range (350-1650nm). The effect of the AgPO3 glass photosensitivity on the guiding properties of the AgPO3/silica PCF was explored by employing a 355nm, 150 ps laser irradiation. The exposure gave rise to a photo-induced enhancement of the transmission-to-stop-band extinction ratio by ~60 dB/cm as well as bandwidth tuning. Numerical calculations of the transmission spectra of the AgPO3/silica PCF have been performed for confirming the experimental results and modelling the photo-induced variation of the two-glass fibre transmission. We believe that the fabrication of the AgPO3/silica PBG fibre constitutes a strong base for the development of new in-fibre sensing and scattering-based devices, by exploiting the high photosensitivity of silver and its specific plasmon absorption properties.

  17. Topological photonic crystal with ideal Weyl points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luyang; Jian, Shao-Kai; Yao, Hong

    Weyl points in three-dimensional photonic crystals behave as monopoles of Berry flux in momentum space. Here, based on symmetry analysis, we show that a minimal number of symmetry-related Weyl points can be realized in time-reversal invariant photonic crystals. We propose to realize these ``ideal'' Weyl points in modified double-gyroid photonic crystals, which is confirmed by our first-principle photonic band-structure calculations. Photonic crystals with ideal Weyl points are qualitatively advantageous in applications such as angular and frequency selectivity, broadband invisibility cloaking, and broadband 3D-imaging.

  18. Topological photonic crystal with equifrequency Weyl points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luyang; Jian, Shao-Kai; Yao, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Weyl points in three-dimensional photonic crystals behave as monopoles of Berry flux in momentum space. Here, based on general symmetry analysis, we show that a minimal number of four symmetry-related (consequently equifrequency) Weyl points can be realized in time-reversal invariant photonic crystals. We further propose an experimentally feasible way to modify double-gyroid photonic crystals to realize four equifrequency Weyl points, which is explicitly confirmed by our first-principle photonic band-structure calculations. Remarkably, photonic crystals with equifrequency Weyl points are qualitatively advantageous in applications including angular selectivity, frequency selectivity, invisibility cloaking, and three-dimensional imaging.

  19. Cholesteric liquid crystal photonic crystal lasers and photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ying

    This dissertation discusses cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs) and polymers based photonic devices including one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal lasers and broadband circular polarizers. CLCs showing unique self-organized chiral structures have been widely used in bistable displays, flexible displays, and reflectors. However, the photonic band gap they exhibit opens a new way for generating laser light at the photonic band edge (PBE) or inside the band gap. When doped with an emissive laser dye, cholesteric liquid crystals provide distributed feedback so that mirrorless lasing is hence possible. Due to the limited surface anchoring, the thickness of gain medium and feedback length is tens of micrometers. Therefore lasing efficiency is quite limited and laser beam is highly divergent. To meet the challenges, we demonstrated several new methods to enhance the laser emission while reducing the beam divergence from a cholesteric liquid crystal laser. Enhanced laser emission is demonstrated by incorporating a single external CLC reflector as a polarization conserved reflector. Because the distributed feedback from the active layer is polarization selective, a CLC reflector preserves the original polarization of the reflected light and a further stimulated amplification ensues. As a result of virtually doubled feedback length, the output is dramatically enhanced in the same circular polarization state. Meanwhile, the laser beam divergence is dramatically reduced due to the increased cavity length from micrometer to millimeter scale. Enhanced laser emission is also demonstrated by the in-cell metallic reflector because the active layer is pumped twice. Unlike a CLC reflector, the output from a mirror-reflected CLC laser is linearly polarized as a result of coherent superposition of two orthogonal circular polarization states. The output linear polarization direction can be well controlled and fine tuned by varying the operating temperature and cell gap. Enhanced laser

  20. Photonic crystals--a step towards integrated circuits for photonics.

    PubMed

    Thylén, Lars; Qiu, Min; Anand, Srinivasan

    2004-09-20

    The field of photonic crystals has, over the past few years, received dramatically increased attention. Photonic crystals are artificially engineered structures that exhibit a periodic variation in one, two, or three dimensions of the dielectric constant, with a period of the order of the pertinent light wavelength. Such structures in three dimensions should exhibit properties similar to solid-state electronic crystals, such as bandgaps, in other words wavelength regions where light cannot propagate in any direction. By introducing defects into the periodic arrangement, the photonic crystals exhibit properties analogous to those of solid-state crystals. The basic feature of a photonic bandgap was indeed experimentally demonstrated in the beginning of the 1990s, and sparked a large interest in, and in many ways revitalized, photonics research. There are several reasons for this attention. One is that photonic crystals, in their own right, offer a proliferation of challenging research tasks, involving a multitude of disciplines, such as electromagnetic theory, nanofabrication, semi-conductor technology, materials science, biotechnology, to name a few. Another reason is given by the somewhat more down-to-earth expectations that photonics crystals will create unique opportunities for novel devices and applications, and contribute to solving some of the issues that have plagued photonics such as large physical sizes, comparatively low functionality, and high costs. Herein, we will treat some basics of photonic crystal structures and discuss the state-of-the-art in fabrication as well give some examples of devices with unique properties, due to the use of photonic crystals. We will also point out some of the problems that still remain to be solved, and give a view on where photonic crystals currently stand. PMID:15499844

  1. Frozen multipartite entanglement in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Xu, Jing-Bo

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the multipartite entanglement dynamics of a many-body system consisting of N identical two-level atoms locally embedded in their own band-gap photonic crystals. It is shown that the tripartite entanglement of this photonic-crystal system can be frozen in a stationary state. We also find that a double-sudden-change phenomenon of four-partite entanglement occurs in this photonic-crystal system during the decoherence process under certain suitable conditions.

  2. Monochromatic Wannier Functions in the Theory of 2D Photonic Crystals and Photonic Crystal Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Mazhirina, Yu. A.; Melnikov, L. A.

    2011-10-03

    The use of the monochromatic Wannier functions which have the temporal dependence as (exp(-i{omega}t)) in the theory of 2D photonic crystals and photonic crystal fibers is proposed. Corresponding equations and formulae are derived and discussed.

  3. Quantum storage of entangled telecom-wavelength photons in an erbium-doped optical fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saglamyurek, Erhan; Jin, Jeongwan; Verma, Varun B.; Shaw, Matthew D.; Marsili, Francesco; Nam, Sae Woo; Oblak, Daniel; Tittel, Wolfgang

    2015-02-01

    The realization of a future quantum Internet requires the processing and storage of quantum information at local nodes and interconnecting distant nodes using free-space and fibre-optic links. Quantum memories for light are key elements of such quantum networks. However, to date, neither an atomic quantum memory for non-classical states of light operating at a wavelength compatible with standard telecom fibre infrastructure, nor a fibre-based implementation of a quantum memory, has been reported. Here, we demonstrate the storage and faithful recall of the state of a 1,532 nm wavelength photon entangled with a 795 nm photon, in an ensemble of cryogenically cooled erbium ions doped into a 20-m-long silica fibre, using a photon-echo quantum memory protocol. Despite its currently limited efficiency and storage time, our broadband light-matter interface brings fibre-based quantum networks one step closer to reality.

  4. Tunable liquid crystal photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yun-Hsing

    2005-07-01

    Liquid crystal (LC)-based adaptive optics are important for information processing, optical interconnections, photonics, integrated optics, and optical communications due to their tunable optical properties. In this dissertation, we describe novel liquid crystal photonic devices. In Chap. 3, we demonstrate a novel electrically tunable-efficiency Fresnel lens which is devised for the first time using nanoscale PDLC. The tunable Fresnel lens is very desirable to eliminate the need of external spatial light modulator. The nanoscale LC devices are polarization independent and exhibit a fast response time. Because of the small droplet sizes, the operating voltage is higher than 100 Vrms. To lower the driving voltage, in Chap. 2 and Chap. 3, we have investigated tunable Fresnel lens using polymer-network liquid crystal (PNLC) and phase-separated composite film (PSCOF). The operating voltage is below 12 Vrms. The PNLC and PSCOF devices are polarization dependent. To overcome this shortcoming, stacking two cells with orthogonal alignment directions is a possibility. Using PNLC, we also demonstrated LC blazed grating. The diffraction efficiency of these devices is continuously controlled by the electric field. We also develop a system with continuously tunable focal length. A conventional mechanical zooming system is bulky and power hungry. In Chap. 4, we developed an electrically tunable-focus flat LC spherical lens and microlens array. A huge tunable range from 0.6 m to infinity is achieved by the applied voltage. In Chap. 5, we describe a LC microlens array whose focal length can be switched from positive to negative by the applied voltage. The fast response time feature of our LC microlens array will be very helpful in developing 3-D animated images. In Chap. 6, we demonstrate polymer network liquid crystals for switchable polarizers and optical shutters. The use of dual-frequency liquid crystal and special driving scheme leads to a sub-millisecond response time. In

  5. Energy transduction in surface photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fuchyi

    2011-12-01

    This dissertation is a detailed investigation of the fabrication, design, characterization, and understanding of physical principles of energy transduction in surface photonic crystals which are engineered for various applications. One-dimensional photonic crystals are engineered as optically tunable reflectance filters for lambda = 632.8 nm wavelength light by incorporating azobenzene liquid crystal dye molecules into the photonic crystal structure. Optical energy is transduced to accomplish mechanical work by exciting the dye molecules into different physical configurations, leading to changes in the optical properties of the dye molecules, namely their refractive index. This mechanism is used to tune the reflection resonance of the photonic crystal filter. The spectral and temporal optical tuning response of the photonic crystal filter due to excitation light at lambda = 532 nm is characterized. Modulation of the transmitted and reflected lambda = 632.8 nm light is achieved at microsecond time response. Two-dimensional photonic crystals are also investigated as reflectance filters for lambda = 532 nm wavelength light. Both optically tunable and static reflectance filters are studied. Again, azobenzene liquid crystal molecules are incorporated into the photonic crystal to achieve optical tuning of the reflectance wavelength. In this case, the lambda = 532 nm wavelength light is used for self-modulation. That is, the light serves both to optically tune the photonic crystal filter as well as to modulate its own reflection efficiency through the photonic crystal filter. Moreover, stacking of multiple photonic crystals into a single filter is studied for both static and optically tunable photonic crystal filters. It is shown that this approach improves the performance of the photonic crystal reflectance filter by increasing its optical density and its angular tolerance at the reflection wavelength of lambda = 532 nm. Additionally, surface photonic crystals are

  6. Photonic crystal scintillators and methods of manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Ricardo D.; Sexton, Lindsay T.; Fuentes, Roderick E.; Cortes-Concepcion, Jose

    2015-08-11

    Photonic crystal scintillators and their methods of manufacture are provided. Exemplary methods of manufacture include using a highly-ordered porous anodic alumina membrane as a pattern transfer mask for either the etching of underlying material or for the deposition of additional material onto the surface of a scintillator. Exemplary detectors utilizing such photonic crystal scintillators are also provided.

  7. Photonic crystal technology for terahertz system integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Masayuki; Nagatsuma, Tadao

    2016-04-01

    Developing terahertz integration technology is essential for practical use of terahertz electromagnetic waves (0.1-10 THz) in various applications including broadband wireless communication, spectroscopic sensing, and nondestructive imaging. In this paper, we present our recent challenges towards terahertz system integration based on photonic crystal technology such as the development of terahertz transceivers. We use photonic-crystal slabs consisting of a twodimensional lattice of air holes formed in a silicon slab to develop low loss compact terahertz components in planar structures. The demonstration of ultralow loss (< 0.1 dB/cm) waveguides and integrated transceiver devices in the 0.3 THz band shows the potential for the application of photonic crystals to terahertz integration technology. Improving the coupling efficiency between the photonic crystal waveguide and resonant tunneling diode is important to take full advantage of the ultralow loss photonic crystal waveguides.

  8. Selective-fluid-filled photonic crystal fibers and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiping; Liao, Changrui; Zhong, Xiaoyong; Li, Zhengyong; Liu, Yingjie; Zhou, Jiangtao; Yang, Kaiming

    2013-08-01

    A selective-filling technique was demonstrated to improve the optical properties of photonic crystal fibres (PCFs). Such a technique can be used to fill one or more fluid samples selectively into desired air holes. The technique is based on drilling a hole or carving a groove on the surface of a PCF to expose selected air holes to atmosphere by the use of a micromachining system comprising of a femtosecond infrared laser and a microscope. The exposed section was immersed into a fluid and the air holes are then filled through the well-known capillarity action. Provided two or more grooves are fabricated on different locations and different orientation along the fibre surface, different fluids may be filled into different airholes to form a hybrid fibre. As an example, we filled half of a pure-silica PCF by a fluid with n=1.480 by carving a rectangular groove on the fibre. Consequently, the half-filled PCF became a bandgap-guiding structure (upper half), resulted from a higher refractive index in the fluid rods than in the fibre core, and three bandgaps were observed within the wavelength range from 600 to 1700 nm. Whereas, the lower half (unfilled holes) of the fibre remains an air/silica index-guiding structure. When the hybrid PCF is bent, its bandgaps gradually narrowed, resulted from the shifts of the bandgap edges. The bandgap edges had distinct bend-sensitivities when the hybrid PCF was bent toward different directions. Especially, the bandgaps are hardly affected when the half-filled PCF was bent toward the fluid-filled region. Such unique bend properties could be used to monitor simultaneously the bend directions and the curvature of the engineering structures.

  9. Liquid crystal orientation control in photonic liquid crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chychlowski, M. S.; Nowinowski-Kruszelnicki, E.; Woliński, T. R.

    2011-05-01

    Similarly to liquid crystal displays technology in photonic liquid crystal fibers (PLCFs) a molecular orientation control is a crucial issue that influences proper operation of PLCF-based devices. The paper presents two distinct configurations: planar and radial escaped orientation of the LC molecules inside capillaries as well as methods of their application to photonic liquid crystal fibers. Possibilities of LC orientation control influence both: attenuation and transmitting spectra of the PLCF The orienting method is based on creation of an additional orienting layer on the inner surface of the capillary or air hole of the photonic liquid crystal fiber. Aligning materials used in the experiment are commercially available polyimides SE1211 and SE130 which induce liquid crystal homeotropic and planar anchoring conditions. The orienting layer increase an order parameter of the liquid crystal improving propagation properties and stability of photonic liquid crystal fiber-based devices.

  10. Butterfly wing color: A photonic crystal demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proietti Zaccaria, Remo

    2016-01-01

    We have theoretically modeled the optical behavior of a natural occurring photonic crystal, as defined by the geometrical characteristics of the Teinopalpus Imperialis butterfly. In particular, following a genetic algorithm approach, we demonstrate how its wings follow a triclinic crystal geometry with a tetrahedron unit base. By performing both photonic band analysis and transmission/reflection simulations, we are able to explain the characteristic colors emerging by the butterfly wings, thus confirming their crystal form.

  11. Two-photon excited fluorescence in praseodymium doped fibre and its application in distributed optical fibre sensing of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalzell, Craig J.; Han, Thomas P. J.; Ruddock, Ivan S.

    2011-05-01

    Distributed temperature sensing based on time-correlated two-photon excited fluorescence (TPF) in doped fibre is described. Counter-propagating laser pulses generate a TPF flash at the position of overlap which is scanned along the fibre by a variable relative time delay. The flash is detected and analysed at one end. With the fluorescence power being completely independent of excitation pulse duration and temporal profile, the sensor does not require ultrashort excitation pulses for operation. There is potential for high spatial resolution as the length of the sensed region depends only on pulse duration. TPF is reported in bulk glass doped with rare earths and in doped single-mode fibre. The suitability of fluorescence transitions for sensing is discussed taking into account the temperature dependence of the decay times, the location of the terminating energy level relative to the ground state, and the option of non-degenerate TPF.

  12. Photonic crystal microcavity lasers and laser arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jiang-Rong

    As a state-of-the-art technology, photonic crystal microcavity lasers have great potentials to resolve many semiconductor laser performance challenges, owing to their compact size, high spontaneous emission factor, and inherent advantages in dimension scalability. This thesis describes efficient numerical analyzing methods for multimode photonic crystal microcavities, including a parallel computing three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method combined with Pade interpolation, point group projection, and vectorial Green's function method. With the help of these analyzing tools, various experimental photonic crystal microcavity devices fabricated in InGaAsP/InP based materials were studies. Room temperature optical pumped InGaAsP suspended membrane photonic crystal microcavity lasers were demonstrated. Their lithographical fine-tuning, above room temperature operations, mode identifications and polarizations were demonstrated. Room temperature continuous wave (CW) optically pumped photonic crystal microcavity lasers at diameter less than 3.2 mum were demonstrated with crystalline alpha-Al 2O3 (sapphire) as a cladding layer to the InGaAsP membrane. The far-field radiation profiles from these microcavity lasers were measured and compared with our numerical modeling predictions. Two electrical injection scenes for photonic crystal microcavity lasers were introduced, together with some preliminary results including the demonstrations of optically pumped lasing of highly doped cavities and cavities with an electrical conduction post underneath. Electrically excited photonic crystal microcavity light emitting diodes (LEDs) were also experimentally demonstrated.

  13. Guided-wave liquid-crystal photonics.

    PubMed

    Zografopoulos, D C; Asquini, R; Kriezis, E E; d'Alessandro, A; Beccherelli, R

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we review the state of the art in the field of liquid-crystal tunable guided-wave photonic devices, a unique type of fill-once, molecular-level actuated, optofluidic systems. These have recently attracted significant research interest as potential candidates for low-cost, highly functional photonic elements. We cover a full range of structures, which span from micromachined liquid-crystal on silicon devices to periodic structures and liquid-crystal infiltrated photonic crystal fibers, with focus on key-applications for photonics. Various approaches on the control of the LC molecular orientation are assessed, including electro-, thermo- and all-optical switching. Special attention is paid to practical issues regarding liquid-crystal infiltration, molecular alignment and actuation, low-power operation, as well as their integrability in chip-scale or fiber-based devices. PMID:22842818

  14. Novel photonic crystal cavities and related structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Luk, Ting Shan

    2007-11-01

    The key accomplishment of this project is to achieve a much more in-depth understanding of the thermal emission physics of metallic photonic crystal through theoretical modeling and experimental measurements. An improved transfer matrix technique was developed to enable incorporation of complex dielectric function. Together with microscopic theory describing emitter radiative and non-radiative relaxation dynamics, a non-equilibrium thermal emission model is developed. Finally, experimental methodology was developed to measure absolute emissivity of photonic crystal at high temperatures with accuracy of +/-2%. Accurate emissivity measurements allow us to validate the procedure to treat the effect of the photonic crystal substrate.

  15. Analysis of photon recycling using metallic photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Sung; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Chang, Allan S. P.; Lee, Jae-Hwang; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2007-09-01

    We investigate a photon recycling scheme using two-dimensional metallic photonic crystals made of silver to improve the energy efficiency of an incandescent light source. A theoretical framework is presented to analyze the resultant photon-recycled lighting system. Calculation results show that the system can reach a maximum luminous efficiency of 125 lm/W, which is 8 times higher than that of a bare blackbody radiation at 2800 K. The color temperature of the system is calculated to be around 3500 K or below, while the color rendering index is between 68 and 90. These results suggest that a photon-recycled incandescent light source using metallic photonic crystals can be a viable alternative future lighting solution.

  16. Multifunctional Glassy Liquid Crystal for Photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,S.H.

    2004-11-05

    As an emerging class of photonic materials, morphologically stable glassy liquid crystals, were developed following a versatile molecular design approach. Glassy cholesteric liquid crystals with elevated phase-transition temperatures and capability for selective-wavelength reflection and circular polarization were synthesized via determinstic synthesis strategies. Potential applications of glassy cholesteric liquid crystals include high-performance polarizers, optical notch filters and reflectors, and circularly polarized photoluminescence. A glassy nematic liquid crystal comprising a dithienylethene core was also synthesized for the demonstration of nondestructive rewritable optical memory and photonic switching in the sollid state.

  17. Coupled External Cavity Photonic Crystal Enhanced Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Pokhriyal, Anusha; Lu, Meng; Ge, Chun; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    We report a fundamentally new approach to enhance fluorescence in which surface adsorbed fluorophore-tagged biomolecules are excited on a photonic crystal surface that functions as a narrow bandwidth and tunable mirror of an external cavity laser. This scheme leads to ~10× increase in the electromagnetic enhancement factor compared to ordinary photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence. In our experiments, the cavity automatically tunes its lasing wavelength to the resonance wavelength of the photonic crystal, ensuring optimal on-resonance coupling even in the presence of variable device parameters and variations in the density of surface-adsorbed capture molecules. We achieve ~105× improvement in the limit of detection of a fluorophore-tagged protein compared to its detection on an unpatterned glass substrate. The enhanced fluorescence signal and easy optical alignment make cavity-coupled photonic crystals a viable approach for further reducing detection limits of optically-excited light emitters that are used in biological assays. PMID:23129575

  18. Photonic crystal: energy-related applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Zhuo; Park, Joong-Mok; Constant, Kristen; Kim, Tae-Geun; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2012-06-08

    We review recent work on photonic-crystal fabrication using soft-lithography techniques. We consider applications of the resulting structures in energy-related areas such as lighting and solar-energy harvesting. In general, our aim is to introduce the reader to the concepts of photonic crystals, describe their history, development, and fabrication techniques and discuss a selection of energy-related applications.

  19. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, B.; /SLAC

    2005-09-19

    We discuss simulated photonic crystal structure designs for laser-driven particle acceleration, focusing on three-dimensional planar structures based on the so-called ''woodpile'' lattice. We demonstrate guiding of a speed-of-light accelerating mode by a defect in the photonic crystal lattice and discuss the properties of this mode. We also discuss particle beam dynamics in the structure, presenting a novel method for focusing the beam. In addition we describe some potential coupling methods for the structure.

  20. Photonic crystal waveguide created by selective infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas Bedoya, A.; Domachuk, P.; Grillet, C.; Monat, C.; Mägi, E. C.; Li, E.; Eggleton, B. J.

    2012-06-01

    The marriage of photonics and microfluidics ("optofluidics") uses the inherent mobility of fluids to reversibly tune photonic structures beyond traditional fabrication methods by infiltrating voids in said structures. Photonic crystals (PhCs) strongly control light on the wavelength scale and are well suited to optofluidic tuning because their periodic airhole microstructure is a natural candidate for housing liquids. The infiltration of a single row of holes in the PhC matrix modifies the effective refractive index allowing optical modes to be guided by the PhC bandgap. In this work we present the first experimental demonstration of a reconfigurable single mode W1 photonic crystal defect waveguide created by selective liquid infiltration. We modified a hexagonal silicon planar photonic crystal membrane by selectively filling a single row of air holes with ~300nm resolution, using high refractive index ionic liquid. The modification creates optical confinement in the infiltrated region and allows propagation of a single optical waveguide mode. We describe the challenges arising from the infiltration process and the liquid/solid surface interaction in the photonic crystal. We include a detailed comparison between analytic and numerical modeling and experimental results, and introduce a new approach to create an offset photonic crystal cavity by varying the nature of the selective infiltration process.

  1. Optical trapping apparatus, methods and applications using photonic crystal resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, David; Chen, Yih-Fan

    2015-06-16

    A plurality of photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatuses and a plurality optical trapping methods using the plurality of photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatuses include located and formed over a substrate a photonic waveguide that is coupled (i.e., either separately coupled or integrally coupled) with a photonic crystal resonator. In a particular embodiment, the photonic waveguide and the photonic crystal resonator comprise a monocrystalline silicon (or other) photonic material absent any chemical functionalization. In another particular embodiment, the photonic waveguide and the photonic crystal resonator comprise a silicon nitride material which when actuating the photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatus with a 1064 nanometer resonant photonic radiation wavelength (or other resonant photonic radiation wavelength in a range from about 700 to about 1200 nanometers) provides no appreciable heating of an aqueous sample fluid that is analyzed by the photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatus.

  2. Photon Irradiation Response on Ge and Al-Doped SiO{sub 2} Optical Fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Yaakob, Nor Haliza; Wagiran, Husin; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Asni, Hazila; Ali, Hassan

    2010-07-07

    Recently, research groups have reported a number of radiation effects on the applications of SiO{sub 2} optical fibres with possible use as dosimeter material because these optical fibre provide a good basis for medical radiation dosimetry. The objective of this study is to investigate the thermoluminescence response and fading characteristic for germanium and aluminium doped SiO{sub 2} optical fibres with photon irradiation. These optical fibres are placed in solid phantom and irradiated to 6 and 10 MV photon beam at dose ranging from 0.06 Gy to 0.24 Gy using Primus MLC 3339 linear accelerator at Hospital Sultan Ismail, Johor Bahru. In fading studies, the TL measurements were continued up to 14 days period. The optical fibres will produce glow curves whereby the information is then analyzed. Al and Ge-doped optical fibres have a linear dose-TL signal relationship that is proportionality between the TL signal and the doses. Comparison for TL response between different linear accelerator showed a good agreement because these optical fibres also have a linear dose-TL signal relationship even using different equipments.

  3. Photon Irradiation Response on Ge and Al-Doped SiO2 Optical Fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaakob, Nor Haliza; Wagiran, Husin; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Ali, Hassan; Asni, Hazila

    2010-07-01

    Recently, research groups have reported a number of radiation effects on the applications of SiO2 optical fibres with possible use as dosimeter material because these optical fibre provide a good basis for medical radiation dosimetry. The objective of this study is to investigate the thermoluminescence response and fading characteristic for germanium and aluminium doped SiO2 optical fibres with photon irradiation. These optical fibres are placed in solid phantom and irradiated to 6 and 10 MV photon beam at dose ranging from 0.06 Gy to 0.24 Gy using Primus MLC 3339 linear accelerator at Hospital Sultan Ismail, Johor Bahru. In fading studies, the TL measurements were continued up to 14 days period. The optical fibres will produce glow curves whereby the information is then analyzed. Al and Ge-doped optical fibres have a linear dose-TL signal relationship that is proportionality between the TL signal and the doses. Comparison for TL response between different linear accelerator showed a good agreement because these optical fibres also have a linear dose-TL signal relationship even using different equipments.

  4. Controlling spontaneous emission in bioreplica photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, Matthew R.; Butler, Elizabeth S.; Bartl, Michael H.

    2012-04-01

    Sophisticated methods have been created by nature to produce structure-based colors as a way to address the need of a wide variety of organisms. This pallet of available structures presents a unique opportunity for the investigation of new photonic crystal designs. Low-temperature sol-gel biotemplating methods were used to transform a single biotemplate into a variety of inorganic oxide structures. The density of optical states was calculated for a diamond-based natural photonic crystal, as well as several structures templated from it. Calculations were experimentally probed by spontaneous emission studies using time correlated single photon counting measurements.

  5. Optical mirage in graded photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centeno, Emmanuel; Cassagne, David; Albert, Jean Paul

    2006-04-01

    We present the concept of graded photonic crystals (GPC) and show its ability to enhance the control of light propagation. It is shown that gradual modifications of photonic crystal parameters are able to curve the path of light. This light bending which depends on the wavelength and on the incident angle is examined through parametric studies of the iso-frequency curves. We demonstrate that photonic mirages originate from the same physical principles as the usual atmospheric mirages. Two optical components based on two-dimensional GPCs presenting a super bending effect and a large beam shifting are presented.

  6. Thermal tunability of photonic bandgaps in liquid crystal filled polymer photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Doudou; Chen, Guoxiang; Wang, Lili

    2016-05-01

    A highly tunable bandgap-guiding polymer photonic crystal fiber is designed by infiltrating the cladding air holes with liquid crystal 5CB. Structural parameter dependence and thermal tunability of the photonic bandgaps, mode properties and confinement losses of the designed fiber are investigated. Bandgaps red shift as the temperature goes up. Average thermal tuning sensitivity of 30.9 nm/°C and 20.6 nm/°C is achieved around room temperature for the first and second photonic bandgap, respectively. Our results provide theoretical references for applications of polymer photonic crystal fiber in sensing and tunable fiber-optic devices.

  7. Progress in 2D photonic crystal Fano resonance photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weidong; Zhao, Deyin; Shuai, Yi-Chen; Yang, Hongjun; Chuwongin, Santhad; Chadha, Arvinder; Seo, Jung-Hun; Wang, Ken X.; Liu, Victor; Ma, Zhenqiang; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to a conventional symmetric Lorentzian resonance, Fano resonance is predominantly used to describe asymmetric-shaped resonances, which arise from the constructive and destructive interference of discrete resonance states with broadband continuum states. This phenomenon and the underlying mechanisms, being common and ubiquitous in many realms of physical sciences, can be found in a wide variety of nanophotonic structures and quantum systems, such as quantum dots, photonic crystals, plasmonics, and metamaterials. The asymmetric and steep dispersion of the Fano resonance profile promises applications for a wide range of photonic devices, such as optical filters, switches, sensors, broadband reflectors, lasers, detectors, slow-light and non-linear devices, etc. With advances in nanotechnology, impressive progress has been made in the emerging field of nanophotonic structures. One of the most attractive nanophotonic structures for integrated photonics is the two-dimensional photonic crystal slab (2D PCS), which can be integrated into a wide range of photonic devices. The objective of this manuscript is to provide an in depth review of the progress made in the general area of Fano resonance photonics, focusing on the photonic devices based on 2D PCS structures. General discussions are provided on the origins and characteristics of Fano resonances in 2D PCSs. A nanomembrane transfer printing fabrication technique is also reviewed, which is critical for the heterogeneous integrated Fano resonance photonics. The majority of the remaining sections review progress made on various photonic devices and structures, such as high quality factor filters, membrane reflectors, membrane lasers, detectors and sensors, as well as structures and phenomena related to Fano resonance slow light effect, nonlinearity, and optical forces in coupled PCSs. It is expected that further advances in the field will lead to more significant advances towards 3D integrated photonics, flat

  8. Liquid crystal devices for photonics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chigrinov, Vladimir G.

    2007-11-01

    Liquid crystal (LC) devices for Photonics applications is a hot topic of research. Such elements begin to appear in Photonics market. Passive elements for fiber optical communication systems (DWDM components) based on LC cells can successfully compete with the other elements used for the purpose, such as micro electromechanical (MEM), thermo-optical, opto-mechanical or acousto-optical devices. Application of nematic and ferroelectric LC for high speed communication systems, producing elements that are extremely fast, stable, durable, of low loss, operable over a wide temperature range, and that require small operating voltages and extremely low power consumption. The known LC applications in fiber optics enable to produce switches, filters, attenuators, equalizers, polarization controllers, phase emulators and other fiber optical components. Good robustness due to the absence of moving parts and compatibility with VLSI technology, excellent parameters in a large photonic wavelength range, whereas the complexity of the design and the cost of the device are equivalent to regular passive matrix LC displays makes LC fiber optical devices very attractive for mass production. We have already successfully fabricated certain prototypes of the optical switches based on ferroelectric and nematic LC materials. The electrooptical modes used for the purpose included the light polarization rotation, voltage controllable diffraction and fast switching of the LC refractive index. We used the powerful software to optimize the LC modulation characteristics. Use of photo-alignment technique pioneered by us makes it possible to develop new LC fiber components. Almost all the criteria of perfect LC alignment are met in case of azo-dye layers. We have already used azo-dye materials to align LC in superthin photonic holes, curved and 3D surfaces and as cladding layers in microring silicon based resonators. The prototypes of new LC efficient Photonics devices are envisaged. Controllable

  9. Photonic crystals with active organic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yeheng

    The concept of photonic crystals, which involves periodically arranged dielectrics that form a new type of material having novel photonic properties, was first proposed about two decades ago. Since then, a number of applications in photonic technology have been explored. Specifically, organic and hybrid photonic crystals are promising because of the unique advantages of the organic materials. A one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal (multilayer) has high reflectance across a certain wavelength range. We report on studies of 1D multilayer polymer films that were fabricated using spin-coating, free film stacking, and co-extrusion techniques. For example, a stack fabricated by placing a laser dye-doped gain medium between two multilayer reflecting polymer films forms a micro-resonator laser or distributed Bragg laser. The resulting laser system is made entirely of plastic and is only several tens of micrometers in thickness. When the gain, a dye-doped medium, comprises one type of a two-type multilayer film, it results a laser exhibiting distributed feedback. At the edge of the photonic band, the group velocity becomes small and the density of photon states becomes high, which leads to laser emission. Such distributed feedback lasers were fabricated using the co-extrusion technique. The refractive indices and the photonic lattice determine the photonic band gap, which can be tuned by changing these parameters. Materials with Kerr nonlinearity exhibit a change in refractive index depending on the incident intensity of the light. To demonstrate such switching, electrochemical etching techniques on silicon wafers were used to form two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystals. By incorporating the nonlinear organic material into the 2D structure, we have made all-optical switches. The reflection of a beam from the 2D photonic crystal can be controlled by another beam because it induces a refractive index change in the active material by altering the reflection band. A mid

  10. Photon Molecules in Atomic Gases Trapped Near Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, James S.; Caneva, Tommaso; Chang, Darrick E.

    2016-07-01

    Realizing systems that support robust, controlled interactions between individual photons is an exciting frontier of nonlinear optics. To this end, one approach that has emerged recently is to leverage atomic interactions to create strong and spatially nonlocal interactions between photons. In particular, effective photonic interactions have been successfully created via interactions between atoms excited to Rydberg levels. Here, we investigate an alternative approach, in which atomic interactions arise via their common coupling to photonic crystal waveguides. This technique takes advantage of the ability to separately tailor the strength and range of interactions via the dispersion engineering of the structure itself, which can lead to qualitatively new types of phenomena. For example, much of the work on photon-photon interactions relies on the linear optical effect of electromagnetically induced transparency, in combination with the use of interactions to shift optical pulses into or out of the associated transparency window. Here, we identify a large new class of "correlated transparency windows," in which photonic states of a certain number and shape selectively propagate through the system. Through this technique, we show that molecular bound states of photon pairs can be created.

  11. Photonic quasi-crystal terahertz lasers

    PubMed Central

    Vitiello, Miriam Serena; Nobile, Michele; Ronzani, Alberto; Tredicucci, Alessandro; Castellano, Fabrizio; Talora, Valerio; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles

    2014-01-01

    Quasi-crystal structures do not present a full spatial periodicity but are nevertheless constructed starting from deterministic generation rules. When made of different dielectric materials, they often possess fascinating optical properties, which lie between those of periodic photonic crystals and those of a random arrangement of scatterers. Indeed, they can support extended band-like states with pseudogaps in the energy spectrum, but lacking translational invariance, they also intrinsically feature a pattern of ‘defects’, which can give rise to critically localized modes confined in space, similar to Anderson modes in random structures. If used as laser resonators, photonic quasi-crystals open up design possibilities that are simply not possible in a conventional periodic photonic crystal. In this letter, we exploit the concept of a 2D photonic quasi crystal in an electrically injected laser; specifically, we pattern the top surface of a terahertz quantum-cascade laser with a Penrose tiling of pentagonal rotational symmetry, reaching 0.1–0.2% wall-plug efficiencies and 65 mW peak output powers with characteristic surface-emitting conical beam profiles, result of the rich quasi-crystal Fourier spectrum. PMID:25523102

  12. The determination of progressive deformation histories from antitaxial syntectonic crystal fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Michael A.

    Antitaxial, syntectonic crystal fibres are modelled here as 'mechanically-passive' features, the fibres representing displacement paths, forming within a homogeneously deforming material. Evidence that many fibres develop in this way is widespread: asymptotic curvature, thinning of fibres, and strained old fibres. A measuring technique is proposed by which the complete deformation history (excluding translation) may be determined. The method involves the iterative unstraining of two complete fibres whose development began and ended simultaneously. A source of error is introduced by assuming that each of the two fibres developed at constant proportional rates, although synthetic examples suggest this error to be minimal. It is suggested that the kinematics of non-passive fibres are unobtainable since the rheologies and boundary conditions of the material involved are relatively unknown, and cannot be determined from geometry alone. Analysis of natural fibres found within the Ordovician slates in New Jersey, U.S.A. indicates that volume losses of up to 50% may occur during the formation of some slates. General constraints concerning the geometrical analysis of syntectonic crystal fibres are briefly discussed, and it is concluded that deformation histories must be interpreted with some modicum of caution.

  13. One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Superprisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David

    2005-01-01

    Theoretical calculations indicate that it should be possible for one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystals (see figure) to exhibit giant dispersions known as the superprism effect. Previously, three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystal superprisms have demonstrated strong wavelength dispersion - about 500 times that of conventional prisms and diffraction gratings. Unlike diffraction gratings, superprisms do not exhibit zero-order transmission or higher-order diffraction, thereby eliminating cross-talk problems. However, the fabrication of these 3D photonic crystals requires complex electron-beam substrate patterning and multilayer thin-film sputtering processes. The proposed 1D superprism is much simpler in structural complexity and, therefore, easier to design and fabricate. Like their 3D counterparts, the 1D superprisms can exhibit giant dispersions over small spectral bands that can be tailored by judicious structure design and tuned by varying incident beam direction. Potential applications include miniature gas-sensing devices.

  14. Computational Modeling of Photonic Crystal Microcavity Single-Photon Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saulnier, Nicole A.

    Conventional cryptography is based on algorithms that are mathematically complex and difficult to solve, such as factoring large numbers. The advent of a quantum computer would render these schemes useless. As scientists work to develop a quantum computer, cryptographers are developing new schemes for unconditionally secure cryptography. Quantum key distribution has emerged as one of the potential replacements of classical cryptography. It relics on the fact that measurement of a quantum bit changes the state of the bit and undetected eavesdropping is impossible. Single polarized photons can be used as the quantum bits, such that a quantum system would in some ways mirror the classical communication scheme. The quantum key distribution system would include components that create, transmit and detect single polarized photons. The focus of this work is on the development of an efficient single-photon source. This source is comprised of a single quantum dot inside of a photonic crystal microcavity. To better understand the physics behind the device, a computational model is developed. The model uses Finite-Difference Time-Domain methods to analyze the electromagnetic field distribution in photonic crystal microcavities. It uses an 8-band k · p perturbation theory to compute the energy band structure of the epitaxially grown quantum dots. We discuss a method that combines the results of these two calculations for determining the spontaneous emission lifetime of a quantum dot in bulk material or in a microcavity. The computational models developed in this thesis are used to identify and characterize microcavities for potential use in a single-photon source. The computational tools developed are also used to investigate novel photonic crystal microcavities that incorporate 1D distributed Bragg reflectors for vertical confinement. It is found that the spontaneous emission enhancement in the quasi-3D cavities can be significantly greater than in traditional suspended slab

  15. Veselago lens by photonic hyper-crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zun Narimanov, Evgenii E.

    2014-07-21

    Based on the recent concept of the photonic hyper-crystal—an artificial optical medium that combines the properties of hyperbolic materials and photonic crystals, we present the imaging system functioning as a Veselago lens. This planar lens shows a nearly constant negative refractive index with substantially reduced image aberrations, and can find potential applications in photolithography and hot-spots detection of silicon-based integrated circuits.

  16. Traceable calibration of a fibre-coupled superconducting nano-wire single photon detector using characterized synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Ingmar; Klein, Roman M.; Werner, Lutz

    2014-12-01

    Radiometric calibrations of fibre-coupled single photon detectors are experiencing growing demand, especially at the telecommunication wavelengths. In this paper, the radiometric calibration of a fibre-coupled superconducting nano-wire single photon detector at the telecom wavelength 1.55 µm by means of well-characterized synchrotron radiation is described. This substitution method is based on the unique properties of synchrotron radiation and the Metrology Light Source, the dedicated electron storage ring of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, and is suitable for fibre-coupled single photon detectors. The Metrology Light Source is used as a light source with a high dynamic range of the radiant power to bridge the radiometric gap occurring in the transition from radiant power measurements and the counting of photons with single photon detectors. Very low uncertainties below 2% have been achieved in the measurement of the detection efficiency of a fibre-coupled superconducting nano-wire single photon detector.

  17. Integrated photonic crystal selective emitter for thermophotovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhiguang; Yehia, Omar; Bermel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Converting blackbody thermal radiation to electricity via thermophotovoltaics (TPV) is inherently inefficient. Photon recycling using cold-side filters offers potentially improved performance but requires extremely close spacing between the thermal emitter and the receiver, namely a high view factor. Here, we propose an alternative approach for thermal energy conversion, the use of an integrated photonic crystal selective emitter (IPSE), which combines two-dimensional photonic crystal selective emitters and filters into a single device. Finite difference time domain and current transport simulations show that IPSEs can significantly suppress sub-bandgap photons. This increases heat-to-electricity conversion for photonic crystal based emitters from 35.2 up to 41.8% at 1573 K for a GaSb photovoltaic (PV) diode with matched bandgaps of 0.7 eV. The physical basis of this enhancement is a shift from a perturbative to a nonperturbative regime, which maximized photon recycling. Furthermore, combining IPSEs with nonconductive optical waveguides eliminates a key difficulty associated with TPV: the need for precise alignment between the hot selective emitter and cool PV diode. The physical effects of both the IPSE and waveguide can be quantified in terms of an extension of the concept of an effective view factor.

  18. Ultra compact spectrometer apparatus and method using photonic crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed to methods of photonic crystal formation, and to methods and apparatus for using such photonic crystals, particularly in conjunction with detector arrays. Photonic crystal parameters and detector array parameters are compared to optimize the selection and orientation of a photonic crystal shape. A photonic crystal is operatively positioned relative to a plurality of light sensors. The light sensors can be separated by a pitch distance and positioned within one half of the pitch distance of an exit surface of the photonic crystals.

  19. Optical amplification enhancement in photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Sapienza, R.; Leonetti, M.; Froufe-Perez, L. S.; Galisteo-Lopez, J. F.; Lopez, C.; Conti, C.

    2011-02-15

    Improving and controlling the efficiency of a gain medium is one of the most challenging problems of laser research. By measuring the gain length in an opal-based photonic crystal doped with laser dye, we demonstrate that optical amplification is more than twenty-fold enhanced along the {Gamma}-K symmetry directions of the face-centered-cubic photonic crystal. These results are theoretically explained by directional variations of the density of states, providing a quantitative connection between density of the states and light amplification.

  20. Crystallization of the C-terminal head domain of the avian adenovirus CELO long fibre

    SciTech Connect

    Guardado Calvo, Pablo; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Langlois, Patrick; Raaij, Mark J. van

    2006-05-01

    Avian adenovirus long-fibre head trimers were expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals belong to space group C2 (unit-cell parameters a = 216.5, b = 59.2, c = 57.5 Å, β = 101.3°). A complete highly redundant data set was collected to 2.2 Å resolution at 100 K using a rotating-anode X-ray source. Avian adenovirus CELO contains two different fibres: fibre 1, the long fibre, and fibre 2, the short fibre. The short fibre is responsible for binding to an unknown avian receptor and is essential for infection of birds. The long fibre is not essential, but is known to bind the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor protein. Both trimeric fibres are attached to the same penton base, of which each icosahedral virus contains 12 copies. The short fibre extends straight outwards, while the long fibre emerges at an angle. The carboxy-terminal amino acids 579–793 of the avian adenovirus long fibre have been expressed with an amino-terminal hexahistidine tag and the expressed trimeric protein has been purified by nickel-affinity chromatography and crystallized. Crystals were grown at low pH using PEG 10 000 as precipitant and belonged to space group C2. The crystals diffracted rotating-anode Cu Kα radiation to at least 1.9 Å resolution and a complete data set was collected from a single crystal to 2.2 Å resolution. Unit-cell parameters were a = 216.5, b = 59.2, c = 57.5 Å, β = 101.3°, suggesting one trimer per asymmetric unit and a solvent content of 46%. The long fibre head does not have significant sequence homology to any other protein of known structure and molecular-replacement attempts with known fibre-head structures were unsuccessful. However, a map calculated using SIRAS phasing shows a clear trimer with a shape similar to known adenovirus fibre-head structures. Structure solution is in progress.

  1. Self-assembled tunable photonic hyper-crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolyaninov, Igor; Smolyaninova, Vera; Yost, Bradley; Lahneman, David; Gresock, Thomas; Narimanov, Evgenii

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a novel artificial optical material, the photonic hyper-crystal, which combines the most interesting features of hyperbolic metamaterials and photonic crystals. Similar to hyperbolic metamaterials, photonic hyper-crystals exhibit broadband divergence in their photonic density of states due to the lack of usual diffraction limit on the photon wave vector. On the other hand, similar to photonic crystals, hyperbolic dispersion law of extraordinary photons is modulated by forbidden gaps near the boundaries of photonic Brillouin zones. Three dimensional self-assembly of photonic hyper-crystals has been achieved by application of external magnetic field to a cobalt nanoparticle-based ferrofluid. Unique spectral properties of photonic hyper-crystals lead to extreme sensitivity of the material to monolayer coatings of cobalt nanoparticles, which should find numerous applications in biological and chemical sensing. This work was supported in part by NSF Grant DMR-1104676, NSF Center for Photonic and Multiscale Nanomaterials, ARO MURI and Gordon and Berry Moore Foundation.

  2. Extreme electronic bandgap modification in laser-crystallized silicon optical fibres.

    PubMed

    Healy, Noel; Mailis, Sakellaris; Bulgakova, Nadezhda M; Sazio, Pier J A; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Cheng, Hiu Y; Badding, John V; Peacock, Anna C

    2014-12-01

    For decades now, silicon has been the workhorse of the microelectronics revolution and a key enabler of the information age. Owing to its excellent optical properties in the near- and mid-infrared, silicon is now promising to have a similar impact on photonics. The ability to incorporate both optical and electronic functionality in a single material offers the tantalizing prospect of amplifying, modulating and detecting light within a monolithic platform. However, a direct consequence of silicon's transparency is that it cannot be used to detect light at telecommunications wavelengths. Here, we report on a laser processing technique developed for our silicon fibre technology through which we can modify the electronic band structure of the semiconductor material as it is crystallized. The unique fibre geometry in which the silicon core is confined within a silica cladding allows large anisotropic stresses to be set into the crystalline material so that the size of the bandgap can be engineered. We demonstrate extreme bandgap reductions from 1.11 eV down to 0.59 eV, enabling optical detection out to 2,100 nm. PMID:25262096

  3. Extreme electronic bandgap modification in laser-crystallized silicon optical fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, Noel; Mailis, Sakellaris; Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.; Sazio, Pier J. A.; Day, Todd D.; Sparks, Justin R.; Cheng, Hiu Y.; Badding, John V.; Peacock, Anna C.

    2014-12-01

    For decades now, silicon has been the workhorse of the microelectronics revolution and a key enabler of the information age. Owing to its excellent optical properties in the near- and mid-infrared, silicon is now promising to have a similar impact on photonics. The ability to incorporate both optical and electronic functionality in a single material offers the tantalizing prospect of amplifying, modulating and detecting light within a monolithic platform. However, a direct consequence of silicon’s transparency is that it cannot be used to detect light at telecommunications wavelengths. Here, we report on a laser processing technique developed for our silicon fibre technology through which we can modify the electronic band structure of the semiconductor material as it is crystallized. The unique fibre geometry in which the silicon core is confined within a silica cladding allows large anisotropic stresses to be set into the crystalline material so that the size of the bandgap can be engineered. We demonstrate extreme bandgap reductions from 1.11 eV down to 0.59 eV, enabling optical detection out to 2,100 nm.

  4. Photon statistics in scintillation crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, Vaibhav Joga Singh

    Scintillation based gamma-ray detectors are widely used in medical imaging, high-energy physics, astronomy and national security. Scintillation gamma-ray detectors are eld-tested, relatively inexpensive, and have good detection eciency. Semi-conductor detectors are gaining popularity because of their superior capability to resolve gamma-ray energies. However, they are relatively hard to manufacture and therefore, at this time, not available in as large formats and much more expensive than scintillation gamma-ray detectors. Scintillation gamma-ray detectors consist of: a scintillator, a material that emits optical (scintillation) photons when it interacts with ionization radiation, and an optical detector that detects the emitted scintillation photons and converts them into an electrical signal. Compared to semiconductor gamma-ray detectors, scintillation gamma-ray detectors have relatively poor capability to resolve gamma-ray energies. This is in large part attributed to the "statistical limit" on the number of scintillation photons. The origin of this statistical limit is the assumption that scintillation photons are either Poisson distributed or super-Poisson distributed. This statistical limit is often dened by the Fano factor. The Fano factor of an integer-valued random process is dened as the ratio of its variance to its mean. Therefore, a Poisson process has a Fano factor of one. The classical theory of light limits the Fano factor of the number of photons to a value greater than or equal to one (Poisson case). However, the quantum theory of light allows for Fano factors to be less than one. We used two methods to look at the correlations between two detectors looking at same scintillation pulse to estimate the Fano factor of the scintillation photons. The relationship between the Fano factor and the correlation between the integral of the two signals detected was analytically derived, and the Fano factor was estimated using the measurements for SrI2:Eu, YAP

  5. Self-assembled tunable photonic hyper-crystals.

    PubMed

    Smolyaninova, Vera N; Yost, Bradley; Lahneman, David; Narimanov, Evgenii E; Smolyaninov, Igor I

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel artificial optical material, the "photonic hyper-crystal", which combines the most interesting features of hyperbolic metamaterials and photonic crystals. Similar to hyperbolic metamaterials, photonic hyper-crystals exhibit broadband divergence in their photonic density of states due to the lack of usual diffraction limit on the photon wave vector. On the other hand, similar to photonic crystals, hyperbolic dispersion law of extraordinary photons is modulated by forbidden gaps near the boundaries of photonic Brillouin zones. Three dimensional self-assembly of photonic hyper-crystals has been achieved by application of external magnetic field to a cobalt nanoparticle-based ferrofluid. Unique spectral properties of photonic hyper-crystals lead to extreme sensitivity of the material to monolayer coatings of cobalt nanoparticles, which should find numerous applications in biological and chemical sensing. PMID:25027947

  6. Visible stealth materials based on photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Guozheng; Liu, Ying

    2014-08-01

    Optical thin film can be used for invisible cloak. As a kind of low-dimension photonic crystal, it is a candidate for metamaterial with designed Σ and μ. As a coating, it is convenient to be stacked to mimic continuous changing of electromagnetic media. Anti-reflection film is suitable for matching coating between layers of media.

  7. Fabrication and Analysis of Photonic Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Dean J.; Korte, Kylee E.; Xia, Younan

    2007-01-01

    These laboratory experiments are designed to explore aspects of nanoscale chemistry by constructing and spectroscopically analyzing thin films of photonic crystals. Films comprised of colloidal spheres and polydimethylsiloxane exhibit diffraction-based stop bands that shift reversibly upon exposure to some common solvents. Topics covered in these…

  8. Photonic Crystal Sensors Based on Porous Silicon

    PubMed Central

    Pacholski, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Porous silicon has been established as an excellent sensing platform for the optical detection of hazardous chemicals and biomolecular interactions such as DNA hybridization, antigen/antibody binding, and enzymatic reactions. Its porous nature provides a high surface area within a small volume, which can be easily controlled by changing the pore sizes. As the porosity and consequently the refractive index of an etched porous silicon layer depends on the electrochemial etching conditions photonic crystals composed of multilayered porous silicon films with well-resolved and narrow optical reflectivity features can easily be obtained. The prominent optical response of the photonic crystal decreases the detection limit and therefore increases the sensitivity of porous silicon sensors in comparison to sensors utilizing Fabry-Pérot based optical transduction. Development of porous silicon photonic crystal sensors which allow for the detection of analytes by the naked eye using a simple color change or the fabrication of stacked porous silicon photonic crystals showing two distinct optical features which can be utilized for the discrimination of analytes emphasize its high application potential. PMID:23571671

  9. Tunable one-dimensional photonic crystal slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beccherelli, R.; Bellini, B.; Zografopoulos, D.; Kriezis, E.

    2007-05-01

    A 1D photonic crystal slab based on preferential etching of commercially available silicon-on-insulator wafers is presented. Compared to dry etching, anisotropic wet etching is more tolerant to errors as it is self-stopping on crystallographic {111} planes and it produces a more precise geometry with symmetries and homothetic properties, with surface roughness close to 1 nm. The resulting grooves are infiltrated by low viscosity liquid crystal having large positive optical anisotropy. The use of slanted grooves provides advantages: first of all the complete filling of slanted grooves is simplified when compared to vertical walls structures. Furthermore alignment is significantly facilitated. Indeed the liquid crystal molecules tend to align with their long axis along the submicron grooves. Therefore by forcing reorientation out of a rest position, the liquid crystal presents a choice of refractive indices to the propagating optical field. The liquid crystal behavior is simulated by a finite element method, and coupled to a finite difference time domain method. We investigate different photonic crystal configurations. Large tunability of bandgap edge for TE polarization is demonstrated when switching the liquid crystal with an applied voltage. We have also studied the use of the same device geometry as a very compact microfluidic refractometric sensor.

  10. Self-assembled tunable photonic hyper-crystals

    PubMed Central

    Smolyaninova, Vera N.; Yost, Bradley; Lahneman, David; Narimanov, Evgenii E.; Smolyaninov, Igor I.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel artificial optical material, the “photonic hyper-crystal”, which combines the most interesting features of hyperbolic metamaterials and photonic crystals. Similar to hyperbolic metamaterials, photonic hyper-crystals exhibit broadband divergence in their photonic density of states due to the lack of usual diffraction limit on the photon wave vector. On the other hand, similar to photonic crystals, hyperbolic dispersion law of extraordinary photons is modulated by forbidden gaps near the boundaries of photonic Brillouin zones. Three dimensional self-assembly of photonic hyper-crystals has been achieved by application of external magnetic field to a cobalt nanoparticle-based ferrofluid. Unique spectral properties of photonic hyper-crystals lead to extreme sensitivity of the material to monolayer coatings of cobalt nanoparticles, which should find numerous applications in biological and chemical sensing. PMID:25027947

  11. Review on photonic crystal coatings for scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapitsch, Arno; Lecoq, Paul

    2014-11-01

    The amount of light and its time distribution are key factors determining the performance of scintillators when used as radiation detectors. However most inorganic scintillators are made of heavy materials and suffer from a high index of refraction which limits light extraction efficiency. This increases the path length of the photons in the material with the consequence of higher absorption and tails in the time distribution of the extracted light. Photonic crystals are a relatively new way of conquering this light extraction problem. Basically they are a way to produce a smooth and controllable index matching between the scintillator and the output medium through the nanostructuration of a thin layer of optically transparent high index material deposited at the coupling face of the scintillator. Our review paper discusses the theory behind this approach as well as the simulation details. Furthermore the different lithography steps of the production of an actual photonic crystal sample will be explained. Measurement results of LSO scintillator pixels covered with a nanolithography machined photonic crystal surface are presented together with practical tips for the further development and improvement of this technique.

  12. The bifoil photodyne: a photonic crystal oscillator.

    PubMed

    Lugo, J E; Doti, R; Sanchez, N; de la Mora, M B; del Rio, J A; Faubert, J

    2014-01-01

    Optical tweezers is an example how to use light to generate a physical force. They have been used to levitate viruses, bacteria, cells, and sub cellular organisms. Nonetheless it would be beneficial to use such force to develop a new kind of applications. However the radiation pressure usually is small to think in moving larger objects. Currently, there is some research investigating novel photonic working principles to generate a higher force. Here, we studied theoretically and experimentally the induction of electromagnetic forces in one-dimensional photonic crystals when light impinges on the off-axis direction. The photonic structure consists of a micro-cavity like structure formed of two one-dimensional photonic crystals made of free-standing porous silicon, separated by a variable air gap and the working wavelength is 633 nm. We show experimental evidence of this force when the photonic structure is capable of making auto-oscillations and forced-oscillations. We measured peak displacements and velocities ranging from 2 up to 35 microns and 0.4 up to 2.1 mm/s with a power of 13 mW. Recent evidence showed that giant resonant light forces could induce average velocity values of 0.45 mm/s in microspheres embedded in water with 43 mW light power. PMID:24423985

  13. The bifoil photodyne: a photonic crystal oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugo, J. E.; Doti, R.; Sanchez, N.; de La Mora, M. B.; Del Rio, J. A.; Faubert, J.

    2014-01-01

    Optical tweezers is an example how to use light to generate a physical force. They have been used to levitate viruses, bacteria, cells, and sub cellular organisms. Nonetheless it would be beneficial to use such force to develop a new kind of applications. However the radiation pressure usually is small to think in moving larger objects. Currently, there is some research investigating novel photonic working principles to generate a higher force. Here, we studied theoretically and experimentally the induction of electromagnetic forces in one-dimensional photonic crystals when light impinges on the off-axis direction. The photonic structure consists of a micro-cavity like structure formed of two one-dimensional photonic crystals made of free-standing porous silicon, separated by a variable air gap and the working wavelength is 633 nm. We show experimental evidence of this force when the photonic structure is capable of making auto-oscillations and forced-oscillations. We measured peak displacements and velocities ranging from 2 up to 35 microns and 0.4 up to 2.1 mm/s with a power of 13 mW. Recent evidence showed that giant resonant light forces could induce average velocity values of 0.45 mm/s in microspheres embedded in water with 43 mW light power.

  14. The bifoil photodyne: a photonic crystal oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Lugo, J. E.; Doti, R.; Sanchez, N.; de la Mora, M. B.; del Rio, J. A.; Faubert, J.

    2014-01-01

    Optical tweezers is an example how to use light to generate a physical force. They have been used to levitate viruses, bacteria, cells, and sub cellular organisms. Nonetheless it would be beneficial to use such force to develop a new kind of applications. However the radiation pressure usually is small to think in moving larger objects. Currently, there is some research investigating novel photonic working principles to generate a higher force. Here, we studied theoretically and experimentally the induction of electromagnetic forces in one-dimensional photonic crystals when light impinges on the off-axis direction. The photonic structure consists of a micro-cavity like structure formed of two one-dimensional photonic crystals made of free-standing porous silicon, separated by a variable air gap and the working wavelength is 633 nm. We show experimental evidence of this force when the photonic structure is capable of making auto-oscillations and forced-oscillations. We measured peak displacements and velocities ranging from 2 up to 35 microns and 0.4 up to 2.1 mm/s with a power of 13 mW. Recent evidence showed that giant resonant light forces could induce average velocity values of 0.45 mm/s in microspheres embedded in water with 43 mW light power. PMID:24423985

  15. A photon-driven micromotor can direct nerve fibre growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao; Nieminen, Timo A.; Mohanty, Samarendra; Miotke, Jill; Meyer, Ronald L.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Berns, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Axonal path-finding is important in the development of the nervous system, nerve repair and nerve regeneration. The behaviour of the growth cone at the tip of the growing axon determines the direction of axonal growth and migration. We have developed an optical-based system to control the direction of growth of individual axons (nerve fibres) using laser-driven spinning birefringent spheres. One or two optical traps position birefringent beads adjacent to growth cones of cultured goldfish retinal ganglion cell axons. Circularly polarized light with angular momentum causes the trapped bead to spin. This creates a localized microfluidic flow generating an estimated 0.17 pN shear force against the growth cone that turns in response to the shear. The direction of axonal growth can be precisely manipulated by changing the rotation direction and position of this optically driven micromotor. A physical model estimating the shear force density on the axon is described.

  16. Photonic crystal slab quantum cascade detector

    SciTech Connect

    Reininger, Peter Schwarz, Benedikt; Harrer, Andreas; Zederbauer, Tobias; Detz, Hermann; Maxwell Andrews, Aaron; Gansch, Roman; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried

    2013-12-09

    In this Letter, we demonstrate the design, fabrication, and characterization of a photonic crystal slab quantum cascade detector (PCS-QCD). By employing a specifically designed resonant cavity, the performance of the photodetector is improved in three distinct ways. The PCS makes the QCD sensitive to surface normal incident light. It resonantly enhances the photon lifetime inside the active zone, thus increasing the photocurrent significantly. And, the construction form of the device inherently decreases the noise. Finally, we compare the characteristics of the PCS-QCD to a PCS - quantum well infrared photodetector and outline the advantages for certain fields of applications.

  17. Photonic crystals: Theory and device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shanhui

    In this thesis, first-principle frequency-domain and time-domain methods are developed and applied to investigate various properties and device applications of photonic crystals. In Chapter 2, I discuss the two numerical methods used to investigate the properties of photonic crystals. The first solves Maxwell's equations in the frequency domain, while the second solves the equations in the time domain. The frequency-domain method yields the frequency, polarization, symmetry, and field distribution of every eigenmode of the system; the time-domain method allows one to determine the temporal behavior of the modes. In Chapter 3, a new class of three-dimensional photonic crystal structures is introduced that is amenable for fabrication at submicron-length scales. The structures give rise to a 3D photonic bandgap. They consist of a layered structure in which a series of cylindrical air holes are etched at normal incidence. The calculation demonstrates the existence of a gap as large as 14% of the mid-gap frequency using Si, SiO2, and air; and 23% using Si and air. In Chapter 4, the bandstructure and transmission properties of three-dimensional metallodielectric photonic crystals are presented. The metallodielectric crystals are modeled as perfect electrical conducting objects embedded in dielectric media. We investigate the face-centered-cubic (fcc) lattice, and the diamond lattice. Partial gaps are predicted in the fcc lattice, in excellent agreement with recent experiments. Complete gaps are found in a diamond lattice of isolated metal spheres. The gaps appear between the second and third bands, and their sizes can be larger than 60% when the radius of the spheres exceeds 21% of the cubic unit cell size. In Chapter 5, I investigate the properties of resonant modes which arise from the introduction of local defects in two-dimensional (2D) and 3D photonic crystals. The properties of these modes can be controlled by changing the nature and the size of the defects. The

  18. Breakdown of Bose-Einstein Distribution in Photonic Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Ping-Yuan; Xiong, Heng-Na; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2015-01-01

    In the last two decades, considerable advances have been made in the investigation of nano-photonics in photonic crystals. Previous theoretical investigations of photon dynamics were carried out at zero temperature. Here, we investigate micro/nano cavity photonics in photonic crystals at finite temperature. Due to photonic-band-gap-induced localized long-lived photon dynamics, we discover that cavity photons in photonic crystals do not obey Bose-Einstein statistical distribution. Within the photonic band gap and in the vicinity of the band edge, cavity photons combine the long-lived non-Markovain dynamics with thermal fluctuations together to form photon states that memorize the initial cavity state information. As a result, Bose-Einstein distribution is completely broken down in these regimes, even if the thermal energy is larger or much larger than the cavity detuning energy. In this investigation, a crossover phenomenon from equilibrium to nonequilibrium steady states is also revealed. PMID:25822135

  19. A plasma photonic crystal bandgap device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    A fully tunable plasma photonic crystal is used to control the propagation of free space electromagnetic waves in the S to X bands of the microwave spectrum. An array of discharge plasma tubes forms a simple square crystal structure with the individual plasma dielectric constant tuned through variation in the plasma density. We show, through simulations and experiments, that transverse electric mode bandgaps exist, arising from the positive and negative dielectric constant regimes of the plasma, and that the respective bandgap frequencies can be shifted through changing the dielectric constant by varying discharge current density.

  20. Focusing concave lens using photonic crystals with magnetic materials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shieh-Yueh; Hong, Chin-Yih; Yang, Hong-Chang

    2006-04-01

    The guided modes lying in the upper gap-edge band in the photonic band structure of photonic crystals have negative values of refractive index. This feature generates many interesting optical phenomena, and some spectacular photonic devices such as focusing slabs have been developed. We report the design of a photonic-crystal, planoconcave lens for focusing incident parallel light, and theoretically analyze the chromatic aberrations for TM and TE modes. In addition to dielectric photonic crystals, the chromatic aberration of a magnetic photonic-crystal planoconcave lens was investigated because the magnetic permeability may also contribute to the periodic index contrast in photonic crystals, especially at long wavelengths. A significant difference was found in the chromatic aberration for a TM mode propagating in a dielectric than in a magnetic photonic-crystal planoconcave lens. PMID:16604781

  1. A tunable microwave plasma photonic crystal filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    The integration of gaseous plasma elements into a microwave photonic crystal band gap cavity structure allows for active tuning of the device. An alumina rod array microwave photonic crystal waveguide resonator is simulated and characterized through finite difference time domain methods. A gaseous plasma element is integrated into the cavity structure and the effect of plasma density on the transmission properties of the structure is investigated. We show, through both simulations and experiments, that the permittivity of the plasma can be adjusted to shift the peak resonance to allow for both switching and tunability of transmission. The experimentally measured peak shifts in transmission are compared to those simulated and the electron density of the gaseous plasma element is calculated and compared to values determined from the measured discharge current density.

  2. "Wandering" soliton in a nonlinear photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysak, T. M.; Trofimov, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    On the basis of computer simulation, we demonstrate the possibility of a new type of "wandering" solitons implementation in nonlinear periodic layered structures. "Wandering" soliton moves across the layers, repeatedly changing its direction of motion due to the reflection from the photonic crystal (PC) boundaries with the ambient medium. The initial soliton is located inside a PC and occupies several of its layers. Its profile can be found as the solution of the corresponding nonlinear eigenvalue problem. "Wandering" solitons are formed as a result of a large perturbation of the wave vector, which leads to the soliton motion across photonic crystal layers. In the process of reflection from the boundary with the ambient medium, the soliton partly penetrates into the ambient medium at a depth equal to the width of several PC layers. A slow return of light energy, which previously left the PC, can take place at this moment.

  3. Absorption enhancement in graphene photonic crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Khaleque, Abdul; Hattori, Haroldo T

    2016-04-10

    Graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice, is attracting significant interest because of its potential applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices. Although graphene exhibits almost uniform absorption within a large wavelength range, its interaction with light is weak. In this paper, the enhancement of the optical absorption in graphene photonic crystal structures is studied: the structure is modified by introducing scatterers and mirrors. It is shown that the absorption of the graphene photonic crystal structure can be enhanced about four times (nearly 40%) with respect to initial reference absorption of 9.8%. The study can be a useful tool for investigating graphene physics in different optical settings. PMID:27139857

  4. A tunable microwave plasma photonic crystal filter

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2015-10-26

    The integration of gaseous plasma elements into a microwave photonic crystal band gap cavity structure allows for active tuning of the device. An alumina rod array microwave photonic crystal waveguide resonator is simulated and characterized through finite difference time domain methods. A gaseous plasma element is integrated into the cavity structure and the effect of plasma density on the transmission properties of the structure is investigated. We show, through both simulations and experiments, that the permittivity of the plasma can be adjusted to shift the peak resonance to allow for both switching and tunability of transmission. The experimentally measured peak shifts in transmission are compared to those simulated and the electron density of the gaseous plasma element is calculated and compared to values determined from the measured discharge current density.

  5. Transmission character of general function photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiang-Yao; Zhang, Bo-Jun; Yang, Jing-Hai; Zhang, Si-Qi; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Wang, Jing; Ba, Nuo; Hua, Zhong; Yin, Xin-Guo

    2012-08-01

    In the paper, we present a new general function photonic crystals (GFPCs), whose refractive index of medium is a arbitrary function of space position. Unlike conventional photonic crystals (PCs), whose structure grows from two mediums A and B, with different constant refractive indexes na and nb. Based on the Fermat principle, we give the motion equations of light in one-dimensional GFPCs, and calculate its transfer matrix, which is different from the conventional PCs. We choose the linearity refractive index function for two mediums A and B, and find the transmissivity of one-dimensional GFPCs can be much larger or smaller than 1 for different slope linearity refractive index functions, which are different from the transmissivity of conventional PCs (its transmissivity is in the range of 0 and 1). Otherwise, we study the effect of different incident angles, the number of periods and optical thickness on the transmissivity, and obtain some new results different from the conventional PCs.

  6. Metallic photonic crystals at optical wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kady, I.; Sigalas, M. M.; Biswas, R.; Ho, K. M.; Soukoulis, C. M.

    2000-12-01

    We theoretically study three-dimensional metallic photonic-band-gap (PBG) materials at near-infrared and optical wavelengths. Our main objective is to find the importance of absorption in the metal and the suitability of observing photonic band gaps in this structure. For that reason, we study simple cubic structures and the metallic scatterers are either cubes or interconnected metallic rods. Several different metals have been studied (aluminum, gold, copper, and silver). Copper gives the smallest absorption and aluminum is more absorptive. The isolated metallic cubes are less lossy than the connected rod structures. The calculations suggest that isolated copper scatterers are very attractive candidates for the fabrication of photonic crystals at the optical wavelengths.

  7. Nonreciprocal photonic crystal add-drop filter

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Keyu; Xiao, Jun-Jun; Yin, Xiaobo

    2014-11-24

    We present a versatile add-drop integrated photonic filter (ADF) consisting of nonreciprocal waveguides in which the propagation of light is restricted in one predetermined direction. With the bus and add/drop waveguides symmetrically coupled through a cavity, the four-port device allows each individual port to add and/or drop a signal of the same frequency. The scheme is general and we demonstrate the nonreciprocal ADF with magneto-optical photonic crystals. The filter is immune to waveguide defects, allowing straightforward implementation of multi-channel ADFs by cascading the four-port designs. The results should find applications in wavelength-division multiplexing and related integrated photonic techniques.

  8. Optical microfiber-based photonic crystal cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Sun, Yi-zhi; Andrews, Steve; Li, Zhi-yuan; Ding, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Using a focused ion beam milling technique, we fabricate broad stop band (∼10% wide) photonic crystal (PhC) cavities in adiabatically-tapered silica fibers. Abrupt structural design of PhC mirrors efficiently reduces radiation loss, increasing the cavity finesse to ∼7.5. Further experiments and simulations verify that the remaining loss is mainly due to Ga ion implantation. Such a microfiber PhC cavity probably has potentials in many light-matter interaction applications.

  9. All-fibre photonic signal generator for attosecond timing and ultralow-noise microwave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Kwangyun; Kim, Jungwon

    2015-11-01

    High-impact frequency comb applications that are critically dependent on precise pulse timing (i.e., repetition rate) have recently emerged and include the synchronization of X-ray free-electron lasers, photonic analogue-to-digital conversion and photonic radar systems. These applications have used attosecond-level timing jitter of free-running mode-locked lasers on a fast time scale within ~100 μs. Maintaining attosecond-level absolute jitter over a significantly longer time scale can dramatically improve many high-precision comb applications. To date, ultrahigh quality-factor (Q) optical resonators have been used to achieve the highest-level repetition-rate stabilization of mode-locked lasers. However, ultrahigh-Q optical-resonator-based methods are often fragile, alignment sensitive and complex, which limits their widespread use. Here we demonstrate a fibre-delay line-based repetition-rate stabilization method that enables the all-fibre photonic generation of optical pulse trains with 980-as (20-fs) absolute r.m.s. timing jitter accumulated over 0.01 s (1 s). This simple approach is based on standard off-the-shelf fibre components and can therefore be readily used in various comb applications that require ultra-stable microwave frequency and attosecond optical timing.

  10. All-fibre photonic signal generator for attosecond timing and ultralow-noise microwave

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kwangyun; Kim, Jungwon

    2015-01-01

    High-impact frequency comb applications that are critically dependent on precise pulse timing (i.e., repetition rate) have recently emerged and include the synchronization of X-ray free-electron lasers, photonic analogue-to-digital conversion and photonic radar systems. These applications have used attosecond-level timing jitter of free-running mode-locked lasers on a fast time scale within ~100 μs. Maintaining attosecond-level absolute jitter over a significantly longer time scale can dramatically improve many high-precision comb applications. To date, ultrahigh quality-factor (Q) optical resonators have been used to achieve the highest-level repetition-rate stabilization of mode-locked lasers. However, ultrahigh-Q optical-resonator-based methods are often fragile, alignment sensitive and complex, which limits their widespread use. Here we demonstrate a fibre-delay line-based repetition-rate stabilization method that enables the all-fibre photonic generation of optical pulse trains with 980-as (20-fs) absolute r.m.s. timing jitter accumulated over 0.01 s (1 s). This simple approach is based on standard off-the-shelf fibre components and can therefore be readily used in various comb applications that require ultra-stable microwave frequency and attosecond optical timing. PMID:26531777

  11. Two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals in dielectric barrier discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Weili; Dong Lifang; Zhang Xinchun

    2010-11-15

    A series of two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals have been obtained by filaments' self-organization in atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge with two water electrodes, which undergo the transition from square to square superlattice and finally to the hexagon. The spatio-temporal behaviors of the plasma photonic crystals in nanosecond scale have been studied by optical method, which show that the plasma photonic crystal is actually an integration of different transient sublattices. The photonic band diagrams of the transverse electric (TE) mode and transverse magnetic mode for each sublattice of these plasma photonic crystals have been investigated theoretically. A wide complete band gap is formed in the hexagonal plasma photonic crystal with the TE mode. The changes of the band edge frequencies and the band gap widths in the evolvement of different structures are studied. A kind of tunable plasma photonic crystal which can be controlled both in space and time is suggested.

  12. Switchable tunneling mode for cylindrical photonic quantum well consisting of photonic crystals containing liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, C. A.; Yang, S. L.; Yang, T. J.

    2013-06-01

    We propose a cylindrical photonic quantum well made of photonic crystals containing liquid crystals, the properties of which are theoretically calculated and investigated by the transfer matrix method in the cylindrical symmetry system. Liquid crystals are introduced into the photonic quantum well structure as tunable defect layers. When the liquid crystals are pseudo-isotropic state and the azimuthal mode order of incident waves are m=0, there were two pass-bands around certain wavelength. When the liquid crystals are homeotropic state, the reflectance of pass-band at shorter wavelength decreases from 0.75 to 0.05 in the TM mode, but the reflectance does not change in the TE mode. When mode order m=1 and the liquid crystals are pseudo-isotropic state, the reflectance of defect mode stayed the same as m=0. However, the result is reversed while the phase of liquid crystals change from pseudo-isotropic to homeotropic state. The reflectance is the same as in the TM mode, but that in the TE mode decreases substantially from 0.75 to 0.05. The application of our structure to switching device is highly potential.

  13. Radiative energy transfer in disordered photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Erementchouk, M V; Deych, L I; Noh, H; Cao, H; Lisyansky, A A

    2009-04-29

    The difficulty of description of the radiative transfer in disordered photonic crystals arises from the necessity to consider on an equal footing the wave scattering by periodic modulations of the dielectric function and by its random inhomogeneities. We resolve this difficulty by approaching this problem from the standpoint of the general multiple scattering theory in media with an arbitrary regular profile of the dielectric function. We use the general asymptotic solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation in order to show that for a sufficiently weak disorder the diffusion limit in disordered photonic crystals is presented by incoherent superpositions of the modes of the ideal structure with weights inversely proportional to the respective group velocities. The radiative transfer and the diffusion equations are derived as a relaxation of long scale deviations from this limiting distribution. In particular, it is shown that in general the diffusion is anisotropic unless the crystal has sufficiently rich symmetry, say, the square lattice in 2D or the cubic lattice in 3D. In this case, the diffusion is isotropic and only in this case can the effect of the disorder be characterized by a single mean free path depending on frequency. PMID:21825416

  14. Zero-n gap in one dimensional photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chobey, Mahesh K.; Suthar, B.

    2016-05-01

    We study a one-dimensional (1-D) photonic crystal composed of Double Positive (DPS) and Double Negative (DNG) material. This structure shows omnidirectional photonic bandgap, which is insensitive with angle of incidence and polarization. To study the effect of structural parameters on the photonic band structure, we have calculated photonic band gap at various thicknesses of DPS and DNG.

  15. Raman cooling in silicon photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yin-Chung; Bahl, Gaurav

    2016-03-01

    Laser cooling of solids can be achieved through various photon up-conversion processes including anti-Stokes photoluminescence and anti-Stokes light scattering. While it has been shown that cooling using photoluminescence-based methods can achieve efficiency comparable to that of thermoelectric cooling, the reliance on specific transitions of the rare-earth dopants limits material choice. Light scattering, on the other hand, occurs in all materials, and has the potential to enable cooling in most materials. We show that by engineering the photonic density of states of a material, one can suppress the Stokes process, and enhance the anti-Stokes radiation. We employ the well-known diamond-structured photonic crystal patterned in crystalline silicon to demonstrate theoretically that when operating within a high transparency regime, the net energy removal rate from phonon annihilation can overcome the optical absorption. The engineered photonic density of states can thus enable simultaneous cooling of all Raman-active phonon modes and the net cooling of the solid.

  16. Slab photonic crystals with dimer colloid bases

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Erin K.; Liddell Watson, Chekesha M.

    2014-06-14

    The photonic band gap properties for centered rectangular monolayers of asymmetric dimers are reported. Colloids in suspension have been organized into the phase under confinement. The theoretical model is inspired by the range of asymmetric dimers synthesized via seeded emulsion polymerization and explores, in particular, the band structures as a function of degree of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion. These parameters are varied incrementally from spheres to lobe-tangent dimers over morphologies yielding physically realizable particles. The work addresses the relative scarcity of theoretical studies on photonic crystal slabs with vertical variation that is consistent with colloidal self-assembly. Odd, even and polarization independent gaps in the guided modes are determined for direct slab structures. A wide range of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion combinations having Brillouin zones with moderate to high isotropy support gaps between odd mode band indices 3-4 and even mode band indices 1-2 and 2-3.

  17. Photonic crystal devices formed by a charged-particle beam

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Shawn-Yu; Koops, Hans W. P.

    2000-01-01

    A photonic crystal device and method. The photonic crystal device comprises a substrate with at least one photonic crystal formed thereon by a charged-particle beam deposition method. Each photonic crystal comprises a plurality of spaced elements having a composition different from the substrate, and may further include one or more impurity elements substituted for spaced elements. Embodiments of the present invention may be provided as electromagnetic wave filters, polarizers, resonators, sources, mirrors, beam directors and antennas for use at wavelengths in the range from about 0.2 to 200 microns or longer. Additionally, photonic crystal devices may be provided with one or more electromagnetic waveguides adjacent to a photonic crystal for forming integrated electromagnetic circuits for use at optical, infrared, or millimeter-wave frequencies.

  18. Macroscopic response in active nonlinear photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Alagappan, Gandhi; John, Sajeev; Li, Er Ping

    2013-09-15

    We derive macroscopic equations of motion for the slowly varying electric field amplitude in three-dimensional active nonlinear optical nanostructures. We show that the microscopic Maxwell equations and polarization dynamics can be simplified to a macroscopic one-dimensional problem in the direction of group velocity. For a three-level active material, we derive the steady-state equations for normal mode frequency, threshold pumping, nonlinear Bloch mode amplitude, and lasing in photonic crystals. Our analytical results accurately recapture the results of exact numerical methods. PMID:24104802

  19. Broadband photon-photon interactions mediated by cold atoms in a photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litinskaya, Marina; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that photon-photon attraction can be engineered in the continuum of scattering states for pairs of photons propagating in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with cold atoms. The atoms are regularly spaced in an optical lattice configuration and the photons are resonantly tuned to an internal atomic transition. We show that the hard-core repulsion resulting from saturation of the atomic transitions induces bunching in the photonic component of the collective atom-photon modes (polaritons). Bunching is obtained in a frequency range as large as tens of GHz, and can be controlled by the inter-atomic separation. We provide a fully analytical explanation for this phenomenon by proving that correlations result from a mismatch of the quantization volumes for atomic excitations and photons in the continuum. Even stronger correlations can be observed for in-gap two-polariton bound states. Our theoretical results use parameters relevant for current experiments and suggest a simple and feasible way to induce interactions between photons.

  20. Broadband photon-photon interactions mediated by cold atoms in a photonic crystal fiber

    PubMed Central

    Litinskaya, Marina; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that photon-photon attraction can be engineered in the continuum of scattering states for pairs of photons propagating in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with cold atoms. The atoms are regularly spaced in an optical lattice configuration and the photons are resonantly tuned to an internal atomic transition. We show that the hard-core repulsion resulting from saturation of the atomic transitions induces bunching in the photonic component of the collective atom-photon modes (polaritons). Bunching is obtained in a frequency range as large as tens of GHz, and can be controlled by the inter-atomic separation. We provide a fully analytical explanation for this phenomenon by proving that correlations result from a mismatch of the quantization volumes for atomic excitations and photons in the continuum. Even stronger correlations can be observed for in-gap two-polariton bound states. Our theoretical results use parameters relevant for current experiments and suggest a simple and feasible way to induce interactions between photons. PMID:27170160

  1. Broadband photon-photon interactions mediated by cold atoms in a photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Litinskaya, Marina; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that photon-photon attraction can be engineered in the continuum of scattering states for pairs of photons propagating in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with cold atoms. The atoms are regularly spaced in an optical lattice configuration and the photons are resonantly tuned to an internal atomic transition. We show that the hard-core repulsion resulting from saturation of the atomic transitions induces bunching in the photonic component of the collective atom-photon modes (polaritons). Bunching is obtained in a frequency range as large as tens of GHz, and can be controlled by the inter-atomic separation. We provide a fully analytical explanation for this phenomenon by proving that correlations result from a mismatch of the quantization volumes for atomic excitations and photons in the continuum. Even stronger correlations can be observed for in-gap two-polariton bound states. Our theoretical results use parameters relevant for current experiments and suggest a simple and feasible way to induce interactions between photons. PMID:27170160

  2. Young's double-slit experiment in photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2012-10-01

    We present an experimental and numerical study of the transmission of a photonic crystal perforated by two sub-wavelength slits, separated by two wavelengths.The experimental near-field image of the double-slit design of the photonic crystal shows an interference pattern, which is analogous to Young’s experiment. This interference arises as a consequence of the excitation of surface states of the photonic crystals and agrees very well with the simulations.

  3. Back focal plane imaging spectroscopy of photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Rebecca; Heerklotz, Lars; Kortenbruck, Nikolai; Cichos, Frank

    2012-08-01

    Back focal plane imaging spectroscopy is introduced to record angle resolved emission spectra of 3-dimensional colloidal photonic crystals. The auto-fluorescence of the colloids is used to quickly map the photonic band structure up to 72 % of the solid angle of a semisphere with the help of a high numerical aperture objective. Local excitation provides spatially resolved information on the photonic crystal's optical properties. The obtained fractional density of states allows direct conclusions on the crystal's stacking faults or defects.

  4. Mid-IR luminescence of Cr{sup 2+} : II - VI crystals in chalcogenide glass fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Mironov, Roman A; Zabezhailov, A O; Dianov, Evgenii M; Karaksina, E V; Shapashnikov, R M; Churbanov, M F

    2010-11-13

    Optical fibres have been fabricated for the first time from As{sub 2}S{sub 3} glass containing chromium-doped ZnS and ZnSe crystals, and their optical loss and luminescence spectra have been measured in the mid-IR. In the spectral range 2 - 3 {mu}m, the optical loss in the fibres is 2 - 4 dB m{sup -1}. The fibres have a broad luminescence band in the range 1.8 - 3 {mu}m, with a maximum near 1.9 {mu}m, which is due to Cr{sup 2+} {sup 5}E - {sup 5}T{sub 2} intracentre transitions in the II - VI host. (fibre optics)

  5. Biomimetic Photonic Crystals based on Diatom Algae Frustules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishler, Jonathan; Alverson, Andrew; Herzog, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    Diatom algae are unicellular, photosynthetic microorganisms with a unique external shell known as a frustule. Frustules, which are composed of amorphous silica, exhibit a unique periodic nano-patterning, distinguishing diatoms from other types of phytoplankton. Diatoms have been studied for their distinctive optical properties due to their resemblance of photonic crystals. In this regard, diatoms are not only considered for their applications as photonic crystals, but also for their use as biomimetic templates for artificially fabricated photonic crystals. Through the examination and measurement of the physical characteristics of many scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of diatom frustules, a biomimetic photonic crystal derived from diatom frustules can be recreated and modeled with the finite element method. In this approach, the average geometries of the diatom frustules are used to recreate a 2-dimensional photonic crystal, after which the electric field distribution and optical transmission through the photonic crystal are both measured. The optical transmission is then compared to the transmission spectra of a regular hexagonal photonic crystal, revealing the effects of diatom geometry on their optical properties. Finally, the dimensions of the photonic crystal are parametrically swept, allowing for further control over the transmission of light through the photonic crystal.

  6. Engineering and characterizing light-matter interactions in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzezinski, Andrew

    Photonic crystals can affect the behavior of visible light, and other electromagnetic waves, in ways that are not possible by other means. The propagation of photons can be completely forbidden or the light can be made to follow a well-defined path. Fluorescent emission can be enhanced for some wavelengths or completely shut off for others, and it is possible to do all this simultaneously in a single structure. However, photonic crystals are very difficult to fabricate as they require precision patterning at sub-micron length scales. This fabrication difficulty has resulted in many of the potential applications for photonic crystals to currently be unrealized. Similarly, there is an abundance of opportunities to explore the workings of photonic crystals and also to develop exciting new methods for their fabrication. The content of this dissertation explores some methods for fabricating photonic crystals, including direct laser writing, interference lithography, colloidal deposition, and chemical vapor deposition. The angle-resolved characterization of photonic crystals is performed on fluorescent photonic crystals that exhibit uniquely photonic effects, which are explained with a simplified model of the electromagnetic wave-functions. Another model is shown to well-explain the emission from fluorescent photonic crystals that are not of sufficient quality to exhibit truly photonic effects. The ability to perform angle-resolved optical characterization is improved with a commercial 4-circle diffractometer. A method to determination the resulting structure of conformal deposition processes proves useful as a tool for the design, modeling, and characterization of photonic crystals. Finally, attempts are made to radically alter the emission of light from rare earth emitters embedded inside photonic crystals.

  7. Negative Refraction experiments in Photonic Crystal prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodo, Plarenta; Parimi, Patanjali. V.; Lu, Wentao. T.; di Gennaro, Emiliano; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2004-03-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated negative refraction in metallic photonic crystal (PC) prisms [1]. The refracted fields in the parallel plate waveguide (PPW) are measured by an automated dipole antenna, which scans the desired area, while the free space (FS) measurements, performed in a anechoic chamber, are measured by a rectangular X-band horn that swings in an arc in far field area. Both TE and TM excitation modes are used in FS experiments. Numerical calculations of the band structure and equi-frequency surface simulations are used to determine frequency regions of negative refraction of the triangular lattice PC. Angle of refraction determined by theoretical simulations and experimental results, are in exceptional good agreement, yielding the negative refraction index. FS and PPW refraction experimental results agree remarkably with simulations. 1. "Negative Refraction and Left-handed electromagnetism in Microwave Photonic Crystals", P.V Parimi, W.T Lu, P.Vodo J. Sokoloff and S.Sridhar, cond-mat/0306109 (2003)

  8. Multicriteria classification for photonic crystal fiber design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassi, Imene; Belacel, Nabil; Bouslimani, Yassine; Hamam, Habib; Attia, Rabah

    2008-06-01

    The photonic crystal fibers (PCF) are considered as the future information support for the telecommunication system. In this paper, a multicriteria method is used for the design of the PCFs with the user-defined optical proprieties. This method combines the deductive and the inductive learning and it is introduced for the first time in the field of optical fibers. These simulation tools will be optimized for PCF structures in order to optimize the parameters necessary for the improvement of the communication system performances. The multicriteria decision analysis makes it possible to evaluate the optical proprieties of PCFs by determining the effects of attenuation and distortion caused by Physics Phenomena. This decision is done by the means of a relational model preferably. As a result, this method avoids the recourse to distances and makes it possible to use quantitative and/or qualitative criteria. Moreover, it defeat some difficulties encountered when data are expressed in different units. These advantages allow the new multicriteria classification method to be employed easily to the diagnosis and to the design of photonic-crystals fibers.

  9. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M.

    2007-08-22

    Laser-driven acceleration holds great promise for significantly improving accelerating gradient. However, scaling the conventional process of structure-based acceleration in vacuum down to optical wavelengths requires a substantially different kind of structure. We require an optical waveguide that (1) is constructed out of dielectric materials, (2) has transverse size on the order of a wavelength, and (3) supports a mode with speed-of-light phase velocity in vacuum. Photonic crystals---structures whose electromagnetic properties are spatially periodic---can meet these requirements. We discuss simulated photonic crystal accelerator structures and describe their properties. We begin with a class of two-dimensional structures which serves to illustrate the design considerations and trade-offs involved. We then present a three-dimensional structure, and describe its performance in terms of accelerating gradient and efficiency. We discuss particle beam dynamics in this structure, demonstrating a method for keeping a beam confined to the waveguide. We also discuss material and fabrication considerations. Since accelerating gradient is limited by optical damage to the structure, the damage threshold of the dielectric is a critical parameter. We experimentally measure the damage threshold of silicon for picosecond pulses in the infrared, and determine that our structure is capable of sustaining an accelerating gradient of 300 MV/m at 1550 nm. Finally, we discuss possibilities for manufacturing these structures using common microfabrication techniques.

  10. Fabrication and evaluation of photonic metamaterial crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabete, S.; Nakagawa, Y.; Okamoto, T.; Haraguchi, M.; Isu, T.; Shinomiya, G.

    2013-09-01

    Many researching efforts have been reported to seek various fundamental LC resonance structures, recently. But still the Split Ring Resonator (SRR) is the most famous and major fundamental LC-resonance structure used in the metamaterial. We employed SRR structure as the fundamental LC-resonance mechanism to fabricate photonic crystal with periodic arrangement of two different metamaterial areas composed from SRR arrays on the dielectric substrate. We developed Photonic Metamaterial Crystal (PMC) to realize the more advanced and versatile functions of the metamaterial by 1 dimensional or 2 dimensional periodic arranging of two metamaterial sections which have different dispersion properties due to the different size of SRR structures each other. In this paper, we report the fabrication process, estimation of PMC properties and some possible future application prospects, for instance the PMC waveguide structures and nonlinear properties of PMC observed as selective LC-resonant properties in Raman mapping analysis of PMC. These are quite interesting characters of PMC and the attractive applications as the PMC devices.

  11. Dielectric matrices with air cavities as a waveguide photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usanov, D. A.; Skripal', A. V.; Merdanov, M. K.; Gorlitskii, V. O.

    2016-02-01

    Frequency dependences of the transmission coefficient of a microwave photonic crystal that represents a structure containing alternating layers of ceramic material (Al2O3) with a relatively large number of cavities and foam plastic are studied in the presence and absence of distortions of the periodicity of a photonic structure. The frequency dependences of the transmission coefficient can be analyzed using a model of effective medium that makes it possible to consider the interaction of electromagnetic wave and photonic crystal using a transfer matrix of a 1D photonic crystal. The band character of the frequency dependence of the transmission coefficient of the photonic crystal related to the periodicity of the photonic crystal in the transverse plane for the waveguide with a standard cross section is not manifested in a certain range of material permittivities.

  12. Photonic Crystal Enhanced Fluorescence for Early Breast Cancer Biomarker Detection

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Brian T.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Photonic crystal surfaces offer a compelling platform for improving the sensitivity of surface-based fluorescent assays used in disease diagnostics. Through the complementary processes of photonic crystal enhanced excitation and enhanced extraction, a periodic dielectric-based nanostructured surface can simultaneously increase the electric field intensity experienced by surface-bound fluorophores and increase the collection efficiency of emitted fluorescent photons. Through the ability to inexpensively fabricate photonic crystal surfaces over substantial surface areas, they are amenable to single-use applications in biological sensing, such as disease biomarker detection in serum. In this review, we will describe the motivation for implementing high-sensitivity, multiplexed biomarker detection in the context of breast cancer diagnosis. We will summarize recent efforts to improve the detection limits of such assays though the use of photonic crystal surfaces. Reduction of detection limits is driven by low autofluorescent substrates for photonic crystal fabrication, and detection instruments that take advantage of their unique features. PMID:22736539

  13. Two-dimensional metal-glass photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pysz, Dariusz; Kujawa, Ireneusz; Stępień, Ryszard; Dominiak, Radosław; Pniewski, Jacek; Szoplik, Tomasz

    2007-04-01

    We present recent achievements in fabricating a two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal in the form of a bundle of parallel micro- or nanowires embedded in glass matrix. The method is similar to that of sequential thinning used for fabrication of photonic crystal fibers. We discuss technological issues that aim at preservation of regularity of photonic crystal lattice and uniformity of wire diameters. Proper selection of a melting point of metal alloy and the range of temperatures of glass viscosity leads to reduction of regularity losses resulting from sequential processes of drawing. Measured distributions of crystal lattices, wire diameters and shapes of wires are used to simulate photonic band structure of fabricated crystals. This work is directed toward fabrication of a photonic crystal showing the negative refraction in the near infrared and visible spectral range.

  14. Extended-Range Ultrarefractive 1D Photonic Crystal Prisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    A proposal has been made to exploit the special wavelength-dispersive characteristics of devices of the type described in One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Superprisms (NPO-30232) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 4 (April 2005), page 10a. A photonic crystal is an optical component that has a periodic structure comprising two dielectric materials with high dielectric contrast (e.g., a semiconductor and air), with geometrical feature sizes comparable to or smaller than light wavelengths of interest. Experimental superprisms have been realized as photonic crystals having three-dimensional (3D) structures comprising regions of amorphous Si alternating with regions of SiO2, fabricated in a complex process that included sputtering. A photonic crystal of the type to be exploited according to the present proposal is said to be one-dimensional (1D) because its contrasting dielectric materials would be stacked in parallel planar layers; in other words, there would be spatial periodicity in one dimension only. The processes of designing and fabricating 1D photonic crystal superprisms would be simpler and, hence, would cost less than do those for 3D photonic crystal superprisms. As in 3D structures, 1D photonic crystals may be used in applications such as wavelength-division multiplexing. In the extended-range configuration, it is also suitable for spectrometry applications. As an engineered structure or artificially engineered material, a photonic crystal can exhibit optical properties not commonly found in natural substances. Prior research had revealed several classes of photonic crystal structures for which the propagation of electromagnetic radiation is forbidden in certain frequency ranges, denoted photonic bandgaps. It had also been found that in narrow frequency bands just outside the photonic bandgaps, the angular wavelength dispersion of electromagnetic waves propagating in photonic crystal superprisms is much stronger than is the angular wavelength dispersion obtained

  15. Theoretical design of photonic crystal devices for integrated optical circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekis, Attila

    2000-12-01

    In this thesis we investigate novel photonic crystal devices that can be used as building blocks of all- optical circuits. We contrast the behavior of light in photonic crystal systems and in their traditional counterparts. We exhibit that bends in photonic crystals are able to transmit light with over 90% efficiency for large bandwidths and with 100% efficiency for specific frequencies. In contrast to traditional waveguides, bound states in photonic crystal waveguides can also exist in constrictions and above the cutoff frequency. We discuss how to lower reflections encountered when photonic crystal waveguides are terminated, both in an experimental setup as well as in numerical simulations. We show that light can be very efficiently coupled into and out of photonic crystal waveguides using tapered dielectric waveguides. In time-domain simulations of photonic crystal waveguides, spurious reflections from cell edges can be eliminated by terminating the waveguide with a Bragg reflector waveguide. We demonstrate novel lasing action in two-dimensional photonic crystal slabs with gain media, where lasing occurs at saddle points in the band structure, in contrast to one-dimensional photonic crystals. We also design a photonic crystal slab with organic gain media that has a TE-like pseudogap. We demonstrate that such a slab can support a high- Q defect mode, enabling low threshold lasing, and we discuss how the quality factor depends on the design parameters. We also propose to use two- dimensional photonic crystal slabs as directionally efficient free-space couplers. We draft methods to calculate the coupling constant both numerically and analytically, using a finite-difference time-domain method and the volume current method with a Green's function approach, respectively. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  16. A 1-D dusty plasma photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Mitu, M. L.; Ticoş, C. M.; Toader, D.; Banu, N.; Scurtu, A.

    2013-09-21

    It is demonstrated numerically that a 1-D plasma crystal made of micron size cylindrical dust particles can, in principle, work as a photonic crystal for terahertz waves. The dust rods are parallel to each other and arranged in a linear string forming a periodic structure of dielectric-plasma regions. The dispersion equation is found by solving the waves equation with the boundary conditions at the dust-plasma interface and taking into account the dielectric permittivity of the dust material and plasma. The wavelength of the electromagnetic waves is in the range of a few hundred microns, close to the interparticle separation distance. The band gaps of the 1-D plasma crystal are numerically found for different types of dust materials, separation distances between the dust rods and rod diameters. The distance between levitated dust rods forming a string in rf plasma is shown experimentally to vary over a relatively wide range, from 650 μm to about 1350 μm, depending on the rf power fed into the discharge.

  17. Three-dimensional photonic crystals fabricated by simultaneous multidirectional etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitano, Keisuke; Suzuki, Katsuyoshi; Ishizaki, Kenji; Noda, Susumu

    2015-04-01

    We discuss three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals fabricated by simultaneous multidirectional plasma etching. First, we investigate a method for controlling the ion sheath used in reactive ion etching for obtaining multidirectional etching. We then discuss the fabrication tolerance from an analytical perspective. Based on our results, we demonstrate the fabrication of 3D photonic crystals with thicknesses of 1, 1.5, and 2 lattice periods in the surface-normal direction on single-crystalline silicon wafers, which show high reflectance (˜100 %) and low transmittance (-17 dB ) at optical communication wavelengths, suggesting the formation of a complete photonic band gap. We reveal that the shape of the etched holes limits the performance of 3D photonic crystals and suggest possible ways to improve the band-gap effect. Moreover, we show that 3D photonic crystals with short lattice constants show high reflectance (˜80 %) at visible to near-infrared wavelengths. By investigating the influence of absorption on the characteristics of 3D photonic crystals, we reveal that the reflectance remains as high as 94% in the photonic band-gap range even when the absorption of silicon is taken into account. We find that a unique increase of absorption occurs at several discrete wavelengths below the photonic band gap, suggesting the possibility of manipulating light absorption. These results not only simplify the fabrication of 3D photonic crystals, but also provide a basis for realizing 3D photonic nanostructures that include other materials.

  18. Photonic crystal chips for optical communications and quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englund, Dirk; Fushman, Ilya; Faraon, Andrei; Ellis, Bryan; Vučković, Jelena

    2008-08-01

    We discuss recent our recent progress on functional photonic crystals devices and circuits for classical and quantum information processing. For classical applications, we have demonstrated a room-temperature-operated, low threshold, nanocavity laser with pulse width in the picosecond regime; and an all-optical switch controlled with 60 fJ pulses that shows switching time on the order of tens of picoseconds. For quantum information processing, we discuss the promise of quantum networks on multifunctional photonic crystals chips. We also discuss a new coherent probing technique of quantum dots coupled to photonic crystal nanocavities and demonstrate amplitude and phase nonlinearities realized with control beams at the single photon level.

  19. Controlled coupling of photonic crystal cavities using photochromic tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Tao; Bose, Ranojoy; Solomon, Glenn S.; Waks, Edo

    2013-04-01

    We present a method to control the resonant coupling interaction in a coupled-cavity photonic crystal molecule by using a local and reversible photochromic tuning technique. We demonstrate the ability to tune both a two-cavity and a three-cavity photonic crystal molecule through the resonance condition by selectively tuning the individual cavities. Using this technique, we can quantitatively determine important parameters of the coupled-cavity system such as the photon tunneling rate. This method can be scaled to photonic crystal molecules with larger numbers of cavities, which provides a versatile method for studying strong interactions in coupled resonator arrays.

  20. Waveguide circuits in three-dimensional photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Rana; Christensen, C.; Muehlmeier, J.; Tuttle, G.; Ho, K.-M.

    2008-04-07

    Waveguide circuits in three-dimensional photonic crystals with complete photonic band gaps are simulated with finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations, and compared with measurements on microwave scale photonic crystals. The transmission through waveguide bends critically depends on the photonic crystal architecture in the bend region. We have found experimentally and theoretically, a new waveguide bend configuration consisting of overlapping rods in the bend region, that performs better than the simple waveguide bend of terminated rods, especially in the higher frequency portion of the band. Efficient beam splitters with this junction geometry are also simulated.

  1. Strongly-Refractive One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Prisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal prisms can separate a beam of polychromatic electromagnetic waves into constituent wavelength components and can utilize unconventional refraction properties for wavelength dispersion over significant portions of an entire photonic band rather than just near the band edges outside the photonic band gaps. Using a ID photonic crystal simplifies the design and fabrication process and allows the use of larger feature sizes. The prism geometry broadens the useful wavelength range, enables better optical transmission, and exhibits angular dependence on wavelength with reduced non-linearity. The properties of the 1 D photonic crystal prism can be tuned by varying design parameters such as incidence angle, exit surface angle, and layer widths. The ID photonic crystal prism can be fabricated in a planar process, and can be used as optical integrated circuit elements.

  2. Photonic crystal fibre-based light source for STED lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Glubokov, D A; Sychev, V V; Vitukhnovsky, Alexey G; Korol'kov, A E

    2013-06-30

    A light source having a relative noise level in the order of 10{sup -6} and sufficient stability for application in STED lithography has been obtained using the generation of Cherenkov peaks in a supercontinuum spectrum. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  3. Two-photon-induced singlet fission in rubrene single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lin; Galstyan, Gegham; Zhang, Keke; Kloc, Christian; Sun, Handong; Soci, Cesare; Michel-Beyerle, Maria E.; Gurzadyan, Gagik G.

    2013-05-01

    The two-photon-induced singlet fission was observed in rubrene single crystal and studied by use of femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. The location of two-photon excited states was obtained from the nondegenerate two-photon absorption (TPA) spectrum. Time evolution of the two-photon-induced transient absorption spectra reveals the direct singlet fission from the two-photon excited states. The TPA absorption coefficient of rubrene single crystal is 52 cm/GW at 740 nm, as obtained from Z-scan measurements. Quantum chemical calculations based on time-dependent density functional theory support our experimental data.

  4. Optical nanofiber-based photonic crystal cavity.

    PubMed

    Nayak, K P; Zhang, Pengfei; Hakuta, K

    2014-01-15

    We demonstrate the fabrication of photonic crystal (PhC) cavities on optical nanofibers using femtosecond laser ablation. PhC cavities with cavity lengths varying from 0.54 to 3.43 mm are fabricated by controlling the profile of the nanocrater array formed on the nanofiber. Such PhC cavities show high transmission of 87% for a finesse of 39. For higher finesse values from 150 to 500, the transmission can still be maintained at 20%-25%. Due to the strong confinement of the field and the efficient coupling to single-mode optical fibers, such nanofiber-based PhC cavities may become an interface between quantum and classical networks. PMID:24562114

  5. Nonlinear waveguide optics and photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Knight, J C; Skryabin, D V

    2007-11-12

    Focus Serial: Frontiers of Nonlinear Optics

    Optical fibers and waveguides provide unique and distinct environments for nonlinear optics, because of the combination of high intensities, long interaction lengths, and control of the propagation constants. They are also becoming of technological importance. The topic has a long history but continues to generate rapid development, most recently through the invention of the new forms of optical fiber collectively known as photonic crystal fibers. Some of the discoveries and ideas from the new fibers look set to have lasting influence in the broader field of guided-wave nonlinear optics. In this paper we introduce some of these ideas. PMID:19550822

  6. Enhanced photoacoustic detection using photonic crystal substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yunfei; Liu, Kaiyang; McClelland, John; Lu, Meng

    2014-04-21

    This paper demonstrates the enhanced photoacoustic sensing of surface-bound light absorbing molecules and metal nanoparticles using a one-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) substrate. The PC structure functions as an optical resonator at the wavelength where the analyte absorption is strong. The optical resonance of the PC sensor provides an intensified evanescent field with respect to the excitation light source and results in enhanced optical absorption by surface-immobilized samples. For the analysis of a light absorbing dye deposited on the PC surface, the intensity of photoacoustic signal was enhanced by more than 10-fold in comparison to an un-patterned acrylic substrate. The technique was also applied to detect gold nanorods and exhibited more than 40 times stronger photoacoustic signals. The demonstrated approach represents a potential path towards single molecule absorption spectroscopy with greater performance and inexpensive instrumentation.

  7. Photonic crystal cavities with metallic Schottky contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Quiring, W.; Al-Hmoud, M.; Reuter, D.; Zrenner, A.; Rai, A.; Wieck, A. D.

    2015-07-27

    We report about the fabrication and analysis of high Q photonic crystal cavities with metallic Schottky-contacts. The structures are based on GaAs n-i membranes with an InGaAs quantum well in the i-region and nanostructured low ohmic metal top-gates. They are designed for photocurrent readout within the cavity and fast electric manipulations. The cavity structures are characterized by photoluminescence and photocurrent spectroscopy under resonant excitation. We find strong cavity resonances in the photocurrent spectra and surprisingly high Q-factors up to 6500. Temperature dependent photocurrent measurements in the region between 4.5 K and 310 K show an exponential enhancement of the photocurrent signal and an external quantum efficiency up to 0.26.

  8. Asymptotics for metamaterials and photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Antonakakis, T; Craster, R V; Guenneau, S

    2013-04-01

    Metamaterial and photonic crystal structures are central to modern optics and are typically created from multiple elementary repeating cells. We demonstrate how one replaces such structures asymptotically by a continuum, and therefore by a set of equations, that captures the behaviour of potentially high-frequency waves propagating through a periodic medium. The high-frequency homogenization that we use recovers the classical homogenization coefficients in the low-frequency long-wavelength limit. The theory is specifically developed in electromagnetics for two-dimensional square lattices where every cell contains an arbitrary hole with Neumann boundary conditions at its surface and implemented numerically for cylinders and split-ring resonators. Illustrative numerical examples include lensing via all-angle negative refraction, as well as omni-directive antenna, endoscope and cloaking effects. We also highlight the importance of choosing the correct Brillouin zone and the potential of missing interesting physical effects depending upon the path chosen. PMID:23633908

  9. Suspended polymeric photonic crystals: simulation and fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebigan, R.; Dinescu, A.; Kusko, C.; Gavrila, R.; Cristea, D.; Obreja, C.; Schiopu, P.

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we present simulation of transmission / reflection spectra of polymeric rectangular and hexagonal photonic crystals (PC) as well as the propagation of radiation in a hexagonal PC - based waveguide. The polymeric PC are periodic structures consisting in square arrays of holes configured in suspended membranes of PMMA with different diameters and pitch (100 nm diameter with 500 nm, respectively 800 nm pitch; 200 nm diameter with 500 nm pitch; 400 nm diameter with 700 nm pitch). For fabrication, we propose the bi-layer EBL technique based on simultaneous patterning of a bottom sacrificial layer (LOR 5A - Microchem Corporation) and a positive electron resist (PMMA of different molecular weights). Characterization of nanostructures was performed using SEM imaging and AFM measurements .

  10. Surface Brillouin scattering in photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Tchahame, Joël Cabrel; Beugnot, Jean-Charles; Huy, Kien Phan; Laude, Vincent; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Sylvestre, Thibaut

    2016-07-15

    We report, to the best of our knowledge, the first experimental observation of surface Brillouin scattering in silica-based photonic crystal fibers, arising from the interaction between guided light and surface acoustic waves. This was achieved using small-core and high air-filling fraction microstructured fibers that enable a strong opto-acoustic coupling near the air holes while mitigating the acoustic leakages in the microstructured cladding. It is further shown that this new type of light scattering is highly sensitive to the fiber air-hole microstructure, thus providing a passive and efficient way to control it. Our observations are confirmed through numerical simulations of the elastodynamics equation. PMID:27420512

  11. Squeezed state generation in photonic crystal microcavities.

    PubMed

    Banaee, M G; Young, Jeff F

    2008-12-01

    The feasibility of using a parametric down-conversion process to generate squeezed electromagnetic states in three dimensional photonic crystal microcavity structures is investigated for the first time. The spectrum of the squeezed light is theoretically calculated by using an open cavity quantum mechanical formalism. The cavity communicates with two main channels, which model vertical radiation losses and coupling into a single-mode waveguide respectively. The amount of squeezing is determined by the correlation functions relating the field quadratures of light coupled into the waveguide. All of the relevant model parameters are realistically estimated for structures made in Al0.3Ga0.7As, using finite-difference time-domain simulations. Squeezing up to approximately 30% below the shot noise level is predicted for 10 mW average power, 80 MHz repetition, 500 ps excitation pulses using in a [111] oriented wafer. PMID:19065230

  12. A laminar solid core photonic crystal waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willig, R. L.

    2005-11-01

    A one-dimensional model is presented to explain the physics of solid core photonic crystal fibers. The model provides a clear way to demonstrate many of the interesting characteristics of these fibers: variation of cladding index with wavelength, endlessly single-mode operation, short wavelength index limit, long wavelength index limit, and variation of these properties with the air/silica fraction. The effective index is calculated for a laminar cladding consisting of periodic layers of alternating high and low index dielectrics. The waveguide model consists of the same periodic layers surrounding a high-index core through which most of the light propagates. The light is confined by total internal reflection. The model is shown to be an accurate analogue for a more complicated two-dimensional finned dielectric waveguide.

  13. Stable planar mesoscopic photonic crystal cavities.

    PubMed

    Magno, G; Monmayrant, A; Grande, M; Lozes-Dupuy, F; Gauthier-Lafaye, O; Calò, G; Petruzzelli, V

    2014-07-15

    Mesoscopic self-collimation (MSC) in mesoscopic photonic crystals with high reflectivity is exploited to realize a novel high Q-factor cavity by means of mesoscopic PhC planar mirrors. These mirrors efficiently confine a mode inside a planar Fabry-Perot-like cavity, that results from a beam focusing effect that stabilizes the cavity even for small beam sizes, resembling the focusing behavior of curved mirrors. Moreover, they show an improved reflectivity with respect to their standard distributed Bragg reflector counterparts that allows higher compactness. A Q-factor higher than 10⁴ has been achieved for an optimized 5-period-long mirror cavity. The optimization of the Q-factor and the performances in terms of energy storage, field enhancement, and confinement are detailed. PMID:25121692

  14. Fano resonance in anodic aluminum oxide based photonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Guo Liang; Fei, Guang Tao; Zhang, Yao; Yan, Peng; Xu, Shao Hui; Ouyang, Hao Miao; De Zhang, Li

    2014-01-01

    Anodic aluminum oxide based photonic crystals with periodic porous structure have been prepared using voltage compensation method. The as-prepared sample showed an ultra-narrow photonic bandgap. Asymmetric line-shape profiles of the photonic bandgaps have been observed, which is attributed to Fano resonance between the photonic bandgap state of photonic crystal and continuum scattering state of porous structure. And the exhibited Fano resonance shows more clearly when the sample is saturated ethanol gas than air-filled. Further theoretical analysis by transfer matrix method verified these results. These findings provide a better understanding on the nature of photonic bandgaps of photonic crystals made up of porous materials, in which the porous structures not only exist as layers of effective-refractive-index material providing Bragg scattering, but also provide a continuum light scattering state to interact with Bragg scattering state to show an asymmetric line-shape profile. PMID:24398625

  15. Superconducting Photonic Crystal with Nanostrips for Mid-Infrared Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ooi, C. H. Raymond

    2011-03-30

    One dimensional photonic crystal with superconducting nanostrips and semiconductor materials can be tailored to have narrow bands, with either large transmission or large reflection. Based on the reflection and transmission coefficients, we study the temporal dynamics of the reflected and transmitted pulses from the finite photonic crystal. The output pulse dynamics show slow light effect around the narrow bands that can be useful for photonic technologies.

  16. Thermally Driven Photonic Actuator Based on Silica Opal Photonic Crystal with Liquid Crystal Elastomer.

    PubMed

    Xing, Huihui; Li, Jun; Shi, Yang; Guo, Jinbao; Wei, Jie

    2016-04-13

    We have developed a novel thermoresponsive photonic actuator based on three-dimensional SiO2 opal photonic crystals (PCs) together with liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs). In the process of fabrication of such a photonic actuator, the LCE precursor is infiltrated into the SiO2 opal PC followed by UV light-induced photopolymerization, thereby forming the SiO2 opal PC/LCE composite film with a bilayer structure. We find that this bilayer composite film simultaneously exhibits actuation behavior as well as the photonic band gap (PBG) response to external temperature variation. When the SiO2 opal PC/LCE composite film is heated, it exhibits a considerable bending deformation, and its PBG shifts to a shorter wavelength at the same time. In addition, this actuation is quite fast, reversible, and highly repeatable. The thermoresponsive behavior of the SiO2 opal PC/LCE composite films mainly derives from the thermal-driven change of nematic order of the LCE layer which leads to the asymmetric shrinkage/expansion of the bilayer structure. These results will be of interest in designing optical actuator systems for environment-temperature detection. PMID:26996608

  17. Transient Plasma Photonic Crystals for High-Power Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, G.; Spatschek, K. H.

    2016-06-01

    A new type of transient photonic crystals for high-power lasers is presented. The crystal is produced by counterpropagating laser beams in plasma. Trapped electrons and electrically forced ions generate a strong density grating. The lifetime of the transient photonic crystal is determined by the ballistic motion of ions. The robustness of the photonic crystal allows one to manipulate high-intensity laser pulses. The scheme of the crystal is analyzed here by 1D Vlasov simulations. Reflection or transmission of high-power laser pulses are predicted by particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that a transient plasma photonic crystal may act as a tunable mirror for intense laser pulses. Generalizations to 2D and 3D configurations are possible.

  18. Transient Plasma Photonic Crystals for High-Power Lasers.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, G; Spatschek, K H

    2016-06-01

    A new type of transient photonic crystals for high-power lasers is presented. The crystal is produced by counterpropagating laser beams in plasma. Trapped electrons and electrically forced ions generate a strong density grating. The lifetime of the transient photonic crystal is determined by the ballistic motion of ions. The robustness of the photonic crystal allows one to manipulate high-intensity laser pulses. The scheme of the crystal is analyzed here by 1D Vlasov simulations. Reflection or transmission of high-power laser pulses are predicted by particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that a transient plasma photonic crystal may act as a tunable mirror for intense laser pulses. Generalizations to 2D and 3D configurations are possible. PMID:27314721

  19. Topological modes in one-dimensional solids and photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, Timothy J.; Butler, Celia A. M.; Taylor, Melita C.; Hooper, Ian R.; Hibbins, Alastair P.; Sambles, J. Roy; Mathur, Harsh

    2016-03-01

    It is shown theoretically that a one-dimensional crystal with time-reversal and particle-hole symmetries is characterized by a topological invariant that predicts the existence or otherwise of edge states. This is confirmed experimentally through the construction and simulation of a photonic crystal analog in the microwave regime. It is shown that the edge mode couples to modes external to the photonic crystal via a Fano resonance.

  20. Coupling light in photonic crystal waveguides: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Hemant Sankar; Goyal, Amit Kumar; Srivastava, Varun; Pal, Suchandan

    2016-07-01

    Submicron scale structures with high index contrast are key to compact structures for realizing photonic integrated structures. Ultra-compact optical devices in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates serve compatibility with semiconductor fabrication technology leading to reduction of cost and mass production. Photonic crystal structures possess immense potential for realizing various compact optical devices. However, coupling light to photonic crystal waveguide structures is crucial in order to achieve strong transmission and wider bandwidth of signal. Widening of bandwidth will increase potential for various applications and high transmission will make easy signal detection at the output. In this paper, the techniques reported so far for coupling light in photonic crystal waveguides have been reviewed and analyzed so that a comprehensive guide for an efficient coupling to photonic crystal waveguides can be made possible.

  1. Laser radiation frequency doubling in a single-crystal fibre based on a stoichiometric LiNbO{sub 3} crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Kashin, V V; Nikolaev, D A; Rusanov, S Ya; Tsvetkov, V B

    2015-01-31

    We demonstrate the employment of single-crystal optical fibres based on lithium niobate for doubling the laser radiation frequency. The measured characteristics of the fibre confirm its high quality and spatial homogeneity. Parameters of the frequency doublers for neodymium laser radiation (λ = 1 mm) based on fibre and bulk single crystals are compared. Single crystals are grown by the method of laser-heated pedestal growing with heating by radiation of a CO{sub 2} laser (LHPG-method). (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  2. Three dimensional reflectance properties of superconductor-dielectric photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, G. N.; Pandey, J. P.; Pandey, U. K.; Sancheti, Bhagyashree; Ojha, S. P.

    2016-05-01

    In this present communication, we have studied the optical properties of Photonics Crystals with super conducting constituent using the TMM method for a stratified medium. We also studied the three dimensional reflectance property of superconductor-dielectric photonic crystal at different temperature and thickness. From above study we show that the superconductor-dielectric photonic crystal may be used as broad band reflector and omnidirectional reflector at low temperature below to the critical temperature. Such property may be applied to make of the reflector which can be used in low temperature region.

  3. Three-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, B.; /SLAC

    2006-09-07

    We discuss simulated photonic crystal structure designs for laser-driven particle acceleration, focusing on three-dimensional planar structures based on the so-called ''woodpile'' lattice. We describe guiding of a speed-of-light accelerating mode by a defect in the photonic crystal lattice and discuss the properties of this mode, including particle beam dynamics and potential coupling methods for the structure. We also discuss possible materials and power sources for this structure and their effects on performance parameters, as well as possible manufacturing techniques and the required tolerances. In addition we describe the computational technique and possible improvements in numerical modeling that would aid development of photonic crystal structures.

  4. Recent progress and novel applications of photonic crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arismar Cerqueira, S., Jr.

    2010-02-01

    Photonic crystal fibers present a wavelength-scale periodic microstructure running along their length. Their core and two-dimensional photonic crystal might be based on varied geometries and materials, enabling light guidance due to different propagation mechanisms in an extremely large wavelength range, extending to the terahertz regions. As a result, these fibers have revolutionized the optical fiber technology by means of creating new degrees of freedom in the fiber design, fabrication and applicability. This report aims to provide a detailed statement on the recent progress and novel potential applications of photonic crystal fibers.

  5. Quantitative modeling of fluorescent emission in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmann, Johannes; Zappe, Hans; Goldschmidt, Jan Christoph

    2013-11-01

    Photonic crystals affect the photon emission of embedded emitters due to an altered local density of photon states (LDOS). We review the calculation of the LDOS from eigenmodes in photonic crystals and propose a rate equation model for fluorescent emitters to determine the changes in emission induced by the LDOS. We show how to calculate the modifications of three experimentally accessible characteristics: emission spectrum (spectral redistribution), emitter quantum yield, and fluorescence lifetime. As an example, we present numerical results for the emission of the dye Rhodamine B inside an opal photonic crystal. For such photonic crystals with small permittivity contrast, the LDOS is only weakly modified, resulting in rather small changes. We point out that in experiments, however, usually only part of the emitted light is detected, which can have a very different spectral distribution (e.g., due to a photonic band gap in the direction of detection). We demonstrate the calculation of this detected spectrum for a typical measurement setup. With this reasoning, we explain the previously not fully understood experimental observation that strong spectral modifications occurred, while at the same time only small changes in lifetime were found. With our approach, the mentioned effects can be quantitatively calculated for fluorescent emitters in any photonic crystal.

  6. Photonic crystal structures for efficent localization or extraction of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuckovic, Jelena

    Three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals offer the opportunity of light manipulation in all directions in space, but they are very difficult to fabricate. On the other hand, planar photonic crystals are much simpler to make, but they exhibit only a "quasi-3D" confinement, resulting from the combined action of 2D photonic crystal and internal reflection. The imperfect confinement in the third dimension produces some unwanted out-of-plane loss, which is usually a limiting factor in performance of these structures. This thesis proposes how to fully take advantage of the relatively simple fabrication of planar photonic crystals, by addressing a problem of loss-reduction. One of the greatest challenges in photonics is a construction of optical microcavities with small mode volumes and large quality factors, for efficient localization of light. Beside standard applications of these structures (such as lasers or filters), they can potentially be used for cavity QED experiments, or as building blocks for quantum networks. This work also presents the design and fabrication of optical microcavities based on planar photonic crystals, with mode volumes of the order of one half of cubic wavelength of light (measured in material) and with Q factors predicted to be even larger than 10 4. In addition to photonic crystals fabricated in semiconductors, we also address interesting properties of metallic photonic crystals and present our theoretical and experimental work on using them to improve the output of light emissive devices. Feature sizes of structures presented here are below those achievable by photolithography. Therefore, a high resolution lithography is necessary for their fabrication. The presently used e-beam writing techniques suffer from limitations in speed and wafer throughput, and they represent a huge obstacle to commercialization of photonic crystals. Our preliminary work on electron beam projection lithography, the technique that could provide us with the speed

  7. Photochemistry in photonic crystal fiber nanoreactors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jocelyn S Y; Euser, Tijmen G; Farrer, Nicola J; Sadler, Peter J; Scharrer, Michael; Russell, Philip St J

    2010-05-17

    We report the use of a liquid-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) as a highly controlled photochemical reactor. Hollow-core PCFs have several major advantages over conventional sample cells: the sample volume per optical path length is very small (2.8 nL cm(-1) in the fiber used), long optical path lengths are possible as a result of very low intrinsic waveguide loss, and furthermore the light travels in a diffractionless single mode with a constant transverse intensity profile. As a proof of principle, the (very low) quantum yield of the photochemical conversion of vitamin B(12), cyanocobalamin (CNCbl) to hydroxocobalamin ([H(2)OCbl](+)) in aqueous solution was measured for several pH values from 2.5 to 7.5. The dynamics of the actively induced reaction were monitored in real-time by broadband absorption spectroscopy. The PCF nanoreactor required ten thousand times less sample volume compared to conventional techniques. Furthermore, the enhanced sensitivity and optical pump intensity implied that even systems with very small quantum yields can be measured very quickly--in our experiments one thousand times faster than in a conventional cuvette. PMID:20391563

  8. Optics in Microstructured and Photonic Crystal Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, J. C.

    2008-10-01

    The development of optical fibers with two-dimensional patterns of air holes running down their length has reinvigorated research in the field of fiber optics. It has greatly—and fundamentally—broadened the range of specialty optical fibers, by demonstrating that optical fibers can be more "special" than previously thought. Fibers with air cores have made it possible to deliver energetic femtosecond-scale optical pulses, transform limited, as solitons, using single-mode fiber. Other fibers with anomalous dispersion at visible wavelengths have spawned a new generation of single-mode optical supercontinuum sources, spanning visible and near-infrared wavelengths and based on compact pump sources. A third example is in the field of fiber lasers, where the use of photonic crystal fiber concepts has led to a new hybrid laser technology, in which the very high numerical aperture available sing air holes have enabled fibers so short they are more naturally held straight than bent. This paper describes some of the basic physics and technology behind these developments, illustrated with some of the impressive demonstrations of the past 18 months.

  9. Topological Z2 Gapless Photonic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Biye; Wang, Zidan

    Topological properties of electronic materials with gapless band structure such as Topological Semimetals(TSMs) and Topological Metals(TMs) have drew lots of attention to both theoretical and experimental physicists recently. Although theoretical prediction of TSMs and TMs have been done well, experimental study of them is quite difficult to perform due to the fact that it is very difficult to control and design certain electronic materials. However, since the topological properties stem from the geometric feature, we can study them in Photonic Crystals(PhCs) which are much easy to be controlled and designed. Here we study 2-dimension PhCs consisting of gyrotropic materials with hexagonal structure. In the Brillouin corner, the dispersion relation has gapless points which are similar to Dirac Cones in electronic materials. We firstly derive the effective Hamiltonian of this system and show that if certain perturbation is added to this effective Hamiltonian, this system belongs to AII class according to Altland and Zirbauer topological classification and is described by a Z2 topological charge. Finally we also propose a way to detect this Z2 topological charge using momentum space Aharonov-Bohm interferometer which is firstly proposed by L.Duca and T.Li,etc.

  10. Tunable complete photonic band gap in anisotropic photonic crystal slabs with non-circular air holes using liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathollahi Khalkhali, T.; Bananej, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we analyze the tunability of complete photonic band gap of square and triangular photonic crystal slabs composed of square and hexagonal air holes in anisotropic tellurium background with SiO2 as cladding material. The non-circular holes are infiltrated with liquid crystal. Using the supercell method based on plane wave expansion, we study the variation of complete band gap by changing the optical axis orientation of liquid crystal. Our numerical results show that noticeable tunability of complete photonic band gap can be obtained in both square and triangular structures with non-circular holes.

  11. Two-pattern compound photonic crystals with a large complete photonic band gap

    SciTech Connect

    Jia Lin; Thomas, Edwin L.

    2011-09-15

    We present a set of two-dimensional aperiodic structures with a large complete photonic band gap (PBG), which are named two-pattern photonic crystals. By superposing two substructures without regard to registration, we designed six new aperiodic PBG structures having a complete PBG larger than 15% for {epsilon}{sub 2}/{epsilon}{sub 1} = 11.4. The rod-honeycomb two-pattern photonic crystal provides the largest complete PBG to date. An aperiodic structure becomes the champion structure with the largest PBG. Surprisingly, the TM and TE gaps of a two-pattern photonic crystal are much less interdependent than the PBGs of conventional photonic crystals proposed before, affording interesting capabilities for us to tune the TM and TE PBGs separately. By altering the respective substructures, optical devices for different polarizations (TE, TM, or both) can readily be designed.

  12. Photonic Crystal and Photonic Band-Gap Structures for Light Extraction and Emission Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Rue, Richard M.

    Research into photonic crystal (PhC) and photonic band-gap (PBG) structures has been motivated, from the start, by their possible use in controlling, modifying and enhancing the light emission process from high refractive index solid materials. This chapter considers the possible role of such structures when incorporated into semiconductor diode based light-emitting devices. Both light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and lasers will be considered. In order to provide a proper framework for discussion and analysis, space is devoted to the historical development of III-V semiconductor based LEDs — and to competing alternative approaches that have been demonstrated for enhanced light extraction. The possible advantages of photonic quasi-crystal (PQC) structures over regularly periodic photon crystal structures for advanced LED designs are also considered. Photonic crystal structures potentially provide major enhancements in the performance of laser diodes (LDs) — and progress towards this performance enhancement will be reviewed.

  13. Pendellösung effect in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savo, S.; di Gennaro, E.; Miletto, C.; Andreone, A.; Dardano, P.; Moretti, L.; Mocella, V.

    2008-06-01

    At the exit surface of a photonic crystal, the intensity of the diffracted wave can be periodically modulated, showing a maximum in the "positive" (forward diffracted) or in the "negative" (diffracted) direction, depending on the slab thickness. This thickness dependence is a direct result of the so-called Pendellosung phenomenon, consisting of the periodic exchange inside the crystal of the energy between direct and diffracted beams. We report the experimental observation of this effect in the microwave region at about 14 GHz by irradiating 2D photonic crystal slabs of different thickness and detecting the intensity distribution of the electromagnetic field at the exit surface and inside the crystal itself.

  14. Photonic crystals for improving light absorption in organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Duché, D. Le Rouzo, J.; Masclaux, C.; Gourgon, C.

    2015-02-07

    We theoretically and experimentally study the structuration of organic solar cells in the shape of photonic crystal slabs. By taking advantage of the optical properties of photonic crystals slabs, we show the possibility to couple Bloch modes with very low group velocities in the active layer of the cells. These Bloch modes, also called slow Bloch modes (SBMs), allow increasing the lifetime of photons within the active layer. Finally, we present experimental demonstration performed by using nanoimprint to directly pattern the standard poly-3-hexylthiophène:[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butiryc acid methyl ester organic semiconductor blend in thin film form in the shape of a photonic crystal able to couple SBMs. In agreement with the model, optical characterizations will demonstrate significant photonic absorption gains.

  15. Imaging of Protein Crystals with Two-Photon Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Padayatti, Pius; Palczewska, Grazyna; Sun, Wenyu; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Salom, David

    2012-05-02

    Second-order nonlinear optical imaging of chiral crystals (SONICC), which portrays second-harmonic generation (SHG) by noncentrosymmetric crystals, is emerging as a powerful imaging technique for protein crystals in media opaque to visible light because of its high signal-to-noise ratio. Here we report the incorporation of both SONICC and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) into one imaging system that allows visualization of crystals as small as 10 {mu}m in their longest dimension. Using this system, we then documented an inverse correlation between the level of symmetry in examined crystals and the intensity of their SHG. Moreover, because of blue-green TPEF exhibited by most tested protein crystals, we also could identify and image SHG-silent protein crystals. Our experimental data suggest that the TPEF in protein crystals is mainly caused by the oxidation of tryptophan residues. Additionally, we found that unspecific fluorescent dyes are able to bind to lysozyme crystals and enhance their detection by TPEF. We finally confirmed that the observed fluorescence was generated by a two-photon rather than a three-photon process. The capability for imaging small protein crystals in turbid or opaque media with nondamaging infrared light in a single system makes the combination of SHG and intrinsic visible TPEF a powerful tool for nondestructive protein crystal identification and characterization during crystallization trials.

  16. Imaging of protein crystals with two–photon microscopy†

    PubMed Central

    Padayatti, Pius; Palczewska, Grazyna; Sun, Wenyu; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Salom, David

    2012-01-01

    Second–order non–linear optical imaging of chiral crystals (SONICC), that portrays second harmonic generation (SHG) by non–centrosymmetric crystals, is emerging as a powerful imaging technique for protein crystals in media opaque to visible light because of its high signal–to–noise ratio. Here we report the incorporation of both SONICC and two–photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) into one imaging system that allows visualization of crystals as small as ~10 μm in their longest dimension. Using this system, we then documented an inverse correlation between the level of symmetry in examined crystals and the intensity of their SHG. Moreover, because of blue-green TPEF exhibited by most tested protein crystals, we also could identify and image SHG–silent protein crystals. Our experimental data suggests that the TPEF in protein crystals is mainly caused by the oxidation of tryptophan residues. Additionally, we found that unspecific fluorescent dyes are able to bind to lysozyme crystals and enhance their detection by TPFE. We finally confirmed that the observed fluorescence was generated by a two-photon rather than a three-photon process. The capability for imaging small protein crystals in turbid or opaque media with non–damaging infrared light in a single system, makes the combination of SHG and intrinsic visible TPEF a powerful tool for non–destructive protein crystal identification and characterization during crystallization trials. PMID:22324807

  17. The research on a photonic-crystal fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yong; Cheng, Yi

    2009-07-01

    To study the photonic-crystal fiber applied in the chemical sensor, the photonic-crystal fiber was used as transmission medium. With Sol-Gel method, we selective coated thin film containing fluorescent probe in the photonic-crystal fiber core, then attained an excellent photonic-crystal fiber acetylcholinesterase sensor. The sensor could be applied in biological / chemical research, clinical medicine, environmental protection, food inspection, biochemical preventive war field and so on. In organophosphorus pesticide residue testing, the experimental results indicated that the linear measurement range could arrive to 1×10-9~ 1×10-3 mol/L, moreover the detection limit is 1×10-10 mol/L.

  18. Enhanced spontaneous Raman scattering using a photonic crystal fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Buric, M.P.; Falk, J.; Chen, K.; Woodruff, S.D.

    2008-07-22

    The output power from spontaneous gas-phase Raman scattering is enhanced using a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber for the gas cell and Stokes light collector, yielding >100 times enhancement over a free-space configuration.

  19. Enhanced Spontaneous Raman Scattering using a Photonic Crystal Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    M.P. Buric; J. Fal; K. Chen; S. Woodruff1

    2007-10-01

    The output power from spontaneous gas-phase Raman scattering is enhanced using a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber for the gas cell and Stokes light collector, yielding >100 times enhancement over a free-space configuration.

  20. Photonic-crystal time-domain simulations using Wannier functions.

    PubMed

    Blum, Christian; Wolff, Christian; Busch, Kurt

    2011-01-15

    We present a Wannier-function-based time-domain method for photonic-crystal integrated optical circuits. In contrast to other approaches, this method allows one to trade CPU time against memory consumption and therefore is particularly well suited for the treatment of large-scale systems. As an illustration, we apply the method to the design of a photonic-crystal-based sensor, which utilizes a dual Mach-Zehnder-Fano interferometer. PMID:21263535

  1. Use of a photonic crystal for optical amplifier gain control

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; El-Kady, Ihab

    2006-07-18

    An optical amplifier having a uniform gain profile uses a photonic crystal to tune the density-of-states of a gain medium so as to modify the light emission rate between atomic states. The density-of-states of the gain medium is tuned by selecting the size, shape, dielectric constant, and spacing of a plurality of microcavity defects in the photonic crystal. The optical amplifier is particularly useful for the regeneration of DWDM signals in long optical fibers.

  2. Measurements of HB photonic crystal fibers with low temperature sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makara, Mariusz; Wojcik, Jan; Mergo, Pawel; Klimek, Jacek; Skorupski, Krzysztof; Kopeć, Jarosław

    2008-06-01

    We report on experimental studies of phase and group modal birefringence vs. temperature in two highly birefringent (HB) photonic crystal fibers, in which birefringence is caused by filling factor asymmetry. The sensitivity measurements were carried out at two wavelengths 633 and 834 nm. Our results show that temperature sensitivity in the HB photonic crystal fibers is two orders smaller then in traditional HB fibers. Simultaneously, our results exhibit weak dependence of group modal birefringence on temperature.

  3. Two-photon absorption in Hg 2Cl 2 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelant, I.; Ambrož, M.; Hála, J.; Kohlová, V.; Barta, Č.

    1985-01-01

    Violet luminescence (396 nm) of Hg 2Cl 2 single crystals was observed under excitation of green light (∼ 500 nm) of a pulsed dye laser at liquid helium temperature. The effect is interpreted as due to the two-photon absorption process. The two-photon excitation spectrum of the luminescence was measured in the wavelength range 475-530 nm. Possible mechanisms of the two-photon transition are outlined.

  4. Polarisation singularities in photonic crystals for an on-chip spin-photon interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beggs, Daryl M.; Young, Andrew B.; Thijssen, Arthur C. T.; Oulton, Ruth

    2015-03-01

    Integrated quantum photonic chips are a leading contender for future quantum technologies, which aim to use the entanglement and superposition properties of quantum physics to speed up the manipulation of data. Quantum information may be stored and transmitted in photons, which make excellent flying qubits. Photons suffer little from decoherence, and single qubit gates performed by changing photon phase, are straightforward. Less straightforward is the ability to create two qubit gates, where one photon is used to switch another's state; inherently difficult due to the extremely small interaction cross-section between photons. The required deterministic two-qubit interactions will likely need a hybrid scheme with the ``flying'' photonic qubit interacting with a ``static'' matter qubit. Here we present the design of a photonic crystal waveguide structure that can couple electron-spin to photon path, thus providing an interface between a static and a flying qubit. We will show that the complex polarization properties inherent in the photonic crystal eigenmodes supports polarization singularities - positions in the electric field vector where one of the parameters describing the local polarization ellipse is singular - and that these singularities are ideal for a range of quantum information applications. In particular, we will show that by placing a quantum dot at one of these singularities, the electron-spin becomes correlated with the photon emission direction, creating an in-plane spin-photon interface that can transfer quantum information from static to flying qubits.

  5. REVIEW ARTICLE Blue extension of optical fibre supercontinuum generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travers, J. C.

    2010-11-01

    Supercontinuum generation in optical fibres pumped with high power pulse sources in the modulation instability regime is reviewed. The physical mechanisms and supercontinuum dynamics are described in detail. Routes to optimized output in terms of spectral flatness and particularly blue and ultraviolet spectral extent are presented, including the use of cascaded and tapered photonic crystal fibres.

  6. Alignment of crystal orientations of the multi-domain photonic crystals in Parides sesostris wing scales.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, S; Fujita, H; Kinoshita, S; Matsuhana, B

    2014-03-01

    It is known that the wing scales of the emerald-patched cattleheart butterfly, Parides sesostris, contain gyroid-type photonic crystals, which produce a green structural colour. However, the photonic crystal is not a single crystal that spreads over the entire scale, but it is separated into many small domains with different crystal orientations. As a photonic crystal generally has band gaps at different frequencies depending on the direction of light propagation, it seems mysterious that the scale is observed to be uniformly green under an optical microscope despite the multi-domain structure. In this study, we have carefully investigated the structure of the wing scale and discovered that the crystal orientations of different domains are not perfectly random, but there is a preferred crystal orientation that is aligned along the surface normal of the scale. This finding suggests that there is an additional factor during the developmental process of the microstructure that regulates the crystal orientation. PMID:24352678

  7. Alignment of crystal orientations of the multi-domain photonic crystals in Parides sesostris wing scales

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, S.; Fujita, H.; Kinoshita, S.; Matsuhana, B.

    2014-01-01

    It is known that the wing scales of the emerald-patched cattleheart butterfly, Parides sesostris, contain gyroid-type photonic crystals, which produce a green structural colour. However, the photonic crystal is not a single crystal that spreads over the entire scale, but it is separated into many small domains with different crystal orientations. As a photonic crystal generally has band gaps at different frequencies depending on the direction of light propagation, it seems mysterious that the scale is observed to be uniformly green under an optical microscope despite the multi-domain structure. In this study, we have carefully investigated the structure of the wing scale and discovered that the crystal orientations of different domains are not perfectly random, but there is a preferred crystal orientation that is aligned along the surface normal of the scale. This finding suggests that there is an additional factor during the developmental process of the microstructure that regulates the crystal orientation. PMID:24352678

  8. Photonic crystals, light manipulation, and imaging in complex nematic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravnik, Miha; Å timulak, Mitja; Mur, Urban; Čančula, Miha; Čopar, Simon; Žumer, Slobodan

    2016-03-01

    Three selected approaches for manipulation of light by complex nematic colloidal and non-colloidal structures are presented using different own custom developed theoretical and modelling approaches. Photonic crystals bands of distorted cholesteric liquid crystal helix and of nematic colloidal opals are presented, also revealing distinct photonic modes and density of states. Light propagation along half-integer nematic disclinations is shown with changes in the light polarization of various winding numbers. As third, simulated light transmission polarization micrographs of nematic torons are shown, offering a new insight into the complex structure characterization. Finally, this work is a contribution towards using complex soft matter in optics and photonics for advanced light manipulation.

  9. Chalcogenide glass-based three-dimensional photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigel, A.; Kotler, Z.; Sfez, B.; Arsh, A.; Klebanov, M.; Lyubin, V.

    2000-11-01

    AsSeTe chalcogenide glasses are materials that are photosensitive and have a large refractive index. These properties make these glasses particularly suitable for the fabrication of photonic crystals. We present a way to build three-dimensional photonic structures from chalcogenide glasses using vapor deposition and direct holographic writing. We show that this technique is intrinsically self-aligned, providing a simple way to build layer-by-layer photonic crystals and a four-layer structure demonstrating the principle of the technique.

  10. Controllable light diffraction in woodpile photonic crystals filled with liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Chih-Hua; Zeng, Hao; Wiersma, Diederik S.; Cheng, Yu-Chieh; Maigyte, Lina; Trull, Jose; Cojocaru, Crina; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2015-01-12

    An approach to switching between different patterns of light beams transmitted through the woodpile photonic crystals filled with liquid crystals is proposed. The phase transition between the nematic and isotropic liquid crystal states leads to an observable variation of the spatial pattern transmitted through the photonic structure. The transmission profiles in the nematic phase also show polarization sensibility due to refractive index dependence on the field polarization. The experimental results are consistent with a numerical calculation by Finite Difference Time Domain method.

  11. Manipulating light propagation and emission using photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Rajesh V.; Jagatap, B. N.

    2014-03-31

    We discuss the synthesis and characterization of self-assembled photonic crystals using polymer colloids having sub-micron diameters. The angle resolved optical reflectivity measurements indicate the hybridization between stop gaps in the multiple Bragg diffraction regimes. Each diffraction resonances in the multiple Bragg diffraction regimes are assigned to respective crystal planes. We also discuss laser-induced studies of spontaneous emission in self-assembled photonic crystals having Rhodamine-B dye doped colloids. Our experimental results reveal more than 51% inhibition in emission intensity within the stop gap as compared to a proper reference sample.

  12. Three dimensional silicon photonic crystals fabricated by two photon phase mask lithography.

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltzius, P.; Braun, P. V.; Liao, H.; Brzezinski, A.; Chen, Y. C.; Nelson, E.; Shir, D.; Rogers, J. A.; Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen

    2008-08-01

    We describe the fabrication of silicon three dimensional photonic crystals using polymer templates defined by a single step, two-photon exposure through a layer of photopolymer with relief molded on its surface. The resulting crystals exhibit high structural quality over large areas, displaying geometries consistent with calculation. Spectroscopic measurements of transmission and reflection through the silicon and polymer structures reveal excellent optical properties, approaching properties predicted by simulations that assume ideal layouts.

  13. Crystallization of the C-terminal globular domain of avian reovirus fibre

    SciTech Connect

    Raaij, Mark J. van; Hermo Parrado, X. Lois; Guardado Calvo, Pablo; Fox, Gavin C.; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Costas, Celina; Martínez-Costas, José; Benavente, Javier

    2005-07-01

    Partial proteolysis of the avian reovirus cell-attachment protein σC yields a major homotrimeric C-terminal fragment that presumably contains the receptor-binding domain. This fragment has been crystallized in the presence and absence of zinc sulfate and cadmium sulfate. One of the crystal forms diffracts synchrotron X-rays to 2.2–2.3 Å. Avian reovirus fibre, a homotrimer of the σC protein, is responsible for primary host-cell attachment. Using the protease trypsin, a C-terminal σC fragment containing amino acids 156–326 has been generated which was subsequently purified and crystallized. Two different crystal forms were obtained, one grown in the absence of divalent cations and belonging to space group P6{sub 3}22 (unit-cell parameters a = 75.6, c = 243.1 Å) and one grown in the presence of either zinc or cadmium sulfate and belonging to space group P321 (unit-cell parameters a = 74.7, c = 74.5 Å and a = 73.1, c = 69.9 Å for the Zn{sup II}- and Cd{sup II}-grown crystals, respectively). The first crystal form diffracted synchrotron radiation to 3.0 Å resolution and the second form to 2.2–2.3 Å. Its closest related structure, the C-terminal fragment of mammalian reovirus fibre, has only 18% sequence identity and molecular-replacement attempts were unsuccessful. Therefore, a search is under way for suitable heavy-atom derivatives and attempts are being made to grow protein crystals containing selenomethionine instead of methionine.

  14. Photon Cascade from a Single Crystal Phase Nanowire Quantum Dot.

    PubMed

    Bouwes Bavinck, Maaike; Jöns, Klaus D; Zieliński, Michal; Patriarche, Gilles; Harmand, Jean-Christophe; Akopian, Nika; Zwiller, Val

    2016-02-10

    We report the first comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the optical properties of single crystal phase quantum dots in InP nanowires. Crystal phase quantum dots are defined by a transition in the crystallographic lattice between zinc blende and wurtzite segments and therefore offer unprecedented potential to be controlled with atomic layer accuracy without random alloying. We show for the first time that crystal phase quantum dots are a source of pure single-photons and cascaded photon-pairs from type II transitions with excellent optical properties in terms of intensity and line width. We notice that the emission spectra consist often of two peaks close in energy, which we explain with a comprehensive theory showing that the symmetry of the system plays a crucial role for the hole levels forming hybridized orbitals. Our results state that crystal phase quantum dots have promising quantum optical properties for single photon application and quantum optics. PMID:26806321

  15. Tunable optical anisotropy in three-dimensional photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Che Ming; Li Zhiyuan; Liu Rongjuan

    2007-08-15

    Artificial optical birefringence can be realized in three-dimensional photonic crystals with a uniaxial structural symmetry: e.g., woodpile photonic crystals with a tetragonal lattice structure in the long-wavelength limit. The ordinary and extraordinary indices of refraction are determined from calculation of the reflection coefficient for a plane wave incident on the surface of a semi-infinite photonic crystal at different angles. We find that the anisotropy can be widely tuned by simply changing the width and thickness of the dielectric rod. A large relative negative anisotropy over 33% is found. A transition from positive anisotropy to negative anisotropy can be readily achieved. At certain parameters, a structurally anisotropic nanostructure can behave like an optically isotropic medium. Our study opens a window to use artificial nanostructures to create an arbitrary optical anisotropy that is not possible in natural crystals.

  16. SPECIAL ISSUE DEVOTED TO THE 90TH ANNIVERSARY OF A.M. PROKHOROV: Neodymium-doped graded-index single-crystal fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufetova, G. A.; Kashin, V. V.; Nikolaev, D. A.; Rusanov, S. Ya; Seregin, V. F.; Tsvetkov, V. B.; Shcherbakov, Ivan A.; Yakovlev, A. A.

    2006-07-01

    The efficient technology is developed for growing high-quality doped single-crystal fibres by the mini-pedestal method with laser heating. The technology can be used to fabricate high-quality doped single-crystal fibres with a controllable radial gradient of the refractive index. The refractive-index profile in single-crystal fibres is studied experimentally. The efficient operation of a Nd3+ : YAG single-crystal fibre laser in the waveguide regime was demonstrated upon longitudinal pumping by a laser diode.

  17. Gigahertz Modulation of a Photonic Crystal Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Aaron Karim Taylor

    Photonic crystal (PtC) cavities are an increasingly important way to create all optical methods to control optical data. Not only must the data be controlled, but interfacing it with high frequency electrical signals is particularly interesting especially if this occurs in the 1.55microm telecom band. We present an experiment that uses Rayleigh surface acoustic waves (SAWs) to modulate the frequency of the guided mode of an L3-cavity PtC created on a silicon slab. This work has the potential to interface optical and electrical signals via a mechanical strain wave operating at gigahertz frequencies. Defects are carefully designed into a triangular lattice PtC to realize a waveguide coupled optical cavity. The cavity can be experimentally accessed through grating couplers excited by polarized light at 10° incidence from normal. The optical components are fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator platform, with light confined to the silicon slab region. Through transmission experiments, the L3 cavity was found to have a narrow resonance characterized by a Lorentzian distribution. A quality factor of 165 centered at 6255cm --1 (1.599microm) was measured. Aluminum interdigitated transducers (IDTs) were fabricated through a lithography liftoff process. Their ability to create SAWs requires a piezoelectric medium. As silicon does not have this property, growth of a thin ZnO film was required. The transducers were measured using a network analyzer and were found to produce Rayleigh SAWs at a frequency of 179MHz and a wavelength of 24microm. The acoustic energy traveled 70microm to the target optical device. The L3 cavity has dimensions of around 4microm a side - less than 1/2 a SAW wavelength. Modulation of the L3 PtC resonant frequency was monitored through a repeat of the transmission experiment but with RF excitation of the IDTs at the SAW frequency. A broadening of the transmission spectrum was expected. Unfortunately no change in the fitting parameters could be measured

  18. Controlling single-photon transport with three-level quantum dots in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Cong-Hua; Jia, Wen-Zhi; Wei, Lian-Fu

    2014-03-01

    We investigate how to control single-photon transport along the photonic crystal waveguide with the recent experimentally demonstrated artificial atoms [i.e., Λ-type quantum dots (QDs)] [S. G. Carter et al., Nat. Photon. 7, 329 (2013), 10.1038/nphoton.2013.41] in an all-optical way. Adopting full quantum theory in real space, we analytically calculate the transport coefficients of single photons scattered by a Λ-type QD embedded in single- and two-mode photonic crystal cavities (PCCs), respectively. Our numerical results clearly show that the photonic transmission properties can be exactly manipulated by adjusting the coupling strengths of waveguide-cavity and QD-cavity interactions. Specifically, for the PCC with two degenerate orthogonal polarization modes coupled to a Λ-type QD with two degenerate ground states, we find that the photonic transmission spectra show three Rabi-splitting dips and the present system could serve as single-photon polarization beam splitters. The feasibility of our proposal with the current photonic crystal technique is also discussed.

  19. Crystallization of the C-terminal domain of the bacteriophage T7 fibre protein gp17

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Doval, Carmela; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophage T7 attaches to its host using the C-terminal domains of its six fibres, which are trimers of the gp17 protein. A C-terminal fragment of gp17 consisting of amino acids 371–553 has been expressed, purified and crystallized. Crystals of two forms were obtained, belonging to space group P212121 (unit-cell parameters a = 61.2, b = 86.0, c = 118.4 Å) and space group C2221 (unit-cell parameters a = 68.3, b = 145.6, c = 172.1 Å). They diffracted to 1.9 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively. Both crystals are expected to contain one trimer in the asymmetric unit. Multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing with a mercury derivative is in progress. PMID:22297990

  20. Crystallization of the C-terminal domain of the bacteriophage T7 fibre protein gp17.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Doval, Carmela; van Raaij, Mark J

    2012-02-01

    Bacteriophage T7 attaches to its host using the C-terminal domains of its six fibres, which are trimers of the gp17 protein. A C-terminal fragment of gp17 consisting of amino acids 371-553 has been expressed, purified and crystallized. Crystals of two forms were obtained, belonging to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) (unit-cell parameters a = 61.2, b = 86.0, c = 118.4 Å) and space group C222(1) (unit-cell parameters a = 68.3, b = 145.6, c = 172.1 Å). They diffracted to 1.9 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively. Both crystals are expected to contain one trimer in the asymmetric unit. Multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing with a mercury derivative is in progress. PMID:22297990

  1. Fabrication and characterization of three-dimensional infrared photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavieh, Lisa

    It has been predicted theoretically that photonic crystals can be used to control the propagation of light through dielectric media for wavelengths extending beyond the microwave to include the infrared and the visible. Fabrication of 3-D photonic crystals with a bandgap in the near infrared or visible would have application in the design of a new class of photonic devices that include optical mirrors, waveguides, and cavity resonators. Demonstrations of 3-D photonic crystals have been limited primarily to the microwave and infrared wavelength regimes because of the constraints imposed by the nanometer scale dimensions required for operation in the visible. This thesis presents a novel method of fabricating a simple cubic photonic crystal which potentially can be tailored to operate at any wavelength. Fabrication was broken down into several processing steps, each of which was investigated independently. Design of Experiment (DOE) was used in a parametric study to optimize dry etching conditions by which GaAs/AlxGa1--x As multilayer structures were etched with anisotropic profile and rapid etch rate. Also, the etching properties of diffusion controlled wet lateral etching of buried AlxGa1--xAs layers in hydrofluoric acid solutions (HF) were investigated. Using the results obtained from the etching studies, both dry and wet etching techniques were employed to fabricate the simple-cubic photonic structure. Following fabrication, the photonic crystal was characterized at normal angles and oblique incidence using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The experimental results show strong correlation to theoretically predicted values. The simplicity of the process and positive results indicate that it may be possible to scale down the structure to obtain an photonic band lattice with a bandgap of 1.55 mum.

  2. Photonic Crystals: A view of the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, David J.

    2007-03-01

    Despite intense research efforts, no three-dimensional materials with a photonic bandgap for visible wavelengths have yet been fabricated. A new self-assembly strategy lays out the route towards the realization of this dream.

  3. Thermally tunable ferroelectric thin film photonic crystals.

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, P. T.; Wessels, B. W.; Imre, A.; Ocola, L. E.; Northwestern Univ.

    2008-01-01

    Thermally tunable PhCs are fabricated from ferroelectric thin films. Photonic band structure and temperature dependent diffraction are calculated by FDTD. 50% intensity modulation is demonstrated experimentally. This device has potential in active ultra-compact optical circuits.

  4. 3D holographic polymer photonic crystal for superprism application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiaqi; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Xiaonan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Sasa; Chen, Ray T.

    2007-02-01

    Photonic crystal based superprism offers a new way to design new optical components for beam steering and DWDM application. 3D photonic crystals are especially attractive as they could offer more control of the light beam based on the needs. A polygonal prism based holographic fabrication method has been demonstrated for a three-dimensional face-centered-cubic (FCC)-type submicron polymer photonic crystal using SU8 as the photo-sensitive material. Therefore antivibration equipment and complicated optical alignment system are not needed and the requirement for the coherence of the laser source is relaxed compared with the traditional holographic setup. By changing the top-cut prism structure, the polarization of the laser beam, the exposure and development conditions we can achieve different kinds of triclinic or orthorhombic photonic crystals on demand. Special fabrication treatments have been introduced to ensure the survivability of the fabricated large area (cm2) nano-structures. Scanning electron microscopy and diffraction results proved the good uniformity of the fabricated structures. With the proper design of the refraction prism we have achieved a partial bandgap for S+C band (1460-1565nm) in the [111] direction. The transmission and reflection spectra obtained by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) are in good agreement with simulated band structure. The superprism effects around 1550nm wavelength for the fabricated 3D polymer photonic crystal have been theoretically calculated and such effects can be used for beam steering purpose.

  5. Slow light in nonlinear photonic crystal coupled-cavity waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Na; Wang, Yige; Ren, Qingqing; Zhu, Li; Yuan, Minmin; An, Guimin

    2014-04-01

    Nonlinear photonic crystals can be formed by inserting Kerr-type nonlinear dielectric rods into perfect photonic crystals. Based on nonlinear photonic crystal, nonlinear photonic crystal coupled-cavity waveguide is constructed and its slow light properties are studied by using the Plane Wave expansion Method (PWM). Both single-defect coupled cavity and two-defect coupled cavity are proposed to optimize slow light properties. The result shows that using single-defect coupled cavity in waveguide is beneficial to obtain larger Normalized Delay-Bandwidth Product (NDBP) but it contributes little to decrease the group velocity of light and enlarging Q factor and delay time; While using two-defect cavity in waveguide can efficiently reduce the group velocity of light and enlarge Q factor and delay time. Compared to normal structures, our new designed nonlinear photonic crystal coupled cavity waveguide owns group velocity that is three magnitudes smaller than the vacuum speed of light. Delay time is of magnitude order of 10 ns and Q factor is of magnitude order of 1000, it means less loss and higher ability of storing energy.

  6. Tunable negative-index photonic crystals using colloidal magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Tao; Wang, Xin; Wang, Yan; Dong, Xiang-Mei

    2015-12-01

    The model of using colloidal magnetic fluid to build tunable negative-index photonic crystal is established. The effective permittivity ɛe and permeability μe of the two-dimensional photonic crystal are investigated in detail. For transverse magnetic polarization, both ɛe and μe exhibit a Lorentz-type anomalous dispersion, leading to a region where ɛe and μe are simultaneously negative. Then, considering a practical case, in which the thickness of photonic crystal is finite, the band structures for odd modes are calculated by the plane wave expansion method and the finite-difference time-domain method. The results suggest that reducing the external magnetic field strength or slab thickness will weaken the periodic modulation strength of the photonic crystal. Simulation results prove that the negative-index can be tuned by varying the external magnetic field strength or the slab thickness. The work presented in this paper gives a guideline for realizing the flat photonic crystal lens with tunable properties at optical frequencies, which may have potential applications in tunable near-field imaging systems. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB352001), the Shanghai Rising-Star Program, China (Grant No. 12QA1402300), the China Scholarship Council (CSC) Program, and the Basic Research Program of Shanghai, China (Grant No. 14ZR1428500).

  7. Dispersive photonic crystals from the plane wave method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara-Cabrera, E.; Palomino-Ovando, M. A.; Flores-Desirena, B.; Gaspar-Armenta, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays photonic crystals are widely used in many different applications. One of the most used methods to compute their band structure is the plane wave method (PWM). However, it can only be applied directly to non-dispersive media and be extended to systems with a few model dielectric functions. We explore an extension of the PWM to photonic crystals containing dispersive materials, that solves an eigenvalue equation for the Bloch wave vectors. First we compare our calculation with analytical results for one dimensional photonic crystals containing Si using experimental values of its optical parameters, and obtainig very well agreement, even for the spectrum region with strong absorption. Then, using the same method, we computed the band structure for a two dimensional photonic crystal without absorption, formed by an square array of MgO cylinders in air. The optical parameters for MgO were modeled with the Lorentz dielectric function. Finally, we studied an array of MgO cylinders in a metal, using Drude model without absorption, for the metal dielectric function. For this last case, we study the gap-midgap ratio as a function of the filling fraction for both the square and triangular lattice. The gap-midgap ratio is larger for the triangular lattice, with a maximum value of 10% for a filling fraction of 0.6. Our results show that the method can be applied to dispersive materials, and then to a wide range of applications where photonic crystals can be used.

  8. Dispersion optimization of nonlinear glass photonic crystal fibers and impact of fabrication tolerances on their telecom nonlinear applications performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanka, Jiri

    2009-05-01

    For most telecom nonlinear applications a high effective nonlinearity, low group velocity dispersion with a low dispersion slope and a short fibre length are the key parameters. Combining photonic crystal fibre (PCF) technology with highly nonlinear glasses could meet these requirements very well. We have performed dispersion optimization of PCFs made from selected nonlinear glasses with a solid core and small number of hexagonally arrayed air holes. The optimization procedure employs the Nelder-Mead downhill simplex algorithm. For the modal analysis of the photonic crystal fibre structure a fully-vectorial mode solver based on the finite element method is used. We have obtained two types of dispersion optimized nonlinear PCF designs: PCFs of the first type are single-mode and highly nonlinear with a small and flattened dispersion in the 1500-1600 nm range. These PCF structures have air holes hexagonally arrayed in from 3 to 5 rings, however, their dispersion characteristics are very sensitive to variations in structural parameters. PCFs of the second type are two-ring PCFs with larger multi-mode cores. They have fundamental mode's zero dispersion wavelength around 1550 nm with non-zero moderate dispersion slopes which are less sensitive to structural variation. It is supposed that this alternative PCF design will be easier to fabricate. The effects of fabrication imprecision on the dispersion characteristics for both PCF designs are demonstrated numerically and discussed in the context of nonlinear telecom applications.

  9. Phenomenological study of binding in optically trapped photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maystre, D.; Vincent, P.

    2007-08-01

    We describe a phenomenological theory of the phenomenon of binding observed both experimentally and numerically when particles are trapped by an interference system in order to make a structure close to a photonic crystal. This theory leads to a very simple conclusion, which links the binding phenomenon to the bottom of the lowest bandgap of the trapped crystal in a given direction. The phenomenological theory allows one to calculate the period of the trapped crystal by using numerical tools on dispersion diagrams of photonic crystals. It emerges that the agreement of our theory with our rigorous numerical results given in a previous paper [J. Opt A8, 1059 (2006)] is better than 2% on the crystal period. Furthermore, it is shown that in two-dimensional problems and s polarization, all the optical forces derive from a scalar potential.

  10. Dispersion engineering in soft glass photonic crystal fibers infiltrated with liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefaniuk, Tomasz; Le Van, Hieu; Pniewski, Jacek; Cao Long, Van; Ramaniuk, Aleksandr; Grajewski, Karol; Chu Van, Lanh; Karpierz, Mirosław; Trippenbach, Marek; Buczynski, Ryszard

    2015-12-01

    We present a numerical study of the dispersion characteristic modification in a nonlinear photonic crystal fibre (PCF) infiltrated with organic solvents. The PCF is made of PBG08 glass and was developed in the stack-and-draw process. The PBG08 glass has a high refractive index (n < 2.0), high nonlinear refractive index (n2 = 4.3×10-19 m2/W) and good rheological properties that allow for thermal processing of the glass without crystallization. In the numerical study 18 different solvents were used. The dispersion, mode area, and losses characteristics were calculated. The zero dispersion wavelength (ZDW) of the fibre can be shifted towards longer wavelengths by approx. 150 nm by using Nitrobenzene as infiltrating liquid and by a smaller value using other liquids. At the same time the mode area of the fundamental mode increases by approx. 5 to 15% depending on the wavelength considered. The confinement losses increase significantly for six analysed liquids by a few orders of magnitude up to 102 dB/m. Our approach allows to combine high nonlinearities of the soft glass with the possibility to tune zero dispersion wavelength to the desired value.