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Sample records for photonic crystal superlattices

  1. Layer-by-Layer Approach to (2+1)D Photonic Crystal Superlattice with Enhanced Crystalline Integrity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijing; Xiong, Zhuo; Shan, Liang; Zheng, Lu; Wei, Tongbo; Yan, Qingfeng

    2015-10-01

    Large-area polystyrene (PS) colloidal monolayers with high mechanical strength are created by a combination of the air/water interface self-assembly and the solvent vapor annealing technique. Layer-by-layer (LBL) stacking of these colloidal monolayers leads to the formation of (2+1)D photonic crystal superlattice with enhanced crystalline integrity. By manipulating the diameter of PS spheres and the repetition period of the colloidal monolayers, flexible control in structure and stop band position of the (2+1)D photonic crystal superlattice has been realized, which may afford new opportunities for engineering photonic bandgap materials. Furthermore, an enhancement of 97.3% on light output power of a GaN-based light emitting diode is demonstrated when such a (2+1)D photonic crystal superlattice employed as a back reflector. The performance enhancement is attributed to the photonic bandgap enhancement and good angle-independence of the (2+1)D photonic crystal superlattice. PMID:26179658

  2. Photonic crystal light source

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Bur, James A.

    2004-07-27

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  3. Function photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiang-Yao; Zhang, Bai-Jun; Yang, Jing-Hai; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Ba, Nuo; Wu, Yi-Heng; Wang, Qing-Cai

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we present a new kind of function photonic crystals (PCs), whose refractive index is a function of space position. Conventional PCs structure grows from two materials, A and B, with different dielectric constants εA and εB. Based on Fermat principle, we give the motion equations of light in one-dimensional, two-dimensional and three-dimensional function photonic crystals. For one-dimensional function photonic crystals, we give the dispersion relation, band gap structure and transmissivity, and compare them with conventional photonic crystals, and we find the following: (1) For the vertical and non-vertical incidence light of function photonic crystals, there are band gap structures, and for only the vertical incidence light, the conventional PCs have band gap structures. (2) By choosing various refractive index distribution functions n( z), we can obtain more wider or more narrower band gap structure than conventional photonic crystals.

  4. Two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals in dielectric barrier discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Weili; Dong Lifang; Zhang Xinchun

    2010-11-15

    A series of two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals have been obtained by filaments' self-organization in atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge with two water electrodes, which undergo the transition from square to square superlattice and finally to the hexagon. The spatio-temporal behaviors of the plasma photonic crystals in nanosecond scale have been studied by optical method, which show that the plasma photonic crystal is actually an integration of different transient sublattices. The photonic band diagrams of the transverse electric (TE) mode and transverse magnetic mode for each sublattice of these plasma photonic crystals have been investigated theoretically. A wide complete band gap is formed in the hexagonal plasma photonic crystal with the TE mode. The changes of the band edge frequencies and the band gap widths in the evolvement of different structures are studied. A kind of tunable plasma photonic crystal which can be controlled both in space and time is suggested.

  5. Dispersion in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzens, Jeremy

    2005-11-01

    Investigations on the dispersive properties of photonic crystals, modified scattering in ring-resonators, monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers and advanced data processing techniques for the finite-difference time-domain method are presented. Photonic crystals are periodic mesoscopic arrays of scatterers that modify the propagation properties of electromagnetic waves in a similar way as "natural" crystals modify the properties of electrons in solid-state physics. In this thesis photonic crystals are implemented as planar photonic crystals, i.e., optically thin semiconductor films with periodic arrays of holes etched into them, with a hole-to-hole spacing of the order of the wavelength of light in the dielectric media. Photonic crystals can feature forbidden frequency ranges (the band-gaps) in which light cannot propagate. Even though most work on photonic crystals has focused on these band-gaps for application such as confinement and guiding of light, this thesis focuses on the allowed frequency regions (the photonic bands) and investigates how the propagation of light is modified by the crystal lattice. In particular the guiding of light in bulk photonic crystals in the absence of lattice defects (the self-collimation effect) and the angular steering of light in photonic crystals (the superprism effect) are investigated. The latter is used to design a planar lightwave circuit for frequency domain demultiplexion. Difficulties such as efficient insertion of light into the crystal are resolved and previously predicted limitations on the resolution are circumvented. The demultiplexer is also fabricated and characterized. Monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers by means of resonantly enhanced grating couplers is investigated. The grating coupler is designed to bend light through a ninety-degree angle and is characterized with the finite-difference time-domain method. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers are

  6. Tunable electrochromic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuai, Su-Lan; Bader, Georges; Ashrit, P. V.

    2005-05-01

    Photonic crystals based on the electrochromic phenomenon have been fabricated and proposed for band gap tuning. Electrochromic tungsten trioxide (WO3) inverse opals have been fabricated by polystyrene colloidal crystal templating. The WO3 matrix was obtained through a dip-infiltrating sol-gel process, with subsequent removal of the polymer microspheres by calcination. Scanning electron micrographs confirm the ordering of the hexagonal macroporous structure. The reflection spectra show two pronounced Bragg diffraction peaks. By inserting lithium into the crystals, the first reflection peak shifts gradually toward shorter wavelength for 36 nm, while the second reflection peak shifts toward longer wavelength for about 28 nm. This should be of great interest for photonic device applications.

  7. Photonic Crystal Nanocavity Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Axel

    2001-03-01

    Two- and three-dimensional microfabricated mirrors are generally referred to as photonic bandgap (PBG) crystals, and can be lithographically constructed to match a given frequency to confine light to very small volumes.1 For mirrors matching light emission at 1550nm, the lattice parameter a should correspond to 500nm, and the radius of the holes should be 180nm. By combining the slab waveguide design from microdisk lasers with the concept of microfabricating Bragg reflectors around a 2-D Fabry-Perot structure, we arrive at the design for ultra-small sub-3 optical nanocavity photonic crystal lasers. The mode volume in these laser cavities can be as small as 2.5 cubic half wavelengths or 0.03m3, and spontaneous emission in the cavity can be very efficiently coupled into the lasing mode. This efficient coupling in turn results in significant advantages of these nanocavity lasers over devices with larger mode volumes, as high modulation speed and very low threshold power light emission are expected. If the photonic crystal is designed appropriately and is not too porous, it is also possible to efficiently guide light within the perforated slab and to minimize diffraction losses. This waveguiding within a photonic crystal provides us with an opportunity to couple light from one cavity to another, or into connecting waveguides. By creating two-dimensional photonic crystals, which are microfabricated into InGaAsP slabs, we have recently defined the smallest lasers to date. When combined with high index contrast slabs in which light can be efficiently guided, microfabricated two-dimensional photonic bandgap mirrors provide the geometries needed to confine light into extremely small volumes with high Q.1,2,3,4 Two-dimensional Fabry-Perot resonators with microfabricated mirrors are formed when defects are introduced into the periodic photonic bandgap structure. It is then possible to tune these cavities lithographically by changing the precise geometry of the microstructures

  8. Slotted photonic crystal biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scullion, Mark Gerard

    Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them result in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This thesis presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which engender higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the peak of optical mode within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. High sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than most competing devices in the literature. Initial tests with cellular material for real applications was also performed, and shown to be of promise. In addition, groundwork to make an integrated device that includes the spectrometer function was also carried out showing that slotted photonic crystals themselves can be used for on-chip wavelength specific filtering and spectroscopy, whilst gas-free microvalves for automation were also developed. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study.

  9. Hydrophobic photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Limin; Birks, T A; Loh, W H

    2011-12-01

    We propose and demonstrate hydrophobic photonic crystal fibers (PCFs). A chemical surface treatment for making PCFs hydrophobic is introduced. This repels water from the holes of PCFs, so that their optical properties remain unchanged even when they are immersed in water. The combination of a hollow core and a water-repellent inner surface of the hydrophobic PCF provides an ultracompact dissolved-gas sensor element, which is demonstrated for the sensing of dissolved ammonia gas. PMID:22139276

  10. Slotted photonic crystal sensors.

    PubMed

    Scullion, Mark G; Krauss, Thomas F; Di Falco, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them results in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This review article presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which provide higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the optical mode peak within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. Higher sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than possible with most competing devices reported in the literature. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study. PMID:23503295

  11. Slotted Photonic Crystal Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Scullion, Mark G.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Di Falco, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them results in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This review article presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which provide higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the optical mode peak within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. Higher sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than possible with most competing devices reported in the literature. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study. PMID:23503295

  12. Photonic Crystal Laser Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M

    2003-05-21

    Photonic crystals have great potential for use as laser-driven accelerator structures. A photonic crystal is a dielectric structure arranged in a periodic geometry. Like a crystalline solid with its electronic band structure, the modes of a photonic crystal lie in a set of allowed photonic bands. Similarly, it is possible for a photonic crystal to exhibit one or more photonic band gaps, with frequencies in the gap unable to propagate in the crystal. Thus photonic crystals can confine an optical mode in an all-dielectric structure, eliminating the need for metals and their characteristic losses at optical frequencies. We discuss several geometries of photonic crystal accelerator structures. Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) are optical fibers which can confine a speed-of-light optical mode in vacuum. Planar structures, both two- and three-dimensional, can also confine such a mode, and have the additional advantage that they can be manufactured using common microfabrication techniques such as those used for integrated circuits. This allows for a variety of possible materials, so that dielectrics with desirable optical and radiation-hardness properties can be chosen. We discuss examples of simulated photonic crystal structures to demonstrate the scaling laws and trade-offs involved, and touch on potential fabrication processes.

  13. Natural photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneron, Jean Pol; Simonis, Priscilla

    2012-10-01

    Photonic structures appeared in nature several hundred millions years ago. In the living world, color is used for communication and this important function strongly impacts the individual chances of survival as well as the chances to reproduce. This has a statistical influence on species populations. Therefore, because they are involved in evolution, natural color-generating structures are - from some point of view - highly optimized. In this short review, a survey is presented of the development of natural photonic crystal-type structures occurring in insects, spiders, birds, fishes and other marine animals, in plants and more, from the standpoint of light-waves propagation. One-, two-, and three-dimensional structures will be reviewed with selected examples.

  14. Photonic crystal microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhokhov, A. A.; Masalov, V. M.; Sukhinina, N. S.; Matveev, D. V.; Dolganov, P. V.; Dolganov, V. K.; Emelchenko, G. A.

    2015-11-01

    Spherical samples of photonic crystals formed by colloidal SiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized. Synthesis of microspheres from 160 nm, 200 nm and 430 nm diameter colloidal nanoparticles was performed over a wide size range, from 5 μm to 50 μm. The mechanism of formation of void microparticles exceeding 50 μm is discussed. The spectral measurements verified the association of the spectra with the peaks of selective reflection from the cubic lattice planes. The microparticle morphology is characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  15. Optics of globular photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, V S

    2007-05-31

    The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the optical properties of globular photonic crystals - new physical objects having a crystal structure with the lattice period exceeding considerably the atomic size, are presented. As globular photonic crystals, artificial opal matrices consisting of close-packed silica globules of diameter {approx}200 nm were used. The reflection spectra of these objects characterising the parameters of photonic bands existing in these crystals in the visible spectral region are presented. The idealised models of the energy band structure of photonic crystals investigated in the review give analytic dispersion dependences for the group velocity and the effective photon mass in a globular photonic crystal. The characteristics of secondary emission excited in globular photonic crystals by monochromatic and broadband radiation are presented. The results of investigations of single-photon-excited delayed scattering of light observed in globular photonic crystals exposed to cw UV radiation and radiation from a repetitively pulsed copper vapour laser are presented. The possibilities of using globular photonic crystals as active media for lasing in different spectral regions are considered. It is proposed to use globular photonic crystals as sensitive sensors in optoelectronic devices for molecular analysis of organic and inorganic materials by the modern methods of laser spectroscopy. The results of experimental studies of spontaneous and stimulated globular scattering of light are discussed. The conditions for observing resonance and two-photon-excited delayed scattering of light are found. The possibility of accumulation and localisation of the laser radiation energy inside a globular photonic crystal is reported. (review)

  16. Photonic crystal and photonic wire device structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Rue, Richard; Sorel, Marc; Johnson, Nigel; Rahman, Faiz; Ironside, Charles; Cronin, Lee; Watson, Ian; Martin, Robert; Jin, Chongjun; Pottier, Pierre; Chong, Harold; Gnan, Marco; Jugessur, Aju; Camargo, Edilson; Erwin, Grant; Md Zain, Ahmad; Ntakis, Iraklis; Hobbs, Lois; Zhang, Hua; Armenise, Mario; Ciminelli, Caterina; Coquillat, Dominique

    2005-09-01

    Photonic devices that exploit photonic crystal (PhC) principles in a planar environment continue to provide a fertile field of research. 2D PhC based channel waveguides can provide both strong confinement and controlled dispersion behaviour. In conjunction with, for instance, various electro-optic, thermo-optic and other effects, a range of device functionality is accessible in very compact PhC channel-guide devices that offer the potential for high-density integration. Low enough propagation losses are now being obtained with photonic crystal channel-guide structures that their use in real applications has become plausible. Photonic wires (PhWs) can also provide strong confinement and low propagation losses. Bragg-gratings imposed on photonic wires can provide dispersion and frequency selection in device structures that are intrinsically simpler than 2D PhC channel guides--and can compete with them under realistic conditions.

  17. Design of MWIR Type-II Superlattices for Infrared Photon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grein, Christoph

    The Type II InAs/GaInSb and InAs/InAsSb superlattices are material systems for implementation as photodetector absorbers in infrared imaging applications. In addition to cutoff wavelengths spanning the infrared spectrum, they offer degrees of freedom in their materials design (e.g. layer thicknesses, alloy compositions, number of layers in one superlattice period) that permit the optimization of an infrared photon detector's figures of merit such as detectivity through the tuning of material properties like generation/recombination lifetimes and optical absorption. We describe efforts to obtain accurate electronic band structures of superlattice semiconductors with infrared energy gaps, and employing them to evaluate nonradiative minority carrier lifetimes. Simple device models are utilized to suggest potential performance enhancements that arise from employing superlattices as infrared absorber. We also discuss current efforts to simulate the molecular beam epitaxial growth of InAs/InAsSb superlattices to predict dominant native point defects and other growth nonidealities. Design of MWIR Type-II Superlattices for Infrared Photon Detectors.

  18. Strong localization of photonics in symmetric Fibonacci superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y. H.; Tsao, C. W.; Chen, C. H.; Hsueh, W. J.

    2015-07-01

    Strong localization from the Fabry-Pérot-like resonances that occur in symmetric Fibonacci superlattices is presented in this study. When compared with traditional Fabry-Pérot resonators, in symmetric Fibonacci superlattices, the middle space is a variant rather than an invariant half-wavelength thickness for each resonance with different orders. In addition, the electric fields of the resonances may be located on both sides of the space layer in the superlattice, which is in contrast to those in a traditional Fabry-Pérot resonator. The electric field of the resonances is strongly localized as the generation order increases. Moreover, the group delays of these peaks increase with generation order. More strongly localized modes can be found from the symmetric Fibonacci superlattices than from the traditional Fabry-Pérot resonators, which makes the proposed structure an attractive alternative to a wide variety of optoelectronic devices.

  19. Photonic Crystal Nanolaser Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Shota; Otsuka, Shota; Hachuda, Shoji; Endo, Tatsuro; Imai, Yasunori; Nishijima, Yoshiaki; Misawa, Hiroaki; Baba, Toshihiko

    High-performance and low-cost sensors are critical devices for high-throughput analyses of bio-samples in medical diagnoses and life sciences. In this paper, we demonstrate photonic crystal nanolaser sensor, which detects the adsorption of biomolecules from the lasing wavelength shift. It is a promising device, which balances a high sensitivity, high resolution, small size, easy integration, simple setup and low cost. In particular with a nanoslot structure, it achieves a super-sensitivity in protein sensing whose detection limit is three orders of magnitude lower than that of standard surface-plasmon-resonance sensors. Our investigations indicate that the nanoslot acts as a protein condenser powered by the optical gradient force, which arises from the strong localization of laser mode in the nanoslot.

  20. Plasmon-polariton and photonic superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejía-Salazar, J. R.; Porras-Montenegro, N.; Reyes-Gómez, E.; Cavalcanti, S. B.; Oliveira, L. E.

    2014-05-01

    We have used the transfer-matrix approach for one-dimensional Cantor photonic superlattices, and studied the plasmon-polariton modes for a multilayered system composed by alternating layers of positive and dispersive materials. Results indicate that the corresponding plasmon-polariton modes, which show up for oblique incidence, strongly depend on the Cantor step, and the plasmon-polariton subbands are associated with the number of metamaterial layers contained in the elementary cell. Moreover, we have studied the = 0 non-Bragg gap in such fractal photonic superlattices and characterized its behavior as function of the steps of the Cantor series.

  1. Generation of tunable plasma photonic crystals in meshed dielectric barrier discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yongjie; Dong, Lifang Liu, Weibo; He, Yafeng; Li, Yonghui

    2014-07-15

    Tunable superlattice plasma photonic crystals are obtained in a meshed dielectric barrier discharge. These plasma photonic crystals are composed of thin artificial lattices and thick self-organized lattices, and can be tuned easily by adjusting the applied voltage. A plasma photonic crystal with self-organized hexagonal lattice coupled to artificial square lattice is first realized. The dispersion relations of the square sublattices with different radii, which are recorded by an intensified charge-coupled device camera, are calculated. The results show that the thick square sublattice has the higher band edge frequencies and wider band widths. Band gaps of superlattice plasma photonic crystals are actually temporal integrations of those of transient sublattices.

  2. Spherical colloidal photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuanjin; Shang, Luoran; Cheng, Yao; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Colloidal photonic crystals (PhCs), periodically arranged monodisperse nanoparticles, have emerged as one of the most promising materials for light manipulation because of their photonic band gaps (PBGs), which affect photons in a manner similar to the effect of semiconductor energy band gaps on electrons. The PBGs arise due to the periodic modulation of the refractive index between the building nanoparticles and the surrounding medium in space with subwavelength period. This leads to light with certain wavelengths or frequencies located in the PBG being prohibited from propagating. Because of this special property, the fabrication and application of colloidal PhCs have attracted increasing interest from researchers. The most simple and economical method for fabrication of colloidal PhCs is the bottom-up approach of nanoparticle self-assembly. Common colloidal PhCs from this approach in nature are gem opals, which are made from the ordered assembly and deposition of spherical silica nanoparticles after years of siliceous sedimentation and compression. Besides naturally occurring opals, a variety of manmade colloidal PhCs with thin film or bulk morphology have also been developed. In principle, because of the effect of Bragg diffraction, these PhC materials show different structural colors when observed from different angles, resulting in brilliant colors and important applications. However, this angle dependence is disadvantageous for the construction of some optical materials and devices in which wide viewing angles are desired. Recently, a series of colloidal PhC materials with spherical macroscopic morphology have been created. Because of their spherical symmetry, the PBGs of spherical colloidal PhCs are independent of rotation under illumination of the surface at a fixed incident angle of the light, broadening the perspective of their applications. Based on droplet templates containing colloidal nanoparticles, these spherical colloidal PhCs can be

  3. Configurable silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Prorok, Stefan; Petrov, Alexander; Eich, Manfred; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2013-12-23

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the mode cut off of a photonic crystal waveguide can be trimmed with high accuracy by electron beam bleaching of a chromophore doped polymer cladding. Using this method, configurable waveguides are realized, which allow for spatially resolved changes of the photonic crystal's effective lattice constant as small as 7.6 pm. We show three different examples how to take advantage of configurable photonic crystal waveguides: Shifting of the complete transmission spectrum, definition of cavities with high quality factor, and tuning of existing cavities.

  4. Multicolor photonic crystal laser array

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jeremy B; Brener, Igal; Subramania, Ganapathi S; Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2015-04-28

    A multicolor photonic crystal laser array comprises pixels of monolithically grown gain sections each with a different emission center wavelength. As an example, two-dimensional surface-emitting photonic crystal lasers comprising broad gain-bandwidth III-nitride multiple quantum well axial heterostructures were fabricated using a novel top-down nanowire fabrication method. Single-mode lasing was obtained in the blue-violet spectral region with 60 nm of tuning (or 16% of the nominal center wavelength) that was determined purely by the photonic crystal geometry. This approach can be extended to cover the entire visible spectrum.

  5. Configurable silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prorok, Stefan; Petrov, Alexander; Eich, Manfred; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2013-12-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the mode cut off of a photonic crystal waveguide can be trimmed with high accuracy by electron beam bleaching of a chromophore doped polymer cladding. Using this method, configurable waveguides are realized, which allow for spatially resolved changes of the photonic crystal's effective lattice constant as small as 7.6 pm. We show three different examples how to take advantage of configurable photonic crystal waveguides: Shifting of the complete transmission spectrum, definition of cavities with high quality factor, and tuning of existing cavities.

  6. Simultaneous microwave photonic and phononic band gaps in piezoelectric-piezomagnetic superlattices with three types of domains in a unit cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zheng-hua; Jiang, Zheng-Sheng; Chen, Tao; Lei, Da-Jun; Yan, Wen-Yan; Qiu, Feng; Huang, Jian-Quan; Deng, Hai-Ming; Yao, Min

    2016-04-01

    A novel phoxonic crystal using the piezoelectric (PMN-PT) and piezomagnetic (CoFe2O4) superlattices with three types of domains in a unit cell (PPSUC) is present, in which dual microwave photonic and phononic band gaps can be obtained simultaneously. Two categories of phononic band gaps, originating from both the Bragg scattering of acoustic waves in periodic structures at the Brillouin zone boundary and the electromagnetic wave-lattice vibration couplings near the Brillouin zone center, can be observed in the phononic band structures. The general characteristics of the microwave photonic band structures are similar to those of pure piezoelectric or piezomagnetic superlattices, with the major discrepancy being the appearance of nearly dispersionless branches within the microwave photonic band gaps, which show an extremely large group velocity delay. Thus, the properties may also be applied to compact acoustic-microwave devices.

  7. Spatial filtering with photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Maigyte, Lina; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2015-03-15

    Photonic crystals are well known for their celebrated photonic band-gaps—the forbidden frequency ranges, for which the light waves cannot propagate through the structure. The frequency (or chromatic) band-gaps of photonic crystals can be utilized for frequency filtering. In analogy to the chromatic band-gaps and the frequency filtering, the angular band-gaps and the angular (spatial) filtering are also possible in photonic crystals. In this article, we review the recent advances of the spatial filtering using the photonic crystals in different propagation regimes and for different geometries. We review the most evident configuration of filtering in Bragg regime (with the back-reflection—i.e., in the configuration with band-gaps) as well as in Laue regime (with forward deflection—i.e., in the configuration without band-gaps). We explore the spatial filtering in crystals with different symmetries, including axisymmetric crystals; we discuss the role of chirping, i.e., the dependence of the longitudinal period along the structure. We also review the experimental techniques to fabricate the photonic crystals and numerical techniques to explore the spatial filtering. Finally, we discuss several implementations of such filters for intracavity spatial filtering.

  8. superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haoran; Wang, Xinnan; Li, Tao; Lee, Byeongdu

    2014-06-01

    Recently, we reported a new method to synthesize the rod-like tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) superlattice. To explore its potentials in nanolattice templating and tissue scaffolding, this work focused the viscoelasticity of the superlattice with a novel transient method via atomic force microscopy (AFM). For measuring viscoelasticity, in contrast to previous methods that assessed the oscillating response, the method proposed in this work enabled us to determine the transient response (creep or relaxation) of micro/nanobiomaterials. The mathematical model and numerical process were elaborated to extract the viscoelastic properties from the indentation data. The adhesion between the AFM tip and the sample was included in the indentation model. Through the functional equation method, the elastic solution for the indentation model was extended to the viscoelastic solution so that the time dependent force vs. displacement relation could be attained. To simplify the solving of the differential equation, a standard solid model was modified to obtain the elastic and viscoelastic components of the sample. The viscoelastic responses with different mechanical stimuli and the dynamic properties were also investigated.

  9. Experimental study of photonic crystal triangular lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Ruhu; Qin, Bo; Jin, Chongjun

    1999-06-01

    Triangular lattice photonic crystal behaving in the electromagnetic zones constructed from fused silica cylinders in styrofoam is fabricated. The transmission spectra of the photonic crystal with and without defects are measured. On this basis, the defect modes of photonic crystal were studied, and the potential applications of the photonic crystal are discussed.

  10. Manufacturing method of photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Park, In Sung; Lee, Tae Ho; Ahn, Jin Ho; Biswas, Rana; Constant, Kristen P.; Ho, Kai-Ming; Lee, Jae-Hwang

    2013-01-29

    A manufacturing method of a photonic crystal is provided. In the method, a high-refractive-index material is conformally deposited on an exposed portion of a periodic template composed of a low-refractive-index material by an atomic layer deposition process so that a difference in refractive indices or dielectric constants between the template and adjacent air becomes greater, which makes it possible to form a three-dimensional photonic crystal having a superior photonic bandgap. Herein, the three-dimensional structure may be prepared by a layer-by-layer method.

  11. Diamond based photonic crystal microcavities.

    PubMed

    Tomljenovic-Hanic, S; Steel, M J; de Sterke, C Martijn; Salzman, J

    2006-04-17

    Diamond based technologies offer a material platform for the implementation of qubits for quantum computing. The photonic crystal architecture provides the route for a scalable and controllable implementation of high quality factor (Q) nanocavities, operating in the strong coupling regime for cavity quantum electrodynamics. Here we compute the photonic band structures and quality factors of microcavities in photonic crystal slabs in diamond, and compare the results with those of the more commonly-used silicon platform. We find that, in spite of the lower index contrast, diamond based photonic crystal microcavities can exhibit quality factors of Q=3.0x10(4), sufficient for proof of principle demonstrations in the quantum regime. PMID:19516502

  12. Photonic Design for Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Kosten, E.; Callahan, D.; Horowitz, K.; Pala, R.; Atwater, H.

    2014-08-28

    We describe photonic design approaches for silicon photovoltaics including i) trapezoidal broadband light trapping structures ii) broadband light trapping with photonic crystal superlattices iii) III-V/Si nanowire arrays designed for broadband light trapping.

  13. Incorporation of superlattice crystal layers in multijunction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackslee, A. E.; Mitchell, K. W.

    1980-01-01

    Superlattice layers are effective in decreasing the density of dislocations in lattice mismatched heterostructures at least four orders of magnitude. Hence it was proposed to utilize this feature of superlattices to alleviate the problems due to misfit dislocations generated in the regions between two or more photovoltaic collecting junctions. A further advantage is that the possibility is presented for using silicon as a low cost substrate as well as for the low band gap junction. In the test case, a silicon low gap cell was connected to a GaAs.7P.3 high gap cell through a connecting region containing a GaAs/GaP superlattice.

  14. Photonic crystal scene projector development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. A.; Burckel, B.; Caulfield, J.; Cogan, S.; Massie, M.; Lamott, R.; Snyder, D.; Rapp, R.

    2010-04-01

    This paper describes results from the Extremely High Temperature Photonic Crystal System Technology (XTEMPS) program. The XTEMPS program is developing projector technology based on photonic crystals capable of high dynamic range, multispectral emission from SWIR to LWIR, and realistic band widths. These Photonics Crystals (PhC) are fabricated from refractory materials to provide high radiance and long device lifetime. Cyan is teamed with Sandia National Laboratories, to develop photonics crystals designed for realistic scene projection systems and Nova sensors to utilize their advanced Read In Integrated Circuit (RIIC). PhC based emitters show improved in-band output power efficiency when compared to broad band "graybody" emitters due to the absence of out-of-band emission. Less electrical power is required to achieve high operating temperature, and the potential for nonequilibrium pumping exists. Both effects boost effective radiance output. Cyan has demonstrated pixel designs compatible with Nova's medium format RIIC, ensuring high apparent output temperatures, modest drive currents, and low operating voltages of less than five volts. Unit cell pixel structures with high radiative efficiency have been demonstrated, and arrays using PhC optimized for up to four spectral bands have been successfully patterned.

  15. Photonic crystal surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chua, Song Liang; Lu, Ling; Soljacic, Marin

    2015-06-23

    A photonic-crystal surface-emitting laser (PCSEL) includes a gain medium electromagnetically coupled to a photonic crystal whose energy band structure exhibits a Dirac cone of linear dispersion at the center of the photonic crystal's Brillouin zone. This Dirac cone's vertex is called a Dirac point; because it is at the Brillouin zone center, it is called an accidental Dirac point. Tuning the photonic crystal's band structure (e.g., by changing the photonic crystal's dimensions or refractive index) to exhibit an accidental Dirac point increases the photonic crystal's mode spacing by orders of magnitudes and reduces or eliminates the photonic crystal's distributed in-plane feedback. Thus, the photonic crystal can act as a resonator that supports single-mode output from the PCSEL over a larger area than is possible with conventional PCSELs, which have quadratic band edge dispersion. Because output power generally scales with output area, this increase in output area results in higher possible output powers.

  16. Optical Magnetometer Incorporating Photonic Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulikov, Igor; Florescu, Lucia

    2007-01-01

    According to a proposal, photonic crystals would be used to greatly increase the sensitivities of optical magnetometers that are already regarded as ultrasensitive. The proposal applies, more specifically, to a state-of-the-art type of quantum coherent magnetometer that exploits the electromagnetically-induced-transparency (EIT) method for determining a small change in a magnetic field indirectly via measurement of the shift, induced by that change, in the hyperfine levels of resonant atoms exposed to the field.

  17. Topological photonic crystal with ideal Weyl points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luyang; Jian, Shao-Kai; Yao, Hong

    Weyl points in three-dimensional photonic crystals behave as monopoles of Berry flux in momentum space. Here, based on symmetry analysis, we show that a minimal number of symmetry-related Weyl points can be realized in time-reversal invariant photonic crystals. We propose to realize these ``ideal'' Weyl points in modified double-gyroid photonic crystals, which is confirmed by our first-principle photonic band-structure calculations. Photonic crystals with ideal Weyl points are qualitatively advantageous in applications such as angular and frequency selectivity, broadband invisibility cloaking, and broadband 3D-imaging.

  18. Topological photonic crystal with equifrequency Weyl points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luyang; Jian, Shao-Kai; Yao, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Weyl points in three-dimensional photonic crystals behave as monopoles of Berry flux in momentum space. Here, based on general symmetry analysis, we show that a minimal number of four symmetry-related (consequently equifrequency) Weyl points can be realized in time-reversal invariant photonic crystals. We further propose an experimentally feasible way to modify double-gyroid photonic crystals to realize four equifrequency Weyl points, which is explicitly confirmed by our first-principle photonic band-structure calculations. Remarkably, photonic crystals with equifrequency Weyl points are qualitatively advantageous in applications including angular selectivity, frequency selectivity, invisibility cloaking, and three-dimensional imaging.

  19. Bulk plasmon-polariton gap solitons in defective metamaterial photonic superlattices.

    PubMed

    Gómez, F Reyes; Mejía-Salazar, J R

    2015-11-01

    We show the existence of a defect mode within the plasmon-polariton gap in 1D defective photonic superlattices, composed by alternating layers of conventional dielectric (A) and negative refractive (B) material slabs with a dielectric defective layer (D), which, in the nonlinear regime, can be tuned by means of the incident field intensity. Also, we have shown that the self-induced transparency phenomena can be only observed when gap-soliton modes, coupled through the defective layer, are excited in both mirror systems around the defective slab. PMID:26512512

  20. Ligand Exchange Governs the Crystal Structures in Binary Nanocrystal Superlattices.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jingjing; Schaeffer, Nicolas; Pileni, Marie-Paule

    2015-11-25

    The surface chemistry in colloidal nanocrystals on the final crystalline structure of binary superlattices produced by self-assembly of two sets of nanocrystals is hereby demonstrated. By mixing nanocrystals having two different sizes and the same coating agent, oleylamine (OAM), the binary nanocrystal superlattices that are produced, such as NaCl, AlB2, NaZn13, and MgZn2, are well in agreement with the crystalline structures predicted by the hard-sphere model, their formation being purely driven by entropic forces. By opposition, when large and small nanocrystals are coated with two different ligands [OAM and dodecanethiol (DDT), respectively] while keeping all other experimental conditions unchanged, the final binary structures markedly change and various structures with lower packing densities, such as Cu3Au, CaB6, and quasicrystals, are observed. This effect of the nanocrystals' coating agents could also be extended to other binary systems, such as Ag-Au and CoFe2O4-Ag supracrystalline binary lattices. In order to understand this effect, a mechanism based on ligand exchange process is proposed. Ligand exchange mechanism is believed to affect the thermodynamics in the formation of binary systems composed of two sets of nanocrystals with different sizes and bearing two different coating agents. Hence, the formation of binary superlattices with lower packing densities may be favored kinetically because the required energetic penalty is smaller than that of a denser structure. PMID:26549642

  1. Cholesteric liquid crystal photonic crystal lasers and photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ying

    This dissertation discusses cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs) and polymers based photonic devices including one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal lasers and broadband circular polarizers. CLCs showing unique self-organized chiral structures have been widely used in bistable displays, flexible displays, and reflectors. However, the photonic band gap they exhibit opens a new way for generating laser light at the photonic band edge (PBE) or inside the band gap. When doped with an emissive laser dye, cholesteric liquid crystals provide distributed feedback so that mirrorless lasing is hence possible. Due to the limited surface anchoring, the thickness of gain medium and feedback length is tens of micrometers. Therefore lasing efficiency is quite limited and laser beam is highly divergent. To meet the challenges, we demonstrated several new methods to enhance the laser emission while reducing the beam divergence from a cholesteric liquid crystal laser. Enhanced laser emission is demonstrated by incorporating a single external CLC reflector as a polarization conserved reflector. Because the distributed feedback from the active layer is polarization selective, a CLC reflector preserves the original polarization of the reflected light and a further stimulated amplification ensues. As a result of virtually doubled feedback length, the output is dramatically enhanced in the same circular polarization state. Meanwhile, the laser beam divergence is dramatically reduced due to the increased cavity length from micrometer to millimeter scale. Enhanced laser emission is also demonstrated by the in-cell metallic reflector because the active layer is pumped twice. Unlike a CLC reflector, the output from a mirror-reflected CLC laser is linearly polarized as a result of coherent superposition of two orthogonal circular polarization states. The output linear polarization direction can be well controlled and fine tuned by varying the operating temperature and cell gap. Enhanced laser

  2. Photonic crystals--a step towards integrated circuits for photonics.

    PubMed

    Thylén, Lars; Qiu, Min; Anand, Srinivasan

    2004-09-20

    The field of photonic crystals has, over the past few years, received dramatically increased attention. Photonic crystals are artificially engineered structures that exhibit a periodic variation in one, two, or three dimensions of the dielectric constant, with a period of the order of the pertinent light wavelength. Such structures in three dimensions should exhibit properties similar to solid-state electronic crystals, such as bandgaps, in other words wavelength regions where light cannot propagate in any direction. By introducing defects into the periodic arrangement, the photonic crystals exhibit properties analogous to those of solid-state crystals. The basic feature of a photonic bandgap was indeed experimentally demonstrated in the beginning of the 1990s, and sparked a large interest in, and in many ways revitalized, photonics research. There are several reasons for this attention. One is that photonic crystals, in their own right, offer a proliferation of challenging research tasks, involving a multitude of disciplines, such as electromagnetic theory, nanofabrication, semi-conductor technology, materials science, biotechnology, to name a few. Another reason is given by the somewhat more down-to-earth expectations that photonics crystals will create unique opportunities for novel devices and applications, and contribute to solving some of the issues that have plagued photonics such as large physical sizes, comparatively low functionality, and high costs. Herein, we will treat some basics of photonic crystal structures and discuss the state-of-the-art in fabrication as well give some examples of devices with unique properties, due to the use of photonic crystals. We will also point out some of the problems that still remain to be solved, and give a view on where photonic crystals currently stand. PMID:15499844

  3. Frozen multipartite entanglement in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Xu, Jing-Bo

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the multipartite entanglement dynamics of a many-body system consisting of N identical two-level atoms locally embedded in their own band-gap photonic crystals. It is shown that the tripartite entanglement of this photonic-crystal system can be frozen in a stationary state. We also find that a double-sudden-change phenomenon of four-partite entanglement occurs in this photonic-crystal system during the decoherence process under certain suitable conditions.

  4. Monochromatic Wannier Functions in the Theory of 2D Photonic Crystals and Photonic Crystal Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Mazhirina, Yu. A.; Melnikov, L. A.

    2011-10-03

    The use of the monochromatic Wannier functions which have the temporal dependence as (exp(-i{omega}t)) in the theory of 2D photonic crystals and photonic crystal fibers is proposed. Corresponding equations and formulae are derived and discussed.

  5. Tunable liquid crystal photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yun-Hsing

    2005-07-01

    Liquid crystal (LC)-based adaptive optics are important for information processing, optical interconnections, photonics, integrated optics, and optical communications due to their tunable optical properties. In this dissertation, we describe novel liquid crystal photonic devices. In Chap. 3, we demonstrate a novel electrically tunable-efficiency Fresnel lens which is devised for the first time using nanoscale PDLC. The tunable Fresnel lens is very desirable to eliminate the need of external spatial light modulator. The nanoscale LC devices are polarization independent and exhibit a fast response time. Because of the small droplet sizes, the operating voltage is higher than 100 Vrms. To lower the driving voltage, in Chap. 2 and Chap. 3, we have investigated tunable Fresnel lens using polymer-network liquid crystal (PNLC) and phase-separated composite film (PSCOF). The operating voltage is below 12 Vrms. The PNLC and PSCOF devices are polarization dependent. To overcome this shortcoming, stacking two cells with orthogonal alignment directions is a possibility. Using PNLC, we also demonstrated LC blazed grating. The diffraction efficiency of these devices is continuously controlled by the electric field. We also develop a system with continuously tunable focal length. A conventional mechanical zooming system is bulky and power hungry. In Chap. 4, we developed an electrically tunable-focus flat LC spherical lens and microlens array. A huge tunable range from 0.6 m to infinity is achieved by the applied voltage. In Chap. 5, we describe a LC microlens array whose focal length can be switched from positive to negative by the applied voltage. The fast response time feature of our LC microlens array will be very helpful in developing 3-D animated images. In Chap. 6, we demonstrate polymer network liquid crystals for switchable polarizers and optical shutters. The use of dual-frequency liquid crystal and special driving scheme leads to a sub-millisecond response time. In

  6. Direct observation of two-step crystallization in nanoparticle superlattice formation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jungwon; Zheng, Haimei; Lee, Won Chul; Geissler, Phillip L.; Rabani, Eran; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2011-10-06

    Direct imaging of nanoparticle solutions by liquid phase transmission electron microscopy has enabled unique in-situ studies of nanoparticle motion and growth. In the present work, we report on real-time formation of two-dimensional nanoparticle arrays in the very low diffusive limit, where nanoparticles are mainly driven by capillary forces and solvent fluctuations. We find that superlattice formation appears to be segregated into multiple regimes. Initially, the solvent front drags the nanoparticles, condensing them into an amorphous agglomerate. Subsequently, the nanoparticle crystallization into an array is driven by local fluctuations. Following the crystallization event, superlattice growth can also occur via the addition of individual nanoparticles drawn from outlying regions by different solvent fronts. The dragging mechanism is consistent with simulations based on a coarse-grained lattice gas model at the same limit.

  7. Energy transduction in surface photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fuchyi

    2011-12-01

    This dissertation is a detailed investigation of the fabrication, design, characterization, and understanding of physical principles of energy transduction in surface photonic crystals which are engineered for various applications. One-dimensional photonic crystals are engineered as optically tunable reflectance filters for lambda = 632.8 nm wavelength light by incorporating azobenzene liquid crystal dye molecules into the photonic crystal structure. Optical energy is transduced to accomplish mechanical work by exciting the dye molecules into different physical configurations, leading to changes in the optical properties of the dye molecules, namely their refractive index. This mechanism is used to tune the reflection resonance of the photonic crystal filter. The spectral and temporal optical tuning response of the photonic crystal filter due to excitation light at lambda = 532 nm is characterized. Modulation of the transmitted and reflected lambda = 632.8 nm light is achieved at microsecond time response. Two-dimensional photonic crystals are also investigated as reflectance filters for lambda = 532 nm wavelength light. Both optically tunable and static reflectance filters are studied. Again, azobenzene liquid crystal molecules are incorporated into the photonic crystal to achieve optical tuning of the reflectance wavelength. In this case, the lambda = 532 nm wavelength light is used for self-modulation. That is, the light serves both to optically tune the photonic crystal filter as well as to modulate its own reflection efficiency through the photonic crystal filter. Moreover, stacking of multiple photonic crystals into a single filter is studied for both static and optically tunable photonic crystal filters. It is shown that this approach improves the performance of the photonic crystal reflectance filter by increasing its optical density and its angular tolerance at the reflection wavelength of lambda = 532 nm. Additionally, surface photonic crystals are

  8. Photonic crystal scintillators and methods of manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Ricardo D.; Sexton, Lindsay T.; Fuentes, Roderick E.; Cortes-Concepcion, Jose

    2015-08-11

    Photonic crystal scintillators and their methods of manufacture are provided. Exemplary methods of manufacture include using a highly-ordered porous anodic alumina membrane as a pattern transfer mask for either the etching of underlying material or for the deposition of additional material onto the surface of a scintillator. Exemplary detectors utilizing such photonic crystal scintillators are also provided.

  9. Femtosecond dynamics of decoupled superlattice zones in 4Hb-TaSe2 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olaoye, O.; Erasmus, N.; Haupt, K.; Schwoerer, H.

    2016-03-01

    Strongly correlated electronic crystal systems marked by temperature-dependent phase transitions often feature an emergence of new structural periodicities, arising from an interplay between modulated electron density and periodic lattice distortion. We investigate the structural evolution of \\sqrt{13}a× \\sqrt{13}a× c superlattice clusters in 4Hb-TaSe2 single crystals on a subpicosecond and atomic resolution via femtosecond electron diffraction (FED). The superlattice clusters comprise of two six-member rings each, related by a rotational symmetry and held in position by Coulombic mode repulsion. The two six-member rings are decoupled into two possible zones, which are further decoupled into respective site-specific satellite reflections in the reciprocal space. Governed by the interlayer interactions and the electron diffraction simulation analysis, FED measurements are used to demonstrate the suppression and dynamics of the decoupled superlattice zones. The simultaneous temporal evolution of the two CDW reflection orders are assigned to the decoupled Raman-active A g and {E}2g soft phonon modes previously reported on an isomorphic crystal structure (4Hb-TaS2). It is found that the charge density wave amplitude mode dominates over the corresponding phase mode.

  10. Photonic crystal technology for terahertz system integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Masayuki; Nagatsuma, Tadao

    2016-04-01

    Developing terahertz integration technology is essential for practical use of terahertz electromagnetic waves (0.1-10 THz) in various applications including broadband wireless communication, spectroscopic sensing, and nondestructive imaging. In this paper, we present our recent challenges towards terahertz system integration based on photonic crystal technology such as the development of terahertz transceivers. We use photonic-crystal slabs consisting of a twodimensional lattice of air holes formed in a silicon slab to develop low loss compact terahertz components in planar structures. The demonstration of ultralow loss (< 0.1 dB/cm) waveguides and integrated transceiver devices in the 0.3 THz band shows the potential for the application of photonic crystals to terahertz integration technology. Improving the coupling efficiency between the photonic crystal waveguide and resonant tunneling diode is important to take full advantage of the ultralow loss photonic crystal waveguides.

  11. Materials science: Superlattice substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    What happens if some of the particles of a superlattice -- an array of identical nanoscale crystals -- are replaced with foreign ones? It emerges that the properties of superlattices can be radically altered in this way. See Letter p.450

  12. Liquid crystal orientation control in photonic liquid crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chychlowski, M. S.; Nowinowski-Kruszelnicki, E.; Woliński, T. R.

    2011-05-01

    Similarly to liquid crystal displays technology in photonic liquid crystal fibers (PLCFs) a molecular orientation control is a crucial issue that influences proper operation of PLCF-based devices. The paper presents two distinct configurations: planar and radial escaped orientation of the LC molecules inside capillaries as well as methods of their application to photonic liquid crystal fibers. Possibilities of LC orientation control influence both: attenuation and transmitting spectra of the PLCF The orienting method is based on creation of an additional orienting layer on the inner surface of the capillary or air hole of the photonic liquid crystal fiber. Aligning materials used in the experiment are commercially available polyimides SE1211 and SE130 which induce liquid crystal homeotropic and planar anchoring conditions. The orienting layer increase an order parameter of the liquid crystal improving propagation properties and stability of photonic liquid crystal fiber-based devices.

  13. Butterfly wing color: A photonic crystal demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proietti Zaccaria, Remo

    2016-01-01

    We have theoretically modeled the optical behavior of a natural occurring photonic crystal, as defined by the geometrical characteristics of the Teinopalpus Imperialis butterfly. In particular, following a genetic algorithm approach, we demonstrate how its wings follow a triclinic crystal geometry with a tetrahedron unit base. By performing both photonic band analysis and transmission/reflection simulations, we are able to explain the characteristic colors emerging by the butterfly wings, thus confirming their crystal form.

  14. Photonic crystal microcavity lasers and laser arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jiang-Rong

    As a state-of-the-art technology, photonic crystal microcavity lasers have great potentials to resolve many semiconductor laser performance challenges, owing to their compact size, high spontaneous emission factor, and inherent advantages in dimension scalability. This thesis describes efficient numerical analyzing methods for multimode photonic crystal microcavities, including a parallel computing three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method combined with Pade interpolation, point group projection, and vectorial Green's function method. With the help of these analyzing tools, various experimental photonic crystal microcavity devices fabricated in InGaAsP/InP based materials were studies. Room temperature optical pumped InGaAsP suspended membrane photonic crystal microcavity lasers were demonstrated. Their lithographical fine-tuning, above room temperature operations, mode identifications and polarizations were demonstrated. Room temperature continuous wave (CW) optically pumped photonic crystal microcavity lasers at diameter less than 3.2 mum were demonstrated with crystalline alpha-Al 2O3 (sapphire) as a cladding layer to the InGaAsP membrane. The far-field radiation profiles from these microcavity lasers were measured and compared with our numerical modeling predictions. Two electrical injection scenes for photonic crystal microcavity lasers were introduced, together with some preliminary results including the demonstrations of optically pumped lasing of highly doped cavities and cavities with an electrical conduction post underneath. Electrically excited photonic crystal microcavity light emitting diodes (LEDs) were also experimentally demonstrated.

  15. Guided-wave liquid-crystal photonics.

    PubMed

    Zografopoulos, D C; Asquini, R; Kriezis, E E; d'Alessandro, A; Beccherelli, R

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we review the state of the art in the field of liquid-crystal tunable guided-wave photonic devices, a unique type of fill-once, molecular-level actuated, optofluidic systems. These have recently attracted significant research interest as potential candidates for low-cost, highly functional photonic elements. We cover a full range of structures, which span from micromachined liquid-crystal on silicon devices to periodic structures and liquid-crystal infiltrated photonic crystal fibers, with focus on key-applications for photonics. Various approaches on the control of the LC molecular orientation are assessed, including electro-, thermo- and all-optical switching. Special attention is paid to practical issues regarding liquid-crystal infiltration, molecular alignment and actuation, low-power operation, as well as their integrability in chip-scale or fiber-based devices. PMID:22842818

  16. Novel photonic crystal cavities and related structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Luk, Ting Shan

    2007-11-01

    The key accomplishment of this project is to achieve a much more in-depth understanding of the thermal emission physics of metallic photonic crystal through theoretical modeling and experimental measurements. An improved transfer matrix technique was developed to enable incorporation of complex dielectric function. Together with microscopic theory describing emitter radiative and non-radiative relaxation dynamics, a non-equilibrium thermal emission model is developed. Finally, experimental methodology was developed to measure absolute emissivity of photonic crystal at high temperatures with accuracy of +/-2%. Accurate emissivity measurements allow us to validate the procedure to treat the effect of the photonic crystal substrate.

  17. Superlattice strain gage

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Smith, Darryl L.; Sinha, Dipen N.

    1990-01-01

    A strain gage comprising a strained-layer superlattice crystal exhibiting piezoelectric properties is described. A substrate upon which such a strained-layer superlattice crystal has been deposited is attached to an element to be monitored for strain. A light source is focused on the superlattice crystal and the light reflected from, passed through, or emitted from the crystal is gathered and compared with previously obtained optical property data to determine the strain in the element.

  18. Superlattice strain gage

    DOEpatents

    Noel, B.W.; Smith, D.L.; Sinha, D.N.

    1988-06-28

    A strain gage comprising a strained-layer superlattice crystal exhibiting piezoelectric properties is described. A substrate upon which such a strained-layer superlattice crystal has been deposited is attached to an element to be monitored for strain. A light source is focused on the superlattice crystal and the light reflected from, passed through, or emitted from the crystal is gathered and compared with previously obtained optical property data to determine the strain in the element. 8 figs.

  19. Analysis of photon recycling using metallic photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Sung; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Chang, Allan S. P.; Lee, Jae-Hwang; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2007-09-01

    We investigate a photon recycling scheme using two-dimensional metallic photonic crystals made of silver to improve the energy efficiency of an incandescent light source. A theoretical framework is presented to analyze the resultant photon-recycled lighting system. Calculation results show that the system can reach a maximum luminous efficiency of 125 lm/W, which is 8 times higher than that of a bare blackbody radiation at 2800 K. The color temperature of the system is calculated to be around 3500 K or below, while the color rendering index is between 68 and 90. These results suggest that a photon-recycled incandescent light source using metallic photonic crystals can be a viable alternative future lighting solution.

  20. Multifunctional Glassy Liquid Crystal for Photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,S.H.

    2004-11-05

    As an emerging class of photonic materials, morphologically stable glassy liquid crystals, were developed following a versatile molecular design approach. Glassy cholesteric liquid crystals with elevated phase-transition temperatures and capability for selective-wavelength reflection and circular polarization were synthesized via determinstic synthesis strategies. Potential applications of glassy cholesteric liquid crystals include high-performance polarizers, optical notch filters and reflectors, and circularly polarized photoluminescence. A glassy nematic liquid crystal comprising a dithienylethene core was also synthesized for the demonstration of nondestructive rewritable optical memory and photonic switching in the sollid state.

  1. Coupled External Cavity Photonic Crystal Enhanced Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Pokhriyal, Anusha; Lu, Meng; Ge, Chun; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    We report a fundamentally new approach to enhance fluorescence in which surface adsorbed fluorophore-tagged biomolecules are excited on a photonic crystal surface that functions as a narrow bandwidth and tunable mirror of an external cavity laser. This scheme leads to ~10× increase in the electromagnetic enhancement factor compared to ordinary photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence. In our experiments, the cavity automatically tunes its lasing wavelength to the resonance wavelength of the photonic crystal, ensuring optimal on-resonance coupling even in the presence of variable device parameters and variations in the density of surface-adsorbed capture molecules. We achieve ~105× improvement in the limit of detection of a fluorophore-tagged protein compared to its detection on an unpatterned glass substrate. The enhanced fluorescence signal and easy optical alignment make cavity-coupled photonic crystals a viable approach for further reducing detection limits of optically-excited light emitters that are used in biological assays. PMID:23129575

  2. Photonic crystal: energy-related applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Zhuo; Park, Joong-Mok; Constant, Kristen; Kim, Tae-Geun; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2012-06-08

    We review recent work on photonic-crystal fabrication using soft-lithography techniques. We consider applications of the resulting structures in energy-related areas such as lighting and solar-energy harvesting. In general, our aim is to introduce the reader to the concepts of photonic crystals, describe their history, development, and fabrication techniques and discuss a selection of energy-related applications.

  3. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, B.; /SLAC

    2005-09-19

    We discuss simulated photonic crystal structure designs for laser-driven particle acceleration, focusing on three-dimensional planar structures based on the so-called ''woodpile'' lattice. We demonstrate guiding of a speed-of-light accelerating mode by a defect in the photonic crystal lattice and discuss the properties of this mode. We also discuss particle beam dynamics in the structure, presenting a novel method for focusing the beam. In addition we describe some potential coupling methods for the structure.

  4. Photonic crystal waveguide created by selective infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas Bedoya, A.; Domachuk, P.; Grillet, C.; Monat, C.; Mägi, E. C.; Li, E.; Eggleton, B. J.

    2012-06-01

    The marriage of photonics and microfluidics ("optofluidics") uses the inherent mobility of fluids to reversibly tune photonic structures beyond traditional fabrication methods by infiltrating voids in said structures. Photonic crystals (PhCs) strongly control light on the wavelength scale and are well suited to optofluidic tuning because their periodic airhole microstructure is a natural candidate for housing liquids. The infiltration of a single row of holes in the PhC matrix modifies the effective refractive index allowing optical modes to be guided by the PhC bandgap. In this work we present the first experimental demonstration of a reconfigurable single mode W1 photonic crystal defect waveguide created by selective liquid infiltration. We modified a hexagonal silicon planar photonic crystal membrane by selectively filling a single row of air holes with ~300nm resolution, using high refractive index ionic liquid. The modification creates optical confinement in the infiltrated region and allows propagation of a single optical waveguide mode. We describe the challenges arising from the infiltration process and the liquid/solid surface interaction in the photonic crystal. We include a detailed comparison between analytic and numerical modeling and experimental results, and introduce a new approach to create an offset photonic crystal cavity by varying the nature of the selective infiltration process.

  5. Optical trapping apparatus, methods and applications using photonic crystal resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, David; Chen, Yih-Fan

    2015-06-16

    A plurality of photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatuses and a plurality optical trapping methods using the plurality of photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatuses include located and formed over a substrate a photonic waveguide that is coupled (i.e., either separately coupled or integrally coupled) with a photonic crystal resonator. In a particular embodiment, the photonic waveguide and the photonic crystal resonator comprise a monocrystalline silicon (or other) photonic material absent any chemical functionalization. In another particular embodiment, the photonic waveguide and the photonic crystal resonator comprise a silicon nitride material which when actuating the photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatus with a 1064 nanometer resonant photonic radiation wavelength (or other resonant photonic radiation wavelength in a range from about 700 to about 1200 nanometers) provides no appreciable heating of an aqueous sample fluid that is analyzed by the photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatus.

  6. Optical mirage in graded photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centeno, Emmanuel; Cassagne, David; Albert, Jean Paul

    2006-04-01

    We present the concept of graded photonic crystals (GPC) and show its ability to enhance the control of light propagation. It is shown that gradual modifications of photonic crystal parameters are able to curve the path of light. This light bending which depends on the wavelength and on the incident angle is examined through parametric studies of the iso-frequency curves. We demonstrate that photonic mirages originate from the same physical principles as the usual atmospheric mirages. Two optical components based on two-dimensional GPCs presenting a super bending effect and a large beam shifting are presented.

  7. Controlling spontaneous emission in bioreplica photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, Matthew R.; Butler, Elizabeth S.; Bartl, Michael H.

    2012-04-01

    Sophisticated methods have been created by nature to produce structure-based colors as a way to address the need of a wide variety of organisms. This pallet of available structures presents a unique opportunity for the investigation of new photonic crystal designs. Low-temperature sol-gel biotemplating methods were used to transform a single biotemplate into a variety of inorganic oxide structures. The density of optical states was calculated for a diamond-based natural photonic crystal, as well as several structures templated from it. Calculations were experimentally probed by spontaneous emission studies using time correlated single photon counting measurements.

  8. Progress in 2D photonic crystal Fano resonance photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weidong; Zhao, Deyin; Shuai, Yi-Chen; Yang, Hongjun; Chuwongin, Santhad; Chadha, Arvinder; Seo, Jung-Hun; Wang, Ken X.; Liu, Victor; Ma, Zhenqiang; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to a conventional symmetric Lorentzian resonance, Fano resonance is predominantly used to describe asymmetric-shaped resonances, which arise from the constructive and destructive interference of discrete resonance states with broadband continuum states. This phenomenon and the underlying mechanisms, being common and ubiquitous in many realms of physical sciences, can be found in a wide variety of nanophotonic structures and quantum systems, such as quantum dots, photonic crystals, plasmonics, and metamaterials. The asymmetric and steep dispersion of the Fano resonance profile promises applications for a wide range of photonic devices, such as optical filters, switches, sensors, broadband reflectors, lasers, detectors, slow-light and non-linear devices, etc. With advances in nanotechnology, impressive progress has been made in the emerging field of nanophotonic structures. One of the most attractive nanophotonic structures for integrated photonics is the two-dimensional photonic crystal slab (2D PCS), which can be integrated into a wide range of photonic devices. The objective of this manuscript is to provide an in depth review of the progress made in the general area of Fano resonance photonics, focusing on the photonic devices based on 2D PCS structures. General discussions are provided on the origins and characteristics of Fano resonances in 2D PCSs. A nanomembrane transfer printing fabrication technique is also reviewed, which is critical for the heterogeneous integrated Fano resonance photonics. The majority of the remaining sections review progress made on various photonic devices and structures, such as high quality factor filters, membrane reflectors, membrane lasers, detectors and sensors, as well as structures and phenomena related to Fano resonance slow light effect, nonlinearity, and optical forces in coupled PCSs. It is expected that further advances in the field will lead to more significant advances towards 3D integrated photonics, flat

  9. Thermal tunability of photonic bandgaps in liquid crystal filled polymer photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Doudou; Chen, Guoxiang; Wang, Lili

    2016-05-01

    A highly tunable bandgap-guiding polymer photonic crystal fiber is designed by infiltrating the cladding air holes with liquid crystal 5CB. Structural parameter dependence and thermal tunability of the photonic bandgaps, mode properties and confinement losses of the designed fiber are investigated. Bandgaps red shift as the temperature goes up. Average thermal tuning sensitivity of 30.9 nm/°C and 20.6 nm/°C is achieved around room temperature for the first and second photonic bandgap, respectively. Our results provide theoretical references for applications of polymer photonic crystal fiber in sensing and tunable fiber-optic devices.

  10. Liquid crystal devices for photonics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chigrinov, Vladimir G.

    2007-11-01

    Liquid crystal (LC) devices for Photonics applications is a hot topic of research. Such elements begin to appear in Photonics market. Passive elements for fiber optical communication systems (DWDM components) based on LC cells can successfully compete with the other elements used for the purpose, such as micro electromechanical (MEM), thermo-optical, opto-mechanical or acousto-optical devices. Application of nematic and ferroelectric LC for high speed communication systems, producing elements that are extremely fast, stable, durable, of low loss, operable over a wide temperature range, and that require small operating voltages and extremely low power consumption. The known LC applications in fiber optics enable to produce switches, filters, attenuators, equalizers, polarization controllers, phase emulators and other fiber optical components. Good robustness due to the absence of moving parts and compatibility with VLSI technology, excellent parameters in a large photonic wavelength range, whereas the complexity of the design and the cost of the device are equivalent to regular passive matrix LC displays makes LC fiber optical devices very attractive for mass production. We have already successfully fabricated certain prototypes of the optical switches based on ferroelectric and nematic LC materials. The electrooptical modes used for the purpose included the light polarization rotation, voltage controllable diffraction and fast switching of the LC refractive index. We used the powerful software to optimize the LC modulation characteristics. Use of photo-alignment technique pioneered by us makes it possible to develop new LC fiber components. Almost all the criteria of perfect LC alignment are met in case of azo-dye layers. We have already used azo-dye materials to align LC in superthin photonic holes, curved and 3D surfaces and as cladding layers in microring silicon based resonators. The prototypes of new LC efficient Photonics devices are envisaged. Controllable

  11. Photonic crystals with active organic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yeheng

    The concept of photonic crystals, which involves periodically arranged dielectrics that form a new type of material having novel photonic properties, was first proposed about two decades ago. Since then, a number of applications in photonic technology have been explored. Specifically, organic and hybrid photonic crystals are promising because of the unique advantages of the organic materials. A one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal (multilayer) has high reflectance across a certain wavelength range. We report on studies of 1D multilayer polymer films that were fabricated using spin-coating, free film stacking, and co-extrusion techniques. For example, a stack fabricated by placing a laser dye-doped gain medium between two multilayer reflecting polymer films forms a micro-resonator laser or distributed Bragg laser. The resulting laser system is made entirely of plastic and is only several tens of micrometers in thickness. When the gain, a dye-doped medium, comprises one type of a two-type multilayer film, it results a laser exhibiting distributed feedback. At the edge of the photonic band, the group velocity becomes small and the density of photon states becomes high, which leads to laser emission. Such distributed feedback lasers were fabricated using the co-extrusion technique. The refractive indices and the photonic lattice determine the photonic band gap, which can be tuned by changing these parameters. Materials with Kerr nonlinearity exhibit a change in refractive index depending on the incident intensity of the light. To demonstrate such switching, electrochemical etching techniques on silicon wafers were used to form two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystals. By incorporating the nonlinear organic material into the 2D structure, we have made all-optical switches. The reflection of a beam from the 2D photonic crystal can be controlled by another beam because it induces a refractive index change in the active material by altering the reflection band. A mid

  12. Photon Molecules in Atomic Gases Trapped Near Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, James S.; Caneva, Tommaso; Chang, Darrick E.

    2016-07-01

    Realizing systems that support robust, controlled interactions between individual photons is an exciting frontier of nonlinear optics. To this end, one approach that has emerged recently is to leverage atomic interactions to create strong and spatially nonlocal interactions between photons. In particular, effective photonic interactions have been successfully created via interactions between atoms excited to Rydberg levels. Here, we investigate an alternative approach, in which atomic interactions arise via their common coupling to photonic crystal waveguides. This technique takes advantage of the ability to separately tailor the strength and range of interactions via the dispersion engineering of the structure itself, which can lead to qualitatively new types of phenomena. For example, much of the work on photon-photon interactions relies on the linear optical effect of electromagnetically induced transparency, in combination with the use of interactions to shift optical pulses into or out of the associated transparency window. Here, we identify a large new class of "correlated transparency windows," in which photonic states of a certain number and shape selectively propagate through the system. Through this technique, we show that molecular bound states of photon pairs can be created.

  13. Photonic quasi-crystal terahertz lasers

    PubMed Central

    Vitiello, Miriam Serena; Nobile, Michele; Ronzani, Alberto; Tredicucci, Alessandro; Castellano, Fabrizio; Talora, Valerio; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles

    2014-01-01

    Quasi-crystal structures do not present a full spatial periodicity but are nevertheless constructed starting from deterministic generation rules. When made of different dielectric materials, they often possess fascinating optical properties, which lie between those of periodic photonic crystals and those of a random arrangement of scatterers. Indeed, they can support extended band-like states with pseudogaps in the energy spectrum, but lacking translational invariance, they also intrinsically feature a pattern of ‘defects’, which can give rise to critically localized modes confined in space, similar to Anderson modes in random structures. If used as laser resonators, photonic quasi-crystals open up design possibilities that are simply not possible in a conventional periodic photonic crystal. In this letter, we exploit the concept of a 2D photonic quasi crystal in an electrically injected laser; specifically, we pattern the top surface of a terahertz quantum-cascade laser with a Penrose tiling of pentagonal rotational symmetry, reaching 0.1–0.2% wall-plug efficiencies and 65 mW peak output powers with characteristic surface-emitting conical beam profiles, result of the rich quasi-crystal Fourier spectrum. PMID:25523102

  14. One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Superprisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David

    2005-01-01

    Theoretical calculations indicate that it should be possible for one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystals (see figure) to exhibit giant dispersions known as the superprism effect. Previously, three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystal superprisms have demonstrated strong wavelength dispersion - about 500 times that of conventional prisms and diffraction gratings. Unlike diffraction gratings, superprisms do not exhibit zero-order transmission or higher-order diffraction, thereby eliminating cross-talk problems. However, the fabrication of these 3D photonic crystals requires complex electron-beam substrate patterning and multilayer thin-film sputtering processes. The proposed 1D superprism is much simpler in structural complexity and, therefore, easier to design and fabricate. Like their 3D counterparts, the 1D superprisms can exhibit giant dispersions over small spectral bands that can be tailored by judicious structure design and tuned by varying incident beam direction. Potential applications include miniature gas-sensing devices.

  15. Computational Modeling of Photonic Crystal Microcavity Single-Photon Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saulnier, Nicole A.

    Conventional cryptography is based on algorithms that are mathematically complex and difficult to solve, such as factoring large numbers. The advent of a quantum computer would render these schemes useless. As scientists work to develop a quantum computer, cryptographers are developing new schemes for unconditionally secure cryptography. Quantum key distribution has emerged as one of the potential replacements of classical cryptography. It relics on the fact that measurement of a quantum bit changes the state of the bit and undetected eavesdropping is impossible. Single polarized photons can be used as the quantum bits, such that a quantum system would in some ways mirror the classical communication scheme. The quantum key distribution system would include components that create, transmit and detect single polarized photons. The focus of this work is on the development of an efficient single-photon source. This source is comprised of a single quantum dot inside of a photonic crystal microcavity. To better understand the physics behind the device, a computational model is developed. The model uses Finite-Difference Time-Domain methods to analyze the electromagnetic field distribution in photonic crystal microcavities. It uses an 8-band k · p perturbation theory to compute the energy band structure of the epitaxially grown quantum dots. We discuss a method that combines the results of these two calculations for determining the spontaneous emission lifetime of a quantum dot in bulk material or in a microcavity. The computational models developed in this thesis are used to identify and characterize microcavities for potential use in a single-photon source. The computational tools developed are also used to investigate novel photonic crystal microcavities that incorporate 1D distributed Bragg reflectors for vertical confinement. It is found that the spontaneous emission enhancement in the quasi-3D cavities can be significantly greater than in traditional suspended slab

  16. Veselago lens by photonic hyper-crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zun Narimanov, Evgenii E.

    2014-07-21

    Based on the recent concept of the photonic hyper-crystal—an artificial optical medium that combines the properties of hyperbolic materials and photonic crystals, we present the imaging system functioning as a Veselago lens. This planar lens shows a nearly constant negative refractive index with substantially reduced image aberrations, and can find potential applications in photolithography and hot-spots detection of silicon-based integrated circuits.

  17. Integrated photonic crystal selective emitter for thermophotovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhiguang; Yehia, Omar; Bermel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Converting blackbody thermal radiation to electricity via thermophotovoltaics (TPV) is inherently inefficient. Photon recycling using cold-side filters offers potentially improved performance but requires extremely close spacing between the thermal emitter and the receiver, namely a high view factor. Here, we propose an alternative approach for thermal energy conversion, the use of an integrated photonic crystal selective emitter (IPSE), which combines two-dimensional photonic crystal selective emitters and filters into a single device. Finite difference time domain and current transport simulations show that IPSEs can significantly suppress sub-bandgap photons. This increases heat-to-electricity conversion for photonic crystal based emitters from 35.2 up to 41.8% at 1573 K for a GaSb photovoltaic (PV) diode with matched bandgaps of 0.7 eV. The physical basis of this enhancement is a shift from a perturbative to a nonperturbative regime, which maximized photon recycling. Furthermore, combining IPSEs with nonconductive optical waveguides eliminates a key difficulty associated with TPV: the need for precise alignment between the hot selective emitter and cool PV diode. The physical effects of both the IPSE and waveguide can be quantified in terms of an extension of the concept of an effective view factor.

  18. Ultra compact spectrometer apparatus and method using photonic crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed to methods of photonic crystal formation, and to methods and apparatus for using such photonic crystals, particularly in conjunction with detector arrays. Photonic crystal parameters and detector array parameters are compared to optimize the selection and orientation of a photonic crystal shape. A photonic crystal is operatively positioned relative to a plurality of light sensors. The light sensors can be separated by a pitch distance and positioned within one half of the pitch distance of an exit surface of the photonic crystals.

  19. Optical amplification enhancement in photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Sapienza, R.; Leonetti, M.; Froufe-Perez, L. S.; Galisteo-Lopez, J. F.; Lopez, C.; Conti, C.

    2011-02-15

    Improving and controlling the efficiency of a gain medium is one of the most challenging problems of laser research. By measuring the gain length in an opal-based photonic crystal doped with laser dye, we demonstrate that optical amplification is more than twenty-fold enhanced along the {Gamma}-K symmetry directions of the face-centered-cubic photonic crystal. These results are theoretically explained by directional variations of the density of states, providing a quantitative connection between density of the states and light amplification.

  20. Self-assembled tunable photonic hyper-crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolyaninov, Igor; Smolyaninova, Vera; Yost, Bradley; Lahneman, David; Gresock, Thomas; Narimanov, Evgenii

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a novel artificial optical material, the photonic hyper-crystal, which combines the most interesting features of hyperbolic metamaterials and photonic crystals. Similar to hyperbolic metamaterials, photonic hyper-crystals exhibit broadband divergence in their photonic density of states due to the lack of usual diffraction limit on the photon wave vector. On the other hand, similar to photonic crystals, hyperbolic dispersion law of extraordinary photons is modulated by forbidden gaps near the boundaries of photonic Brillouin zones. Three dimensional self-assembly of photonic hyper-crystals has been achieved by application of external magnetic field to a cobalt nanoparticle-based ferrofluid. Unique spectral properties of photonic hyper-crystals lead to extreme sensitivity of the material to monolayer coatings of cobalt nanoparticles, which should find numerous applications in biological and chemical sensing. This work was supported in part by NSF Grant DMR-1104676, NSF Center for Photonic and Multiscale Nanomaterials, ARO MURI and Gordon and Berry Moore Foundation.

  1. Zero- n bar band gap in two-dimensional metamaterial photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejía-Salazar, J. R.; Porras-Montenegro, N.

    2015-04-01

    We have theoretically studied metamaterial photonic crystals (PCs) composed by air and double negative (DNG) material. Numerical data were obtained by means of the finite difference time-domain (FDTD) method, with results indicating the possibility for the existence of the zero- n bar non-Bragg gap in two-dimensional metamaterial PCs, which has been previously observed only in one-dimensional photonic superlattices. Validity of the present FDTD algorithm for the study of one-dimensional metamaterial PCs is shown by comparing with results for the transmittance spectra obtained by means of the well known transfer matrix method (TMM). In the case of two-dimensional metamaterial PCs, we have calculated the photonic band structure (PBS) in the limiting case of a one-dimensional photonic superlattice and for a nearly one-dimensional PC, showing a very similar dispersion relation. Finally, we show that due to the strong electromagnetic field localization on the constitutive rods, the zero- n bar non-Bragg gap may only exist in two-dimensional systems under strict geometrical conditions.

  2. Photon statistics in scintillation crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, Vaibhav Joga Singh

    Scintillation based gamma-ray detectors are widely used in medical imaging, high-energy physics, astronomy and national security. Scintillation gamma-ray detectors are eld-tested, relatively inexpensive, and have good detection eciency. Semi-conductor detectors are gaining popularity because of their superior capability to resolve gamma-ray energies. However, they are relatively hard to manufacture and therefore, at this time, not available in as large formats and much more expensive than scintillation gamma-ray detectors. Scintillation gamma-ray detectors consist of: a scintillator, a material that emits optical (scintillation) photons when it interacts with ionization radiation, and an optical detector that detects the emitted scintillation photons and converts them into an electrical signal. Compared to semiconductor gamma-ray detectors, scintillation gamma-ray detectors have relatively poor capability to resolve gamma-ray energies. This is in large part attributed to the "statistical limit" on the number of scintillation photons. The origin of this statistical limit is the assumption that scintillation photons are either Poisson distributed or super-Poisson distributed. This statistical limit is often dened by the Fano factor. The Fano factor of an integer-valued random process is dened as the ratio of its variance to its mean. Therefore, a Poisson process has a Fano factor of one. The classical theory of light limits the Fano factor of the number of photons to a value greater than or equal to one (Poisson case). However, the quantum theory of light allows for Fano factors to be less than one. We used two methods to look at the correlations between two detectors looking at same scintillation pulse to estimate the Fano factor of the scintillation photons. The relationship between the Fano factor and the correlation between the integral of the two signals detected was analytically derived, and the Fano factor was estimated using the measurements for SrI2:Eu, YAP

  3. Self-assembled tunable photonic hyper-crystals.

    PubMed

    Smolyaninova, Vera N; Yost, Bradley; Lahneman, David; Narimanov, Evgenii E; Smolyaninov, Igor I

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel artificial optical material, the "photonic hyper-crystal", which combines the most interesting features of hyperbolic metamaterials and photonic crystals. Similar to hyperbolic metamaterials, photonic hyper-crystals exhibit broadband divergence in their photonic density of states due to the lack of usual diffraction limit on the photon wave vector. On the other hand, similar to photonic crystals, hyperbolic dispersion law of extraordinary photons is modulated by forbidden gaps near the boundaries of photonic Brillouin zones. Three dimensional self-assembly of photonic hyper-crystals has been achieved by application of external magnetic field to a cobalt nanoparticle-based ferrofluid. Unique spectral properties of photonic hyper-crystals lead to extreme sensitivity of the material to monolayer coatings of cobalt nanoparticles, which should find numerous applications in biological and chemical sensing. PMID:25027947

  4. Visible stealth materials based on photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Guozheng; Liu, Ying

    2014-08-01

    Optical thin film can be used for invisible cloak. As a kind of low-dimension photonic crystal, it is a candidate for metamaterial with designed Σ and μ. As a coating, it is convenient to be stacked to mimic continuous changing of electromagnetic media. Anti-reflection film is suitable for matching coating between layers of media.

  5. Fabrication and Analysis of Photonic Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Dean J.; Korte, Kylee E.; Xia, Younan

    2007-01-01

    These laboratory experiments are designed to explore aspects of nanoscale chemistry by constructing and spectroscopically analyzing thin films of photonic crystals. Films comprised of colloidal spheres and polydimethylsiloxane exhibit diffraction-based stop bands that shift reversibly upon exposure to some common solvents. Topics covered in these…

  6. Photonic Crystal Sensors Based on Porous Silicon

    PubMed Central

    Pacholski, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Porous silicon has been established as an excellent sensing platform for the optical detection of hazardous chemicals and biomolecular interactions such as DNA hybridization, antigen/antibody binding, and enzymatic reactions. Its porous nature provides a high surface area within a small volume, which can be easily controlled by changing the pore sizes. As the porosity and consequently the refractive index of an etched porous silicon layer depends on the electrochemial etching conditions photonic crystals composed of multilayered porous silicon films with well-resolved and narrow optical reflectivity features can easily be obtained. The prominent optical response of the photonic crystal decreases the detection limit and therefore increases the sensitivity of porous silicon sensors in comparison to sensors utilizing Fabry-Pérot based optical transduction. Development of porous silicon photonic crystal sensors which allow for the detection of analytes by the naked eye using a simple color change or the fabrication of stacked porous silicon photonic crystals showing two distinct optical features which can be utilized for the discrimination of analytes emphasize its high application potential. PMID:23571671

  7. Tunable one-dimensional photonic crystal slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beccherelli, R.; Bellini, B.; Zografopoulos, D.; Kriezis, E.

    2007-05-01

    A 1D photonic crystal slab based on preferential etching of commercially available silicon-on-insulator wafers is presented. Compared to dry etching, anisotropic wet etching is more tolerant to errors as it is self-stopping on crystallographic {111} planes and it produces a more precise geometry with symmetries and homothetic properties, with surface roughness close to 1 nm. The resulting grooves are infiltrated by low viscosity liquid crystal having large positive optical anisotropy. The use of slanted grooves provides advantages: first of all the complete filling of slanted grooves is simplified when compared to vertical walls structures. Furthermore alignment is significantly facilitated. Indeed the liquid crystal molecules tend to align with their long axis along the submicron grooves. Therefore by forcing reorientation out of a rest position, the liquid crystal presents a choice of refractive indices to the propagating optical field. The liquid crystal behavior is simulated by a finite element method, and coupled to a finite difference time domain method. We investigate different photonic crystal configurations. Large tunability of bandgap edge for TE polarization is demonstrated when switching the liquid crystal with an applied voltage. We have also studied the use of the same device geometry as a very compact microfluidic refractometric sensor.

  8. The phonon-polariton spectrum of one-dimensional Rudin-Shapiro photonic superlattices with uniaxial polar materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Urrea, H. A.; Duque, C. A.; Mora-Ramos, M. E.

    2015-11-01

    The properties of the optical-phonon-associated polaritonic modes that appear under oblique light incidence in 1D superlattices made of photonic materials are studied. The investigated systems result from the periodic repetition of quasiregular Rudin-Shapiro (RS) multilayer units. It is assume that the structure consists of both passive non-dispersive layers of constant refraction index and active layers of uniaxial polar materials. In particular, we consider III-V wurtzite nitrides. The optical axis of these polaritonic materials is taken along the growth direction. Maxwell equations are solved using the transfer matrix technique for all admissible values of the incidence angle.

  9. Plasmon-polariton and ⟨n⟨ = 0 non-Bragg gaps in 1D Cantor photonic superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Mejía-Salazar, J. R.; Porras-Montenegro, N.; Reyes-Gómez, E.; Cavalcanti, S. B.; Oliveira, L. E.

    2014-05-15

    We have used the transfer-matrix approach for one-dimensional Cantor photonic superlattices, and studied the plasmon-polariton modes for a multilayered system composed by alternating layers of positive and dispersive materials. Results indicate that the corresponding plasmon-polariton modes, which show up for oblique incidence, strongly depend on the Cantor step, and the plasmon-polariton subbands are associated with the number of metamaterial layers contained in the elementary cell. Moreover, we have studied the ⟨n⟩ = 0 non-Bragg gap in such fractal photonic superlattices and characterized its behavior as function of the steps of the Cantor series.

  10. Hierarchical self-assembly of hexagonal single-crystal nanosheets into 3D layered superlattices with high conductivity.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yulun; Shen, Yuhua; Yang, Liangbao; Han, Bin; Huang, Fangzhi; Li, Shikuo; Chu, Zhuwang; Xie, Anjian

    2012-06-21

    While the number of man-made nano superstructures realized by self-assembly is growing in recent years, assemblies of conductive polymer nanocrystals, especially for superlattices, are still a significant challenge, not only because of the simplicity of the shape of the nanocrystal building blocks and their interactions, but also because of the poor control over these parameters in the fabrication of more elaborate nanocrystals. Here, we firstly report a facile and general route to a new generation of 3D layered superlattices of polyaniline doped with CSA (PANI-CSA) and show how PANI crystallize and self-assemble, in a suitable single solution environment. In cyclohexane, 1D amorphous nanofibers transformed to 1D nanorods as building blocks, and then to 2D single-crystal nanosheets with a hexagonal phase, and lastly to 3D ordered layered superlattices with the narrowest polydispersity value (M(w)/M(n) = 1.47). Remarkably, all the instructions for the hierarchical self-assembly are encoded in the layered shape in other non-polar solvents (hexane, octane) and their conductivity in the π-π stacking direction is improved to about 50 S cm(-1), which is even higher than that of the highest previously reported value (16 S cm(-1)). The method used in this study is greatly expected to be readily scalable to produce superlattices of conductive polymers with high quality and low cost. PMID:22609947

  11. Self-assembled tunable photonic hyper-crystals

    PubMed Central

    Smolyaninova, Vera N.; Yost, Bradley; Lahneman, David; Narimanov, Evgenii E.; Smolyaninov, Igor I.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel artificial optical material, the “photonic hyper-crystal”, which combines the most interesting features of hyperbolic metamaterials and photonic crystals. Similar to hyperbolic metamaterials, photonic hyper-crystals exhibit broadband divergence in their photonic density of states due to the lack of usual diffraction limit on the photon wave vector. On the other hand, similar to photonic crystals, hyperbolic dispersion law of extraordinary photons is modulated by forbidden gaps near the boundaries of photonic Brillouin zones. Three dimensional self-assembly of photonic hyper-crystals has been achieved by application of external magnetic field to a cobalt nanoparticle-based ferrofluid. Unique spectral properties of photonic hyper-crystals lead to extreme sensitivity of the material to monolayer coatings of cobalt nanoparticles, which should find numerous applications in biological and chemical sensing. PMID:25027947

  12. Review on photonic crystal coatings for scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapitsch, Arno; Lecoq, Paul

    2014-11-01

    The amount of light and its time distribution are key factors determining the performance of scintillators when used as radiation detectors. However most inorganic scintillators are made of heavy materials and suffer from a high index of refraction which limits light extraction efficiency. This increases the path length of the photons in the material with the consequence of higher absorption and tails in the time distribution of the extracted light. Photonic crystals are a relatively new way of conquering this light extraction problem. Basically they are a way to produce a smooth and controllable index matching between the scintillator and the output medium through the nanostructuration of a thin layer of optically transparent high index material deposited at the coupling face of the scintillator. Our review paper discusses the theory behind this approach as well as the simulation details. Furthermore the different lithography steps of the production of an actual photonic crystal sample will be explained. Measurement results of LSO scintillator pixels covered with a nanolithography machined photonic crystal surface are presented together with practical tips for the further development and improvement of this technique.

  13. The bifoil photodyne: a photonic crystal oscillator.

    PubMed

    Lugo, J E; Doti, R; Sanchez, N; de la Mora, M B; del Rio, J A; Faubert, J

    2014-01-01

    Optical tweezers is an example how to use light to generate a physical force. They have been used to levitate viruses, bacteria, cells, and sub cellular organisms. Nonetheless it would be beneficial to use such force to develop a new kind of applications. However the radiation pressure usually is small to think in moving larger objects. Currently, there is some research investigating novel photonic working principles to generate a higher force. Here, we studied theoretically and experimentally the induction of electromagnetic forces in one-dimensional photonic crystals when light impinges on the off-axis direction. The photonic structure consists of a micro-cavity like structure formed of two one-dimensional photonic crystals made of free-standing porous silicon, separated by a variable air gap and the working wavelength is 633 nm. We show experimental evidence of this force when the photonic structure is capable of making auto-oscillations and forced-oscillations. We measured peak displacements and velocities ranging from 2 up to 35 microns and 0.4 up to 2.1 mm/s with a power of 13 mW. Recent evidence showed that giant resonant light forces could induce average velocity values of 0.45 mm/s in microspheres embedded in water with 43 mW light power. PMID:24423985

  14. The bifoil photodyne: a photonic crystal oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Lugo, J. E.; Doti, R.; Sanchez, N.; de la Mora, M. B.; del Rio, J. A.; Faubert, J.

    2014-01-01

    Optical tweezers is an example how to use light to generate a physical force. They have been used to levitate viruses, bacteria, cells, and sub cellular organisms. Nonetheless it would be beneficial to use such force to develop a new kind of applications. However the radiation pressure usually is small to think in moving larger objects. Currently, there is some research investigating novel photonic working principles to generate a higher force. Here, we studied theoretically and experimentally the induction of electromagnetic forces in one-dimensional photonic crystals when light impinges on the off-axis direction. The photonic structure consists of a micro-cavity like structure formed of two one-dimensional photonic crystals made of free-standing porous silicon, separated by a variable air gap and the working wavelength is 633 nm. We show experimental evidence of this force when the photonic structure is capable of making auto-oscillations and forced-oscillations. We measured peak displacements and velocities ranging from 2 up to 35 microns and 0.4 up to 2.1 mm/s with a power of 13 mW. Recent evidence showed that giant resonant light forces could induce average velocity values of 0.45 mm/s in microspheres embedded in water with 43 mW light power. PMID:24423985

  15. The bifoil photodyne: a photonic crystal oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugo, J. E.; Doti, R.; Sanchez, N.; de La Mora, M. B.; Del Rio, J. A.; Faubert, J.

    2014-01-01

    Optical tweezers is an example how to use light to generate a physical force. They have been used to levitate viruses, bacteria, cells, and sub cellular organisms. Nonetheless it would be beneficial to use such force to develop a new kind of applications. However the radiation pressure usually is small to think in moving larger objects. Currently, there is some research investigating novel photonic working principles to generate a higher force. Here, we studied theoretically and experimentally the induction of electromagnetic forces in one-dimensional photonic crystals when light impinges on the off-axis direction. The photonic structure consists of a micro-cavity like structure formed of two one-dimensional photonic crystals made of free-standing porous silicon, separated by a variable air gap and the working wavelength is 633 nm. We show experimental evidence of this force when the photonic structure is capable of making auto-oscillations and forced-oscillations. We measured peak displacements and velocities ranging from 2 up to 35 microns and 0.4 up to 2.1 mm/s with a power of 13 mW. Recent evidence showed that giant resonant light forces could induce average velocity values of 0.45 mm/s in microspheres embedded in water with 43 mW light power.

  16. Photonic crystal slab quantum cascade detector

    SciTech Connect

    Reininger, Peter Schwarz, Benedikt; Harrer, Andreas; Zederbauer, Tobias; Detz, Hermann; Maxwell Andrews, Aaron; Gansch, Roman; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried

    2013-12-09

    In this Letter, we demonstrate the design, fabrication, and characterization of a photonic crystal slab quantum cascade detector (PCS-QCD). By employing a specifically designed resonant cavity, the performance of the photodetector is improved in three distinct ways. The PCS makes the QCD sensitive to surface normal incident light. It resonantly enhances the photon lifetime inside the active zone, thus increasing the photocurrent significantly. And, the construction form of the device inherently decreases the noise. Finally, we compare the characteristics of the PCS-QCD to a PCS - quantum well infrared photodetector and outline the advantages for certain fields of applications.

  17. Photonic crystals: Theory and device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shanhui

    In this thesis, first-principle frequency-domain and time-domain methods are developed and applied to investigate various properties and device applications of photonic crystals. In Chapter 2, I discuss the two numerical methods used to investigate the properties of photonic crystals. The first solves Maxwell's equations in the frequency domain, while the second solves the equations in the time domain. The frequency-domain method yields the frequency, polarization, symmetry, and field distribution of every eigenmode of the system; the time-domain method allows one to determine the temporal behavior of the modes. In Chapter 3, a new class of three-dimensional photonic crystal structures is introduced that is amenable for fabrication at submicron-length scales. The structures give rise to a 3D photonic bandgap. They consist of a layered structure in which a series of cylindrical air holes are etched at normal incidence. The calculation demonstrates the existence of a gap as large as 14% of the mid-gap frequency using Si, SiO2, and air; and 23% using Si and air. In Chapter 4, the bandstructure and transmission properties of three-dimensional metallodielectric photonic crystals are presented. The metallodielectric crystals are modeled as perfect electrical conducting objects embedded in dielectric media. We investigate the face-centered-cubic (fcc) lattice, and the diamond lattice. Partial gaps are predicted in the fcc lattice, in excellent agreement with recent experiments. Complete gaps are found in a diamond lattice of isolated metal spheres. The gaps appear between the second and third bands, and their sizes can be larger than 60% when the radius of the spheres exceeds 21% of the cubic unit cell size. In Chapter 5, I investigate the properties of resonant modes which arise from the introduction of local defects in two-dimensional (2D) and 3D photonic crystals. The properties of these modes can be controlled by changing the nature and the size of the defects. The

  18. Breakdown of Bose-Einstein Distribution in Photonic Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Ping-Yuan; Xiong, Heng-Na; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2015-01-01

    In the last two decades, considerable advances have been made in the investigation of nano-photonics in photonic crystals. Previous theoretical investigations of photon dynamics were carried out at zero temperature. Here, we investigate micro/nano cavity photonics in photonic crystals at finite temperature. Due to photonic-band-gap-induced localized long-lived photon dynamics, we discover that cavity photons in photonic crystals do not obey Bose-Einstein statistical distribution. Within the photonic band gap and in the vicinity of the band edge, cavity photons combine the long-lived non-Markovain dynamics with thermal fluctuations together to form photon states that memorize the initial cavity state information. As a result, Bose-Einstein distribution is completely broken down in these regimes, even if the thermal energy is larger or much larger than the cavity detuning energy. In this investigation, a crossover phenomenon from equilibrium to nonequilibrium steady states is also revealed. PMID:25822135

  19. A plasma photonic crystal bandgap device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    A fully tunable plasma photonic crystal is used to control the propagation of free space electromagnetic waves in the S to X bands of the microwave spectrum. An array of discharge plasma tubes forms a simple square crystal structure with the individual plasma dielectric constant tuned through variation in the plasma density. We show, through simulations and experiments, that transverse electric mode bandgaps exist, arising from the positive and negative dielectric constant regimes of the plasma, and that the respective bandgap frequencies can be shifted through changing the dielectric constant by varying discharge current density.

  20. Focusing concave lens using photonic crystals with magnetic materials.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shieh-Yueh; Hong, Chin-Yih; Yang, Hong-Chang

    2006-04-01

    The guided modes lying in the upper gap-edge band in the photonic band structure of photonic crystals have negative values of refractive index. This feature generates many interesting optical phenomena, and some spectacular photonic devices such as focusing slabs have been developed. We report the design of a photonic-crystal, planoconcave lens for focusing incident parallel light, and theoretically analyze the chromatic aberrations for TM and TE modes. In addition to dielectric photonic crystals, the chromatic aberration of a magnetic photonic-crystal planoconcave lens was investigated because the magnetic permeability may also contribute to the periodic index contrast in photonic crystals, especially at long wavelengths. A significant difference was found in the chromatic aberration for a TM mode propagating in a dielectric than in a magnetic photonic-crystal planoconcave lens. PMID:16604781

  1. A tunable microwave plasma photonic crystal filter

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2015-10-26

    The integration of gaseous plasma elements into a microwave photonic crystal band gap cavity structure allows for active tuning of the device. An alumina rod array microwave photonic crystal waveguide resonator is simulated and characterized through finite difference time domain methods. A gaseous plasma element is integrated into the cavity structure and the effect of plasma density on the transmission properties of the structure is investigated. We show, through both simulations and experiments, that the permittivity of the plasma can be adjusted to shift the peak resonance to allow for both switching and tunability of transmission. The experimentally measured peak shifts in transmission are compared to those simulated and the electron density of the gaseous plasma element is calculated and compared to values determined from the measured discharge current density.

  2. A tunable microwave plasma photonic crystal filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    The integration of gaseous plasma elements into a microwave photonic crystal band gap cavity structure allows for active tuning of the device. An alumina rod array microwave photonic crystal waveguide resonator is simulated and characterized through finite difference time domain methods. A gaseous plasma element is integrated into the cavity structure and the effect of plasma density on the transmission properties of the structure is investigated. We show, through both simulations and experiments, that the permittivity of the plasma can be adjusted to shift the peak resonance to allow for both switching and tunability of transmission. The experimentally measured peak shifts in transmission are compared to those simulated and the electron density of the gaseous plasma element is calculated and compared to values determined from the measured discharge current density.

  3. "Wandering" soliton in a nonlinear photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysak, T. M.; Trofimov, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    On the basis of computer simulation, we demonstrate the possibility of a new type of "wandering" solitons implementation in nonlinear periodic layered structures. "Wandering" soliton moves across the layers, repeatedly changing its direction of motion due to the reflection from the photonic crystal (PC) boundaries with the ambient medium. The initial soliton is located inside a PC and occupies several of its layers. Its profile can be found as the solution of the corresponding nonlinear eigenvalue problem. "Wandering" solitons are formed as a result of a large perturbation of the wave vector, which leads to the soliton motion across photonic crystal layers. In the process of reflection from the boundary with the ambient medium, the soliton partly penetrates into the ambient medium at a depth equal to the width of several PC layers. A slow return of light energy, which previously left the PC, can take place at this moment.

  4. Absorption enhancement in graphene photonic crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Khaleque, Abdul; Hattori, Haroldo T

    2016-04-10

    Graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice, is attracting significant interest because of its potential applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices. Although graphene exhibits almost uniform absorption within a large wavelength range, its interaction with light is weak. In this paper, the enhancement of the optical absorption in graphene photonic crystal structures is studied: the structure is modified by introducing scatterers and mirrors. It is shown that the absorption of the graphene photonic crystal structure can be enhanced about four times (nearly 40%) with respect to initial reference absorption of 9.8%. The study can be a useful tool for investigating graphene physics in different optical settings. PMID:27139857

  5. Transmission character of general function photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiang-Yao; Zhang, Bo-Jun; Yang, Jing-Hai; Zhang, Si-Qi; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Wang, Jing; Ba, Nuo; Hua, Zhong; Yin, Xin-Guo

    2012-08-01

    In the paper, we present a new general function photonic crystals (GFPCs), whose refractive index of medium is a arbitrary function of space position. Unlike conventional photonic crystals (PCs), whose structure grows from two mediums A and B, with different constant refractive indexes na and nb. Based on the Fermat principle, we give the motion equations of light in one-dimensional GFPCs, and calculate its transfer matrix, which is different from the conventional PCs. We choose the linearity refractive index function for two mediums A and B, and find the transmissivity of one-dimensional GFPCs can be much larger or smaller than 1 for different slope linearity refractive index functions, which are different from the transmissivity of conventional PCs (its transmissivity is in the range of 0 and 1). Otherwise, we study the effect of different incident angles, the number of periods and optical thickness on the transmissivity, and obtain some new results different from the conventional PCs.

  6. Nonreciprocal photonic crystal add-drop filter

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Keyu; Xiao, Jun-Jun; Yin, Xiaobo

    2014-11-24

    We present a versatile add-drop integrated photonic filter (ADF) consisting of nonreciprocal waveguides in which the propagation of light is restricted in one predetermined direction. With the bus and add/drop waveguides symmetrically coupled through a cavity, the four-port device allows each individual port to add and/or drop a signal of the same frequency. The scheme is general and we demonstrate the nonreciprocal ADF with magneto-optical photonic crystals. The filter is immune to waveguide defects, allowing straightforward implementation of multi-channel ADFs by cascading the four-port designs. The results should find applications in wavelength-division multiplexing and related integrated photonic techniques.

  7. Metallic photonic crystals at optical wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kady, I.; Sigalas, M. M.; Biswas, R.; Ho, K. M.; Soukoulis, C. M.

    2000-12-01

    We theoretically study three-dimensional metallic photonic-band-gap (PBG) materials at near-infrared and optical wavelengths. Our main objective is to find the importance of absorption in the metal and the suitability of observing photonic band gaps in this structure. For that reason, we study simple cubic structures and the metallic scatterers are either cubes or interconnected metallic rods. Several different metals have been studied (aluminum, gold, copper, and silver). Copper gives the smallest absorption and aluminum is more absorptive. The isolated metallic cubes are less lossy than the connected rod structures. The calculations suggest that isolated copper scatterers are very attractive candidates for the fabrication of photonic crystals at the optical wavelengths.

  8. Photonic crystal fibres in biomedical investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Skibina, Yu S; Tuchin, Valerii V; Beloglazov, V I; Shteinmaeer, G; Betge, I L; Wedell, R; Langhoff, N

    2011-04-30

    The state of the art in the field of design and study of photonic crystal fibres for biomedical applications is considered and some original results recently obtained by the authors are presented. Optical properties of the fibres that offer prospects of their wide application as biological sensors, 'labs-on-a-chip', and facilities of electromagnetic radiation control in a wide range of wavelengths aimed at designing novel biomedical instrumentation are considered (optical technologies in biophysics and medicine)

  9. Optical microfiber-based photonic crystal cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Sun, Yi-zhi; Andrews, Steve; Li, Zhi-yuan; Ding, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Using a focused ion beam milling technique, we fabricate broad stop band (∼10% wide) photonic crystal (PhC) cavities in adiabatically-tapered silica fibers. Abrupt structural design of PhC mirrors efficiently reduces radiation loss, increasing the cavity finesse to ∼7.5. Further experiments and simulations verify that the remaining loss is mainly due to Ga ion implantation. Such a microfiber PhC cavity probably has potentials in many light-matter interaction applications.

  10. Switchable tunneling mode for cylindrical photonic quantum well consisting of photonic crystals containing liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, C. A.; Yang, S. L.; Yang, T. J.

    2013-06-01

    We propose a cylindrical photonic quantum well made of photonic crystals containing liquid crystals, the properties of which are theoretically calculated and investigated by the transfer matrix method in the cylindrical symmetry system. Liquid crystals are introduced into the photonic quantum well structure as tunable defect layers. When the liquid crystals are pseudo-isotropic state and the azimuthal mode order of incident waves are m=0, there were two pass-bands around certain wavelength. When the liquid crystals are homeotropic state, the reflectance of pass-band at shorter wavelength decreases from 0.75 to 0.05 in the TM mode, but the reflectance does not change in the TE mode. When mode order m=1 and the liquid crystals are pseudo-isotropic state, the reflectance of defect mode stayed the same as m=0. However, the result is reversed while the phase of liquid crystals change from pseudo-isotropic to homeotropic state. The reflectance is the same as in the TM mode, but that in the TE mode decreases substantially from 0.75 to 0.05. The application of our structure to switching device is highly potential.

  11. Radiative energy transfer in disordered photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Erementchouk, M V; Deych, L I; Noh, H; Cao, H; Lisyansky, A A

    2009-04-29

    The difficulty of description of the radiative transfer in disordered photonic crystals arises from the necessity to consider on an equal footing the wave scattering by periodic modulations of the dielectric function and by its random inhomogeneities. We resolve this difficulty by approaching this problem from the standpoint of the general multiple scattering theory in media with an arbitrary regular profile of the dielectric function. We use the general asymptotic solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation in order to show that for a sufficiently weak disorder the diffusion limit in disordered photonic crystals is presented by incoherent superpositions of the modes of the ideal structure with weights inversely proportional to the respective group velocities. The radiative transfer and the diffusion equations are derived as a relaxation of long scale deviations from this limiting distribution. In particular, it is shown that in general the diffusion is anisotropic unless the crystal has sufficiently rich symmetry, say, the square lattice in 2D or the cubic lattice in 3D. In this case, the diffusion is isotropic and only in this case can the effect of the disorder be characterized by a single mean free path depending on frequency. PMID:21825416

  12. Zero-n gap in one dimensional photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chobey, Mahesh K.; Suthar, B.

    2016-05-01

    We study a one-dimensional (1-D) photonic crystal composed of Double Positive (DPS) and Double Negative (DNG) material. This structure shows omnidirectional photonic bandgap, which is insensitive with angle of incidence and polarization. To study the effect of structural parameters on the photonic band structure, we have calculated photonic band gap at various thicknesses of DPS and DNG.

  13. Raman cooling in silicon photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yin-Chung; Bahl, Gaurav

    2016-03-01

    Laser cooling of solids can be achieved through various photon up-conversion processes including anti-Stokes photoluminescence and anti-Stokes light scattering. While it has been shown that cooling using photoluminescence-based methods can achieve efficiency comparable to that of thermoelectric cooling, the reliance on specific transitions of the rare-earth dopants limits material choice. Light scattering, on the other hand, occurs in all materials, and has the potential to enable cooling in most materials. We show that by engineering the photonic density of states of a material, one can suppress the Stokes process, and enhance the anti-Stokes radiation. We employ the well-known diamond-structured photonic crystal patterned in crystalline silicon to demonstrate theoretically that when operating within a high transparency regime, the net energy removal rate from phonon annihilation can overcome the optical absorption. The engineered photonic density of states can thus enable simultaneous cooling of all Raman-active phonon modes and the net cooling of the solid.

  14. Slab photonic crystals with dimer colloid bases

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Erin K.; Liddell Watson, Chekesha M.

    2014-06-14

    The photonic band gap properties for centered rectangular monolayers of asymmetric dimers are reported. Colloids in suspension have been organized into the phase under confinement. The theoretical model is inspired by the range of asymmetric dimers synthesized via seeded emulsion polymerization and explores, in particular, the band structures as a function of degree of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion. These parameters are varied incrementally from spheres to lobe-tangent dimers over morphologies yielding physically realizable particles. The work addresses the relative scarcity of theoretical studies on photonic crystal slabs with vertical variation that is consistent with colloidal self-assembly. Odd, even and polarization independent gaps in the guided modes are determined for direct slab structures. A wide range of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion combinations having Brillouin zones with moderate to high isotropy support gaps between odd mode band indices 3-4 and even mode band indices 1-2 and 2-3.

  15. The polaritonic spectrum of two-dimensional photonic crystals based on uniaxial polar materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Urrea, H. A.; Duque, C. A.; Mora-Ramos, M. E.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the dispersion relations of two-dimensional photonic crystals made of cylindrical rods of uniaxial polar materials that exhibit transverse phonon-polariton excitations. The rods are considered to be embedded in a dielectric background. The photonic properties are obtained with the use of the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method and the auxiliary differential equation (ADE) technique. The anisotropy of the dielectric function is explicitly considered using an empirical approach that assigns different weights to contributions of the parallel (z) and transversal (t) polaritonic relations. The effective dielectric function is then expressed as a weighted combination of the longitudinal and transversal components: ε (ω) =αzεz (ω) +αtεt (ω) . Different sets of values of the coefficients αz and αt have been considered. The frequencies of the allowed electromagnetic modes are determined as the local maxima of the spectral analysis using a fast Fourier transform (FFT). The particular case of a square photonic crystal superlattice geometry is analyzed, and input data corresponding to phonon frequencies of wurtzite nitride semiconductors is used. It is shown that larger values of the quantity |νz,T -νt,T | are desirable if the associated dielectric anisotropy is used as a tool for tuning photonic properties in the system.

  16. Hierarchical self-assembly of hexagonal single-crystal nanosheets into 3D layered superlattices with high conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yulun; Shen, Yuhua; Yang, Liangbao; Han, Bin; Huang, Fangzhi; Li, Shikuo; Chu, Zhuwang; Xie, Anjian

    2012-05-01

    While the number of man-made nano superstructures realized by self-assembly is growing in recent years, assemblies of conductive polymer nanocrystals, especially for superlattices, are still a significant challenge, not only because of the simplicity of the shape of the nanocrystal building blocks and their interactions, but also because of the poor control over these parameters in the fabrication of more elaborate nanocrystals. Here, we firstly report a facile and general route to a new generation of 3D layered superlattices of polyaniline doped with CSA (PANI-CSA) and show how PANI crystallize and self-assemble, in a suitable single solution environment. In cyclohexane, 1D amorphous nanofibers transformed to 1D nanorods as building blocks, and then to 2D single-crystal nanosheets with a hexagonal phase, and lastly to 3D ordered layered superlattices with the narrowest polydispersity value (Mw/Mn = 1.47). Remarkably, all the instructions for the hierarchical self-assembly are encoded in the layered shape in other non-polar solvents (hexane, octane) and their conductivity in the π-π stacking direction is improved to about 50 S cm-1, which is even higher than that of the highest previously reported value (16 S cm-1). The method used in this study is greatly expected to be readily scalable to produce superlattices of conductive polymers with high quality and low cost.While the number of man-made nano superstructures realized by self-assembly is growing in recent years, assemblies of conductive polymer nanocrystals, especially for superlattices, are still a significant challenge, not only because of the simplicity of the shape of the nanocrystal building blocks and their interactions, but also because of the poor control over these parameters in the fabrication of more elaborate nanocrystals. Here, we firstly report a facile and general route to a new generation of 3D layered superlattices of polyaniline doped with CSA (PANI-CSA) and show how PANI crystallize and

  17. Photonic crystal devices formed by a charged-particle beam

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Shawn-Yu; Koops, Hans W. P.

    2000-01-01

    A photonic crystal device and method. The photonic crystal device comprises a substrate with at least one photonic crystal formed thereon by a charged-particle beam deposition method. Each photonic crystal comprises a plurality of spaced elements having a composition different from the substrate, and may further include one or more impurity elements substituted for spaced elements. Embodiments of the present invention may be provided as electromagnetic wave filters, polarizers, resonators, sources, mirrors, beam directors and antennas for use at wavelengths in the range from about 0.2 to 200 microns or longer. Additionally, photonic crystal devices may be provided with one or more electromagnetic waveguides adjacent to a photonic crystal for forming integrated electromagnetic circuits for use at optical, infrared, or millimeter-wave frequencies.

  18. Macroscopic response in active nonlinear photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Alagappan, Gandhi; John, Sajeev; Li, Er Ping

    2013-09-15

    We derive macroscopic equations of motion for the slowly varying electric field amplitude in three-dimensional active nonlinear optical nanostructures. We show that the microscopic Maxwell equations and polarization dynamics can be simplified to a macroscopic one-dimensional problem in the direction of group velocity. For a three-level active material, we derive the steady-state equations for normal mode frequency, threshold pumping, nonlinear Bloch mode amplitude, and lasing in photonic crystals. Our analytical results accurately recapture the results of exact numerical methods. PMID:24104802

  19. Semitransparent Metallic Photonic Crystals: Variety of Plasmons in Inverted Opal Nano-Meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakhidov, Anvar; Baughman, Ray; Khayrullin, Ilyas; Wiley, John; Eradat, Nayer; Efros, Alex; Vardeny, Valy

    2001-03-01

    We have recently fabricated three-dimensional nano-structures by self-assembling sub-micron particles into 3-D porous superlattices, and templating them with practically any material, both electrically conductive and insulating, including carbon [1], thermoelectric semiconductors [2], polymers [3], and magnets [4]. Being photonic crystals (PCs), our superlattices possess new, unconventional properties, such as the tunable intra-gap lasing [5], anomalous coherent backscattering [6], and structural solvatochromism. Here we describe synthesis and physical properties of another class of photonic crystals, called plasmon or metallic PC. Their metallo-dielectric structure has a metallic (or plasmon) photonic band gap (PBG) in IR spectral range, and therefore shows unusual optical properties. Of particular interest is the increased transparency and reflectivity spectrum, different from that of usual bulk metal. We demonstrate that by changing the topology from a network (continuos mesh) to a cermet (discontinuous web) one can achieve tunability of reflectivity peak in IR via modulation of plasmon spectrum and the metallicity PBG [7]. The theoretical model, which takes into account 1-D plasmon, surface plasmon and effectively changed 3-D plasmon (due to low filling factor), explains the observed peaks in reflectivity, and increase of the transparency. Such semitransparent metallic nano-meshes can be used for example as electrodes for LEDs and lasers. 1. A.A. Zakhidov, et al, Science, 282 (1998) 897. 2. R.H. Baughman, et al . Proc. ICT'98 (1998) 288. 3. A.A. Zakhidov, et al., Nanostructured Materials, 12 (1999) 1089. 4. T.-B,Xu, et al, J. Appl. Phys, 88 (2000) 405. 5. L.Xu, et al, Chem. Comm., (2000) 997. 6. M.N. Shkunov, et al. Synth.Met (in press), 7. AA. Zakhidov, et al., Synthetic Metals (in press).

  20. Broadband photon-photon interactions mediated by cold atoms in a photonic crystal fiber

    PubMed Central

    Litinskaya, Marina; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that photon-photon attraction can be engineered in the continuum of scattering states for pairs of photons propagating in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with cold atoms. The atoms are regularly spaced in an optical lattice configuration and the photons are resonantly tuned to an internal atomic transition. We show that the hard-core repulsion resulting from saturation of the atomic transitions induces bunching in the photonic component of the collective atom-photon modes (polaritons). Bunching is obtained in a frequency range as large as tens of GHz, and can be controlled by the inter-atomic separation. We provide a fully analytical explanation for this phenomenon by proving that correlations result from a mismatch of the quantization volumes for atomic excitations and photons in the continuum. Even stronger correlations can be observed for in-gap two-polariton bound states. Our theoretical results use parameters relevant for current experiments and suggest a simple and feasible way to induce interactions between photons. PMID:27170160

  1. Broadband photon-photon interactions mediated by cold atoms in a photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litinskaya, Marina; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that photon-photon attraction can be engineered in the continuum of scattering states for pairs of photons propagating in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with cold atoms. The atoms are regularly spaced in an optical lattice configuration and the photons are resonantly tuned to an internal atomic transition. We show that the hard-core repulsion resulting from saturation of the atomic transitions induces bunching in the photonic component of the collective atom-photon modes (polaritons). Bunching is obtained in a frequency range as large as tens of GHz, and can be controlled by the inter-atomic separation. We provide a fully analytical explanation for this phenomenon by proving that correlations result from a mismatch of the quantization volumes for atomic excitations and photons in the continuum. Even stronger correlations can be observed for in-gap two-polariton bound states. Our theoretical results use parameters relevant for current experiments and suggest a simple and feasible way to induce interactions between photons.

  2. Broadband photon-photon interactions mediated by cold atoms in a photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Litinskaya, Marina; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that photon-photon attraction can be engineered in the continuum of scattering states for pairs of photons propagating in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with cold atoms. The atoms are regularly spaced in an optical lattice configuration and the photons are resonantly tuned to an internal atomic transition. We show that the hard-core repulsion resulting from saturation of the atomic transitions induces bunching in the photonic component of the collective atom-photon modes (polaritons). Bunching is obtained in a frequency range as large as tens of GHz, and can be controlled by the inter-atomic separation. We provide a fully analytical explanation for this phenomenon by proving that correlations result from a mismatch of the quantization volumes for atomic excitations and photons in the continuum. Even stronger correlations can be observed for in-gap two-polariton bound states. Our theoretical results use parameters relevant for current experiments and suggest a simple and feasible way to induce interactions between photons. PMID:27170160

  3. Young's double-slit experiment in photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2012-10-01

    We present an experimental and numerical study of the transmission of a photonic crystal perforated by two sub-wavelength slits, separated by two wavelengths.The experimental near-field image of the double-slit design of the photonic crystal shows an interference pattern, which is analogous to Young’s experiment. This interference arises as a consequence of the excitation of surface states of the photonic crystals and agrees very well with the simulations.

  4. Back focal plane imaging spectroscopy of photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Rebecca; Heerklotz, Lars; Kortenbruck, Nikolai; Cichos, Frank

    2012-08-01

    Back focal plane imaging spectroscopy is introduced to record angle resolved emission spectra of 3-dimensional colloidal photonic crystals. The auto-fluorescence of the colloids is used to quickly map the photonic band structure up to 72 % of the solid angle of a semisphere with the help of a high numerical aperture objective. Local excitation provides spatially resolved information on the photonic crystal's optical properties. The obtained fractional density of states allows direct conclusions on the crystal's stacking faults or defects.

  5. Biomimetic Photonic Crystals based on Diatom Algae Frustules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishler, Jonathan; Alverson, Andrew; Herzog, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    Diatom algae are unicellular, photosynthetic microorganisms with a unique external shell known as a frustule. Frustules, which are composed of amorphous silica, exhibit a unique periodic nano-patterning, distinguishing diatoms from other types of phytoplankton. Diatoms have been studied for their distinctive optical properties due to their resemblance of photonic crystals. In this regard, diatoms are not only considered for their applications as photonic crystals, but also for their use as biomimetic templates for artificially fabricated photonic crystals. Through the examination and measurement of the physical characteristics of many scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of diatom frustules, a biomimetic photonic crystal derived from diatom frustules can be recreated and modeled with the finite element method. In this approach, the average geometries of the diatom frustules are used to recreate a 2-dimensional photonic crystal, after which the electric field distribution and optical transmission through the photonic crystal are both measured. The optical transmission is then compared to the transmission spectra of a regular hexagonal photonic crystal, revealing the effects of diatom geometry on their optical properties. Finally, the dimensions of the photonic crystal are parametrically swept, allowing for further control over the transmission of light through the photonic crystal.

  6. Engineering and characterizing light-matter interactions in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzezinski, Andrew

    Photonic crystals can affect the behavior of visible light, and other electromagnetic waves, in ways that are not possible by other means. The propagation of photons can be completely forbidden or the light can be made to follow a well-defined path. Fluorescent emission can be enhanced for some wavelengths or completely shut off for others, and it is possible to do all this simultaneously in a single structure. However, photonic crystals are very difficult to fabricate as they require precision patterning at sub-micron length scales. This fabrication difficulty has resulted in many of the potential applications for photonic crystals to currently be unrealized. Similarly, there is an abundance of opportunities to explore the workings of photonic crystals and also to develop exciting new methods for their fabrication. The content of this dissertation explores some methods for fabricating photonic crystals, including direct laser writing, interference lithography, colloidal deposition, and chemical vapor deposition. The angle-resolved characterization of photonic crystals is performed on fluorescent photonic crystals that exhibit uniquely photonic effects, which are explained with a simplified model of the electromagnetic wave-functions. Another model is shown to well-explain the emission from fluorescent photonic crystals that are not of sufficient quality to exhibit truly photonic effects. The ability to perform angle-resolved optical characterization is improved with a commercial 4-circle diffractometer. A method to determination the resulting structure of conformal deposition processes proves useful as a tool for the design, modeling, and characterization of photonic crystals. Finally, attempts are made to radically alter the emission of light from rare earth emitters embedded inside photonic crystals.

  7. Multicriteria classification for photonic crystal fiber design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassi, Imene; Belacel, Nabil; Bouslimani, Yassine; Hamam, Habib; Attia, Rabah

    2008-06-01

    The photonic crystal fibers (PCF) are considered as the future information support for the telecommunication system. In this paper, a multicriteria method is used for the design of the PCFs with the user-defined optical proprieties. This method combines the deductive and the inductive learning and it is introduced for the first time in the field of optical fibers. These simulation tools will be optimized for PCF structures in order to optimize the parameters necessary for the improvement of the communication system performances. The multicriteria decision analysis makes it possible to evaluate the optical proprieties of PCFs by determining the effects of attenuation and distortion caused by Physics Phenomena. This decision is done by the means of a relational model preferably. As a result, this method avoids the recourse to distances and makes it possible to use quantitative and/or qualitative criteria. Moreover, it defeat some difficulties encountered when data are expressed in different units. These advantages allow the new multicriteria classification method to be employed easily to the diagnosis and to the design of photonic-crystals fibers.

  8. Negative Refraction experiments in Photonic Crystal prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodo, Plarenta; Parimi, Patanjali. V.; Lu, Wentao. T.; di Gennaro, Emiliano; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2004-03-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated negative refraction in metallic photonic crystal (PC) prisms [1]. The refracted fields in the parallel plate waveguide (PPW) are measured by an automated dipole antenna, which scans the desired area, while the free space (FS) measurements, performed in a anechoic chamber, are measured by a rectangular X-band horn that swings in an arc in far field area. Both TE and TM excitation modes are used in FS experiments. Numerical calculations of the band structure and equi-frequency surface simulations are used to determine frequency regions of negative refraction of the triangular lattice PC. Angle of refraction determined by theoretical simulations and experimental results, are in exceptional good agreement, yielding the negative refraction index. FS and PPW refraction experimental results agree remarkably with simulations. 1. "Negative Refraction and Left-handed electromagnetism in Microwave Photonic Crystals", P.V Parimi, W.T Lu, P.Vodo J. Sokoloff and S.Sridhar, cond-mat/0306109 (2003)

  9. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M.

    2007-08-22

    Laser-driven acceleration holds great promise for significantly improving accelerating gradient. However, scaling the conventional process of structure-based acceleration in vacuum down to optical wavelengths requires a substantially different kind of structure. We require an optical waveguide that (1) is constructed out of dielectric materials, (2) has transverse size on the order of a wavelength, and (3) supports a mode with speed-of-light phase velocity in vacuum. Photonic crystals---structures whose electromagnetic properties are spatially periodic---can meet these requirements. We discuss simulated photonic crystal accelerator structures and describe their properties. We begin with a class of two-dimensional structures which serves to illustrate the design considerations and trade-offs involved. We then present a three-dimensional structure, and describe its performance in terms of accelerating gradient and efficiency. We discuss particle beam dynamics in this structure, demonstrating a method for keeping a beam confined to the waveguide. We also discuss material and fabrication considerations. Since accelerating gradient is limited by optical damage to the structure, the damage threshold of the dielectric is a critical parameter. We experimentally measure the damage threshold of silicon for picosecond pulses in the infrared, and determine that our structure is capable of sustaining an accelerating gradient of 300 MV/m at 1550 nm. Finally, we discuss possibilities for manufacturing these structures using common microfabrication techniques.

  10. Fabrication and evaluation of photonic metamaterial crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabete, S.; Nakagawa, Y.; Okamoto, T.; Haraguchi, M.; Isu, T.; Shinomiya, G.

    2013-09-01

    Many researching efforts have been reported to seek various fundamental LC resonance structures, recently. But still the Split Ring Resonator (SRR) is the most famous and major fundamental LC-resonance structure used in the metamaterial. We employed SRR structure as the fundamental LC-resonance mechanism to fabricate photonic crystal with periodic arrangement of two different metamaterial areas composed from SRR arrays on the dielectric substrate. We developed Photonic Metamaterial Crystal (PMC) to realize the more advanced and versatile functions of the metamaterial by 1 dimensional or 2 dimensional periodic arranging of two metamaterial sections which have different dispersion properties due to the different size of SRR structures each other. In this paper, we report the fabrication process, estimation of PMC properties and some possible future application prospects, for instance the PMC waveguide structures and nonlinear properties of PMC observed as selective LC-resonant properties in Raman mapping analysis of PMC. These are quite interesting characters of PMC and the attractive applications as the PMC devices.

  11. Photonic Crystal Enhanced Fluorescence for Early Breast Cancer Biomarker Detection

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Brian T.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Photonic crystal surfaces offer a compelling platform for improving the sensitivity of surface-based fluorescent assays used in disease diagnostics. Through the complementary processes of photonic crystal enhanced excitation and enhanced extraction, a periodic dielectric-based nanostructured surface can simultaneously increase the electric field intensity experienced by surface-bound fluorophores and increase the collection efficiency of emitted fluorescent photons. Through the ability to inexpensively fabricate photonic crystal surfaces over substantial surface areas, they are amenable to single-use applications in biological sensing, such as disease biomarker detection in serum. In this review, we will describe the motivation for implementing high-sensitivity, multiplexed biomarker detection in the context of breast cancer diagnosis. We will summarize recent efforts to improve the detection limits of such assays though the use of photonic crystal surfaces. Reduction of detection limits is driven by low autofluorescent substrates for photonic crystal fabrication, and detection instruments that take advantage of their unique features. PMID:22736539

  12. Dielectric matrices with air cavities as a waveguide photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usanov, D. A.; Skripal', A. V.; Merdanov, M. K.; Gorlitskii, V. O.

    2016-02-01

    Frequency dependences of the transmission coefficient of a microwave photonic crystal that represents a structure containing alternating layers of ceramic material (Al2O3) with a relatively large number of cavities and foam plastic are studied in the presence and absence of distortions of the periodicity of a photonic structure. The frequency dependences of the transmission coefficient can be analyzed using a model of effective medium that makes it possible to consider the interaction of electromagnetic wave and photonic crystal using a transfer matrix of a 1D photonic crystal. The band character of the frequency dependence of the transmission coefficient of the photonic crystal related to the periodicity of the photonic crystal in the transverse plane for the waveguide with a standard cross section is not manifested in a certain range of material permittivities.

  13. Two-dimensional metal-glass photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pysz, Dariusz; Kujawa, Ireneusz; Stępień, Ryszard; Dominiak, Radosław; Pniewski, Jacek; Szoplik, Tomasz

    2007-04-01

    We present recent achievements in fabricating a two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal in the form of a bundle of parallel micro- or nanowires embedded in glass matrix. The method is similar to that of sequential thinning used for fabrication of photonic crystal fibers. We discuss technological issues that aim at preservation of regularity of photonic crystal lattice and uniformity of wire diameters. Proper selection of a melting point of metal alloy and the range of temperatures of glass viscosity leads to reduction of regularity losses resulting from sequential processes of drawing. Measured distributions of crystal lattices, wire diameters and shapes of wires are used to simulate photonic band structure of fabricated crystals. This work is directed toward fabrication of a photonic crystal showing the negative refraction in the near infrared and visible spectral range.

  14. Extended-Range Ultrarefractive 1D Photonic Crystal Prisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    A proposal has been made to exploit the special wavelength-dispersive characteristics of devices of the type described in One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Superprisms (NPO-30232) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 4 (April 2005), page 10a. A photonic crystal is an optical component that has a periodic structure comprising two dielectric materials with high dielectric contrast (e.g., a semiconductor and air), with geometrical feature sizes comparable to or smaller than light wavelengths of interest. Experimental superprisms have been realized as photonic crystals having three-dimensional (3D) structures comprising regions of amorphous Si alternating with regions of SiO2, fabricated in a complex process that included sputtering. A photonic crystal of the type to be exploited according to the present proposal is said to be one-dimensional (1D) because its contrasting dielectric materials would be stacked in parallel planar layers; in other words, there would be spatial periodicity in one dimension only. The processes of designing and fabricating 1D photonic crystal superprisms would be simpler and, hence, would cost less than do those for 3D photonic crystal superprisms. As in 3D structures, 1D photonic crystals may be used in applications such as wavelength-division multiplexing. In the extended-range configuration, it is also suitable for spectrometry applications. As an engineered structure or artificially engineered material, a photonic crystal can exhibit optical properties not commonly found in natural substances. Prior research had revealed several classes of photonic crystal structures for which the propagation of electromagnetic radiation is forbidden in certain frequency ranges, denoted photonic bandgaps. It had also been found that in narrow frequency bands just outside the photonic bandgaps, the angular wavelength dispersion of electromagnetic waves propagating in photonic crystal superprisms is much stronger than is the angular wavelength dispersion obtained

  15. Theoretical design of photonic crystal devices for integrated optical circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekis, Attila

    2000-12-01

    In this thesis we investigate novel photonic crystal devices that can be used as building blocks of all- optical circuits. We contrast the behavior of light in photonic crystal systems and in their traditional counterparts. We exhibit that bends in photonic crystals are able to transmit light with over 90% efficiency for large bandwidths and with 100% efficiency for specific frequencies. In contrast to traditional waveguides, bound states in photonic crystal waveguides can also exist in constrictions and above the cutoff frequency. We discuss how to lower reflections encountered when photonic crystal waveguides are terminated, both in an experimental setup as well as in numerical simulations. We show that light can be very efficiently coupled into and out of photonic crystal waveguides using tapered dielectric waveguides. In time-domain simulations of photonic crystal waveguides, spurious reflections from cell edges can be eliminated by terminating the waveguide with a Bragg reflector waveguide. We demonstrate novel lasing action in two-dimensional photonic crystal slabs with gain media, where lasing occurs at saddle points in the band structure, in contrast to one-dimensional photonic crystals. We also design a photonic crystal slab with organic gain media that has a TE-like pseudogap. We demonstrate that such a slab can support a high- Q defect mode, enabling low threshold lasing, and we discuss how the quality factor depends on the design parameters. We also propose to use two- dimensional photonic crystal slabs as directionally efficient free-space couplers. We draft methods to calculate the coupling constant both numerically and analytically, using a finite-difference time-domain method and the volume current method with a Green's function approach, respectively. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  16. A 1-D dusty plasma photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Mitu, M. L.; Ticoş, C. M.; Toader, D.; Banu, N.; Scurtu, A.

    2013-09-21

    It is demonstrated numerically that a 1-D plasma crystal made of micron size cylindrical dust particles can, in principle, work as a photonic crystal for terahertz waves. The dust rods are parallel to each other and arranged in a linear string forming a periodic structure of dielectric-plasma regions. The dispersion equation is found by solving the waves equation with the boundary conditions at the dust-plasma interface and taking into account the dielectric permittivity of the dust material and plasma. The wavelength of the electromagnetic waves is in the range of a few hundred microns, close to the interparticle separation distance. The band gaps of the 1-D plasma crystal are numerically found for different types of dust materials, separation distances between the dust rods and rod diameters. The distance between levitated dust rods forming a string in rf plasma is shown experimentally to vary over a relatively wide range, from 650 μm to about 1350 μm, depending on the rf power fed into the discharge.

  17. Three-dimensional photonic crystals fabricated by simultaneous multidirectional etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitano, Keisuke; Suzuki, Katsuyoshi; Ishizaki, Kenji; Noda, Susumu

    2015-04-01

    We discuss three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals fabricated by simultaneous multidirectional plasma etching. First, we investigate a method for controlling the ion sheath used in reactive ion etching for obtaining multidirectional etching. We then discuss the fabrication tolerance from an analytical perspective. Based on our results, we demonstrate the fabrication of 3D photonic crystals with thicknesses of 1, 1.5, and 2 lattice periods in the surface-normal direction on single-crystalline silicon wafers, which show high reflectance (˜100 %) and low transmittance (-17 dB ) at optical communication wavelengths, suggesting the formation of a complete photonic band gap. We reveal that the shape of the etched holes limits the performance of 3D photonic crystals and suggest possible ways to improve the band-gap effect. Moreover, we show that 3D photonic crystals with short lattice constants show high reflectance (˜80 %) at visible to near-infrared wavelengths. By investigating the influence of absorption on the characteristics of 3D photonic crystals, we reveal that the reflectance remains as high as 94% in the photonic band-gap range even when the absorption of silicon is taken into account. We find that a unique increase of absorption occurs at several discrete wavelengths below the photonic band gap, suggesting the possibility of manipulating light absorption. These results not only simplify the fabrication of 3D photonic crystals, but also provide a basis for realizing 3D photonic nanostructures that include other materials.

  18. Photonic crystal chips for optical communications and quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englund, Dirk; Fushman, Ilya; Faraon, Andrei; Ellis, Bryan; Vučković, Jelena

    2008-08-01

    We discuss recent our recent progress on functional photonic crystals devices and circuits for classical and quantum information processing. For classical applications, we have demonstrated a room-temperature-operated, low threshold, nanocavity laser with pulse width in the picosecond regime; and an all-optical switch controlled with 60 fJ pulses that shows switching time on the order of tens of picoseconds. For quantum information processing, we discuss the promise of quantum networks on multifunctional photonic crystals chips. We also discuss a new coherent probing technique of quantum dots coupled to photonic crystal nanocavities and demonstrate amplitude and phase nonlinearities realized with control beams at the single photon level.

  19. Controlled coupling of photonic crystal cavities using photochromic tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Tao; Bose, Ranojoy; Solomon, Glenn S.; Waks, Edo

    2013-04-01

    We present a method to control the resonant coupling interaction in a coupled-cavity photonic crystal molecule by using a local and reversible photochromic tuning technique. We demonstrate the ability to tune both a two-cavity and a three-cavity photonic crystal molecule through the resonance condition by selectively tuning the individual cavities. Using this technique, we can quantitatively determine important parameters of the coupled-cavity system such as the photon tunneling rate. This method can be scaled to photonic crystal molecules with larger numbers of cavities, which provides a versatile method for studying strong interactions in coupled resonator arrays.

  20. Waveguide circuits in three-dimensional photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Rana; Christensen, C.; Muehlmeier, J.; Tuttle, G.; Ho, K.-M.

    2008-04-07

    Waveguide circuits in three-dimensional photonic crystals with complete photonic band gaps are simulated with finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations, and compared with measurements on microwave scale photonic crystals. The transmission through waveguide bends critically depends on the photonic crystal architecture in the bend region. We have found experimentally and theoretically, a new waveguide bend configuration consisting of overlapping rods in the bend region, that performs better than the simple waveguide bend of terminated rods, especially in the higher frequency portion of the band. Efficient beam splitters with this junction geometry are also simulated.

  1. Strongly-Refractive One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Prisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal prisms can separate a beam of polychromatic electromagnetic waves into constituent wavelength components and can utilize unconventional refraction properties for wavelength dispersion over significant portions of an entire photonic band rather than just near the band edges outside the photonic band gaps. Using a ID photonic crystal simplifies the design and fabrication process and allows the use of larger feature sizes. The prism geometry broadens the useful wavelength range, enables better optical transmission, and exhibits angular dependence on wavelength with reduced non-linearity. The properties of the 1 D photonic crystal prism can be tuned by varying design parameters such as incidence angle, exit surface angle, and layer widths. The ID photonic crystal prism can be fabricated in a planar process, and can be used as optical integrated circuit elements.

  2. Two-photon-induced singlet fission in rubrene single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lin; Galstyan, Gegham; Zhang, Keke; Kloc, Christian; Sun, Handong; Soci, Cesare; Michel-Beyerle, Maria E.; Gurzadyan, Gagik G.

    2013-05-01

    The two-photon-induced singlet fission was observed in rubrene single crystal and studied by use of femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. The location of two-photon excited states was obtained from the nondegenerate two-photon absorption (TPA) spectrum. Time evolution of the two-photon-induced transient absorption spectra reveals the direct singlet fission from the two-photon excited states. The TPA absorption coefficient of rubrene single crystal is 52 cm/GW at 740 nm, as obtained from Z-scan measurements. Quantum chemical calculations based on time-dependent density functional theory support our experimental data.

  3. Photonic crystal cavities with metallic Schottky contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Quiring, W.; Al-Hmoud, M.; Reuter, D.; Zrenner, A.; Rai, A.; Wieck, A. D.

    2015-07-27

    We report about the fabrication and analysis of high Q photonic crystal cavities with metallic Schottky-contacts. The structures are based on GaAs n-i membranes with an InGaAs quantum well in the i-region and nanostructured low ohmic metal top-gates. They are designed for photocurrent readout within the cavity and fast electric manipulations. The cavity structures are characterized by photoluminescence and photocurrent spectroscopy under resonant excitation. We find strong cavity resonances in the photocurrent spectra and surprisingly high Q-factors up to 6500. Temperature dependent photocurrent measurements in the region between 4.5 K and 310 K show an exponential enhancement of the photocurrent signal and an external quantum efficiency up to 0.26.

  4. Asymptotics for metamaterials and photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Antonakakis, T; Craster, R V; Guenneau, S

    2013-04-01

    Metamaterial and photonic crystal structures are central to modern optics and are typically created from multiple elementary repeating cells. We demonstrate how one replaces such structures asymptotically by a continuum, and therefore by a set of equations, that captures the behaviour of potentially high-frequency waves propagating through a periodic medium. The high-frequency homogenization that we use recovers the classical homogenization coefficients in the low-frequency long-wavelength limit. The theory is specifically developed in electromagnetics for two-dimensional square lattices where every cell contains an arbitrary hole with Neumann boundary conditions at its surface and implemented numerically for cylinders and split-ring resonators. Illustrative numerical examples include lensing via all-angle negative refraction, as well as omni-directive antenna, endoscope and cloaking effects. We also highlight the importance of choosing the correct Brillouin zone and the potential of missing interesting physical effects depending upon the path chosen. PMID:23633908

  5. Suspended polymeric photonic crystals: simulation and fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebigan, R.; Dinescu, A.; Kusko, C.; Gavrila, R.; Cristea, D.; Obreja, C.; Schiopu, P.

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we present simulation of transmission / reflection spectra of polymeric rectangular and hexagonal photonic crystals (PC) as well as the propagation of radiation in a hexagonal PC - based waveguide. The polymeric PC are periodic structures consisting in square arrays of holes configured in suspended membranes of PMMA with different diameters and pitch (100 nm diameter with 500 nm, respectively 800 nm pitch; 200 nm diameter with 500 nm pitch; 400 nm diameter with 700 nm pitch). For fabrication, we propose the bi-layer EBL technique based on simultaneous patterning of a bottom sacrificial layer (LOR 5A - Microchem Corporation) and a positive electron resist (PMMA of different molecular weights). Characterization of nanostructures was performed using SEM imaging and AFM measurements .

  6. Surface Brillouin scattering in photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Tchahame, Joël Cabrel; Beugnot, Jean-Charles; Huy, Kien Phan; Laude, Vincent; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Sylvestre, Thibaut

    2016-07-15

    We report, to the best of our knowledge, the first experimental observation of surface Brillouin scattering in silica-based photonic crystal fibers, arising from the interaction between guided light and surface acoustic waves. This was achieved using small-core and high air-filling fraction microstructured fibers that enable a strong opto-acoustic coupling near the air holes while mitigating the acoustic leakages in the microstructured cladding. It is further shown that this new type of light scattering is highly sensitive to the fiber air-hole microstructure, thus providing a passive and efficient way to control it. Our observations are confirmed through numerical simulations of the elastodynamics equation. PMID:27420512

  7. Squeezed state generation in photonic crystal microcavities.

    PubMed

    Banaee, M G; Young, Jeff F

    2008-12-01

    The feasibility of using a parametric down-conversion process to generate squeezed electromagnetic states in three dimensional photonic crystal microcavity structures is investigated for the first time. The spectrum of the squeezed light is theoretically calculated by using an open cavity quantum mechanical formalism. The cavity communicates with two main channels, which model vertical radiation losses and coupling into a single-mode waveguide respectively. The amount of squeezing is determined by the correlation functions relating the field quadratures of light coupled into the waveguide. All of the relevant model parameters are realistically estimated for structures made in Al0.3Ga0.7As, using finite-difference time-domain simulations. Squeezing up to approximately 30% below the shot noise level is predicted for 10 mW average power, 80 MHz repetition, 500 ps excitation pulses using in a [111] oriented wafer. PMID:19065230

  8. A laminar solid core photonic crystal waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willig, R. L.

    2005-11-01

    A one-dimensional model is presented to explain the physics of solid core photonic crystal fibers. The model provides a clear way to demonstrate many of the interesting characteristics of these fibers: variation of cladding index with wavelength, endlessly single-mode operation, short wavelength index limit, long wavelength index limit, and variation of these properties with the air/silica fraction. The effective index is calculated for a laminar cladding consisting of periodic layers of alternating high and low index dielectrics. The waveguide model consists of the same periodic layers surrounding a high-index core through which most of the light propagates. The light is confined by total internal reflection. The model is shown to be an accurate analogue for a more complicated two-dimensional finned dielectric waveguide.

  9. Enhanced photoacoustic detection using photonic crystal substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yunfei; Liu, Kaiyang; McClelland, John; Lu, Meng

    2014-04-21

    This paper demonstrates the enhanced photoacoustic sensing of surface-bound light absorbing molecules and metal nanoparticles using a one-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) substrate. The PC structure functions as an optical resonator at the wavelength where the analyte absorption is strong. The optical resonance of the PC sensor provides an intensified evanescent field with respect to the excitation light source and results in enhanced optical absorption by surface-immobilized samples. For the analysis of a light absorbing dye deposited on the PC surface, the intensity of photoacoustic signal was enhanced by more than 10-fold in comparison to an un-patterned acrylic substrate. The technique was also applied to detect gold nanorods and exhibited more than 40 times stronger photoacoustic signals. The demonstrated approach represents a potential path towards single molecule absorption spectroscopy with greater performance and inexpensive instrumentation.

  10. Stable planar mesoscopic photonic crystal cavities.

    PubMed

    Magno, G; Monmayrant, A; Grande, M; Lozes-Dupuy, F; Gauthier-Lafaye, O; Calò, G; Petruzzelli, V

    2014-07-15

    Mesoscopic self-collimation (MSC) in mesoscopic photonic crystals with high reflectivity is exploited to realize a novel high Q-factor cavity by means of mesoscopic PhC planar mirrors. These mirrors efficiently confine a mode inside a planar Fabry-Perot-like cavity, that results from a beam focusing effect that stabilizes the cavity even for small beam sizes, resembling the focusing behavior of curved mirrors. Moreover, they show an improved reflectivity with respect to their standard distributed Bragg reflector counterparts that allows higher compactness. A Q-factor higher than 10⁴ has been achieved for an optimized 5-period-long mirror cavity. The optimization of the Q-factor and the performances in terms of energy storage, field enhancement, and confinement are detailed. PMID:25121692

  11. Nonlinear waveguide optics and photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Knight, J C; Skryabin, D V

    2007-11-12

    Focus Serial: Frontiers of Nonlinear Optics

    Optical fibers and waveguides provide unique and distinct environments for nonlinear optics, because of the combination of high intensities, long interaction lengths, and control of the propagation constants. They are also becoming of technological importance. The topic has a long history but continues to generate rapid development, most recently through the invention of the new forms of optical fiber collectively known as photonic crystal fibers. Some of the discoveries and ideas from the new fibers look set to have lasting influence in the broader field of guided-wave nonlinear optics. In this paper we introduce some of these ideas. PMID:19550822

  12. Optical nanofiber-based photonic crystal cavity.

    PubMed

    Nayak, K P; Zhang, Pengfei; Hakuta, K

    2014-01-15

    We demonstrate the fabrication of photonic crystal (PhC) cavities on optical nanofibers using femtosecond laser ablation. PhC cavities with cavity lengths varying from 0.54 to 3.43 mm are fabricated by controlling the profile of the nanocrater array formed on the nanofiber. Such PhC cavities show high transmission of 87% for a finesse of 39. For higher finesse values from 150 to 500, the transmission can still be maintained at 20%-25%. Due to the strong confinement of the field and the efficient coupling to single-mode optical fibers, such nanofiber-based PhC cavities may become an interface between quantum and classical networks. PMID:24562114

  13. Fano resonance in anodic aluminum oxide based photonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Guo Liang; Fei, Guang Tao; Zhang, Yao; Yan, Peng; Xu, Shao Hui; Ouyang, Hao Miao; De Zhang, Li

    2014-01-01

    Anodic aluminum oxide based photonic crystals with periodic porous structure have been prepared using voltage compensation method. The as-prepared sample showed an ultra-narrow photonic bandgap. Asymmetric line-shape profiles of the photonic bandgaps have been observed, which is attributed to Fano resonance between the photonic bandgap state of photonic crystal and continuum scattering state of porous structure. And the exhibited Fano resonance shows more clearly when the sample is saturated ethanol gas than air-filled. Further theoretical analysis by transfer matrix method verified these results. These findings provide a better understanding on the nature of photonic bandgaps of photonic crystals made up of porous materials, in which the porous structures not only exist as layers of effective-refractive-index material providing Bragg scattering, but also provide a continuum light scattering state to interact with Bragg scattering state to show an asymmetric line-shape profile. PMID:24398625

  14. Superconducting Photonic Crystal with Nanostrips for Mid-Infrared Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ooi, C. H. Raymond

    2011-03-30

    One dimensional photonic crystal with superconducting nanostrips and semiconductor materials can be tailored to have narrow bands, with either large transmission or large reflection. Based on the reflection and transmission coefficients, we study the temporal dynamics of the reflected and transmitted pulses from the finite photonic crystal. The output pulse dynamics show slow light effect around the narrow bands that can be useful for photonic technologies.

  15. Thermally Driven Photonic Actuator Based on Silica Opal Photonic Crystal with Liquid Crystal Elastomer.

    PubMed

    Xing, Huihui; Li, Jun; Shi, Yang; Guo, Jinbao; Wei, Jie

    2016-04-13

    We have developed a novel thermoresponsive photonic actuator based on three-dimensional SiO2 opal photonic crystals (PCs) together with liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs). In the process of fabrication of such a photonic actuator, the LCE precursor is infiltrated into the SiO2 opal PC followed by UV light-induced photopolymerization, thereby forming the SiO2 opal PC/LCE composite film with a bilayer structure. We find that this bilayer composite film simultaneously exhibits actuation behavior as well as the photonic band gap (PBG) response to external temperature variation. When the SiO2 opal PC/LCE composite film is heated, it exhibits a considerable bending deformation, and its PBG shifts to a shorter wavelength at the same time. In addition, this actuation is quite fast, reversible, and highly repeatable. The thermoresponsive behavior of the SiO2 opal PC/LCE composite films mainly derives from the thermal-driven change of nematic order of the LCE layer which leads to the asymmetric shrinkage/expansion of the bilayer structure. These results will be of interest in designing optical actuator systems for environment-temperature detection. PMID:26996608

  16. Transient Plasma Photonic Crystals for High-Power Lasers.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, G; Spatschek, K H

    2016-06-01

    A new type of transient photonic crystals for high-power lasers is presented. The crystal is produced by counterpropagating laser beams in plasma. Trapped electrons and electrically forced ions generate a strong density grating. The lifetime of the transient photonic crystal is determined by the ballistic motion of ions. The robustness of the photonic crystal allows one to manipulate high-intensity laser pulses. The scheme of the crystal is analyzed here by 1D Vlasov simulations. Reflection or transmission of high-power laser pulses are predicted by particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that a transient plasma photonic crystal may act as a tunable mirror for intense laser pulses. Generalizations to 2D and 3D configurations are possible. PMID:27314721

  17. Transient Plasma Photonic Crystals for High-Power Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, G.; Spatschek, K. H.

    2016-06-01

    A new type of transient photonic crystals for high-power lasers is presented. The crystal is produced by counterpropagating laser beams in plasma. Trapped electrons and electrically forced ions generate a strong density grating. The lifetime of the transient photonic crystal is determined by the ballistic motion of ions. The robustness of the photonic crystal allows one to manipulate high-intensity laser pulses. The scheme of the crystal is analyzed here by 1D Vlasov simulations. Reflection or transmission of high-power laser pulses are predicted by particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that a transient plasma photonic crystal may act as a tunable mirror for intense laser pulses. Generalizations to 2D and 3D configurations are possible.

  18. Topological modes in one-dimensional solids and photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, Timothy J.; Butler, Celia A. M.; Taylor, Melita C.; Hooper, Ian R.; Hibbins, Alastair P.; Sambles, J. Roy; Mathur, Harsh

    2016-03-01

    It is shown theoretically that a one-dimensional crystal with time-reversal and particle-hole symmetries is characterized by a topological invariant that predicts the existence or otherwise of edge states. This is confirmed experimentally through the construction and simulation of a photonic crystal analog in the microwave regime. It is shown that the edge mode couples to modes external to the photonic crystal via a Fano resonance.

  19. Semiconductor superlattice photodetectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, S. L.; Hess, K.; Coleman, J. J.; Leburton, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    Superlattice photodetectors were investigated. A few major physical processes in the quantum-well heterostructures related to the photon detection and electron conduction mechanisms, the field effect on the wave functions and the energy levels of the electrons, and the optical absorption with and without the photon assistance were studied.

  20. Coupling light in photonic crystal waveguides: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Hemant Sankar; Goyal, Amit Kumar; Srivastava, Varun; Pal, Suchandan

    2016-07-01

    Submicron scale structures with high index contrast are key to compact structures for realizing photonic integrated structures. Ultra-compact optical devices in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates serve compatibility with semiconductor fabrication technology leading to reduction of cost and mass production. Photonic crystal structures possess immense potential for realizing various compact optical devices. However, coupling light to photonic crystal waveguide structures is crucial in order to achieve strong transmission and wider bandwidth of signal. Widening of bandwidth will increase potential for various applications and high transmission will make easy signal detection at the output. In this paper, the techniques reported so far for coupling light in photonic crystal waveguides have been reviewed and analyzed so that a comprehensive guide for an efficient coupling to photonic crystal waveguides can be made possible.

  1. Crystallization of spin superlattices with pressure and field in the layered magnet SrCu2(BO3)2

    PubMed Central

    Haravifard, S.; Graf, D.; Feiguin, A. E.; Batista, C. D.; Lang, J. C.; Silevitch, D. M.; Srajer, G.; Gaulin, B. D.; Dabkowska, H. A.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2016-01-01

    An exact mapping between quantum spins and boson gases provides fresh approaches to the creation of quantum condensates and crystals. Here we report on magnetization measurements on the dimerized quantum magnet SrCu2(BO3)2 at cryogenic temperatures and through a quantum-phase transition that demonstrate the emergence of fractionally filled bosonic crystals in mesoscopic patterns, specified by a sequence of magnetization plateaus. We apply tens of Teslas of magnetic field to tune the density of bosons and gigapascals of hydrostatic pressure to regulate the underlying interactions. Simulations help parse the balance between energy and geometry in the emergent spin superlattices. The magnetic crystallites are the end result of a progression from a direct product of singlet states in each short dimer at zero field to preferred filling fractions of spin-triplet bosons in each dimer at large magnetic field, enriching the known possibilities for collective states in both quantum spin and atomic systems. PMID:27320787

  2. Crystallization of spin superlattices with pressure and field in the layered magnet SrCu2(BO3)2.

    PubMed

    Haravifard, S; Graf, D; Feiguin, A E; Batista, C D; Lang, J C; Silevitch, D M; Srajer, G; Gaulin, B D; Dabkowska, H A; Rosenbaum, T F

    2016-01-01

    An exact mapping between quantum spins and boson gases provides fresh approaches to the creation of quantum condensates and crystals. Here we report on magnetization measurements on the dimerized quantum magnet SrCu2(BO3)2 at cryogenic temperatures and through a quantum-phase transition that demonstrate the emergence of fractionally filled bosonic crystals in mesoscopic patterns, specified by a sequence of magnetization plateaus. We apply tens of Teslas of magnetic field to tune the density of bosons and gigapascals of hydrostatic pressure to regulate the underlying interactions. Simulations help parse the balance between energy and geometry in the emergent spin superlattices. The magnetic crystallites are the end result of a progression from a direct product of singlet states in each short dimer at zero field to preferred filling fractions of spin-triplet bosons in each dimer at large magnetic field, enriching the known possibilities for collective states in both quantum spin and atomic systems. PMID:27320787

  3. Crystallization of spin superlattices with pressure and field in the layered magnet SrCu2(BO3)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haravifard, S.; Graf, D.; Feiguin, A. E.; Batista, C. D.; Lang, J. C.; Silevitch, D. M.; Srajer, G.; Gaulin, B. D.; Dabkowska, H. A.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2016-06-01

    An exact mapping between quantum spins and boson gases provides fresh approaches to the creation of quantum condensates and crystals. Here we report on magnetization measurements on the dimerized quantum magnet SrCu2(BO3)2 at cryogenic temperatures and through a quantum-phase transition that demonstrate the emergence of fractionally filled bosonic crystals in mesoscopic patterns, specified by a sequence of magnetization plateaus. We apply tens of Teslas of magnetic field to tune the density of bosons and gigapascals of hydrostatic pressure to regulate the underlying interactions. Simulations help parse the balance between energy and geometry in the emergent spin superlattices. The magnetic crystallites are the end result of a progression from a direct product of singlet states in each short dimer at zero field to preferred filling fractions of spin-triplet bosons in each dimer at large magnetic field, enriching the known possibilities for collective states in both quantum spin and atomic systems.

  4. Three dimensional reflectance properties of superconductor-dielectric photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, G. N.; Pandey, J. P.; Pandey, U. K.; Sancheti, Bhagyashree; Ojha, S. P.

    2016-05-01

    In this present communication, we have studied the optical properties of Photonics Crystals with super conducting constituent using the TMM method for a stratified medium. We also studied the three dimensional reflectance property of superconductor-dielectric photonic crystal at different temperature and thickness. From above study we show that the superconductor-dielectric photonic crystal may be used as broad band reflector and omnidirectional reflector at low temperature below to the critical temperature. Such property may be applied to make of the reflector which can be used in low temperature region.

  5. Three-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, B.; /SLAC

    2006-09-07

    We discuss simulated photonic crystal structure designs for laser-driven particle acceleration, focusing on three-dimensional planar structures based on the so-called ''woodpile'' lattice. We describe guiding of a speed-of-light accelerating mode by a defect in the photonic crystal lattice and discuss the properties of this mode, including particle beam dynamics and potential coupling methods for the structure. We also discuss possible materials and power sources for this structure and their effects on performance parameters, as well as possible manufacturing techniques and the required tolerances. In addition we describe the computational technique and possible improvements in numerical modeling that would aid development of photonic crystal structures.

  6. Recent progress and novel applications of photonic crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arismar Cerqueira, S., Jr.

    2010-02-01

    Photonic crystal fibers present a wavelength-scale periodic microstructure running along their length. Their core and two-dimensional photonic crystal might be based on varied geometries and materials, enabling light guidance due to different propagation mechanisms in an extremely large wavelength range, extending to the terahertz regions. As a result, these fibers have revolutionized the optical fiber technology by means of creating new degrees of freedom in the fiber design, fabrication and applicability. This report aims to provide a detailed statement on the recent progress and novel potential applications of photonic crystal fibers.

  7. Quantitative modeling of fluorescent emission in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmann, Johannes; Zappe, Hans; Goldschmidt, Jan Christoph

    2013-11-01

    Photonic crystals affect the photon emission of embedded emitters due to an altered local density of photon states (LDOS). We review the calculation of the LDOS from eigenmodes in photonic crystals and propose a rate equation model for fluorescent emitters to determine the changes in emission induced by the LDOS. We show how to calculate the modifications of three experimentally accessible characteristics: emission spectrum (spectral redistribution), emitter quantum yield, and fluorescence lifetime. As an example, we present numerical results for the emission of the dye Rhodamine B inside an opal photonic crystal. For such photonic crystals with small permittivity contrast, the LDOS is only weakly modified, resulting in rather small changes. We point out that in experiments, however, usually only part of the emitted light is detected, which can have a very different spectral distribution (e.g., due to a photonic band gap in the direction of detection). We demonstrate the calculation of this detected spectrum for a typical measurement setup. With this reasoning, we explain the previously not fully understood experimental observation that strong spectral modifications occurred, while at the same time only small changes in lifetime were found. With our approach, the mentioned effects can be quantitatively calculated for fluorescent emitters in any photonic crystal.

  8. Photonic crystal structures for efficent localization or extraction of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuckovic, Jelena

    Three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals offer the opportunity of light manipulation in all directions in space, but they are very difficult to fabricate. On the other hand, planar photonic crystals are much simpler to make, but they exhibit only a "quasi-3D" confinement, resulting from the combined action of 2D photonic crystal and internal reflection. The imperfect confinement in the third dimension produces some unwanted out-of-plane loss, which is usually a limiting factor in performance of these structures. This thesis proposes how to fully take advantage of the relatively simple fabrication of planar photonic crystals, by addressing a problem of loss-reduction. One of the greatest challenges in photonics is a construction of optical microcavities with small mode volumes and large quality factors, for efficient localization of light. Beside standard applications of these structures (such as lasers or filters), they can potentially be used for cavity QED experiments, or as building blocks for quantum networks. This work also presents the design and fabrication of optical microcavities based on planar photonic crystals, with mode volumes of the order of one half of cubic wavelength of light (measured in material) and with Q factors predicted to be even larger than 10 4. In addition to photonic crystals fabricated in semiconductors, we also address interesting properties of metallic photonic crystals and present our theoretical and experimental work on using them to improve the output of light emissive devices. Feature sizes of structures presented here are below those achievable by photolithography. Therefore, a high resolution lithography is necessary for their fabrication. The presently used e-beam writing techniques suffer from limitations in speed and wafer throughput, and they represent a huge obstacle to commercialization of photonic crystals. Our preliminary work on electron beam projection lithography, the technique that could provide us with the speed

  9. Photochemistry in photonic crystal fiber nanoreactors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jocelyn S Y; Euser, Tijmen G; Farrer, Nicola J; Sadler, Peter J; Scharrer, Michael; Russell, Philip St J

    2010-05-17

    We report the use of a liquid-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) as a highly controlled photochemical reactor. Hollow-core PCFs have several major advantages over conventional sample cells: the sample volume per optical path length is very small (2.8 nL cm(-1) in the fiber used), long optical path lengths are possible as a result of very low intrinsic waveguide loss, and furthermore the light travels in a diffractionless single mode with a constant transverse intensity profile. As a proof of principle, the (very low) quantum yield of the photochemical conversion of vitamin B(12), cyanocobalamin (CNCbl) to hydroxocobalamin ([H(2)OCbl](+)) in aqueous solution was measured for several pH values from 2.5 to 7.5. The dynamics of the actively induced reaction were monitored in real-time by broadband absorption spectroscopy. The PCF nanoreactor required ten thousand times less sample volume compared to conventional techniques. Furthermore, the enhanced sensitivity and optical pump intensity implied that even systems with very small quantum yields can be measured very quickly--in our experiments one thousand times faster than in a conventional cuvette. PMID:20391563

  10. Topological Z2 Gapless Photonic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Biye; Wang, Zidan

    Topological properties of electronic materials with gapless band structure such as Topological Semimetals(TSMs) and Topological Metals(TMs) have drew lots of attention to both theoretical and experimental physicists recently. Although theoretical prediction of TSMs and TMs have been done well, experimental study of them is quite difficult to perform due to the fact that it is very difficult to control and design certain electronic materials. However, since the topological properties stem from the geometric feature, we can study them in Photonic Crystals(PhCs) which are much easy to be controlled and designed. Here we study 2-dimension PhCs consisting of gyrotropic materials with hexagonal structure. In the Brillouin corner, the dispersion relation has gapless points which are similar to Dirac Cones in electronic materials. We firstly derive the effective Hamiltonian of this system and show that if certain perturbation is added to this effective Hamiltonian, this system belongs to AII class according to Altland and Zirbauer topological classification and is described by a Z2 topological charge. Finally we also propose a way to detect this Z2 topological charge using momentum space Aharonov-Bohm interferometer which is firstly proposed by L.Duca and T.Li,etc.

  11. Optics in Microstructured and Photonic Crystal Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, J. C.

    2008-10-01

    The development of optical fibers with two-dimensional patterns of air holes running down their length has reinvigorated research in the field of fiber optics. It has greatly—and fundamentally—broadened the range of specialty optical fibers, by demonstrating that optical fibers can be more "special" than previously thought. Fibers with air cores have made it possible to deliver energetic femtosecond-scale optical pulses, transform limited, as solitons, using single-mode fiber. Other fibers with anomalous dispersion at visible wavelengths have spawned a new generation of single-mode optical supercontinuum sources, spanning visible and near-infrared wavelengths and based on compact pump sources. A third example is in the field of fiber lasers, where the use of photonic crystal fiber concepts has led to a new hybrid laser technology, in which the very high numerical aperture available sing air holes have enabled fibers so short they are more naturally held straight than bent. This paper describes some of the basic physics and technology behind these developments, illustrated with some of the impressive demonstrations of the past 18 months.

  12. Tunable complete photonic band gap in anisotropic photonic crystal slabs with non-circular air holes using liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathollahi Khalkhali, T.; Bananej, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we analyze the tunability of complete photonic band gap of square and triangular photonic crystal slabs composed of square and hexagonal air holes in anisotropic tellurium background with SiO2 as cladding material. The non-circular holes are infiltrated with liquid crystal. Using the supercell method based on plane wave expansion, we study the variation of complete band gap by changing the optical axis orientation of liquid crystal. Our numerical results show that noticeable tunability of complete photonic band gap can be obtained in both square and triangular structures with non-circular holes.

  13. Two-pattern compound photonic crystals with a large complete photonic band gap

    SciTech Connect

    Jia Lin; Thomas, Edwin L.

    2011-09-15

    We present a set of two-dimensional aperiodic structures with a large complete photonic band gap (PBG), which are named two-pattern photonic crystals. By superposing two substructures without regard to registration, we designed six new aperiodic PBG structures having a complete PBG larger than 15% for {epsilon}{sub 2}/{epsilon}{sub 1} = 11.4. The rod-honeycomb two-pattern photonic crystal provides the largest complete PBG to date. An aperiodic structure becomes the champion structure with the largest PBG. Surprisingly, the TM and TE gaps of a two-pattern photonic crystal are much less interdependent than the PBGs of conventional photonic crystals proposed before, affording interesting capabilities for us to tune the TM and TE PBGs separately. By altering the respective substructures, optical devices for different polarizations (TE, TM, or both) can readily be designed.

  14. Photonic Crystal and Photonic Band-Gap Structures for Light Extraction and Emission Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Rue, Richard M.

    Research into photonic crystal (PhC) and photonic band-gap (PBG) structures has been motivated, from the start, by their possible use in controlling, modifying and enhancing the light emission process from high refractive index solid materials. This chapter considers the possible role of such structures when incorporated into semiconductor diode based light-emitting devices. Both light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and lasers will be considered. In order to provide a proper framework for discussion and analysis, space is devoted to the historical development of III-V semiconductor based LEDs — and to competing alternative approaches that have been demonstrated for enhanced light extraction. The possible advantages of photonic quasi-crystal (PQC) structures over regularly periodic photon crystal structures for advanced LED designs are also considered. Photonic crystal structures potentially provide major enhancements in the performance of laser diodes (LDs) — and progress towards this performance enhancement will be reviewed.

  15. Pendellösung effect in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savo, S.; di Gennaro, E.; Miletto, C.; Andreone, A.; Dardano, P.; Moretti, L.; Mocella, V.

    2008-06-01

    At the exit surface of a photonic crystal, the intensity of the diffracted wave can be periodically modulated, showing a maximum in the "positive" (forward diffracted) or in the "negative" (diffracted) direction, depending on the slab thickness. This thickness dependence is a direct result of the so-called Pendellosung phenomenon, consisting of the periodic exchange inside the crystal of the energy between direct and diffracted beams. We report the experimental observation of this effect in the microwave region at about 14 GHz by irradiating 2D photonic crystal slabs of different thickness and detecting the intensity distribution of the electromagnetic field at the exit surface and inside the crystal itself.

  16. Photonic crystals for improving light absorption in organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Duché, D. Le Rouzo, J.; Masclaux, C.; Gourgon, C.

    2015-02-07

    We theoretically and experimentally study the structuration of organic solar cells in the shape of photonic crystal slabs. By taking advantage of the optical properties of photonic crystals slabs, we show the possibility to couple Bloch modes with very low group velocities in the active layer of the cells. These Bloch modes, also called slow Bloch modes (SBMs), allow increasing the lifetime of photons within the active layer. Finally, we present experimental demonstration performed by using nanoimprint to directly pattern the standard poly-3-hexylthiophène:[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butiryc acid methyl ester organic semiconductor blend in thin film form in the shape of a photonic crystal able to couple SBMs. In agreement with the model, optical characterizations will demonstrate significant photonic absorption gains.

  17. Imaging of protein crystals with two–photon microscopy†

    PubMed Central

    Padayatti, Pius; Palczewska, Grazyna; Sun, Wenyu; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Salom, David

    2012-01-01

    Second–order non–linear optical imaging of chiral crystals (SONICC), that portrays second harmonic generation (SHG) by non–centrosymmetric crystals, is emerging as a powerful imaging technique for protein crystals in media opaque to visible light because of its high signal–to–noise ratio. Here we report the incorporation of both SONICC and two–photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) into one imaging system that allows visualization of crystals as small as ~10 μm in their longest dimension. Using this system, we then documented an inverse correlation between the level of symmetry in examined crystals and the intensity of their SHG. Moreover, because of blue-green TPEF exhibited by most tested protein crystals, we also could identify and image SHG–silent protein crystals. Our experimental data suggests that the TPEF in protein crystals is mainly caused by the oxidation of tryptophan residues. Additionally, we found that unspecific fluorescent dyes are able to bind to lysozyme crystals and enhance their detection by TPFE. We finally confirmed that the observed fluorescence was generated by a two-photon rather than a three-photon process. The capability for imaging small protein crystals in turbid or opaque media with non–damaging infrared light in a single system, makes the combination of SHG and intrinsic visible TPEF a powerful tool for non–destructive protein crystal identification and characterization during crystallization trials. PMID:22324807

  18. Imaging of Protein Crystals with Two-Photon Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Padayatti, Pius; Palczewska, Grazyna; Sun, Wenyu; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Salom, David

    2012-05-02

    Second-order nonlinear optical imaging of chiral crystals (SONICC), which portrays second-harmonic generation (SHG) by noncentrosymmetric crystals, is emerging as a powerful imaging technique for protein crystals in media opaque to visible light because of its high signal-to-noise ratio. Here we report the incorporation of both SONICC and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) into one imaging system that allows visualization of crystals as small as 10 {mu}m in their longest dimension. Using this system, we then documented an inverse correlation between the level of symmetry in examined crystals and the intensity of their SHG. Moreover, because of blue-green TPEF exhibited by most tested protein crystals, we also could identify and image SHG-silent protein crystals. Our experimental data suggest that the TPEF in protein crystals is mainly caused by the oxidation of tryptophan residues. Additionally, we found that unspecific fluorescent dyes are able to bind to lysozyme crystals and enhance their detection by TPEF. We finally confirmed that the observed fluorescence was generated by a two-photon rather than a three-photon process. The capability for imaging small protein crystals in turbid or opaque media with nondamaging infrared light in a single system makes the combination of SHG and intrinsic visible TPEF a powerful tool for nondestructive protein crystal identification and characterization during crystallization trials.

  19. The research on a photonic-crystal fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yong; Cheng, Yi

    2009-07-01

    To study the photonic-crystal fiber applied in the chemical sensor, the photonic-crystal fiber was used as transmission medium. With Sol-Gel method, we selective coated thin film containing fluorescent probe in the photonic-crystal fiber core, then attained an excellent photonic-crystal fiber acetylcholinesterase sensor. The sensor could be applied in biological / chemical research, clinical medicine, environmental protection, food inspection, biochemical preventive war field and so on. In organophosphorus pesticide residue testing, the experimental results indicated that the linear measurement range could arrive to 1×10-9~ 1×10-3 mol/L, moreover the detection limit is 1×10-10 mol/L.

  20. Enhanced spontaneous Raman scattering using a photonic crystal fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Buric, M.P.; Falk, J.; Chen, K.; Woodruff, S.D.

    2008-07-22

    The output power from spontaneous gas-phase Raman scattering is enhanced using a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber for the gas cell and Stokes light collector, yielding >100 times enhancement over a free-space configuration.

  1. Enhanced Spontaneous Raman Scattering using a Photonic Crystal Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    M.P. Buric; J. Fal; K. Chen; S. Woodruff1

    2007-10-01

    The output power from spontaneous gas-phase Raman scattering is enhanced using a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber for the gas cell and Stokes light collector, yielding >100 times enhancement over a free-space configuration.

  2. Use of a photonic crystal for optical amplifier gain control

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; El-Kady, Ihab

    2006-07-18

    An optical amplifier having a uniform gain profile uses a photonic crystal to tune the density-of-states of a gain medium so as to modify the light emission rate between atomic states. The density-of-states of the gain medium is tuned by selecting the size, shape, dielectric constant, and spacing of a plurality of microcavity defects in the photonic crystal. The optical amplifier is particularly useful for the regeneration of DWDM signals in long optical fibers.

  3. Photonic-crystal time-domain simulations using Wannier functions.

    PubMed

    Blum, Christian; Wolff, Christian; Busch, Kurt

    2011-01-15

    We present a Wannier-function-based time-domain method for photonic-crystal integrated optical circuits. In contrast to other approaches, this method allows one to trade CPU time against memory consumption and therefore is particularly well suited for the treatment of large-scale systems. As an illustration, we apply the method to the design of a photonic-crystal-based sensor, which utilizes a dual Mach-Zehnder-Fano interferometer. PMID:21263535

  4. Measurements of HB photonic crystal fibers with low temperature sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makara, Mariusz; Wojcik, Jan; Mergo, Pawel; Klimek, Jacek; Skorupski, Krzysztof; Kopeć, Jarosław

    2008-06-01

    We report on experimental studies of phase and group modal birefringence vs. temperature in two highly birefringent (HB) photonic crystal fibers, in which birefringence is caused by filling factor asymmetry. The sensitivity measurements were carried out at two wavelengths 633 and 834 nm. Our results show that temperature sensitivity in the HB photonic crystal fibers is two orders smaller then in traditional HB fibers. Simultaneously, our results exhibit weak dependence of group modal birefringence on temperature.

  5. Two-photon absorption in Hg 2Cl 2 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelant, I.; Ambrož, M.; Hála, J.; Kohlová, V.; Barta, Č.

    1985-01-01

    Violet luminescence (396 nm) of Hg 2Cl 2 single crystals was observed under excitation of green light (∼ 500 nm) of a pulsed dye laser at liquid helium temperature. The effect is interpreted as due to the two-photon absorption process. The two-photon excitation spectrum of the luminescence was measured in the wavelength range 475-530 nm. Possible mechanisms of the two-photon transition are outlined.

  6. Theoretical study of interfacial damping in perpendicular anisotropy superlattices along multiple crystal orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, T.; Victora, R. H.

    2016-06-01

    Damping, representing the loss of magnetic energy from the electrons to the lattice through the spin-orbit interaction, is calculated for Co/Pt and Co/Pd superlattices grown along the (001), (111), and (011) orientations. The damping consists of two contributions: interfacial and, usually, bulk. The interfacial damping shows dependence on the superlattice orientation. The origin of the interfacial damping is due to both the distorted electronic states at the interface and the spin-orbit interaction in the weakly polarized nonmagnetic Pt/Pd layers deposited on Co layers. The density of states around the Fermi level provides the spin-flip channels and closely correlates with the damping value. The damping shows asymmetry in the two transverse directions of the spin for spins at most angles. The damping for out-of-plane magnetization can be as much as 1.7 times larger than that of in-plane magnetization.

  7. Hypersonic crystal band gaps in Ni/Cu superlattice nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jia-Guang; Shen, Tie

    2016-03-01

    The hexagonal and tetragonal ordered arrays were prepared by Ni/Cu superlattice nanowires on the porous anodic alumina membrane template, and their phonon band structures were calculated by using the plane wave expansion method. Numerical results show that the hypersonic band gaps can be acquired by adjusting the structural parameters. Along the different wave-vector directions, the width and position of band gap would vary. If the nanowires'filling fraction is increased continuously, the width of the first band gap firstly increases and then decreases within a certain range. The height of superlattice nanowire elementary unit can only affect the width of band gap within a quite narrow range. When the height of elementary unit remains unchanged, the decrease of the Cu-component ratio can contribute to the formation of a wider band gap. Additionally, the wide band gap is more easily formed in tetragonal structure than in hexagonal structure.

  8. Polarisation singularities in photonic crystals for an on-chip spin-photon interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beggs, Daryl M.; Young, Andrew B.; Thijssen, Arthur C. T.; Oulton, Ruth

    2015-03-01

    Integrated quantum photonic chips are a leading contender for future quantum technologies, which aim to use the entanglement and superposition properties of quantum physics to speed up the manipulation of data. Quantum information may be stored and transmitted in photons, which make excellent flying qubits. Photons suffer little from decoherence, and single qubit gates performed by changing photon phase, are straightforward. Less straightforward is the ability to create two qubit gates, where one photon is used to switch another's state; inherently difficult due to the extremely small interaction cross-section between photons. The required deterministic two-qubit interactions will likely need a hybrid scheme with the ``flying'' photonic qubit interacting with a ``static'' matter qubit. Here we present the design of a photonic crystal waveguide structure that can couple electron-spin to photon path, thus providing an interface between a static and a flying qubit. We will show that the complex polarization properties inherent in the photonic crystal eigenmodes supports polarization singularities - positions in the electric field vector where one of the parameters describing the local polarization ellipse is singular - and that these singularities are ideal for a range of quantum information applications. In particular, we will show that by placing a quantum dot at one of these singularities, the electron-spin becomes correlated with the photon emission direction, creating an in-plane spin-photon interface that can transfer quantum information from static to flying qubits.

  9. Alignment of crystal orientations of the multi-domain photonic crystals in Parides sesostris wing scales.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, S; Fujita, H; Kinoshita, S; Matsuhana, B

    2014-03-01

    It is known that the wing scales of the emerald-patched cattleheart butterfly, Parides sesostris, contain gyroid-type photonic crystals, which produce a green structural colour. However, the photonic crystal is not a single crystal that spreads over the entire scale, but it is separated into many small domains with different crystal orientations. As a photonic crystal generally has band gaps at different frequencies depending on the direction of light propagation, it seems mysterious that the scale is observed to be uniformly green under an optical microscope despite the multi-domain structure. In this study, we have carefully investigated the structure of the wing scale and discovered that the crystal orientations of different domains are not perfectly random, but there is a preferred crystal orientation that is aligned along the surface normal of the scale. This finding suggests that there is an additional factor during the developmental process of the microstructure that regulates the crystal orientation. PMID:24352678

  10. Alignment of crystal orientations of the multi-domain photonic crystals in Parides sesostris wing scales

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, S.; Fujita, H.; Kinoshita, S.; Matsuhana, B.

    2014-01-01

    It is known that the wing scales of the emerald-patched cattleheart butterfly, Parides sesostris, contain gyroid-type photonic crystals, which produce a green structural colour. However, the photonic crystal is not a single crystal that spreads over the entire scale, but it is separated into many small domains with different crystal orientations. As a photonic crystal generally has band gaps at different frequencies depending on the direction of light propagation, it seems mysterious that the scale is observed to be uniformly green under an optical microscope despite the multi-domain structure. In this study, we have carefully investigated the structure of the wing scale and discovered that the crystal orientations of different domains are not perfectly random, but there is a preferred crystal orientation that is aligned along the surface normal of the scale. This finding suggests that there is an additional factor during the developmental process of the microstructure that regulates the crystal orientation. PMID:24352678

  11. Photonic crystals, light manipulation, and imaging in complex nematic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravnik, Miha; Å timulak, Mitja; Mur, Urban; Čančula, Miha; Čopar, Simon; Žumer, Slobodan

    2016-03-01

    Three selected approaches for manipulation of light by complex nematic colloidal and non-colloidal structures are presented using different own custom developed theoretical and modelling approaches. Photonic crystals bands of distorted cholesteric liquid crystal helix and of nematic colloidal opals are presented, also revealing distinct photonic modes and density of states. Light propagation along half-integer nematic disclinations is shown with changes in the light polarization of various winding numbers. As third, simulated light transmission polarization micrographs of nematic torons are shown, offering a new insight into the complex structure characterization. Finally, this work is a contribution towards using complex soft matter in optics and photonics for advanced light manipulation.

  12. Chalcogenide glass-based three-dimensional photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigel, A.; Kotler, Z.; Sfez, B.; Arsh, A.; Klebanov, M.; Lyubin, V.

    2000-11-01

    AsSeTe chalcogenide glasses are materials that are photosensitive and have a large refractive index. These properties make these glasses particularly suitable for the fabrication of photonic crystals. We present a way to build three-dimensional photonic structures from chalcogenide glasses using vapor deposition and direct holographic writing. We show that this technique is intrinsically self-aligned, providing a simple way to build layer-by-layer photonic crystals and a four-layer structure demonstrating the principle of the technique.

  13. Controllable light diffraction in woodpile photonic crystals filled with liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Chih-Hua; Zeng, Hao; Wiersma, Diederik S.; Cheng, Yu-Chieh; Maigyte, Lina; Trull, Jose; Cojocaru, Crina; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2015-01-12

    An approach to switching between different patterns of light beams transmitted through the woodpile photonic crystals filled with liquid crystals is proposed. The phase transition between the nematic and isotropic liquid crystal states leads to an observable variation of the spatial pattern transmitted through the photonic structure. The transmission profiles in the nematic phase also show polarization sensibility due to refractive index dependence on the field polarization. The experimental results are consistent with a numerical calculation by Finite Difference Time Domain method.

  14. Manipulating light propagation and emission using photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Rajesh V.; Jagatap, B. N.

    2014-03-31

    We discuss the synthesis and characterization of self-assembled photonic crystals using polymer colloids having sub-micron diameters. The angle resolved optical reflectivity measurements indicate the hybridization between stop gaps in the multiple Bragg diffraction regimes. Each diffraction resonances in the multiple Bragg diffraction regimes are assigned to respective crystal planes. We also discuss laser-induced studies of spontaneous emission in self-assembled photonic crystals having Rhodamine-B dye doped colloids. Our experimental results reveal more than 51% inhibition in emission intensity within the stop gap as compared to a proper reference sample.

  15. Three dimensional silicon photonic crystals fabricated by two photon phase mask lithography.

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltzius, P.; Braun, P. V.; Liao, H.; Brzezinski, A.; Chen, Y. C.; Nelson, E.; Shir, D.; Rogers, J. A.; Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen

    2008-08-01

    We describe the fabrication of silicon three dimensional photonic crystals using polymer templates defined by a single step, two-photon exposure through a layer of photopolymer with relief molded on its surface. The resulting crystals exhibit high structural quality over large areas, displaying geometries consistent with calculation. Spectroscopic measurements of transmission and reflection through the silicon and polymer structures reveal excellent optical properties, approaching properties predicted by simulations that assume ideal layouts.

  16. Tunable optical anisotropy in three-dimensional photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Che Ming; Li Zhiyuan; Liu Rongjuan

    2007-08-15

    Artificial optical birefringence can be realized in three-dimensional photonic crystals with a uniaxial structural symmetry: e.g., woodpile photonic crystals with a tetragonal lattice structure in the long-wavelength limit. The ordinary and extraordinary indices of refraction are determined from calculation of the reflection coefficient for a plane wave incident on the surface of a semi-infinite photonic crystal at different angles. We find that the anisotropy can be widely tuned by simply changing the width and thickness of the dielectric rod. A large relative negative anisotropy over 33% is found. A transition from positive anisotropy to negative anisotropy can be readily achieved. At certain parameters, a structurally anisotropic nanostructure can behave like an optically isotropic medium. Our study opens a window to use artificial nanostructures to create an arbitrary optical anisotropy that is not possible in natural crystals.

  17. Photon Cascade from a Single Crystal Phase Nanowire Quantum Dot.

    PubMed

    Bouwes Bavinck, Maaike; Jöns, Klaus D; Zieliński, Michal; Patriarche, Gilles; Harmand, Jean-Christophe; Akopian, Nika; Zwiller, Val

    2016-02-10

    We report the first comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the optical properties of single crystal phase quantum dots in InP nanowires. Crystal phase quantum dots are defined by a transition in the crystallographic lattice between zinc blende and wurtzite segments and therefore offer unprecedented potential to be controlled with atomic layer accuracy without random alloying. We show for the first time that crystal phase quantum dots are a source of pure single-photons and cascaded photon-pairs from type II transitions with excellent optical properties in terms of intensity and line width. We notice that the emission spectra consist often of two peaks close in energy, which we explain with a comprehensive theory showing that the symmetry of the system plays a crucial role for the hole levels forming hybridized orbitals. Our results state that crystal phase quantum dots have promising quantum optical properties for single photon application and quantum optics. PMID:26806321

  18. Gigahertz Modulation of a Photonic Crystal Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Aaron Karim Taylor

    Photonic crystal (PtC) cavities are an increasingly important way to create all optical methods to control optical data. Not only must the data be controlled, but interfacing it with high frequency electrical signals is particularly interesting especially if this occurs in the 1.55microm telecom band. We present an experiment that uses Rayleigh surface acoustic waves (SAWs) to modulate the frequency of the guided mode of an L3-cavity PtC created on a silicon slab. This work has the potential to interface optical and electrical signals via a mechanical strain wave operating at gigahertz frequencies. Defects are carefully designed into a triangular lattice PtC to realize a waveguide coupled optical cavity. The cavity can be experimentally accessed through grating couplers excited by polarized light at 10° incidence from normal. The optical components are fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator platform, with light confined to the silicon slab region. Through transmission experiments, the L3 cavity was found to have a narrow resonance characterized by a Lorentzian distribution. A quality factor of 165 centered at 6255cm --1 (1.599microm) was measured. Aluminum interdigitated transducers (IDTs) were fabricated through a lithography liftoff process. Their ability to create SAWs requires a piezoelectric medium. As silicon does not have this property, growth of a thin ZnO film was required. The transducers were measured using a network analyzer and were found to produce Rayleigh SAWs at a frequency of 179MHz and a wavelength of 24microm. The acoustic energy traveled 70microm to the target optical device. The L3 cavity has dimensions of around 4microm a side - less than 1/2 a SAW wavelength. Modulation of the L3 PtC resonant frequency was monitored through a repeat of the transmission experiment but with RF excitation of the IDTs at the SAW frequency. A broadening of the transmission spectrum was expected. Unfortunately no change in the fitting parameters could be measured

  19. Controlling single-photon transport with three-level quantum dots in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Cong-Hua; Jia, Wen-Zhi; Wei, Lian-Fu

    2014-03-01

    We investigate how to control single-photon transport along the photonic crystal waveguide with the recent experimentally demonstrated artificial atoms [i.e., Λ-type quantum dots (QDs)] [S. G. Carter et al., Nat. Photon. 7, 329 (2013), 10.1038/nphoton.2013.41] in an all-optical way. Adopting full quantum theory in real space, we analytically calculate the transport coefficients of single photons scattered by a Λ-type QD embedded in single- and two-mode photonic crystal cavities (PCCs), respectively. Our numerical results clearly show that the photonic transmission properties can be exactly manipulated by adjusting the coupling strengths of waveguide-cavity and QD-cavity interactions. Specifically, for the PCC with two degenerate orthogonal polarization modes coupled to a Λ-type QD with two degenerate ground states, we find that the photonic transmission spectra show three Rabi-splitting dips and the present system could serve as single-photon polarization beam splitters. The feasibility of our proposal with the current photonic crystal technique is also discussed.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of three-dimensional infrared photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavieh, Lisa

    It has been predicted theoretically that photonic crystals can be used to control the propagation of light through dielectric media for wavelengths extending beyond the microwave to include the infrared and the visible. Fabrication of 3-D photonic crystals with a bandgap in the near infrared or visible would have application in the design of a new class of photonic devices that include optical mirrors, waveguides, and cavity resonators. Demonstrations of 3-D photonic crystals have been limited primarily to the microwave and infrared wavelength regimes because of the constraints imposed by the nanometer scale dimensions required for operation in the visible. This thesis presents a novel method of fabricating a simple cubic photonic crystal which potentially can be tailored to operate at any wavelength. Fabrication was broken down into several processing steps, each of which was investigated independently. Design of Experiment (DOE) was used in a parametric study to optimize dry etching conditions by which GaAs/AlxGa1--x As multilayer structures were etched with anisotropic profile and rapid etch rate. Also, the etching properties of diffusion controlled wet lateral etching of buried AlxGa1--xAs layers in hydrofluoric acid solutions (HF) were investigated. Using the results obtained from the etching studies, both dry and wet etching techniques were employed to fabricate the simple-cubic photonic structure. Following fabrication, the photonic crystal was characterized at normal angles and oblique incidence using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The experimental results show strong correlation to theoretically predicted values. The simplicity of the process and positive results indicate that it may be possible to scale down the structure to obtain an photonic band lattice with a bandgap of 1.55 mum.

  1. Photonic Crystals: A view of the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, David J.

    2007-03-01

    Despite intense research efforts, no three-dimensional materials with a photonic bandgap for visible wavelengths have yet been fabricated. A new self-assembly strategy lays out the route towards the realization of this dream.

  2. Thermally tunable ferroelectric thin film photonic crystals.

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, P. T.; Wessels, B. W.; Imre, A.; Ocola, L. E.; Northwestern Univ.

    2008-01-01

    Thermally tunable PhCs are fabricated from ferroelectric thin films. Photonic band structure and temperature dependent diffraction are calculated by FDTD. 50% intensity modulation is demonstrated experimentally. This device has potential in active ultra-compact optical circuits.

  3. Tunable negative-index photonic crystals using colloidal magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Tao; Wang, Xin; Wang, Yan; Dong, Xiang-Mei

    2015-12-01

    The model of using colloidal magnetic fluid to build tunable negative-index photonic crystal is established. The effective permittivity ɛe and permeability μe of the two-dimensional photonic crystal are investigated in detail. For transverse magnetic polarization, both ɛe and μe exhibit a Lorentz-type anomalous dispersion, leading to a region where ɛe and μe are simultaneously negative. Then, considering a practical case, in which the thickness of photonic crystal is finite, the band structures for odd modes are calculated by the plane wave expansion method and the finite-difference time-domain method. The results suggest that reducing the external magnetic field strength or slab thickness will weaken the periodic modulation strength of the photonic crystal. Simulation results prove that the negative-index can be tuned by varying the external magnetic field strength or the slab thickness. The work presented in this paper gives a guideline for realizing the flat photonic crystal lens with tunable properties at optical frequencies, which may have potential applications in tunable near-field imaging systems. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB352001), the Shanghai Rising-Star Program, China (Grant No. 12QA1402300), the China Scholarship Council (CSC) Program, and the Basic Research Program of Shanghai, China (Grant No. 14ZR1428500).

  4. Dispersive photonic crystals from the plane wave method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara-Cabrera, E.; Palomino-Ovando, M. A.; Flores-Desirena, B.; Gaspar-Armenta, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays photonic crystals are widely used in many different applications. One of the most used methods to compute their band structure is the plane wave method (PWM). However, it can only be applied directly to non-dispersive media and be extended to systems with a few model dielectric functions. We explore an extension of the PWM to photonic crystals containing dispersive materials, that solves an eigenvalue equation for the Bloch wave vectors. First we compare our calculation with analytical results for one dimensional photonic crystals containing Si using experimental values of its optical parameters, and obtainig very well agreement, even for the spectrum region with strong absorption. Then, using the same method, we computed the band structure for a two dimensional photonic crystal without absorption, formed by an square array of MgO cylinders in air. The optical parameters for MgO were modeled with the Lorentz dielectric function. Finally, we studied an array of MgO cylinders in a metal, using Drude model without absorption, for the metal dielectric function. For this last case, we study the gap-midgap ratio as a function of the filling fraction for both the square and triangular lattice. The gap-midgap ratio is larger for the triangular lattice, with a maximum value of 10% for a filling fraction of 0.6. Our results show that the method can be applied to dispersive materials, and then to a wide range of applications where photonic crystals can be used.

  5. 3D holographic polymer photonic crystal for superprism application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiaqi; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Xiaonan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Sasa; Chen, Ray T.

    2007-02-01

    Photonic crystal based superprism offers a new way to design new optical components for beam steering and DWDM application. 3D photonic crystals are especially attractive as they could offer more control of the light beam based on the needs. A polygonal prism based holographic fabrication method has been demonstrated for a three-dimensional face-centered-cubic (FCC)-type submicron polymer photonic crystal using SU8 as the photo-sensitive material. Therefore antivibration equipment and complicated optical alignment system are not needed and the requirement for the coherence of the laser source is relaxed compared with the traditional holographic setup. By changing the top-cut prism structure, the polarization of the laser beam, the exposure and development conditions we can achieve different kinds of triclinic or orthorhombic photonic crystals on demand. Special fabrication treatments have been introduced to ensure the survivability of the fabricated large area (cm2) nano-structures. Scanning electron microscopy and diffraction results proved the good uniformity of the fabricated structures. With the proper design of the refraction prism we have achieved a partial bandgap for S+C band (1460-1565nm) in the [111] direction. The transmission and reflection spectra obtained by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) are in good agreement with simulated band structure. The superprism effects around 1550nm wavelength for the fabricated 3D polymer photonic crystal have been theoretically calculated and such effects can be used for beam steering purpose.

  6. Slow light in nonlinear photonic crystal coupled-cavity waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Na; Wang, Yige; Ren, Qingqing; Zhu, Li; Yuan, Minmin; An, Guimin

    2014-04-01

    Nonlinear photonic crystals can be formed by inserting Kerr-type nonlinear dielectric rods into perfect photonic crystals. Based on nonlinear photonic crystal, nonlinear photonic crystal coupled-cavity waveguide is constructed and its slow light properties are studied by using the Plane Wave expansion Method (PWM). Both single-defect coupled cavity and two-defect coupled cavity are proposed to optimize slow light properties. The result shows that using single-defect coupled cavity in waveguide is beneficial to obtain larger Normalized Delay-Bandwidth Product (NDBP) but it contributes little to decrease the group velocity of light and enlarging Q factor and delay time; While using two-defect cavity in waveguide can efficiently reduce the group velocity of light and enlarge Q factor and delay time. Compared to normal structures, our new designed nonlinear photonic crystal coupled cavity waveguide owns group velocity that is three magnitudes smaller than the vacuum speed of light. Delay time is of magnitude order of 10 ns and Q factor is of magnitude order of 1000, it means less loss and higher ability of storing energy.

  7. Phenomenological study of binding in optically trapped photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maystre, D.; Vincent, P.

    2007-08-01

    We describe a phenomenological theory of the phenomenon of binding observed both experimentally and numerically when particles are trapped by an interference system in order to make a structure close to a photonic crystal. This theory leads to a very simple conclusion, which links the binding phenomenon to the bottom of the lowest bandgap of the trapped crystal in a given direction. The phenomenological theory allows one to calculate the period of the trapped crystal by using numerical tools on dispersion diagrams of photonic crystals. It emerges that the agreement of our theory with our rigorous numerical results given in a previous paper [J. Opt A8, 1059 (2006)] is better than 2% on the crystal period. Furthermore, it is shown that in two-dimensional problems and s polarization, all the optical forces derive from a scalar potential.

  8. Nanoscale form dictates mesoscale function in plasmonic DNA–nanoparticle superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Michael B.; Ku, Jessie C.; Vaccarezza, Victoria M.; Schatz, George C.; Mirkin , Chad A.

    2015-08-28

    The nanoscale manipulation of matter allows properties to be created in a material that would be difficult or even impossible to achieve in the bulk state. Progress towards such functional nanoscale architectures requires the development of methods to precisely locate nanoscale objects in three dimensions and for the formation of rigorous structure–function relationships across multiple size regimes (beginning from the nanoscale). Here, we use DNA as a programmable ligand to show that two- and three-dimensional mesoscale superlattice crystals with precisely engineered optical properties can be assembled from the bottom up. The superlattices can transition from exhibiting the properties of the constituent plasmonic nanoparticles to adopting the photonic properties defined by the mesoscale crystal (here a rhombic dodecahedron) by controlling the spacing between the gold nanoparticle building blocks. Furthermore, we develop a generally applicable theoretical framework that illustrates how crystal habit can be a design consideration for controlling far-field extinction and light confinement in plasmonic metamaterial superlattices.

  9. Nonorthogonal FDTD simulations for photonic band structures, states density, and transmission/reflection of photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Zichun; Yang, Yang; Quan, Bisheng; Wang, Weibiao; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Chi, Yongjiang; Ma, Lingfang

    2005-01-01

    Photonic crystals have been widely studied in the fields of physics, material science and optical information technology. In general, the standard rectangular finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is used to predict the performances of photonic crystals. It is however very time consuming and inefficient. The current authors developed a software called GCFE, which is based on a non-orthogonal FDTD method. The software can be used to predict the photonic band structures, photonic states density and transmission and/or reflection coefficients for one-dimensional to three-dimensional photonic crystals. In the present paper, the derivations of the discrete Maxwell"s equations in time-domain and space-domain and the derivation of the discrete transfer matrix in real-space domain are briefly described firstly. In addition, the design idea and the functions of GCFE version 2.0.00 are introduced. Moreover, the band structures, transmission and reflection coefficients and photonic states density for the photonic crystal with cube lattice are calculated by our GCFE software, and numerical application results are also shown.

  10. Photonic crystals composed of virtual pillars with magnetic walls: Photonic band gaps and double Dirac cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong-Han; Kim, Soeun; Kee, Chul-Sik

    2016-08-01

    Photonic crystals composed of virtual pillars with magnetic walls are proposed. A virtual pillar with a magnetic wall can be created inside a parallel perfect electric conductor plate waveguide by introducing a circular perfect magnetic conductor patch in the upper perfect electric conductor plate of the waveguide. The virtual pillar mimics a perfect magnetic conductor pillar with a radius less than that of the circular patch because electromagnetic waves can slightly penetrate the wall. Furthermore, the photonic band structures of a triangular photonic crystal composed of virtual pillars for the transverse electromagnetic modes of the waveguide are investigated. They are very similar to those of a triangular photonic crystal composed of infinitely long perfect electric conductor cylinders for transverse magnetic modes. The similarity between the two different photonic crystals is well understood by the boundary conditions of perfect electric and magnetic conductor surfaces. A double Dirac cone at the center of the Brillouin zone is observed and thus the virtual pillar triangular photonic crystal can act a zero-refractive-index material at the Dirac point frequency.

  11. Photonic-crystal-based all-optical NOT logic gate.

    PubMed

    Singh, Brahm Raj; Rawal, Swati

    2015-12-01

    In the present paper, we have utilized the concept of photonic crystals for the implementation of an optical NOT gate inverter. The designed structure has a hexagonal arrangement of silicon rods in air substrate. The logic function is based on the phenomenon of the existence of the photonic bandgap and resulting guided modes in defect photonic crystal waveguides. We have plotted the transmission, extinction ratio, and tolerance analysis graphs for the structure, and it has been observed that the maximum output is obtained for a telecom wavelength of 1.554 μm. Dispersion curves are obtained using the plane wave expansion method, and the transmission is simulated using the finite element method. The proposed structure is applicable for photonic integrated circuits due to its simple structure and clear operating principle. PMID:26831380

  12. Excitation enhancement and extraction enhancement with photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, Ofer; Soljacic, Marin; Zhen, Bo; Chua, Song-Liang; Lee, Jeongwon; Joannopoulos, John

    2015-03-03

    Disclosed herein is a system for stimulating emission from at least one an emitter, such as a quantum dot or organic molecule, on the surface of a photonic crystal comprising a patterned dielectric substrate. Embodiments of this system include a laser or other source that illuminates the emitter and the photonic crystal, which is characterized by an energy band structure exhibiting a Fano resonance, from a first angle so as to stimulate the emission from the emitter at a second angle. The coupling between the photonic crystal and the emitter may result in spectral and angular enhancement of the emission through excitation and extraction enhancement. These enhancement mechanisms also reduce the emitter's lasing threshold. For instance, these enhancement mechanisms enable lasing of a 100 nm thick layer of diluted organic molecules solution with reduced threshold intensity. This reduction in lasing threshold enables more efficient organic light emitting devices and more sensitive molecular sensing.

  13. Compact Couplers for Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin; Lin, M.C.; Schwartz, Brian; Byer, Robert; McGuinness, Christopher; Colby, Eric; England, Robert; Noble, Robert; Spencer, James; /SLAC

    2012-07-02

    Photonic crystal waveguides are promising candidates for laser-driven accelerator structures because of their ability to confine a speed-of-light mode in an all-dielectric structure. Because of the difference between the group velocity of the waveguide mode and the particle bunch velocity, fields must be coupled into the accelerating waveguide at frequent intervals. Therefore efficient, compact couplers are critical to overall accelerator efficiency. We present designs and simulations of high-efficiency coupling to the accelerating mode in a three-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide from a waveguide adjoining it at 90{sup o}. We discuss details of the computation and the resulting transmission. We include some background on the accelerator structure and photonic crystal-based optical acceleration in general.

  14. Preparation, structural, and calorimetric characterization of bicomponent metallic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, M. E.; Murthy, N. S.; Udod, I.; Khayrullin, I. I.; Baughman, R. H.; Zakhidov, A. A.

    2007-03-01

    We report preparation and characterization of novel bicomponent metal-based photonic crystals having submicron three-dimensional (3D) periodicity. Fabricated photonic crystals include SiO2 sphere lattices infiltrated interstitially with metals, carbon inverse lattices filled with metal or metal alloy spheres, Sb inverse lattices, and Sb inverse lattices filled with Bi spheres. Starting from a face centered SiO2 lattice template, these materials were obtained by sequences of either templating and template extraction or templating, template extraction, and retemplating. Surprising high fidelity was obtained for all templating and template extraction steps. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to characterize the structure and the effects of the structure on calorimetric properties. To the best of our knowledge, SAXS data on metallic photonic crystals were collected for first time.

  15. Tuning and Freezing Disorder in Photonic Crystals using Percolation Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Ian B.; Abedzadeh, Navid; Kay, Theresa M.; Shneidman, Anna V.; Cranshaw, Derek J.; Lončar, Marko; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Although common in biological systems, synthetic self-assembly routes to complex 3D photonic structures with tailored degrees of disorder remain elusive. Here we show how liquids can be used to finely control disorder in porous 3D photonic crystals, leading to complex and hierarchical geometries. In these optofluidic crystals, dynamically tunable disorder is superimposed onto the periodic optical structure through partial wetting or evaporation. In both cases, macroscopic symmetry breaking is driven by subtle sub-wavelength variations in the pore geometry. These variations direct site-selective infiltration of liquids through capillary interactions. Incorporating cross-linkable resins into our liquids, we developed methods to freeze in place the filling patterns at arbitrary degrees of partial wetting and intermediate stages of drying. These percolation lithography techniques produced permanent photonic structures with adjustable disorder. By coupling strong changes in optical properties to subtle differences in fluid behavior, optofluidic crystals may also prove useful in rapid analysis of liquids.

  16. Photonic crystal fiber long-period gratings for biochemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rindorf, Lars; Jensen, Jesper B.; Dufva, Martin; Hagsholm Pedersen, Lars; Høiby, Poul Erik; Bang, Ole

    2006-09-01

    We present experimental results showing that long-period gratings in photonic crystal fibers can be used as sensitive biochemical sensors. A layer of biomolecules was immobilized on the sides of the holes of the photonic crystal fiber and by observing the shift in the resonant wavelength of a long-period grating it was possible to measure the thickness of the layer. The long-period gratings were inscribed in a large-mode area silica photonic crystal fiber with a CO2 laser. The thicknesses of a monolayer of poly-L-lysine and double-stranded DNA was measured using the device. We find that the grating has a sensitivity of approximately 1.4nm/1nm in terms of the shift in resonance wavelength in nm per nm thickness of biomolecule layer.

  17. Parametric Simulations of Slanted 1D Photonic Crystal Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer-Weil, Aaron; Almasoud, Naif Nasser; Abbasi, Badaruddin; Yetisen, Ali K.; Yun, Seok-Hyun; Butt, Haider

    2016-03-01

    Photonic crystals and band gap materials act as manipulators of light and have a plethora of applications. They are made up of stacks of alternating dielectric constants. This article shows the simulations of an inclined, one dimensional and tuneble photonic crystal, using numerical finite element methods. The photonic crystal was made up of silver nanoparticles embedded in a hydrogel matrix and it has the ability to change and recover its periodicity. A series of factors concerning the geometry of the lattice were tested in order to analyze the efficiency, performance and optimize the properties of the optical sensor. These factors range from the size of the nanoparticles and their density within the stacks, to observing the effect of diffraction angle in readouts.

  18. Parametric Simulations of Slanted 1D Photonic Crystal Sensors.

    PubMed

    Breuer-Weil, Aaron; Almasoud, Naif Nasser; Abbasi, Badaruddin; Yetisen, Ali K; Yun, Seok-Hyun; Butt, Haider

    2016-12-01

    Photonic crystals and band gap materials act as manipulators of light and have a plethora of applications. They are made up of stacks of alternating dielectric constants. This article shows the simulations of an inclined, one dimensional and tuneble photonic crystal, using numerical finite element methods. The photonic crystal was made up of silver nanoparticles embedded in a hydrogel matrix and it has the ability to change and recover its periodicity. A series of factors concerning the geometry of the lattice were tested in order to analyze the efficiency, performance and optimize the properties of the optical sensor. These factors range from the size of the nanoparticles and their density within the stacks, to observing the effect of diffraction angle in readouts. PMID:27000025

  19. Optical modulator based on coupled photonic crystal cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafimovich, Pavel G.; Kazanskiy, Nikolay L.

    2016-07-01

    We propose and numerically investigate an optical signal modulator based on two-photonic crystal nanobeam cavities coupled through a waveguide. The suggested modulator shifts the resonant frequency over a scalable range. We design a compact optical modulator based on photonic crystal nanobeams cavities that exhibits high stability to manufacturing. Photonic crystal waveguide tuning in the low-intensity region of the resonant mode is demonstrated. The advantages of the suggested approach over the single-resonator optical modulator approaches include the possibilities to shift the modulator frequency over a scalable range that depends on switching energy level and to effectively electrically tune the device in the low-intensity region of the resonant mode.

  20. Tuning and Freezing Disorder in Photonic Crystals using Percolation Lithography

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Ian B.; Abedzadeh, Navid; Kay, Theresa M.; Shneidman, Anna V.; Cranshaw, Derek J.; Lončar, Marko; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Although common in biological systems, synthetic self-assembly routes to complex 3D photonic structures with tailored degrees of disorder remain elusive. Here we show how liquids can be used to finely control disorder in porous 3D photonic crystals, leading to complex and hierarchical geometries. In these optofluidic crystals, dynamically tunable disorder is superimposed onto the periodic optical structure through partial wetting or evaporation. In both cases, macroscopic symmetry breaking is driven by subtle sub-wavelength variations in the pore geometry. These variations direct site-selective infiltration of liquids through capillary interactions. Incorporating cross-linkable resins into our liquids, we developed methods to freeze in place the filling patterns at arbitrary degrees of partial wetting and intermediate stages of drying. These percolation lithography techniques produced permanent photonic structures with adjustable disorder. By coupling strong changes in optical properties to subtle differences in fluid behavior, optofluidic crystals may also prove useful in rapid analysis of liquids. PMID:26790372

  1. High-Q silicon carbide photonic-crystal cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jonathan Y.; Lu, Xiyuan; Lin, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate one-dimensional photonic-crystal nanobeam cavities in amorphous silicon carbide. The fundamental mode exhibits intrinsic optical quality factor as high as 7.69 × 104 with mode volume ˜ 0.60 ( λ / n ) 3 at wavelength 1.5 μm. A corresponding Purcell factor value of ˜104 is the highest reported to date in silicon carbide optical cavities. The device exhibits great potential for integrated nonlinear photonics and cavity nano-optomechanics.

  2. Enhanced live cell imaging via photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weili; Long, Kenneth D; Yu, Hojeong; Tan, Yafang; Choi, Ji Sun; Harley, Brendan A; Cunningham, Brian T

    2014-11-21

    We demonstrate photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence (PCEF) microscopy as a surface-specific fluorescence imaging technique to study the adhesion of live cells by visualizing variations in cell-substrate gap distance. This approach utilizes a photonic crystal surface incorporated into a standard microscope slide as the substrate for cell adhesion, and a microscope integrated with a custom illumination source as the detection instrument. When illuminated with a monochromatic light source, angle-specific optical resonances supported by the photonic crystal enable efficient excitation of surface-confined and amplified electromagnetic fields when excited at an on-resonance condition, while no field enhancement occurs when the same photonic crystal is illuminated in an off-resonance state. By mapping the fluorescence enhancement factor for fluorophore-tagged cellular components between on- and off-resonance states and comparing the results to numerical calculations, the vertical distance of labelled cellular components from the photonic crystal substrate can be estimated, providing critical and quantitative information regarding the spatial distribution of the specific components of cells attaching to a surface. As an initial demonstration of the concept, 3T3 fibroblast cells were grown on fibronectin-coated photonic crystals with fluorophore-labelled plasma membrane or nucleus. We demonstrate that PCEF microscopy is capable of providing information about the spatial distribution of cell-surface interactions at the single-cell level that is not available from other existing forms of microscopy, and that the approach is amenable to large fields of view, without the need for coupling prisms, coupling fluids, or special microscope objectives. PMID:25265458

  3. Enhanced live cell imaging via photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence microscopy†

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weili; Long, Kenneth D.; Yu, Hojeong; Tan, Yafang; Choi, Ji Sun; Harley, Brendan A.; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence (PCEF) microscopy as a surface-specific fluorescence imaging technique to study the adhesion of live cells by visualizing variations in cell-substrate gap distance. This approach utilizes a photonic crystal surface incorporated into a standard microscope slide as the substrate for cell adhesion, and a microscope integrated with a custom illumination source as the detection instrument. When illuminated with a monochromatic light source, angle-specific optical resonances supported by the photonic crystal enable efficient excitation of surface-confined and amplified electromagnetic fields when excited at an on-resonance condition, while no field enhancement occurs when the same photonic crystal is illuminated in an off-resonance state. By mapping the fluorescence enhancement factor for fluorophore-tagged cellular components between on- and off-resonance states and comparing the results to numerical calculations, the vertical distance of labelled cellular components from the photonic crystal substrate can be estimated, providing critical and quantitative information regarding the spatial distribution of the specific components of cells attaching to a surface. As an initial demonstration of the concept, 3T3 fibroblast cells were grown on fibronectin-coated photonic crystals with fluorophore-labelled plasma membrane or nucleus. We demonstrate that PCEF microscopy is capable of providing information about the spatial distribution of cell-surface interactions at the single-cell level that is not available from other existing forms of microscopy, and that the approach is amenable to large fields of view, without the need for coupling prisms, coupling fluids, or special microscope objectives. PMID:25265458

  4. Photonic crystals from multiply-coated spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Che Ting

    2000-03-01

    We show theoretically and experimentally that photonic band gaps can be realized using metal or metal-coated spheres as building blocks. Robust photonic gaps exist in any periodic structure built from such spheres when the filling ratio of the spheres exceeds a threshold, and they are not sensitive to the symmetry or the global long range order, with stacking faults cause almost no degradation. Good agreement between theory and experiment is obtained in the microwave regime. The gaps persist even in a random packing of such spheres. Calculations show that the approach can be scaled up to IR and optical frequencies.

  5. Confinement effects on Brillouin scattering in semiconductor nanowire photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mante, Pierre-Adrien; Anttu, Nicklas; Zhang, Wei; Wallentin, Jesper; Chen, I.-Ju; Lehmann, Sebastian; Heurlin, Magnus; Borgström, Magnus T.; Pistol, Mats-Erik; Yartsev, Arkady

    2016-07-01

    Scattering of photons by phonons, or Brillouin scattering, enables manipulation and control of light and has led to revolutionary applications, from slow light to saser and cooling of micromechanical resonators. Recently, enhanced light and sound interaction has been demonstrated in waveguides. However, the design of the waveguide geometry tunes and alters the phonon and photon dispersion simultaneously. Here we investigate, through femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy and theoretical modeling, the light and sound interaction in a bottom-up fabricated vertical nanowire photonic crystal. In such a system, the phonon dispersion can be tuned by varying the geometry of the constituent nanowires. In contrast, the placement of the nanowires in the photonic crystal can be used for tuning optical array modes, without altering the phonon dispersion. We demonstrate the forward and backward scattering, by acoustic phonons in the nanowires, of (1) such optical array modes and (2) guided modes of the constituent nanowires. Furthermore, our results reveal an enhanced interaction of array modes with phonons that we attribute to the specific scattering mechanism. Our results enable the design of a photonic crystal with separately tailored photon and phonon dispersion for Brillouin scattering. We anticipate these advances to be a starting point for enhanced control of light at the nanoscale.

  6. Polarized quantum dot emission in electrohydrodynamic jet printed photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    See, Gloria G.; Xu, Lu; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Sutanto, Erick; Alleyne, Andrew G.; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2015-08-03

    Tailored optical output, such as color purity and efficient optical intensity, are critical considerations for displays, particularly in mobile applications. To this end, we demonstrate a replica molded photonic crystal structure with embedded quantum dots. Electrohydrodynamic jet printing is used to control the position of the quantum dots within the device structure. This results in significantly less waste of the quantum dot material than application through drop-casting or spin coating. In addition, the targeted placement of the quantum dots minimizes any emission outside of the resonant enhancement field, which enables an 8× output enhancement and highly polarized emission from the photonic crystal structure.

  7. Absorption and emission properties of photonic crystals and metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Lili

    2007-08-03

    We study the emission and absorption properties of photonic crystals and metamaterials using Comsol Multiphysics and Ansoft HFSS as simulation tools. We calculate the emission properties of metallic designs using drude model and the results illustrate that an appropriate termination of the surface of the metallic structure can significantly increase the absorption and therefore the thermal emissivity. We investigate the spontaneous emission rate modifications that occur for emitters inside two-dimensional photonic crystals and find the isotropic and directional emissions with respect to different frequencies as we have expected.

  8. Polarization-independent waveguiding with annular photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Cicek, Ahmet; Ulug, Bulent

    2009-09-28

    A linear waveguide in an annular photonic crystal composed of a square array of annular dielectric rods in air is demonstrated to guide transverse electric and transverse magnetic modes simultaneously. Overlapping of the guided bands in the full band gap of the photonic crystal is shown to be achieved through an appropriate set of geometric parameters. Results of Finite-Difference Time-Domain simulations to demonstrate polarization-independent waveguiding with low loss and wavelength-order confinement are presented. Transmission through a 90 degrees bend is also demonstrated. PMID:19907629

  9. Crystallization of spin superlattices with pressure and field in the layered magnet SrCu2(BO3)2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Haravifard, S.; Graf, D.; Feiguin, A. E.; Batista, C. D.; Lang, J. C.; Silevitch, D. M.; Srajer, G.; Gaulin, B. D.; Dabkowska, H. A.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2016-06-20

    An exact mapping between quantum spins and boson gases provides fresh approaches to the creation of quantum condensates and crystals. Here we report on magnetization measurements on the dimerized quantum magnet SrCu2(BO3)2 at cryogenic temperatures and through a quantum-phase transition that demonstrate the emergence of fractionally filled bosonic crystals in mesoscopic patterns, specified by a sequence of magnetization plateaus. We apply tens of Teslas of magnetic field to tune the density of bosons and gigapascals of hydrostatic pressure to regulate the underlying interactions. Simulations help parse the balance between energy and geometry in the emergent spin superlattices. In conclusion, themore » magnetic crystallites are the end result of a progression from a direct product of singlet states in each short dimer at zero field to preferred filling fractions of spin-triplet bosons in each dimer at large magnetic field, enriching the known possibilities for collective states in both quantum spin and atomic systems.« less

  10. Direct fiber-coupled single photon source based on a photonic crystal waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Byeong-Hyeon Lee, Chang-Min; Lim, Hee-Jin; Schlereth, Thomas W.; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven; Lee, Yong-Hee

    2015-08-24

    A single photon source plays a key role in quantum applications such as quantum computers and quantum communications. Epitaxially grown quantum dots are one of the promising platforms to implement a good single photon source. However, it is challenging to realize an efficient single photon source based on semiconductor materials due to their high refractive index. Here we demonstrate a direct fiber coupled single photon source with high collection efficiency by employing a photonic crystal (PhC) waveguide and a tapered micro-fiber. To confirm the single photon nature, the second-order correlation function g{sup (2)}(τ) is measured with a Hanbury Brown-Twiss setup. The measured g{sup (2)}(0) value is 0.15, and we can estimate 24% direct collection efficiency from a quantum dot to the fiber.

  11. Three-dimensional metallic photonic crystals with optical bandgaps.

    PubMed

    Vasilantonakis, Nikos; Terzaki, Konstantina; Sakellari, Ioanna; Purlys, Vytautas; Gray, David; Soukoulis, Costas M; Vamvakaki, Maria; Kafesaki, Maria; Farsari, Maria

    2012-02-21

    The fabrication of fully three-dimensional photonic crystals with a bandgap at optical wavelengths is demonstrated by way of direct femtosecond laser writing of an organic-inorganic hybrid material with metal-binding moieties, and selective silver coating using electroless plating. The crystals have 600-nm intralayer periodicity and sub-100 nm features, and they exhibit well-defined diffraction patterns. PMID:22278944

  12. Improving image quality and stability of two-dimensional photonic crystal slab by changing surface structure of the photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhao-Jie; Liu, Peng-Fang; Tong, Yuan-Wei

    2016-03-01

    The propagation of electromagnetic (EM) waves in two-dimensional hexagon-lattice photonic crystals (PCs) is investigated through dispersion characteristics analysis and numerical simulation of field pattern. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the image reach 0.37λ which is much smaller than 0.5λ by changing surface structure of the photonic crystal, and the variance of FWHM of image focused by the changed slab seems to be less than the variance of FWHM of image focused by the original slab with the changing of source position.

  13. Dual concentric crystal low energy photon detector

    DOEpatents

    Guilmette, R.A.

    A photon detector for biological samples includes a block of NaI(T1) having a hole containing a thin walled cylinder of CsI(T1). At least three photo multiplier tubes are evenly spaced around the parameter of the block. Biological samples are placed within the hole, and emissions which are sensed by at least two of the photo multipliers from only the NaI(T1) detector are counted.

  14. Photonic crystal with left-handed components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markoš, Peter

    2016-02-01

    We show that the periodic array of left-handed cylinders possesses a rich spectrum of guided modes when the negative permeability of cylinders equals exactly to minus value of permeability of embedding media. These resonances strongly influence propagation of electromagnetic waves through photonic structures made from left-handed materials. A series of Fano resonances excited by incident wave destroys the band frequency spectrum of square array of left-handed cylinders and increases considerably the absorption of transmitted waves.

  15. Tunable photonic structures based on silicon and liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perova, Tatiana S.; Tolmachev, Vladimir A.; Astrova, Ekaterina V.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is focused on the design, fabrication and characterization of the conventional and tunable photonic devices based on grooved silicon, serving as one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal. The advantages of these photonic structures are as follows: the large refractive index contrast, in-plane moulding of the light flow, the possibility to fabricate a composite photonic structures by filling the grooves with a different compounds and compatibility with current semiconductor processing techniques. The optical properties of grooved Si structures were simulated using a transfer matrix method and gap map method and have been verified experimentally using FTIR microscopy. The air spaces in the basic silicon-air matrices were infiltrated with nematic liquid crystal E7. It is shown that the optical properties of the obtained composite 1D photonic crystals can be tuned by means of electro- and thermo-optical effects. Such a structures suit well for the various elements of the integrated optics and can serve as a building blocks for optical interconnects.

  16. Silicon photonic crystal thermal emitter at near-infrared wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    O’Regan, Bryan J.; Wang, Yue; Krauss, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Controlling thermal emission with resonant photonic nanostructures has recently attracted much attention. Most of the work has concentrated on the mid-infrared wavelength range and/or was based on metallic nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate the experimental operation of a resonant thermal emitter operating in the near-infrared (≈1.5 μm) wavelength range. The emitter is based on a doped silicon photonic crystal consisting of a two dimensional square array of holes and using silicon-on-insulator technology with a device-layer thickness of 220 nm. The device is resistively heated by passing current through the photonic crystal membrane. At a temperature of ≈1100 K, we observe relatively sharp emission peaks with a Q factor around 18. A support structure system is implemented in order to achieve a large area suspended photonic crystal thermal emitter and electrical injection. The device demonstrates that weak absorption together with photonic resonances can be used as a wavelength-selection mechanism for thermal emitters, both for the enhancement and the suppression of emission. PMID:26293111

  17. Silicon photonic crystal thermal emitter at near-infrared wavelengths.

    PubMed

    O'Regan, Bryan J; Wang, Yue; Krauss, Thomas F

    2015-01-01

    Controlling thermal emission with resonant photonic nanostructures has recently attracted much attention. Most of the work has concentrated on the mid-infrared wavelength range and/or was based on metallic nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate the experimental operation of a resonant thermal emitter operating in the near-infrared (≈1.5 μm) wavelength range. The emitter is based on a doped silicon photonic crystal consisting of a two dimensional square array of holes and using silicon-on-insulator technology with a device-layer thickness of 220 nm. The device is resistively heated by passing current through the photonic crystal membrane. At a temperature of ≈1100 K, we observe relatively sharp emission peaks with a Q factor around 18. A support structure system is implemented in order to achieve a large area suspended photonic crystal thermal emitter and electrical injection. The device demonstrates that weak absorption together with photonic resonances can be used as a wavelength-selection mechanism for thermal emitters, both for the enhancement and the suppression of emission. PMID:26293111

  18. Analysis of tunable photonic band structure in an extrinsic plasma photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Tzu-Chyang; Yang, Chih-Chiang; Hsieh, Pei-Hung; Chang, Tsung-Wen; Wu, Chien-Jang

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we theoretically investigate the tunable photonic band structure (PBS) for an extrinsic plasma photonic crystal (PPC). The extrinsic PPC is made of a bulk cold plasma layer which is influenced by an externally periodic static magnetic field. The PBS can be tuned by the variation of the magnitude of externally applied magnetic field. In addition, we also show that the PBS can be changed as a function of the electron density as well as the thickness variation.

  19. Multicolor fluorescence enhancement from a photonics crystal surface

    PubMed Central

    Pokhriyal, A.; Lu, M.; Huang, C. S.; Schulz, S.; Cunningham, B. T.

    2010-01-01

    A photonic crystal substrate exhibiting resonant enhancement of multiple fluorophores has been demonstrated. The device, fabricated uniformly from plastic materials over a ∼3×5 in.2 surface area by nanoreplica molding, utilizes two distinct resonant modes to enhance electric field stimulation of a dye excited by a λ=632.8 nm laser (cyanine-5) and a dye excited by a λ=532 nm laser (cyanine-3). Resonant coupling of the laser excitation to the photonic crystal surface is obtained for each wavelength at a distinct incident angle. Compared to detection of a dye-labeled protein on an ordinary glass surface, the photonic crystal surface exhibited a 32× increase in fluorescent signal intensity for cyanine-5 conjugated streptavidin labeling, while a 25× increase was obtained for cyanine-3 conjugated streptavidin labeling. The photonic crystal is capable of amplifying the output of any fluorescent dye with an excitation wavelength in the 532 nm<λ<633 nm range by selection of an appropriate incident angle. The device is designed for biological assays that utilize multiple fluorescent dyes within a single imaged area, such as gene expression microarrays. PMID:20957067

  20. Multicolor fluorescence enhancement from a photonics crystal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhriyal, A.; Lu, M.; Huang, C. S.; Schulz, S.; Cunningham, B. T.

    2010-09-01

    A photonic crystal substrate exhibiting resonant enhancement of multiple fluorophores has been demonstrated. The device, fabricated uniformly from plastic materials over a ˜3×5 in.2 surface area by nanoreplica molding, utilizes two distinct resonant modes to enhance electric field stimulation of a dye excited by a λ =632.8 nm laser (cyanine-5) and a dye excited by a λ =532 nm laser (cyanine-3). Resonant coupling of the laser excitation to the photonic crystal surface is obtained for each wavelength at a distinct incident angle. Compared to detection of a dye-labeled protein on an ordinary glass surface, the photonic crystal surface exhibited a 32× increase in fluorescent signal intensity for cyanine-5 conjugated streptavidin labeling, while a 25× increase was obtained for cyanine-3 conjugated streptavidin labeling. The photonic crystal is capable of amplifying the output of any fluorescent dye with an excitation wavelength in the 532 nm<λ<633 nm range by selection of an appropriate incident angle. The device is designed for biological assays that utilize multiple fluorescent dyes within a single imaged area, such as gene expression microarrays.

  1. Hollow core photonic crystal fiber based viscometer with Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Horan, L E; Ruth, A A; Gunning, F C Garcia

    2012-12-14

    The velocity of a liquid flowing through the core of a hollow core photonic crystal fiber (driven by capillary forces) is used for the determination of a liquid's viscosity, using volumes of less than 10 nl. The simple optical technique used is based on the change in propagation characteristics of the fiber as it fills with the liquid of interest via capillary action, monitored by a laser source. Furthermore, the liquid filled hollow core photonic crystal fiber is then used as a vessel to collect Raman scattering from the sample to determine the molecular fingerprint of the liquid under study. This approach has a wide variety of indicative uses in cases where nano-liter samples are necessary. We use 10-12 cm lengths of hollow core photonic crystal fibers to determine the viscosity and Raman spectra of small volumes of two types of monosaccharides diluted in a phosphate buffer solution to demonstrate the principle. The observed Raman signal is strongest when only the core of the hollow core photonic crystal fiber is filled, and gradually decays as the rest of the fiber fills with the sample. PMID:23249014

  2. Vector–vortex solitons in nonlinear photonic crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgueiro, José R.

    2016-07-01

    In this article, I study a system of two incoherently coupled components in a nonlinear Kerr-type photonic crystal fiber presenting angular momentum in one or both components. I classify the different families of solutions and study their bifurcations in the power dispersion diagram. Finally, I analyze the stability of the different nonlinear modes by means of numerical simulations.

  3. Design and modeling of a photonic crystal fiber gas sensor.

    PubMed

    Hoo, Yeuk L; Jin, Wei; Shi, Chunzheng; Ho, Hoi L; Wang, Dong N; Ruan, Shuang C

    2003-06-20

    We report the modeling results of an all-fiber gas detector that uses photonic crystal fiber (PCF). The relative sensitivity of the PCF as a function of the fiber parameters is calculated. Gas-diffusion dynamics that affect the sensor response time is investigated theoretically and experimentally. A practical PCF sensor aiming for high sensitivity gas detection is proposed. PMID:12833952

  4. [INVITED] New perspectives in photonic crystal fibre sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villatoro, Joel; Zubia, Joseba

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we analyse the recent advances on sensors based on photonic crystal fibres(PCFs) and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. Some innovative approaches to overcome the main limitations of PCF sensors are also analysed. In addition, we discuss some opportunities and challenges in PCF sensing for the coming years.

  5. Three dimensional reflectance properties of plasma dielectric photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, G. N.; Pandey, J. P.; Mishra, A. K.; Ojha, S. P.

    2016-05-01

    In this present communication, we study the three dimentionalomni-directional reflection bands in Plasma Photonic Crystals (PPC), having alternate regions of plasma-dielectric. We have calculated the reflectivity of the proposed structure at the various angles of incidence for both polarizations (TE - & TM) in three dimensions.

  6. Reflection properties of one dimensional plasma photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Arun; Khundrakpam, Pinky; Sharma, Priyanka

    2013-06-01

    In this paper band structure and reflection properties of on one-dimensional plasma photonic crystal (PPC) containing alternate layers of dielectric and micro-plasma have been presented. For the purpose of computation, transfer matrix method has been used. It is found that width of the forbidden band gap(s) can be increased by increasing the thickness of plasma layers.

  7. Hollow core photonic crystal fiber based viscometer with Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horan, L. E.; Ruth, A. A.; Garcia Gunning, F. C.

    2012-12-01

    The velocity of a liquid flowing through the core of a hollow core photonic crystal fiber (driven by capillary forces) is used for the determination of a liquid's viscosity, using volumes of less than 10 nl. The simple optical technique used is based on the change in propagation characteristics of the fiber as it fills with the liquid of interest via capillary action, monitored by a laser source. Furthermore, the liquid filled hollow core photonic crystal fiber is then used as a vessel to collect Raman scattering from the sample to determine the molecular fingerprint of the liquid under study. This approach has a wide variety of indicative uses in cases where nano-liter samples are necessary. We use 10-12 cm lengths of hollow core photonic crystal fibers to determine the viscosity and Raman spectra of small volumes of two types of monosaccharides diluted in a phosphate buffer solution to demonstrate the principle. The observed Raman signal is strongest when only the core of the hollow core photonic crystal fiber is filled, and gradually decays as the rest of the fiber fills with the sample.

  8. Transverse magnetic field impact on waveguide modes of photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Sylgacheva, Daria; Khokhlov, Nikolai; Kalish, Andrey; Dagesyan, Sarkis; Prokopov, Anatoly; Shaposhnikov, Alexandr; Berzhansky, Vladimir; Nur-E-Alam, Mohammad; Vasiliev, Mikhail; Alameh, Kamal; Belotelov, Vladimir

    2016-08-15

    This Letter presents a theoretical and experimental study of waveguide modes of one-dimensional magneto-photonic crystals magnetized in the in-plane direction. It is shown that the propagation constants of the TM waveguide modes are sensitive to the transverse magnetization and the spectrum of the transverse magneto-optical Kerr effect has resonant features at mode excitation frequencies. Two types of structures are considered: a non-magnetic photonic crystal with an additional magnetic layer on top and a magneto-photonic crystal with a magnetic layer within each period. We found that the magneto-optical non-reciprocity effect is greater in the first case: it has a magnitude of δ∼10-4, while the second structure type demonstrates δ∼10-5 only, due to the higher asymmetry of the claddings of the magnetic layer. Experimental observations show resonant features in the optical and magneto-optical Kerr effect spectra. The measured dispersion properties are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions. An amplitude of light intensity modulation of up to 2.5% was observed for waveguide mode excitation within the magnetic top layer of the non-magnetic photonic crystal structure. The presented theoretical approach may be utilized for the design of magneto-optical sensors and modulators requiring pre-determined spectral features. PMID:27519096

  9. Ultrafast optics in dispersion-flattened photonic crystal fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, W. H.; Knight, J. C.; Russell, P. S. J.; Skryabin, D. V.; Omenetto, F. G.; Efimov, A. V.; Taylor, Antoinette J.,

    2002-01-01

    llOfs pulses at 1550nm wavelength were launched in to various ultra flattened dispersion photonic crystal fibers. For output powers of around 100mW spectral components were generated in a range greater than 350-22OOnm.

  10. Ultraflat supercontinuum generation in soft-glass photonic crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miret, J. J.; Silvestre, E.; Andrés, P.

    2009-05-01

    We recognize some photonic-crystal-fiber structures, made up of soft glass, that generate ultrawide (over an octave), very smooth and highly coherent supercontinuum spectrum when illuminated with femtosecond pulsed light around 1.55 μm. The design of soft-glass microstructured fiber geometry with nearly ultraflattened, positive and low dispersion is crucial to accomplish the above goals.

  11. Thermal properties photonic crystal fiber transducers with ferromagnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybysz, N.; Marć, P.; Kisielewska, A.; Jaroszewicz, L. R.

    2015-12-01

    The main aim of the research is to design new types of fiber optic transducers based on filled photonic crystal fibers for sensor applications. In our research we propose to use as a filling material nanoparticles' ferrofluids (Fe3O4 NPs). Optical properties of such transducers are studied by measurements of spectral characteristics' changes when transducers are exposed to temperature and magnetic field changes. From synthesized ferrofluid several mixtures with different NPs' concentrations were prepared. Partially filled commercially available photonic crystal fiber LMA 10 (NKT Photonics) was used to design PCF transducers. Their thermo-optic properties were tested in a temperature chamber. Taking into account magnetic properties of synthetized NPs the patch cords based on a partially filled PM 1550 PCF were measured.

  12. Photonic crystal surface-emitting lasers enabled by an accidental Dirac point

    SciTech Connect

    Chua, Song Liang; Lu, Ling; Soljacic, Marin

    2014-12-02

    A photonic-crystal surface-emitting laser (PCSEL) includes a gain medium electromagnetically coupled to a photonic crystal whose energy band structure exhibits a Dirac cone of linear dispersion at the center of the photonic crystal's Brillouin zone. This Dirac cone's vertex is called a Dirac point; because it is at the Brillouin zone center, it is called an accidental Dirac point. Tuning the photonic crystal's band structure (e.g., by changing the photonic crystal's dimensions or refractive index) to exhibit an accidental Dirac point increases the photonic crystal's mode spacing by orders of magnitudes and reduces or eliminates the photonic crystal's distributed in-plane feedback. Thus, the photonic crystal can act as a resonator that supports single-mode output from the PCSEL over a larger area than is possible with conventional PCSELs, which have quadratic band edge dispersion. Because output power generally scales with output area, this increase in output area results in higher possible output powers.

  13. Light trapping in thin film solar cells using textured photonic crystal

    DOEpatents

    Yi, Yasha; Kimerling, Lionel C.; Duan, Xiaoman; Zeng, Lirong

    2009-01-27

    A solar cell includes a photoactive region that receives light. A photonic crystal is coupled to the photoactive region, wherein the photonic crystal comprises a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) for trapping the light.

  14. Ultra-refractive and extended-range one-dimensional photonic crystal superprisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, D. Z. Y.

    2003-01-01

    We describe theoretical analysis and design of one-dimensional photonic crystal prisms. We found that inside the photonic crystal, for frequencies near the band edges, light propagation direction is extremely sensitive to the variations in wavelength and incident angle.

  15. Enhanced trion emission from colloidal quantum dots with photonic crystals by two-photon excitation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xingsheng

    2013-01-01

    For colloidal quantum dots, the ongoing biggest problem is their fluorescence blinking. Until now, there is no generally accepted model for this fluorescence blinking. Here, two-photon excited fluorescence from CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals on silicon nitride photonic crystals is studied using a femtosecond laser. From analysis of the spectra and decay processes, most of the relative trion efficiency is larger than 10%, and the largest relative trion efficiency reaches 46.7%. The photonic crystals enhance the trion emission of CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals, where the enhancement is due to the coupling of the trion emission to the leaky mode of the photonic crystal slab. Moreover, the photonic crystals enhance the Auger-assisted trapping efficiency of electrons/holes to surface states, and then enhance the efficiency of the generations of charge separation and DC electric field, which modifies the trion spectrum. Therefore, a model is present for explaining the mechanism of fluorescence blinking including the effect of the environment. PMID:24231669

  16. Nano-photonic organic solar cell architecture for advanced light management utilizing dual photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peer, Akshit; Biswas, Rana

    2015-09-01

    Organic solar cells have rapidly increasing efficiencies, but typically absorb less than half of the incident solar spectrum. To increase broadband light absorption, we rigorously design experimentally realizable solar cell architectures based on dual photonic crystals. Our optimized architecture consists of a polymer microlens at the air-glass interface, coupled with a photonic-plasmonic crystal at the metal cathode. The microlens focuses light on the periodic nanostructure that generates strong light diffraction. Waveguiding modes and surface plasmon modes together enhance long wavelength absorption in P3HT-PCBM. The architecture has a period of 500 nm, with absorption and photocurrent enhancement of 49% and 58%, respectively.

  17. Invited Review Article: Development of crystal lenses for energetic photons

    SciTech Connect

    Smither, Robert K.

    2014-08-15

    This paper follows the development of crystal diffraction lenses designed to focus energetic photons. It begins with the search for a solution to the astrophysics problem of how to detect weak astrophysics sources of gamma rays and x-rays. This led to the basic designs for a lens and to the understanding of basic limitations of lens design. The discussion of the development of crystal diffraction lenses is divided into two parts: lenses using crystals with mosaic structure, and lenses that use crystals with curved crystal planes. This second group divides into two sub-groups: (1) Curved crystals that are used to increase the acceptance angle of the diffraction of a monochromatic beam and to increase the energy bandwidth of the diffraction. (2) Curved crystals used to focus gamma ray beams. The paper describes how these two types of crystals affect the design of the corresponding crystal lenses in different fields: astrophysics, medical imaging, detection of weak, distant, gamma-ray sources, etc. The designs of crystal lenses for these applications are given in enough detail to allow the reader to design a lens for his own application.

  18. Photon irradiation response of photonic crystal fibres and flat fibres at radiation therapy doses.

    PubMed

    Hashim, S; Ibrahim, S A; Che Omar, S S; Alajerami, Y S M; Saripan, M I; Noor, N M; Ung, N M; Mahdiraji, G A; Bradley, D A; Alzimami, K

    2014-08-01

    Radiation effects of photon irradiation in pure Photonic Crystal Fibres (PCF) and Flat fibres (FF) are still much less investigated in thermoluminescense dosimetry (TLD). We have reported the TL response of PCF and FF subjected to 6 MV photon irradiation. The proposed dosimeter shows good linearity at doses ranging from 1 to 4 Gy. The small size of these detectors points to its use as a dosimeter at megavoltage energies, where better tissue-equivalence and the Bragg-Gray cavity theory prevails. PMID:24858954

  19. Plasmonic photonic crystals realized through DNA-programmable assembly

    PubMed Central

    Park, Daniel J.; Zhang, Chuan; Ku, Jessie C.; Zhou, Yu; Schatz, George C.; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional dielectric photonic crystals have well-established enhanced light–matter interactions via high Q factors. Their plasmonic counterparts based on arrays of nanoparticles, however, have not been experimentally well explored owing to a lack of available synthetic routes for preparing them. However, such structures should facilitate these interactions based on the small mode volumes associated with plasmonic polarization. Herein we report strong light-plasmon interactions within 3D plasmonic photonic crystals that have lattice constants and nanoparticle diameters that can be independently controlled in the deep subwavelength size regime by using a DNA-programmable assembly technique. The strong coupling within such crystals is probed with backscattering spectra, and the mode splitting (0.10 and 0.24 eV) is defined based on dispersion diagrams. Numerical simulations predict that the crystal photonic modes (Fabry–Perot modes) can be enhanced by coating the crystals with a silver layer, achieving moderate Q factors (∼102) over the visible and near-infrared spectrum. PMID:25548175

  20. Free-Standing Photonic Crystal Films with Gradient Structural Colors.

    PubMed

    Ding, Haibo; Liu, Cihui; Ye, Baofen; Fu, Fanfan; Wang, Huan; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2016-03-23

    Hydrogel colloidal crystal composite materials have a demonstrated value in responsive photonic crystals (PhCs) via controllable stimuli. Although they have been successfully exploited to generate a gradient of color distribution, the soft hydrogels have limitations in terms of stability and storage caused by dependence on environment. Here, we present a practical strategy to fabricate free-standing PhC films with a stable gradient of structural colors using binary polymer networks. A colloidal crystal hydrogel film was prepared for this purpose, with continuously varying photonic band gaps corresponding to the gradient of the press. Then, a second polymer network was used to lock the inside non-close-packed PhC structures and color distribution of the hydrogel film. It was demonstrated that our strategy could bring about a solution to the angle-dependent structural colors of the PhC films by coating the surface with special microstructures. PMID:26962967

  1. Density of photonic states in cholesteric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolganov, P. V.

    2015-04-01

    Density of photonic states ρ (ω ) , group vg, and phase vph velocity of light, and the dispersion relation between wave vector k , and frequency ω (k ) were determined in a cholesteric photonic crystal. A highly sensitive method (measurement of rotation of the plane of polarization of light) was used to determine ρ (ω ) in samples of different quality. In high-quality samples a drastic increase in ρ (ω ) near the boundaries of the stop band and oscillations related to Pendellösung beatings are observed. In low-quality samples photonic properties are strongly modified. The maximal value of ρ (ω ) is substantially smaller, and density of photonic states increases near the selective reflection band without oscillations in ρ (ω ) . Peculiarities of ρ (ω ) , vg, and ω (k ) are discussed. Comparison of the experimental results with theory was performed.

  2. Demonstration of superprism effect in silicon pillar 2-D photonic crystal infiltrated with liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroni, Pierre-Yves; Paeder, Vincent; Chang, Yu-Chi; Roussey, Matthieu; Herzig, Hans Peter; Nakagawa, Wataru

    2011-01-01

    Superprism-based deflection of an optical beam is observed in a photonic crystal composed of a triangular lattice of pillars infiltrated with a liquid crystal. The device is based on a Silicon-on-insulator substrate and operates in the telecommunications band. The experimental results show a wavelength shift of 0.76 μm/nm, in reasonable agreement with simulations. Temperature-based control of the liquid crystal properties is also shown to modulate the superprism characteristics.

  3. Integrated photonic devices using self-assembled and optically defined photonic crystal superstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying

    Photonic crystals are structures with dielectric constants modulated in one, two, or three dimensions. They are an interesting subject of active research due to their ability to control the flow of light on a very small-length scale. In the research for this thesis, two integrated photonic devices were designed, fabricated and characterized which utilize the special optical properties of photonic crystals. The first device is a photonic crystal-photodiode micro-electro-optic filter, where a vertical self-assembly method was employed to grow a 3D face-centered cubic (FCC) photonic crystal over a working electro-optic device, a photodiode and a photodiode-plus-preamplifier made using conventional CMOS techniques. The objective of this project was to judge the practicality of the process and to observe the effect of the photonic crystal on the spectral response of the photodiode and photodiode-amplifier. Spectral measurements taken using a grating monochrometer confirmed that a stop band exists in the photocurrent response of this integrated photonic device, photonic crystal photodiode filter, at the predicted wavelength of 600 nm. These results were consistent with the simulation results made by using a 1D slab structure model. Although many groups have developed procedures to successfully grow self-assembled photonic crystals on substrates, we believe this is the first application of grown opals over functioning integrated electronics. This work explored the ability to include photonic functionality on the wafer with integrated electronic circuitry, and demonstrated a simple, practical and economic way to achieve it. The second device is a tunable planar waveguide with an optically defined 1D photonic crystal cladding layer. In this section a planar waveguide with a photosensitive cladding layer (mixture of PMMA co DR1 and side-chain nematic liquid crystal polymer) that is optically addressable and reversible is presented. The maximum of intensity decrease of the

  4. Atomic Scale Surface Structure and Morphology of InAs Nanowire Crystal Superlattices: The Effect of Epitaxial Overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    While shell growth engineering to the atomic scale is important for tailoring semiconductor nanowires with superior properties, a precise knowledge of the surface structure and morphology at different stages of this type of overgrowth has been lacking. We present a systematic scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) study of homoepitaxial shell growth of twinned superlattices in zinc blende InAs nanowires that transforms {111}A/B-type facets to the nonpolar {110}-type. STM imaging along the nanowires provides information on different stages of the shell growth revealing distinct differences in growth dynamics of the crystal facets and surface structures not found in the bulk. While growth of a new surface layer is initiated simultaneously (at the twin plane interface) on the {111}A and {111}B nanofacets, the step flow growth proceeds much faster on {111}A compared to {111}B leading to significant differences in roughness. Further, we observe that the atomic scale structures on the {111}B facet is different from its bulk counterpart and that shell growth on this facet occurs via steps perpendicular to the ⟨112⟩B-type directions. PMID:25710727

  5. Novel photonic crystals: incorporation of nano-CdS into the natural photonic crystals within peacock feathers.

    PubMed

    Han, Jie; Su, Huilan; Song, Fang; Gu, Jiajun; Di, Zhang; Jiang, Limin

    2009-03-01

    In this investigation, the natural 2D photonic crystals (PhCs) within peacock feathers are applied to incorporate CdS nanocrystallites. Peacock feathers are activated by ethylenediaminetetraacetic/dimethylformamide suspension to increase the reactive sites on the keratin component, on which CdS nanoparticles (nano-CdS) are in situ formed in succession and serve as the "seeds" to direct further incorporation during the following solvothermal procedure. Thus, homogeneous nano-CdS are loaded both on the feathers' surface layer and inside the 2D PhCs. The obtained nano-CdS/peacock feathers hybrids are novel photonic crystals whose photonic stop bands are markedly different from that of the natural PhCs within original peacock feathers, as observed by the reflection spectra. PMID:19437723

  6. Engineered atom-light interactions in 1D photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Michael J.; Hung, Chen-Lung; Yu, Su-Peng; Goban, Akihisa; Muniz, Juan A.; Hood, Jonathan D.; Norte, Richard; McClung, Andrew C.; Meenehan, Sean M.; Cohen, Justin D.; Lee, Jae Hoon; Peng, Lucas; Painter, Oskar; Kimble, H. Jeff

    2014-05-01

    Nano- and microscale optical systems offer efficient and scalable quantum interfaces through enhanced atom-field coupling in both resonators and continuous waveguides. Beyond these conventional topologies, new opportunities emerge from the integration of ultracold atomic systems with nanoscale photonic crystals. One-dimensional photonic crystal waveguides can be engineered for both stable trapping configurations and strong atom-photon interactions, enabling novel cavity QED and quantum many-body systems, as well as distributed quantum networks. We present the experimental realization of such a nanophotonic quantum interface based on a nanoscale photonic crystal waveguide, demonstrating a fractional waveguide coupling of Γ1 D /Γ' of 0 . 32 +/- 0 . 08 , where Γ1 D (Γ') is the atomic emission rate into the guided (all other) mode(s). We also discuss progress towards intra-waveguide trapping of ultracold Cs. This work was supported by the IQIM, an NSF Physics Frontiers Center with support from the Moore Foundation, the DARPA ORCHID program, the AFOSR QuMPASS MURI, the DoD NSSEFF program, NSF, and the Kavli Nanoscience Institute (KNI) at Caltech.

  7. Controlling interactions between coupled photonic crystal cavities using photochromic tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Tao; Bose, Ranojoy; Solomon, Glenn; Waks, Edo

    2013-03-01

    Strongly coupled photonic crystal (PhC) resonator systems provide a promising platform for studying cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) using semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). These device structures enable important applications such as photon blockade, quantum simulation, quantum-optical Josephson interferometer, and quantum phase transition of light. Many of these applications require the ability to accurately tune the resonant frequencies of individual cavities in the array, which provides a method to control their coupling interactions. This tuning method must be sufficiently local to address individual cavities spaced by less than 1 micron spatial separation. Here, we present a method for controlling the coupling interaction of photonic crystal cavity arrays by using a local and reversible photochromic tuning technique. By locally altering the refractive index of the photochromic material all-optically, the coupling interaction between two cavity modes could be modified over a tuning range as large as 700 GHz. By using this technique, we demonstrate the ability to couple photonic crystal cavities with a normal mode splitting of only 31.50 GHz. We further demonstrate that this tuning method can be extended to control the coupling interaction in larger cavity arrays.

  8. Photonic-magnonic crystals: Multifunctional periodic structures for magnonic and photonic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kłos, J. W. Krawczyk, M.; Dadoenkova, Yu. S.; Dadoenkova, N. N.; Lyubchanskii, I. L.

    2014-05-07

    We investigate the properties of a photonic-magnonic crystal, a complex multifunctional one-dimensional structure with magnonic and photonic band gaps in the GHz and PHz frequency ranges for spin waves and light, respectively. The system consists of periodically distributed dielectric magnetic slabs of yttrium iron garnet and nonmagnetic spacers with an internal structure of alternating TiO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} layers which form finite-size dielectric photonic crystals. We show that the spin-wave coupling between the magnetic layers, and thus the formation of the magnonic band structure, necessitates a nonzero in-plane component of the spin-wave wave vector. A more complex structure perceived by light is evidenced by the photonic miniband structure and the transmission spectra in which we have observed transmission peaks related to the repetition of the magnetic slabs in the frequency ranges corresponding to the photonic band gaps of the TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} stack. Moreover, we show that these modes split to very high sharp (a few THz wide) subpeaks in the transmittance spectra. The proposed novel multifunctional artificial crystals can have interesting applications and be used for creating common resonant cavities for spin waves and light to enhance the mutual influence between them.

  9. Synthetic routes and applications of photonic crystal composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ping

    This dissertation focuses on: (1) the development of synthetic routes to fabricate robust photonic crystal composites that allows for a wide range of monomeric systems to be utilized in the encapsulation procedure to a priori design the final optical and thermomechanical characteristics of the composite and (2) the characterization of the optical and thermomechanical properties of the composites and their exploitation in potential applications. In the first section, two strategies were developed, one using poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and its acrylate derivatives as matrixes to encapsulate the CCA of polystyrene spheres and to form a photonic crystal hydrogel (PCH) composite. The second strategy employs the technique of first dehydrating the PCH composite, then swelling it in a monomeric solution, and finally photopolymerizing it in situ, to form a water-free photonic crystal, or photonic band gap (PBG) composite. In the second section, the mechanochromic and solvatochromic responses of the PBG composite composed of poly(EGMEA) were characterized. This composite exhibited a reversible color variation at deformation frequencies up to 200 Hz and a 172 nm total stop band tuning range between +/-120V applied voltages when it was coupled with a piezoelectric actuator. Based on this effect, approaches for generating complex permanent multicolor patterns in both PBG and PCH films were developed. Finally, two types of potential sensing systems were explored in this dissertation. One is a chemical vapor sensing system composed of the poly(EGMEA)-based PBG composite film. The second is a label-free optical bio-recognition system composed of an antigen-selective photonic crystal hydrogel (PCH). The avidin molecules were first covalently immobilized in the PCH film. The biotinylated capture antibody was then introduced into the film through the non-covalent avidin-biotin binding. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  10. Photon assisted hopping conduction mechanism in Tl2SSe crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qasrawi, A. F.; Ziqan, Abdelhalim M.; Jazzar, Suha Kh.; Gasanly, N. M.

    2015-02-01

    In this article, the powder X-ray diffraction data and the dark and the photo-excited electrical conduction parameters of Tl2SSe crystal are reported. The dark and photon excited electrical conduction in the tetragonal crystal are found to be dominated by thermionic emission assisted variable range hopping conduction (VRH). The dark Mott's VRH parameters representing by the degree of disorder (To), the density of localized states near the Fermi level (N (EF)), the average hopping range (R) and average hopping energy (W) exhibited wide tunability via incremental photon intensity. Particularly, while the dark values of T0 , W and R significantly decreased from 2.32 ×108 to 1.52 ×105 K, 114 to 18.25 meV and from 66.15 to 10.58 A°, respectively, the values of N (EF) increased from 7.23 ×1018 to 1.10 ×1022cm-3 /eV when the crystal was photo-excited with a 53.6 mW/cm2 light intensity. These variations in the hopping parameters via photon excitations are promisig for using the crystal in the fabrication of well controlled, widely tunable, low energy consuming and highly efficient electronic devices.

  11. High-Q silicon carbide photonic-crystal cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jonathan Y.; Lu, Xiyuan; Lin, Qiang

    2015-01-26

    We demonstrate one-dimensional photonic-crystal nanobeam cavities in amorphous silicon carbide. The fundamental mode exhibits intrinsic optical quality factor as high as 7.69 × 10{sup 4} with mode volume ∼0.60(λ/n){sup 3} at wavelength 1.5 μm. A corresponding Purcell factor value of ∼10{sup 4} is the highest reported to date in silicon carbide optical cavities. The device exhibits great potential for integrated nonlinear photonics and cavity nano-optomechanics.

  12. Generation of higher odd harmonics in a defective photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanujam, N. R.; Wilson, K. S. Joseph

    2015-06-24

    A photonic crystal (AB){sup 2}(DB)(AB){sup 2} with high refractive index medium as silicon and low refractive medium as air is considered. Using the transfer matrix method, the transmission properties as a function of wavelength with photonic band gaps has been obtained. We are able to demonstrate the generation of third, fifth, seventh and ninth harmonics in the present work. We show that if the air medium is removed in the defect, the defect modes are generated but not harmonics. It can be designed to have a frequency conversion, and have a potential for becoming the basis for the next generation of optical devices.

  13. Optical modulator based on GaAs photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiusheng

    2005-11-01

    In this letter, we propose a novel optical modulator based on GaAs photonic crystals and investigate its optically properties numerically by using the finite-difference time-domain method. The position of the cutoff frequency can be varied by free carriers injection, and the band gap shift can be observed. Band gap shift is used to modulate light. Bing several micrometers length, low insertion loss, and large extinction ratios, the modulator can be used in ultra-small and ultra-dense photonic integrated circuits.

  14. Field expulsion and reconfiguration in polaritonic photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Bienstman, Peter; Joannopoulos, John D; Nelson, Keith A; Fan, Shanhui

    2003-05-16

    We uncover a rich set of optical phenomena stemming from the incorporation of polar materials exhibiting transverse phonon polariton excitations into a photonic crystal structure. We identify in the frequency spectrum two regimes in which the dielectric response of the polaritonic medium can induce extreme localization of the electromagnetic energy. Our analysis of the effect of polarization and the interaction between the polariton and photonic band gaps on the Bloch states leads to a pair of mechanisms for sensitive frequency-controlled relocation and/or reconfiguration of the fields. PMID:12785962

  15. Luneburg and flat lens based on graded photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Sun, Xiaohong; Gao, Minglei; Wang, Shuai

    2016-04-01

    Square-lattice graded photonic crystals employed for designing Luneburg and Flat Lens is presented. Comparable simulation of the Luneburg lens with TE and TM polarizations predicts that TM lens possesses of enlarged transmission bandwidth and strengthened focusing ability, in comparison with TE lens. As a typical simplified counterpart, the evolution of focusing intensity and numerical aperture of the flat lens is achieved. What is more, those Luneburg and Flat Lens can withstand imperfect gradients in structure design. This will provide a guidance to produce a high quality focusing lens with small size, short focal length and large numerical aperture applied in the integrated photonic devices.

  16. Nonreciprocal optical properties in resonant hybrid photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Andrea, A.; Tomassini, N.

    2016-07-01

    The present work is devoted to the theoretical study of the nonreciprocal optical properties in hybrid (isotropic and anisotropic) periodic multilayers for photon energy values chosen close to the electronic energy gaps of semiconductors (excitons). The optical properties of these resonant nonmagnetic photonic crystals, where linear and quadratic spatial dispersion effects are both present, will be studied in the framework of exciton-polariton self-consistent solutions of the Maxwell and Schrödinger equations in the effective-mass approximation. The main interesting optical properties, namely, giant transmission, absorption suppression, and optical unidirectional propagation, will be computed by implementing a two-layer "minimum model."

  17. Generation of higher odd harmonics in a defective photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanujam, N. R.; Wilson, K. S. Joseph

    2015-06-01

    A photonic crystal (AB)2(DB)(AB)2 with high refractive index medium as silicon and low refractive medium as air is considered. Using the transfer matrix method, the transmission properties as a function of wavelength with photonic band gaps has been obtained. We are able to demonstrate the generation of third, fifth, seventh and ninth harmonics in the present work. We show that if the air medium is removed in the defect, the defect modes are generated but not harmonics. It can be designed to have a frequency conversion, and have a potential for becoming the basis for the next generation of optical devices.

  18. Slow light SOI slot photonic crystal waveguides with low loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caer, Charles; Combrie, Sylvain; Le Roux, Xavier; De Rossi, Alfredo; Cassan, Eric

    2013-05-01

    Slow light in SOI Slotted Photonic Crystal Waveguides (SPCW) infiltrated by a refractive liquid are investigated. By employing an interferometric technique similar to Optical Coherent Tomography (OCT), we report a group velocity lower than c/20 over a 1 mm-long SPCW. From the OCT measurements, we also infer moderate propagation losses. In the fast light regime (nG <10) propagation loss is about 15 dB.cm-1. Moreover, the coupling to slow modes is efficient. These results show that infiltrated slow light SPCW are a promising route to silicon organic hybrid photonics.

  19. Hybrid squeezing of solitonic resonant radiation in photonic crystal fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Truong X.; Cassemiro, Katiuscia N.; Soeller, Christoph; Biancalana, Fabio; Blow, Keith J.

    2011-07-15

    We report the existence of a kind of squeezing in photonic crystal fibers which is conceptually intermediate between four-wave-mixing-induced squeezing in which all the participant waves are monochromatic waves, and self-phase-modulation-induced squeezing for a single pulse in a coherent state. This hybrid squeezing occurs when an arbitrary short soliton emits quasimonochromatic resonant radiation near a zero-group-velocity-dispersion point of the fiber. Photons around the resonant frequency become strongly correlated due to the presence of the classical soliton, and a reduction of the quantum noise below the shot-noise level is predicted.

  20. Photoscattering effect in supercontinuum-generating photonic crystal fiber

    PubMed Central

    Tu, H.; Marks, D. L.; Jiang, Z.; Boppart, S. A.

    2010-01-01

    A photosensitivity different from that responsible for fiber grating inscription is found in a supercontinuum-generating photonic crystal fiber transmitting intense 818 nm femtosecond pulses. This photosensitivity progressively generates a waveguide at the entrance of the fiber to scatter light of specific wavelengths and is termed as the photoscattering effect. This effect is linked to the ~800 nm photosensitivity in the microlithography of bulk silica glass. While the effect somewhat limits fiber-optic supercontinuum applications, it can be beneficial to produce new photonic devices. PMID:21350681

  1. Broadband single-photon-level memory in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprague, M. R.; Michelberger, P. S.; Champion, T. F. M.; England, D. G.; Nunn, J.; Jin, X.-M.; Kolthammer, W. S.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.; Walmsley, I. A.

    2014-04-01

    Storing information encoded in light is critical for realizing optical buffers for all-optical signal processing and quantum memories for quantum information processing. These proposals require efficient interaction between atoms and a well-defined optical mode. Photonic crystal fibres can enhance light-matter interactions and have engendered a broad range of nonlinear effects; however, the storage of light has proven elusive. Here, we report the first demonstration of an optical memory in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre. We store gigahertz-bandwidth light in the hyperfine coherence of caesium atoms at room temperature using a far-detuned Raman interaction. We demonstrate a signal-to-noise ratio of 2.6:1 at the single-photon level and a memory efficiency of 27 +/- 1%. Our results demonstrate the potential of a room-temperature fibre-integrated optical memory for implementing local nodes of quantum information networks.

  2. Polarization Engineering in Photonic Crystal Waveguides for Spin-Photon Entanglers.

    PubMed

    Young, A B; Thijssen, A C T; Beggs, D M; Androvitsaneas, P; Kuipers, L; Rarity, J G; Hughes, S; Oulton, R

    2015-10-01

    By performing a full analysis of the projected local density of states (LDOS) in a photonic crystal waveguide, we show that phase plays a crucial role in the symmetry of the light-matter interaction. By considering a quantum dot (QD) spin coupled to a photonic crystal waveguide (PCW) mode, we demonstrate that the light-matter interaction can be asymmetric, leading to unidirectional emission and a deterministic entangled photon source. Further we show that understanding the phase associated with both the LDOS and the QD spin is essential for a range of devices that can be realized with a QD in a PCW. We also show how suppression of quantum interference prevents dipole induced reflection in the waveguide, and highlight a fundamental breakdown of the semiclassical dipole approximation for describing light-matter interactions in these spin dependent systems. PMID:26550722

  3. A compact photonic crystal micro-cavity on a single-mode lithium niobate photonic wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Lutong; Zhang, Shaomei; Hu, Hui

    2016-03-01

    The properties of the guided modes, including the single-mode conditions and the coupling of different polarized modes in the single-crystal lithium niobate photonic wires, were analyzed in detail. One-dimensional photonic crystal micro-cavities with several different patterns, which could be used as an ultra-compact optical filter, were designed and simulated in order to get high transmission at the resonant wavelength and the best preferment. The designed structure, with the whole size of 6.5 × 0.7 μm2, was fabricated on a single-mode photonic wire. A measured peak transmission of 0.34 at 1400 nm, an extinction ratio of 12.5 dB and a Q factor of 156 were obtained. The measured transmission spectrum was basically consistent with the simulation, although a slight shift of resonant wavelength occurred due to the fabrication errors.

  4. Holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal Bragg grating integrated inside a solid core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Zito, Gianluigi; Pissadakis, Stavros

    2013-09-01

    A polymer/liquid crystal-based fiber Bragg grating (PLC-FBG) is fabricated with visible two-beam holography by photo-induced modulation of a prepolymer/liquid crystal solution infiltrated into the hollow channels of a solid core photonic crystal fiber (PCF). The fabrication process and effects related to the photonic bandgap guidance into the infiltrated PCF, and characterization of the PLC-FBG, are discussed. Experimental data presented here demonstrate that the liquid crystal inclusions of the PLC-FBG lead to high thermal and bending sensitivities. The microscopic behavior of the polymer/liquid crystal phase separation inside the PCF capillaries is examined using scanning electron microscopy, and is discussed further. PMID:23988927

  5. Optomechanics of two- and three-dimensional soft photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Dwarak

    Soft photonic crystals are a class of periodic dielectric structures that undergo highly nonlinear deformation due to strain or other external stimulus such as temperature, pH etc. This can in turn dramatically affect optical properties such as light transmittance. Moreover certain classes of lithographically fabricated structures undergo some structural distortion due to the effects of processing, eventually affecting the optical properties of the final photonic crystal. In this work, we study the deformation mechanics of soft photonic crystal structures using realistic physics-based models and leverage that understanding to explain the optomechanics of actual 2-D and 3-D soft photonic crystals undergoing similar symmetry breaking nonlinear deformations. We first study the optomechanics of two classes of 3-D soft photonic crystals: (1) hydrogel and (2) elastomer based material systems. The hydrogel based inverse face-centered-cubic structure undergoes swelling with change in pH of the surrounding fluid. The inverse structure is a network of bulky domains with thin ligament-like connections, and it undergoes a pattern transformation from FCC to L11 as a result of swelling. A continuum scale poroelasticity based coupled fluid-diffusion FEM model is developed to accurately predict this mechanical behavior. Light transmittance simulation results qualitatively explain the experimentally observed trends in the optical behavior with pH change. The elastomer based, lithographically fabricated material experiences shrinkage induced distortion upon processing. This behavior is modeled using FEM with the material represented by a neo-Hookean constitutive law. The light transmittance calculations for normal incidence are carried out using the transfer matrix method and a good comparison is obtained for the positions of first and second order reflectance peaks. A unit cell based approach is taken to compute the photonic bandstructure to estimate light propagation through the

  6. Minority carrier lifetime in mid-wavelength infrared InAs/InAsSb superlattices: Photon recycling and the role of radiative and Shockley-Read-Hall recombination mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Höglund, L.; Ting, D. Z.; Soibel, A.; Fisher, A.; Khoshakhlagh, A.; Hill, C. J.; Keo, S.; Gunapala, S. D.

    2014-11-10

    The influence of radiative recombination on the minority carrier lifetime in mid-wavelength InAs/InAsSb superlattices was investigated. From the lifetime's dependence on temperature, photon recycling, and carrier concentration, it was demonstrated that radiative lifetime dominates for carrier concentrations >5 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −3}, and Shockley-Read-Hall recombination starts to dominate the minority carrier lifetime for carrier concentrations <5 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −3}. An observed increase of the minority carrier lifetime with increasing superlattice thickness was attributed to photon recycling, and good agreement between measured and theoretical values of the photon recycling factor was obtained.

  7. Photon-controlled fabrication of amorphous superlattice structures using ArF (193 nm) excimer laser photolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lowndes, D.H.; Geohegan, D.B.; Eres, D.; Pennycook, S.J.; Mashburn, D.N.; Jellison G.E. Jr.

    1988-05-30

    Pulsed ArF (193 nm) excimer laser photolysis of disilane, germane, and disilane-ammonia mixtures has been used to deposit amorphous superlattices containing silicon, germanium, and silicon nitride layers. Transmission electron microscope cross-section views demonstrate that structures having thin (5--25 nm) layers and sharp interlayer boundaries can be deposited at substrate temperatures below the pyrolytic threshold, entirely under laser photolytic control.

  8. Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Stavroula Foteinopoulou

    2003-12-12

    In this dissertation, they have undertaken the challenge to understand the unusual propagation properties of the photonic crystal (PC). The photonic crystal is a medium where the dielectric function is periodically modulated. These types of structures are characterized by bands and gaps. In other words, they are characterized by frequency regions where propagation is prohibited (gaps) and regions where propagation is allowed (bands). In this study they focus on two-dimensional photonic crystals, i.e., structures with periodic dielectric patterns on a plane and translational symmetry in the perpendicular direction. They start by studying a two-dimensional photonic crystal system for frequencies inside the band gap. The inclusion of a line defect introduces allowed states in the otherwise prohibited frequency spectrum. The dependence of the defect resonance state on different parameters such as size of the structure, profile of incoming source, etc., is investigated in detail. For this study, they used two popular computational methods in photonic crystal research, the Finite Difference Time Domain method (FDTD) and the Transfer Matrix Method (TMM). The results for the one-dimensional defect system are analyzed, and the two methods, FDTD and TMM, are compared. Then, they shift their attention only to periodic two-dimensional crystals, concentrate on their band properties, and study their unusual refractive behavior. Anomalous refractive phenomena in photonic crystals included cases where the beam refracts on the ''wrong'' side of the surface normal. The latter phenomenon, is known as negative refraction and was previously observed in materials where the wave vector, the electric field, and the magnetic field form a left-handed set of vectors. These materials are generally called left-handed materials (LHM) or negative index materials (NIM). They investigated the possibility that the photonic crystal behaves as a LHM, and how this behavior relates with the observed

  9. Analysis of tunable bandgaps in liquid crystal-infiltrated 2D silicon photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cos, J.; Ferré-Borrull, J.; Pallarès, J.; Marsal, L. F.

    2010-09-01

    We present a theoretical study on two-dimensional photonic crystals composed of silicon and the E7 liquid crystal. We analyze how the optical axis orientation of the liquid crystal influences the photonic bands and bandgaps, for the case when the Maxwell equations can be decoupled into the TE and TM modes. We consider two different structures, a triangular lattice of E7 liquid crystal cylinders in a silicon background and a triangular lattice of silicon cylinders in an E7 liquid crystal background. The effect of the liquid crystal anisotropy on the geometry of the irreducible Brillouin zone allows us to propose a simplified way to calculate the photonic bandgaps. Results show that the bandgap width and center frequency have a 60° periodicity for both structures. Using the plane-wave expansion method, we determined the maximum bandgap and the optimal radius of the cylinders for each structure. Finally, for the second structure, we propose an optical switch with a 50% duty cycle. These structures can be applied to design tunable photonic devices.

  10. Two-photon excited UV fluorescence for protein crystal detection

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, Jeremy T.; DeWalt, Emma L.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2011-10-01

    Complementary measurements using SONICC and TPE-UVF allow the sensitive and selective detection of protein crystals. Two-photon excited ultraviolet fluorescence (TPE-UVF) microscopy is explored for sensitive protein-crystal detection as a complement to second-order nonlinear optical imaging of chiral crystals (SONICC). Like conventional ultraviolet fluorescence (UVF), TPE-UVF generates image contrast based on the intrinsic fluorescence of aromatic residues, generally producing higher fluorescence emission within crystals than the mother liquor by nature of the higher local protein concentration. However, TPE-UVF has several advantages over conventional UVF, including (i) insensitivity to optical scattering, allowing imaging in turbid matrices, (ii) direct compatibility with conventional optical plates and windows by using visible light for excitation, (iii) elimination of potentially damaging out-of-plane UV excitation, (iv) improved signal to noise through background reduction from out-of-plane excitation and (v) relatively simple integration into instrumentation developed for SONICC.

  11. Entangled, guided photon generation in (1+1)-dimensional photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Sciscione, L.; Centini, M.; Sibilia, C.; Bertolotti, M.; Scalora, M.

    2006-07-15

    A scheme based on photonic crystal technology is proposed as an ultrabright source of entangled photons on a miniaturized scale. The geometry consists of a multilayer microcavity, excited by a resonant pump frequency, such that the emitted photons are guided transversally to the direction of the incident pump. The entanglement occurs in direction, frequency, and polarization, and the bandwidth of the emitted photons is of the order of 1 nm. We propose a feasible design based on Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} structures and predict an emission rate 10{sup 5} pairs per second with 100 mW pump power. These results are promising for realization of chip and future quantum computer applications.

  12. Dispersion properties of transverse anisotropic liquid crystal core photonic crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasawa, Naoki

    2016-04-01

    The dispersion properties of liquid crystal core photonic crystal fibers for different core diameters have been calculated by a full vectorial finite difference method. In calculations, air holes are assumed to be arranged in a regular hexagonal array in fused silica and a central hole is filled with liquid crystal to create a core. In this study, three types of transverse anisotropic configurations, where liquid crystal molecules are oriented in a transverse plane, and a planar configuration, where liquid crystal molecules are oriented in a propagation direction, are considered. The large changes of the dispersion properties are found when the orientation of the liquid crystal molecules is changed from a planar configuration to a uniform configuration, where all molecules are oriented in the same direction in a transverse plane. Since the orientation of liquid crystal molecules may be controlled by applying an electric field, it could be utilized for various applications including the spectral control of supercontinuum generation.

  13. Photonics of liquid-crystal structures: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Palto, S. P. Blinov, L. M.; Barnik, M. I.; Lazarev, V. V.; Umanskii, B. A.; Shtykov, N. M.

    2011-07-15

    The original results of studies of the electro-optical and laser effects which have been performed at the Laboratory of Liquid Crystals of the Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences, over the last few years are reviewed. Cholesteric liquid crystals as vivid representatives of photonic structures and their behavior in an electric field are considered in detail. The formation of higher harmonics in the periodic distribution of the director field in a helical liquid crystal structure and, correspondingly, the new (anharmonic) mode of electro-optical effects are discussed. Another group of studies is devoted to bistable light switching by an electric field in chiral nematics. Polarization diffraction gratings controlled by an electric field are also considered. The results of studies devoted to microlasers on various photonic structures with cholesteric and nematic liquid crystals are considered in detail. Particular attention is given to the new regime: leaky-mode lasing. Designs of liquid crystal light amplifiers and their polarization, field, and spectral characteristics are considered in the last section.

  14. A composite hydrogels-based photonic crystal multi-sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng; Zhu, Zhigang; Zhu, Xiangrong; Yu, Wei; Liu, Mingju; Ge, Qiaoqiao; Shih, Wei-Heng

    2015-04-01

    A facile route to prepare stimuli-sensitive poly(vinyl alcohol)/poly(acrylic acid) (PVA/PAA) gelated crystalline colloidal array photonic crystal material was developed. PVA was physically gelated by utilizing an ethanol-assisted method, the resulting hydrogel/crystal composite film was then functionalized with PAA to form an interpenetrating hydrogel film. This sensor film is able to efficiently diffract the visible light and rapidly respond to various environmental stimuli such as solvent, pH and strain, and the accompanying structural color shift can be repeatedly changed and easily distinguished by naked eye.

  15. Applications of the layer-KKR method to photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Modinos, A; Stefanou, N; Yannopapas, V

    2001-01-29

    A brief introduction of the layer-Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method for calculations of the frequency band structure of photonic crystals and of the transmission and reflection coefficients of light incident on slabs of such crystals is followed by two applications of the method. The first relates to the frequency band structure of metallodielectric composites and demonstrates the essential difference between cermet and network topology of such composites at low frequencies. The second application is an analysis of recent measurements of the reflection of light from a slab of a colloidal system consisting of latex spheres in air. PMID:19417804

  16. Quantum dots in photonic crystals: from quantum information processing to single photon nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuckovic, Jelena

    2009-05-01

    Quantum dots in photonic crystals are interesting both as a testbed for fundamental cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) experiments, as well as a platform for quantum and classical information processing. Quantum dot-photonic crystal cavity QED has been probed both in photoluminescence and coherently, by resonant light scattering from such a system [1]. In the latter case, both intensity and photon statistics of the reflected beam have been analyzed as a function of wavelength, leading to observation of effects such as photon blockade and photon induced tunneling - for the first time in solid state [2]. The system has also been employed to achieve a controlled phase and amplitude modulation between two modes of light at the single photon level [3] - nonlinearity observed so far only in atomic physics systems. These demonstrations lie at the core of a number of proposals for quantum information processing, and could also be employed to build novel devices, such as optical switches controlled at a single photon level. [4pt] [1] Dirk Englund, Andrei Faraon, Ilya Fushman, Nick Stoltz, Pierre Petroff, and Jelena Vuckovic, ``Controlling cavity reflectivity with a single quantum dot," Nature ,ol. 450, No. 7171, pp. 857-861, December 2007[0pt] [2] Andrei Faraon, Ilya Fushman, Dirk Englund, Nick Stoltz, Pierre Petroff, and Jelena Vuckovic, ``Coherent generation of nonclassical light on a chip via photon-induced tunneling and blockade," Nature Physics ,ol. 4, pp. 859 - 863 (2008)[0pt] [3] Ilya Fushman, Dirk Englund, Andrei Faraon, Nick Stoltz, Pierre Petroff, and Jelena Vuckovic, ``Controlled phase shift with a single quantum dot," Science ,ol. 320, number 5877, pp. 769-772 ( 2008)

  17. Large mode-volume, large beta, photonic crystal laser resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Dezfouli, Mohsen Kamandar; Dignam, Marc M.

    2014-12-15

    We propose an optical resonator formed from the coupling of 13, L2 defects in a triangular-lattice photonic crystal slab. Using a tight-binding formalism, we optimized the coupled-defect cavity design to obtain a resonator with predicted single-mode operation, a mode volume five times that of an L2-cavity mode and a beta factor of 0.39. The results are confirmed using finite-difference time domain simulations. This resonator is very promising for use as a single mode photonic crystal vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with high saturation output power compared to a laser consisting of one of the single-defect cavities.

  18. Silicon photonic crystal resonators for label free biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sana, Amrita Kumar; Honzawa, Keita; Amemiya, Yoshiteru; Yokoyama, Shin

    2016-04-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of a two-dimensional (2D) silicon photonic crystal biosensor consisting of waveguides and cavity-type and defect-type resonators for enhancing the interactions between light and biomaterials. Sensitivity was measured using sucrose solution and the sensor showed the highest sensitivity [1570 nm/RIU (refractive index unit)] ever reported. We also investigated cavity size effects on resonance wavelength shift, and we observed that a large cavity exhibits a greater resonance wavelength shift. The fabricated sensor has shown a high Q of ∼105 in water and a device figure of merit of 1.2 × 105, which represent the improvements of the device performance over other photonic-crystal-based sensors.

  19. Method to fabricate a tilted logpile photonic crystal

    DOEpatents

    Williams, John D.; Sweatt, William C.

    2010-10-26

    A method to fabricate a tilted logpile photonic crystal requires only two lithographic exposures and does not require mask repositioning between exposures. The mask and photoresist-coated substrate are spaced a fixed and constant distance apart using a spacer and the stack is clamped together. The stack is then tilted at a crystallographic symmetry angle (e.g., 45 degrees) relative to the X-ray beam and rotated about the surface normal until the mask is aligned with the X-ray beam. The stack is then rotated in plane by a small stitching angle and exposed to the X-ray beam to pattern the first half of the structure. The stack is then rotated by 180.degree. about the normal and a second exposure patterns the remaining half of the structure. The method can use commercially available DXRL scanner technology and LIGA processes to fabricate large-area, high-quality tilted logpile photonic crystals.

  20. Temperature sensitivity of photonic crystal fibers infiltrated with ethanol solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu Van, Lanh; Stefaniuk, Tomasz; Kasztelanic, Rafał; Cao Long, Van; Klimczak, Mariusz; Le Van, Hieu; Trippenbach, Marek; Buczyński, Ryszard

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we present a numerical study on the optimization of dispersion of a photonic crystal fiber infiltrated with water-ethanol mixtures. The advantage of such an approach stems from the fact that the dependence of the refractive index on temperature is larger in liquids than in solid materials. Here, we examine photonic crystal fibers with a regular, hexagonal lattice and with various geometrical and material parameters, such as different number of rings of holes, various lattice constants and the size of core and air-holes. Additionally, for the optimized structure with flat dispersion characteristics, we analyze the influence of temperature and concentration of the ethanol solution on the dispersion characteristic and the zero dispersion wavelength shift of the fundamental mode.

  1. Graphene-based photonic crystal to steer giant Faraday rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da, Haixia; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2012-06-01

    We present a graphene-based photonic-crystal schematic of enhancing and steering Faraday rotation angle of graphene. This concept is counter-intuitive because the giant Faraday rotation and high transmission can be simultaneously pronounced, which is distinguished from exisitng graphene structures reported before. It is found that chemical potential can be tailored to generate a controllable giant Faraday rotation via graphene with atomic thickness. By engineering the individual component thickness in the photonic crystal, the magneto-optical performance can be significantly improved. This is of fundamental importance in a wide range of magneto-optical applications, simply because the Faraday rotation makes sense only when the transmittivity is decently high.

  2. Flying particle sensors in hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, D. S.; Schmidt, O. A.; Euser, T. G.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2015-07-01

    Optical fibre sensors make use of diverse physical effects to measure parameters such as strain, temperature and electric field. Here we introduce a new class of reconfigurable fibre sensor, based on a ‘flying-particle’ optically trapped inside a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre and illustrate its use in electric field and temperature sensing with high spatial resolution. The electric field distribution near the surface of a multi-element electrode is measured with a resolution of ∼100 μm by monitoring changes in the transmitted light signal due to the transverse displacement of a charged silica microparticle trapped within the hollow core. Doppler-based velocity measurements are used to map the gas viscosity, and thus the temperature, along a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre. The flying-particle approach represents a new paradigm in fibre sensors, potentially allowing multiple physical quantities to be mapped with high positional accuracy over kilometre-scale distances.

  3. Ultra-compact photonic crystal based water temperature sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikoufard, Mahmoud; Kazemi Alamouti, Masoud; Adel, Alireza

    2016-06-01

    We design an ultra-compact water temperature sensor by using the photonic crystal technology on the InP substrate at the 1.55-μm wavelength window. The photonic crystal consists of rods in a hexagonal lattice and a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) background. By using the plane wave expansion (PWE) method, the lattice constant and radius of rods are obtained, 520 nm and 80.6 nm, respectively. With a nanocavity placed in the waveguide, a resonance peak is observed at the 1.55-μm wavelength window. Any change of the water temperature inside the nanocavity results in the shift of the resonance wavelength. Our simulations show a shift of about 11 nm for a temperature change of 22.5 °C. The resonance wavelength has a linear relation with the water temperature.

  4. Reconfigurable photonic crystal waveguides created by selective liquid infiltration.

    PubMed

    Bedoya, A Casas; Domachuk, P; Grillet, C; Monat, C; Mägi, E C; Li, E; Eggleton, B J

    2012-05-01

    We experimentally demonstrate reconfigurable photonic crystal waveguides created directly by infiltrating high refractive index (n≈2.01) liquids into selected air holes of a two-dimensional hexagonal periodic lattice in silicon. The resulting effective index contrast is large enough that a single row of infiltrated holes enables light propagation at near-infrared wavelengths. We include a detailed comparison between modeling and experimental results of single line defect waveguides and show how our infiltration procedure is reversible and repeatable. We achieve infiltration accuracy down to the single air hole level and demonstrate control on the volume of liquid infused into the holes by simply changing the infiltration velocity. This method is promising for achieving a wide range of targeted optical functionalities on a "blank" photonic crystal membrane that can be reconfigured on demand. PMID:22565727

  5. Topological states in one dimensional solids and photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, Timothy; Mathur, Harsh

    2011-03-01

    We show that the band structure of a one-dimensional solid with particle-hole symmetry may be characterized by a topological index that owes its existence to the non-trivial homotopy of the space of non-degenerate real symmetric matrices. Moreover we explicitly demonstrate a theorem linking the topological index to the existence of bound states on the surface of a semi-infinite one dimensional solid. Our analysis is a one-dimensional analogue of the analysis of topological insulators in two and three dimensions by Balents and Moore; our results may be relevant to long molecules that are the one dimensional analogue of topological insulators. We propose the realization of this physics in a one-dimensional photonic crystal. In this case the topology of the bandstructure reveals itself not as a bound surface state but as a Lorentzian feature in the time delay of light that is otherwise perfectly reflected by the photonic crystal.

  6. Self-Organized Growth of Alloy Superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Chason, E.; Floro, J.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Lagally, M.G.; Liu, F.; Tersoff, J.; Venezuela, P.

    1998-10-19

    We predict theoretically and demonstrate experimentally the spontaneous formation of a superlattice during crystal growth. When a strained alloy grows by "step flow", the steps at the surface form periodic bunches. The resulting modulated strain biases the incorporation of the respective alloy components at different steps in the bunch, leading to the formation of a superlattice. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy for SiGe grown on Si give clear evidence for such spontaneous superlattice formation.

  7. Fabrication of photonic crystal structures by tertiary-butyl arsine-based metal–organic vapor-phase epitaxy for photonic crystal lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Masahiro; Kawasaki, Masato; De Zoysa, Menaka; Ishizaki, Kenji; Hatsuda, Ranko; Noda, Susumu

    2016-06-01

    The fabrication of air/semiconductor two-dimensional photonic crystal structures by air-hole-retained crystal regrowth using tertiary-butyl arsine-based metal–organic vapor-phase epitaxy for GaAs-based photonic crystal lasers is investigated. Photonic crystal air holes with filling factors of 10–13%, depths of ∼280 nm, and widths of 120–150 nm are successfully embedded. The embedded air holes exhibit characteristic shapes due to the anisotropy of crystal growth. Furthermore, a low lasing threshold of ∼0.5 kA/cm2 is achieved with the fabricated structures.

  8. Analysis of two-dimensional photonic crystal with anisotropic gain.

    PubMed

    Takigawa, Shinichi; Noda, Susumu

    2011-05-01

    Photonic modes in a two-dimensional square-lattice photonic crystal (PC) with anisotropic gain are analyzed for the first time. A plane-wave expansion method is improved to include the gain, which depends on not only the position but also the propagation direction of each plane wave. The anisotropic gain varies the photonic band structure, the near-field distributions, and the gain dispersion curves through variation in PC symmetry. Low-threshold operation of a PC laser with anisotropic-gain material such as nonpolar InGaN requires that the direction of higher gain in the material aligns along the ΓX direction of the PC. PMID:21643205

  9. Selective mode excitation in hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galea, A. D.; Couny, F.; Coupland, S.; Roberts, P. J.; Sabert, H.; Knight, J. C.; Birks, T. A.; Russell, Philip St. J.

    2005-04-01

    Modes are selectively excited by launching light through the cladding from the side into a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. Measuring the total output power at the end of the fiber as a function of the angle of incidence of the exciting laser beam provides a powerful diagnostic for characterizing the cladding bandgap. Furthermore, various types of modes on either side of the bandgap are excited individually, and their near-field images are obtained.

  10. Spatial solitons in chi(2) planar photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Katia; Assanto, Gaetano

    2007-11-01

    We analyze light self-confinement induced by multiple nonlinear resonances in a two-dimensional chi(2) photonic crystal. With reference to second-harmonic generation in a hexagonal lattice, we show that the system can not only support two-color (1+1)D solitary waves with enhanced confinement and steering capabilities but also enable novel features such as wavelength-dependent soliton routing. PMID:17975626

  11. Superlensing properties of one-dimensional dielectric photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savo, Salvatore; di Gennaro, Emiliano; Andreone, Antonello

    2009-10-01

    We present the experimental observation of the superlensing effect in a slab of a one-dimensional photonic crystal made of tilted dielectric elements. We show that this flat lens can achieve subwavelength resolution in different frequency bands. We also demonstrate that the introduction of a proper corrugation on the lens surface can dramatically improve both the transmission and the resolution of the imaged signal.

  12. Wafer-scale plasmonic and photonic crystal sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, M. C.; Liu, J.-N.; Farhang, A.; Williamson, B.; Black, M.; Wangensteen, T.; Fraser, J.; Petrova, R.; Cunningham, B. T.

    2015-08-01

    200 mm diameter wafer-scale fabrication, metrology, and optical modeling results are reviewed for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors based on 2-D metallic nano-dome and nano-hole arrays (NHA's) as well as 1-D photonic crystal sensors based on a leaky-waveguide mode resonance effect, with potential applications in label free sensing, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), and surface-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SEFS). Potential markets include micro-arrays for medical diagnostics, forensic testing, environmental monitoring, and food safety. 1-D and 2-D nanostructures were fabricated on glass, fused silica, and silicon wafers using optical lithography and semiconductor processing techniques. Wafer-scale optical metrology results are compared to FDTD modeling and presented along with application-based performance results, including label-free plasmonic and photonic crystal sensing of both surface binding kinetics and bulk refractive index changes. In addition, SEFS and SERS results are presented for 1-D photonic crystal and 2-D metallic nano-array structures. Normal incidence transmittance results for a 550 nm pitch NHA showed good bulk refractive index sensitivity, however an intensity-based design with 665 nm pitch was chosen for use as a compact, label-free sensor at both 650 and 632.8 nm wavelengths. The optimized NHA sensor gives an SPR shift of about 480 nm per refractive index unit when detecting a series of 0-40% glucose solutions, but according to modeling shows about 10 times greater surface sensitivity when operating at 532 nm. Narrow-band photonic crystal resonance sensors showed quality factors over 200, with reasonable wafer-uniformity in terms of both resonance position and peak height.

  13. Photonic crystal borax competitive binding carbohydrate sensing motif†

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Qingzhou; Muscatello, Michelle M. Ward; Asher, Sanford A.

    2009-01-01

    We developed a photonic crystal sensing method for diol containing species such as carbohydrates based on a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel containing an embedded crystalline colloidal array (CCA). The polymerized CCA (PCCA) diffracts visible light. We show that in the presence of borax the diffraction wavelength shifts as the concentration of glucose changes. The diffraction shifts result from the competitive binding of glucose to borate, which reduces the concentration of borate bound to the PVA diols. PMID:19381378

  14. Fabrication of photonic crystal lasers by nanomolding of solgel glasses.

    PubMed

    Schueller, O J; Whitesides, G M; Rogers, J A; Meier, M; Dodabalapur, A

    1999-09-20

    We demonstrate the formation, in a single process step, of periodic arrays of features of surface relief with submicrometer lateral dimensions in hybrid organic and inorganic solgel glasses by using elastomeric molding techniques. Lasers formed with molded photonic crystal resonators that consist of triangular, square, and honeycomb lattices of cylindrical posts and holes show emission spectra and lasing thresholds that are similar to devices formed by conventional high-resolution photolithographic patterning of thick layers of thermally grown oxide. PMID:18324096

  15. Optimized photonic crystal fibers supporting efficient capillary electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcerrada, M.; García-Ruiz, C.; Roy, P.; Gonzalez-Herraez, M.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper we present preliminary results on the use of Photonic Crystal Fibers (PCFs) in a conventional capillary electrophoresis system to separate and detect fluorescent species. PCFs show interesting advantages over conventional capillaries for this application, including larger surface-to-volume ratio and potential for higher resolution with comparable sensitivity. Our results illustrate some of these advantages, and we point out the need for stringent tolerances in the fabrication of specific PCFs for this application.

  16. A Single-Crystalline Mesoporous Quartz Superlattice.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, Takamichi; Kuroda, Yoshiyuki; Kitahara, Masaki; Shimojima, Atsushi; Wada, Hiroaki; Kuroda, Kazuyuki

    2016-05-10

    There has been significant interest in the crystallization of nanostructured silica into α-quartz because of its physicochemical properties. We demonstrate a single-crystalline mesoporous quartz superlattice, a silica polymorph with unprecedentedly ordered hierarchical structures on both the several tens of nanometers scale and the atomic one. The mesoporous quartz superlattice consists of periodically arranged α-quartz nanospheres whose crystalline axes are mostly oriented in an assembly. The superlattice is prepared by thermal crystallization of amorphous silica nanospheres constituting a colloidal crystal. We found that the deposition of a strong flux of Li(+) only on the surface of silica nanospheres is effective for crystallization. PMID:27060365

  17. Double photonic crystal vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viktorovitch, Pierre; Sciancalepore, Corrado; Bakir, Badhise Ben; Letartre, Xavier; Seassal, Christian

    2013-03-01

    The periodic patterning of the optical medium achieved through photonic crystal membranes (PCMs) can be employed for controlling the resonant coupling of external radiation continuum to above-the-light-line flat edges of the folded band structure in strongly corrugated waveguides, resulting in high reflectivity for an efficient quasi-3D light harnessing. Recently, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) emitting in C-band using a double set of one-dimensional Si/SiO2 photonic crystals as compact, flexible, and power efficient mirrors have been realized within a mass-scale fabrication paradigm by employing standard 200-mm microelectronics pilot lines. Conceived as the basic building block for photonics-on-silicon back-end integration of group III-V laser microsources, the extreme flexibility of the novel photonic architecture enables to perform a tailored modal selection of the optical cavity, including polarization and far-field control. It also offers a wide range of functionality, such as on-chip optical routing and a variety of efficient wavelength tuning-trimming schemes. Device compactness ensures a considerable reduction in the device footprint, power consumption, and parasitics. Furthermore, high fabrication yields obtained thanks to the state-of-the-art molecular wafer bonding of III-V alloys on silicon conjugate excellent device performances with cost-effective high-throughput production, indicating strong perspective industrial potential.

  18. Polarisation singularities in disordered photonic crystal waveguides for on-chip spin-photon entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beggs, Daryl; Lang, Ben; Young, Andrew; Oulton, Ruth

    A polarisation singularity occurs at a position in a vector field where one of the parameters of the local polarisation ellipse (handedness, eccentricity or orientation) becomes singular. With the vector nature of electromagnetic fields, optics is an obvious place for the study of polarisation singularities, and they can be found in systems ranging from tightly focused beams to speckle fields. Here we demonstrate that photonic crystal waveguides support on-chip polarisation singularities. As Bloch waves, the eigenmodes of photonic crystal waveguides possess a strong longitudinal, as well as transverse, component of their electric field. The spatial dependence of both these components and the phase between them ensures a rich and complex polarisation landscape in the waveguide. Recently, the use of polarisation singularities found in photonic crystal waveguides is generating much interest for integrated quantum information applications, as they can couple the spin-states of electrons confined to quantum dots to the optical modes of the waveguide. For example, at a circular-point (C-point), the sign of the local helicity is governed by the propagation direction of the optical mode, which allows for spin-photon coupling to one direction only. However, any real system will inevitably contain imperfections, and it is not obvious that the polarisation singularities will persist in the disordered waveguides. Here, we use calculations of the eigenmodes of disordered waveguides to demonstrate that the polarisation singularities persist far beyond realistically expected levels of disorder.

  19. Ultracompact ring resonator microwave photonic filters based on photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guansheng; Tian, Huiping; Ji, Yuefeng

    2013-02-20

    We design two microwave photonic filters (notch filter and bandpass filter) based on silicon on insulator (SOI) photonic crystal waveguides for a 60 GHz single-sideband signal radio-over-fiber (ROF) system. By perturbing the radii of the first two rows of holes adjacent to the photonic crystal waveguide, we obtained a broad negligible dispersion bandwidth and a corresponding constant low group velocity. With the slow light effect, the delay line of filters can be significantly reduced while providing the same delay time as fiber based delay lines. The simulation results show that the delay-line length of the notch filter is only about 25.9 μm, and it has a free spectral range of 130 GHz, a baseband width (BW) of 4.12 GHz, and a notch depth of 22 dB. The length of the bandpass filter is 62.4 μm, with a 19.6 dB extinction ratio and a 4.02 GHz BW, and the signal-to-noise ratio requirement of received data can be reduced by 9 dB for the 10(-7) bit-error ratio. Demonstrated microwave photonic crystal filters could be used in a future high-frequency millimeter ROF system. PMID:23434992

  20. Integrating photonic crystals in thin film silicon photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, P. G.; Chutinan, A.; Ozin, G. A.; Kherani, N. P.; Zukotynski, S.

    2010-06-01

    Wave-optics analysis is performed to investigate the benefits of integrating photonic crystals into micromorph cells. Specifically, we theoretically investigate two novel micromorph cells which integrate photonic crystals and compare their optical performance with that of conventional micromorph cells. In the first innovative micromorph cell configuration the intermediate reflector is a selectively transparent and conducting photonic crystal (STCPC). In the second micromorph cell its bottom μc-Si:H cell is structured in the form of an inverted opal. Our results show that with the AM1.5 solar spectrum at normal incidence the current generated in a conventional micromorph cell is increased from 12.1 mA/cm2 to 13.0 mA/cm2 when the bottom μc-Si:H cell is structured in the form of an inverted opal. However, the current generated in the micromorph cell can be increased to as much as 13.7 mA/cm2 when an STCPC is utilized as the intermediate reflector. Furthermore, the thickness of the μc-Si:H opal must be relatively large in order to absorb a sufficient amount of the solar irradiance, which is expected to degrade the electrical performance of the device. In contrast, our results suggest that STCPC intermediate reflectors are a viable technology that could potentially enhance the performance of micromorph cells.

  1. Label-Free Biosensor Imaging on Photonic Crystal Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Yue; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2015-01-01

    We review the development and application of nanostructured photonic crystal surfaces and a hyperspectral reflectance imaging detection instrument which, when used together, represent a new form of optical microscopy that enables label-free, quantitative, and kinetic monitoring of biomaterial interaction with substrate surfaces. Photonic Crystal Enhanced Microscopy (PCEM) has been used to detect broad classes of materials which include dielectric nanoparticles, metal plasmonic nanoparticles, biomolecular layers, and live cells. Because PCEM does not require cytotoxic stains or photobleachable fluorescent dyes, it is especially useful for monitoring the long-term interactions of cells with extracellular matrix surfaces. PCEM is only sensitive to the attachment of cell components within ~200 nm of the photonic crystal surface, which may correspond to the region of most interest for adhesion processes that involve stem cell differentiation, chemotaxis, and metastasis. PCEM has also demonstrated sufficient sensitivity for sensing nanoparticle contrast agents that are roughly the same size as protein molecules, which may enable applications in “digital” diagnostics with single molecule sensing resolution. We will review PCEM’s development history, operating principles, nanostructure design, and imaging modalities that enable tracking of optical scatterers, emitters, absorbers, and centers of dielectric permittivity. PMID:26343684

  2. Transient dynamic distributed strain sensing using photonic crystal fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samad, Shafeek A.; Hegde, G. M.; Roy Mahapatra, D.; Hanagud, S.

    2014-02-01

    A technique to determine the strain field in one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal (PC) involving high strain rate, high temperature around shock or ballistic impact is proposed. Transient strain sensing is important in aerospace and other structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. We consider a MEMS based smart sensor design with photonic crystal integrated on a silicon substrate for dynamic strain correlation. Deeply etched silicon rib waveguides with distributed Bragg reflectors are suitable candidates for miniaturization of sensing elements, replacing the conventional FBG. Main objective here is to investigate the effect of non-uniform strain localization on the sensor output. Computational analysis is done to determine the static and dynamic strain sensing characteristics of the 1D photonic crystal based sensor. The structure is designed and modeled using Finite Element Method. Dynamic localization of strain field is observed. The distributed strain field is used to calculated the PC waveguide response. The sensitivity of the proposed sensor is estimated to be 0.6 pm/μɛ.

  3. Label-Free Biosensor Imaging on Photonic Crystal Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Yue; Cunningham, Brian T

    2015-01-01

    We review the development and application of nanostructured photonic crystal surfaces and a hyperspectral reflectance imaging detection instrument which, when used together, represent a new form of optical microscopy that enables label-free, quantitative, and kinetic monitoring of biomaterial interaction with substrate surfaces. Photonic Crystal Enhanced Microscopy (PCEM) has been used to detect broad classes of materials which include dielectric nanoparticles, metal plasmonic nanoparticles, biomolecular layers, and live cells. Because PCEM does not require cytotoxic stains or photobleachable fluorescent dyes, it is especially useful for monitoring the long-term interactions of cells with extracellular matrix surfaces. PCEM is only sensitive to the attachment of cell components within ~200 nm of the photonic crystal surface, which may correspond to the region of most interest for adhesion processes that involve stem cell differentiation, chemotaxis, and metastasis. PCEM has also demonstrated sufficient sensitivity for sensing nanoparticle contrast agents that are roughly the same size as protein molecules, which may enable applications in "digital" diagnostics with single molecule sensing resolution. We will review PCEM's development history, operating principles, nanostructure design, and imaging modalities that enable tracking of optical scatterers, emitters, absorbers, and centers of dielectric permittivity. PMID:26343684

  4. Nonsymmorphic topological photonic crystal with a single surface Dirac cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ling; Fang, Chen; Fu, Liang; Johnson, Steven; Joannopoulos, John; Soljacic, Marin; MIT Collaboration

    We predict a realization of the nonsymmorphic topological crystalline phase: a three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystal with a single surface Dirac cone. A single Dirac cone on the surface is the hallmark of the 3D topological insulators, where the double degeneracy at the Dirac point is protected by time-reversal symmetry and the spin-splitting away from the point is provided by the spin-orbital coupling. In our 3D topological photonic crystal, the degeneracy at the Dirac point is protected by a nonsymmorphic glide reflection and the linear splitting away from it is enabled by breaking time-reversal symmetry. Such a gapless surface state is fully robust against random disorder of any type. This bosonic topological band structure is achieved by applying alternating magnetization to gap out the 3D ''generalized Dirac points'' discovered in the bulk of our crystal. The Z2 bulk invariant is characterized through the evolution of Wannier centers. Our proposal-readily realizable using ferrimagnetic materials at microwave frequencies-can also be regarded as the photonic analog of topological crystalline insulators, providing the first 3D bosonic symmetry-protected topological system.

  5. Dynamically tunable graphene/dielectric photonic crystal transmission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Ian; Mousavi, S. Hossein; Wang, Zheng

    2015-03-01

    It is well known that graphene supports plasmonic modes with high field confinement and lower losses when compared to conventional metals. Additionally, graphene features a highly tunable conductivity through which the plasmon dispersion can be modulated. Over the years these qualities have inspired a wide range of applications for graphene in the THz and infrared regimes. In this presentation we theoretically demonstrate a graphene parallel plate waveguide (PPWG) that sandwiches a 2D photonic crystal slab. The marriage of these two geometries offers a large two dimensional band gap that can be dynamically tuned over a very broad bandwidth. Our device operates in the low-THz band where the graphene PPWG supports a quasi-TEM mode with a relatively flat attenuation. Unlike conventional photonic crystal slabs, the quasi-TEM nature of the graphene PPWG mode allows the slab thickness to be less than 1/10 of the photonic crystal lattice constant. These features offer up a wealth of opportunities, including tunable metamaterials with a possible platform for large band gaps in 3D structures through tiling and stacking. Additionally, the geometry provides a platform for tunable defect cavities without needing three dimensional periodicity.

  6. Photonic band gaps in one-dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals with arbitrary magnetic declination

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Haifeng; Liu Shaobin; Kong Xiangkun

    2012-12-15

    In this paper, the properties of photonic band gaps and dispersion relations of one-dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals composed of dielectric and magnetized plasma layers with arbitrary magnetic declination are theoretically investigated for TM polarized wave based on transfer matrix method. As TM wave propagates in one-dimensional magnetized plasma photonic crystals, the electromagnetic wave can be divided into two modes due to the influence of Lorentz force. The equations for effective dielectric functions of such two modes are theoretically deduced, and the transfer matrix equation and dispersion relations for TM wave are calculated. The influences of relative dielectric constant, plasma collision frequency, incidence angle, plasma filling factor, the angle between external magnetic field and +z axis, external magnetic field and plasma frequency on transmission, and dispersion relation are investigated, respectively, and some corresponding physical explanations are also given. From the numerical results, it has been shown that plasma collision frequency cannot change the locations of photonic band gaps for both modes, and also does not affect the reflection and transmission magnitudes. The characteristics of photonic band gaps for both modes can be obviously tuned by relative dielectric constant, incidence angle, plasma filling factor, the angle between external magnetic field and +z axis, external magnetic field and plasma frequency, respectively. These results would provide theoretical instructions for designing filters, microcavities, and fibers, etc.

  7. The study of thermal tunable coupling between a Superconducting photonic crystal waveguide and semi-circular photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskooi, Somayeh; Barvestani, Jamal

    2016-08-01

    Through the present study, we investigated the light coupling between superconducting photonic crystal waveguide and a semi-circular photonic crystal. By using the finite difference time domain method, we evaluated the coupling efficiency between the mentioned structures at the various temperatures for different waveguide sizes. Calculation demonstrated that the coupling efficiency strongly depended on the temperature of the superconductor. The peak value of the coupling efficiency was influenced by the size of the nearest neighbor rods of waveguide. The results have shown that it is possible to obtain high efficiency at the desired temperature with proper selection of physical parameters in far-infrared frequency region. This structure has great potential in the optical integration and other areas.

  8. Modeling of Photonic Band Gap Crystals and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ihab Fathy El-Kady

    2002-08-27

    In this work, the authors have undertaken a theoretical approach to the complex problem of modeling the flow of electromagnetic waves in photonic crystals. The focus is to address the feasibility of using the exciting phenomena of photonic gaps (PBG) in actual applications. The authors start by providing analytical derivations of the computational electromagnetic methods used in their work. They also present a detailed explanation of the physics underlying each approach, as well as a comparative study of the strengths and weaknesses of each method. The Plane Wave expansion, Transfer Matrix, and Finite Difference time Domain Methods are addressed. They also introduce a new theoretical approach, the Modal Expansion Method. They then shift the attention to actual applications. They begin with a discussion of 2D photonic crystal wave guides. The structure addressed consists of a 2D hexagonal structure of air cylinders in a layered dielectric background. Comparison with the performance of a conventional guide is made, as well as suggestions for enhancing it. The studies provide an upper theoretical limit on the performance of such guides, as they assumed no crystal imperfections and non-absorbing media. Next, they study 3D metallic PBG materials at near infrared and optical wavelengths. The main objective is to study the importance of absorption in the metal and the suitability of observing photonic band gaps in such structures. They study simple cubic structures where the metallic scatters are either cubes or interconnected metallic rods. Several metals are studied (aluminum, gold, copper, and silver). The effect of topology is addressed and isolated metallic cubes are found to be less lossy than the connected rod structures. The results reveal that the best performance is obtained by choosing metals with a large negative real part of the dielectric function, together with a relatively small imaginary part. Finally, they point out a new direction in photonic crystal

  9. Image formation by and wave propagation in a photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parimi, Patanjali; Vodo, Plarenta; Wentao, Lu; di Gennaro, Emiliano; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2004-03-01

    Negative refraction and imaging by a flat slab of a material are two of the important consequences of lefthanded electromagnetism. In our recent work we have demonstrated negative refraction and imaging by photonic crystals in the microwave frequency range [1]. The details of image formation are intriguing and urge its investigation. We have carried out microwave measurements in a parallel plate waveguide made of a pair of metallic plates. The Photonic crystal is made of alumina rods arranged on a square lattice such that the electric field is parallel to the axis of the rods. The detector is a dipole antenna which is inserted into the waveguide from outside. HP 8510C network analyzer is used to measure the complex transmission coefficient . The intensity maps of vs. probe position are obtained by scanning the probe using an x-y robot, both inside and outside the crystal. The results suggest Bloch wave propagation inside the crystal and that the image formation requires a better understanding than a simple ray diagram following geometric optics. [1] P. V. Parimi et al., Nature, 426, 404 (2003).

  10. Dual curved photonic crystal ring resonator based channel drop filter using two-dimensional photonic crystal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhipa, Mayur Kumar; Dusad, Lalit Kumar

    2016-05-01

    In this paper channel drop filter (CDF) is designed using dual curved photonic crystal ring resonator (PCRR). The photonic band gap (PBG) is calculated by plane wave expansion (PWE) method and the photonic crystal (PhC) based on two dimensional (2D) square lattice periodic arrays of silicon (Si) rods in air structure have been investigated using finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. The number of rods in Z and X directions is 21 and 20 respectively with lattice constant 0.540 nm and rod radius r = 0.1 µm. The channel drop filter has been optimized for telecommunication wavelengths λ = 1.591 µm with refractive indices 3.533. In the designed structure further analysis is also done by changing whole rods refractive index and it has been observed that this filter may be used for filtering several other channels also. The designed structure is useful for CWDM systems. This device may serve as a key component in photonic integrated circuits. The device is ultra compact with the overall size around 123 µm2.

  11. A naturally grown three-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tianxiang; Lu, Dazhi; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Jiyang

    2016-02-01

    Nonlinear frequency conversion via three-dimensional (3D) quasi-phase matching (QPM) process is experimentally realized based on a Ba0.77Ca0.23TiO3 (BCT) crystal. The ferroelectric domains in BCT crystal are observed, and the results reveal that the antiparallel domains distribute in three dimensions and can provide 3D reciprocal lattice vectors for QPM processes. Broadband petal-like second-harmonic patterns are achieved, which are well consistent with the theoretical quasi-cubic model of 3D nonlinear photonic crystals. Our work not only promotes the development of QPM technique but also builds a platform for 3D nonlinear optics and quantum optics.

  12. Two-photon excited UV fluorescence for protein crystal detection

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Jeremy T.; DeWalt, Emma L.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2011-01-01

    Two-photon excited ultraviolet fluorescence (TPE-UVF) microscopy is explored for sensitive protein-crystal detection as a complement to second-order nonlinear optical imaging of chiral crystals (SONICC). Like conventional ultraviolet fluorescence (UVF), TPE-UVF generates image contrast based on the intrinsic fluorescence of aromatic residues, generally producing higher fluorescence emission within crystals than the mother liquor by nature of the higher local protein concentration. However, TPE-UVF has several advantages over conventional UVF, including (i) insensitivity to optical scattering, allowing imaging in turbid matrices, (ii) direct compatibility with conventional optical plates and windows by using visible light for excitation, (iii) elimination of potentially damaging out-of-plane UV excitation, (iv) improved signal to noise through background reduction from out-of-plane excitation and (v) relatively simple integration into instrumentation developed for SONICC. PMID:21931215

  13. Photonic crystal enhanced light-trapping in thin film solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, D.; Biswas, R.

    2008-03-01

    We utilize photonic crystals to simulate enhanced light-trapping in a-Si:H thin film solar cells. A one dimensional photonic crystal or distributed Bragg reflector with alternating dielectric layers acts as low loss backreflector. A two dimensional photonic crystal between the absorber layer and the Bragg reflector diffracts light at oblique angles within the absorber. The photonic crystal geometry is optimized to obtain maximum absorption. The photonic crystal provides lossless diffraction of photons, increasing the photon path length within the absorber layer. The simulation predicts significantly enhanced photon harvesting between 600 and 775?nm below the band edge, and an absorption increase by more than a factor of 10 near the band edge. The optical path length ratio can exceed the classical limit predicted for randomly roughened scattering surfaces at most wavelengths near the band edge. The optical modeling is performed with a rigorous scattering matrix approach where Maxwell's equations are solved in Fourier space.

  14. Tunable one-dimensional plasma photonic crystals in dielectric barrier discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Weili; Dong Lifang

    2010-07-15

    A tunable one-dimensional plasma photonic crystal is obtained by using a dielectric barrier discharge with two liquid electrodes. It is formed by the self-organization of the filaments, rather than that in an artificial array of electrodes. The dispersion relations of the plasma photonic crystals are calculated by solving the Helmholtz equation using a method analogous to Kronig-Penney's problem. The photonic band diagrams of the plasma photonic crystals are studied when changing the filling factor, the lattice constant, and the electron density, based on the experimental results. The critical electron density is given, beyond which the plasma photonic crystal will have a remarkable band structure.

  15. High-efficiency photonic crystal narrowband thermal emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farfan, G. B.; Su, M. F.; Reda Taha, M. M.; El-Kady, I.

    2010-02-01

    Photonic crystals (PhC) are artificial structures fabricated with a periodicity in the dielectric function. This periodic electromagnetic potential results in creation of energy bandgaps where photon propagation is prohibited. PhC structures have promising use in thermal applications if optimized to operate at specific thermal emission spectrum. Here, novel utilization of optimized PhC's in thermal applications is presented. We demonstrate through numerical simulation the modification of the thermal emission spectrum by a metallic photonic crystal (PhC) to create high-efficiency multispectral thermal emitters. These emitters funnel radiation from a broad emission spectrum associated with a Plancklike distribution into a prescribed narrow emission band. A detailed quantitative evaluation of the spectral and power efficiencies of a PhC thermal emitter and its portability across infrared (IR) spectral bands are provided. We show an optimized tungsten PhC with a predominant narrow-band emission profile with an emitter efficiency that is more than double that of an ideal blackbody and ~65-75% more power-efficiency across the IR spectrum. We also report on using optimal three-dimensional Lincoln log photonic crystal (LL-PhC) emitters for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) generation as opposed to using a passive filtering approach to truncate the broadband thermal source emission to match the bandgap of a photovoltaic (PV) cell. The emitter performance is optimized for the 1-2μm PV band using different PhC materials, specifically copper, silver and gold. The use of the proposed PhC in TPV devices can produce significant energy savings not reported before. The optimal design of the PhC geometry is obtained by implementing a variety of optimization methods integrated with artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms.

  16. Criteria of backscattering in chiral one-way photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Pi-Ju; Chang, Shu-Wei

    2016-03-01

    Optical isolators are important devices in photonic circuits. To reduce the unwanted reflection in a robust manner, several setups have been realized using nonreciprocal schemes. In this study, we show that the propagating modes in a strongly-guided chiral photonic crystal (no breaking of the reciprocity) are not backscattering-immune even though they are indeed insensitive to many types of scatters. Without the protection from the nonreciprocity, the backscattering occurs under certain circumstances. We present a perturbative method to calculate the backscattering of chiral photonic crystals in the presence of chiral/achiral scatters. The model is, essentially, a simplified analogy to the first-order Born approximation. Under reasonable assumptions based on the behaviors of chiral photonic modes, we obtained the expression of reflection coefficients which provides criteria for the prominent backscattering in such chiral structures. Numerical examinations using the finite-element method were also performed and the results agree well with the theoretical prediction. From both our theory and numerical calculations, we find that the amount of backscattering critically depends on the symmetry of scatter cross sections. Strong reflection takes place when the azimuthal Fourier components of scatter cross sections have an order l of 2. Chiral scatters without these Fourier components would not efficiently reflect the chiral photonic modes. In addition, for these chiral propagating modes, disturbances at the most significant parts of field profiles do not necessarily result in the most effective backscattering. The observation also reveals what types of scatters or defects should be avoided in one-way applications of chiral structures in order to minimize the backscattering.

  17. Electrically tunable zero dispersion wavelengths in photonic crystal fibers filled with a dual frequency addressable liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Wahle, Markus Kitzerow, Heinz-Siegfried

    2015-11-16

    We present a liquid crystal (LC) infiltrated photonic crystal fiber, which enables the electrical tuning of the position of zero dispersion wavelengths (ZDWs). A dual frequency addressable liquid crystal is aligned perpendicular on the inclusion walls of a photonic crystal fiber, which results in an escaped radial director field. The orientation of the LC is controlled by applying an external electric field. Due to the high index of the liquid crystal the fiber guides light by the photonic band gap effect. Multiple ZDWs exist in the visible and near infrared. The positions of the ZDWs can be either blue or red shifted depending on the frequency of the applied voltage.

  18. Electrically tunable zero dispersion wavelengths in photonic crystal fibers filled with a dual frequency addressable liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahle, Markus; Kitzerow, Heinz-Siegfried

    2015-11-01

    We present a liquid crystal (LC) infiltrated photonic crystal fiber, which enables the electrical tuning of the position of zero dispersion wavelengths (ZDWs). A dual frequency addressable liquid crystal is aligned perpendicular on the inclusion walls of a photonic crystal fiber, which results in an escaped radial director field. The orientation of the LC is controlled by applying an external electric field. Due to the high index of the liquid crystal the fiber guides light by the photonic band gap effect. Multiple ZDWs exist in the visible and near infrared. The positions of the ZDWs can be either blue or red shifted depending on the frequency of the applied voltage.

  19. Modification of Thermal Emission via Metallic Photonic Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, David J.; Stein, Andreas; George, Steven M.

    2012-07-30

    Photonic crystals are materials that are periodically structured on an optical length scale. It was previously demonstrated that the glow, or thermal emission, of tungsten photonic crystals that have a specific structure - known as the 'woodpile structure' - could be modified to reduce the amount of infrared radiation from the material. This ability has implications for improving the efficiency of thermal emission sources and for thermophotovoltaic devices. The study of this effect had been limited because the fabrication of metallic woodpile structures had previously required a complex fabrication process. In this project we pursued several approaches to simplify the fabrication of metallic photonic crystals that are useful for modification of thermal emission. First, we used the self-assembly of micrometer-scale spheres into colloidal crystals known as synthetic opals. These opals can then be infiltrated with a metal and the spheres removed to obtain a structure, known as an inverse opal, in which a three-dimensional array of bubbles is embedded in a film. Second, we used direct laser writing, in which the focus of an infrared laser is moved through a thin film of photoresist to form lines by multiphoton polymerization. Proper layering of such lines can lead to a scaffold with the woodpile structure, which can be coated with a refractory metal. Third, we explored a completely new approach to modified thermal emission - thin metal foils that contain a simple periodic surface pattern, as shown in Fig. 1. When such a foil is heated, surface plasmons are excited that propagate along the metal interface. If these waves strike the pattern, they can be converted into thermal emission with specific properties.

  20. Photonic crystal ring resonator based optical filters for photonic integrated circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, S.

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, a two Dimensional (2D) Photonic Crystal Ring Resonator (PCRR) based optical Filters namely Add Drop Filter, Bandpass Filter, and Bandstop Filter are designed for Photonic Integrated Circuits (PICs). The normalized output response of the filters is obtained using 2D Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method and the band diagram of periodic and non-periodic structure is attained by Plane Wave Expansion (PWE) method. The size of the device is minimized from a scale of few tens of millimeters to the order of micrometers. The overall size of the filters is around 11.4 μm × 11.4 μm which is highly suitable of photonic integrated circuits.

  1. Hyperspectral optical near-field imaging: Looking graded photonic crystals and photonic metamaterials in color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellinger, Jean; Van Do, K.; Le Roux, Xavier; de Fornel, Frédérique; Cassan, Eric; Cluzel, Benoît

    2012-10-01

    Using a scanning near-field optical microscope operating with a hyperspectral detection scheme, we report the direct observation of the mirage effect within an on-chip integrated artificial material made of a two dimensional graded photonic crystal. The light rainbow due to the material dispersion is quantified experimentally and quantitatively compared to three dimensional plane wave assisted Hamiltonian optics predictions of light propagation.

  2. Tuning of full band gap in anisotropic photonic crystal slabs using a liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalkhali, T. Fathollahi; Rezaei, B.; Ramezani, A. H.

    2012-11-01

    We analyze the tunability of full band gap in photonic crystal slabs created by square and triangular lattices of air holes in anisotropic tellurium background, considering that the regions above and below the slab are occupied by SiO2 and the holes are infiltrated with liquid crystals. Using the supercell method based on plane wave expansion, we study the variation of full band gap by changing the optical axis orientation of liquid crystal. Our results demonstrate the existence and remarkable tunability of full band gap in both square and triangular lattices, largest band gap and tunability being obtained for the triangular lattice.

  3. Theoretical modelling of one dimensional photonic crystal based optical demultiplexer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Kumar, Sushil; Prasad, Surendra; Singh, Vivek

    2016-05-01

    An optical demultiplexer through one-dimensional Si-SiO2 photonic crystal structure in the presence of air cavity with a single crystal PMN-0.38PT material is presented. The transmittance of this structure is obtained using the transfer matrix method. The transmittance of this structure shows a sharp passband in the band gap region. It is observed that by introducing PMN-0.38PT layer in both sides of the air cavity, the existing band gap region of Si-SiO2 structure is slightly increased. Here, PMN-0.38PT material is working as a tunable element for passband. By applying some external potential on PMN-0.38PT crystal, the thickness of cavity layer can be tuned and the passband can be placed at any desired wavelength in the band gap region. Since the photonic band gap region contains a range of wavelengths which are not allowed to pass through the structure can be considered as a multiplex signal for the proposed demultiplexer. Therefore, any optical signal that lies in the band gap region of the structure can be separated into its components as a pass band. Hence, the proposed structure will work as an optical demultiplexer.

  4. Optical diode made from a moving photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da-Wei; Zhou, Hai-Tao; Guo, Miao-Jun; Zhang, Jun-Xiang; Evers, Jörg; Zhu, Shi-Yao

    2013-03-01

    Optical diodes controlling the flow of light are of principal significance for optical information processing. They transmit light from an input to an output, but not in the reverse direction. This breaking of time reversal symmetry is conventionally achieved via Faraday or nonlinear effects. For applications in a quantum network, features such as the abilities of all-optical control, on-chip integration, and single-photon operation are important. Here we propose an all-optical optical diode which requires neither magnetic fields nor strong input fields. It is based on a "moving" photonic crystal generated in a three-level electromagnetically induced transparency medium in which the refractive index of a weak probe is modulated by the moving periodic intensity of a strong standing coupling field with two detuned counterpropagating components. Because of the Doppler effect, the frequency range of the crystal's band gap for the probe copropagating with the moving crystal is shifted from that for the counterpropagating probe. This mechanism is experimentally demonstrated in a room temperature Cs vapor cell. PMID:23496710

  5. Light harvesting in photonic crystals revisited: why do slow photons at the blue edge enhance absorption?

    PubMed

    Deparis, O; Mouchet, S R; Su, B-L

    2015-11-11

    Light harvesting enhancement by slow photons in photonic crystal catalysts or dye-sensitized solar cells is a promising approach for increasing the efficiency of photoreactions. This structural effect is exploited in inverse opal TiO2 photocatalysts by tuning the red edge of the photonic band gap to the TiO2 electronic excitation band edge. In spite of many experimental demonstrations, the slow photon effect is not fully understood yet. In particular, observed enhancement by tuning the blue edge has remained unexplained. Based on rigorous couple wave analysis simulations, we quantify light harvesting enhancement in terms of absorption increase at a specific wavelength (monochromatic UV illumination) or photocurrent increase (solar light illumination), with respect to homogeneous flat slab of equivalent material thickness. We show that the commonly accepted explanation relying on light intensity confinement in high (low) dielectric constant regions at the red (blue) edge is challenged in the case of TiO2 inverse opals because of the sub-wavelength size of the material skeleton. The reason why slow photons at the blue edge are also able to enhance light harvesting is the loose confinement of the field, which leads to significant resonantly enhanced field intensity overlap with the skeleton in both red and blue edge tuning cases, yet with different intensity patterns. PMID:26517229

  6. Optically Induced Indirect Photonic Transitions in a Slow Light Photonic Crystal Waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos Muñoz, Michel; Petrov, Alexander Yu.; O'Faolain, Liam; Li, Juntao; Krauss, Thomas F.; Eich, Manfred

    2014-02-01

    We demonstrate indirect photonic transitions in a silicon slow light photonic crystal waveguide. The transitions are driven by an optically generated refractive index front that moves along the waveguide and interacts with a signal pulse copropagating in the structure. We experimentally confirm a theoretical model which indicates that the ratio of the frequency and wave vector shifts associated with the indirect photonic transition is identical to the propagation velocity of the refractive index front. The physical origin of the transitions achieved here is fundamentally different than in previously proposed refractive index modulation concepts with fixed temporal and spatial modulation frequencies; as here, the interaction with the refractive index front results in a Doppler-like signal frequency and wave vector shift. Consequently, the bandwidth over which perfect mode frequency and wave vector matching is achieved is not intrinsically limited by the shape of the photonic bands, and tuning of the indirect photonic transitions is possible without any need for geometrical modifications of the structure. Our device is genuinely nonreciprocal, as it provides different frequency shifts for co- and counterpropagating signal and index fronts.

  7. Waveguide-integrated photonic crystal spectrometer with camera readout

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Fan; Shiue, Ren-Jye; Li, Luozhou; Nie, Jing; Harris, Nicholas C.; Chen, Edward H.; Schröder, Tim; Englund, Dirk; Wan, Noel; Pervez, Nadia; Kymissis, Ioannis

    2014-08-04

    We demonstrate an infrared spectrometer based on waveguide-coupled nanocavity filters in a planar photonic crystal structure. The input light is coupled into the waveguide, from which spectral components are dropped into the cavities and radiated off-chip for detection on a commercial InGaAs camera. The spectrometer has a footprint of only 60 μm by 8 μm. The spectral resolution is about 1 nm in the operation bandwidth of 1522–1545 nm. By substituting the membrane material and structure parameters, this design can be easily extended into the visible regime and developed for a variety of highly efficient, miniature photonic applications.

  8. Strong optomechanical interactions in a sliced photonic crystal nanobeam

    PubMed Central

    Leijssen, Rick; Verhagen, Ewold

    2015-01-01

    Coupling between mechanical and optical degrees of freedom is strongly enhanced by using subwavelength optical mode profiles. We realize an optomechanical system based on a sliced photonic crystal nanobeam, which combines such highly confined optical fields with a low-mass mechanical mode. Analyzing the transduction of motion and effects of radiation pressure we find the system exhibits a photon-phonon coupling rate g0 /2π ≈ 11.5 MHz, exceeding previously reported values by an order of magnitude. We show that the large optomechanical interaction enables detecting thermal motion with detection noise below that at the standard quantum limit, even in broad bandwidth devices, important for both sensor applications as well as measurement-based quantum control. PMID:26522751

  9. Introducing Defects in Photonic Band-Gap (PBG) Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Elliott C.; /North Dakota State U. /SLAC

    2007-11-07

    Photonic Band-Gap (PBG) fibers are a periodic array of optical materials arranged in a lattice called a photonic crystal. The use of PBG fibers for particle acceleration is being studied by the Advanced Accelerator Research Department (AARD) at SLAC. By introducing defects in such fibers, e.g. removing one or more capillaries from a hexagonal lattice, spatially confined modes suitable for particle acceleration may be created. The AARD has acquired several test samples of PBG fiber arrays with varying refractive index, capillary size, and length from an external vendor for testing. The PBGs were inspected with a microscope and characteristics of the capillaries including radii, spacing, and errors in construction were determined. Transmission tests were performed on these samples using a broad-range spectrophotometer. In addition, detailed E-field simulations of different PBG configurations were done using the CUDOS and RSOFT codes. Several accelerating modes for different configurations were found and studied in detail.

  10. Integrable microwave filter based on a photonic crystal delay line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancho, Juan; Bourderionnet, Jerome; Lloret, Juan; Combrié, Sylvain; Gasulla, Ivana; Xavier, Stephane; Sales, Salvador; Colman, Pierre; Lehoucq, Gaelle; Dolfi, Daniel; Capmany, José; de Rossi, Alfredo

    2012-09-01

    The availability of a tunable delay line with a chip-size footprint is a crucial step towards the full implementation of integrated microwave photonic signal processors. Achieving a large and tunable group delay on a millimetre-sized chip is not trivial. Slow light concepts are an appropriate solution, if propagation losses are kept acceptable. Here we use a low-loss 1.5 mm-long photonic crystal waveguide to demonstrate both notch and band-pass microwave filters that can be tuned over the 0-50-GHz spectral band. The waveguide is capable of generating a controllable delay with limited signal attenuation (total insertion loss below 10 dB when the delay is below 70 ps) and degradation. Owing to the very small footprint of the delay line, a fully integrated device is feasible, also featuring more complex and elaborate filter functions.

  11. Liquid-core, liquid-cladding photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    De Matos, Christiano J; Cordeiro, Cristiano M B; Dos Santos, Eliane M; Ong, Jackson S; Bozolan, Alexandre; Brito Cruz, Carlos H

    2007-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a simple and novel technique to simultaneously insert a liquid into the core of a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) and a different liquid into its cladding. The result is a liquid-core, liquid-cladding waveguide in which the two liquids can be selected to yield specific guidance characteristics. As an example, we tuned the core-cladding index difference by proper choice of the inserted liquids to obtain control over the number of guided modes. Single-mode guidance was achieved for a particular choice of liquids. We also experimentally and theoretically investigated the nature of light confinement and observed the transition from photonic bandgap to total internal reflection guidance both with the core-cladding index contrast and with the PCF length. PMID:19547475

  12. Plasmonic gold nanodiscs fabricated into a photonic-crystal nanocavity.

    PubMed

    Sediq, Khalid N; Coles, David; Fry, Paul W; Lidzey, David G

    2016-06-01

    We fabricate and characterise an optical structure consisting of a photonic crystal L3 nanocavity containing two gold nanodisks placed close to a field antinode. We use finite difference time domain (FDTD) modelling to show that the optical properties of the nanocavity are sensitive to the physical separation between the gold nanodisks, and that at reduced separation, the q-factor of a cavity mode polarised parallel to the dimer long-axis is reduced, indicating coupling between the cavity mode and a localised plasmon. Preliminary experimental measurements indeed indicate a damping of the cavity mode in the presence of the dimer; a result consistent with the FDTD modelling. Such a scheme may be used to integrate plasmonic systems into all-optical photonic circuits. PMID:27115917

  13. Chirped photonic crystal with different symmetries for asymmetric light propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Brahm Raj; Rawal, Swati; Sinha, R. K.

    2016-06-01

    In the present paper, we have carried out analysis of asymmetric light propagation in a chirped photonic crystal waveguide. The designed structures have hexagonal arrangement and square arrangement of silicon rods in air substrate. Dimensions of the defect rods are tailored, so that the proposed design structure works as an optical isolator. The transmission analysis of the structure reveals that it can act as an optical diode. We have plotted the extinction ratio and transmission analysis graphs for the structure, and it has been observed that the maximum output is obtained for telecom wavelength of 1.55 μm. Dispersion curves are obtained using the plane wave expansion method, and the transmission is simulated using finite element method. The proposed structures are applicable for photonic integrated circuits due to their simple and clear operating principle.

  14. Formation of discrete pulses using taper defects in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Sai Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    A two-dimensional photonic crystal based on a lattice of silicon rods in air with a photonic bandgap in the visible and near-ultraviolet spectra is proposed by removing some of the silicon rods or resizing their radii to create a monotonically varying tapered line defect, thereby pertaining to a case of structure-based nonlinearity and making it possible to operate with low input powers. By properly manipulating the length of the line defect, pulse compression and consequent adiabatic amplification are seen, along with bunching/antibunching of pulses. For certain modes of operation, field confinement is observed, and this leads to the formation of discrete pulses, or light bullets. Such a structure can be used as a multifunctional device, with some of the functionalities being optical nonpumped amplification, frequency upconversion, memory writing, matched termination, and slow wave guiding, which form the major conclusions of the work.

  15. Tunable defect mode realized by graphene-based photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jiahui; Chen, Wan; Lv, Bo

    2016-04-01

    In this literature, we propose an active terahertz 1D photonic crystal, which consists of silicon layers and air layers. A graphene sheet is embedded at the interface between dielectric and air. Tunable photonic band gap is realized by changing the Fermi level of graphene. Transmission Matrix Method is utilized to explain the influence of the graphene layer. We also demonstrate that a dielectric slab attached with a thin sheet made of single-negative metamaterial acts like a pure dielectric slab with a thinner thickness. A tunable blue shift of the band gap can be realized by simply applying different chemical potentials on the graphene sheet. This feature can be utilized for the design of tunable high-gain antenna array and force generator in terahertz band.

  16. Plasmonic gold nanodiscs fabricated into a photonic-crystal nanocavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sediq, Khalid N.; Coles, David; Fry, Paul W.; Lidzey, David G.

    2016-06-01

    We fabricate and characterise an optical structure consisting of a photonic crystal L3 nanocavity containing two gold nanodisks placed close to a field antinode. We use finite difference time domain (FDTD) modelling to show that the optical properties of the nanocavity are sensitive to the physical separation between the gold nanodisks, and that at reduced separation, the q-factor of a cavity mode polarised parallel to the dimer long-axis is reduced, indicating coupling between the cavity mode and a localised plasmon. Preliminary experimental measurements indeed indicate a damping of the cavity mode in the presence of the dimer; a result consistent with the FDTD modelling. Such a scheme may be used to integrate plasmonic systems into all-optical photonic circuits.

  17. Challenges and Solutions in Fabrication of Silica-Based Photonic Crystal Fibers: An Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amouzad Mahdiraji, G.; Chow, Desmond M.; Sandoghchi, S. R.; Amirkhan, F.; Dermosesian, E.; Shien Yeo, Kwok; Kakaei, Z.; Ghomeishi, M.; Poh, Soo Yong; Gang, Shee Yu; Mahamd Adikan, F. R.

    2014-01-01

    The fabrication process of photonic crystal fibers based on a stack-and-draw method is presented in full detail in this article. In addition, improved techniques of photonic crystal fiber preform preparation and fabrication are highlighted. A new method of connecting a handle to a preform using only a fiber drawing tower is demonstrated, which eliminates the need for a high-temperature glass working lathe. Also, a new technique of modifying the photonic crystal fiber structural pattern by sealing air holes of the photonic crystal fiber cane is presented. Using the proposed methods, several types of photonic crystal fibers are fabricated, which suggests potential for rapid photonic crystal fibers fabrication in laboratories equipped with and limited to only a fiber drawing tower.

  18. An ion trap built with photonic crystal fibre technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenfelser, F. Keitch, B.; Kienzler, D.; Home, J. P.; Bykov, D.; Uebel, P.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2015-03-15

    We demonstrate a surface-electrode ion trap fabricated using techniques transferred from the manufacture of photonic-crystal fibres. This provides a relatively straightforward route for realizing traps with an electrode structure on the 100 micron scale with high optical access. We demonstrate the basic functionality of the trap by cooling a single ion to the quantum ground state, allowing us to measure a heating rate from the ground state of 787 ± 24 quanta/s. Variation of the fabrication procedure used here may provide access to traps in this geometry with trap scales between 100 μm and 10 μm.

  19. Extreme optical confinement in a slotted photonic crystal waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Caër, Charles; Le Roux, Xavier; Cassan, Eric; Combrié, Sylvain De Rossi, Alfredo

    2014-09-22

    Using Optical Coherence Tomography, we measure the attenuation of slow light modes in slotted photonic crystal waveguides. When the group index is close to 20, the attenuation is below 300 dB cm{sup −1}. Here, the optical confinement in the empty slot is very strong, corresponding to an ultra-small effective cross section of 0.02 μm{sup 2}. This is nearly 10 times below the diffraction limit at λ = 1.5 μm, and it enables an effective interaction with a very small volume of functionalized matter.

  20. Detection of endotoxin using a photonic crystal nanolaser

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Daichi; Hachuda, Shoji; Watanabe, Takumi; Nishijima, Yoshiaki; Baba, Toshihiko

    2015-03-30

    Fast and reliable detection of endotoxin (ET) in medical equipment and pharmaceutical products is an essential precursor to clinical treatment. In this study, we demonstrate the use of shifts in wavelength of photonic crystal nanolasers for sensing the Limulus amebocyte lysate reaction, which is a standard method for detecting ET. From working curves of wavelength shift vs ET concentration, whose correlation factors were as high as 98%, we detected a required concentration of 0.001 EU/ml within 33 min and detected a low concentration of 0.0001 EU/ml.

  1. Array integration of thousands of photonic crystal nanolasers

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Takumi Abe, Hiroshi; Nishijima, Yoshiaki; Baba, Toshihiko

    2014-03-24

    Photonic crystal (PC) nanolasers often consist of air-bridge PC slab, which enhances optical confinement while limiting its size to 30 × 30 μm{sup 2} due to the mechanical fragileness. This limit is broken by resin-mediated bonding of the PC slab on a host substrate. In this paper, we demonstrate a GaInAsP PC slab with a size of over 100 × 100 μm{sup 2} in which 1089, 2376, and 11 664 nanolasers showing high-yield laser operation are integrated.

  2. High-visibility photonic crystal fiber interferometer as multifunctional sensor.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Sevilla, G A; Fávero, Fernando C; Villatoro, Joel

    2013-01-01

    A photonic crystal fiber (PCF) interferometer that exhibits record fringe contrast (~40 dB) is demonstrated along with its sensing applications. The device operates in reflection mode and consists of a centimeter-long segment of properly selected PCF fusion spliced to single mode optical fibers. Two identical collapsed zones in the PCF combined with its modal properties allow high-visibility interference patterns. The interferometer is suitable for refractometric and liquid level sensing. The measuring refractive index range goes from 1.33 to 1.43 and the maximum resolution is ~1.6 × 10(-5). PMID:23396192

  3. Experimental Observation of Large Chern Numbers in Photonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Skirlo, Scott A; Lu, Ling; Igarashi, Yuichi; Yan, Qinghui; Joannopoulos, John; Soljačić, Marin

    2015-12-18

    Despite great interest in the quantum anomalous Hall phase and its analogs, all experimental studies in electronic and bosonic systems have been limited to a Chern number of one. Here, we perform microwave transmission measurements in the bulk and at the edge of ferrimagnetic photonic crystals. Band gaps with large Chern numbers of 2, 3, and 4 are present in the experimental results, which show excellent agreement with theory. We measure the mode profiles and Fourier transform them to produce dispersion relations of the edge modes, whose number and direction match our Chern number calculations. PMID:26722920

  4. Magnetically tunable unidirectional waveguide based on magnetic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Weiwei; Wang, Jiafu; Wang, Jun; Liu, Zhaotang; Pang, Yongqiang; Qu, Shaobo

    2016-08-01

    In this letter, we presented a magnetically tunable ferrite-loaded unidirectional waveguide based on magnetic photonic crystals. Two rows of ferrite rods are symmetrically arranged near the two lateral sides of the rectangular waveguide, where they are biased with static magnetic fields with the same amplitude and opposite directions along the rod axis. Since the magnetic one-way transmission is induced by the magnetic surface plasmon resonance, the operating band of the unidirectional waveguide can be tuned by changing the biased magnetic field intensity. To validate the design, a prototype was fabricated and measured. Both the simulation and experiment results verify the unidirectional transmission property.

  5. Threshold Characteristics of Slow-Light Photonic Crystal Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Weiqi; Yu, Yi; Ottaviano, Luisa; Chen, Yaohui; Semenova, Elizaveta; Yvind, Kresten; Mork, Jesper

    2016-02-01

    The threshold properties of photonic crystal quantum dot lasers operating in the slow-light regime are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Measurements show that, in contrast to conventional lasers, the threshold gain attains a minimum value for a specific cavity length. The experimental results are explained by an analytical theory for the laser threshold that takes into account the effects of slow light and random disorder due to unavoidable fabrication imperfections. Longer lasers are found to operate deeper into the slow-light region, leading to a trade-off between slow-light induced reduction of the mirror loss and slow-light enhancement of disorder-induced losses.

  6. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering on diatom biosilica photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Fanghui; Campbell, Jeremy; Hasan, Dihan; Wang, Xiangyu; Rorrer, Gregory L.; Wang, Alan X.

    Diatoms are a group of single-celled photosynthetic algae that make skeletal shells of hydrated amorphous silica, called frustules, which possess hierarchical nanoscale photonic crystal features made by a bottom-up approach at ambient temperature and pressure. In this paper, we theoretically investigate electric field enhancements of plasmonic nanoparticles coated on the surface of diatom skeletal shells. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering substrates are prepared by evaporating 10 nm thick silver film and self-assembling silver nanoparticles on diatom surfaces, which show significantly better SERS signals than silver nanoparticles on flat glass substrates.

  7. Optical properties of two-dimensional metamaterial photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Mejía-Salazar, J. R.

    2013-12-14

    In the present work, we theoretically study a 2D photonic crystal (PC) comprised by double negative (DNG) metamaterial cylinders, showing that such a system presents a superior light-matter interaction when compared with their single negative (SNG) plasmonic PC counterparts, suggesting a route to enhance the performance of sensors and photovoltaic cells. On the other hand, we have observed that depending on the frequency, the mode symmetry resembles either the case of SNG electric (SNG-E) or SNG magnetic (SNG-M) PC, suggesting that either the electric or magnetic character of the DNG metamaterial dominates in each case.

  8. Widely tunable femtosecond solitonic radiation in photonic crystal fiber cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Jiahui; Sokolov, Alexei V.; Benabid, F.; Light, P. S.; Couny, F.; Biancalana, F.; Roberts, P. J.

    2010-03-15

    We report on a means to generate tunable ultrashort optical pulses. We demonstrate that dispersive waves generated by solitons within the small-core features of a photonic crystal fiber cladding can be used to obtain femtosecond pulses tunable over an octave-wide spectral range. The generation process is highly efficient and occurs at the relatively low laser powers available from a simple Ti:sapphire laser oscillator. The described phenomenon is general and will play an important role in other systems where solitons are known to exist.

  9. An ion trap built with photonic crystal fibre technology.

    PubMed

    Lindenfelser, F; Keitch, B; Kienzler, D; Bykov, D; Uebel, P; Schmidt, M A; Russell, P St J; Home, J P

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a surface-electrode ion trap fabricated using techniques transferred from the manufacture of photonic-crystal fibres. This provides a relatively straightforward route for realizing traps with an electrode structure on the 100 micron scale with high optical access. We demonstrate the basic functionality of the trap by cooling a single ion to the quantum ground state, allowing us to measure a heating rate from the ground state of 787 ± 24 quanta/s. Variation of the fabrication procedure used here may provide access to traps in this geometry with trap scales between 100 μm and 10 μm. PMID:25832211

  10. Photonic crystal biosensor based on optical surface waves.

    PubMed

    Konopsky, Valery N; Karakouz, Tanya; Alieva, Elena V; Vicario, Chiara; Sekatskii, Sergey K; Dietler, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    A label-free biosensor device based on registration of photonic crystal surface waves is described. Angular interrogation of the optical surface wave resonance is used to detect changes in the thickness of an adsorbed layer, while an additional simultaneous detection of the critical angle of total internal reflection provides independent data of the liquid refractive index. The abilities of the device are demonstrated by measuring of biotin molecule binding to a streptavidin monolayer, and by measuring association and dissociation kinetics of immunoglobulin G proteins. Additionally, deposition of PSS / PAH polyelectrolytes is recorded in situ resulting calculation of PSS and PAH monolayer thicknesses separately. PMID:23429517

  11. Reversible tuning of photonic crystal cavities using photochromic thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, Deepak; Waks, Edo; Solomon, Glenn; Fourkas, John T.

    2010-04-12

    We demonstrate reversible tuning of a photonic crystal cavity resonance using a thin photochromic film composed of spiropyran and polymethylmethacrylate that serves as a photosensitive cladding layer. Exposure of spiropyran to ultraviolet light results in smooth redshift of the cavity resonance that can be reversed by exposure to visible wavelength light. We achieve a reversible resonance shift of up to 2.7 nm, which can be performed locally on individual cavities. The resonance shift over multiple successive UV and visible light exposures is studied to determine the repeatability of the photochromic film.

  12. Array integration of thousands of photonic crystal nanolasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Takumi; Abe, Hiroshi; Nishijima, Yoshiaki; Baba, Toshihiko

    2014-03-01

    Photonic crystal (PC) nanolasers often consist of air-bridge PC slab, which enhances optical confinement while limiting its size to 30 × 30 μm2 due to the mechanical fragileness. This limit is broken by resin-mediated bonding of the PC slab on a host substrate. In this paper, we demonstrate a GaInAsP PC slab with a size of over 100 × 100 μm2 in which 1089, 2376, and 11 664 nanolasers showing high-yield laser operation are integrated.

  13. Coherent thermal conductance of 1-D photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschikin, Maria; Ben-Abdallah, Philippe; Biehs, Svend-Age

    2012-10-01

    We present an exact calculation of coherent thermal conductance in 1-D multilayer photonic crystals using the S-matrix method. In particular, we study the thermal conductance in a bilayer structure of Si/vacuum or Al2O3/vacuum slabs by means of the exact radiative heat flux expression. Based on the results obtained for the Al2O3/vacuum structure we show by comparison with previous works that the material losses and (localized) surface modes supported by the inner layers play a fundamental role and cannot be omitted in the definition of thermal conductance. Our results could have significant implications in the conception of efficient thermal barriers.

  14. Threshold Characteristics of Slow-Light Photonic Crystal Lasers.

    PubMed

    Xue, Weiqi; Yu, Yi; Ottaviano, Luisa; Chen, Yaohui; Semenova, Elizaveta; Yvind, Kresten; Mork, Jesper

    2016-02-12

    The threshold properties of photonic crystal quantum dot lasers operating in the slow-light regime are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Measurements show that, in contrast to conventional lasers, the threshold gain attains a minimum value for a specific cavity length. The experimental results are explained by an analytical theory for the laser threshold that takes into account the effects of slow light and random disorder due to unavoidable fabrication imperfections. Longer lasers are found to operate deeper into the slow-light region, leading to a trade-off between slow-light induced reduction of the mirror loss and slow-light enhancement of disorder-induced losses. PMID:26918991

  15. Tailoring supercontinuum generation using highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, M. A.; Namihira, Y.; Islam, M. A.; Razzak, S. M. A.; Hirako, Y.; Miyagi, K.; Kaijage, S. F.; Higa, H.

    2012-09-01

    This paper discusses about the tailoring supercontinuum (SC) generation based on a highly nonlinear germanium (Ge) doped photonic crystal fiber (HNL-GePCF) with all normal group velocity dispersion (GVD). Using finite element method (FEM) with a circular perfectly matched boundary layer (PML), it is shown through simulations that how simply the center wavelength can be shifted from one center point to another after optimizing at a particular wavelength using the proposed HNL-GePCF. Moreover, SC spectra at 1.06, 1.31 and 1.55 μm have been generated using picosecond optical pulses produced from relatively less expensive laser sources.

  16. Fused preforms for the fabrication of photonic crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falkenstein, Paul; Merritt, Charles D.; Justus, Brian L.

    2004-08-01

    A novel approach for the fabrication of high-quality preforms for use in the fabrication of photonic crystal fibers is described. The preforms are fabricated in a multistep process that involves stacking a bundle with rods and (or) tubes of two dissimilar glasses, fusing the bundle, and then etching the fused bundle in acid to remove one of the two glasses. The procedure for fabrication of the fused preforms is similar to that used in the fabrication of microchannel plate glass and yields periodically spaced, uniform, round channels that extend through the length of the preform.

  17. Diffractive properties of imaginary-part photonic crystal slab

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The diffraction spectra of imaginary-part photonic crystal (IPPC) slabs are analyzed using the scattering-matrix method. By investigating the thickness dependence of the diffraction, we find a remarkable red shift of central wavelength of the diffraction spectrum, which obviously distinguishes from the phenomenon of spectral hole. We observe that diffraction efficiency can be enhanced more than 20-fold by optimizing the geometry parameters. These imply that the diffraction spectra of the IPPC slab can be controlled at will and used to guide the design to achieve useful nanoscale devices. PMID:22720871

  18. Application of a photonic crystal fiber LPG for vibration monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, I. M.; Chesini, G.; Sousa, Marco; Osório, Jonas H.; Baptista, J. M.; Cordeiro, Cristiano M. B.; Jorge, Pedro A. S.

    2013-05-01

    A fiber optic sensor based on a long-period grating (LPG) inscribed in a photonic crystal fiber is investigated for vibration sensing for structural monitoring applications. In this paper, preliminary results are shown demonstrating the sensor ability to detect vibration induced in a test structure. The sensor frequency response when attached to a loudspeaker-acrylic plate stimulation system (tested in the range from 40 Hz to 2.5 kHz) is analyzed using an intensity based scheme with a tunable laser. An alternative interrogation scheme, where the vibration signal is retrieved from a spectral scan, is also demonstrated and analyzed showing promising characteristics for structural health monitoring.

  19. Photonic quasi-crystal fiber with high birefringence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongfei; Xiao, Wei; Cai, Weicheng; Liu, Exian; Feng, Bo; Wang, Ziming; Liang, Taiyuan; Wang, Shuo; Liu, Jianjun

    2016-03-01

    A high-birefringence photonic quasi-crystal fiber (HB-PQF) based on SiO2 is proposed. The relationships between birefringence and structure parameters and between beat length and structure parameters are researched by finite difference beam propagation method. With the optimization of fiber structure parameters, the birefringence is 1.4207×10-2, which is two orders of magnitude higher than the normally used fiber when the wavelength is 1.55 μm. The radius of the fiber is 6.5 μm. The HB-PQF in a communication sensor will have important application prospects.

  20. Fabrication and optical transmission characteristics of polymers woodpile photonic crystal structures with different crystal planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ling-Jing; Dong, Xian-Zi; Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Yong-Liang; Liu, Jie; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Duan, Xuan-Ming; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng

    2015-10-01

    The photonic band gap effect which originates from the translational invariance of the periodic lattice of dielectrics has been widely applied in the technical applications of microwave, telecommunication and visible wavelengths. Among the various examples, polymers based three dimensional (3D) photonic crystals (PhCs) have attracted considerable interest because they can be easily fabricated by femo-second (fs) ultrafast laser direct writing (DLW) method. However, it is difficult to realize complete band gap in polymers PhCs due to the low index contrast between polymers and air. Here, we report the design and experimental realization of light's nonreciprocal propagation in woodpile PhCs fabricated with DLW method. Firstly, we fabricated several polymers woodpile PhCs on glass substrate with different crystal planes. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements are in agreement with the theoretical predictions, which proves the validity and the accuracy of our DLW method. Further measurements of the transmission spectra with respect to the incident angle reveal that the surface crystal planes and incident wave vectors play important roles in the optical response. Furthermore, we designed and fabricated a 30° PhC wedge. And we find nonreciprocal transmission effect between the forward and backward waves, resulting from the nonsymmetrical refraction of the light in different planes. Our results may find potential applications in future 3D photonic integrated circuits and pave the way for the fabrication of other photonic and optical devices with DLW method.

  1. Investigations of properties of opal-like photonic crystals using combined methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmadeev, A. A.; Salakhov, M. Kh

    2016-05-01

    We propose a technique that combines atomic force microscopy, optical spectrophotometry and diffraction method for characterization of photonic crystals. These materials are promising for the creation of various devices, as well as for the observation of new effects due to their unique properties. Photonic crystals were synthesized by self-assembly of colloidal silica particles with low deviation in size. It is shown that the developed technique allows to increase the accuracy of determining the parameters of the photonic crystal.

  2. Packaging consideration of two-dimensional polymer-based photonic crystals for laser beam steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Xinyuan; Chen, Xiaonan; Chen, Maggie Yihong; Wang, Alan Xiaolong; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Ray T.

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we report the theoretical study of polymer-based photonic crystals for laser beam steering which is based on the superprism effect as well as the experiment fabrication of the two dimensional photonic crystals for the laser beam steering. Superprism effect, the principle for beam steering, was separately studied in details through EFC (Equifrequency Contour) analysis. Polymer based photonic crystals were fabricated through double exposure holographic interference method using SU8-2007. The experiment results were also reported.

  3. Self-phase modulation of femtosecond pulses in hollow photonic-crystal fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Konorov, Stanislav O; Zheltikov, Aleksei M; Sidorov-Biryukov, D A; Bugar, I; Chorvat, D J; Beloglazov, V I; Skibina, N B; Shcherbakov, Andrei V; Chorvat, D; Mel'nikov, L A

    2004-01-31

    Self-phase modulation of femtosecond laser pulses in hollow-core photonic-crystal fibres is experimentally studied. Photonic-crystal fibres allowing single-mode waveguide regimes of nonlinear-optical interactions to be implemented with maximum transmission for 800-nm femtosecond pulses are designed and fabricated. A radical enhancement of self-phase modulation is demonstrated for submicrojoule femtosecond pulses of Ti:sapphire-laser radiation propagating through hollow photonic-crystal fibres. (optical fibres)

  4. Experiment and simulation on one-dimensional plasma photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lin; Ouyang, Ji-Ting

    2014-10-15

    The transmission characteristics of microwaves passing through one-dimensional plasma photonic crystals (PPCs) have been investigated by experiment and simulation. The PPCs were formed by a series of discharge tubes filled with argon at 5 Torr that the plasma density in tubes can be varied by adjusting the discharge current. The transmittance of X-band microwaves through the crystal structure was measured under different discharge currents and geometrical parameters. The finite-different time-domain method was employed to analyze the detailed properties of the microwaves propagation. The results show that there exist bandgaps when the plasma is turned on. The properties of bandgaps depend on the plasma density and the geometrical parameters of the PPCs structure. The PPCs can perform as dynamical band-stop filter to control the transmission of microwaves within a wide frequency range.

  5. Designing Optical Properties in DNA-Programmed Nanoparticle Superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Michael Brendan

    can be used to influence the properties of mesoscale single crystal superlattices, such that they exhibit either plasmonic absorption or photonic scattering. This concept is generalized through simulation, which demonstrates that the crystal habit (size, shape, and morphology) is a powerful design parameter for optical properties in mesoscale nanoparticle assemblies. Finally, chapter 7 summarizes these data and their impact, and puts them in context regarding future opportunities. This work presents a comprehensive demonstration that the optical properties of nanoparticle-based architectures can be precisely controlled and deliberately designed a priori using the unique programmability of DNA and the use of several levels of predictive electromagnetic theory.

  6. Review on recent progress of three-dimensional optical photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Mei-Li; Kuang, Ping; Bur, James A.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; John, Sajeev

    2014-03-31

    Over the past two decades, the field of photonic-crystals has become one of the most influential realms of contemporary optics. In this paper, we will review two recent experimental progresses in three-dimensional photonic-crystal operating in optical wavelengths. The first is the observation of anomalous light-refraction, an acutely negative refraction, in a 3D photonic-crystal for light trapping, guiding and near-unity absorption. The second is the observation of quasi-coherent thermal emission from an all-metallic 3D photonic-crystal at elevated temperatures.

  7. Bending self-collimated one-way light by using gyromagnetic photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qing-Bo; Li, Zhen; Wu, Rui-xin

    2015-12-14

    We theoretically demonstrate that electromagnetic waves can self-collimate and propagate unidirectionally in photonic crystals fabricated using semicylindrical ferrite rods in magnetized states. The parity and time-reversal symmetries of such photonic crystals are broken, resulting in a self-collimated one-way body wave within the photonic crystals. By applying the bias magnetic field in a complex configuration, the self-collimated one-way wave beam can be bent into arbitrary trajectories within the photonic crystal, providing an avenue for controlling wave beams.

  8. Magnetic field sensor based on selectively magnetic fluid infiltrated dual-core photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangwar, Rahul Kumar; Bhardwaj, Vanita; Singh, Vinod Kumar

    2016-02-01

    We reported the modeling result of selectively magnetic fluid infiltrated dual-core photonic crystal fiber based magnetic field sensor. Inside the cross-section of the designed photonic crystal fiber, the two fiber cores filled with magnetic fluid (Fe3O4) form two independent waveguides with mode coupling. The mode coupling under different magnetic field strengths is investigated theoretically. The sensitivity of the sensor as a function of the structural parameters of the photonic crystal fiber is calculated. The result shows that the proposed sensing device with 1 cm photonic crystal fiber length has a large sensitivity of 305.8 pm/Oe.

  9. Time-reversal constraint limits unidirectional photon emission in slow-light photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Lang, Ben; Beggs, Daryl M; Oulton, Ruth

    2016-08-28

    Photonic crystal waveguides are known to support C-points-point-like polarization singularities with local chirality. Such points can couple with dipole-like emitters to produce highly directional emission, from which spin-photon entanglers can be built. Much is made of the promise of using slow-light modes to enhance this light-matter coupling. Here we explore the transition from travelling to standing waves for two different photonic crystal waveguide designs. We find that time-reversal symmetry and the reciprocal nature of light places constraints on using C-points in the slow-light regime. We observe two distinctly different mechanisms through which this condition is satisfied in the two waveguides. In the waveguide designs, we consider a modest group velocity of vg≈c/10 is found to be the optimum for slow-light coupling to the C-points.This article is part of the themed issue 'Unifying physics and technology in light of Maxwell's equations'. PMID:27458258

  10. Cross two photon absorption in a silicon photonic crystal waveguide fiber taper coupler with a physical junction

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkissian, Raymond O'Brien, John

    2015-01-21

    Cross two photon absorption in silicon is characterized using a tapered fiber photonic crystal silicon waveguide coupler. There is a physical junction between the tapered fiber and the waveguide constituting a stand-alone device. This device is used to obtain the spectrum for cross two photon absorption coefficient per unit volume of interaction between photons of nondegenerate energy. The corresponding Kerr coefficient per unit volume of interaction is also experimentally extracted. The thermal resistance of the device is also experimentally determined and the response time of the device is estimated for on-chip all-optical signal processing and data transfer between optical signals of different photon energies.

  11. Optical phase conjugation in third-order nonlinear photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Ping; Zhang Zhaoqing

    2004-05-01

    We predict that the efficiency of the optical phase conjugation generation can be enhanced by more than four orders of magnitude in a {chi}{sup (3)} nonlinear superlattice, as compared with that in a homogeneous nonlinear medium of the same sample thickness and {chi}{sup (3)} nonlinearity. Such an effective enhancement utilizes the localized properties of the fields inside the sample at the band-edge state, gap-soliton state, or defect state. Due to the presence of feedback mechanism at each interface of a superlattice, we also predict that the phase conjugation can still be effectively generated when only one pump wave is used.

  12. Liquid crystal dynamics in a photonic crystal cavity created by selective microfluidic infiltration.

    PubMed

    Casas Bedoya, A; Mahmoodian, S; Monat, C; Tomljenovic-Hanic, S; Grillet, C; Domachuk, P; Mägi, E C; Eggleton, B J; van der Heijden, R W

    2010-12-20

    A microfluidic double heterostructure cavity is created in a silicon planar photonic crystal waveguide by selective infiltration of a liquid crystal. The spectral evolution of the cavity resonances probed by evanescent coupling reveals that the liquid crystal evaporates, even at room temperature, despite its relatively low vapor pressure of 5 × 10(-3) Pa. We explore the infiltration and evaporation dynamics of the liquid crystal within the cavity using a Fabry-Perot model that accounts for the joint effects of liquid volume reduction and cavity length variation due to liquid evaporation. While discussing how the pattern of the infiltrated liquid can be optimized to restrict evaporation, we find that the experimental behavior is consistent with basic microfluidic relations considering the small volumes of liquids and large surface areas present in our structure. PMID:21197006

  13. Research on VCSEL of single-mode multilayer photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenchao; Liu, Zhengjun; Sha, Xiaopeng

    2010-10-01

    Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (VCSEL) of single mode have the potential advantage in the domains of optical information network, routing interactions, optical information storage and data transmission for their excellent performance. However, operating on the single-mode model in the whole pumped area is not solved, which impacts the technologies and applications. In this paper, a new research on VCSEL of single mode multilayer photonic crystal is presented. In the structure of photonic crystal, defects in the horizontal direction are provided by the micro-cavity, while the AIR-KTP interface on the top and the KTP-DBR (Distributed Bragg Reflection) interface at the bottom of cavity provide the defects in the vertical direction, which form quantum defects of electron-hole pairs. The PC-VCSEL in the paper has excellent mode-selection characteristics, which can operate continuously at 850nm in single mode. The single-mode suppression ratio (SMSR) of 45dB is obtained in a wide dynamic range. The PC-VCSEL is expected to become a high-power single-mode light in the future.

  14. Maximizing Photoluminescence Extraction in Silicon Photonic Crystal Slabs.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Ali; Sarau, George; Xavier, Jolly; Paraïso, Taofiq K; Christiansen, Silke; Vollmer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Photonic crystal modes can be tailored for increasing light matter interactions and light extraction efficiencies. These PhC properties have been explored for improving the device performance of LEDs, solar cells and precision biosensors. Tuning the extended band structure of 2D PhC provides a means for increasing light extraction throughout a planar device. This requires careful design and fabrication of PhC with a desirable mode structure overlapping with the spectral region of emission. We show a method for predicting and maximizing light extraction from 2D photonic crystal slabs, exemplified by maximizing silicon photoluminescence (PL). Systematically varying the lattice constant and filling factor, we predict the increases in PL intensity from band structure calculations and confirm predictions in micro-PL experiments. With the near optimal design parameters of PhC, we demonstrate more than 500-fold increase in PL intensity, measured near band edge of silicon at room temperature, an enhancement by an order of magnitude more than what has been reported. PMID:27113674

  15. What is the Brillouin zone of an anisotropic photonic crystal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivarajah, P.; Maznev, A. A.; Ofori-Okai, B. K.; Nelson, K. A.

    2016-02-01

    The concept of the Brillouin zone (BZ) in relation to a photonic crystal fabricated in an optically anisotropic material is explored both experimentally and theoretically. In experiment we used femtosecond laser pulses to excite THz polaritons and image their propagation in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate photonic crystal (PhC) slabs. We directly measured the dispersion relation inside PhCs and observed that the lowest band gap expected to form at the BZ boundary forms inside the BZ in the anisotropic lithium niobate PhC. Our analysis shows that in an anisotropic material the BZ—defined as the Wigner-Seitz cell in the reciprocal lattice—is no longer bounded by Bragg planes and thus does not conform to the original definition of the BZ by Brillouin. We construct an alternative Brillouin zone defined by Bragg planes and show its utility in identifying features of the dispersion bands. We show that for an anisotropic two-dimensional PhC without dispersion, the Bragg plane BZ can be constructed by applying the Wigner-Seitz method to a stretched or compressed reciprocal lattice. We also show that in the presence of the dispersion in the underlying material or in a slab waveguide, the Bragg planes are generally represented by curved surfaces rather than planes. The concept of constructing a BZ with Bragg planes should prove useful in understanding the formation of dispersion bands in anisotropic PhCs and in selectively tailoring their optical properties.

  16. Multi-Colour Nanowire Photonic Crystal Laser Pixels

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jeremy B.; Liu, Sheng; Wang, George T.; Li, Qiming; Benz, Alexander; Koleske, Daniel D.; Lu, Ping; Xu, Huiwen; Lester, Luke; Luk, Ting S.; Brener, Igal; Subramania, Ganapathi

    2013-01-01

    Emerging applications such as solid-state lighting and display technologies require micro-scale vertically emitting lasers with controllable distinct lasing wavelengths and broad wavelength tunability arranged in desired geometrical patterns to form “super-pixels”. Conventional edge-emitting lasers and current surface-emitting lasers that require abrupt changes in semiconductor bandgaps or cavity length are not a viable solution. Here, we successfully address these challenges by introducing a new paradigm that extends the laser tuning range additively by employing multiple monolithically grown gain sections each with a different emission centre wavelength. We demonstrate this using broad gain-bandwidth III-nitride multiple quantum well (MQW) heterostructures and a novel top-down nanowire photonic crystal nanofabrication. We obtain single-mode lasing in the blue-violet spectral region with a remarkable 60 nm of tuning (or 16% of the nominal centre wavelength) that is determined purely by the photonic crystal geometry. This approach can be extended to cover the entire visible spectrum. PMID:24135975

  17. Nonlinear Optics and Solitons in Photonic Crystal Fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skryabin, Dmitry V.; Wadsworth, William J.

    The fibre optics revolution in communication technologies followed the 1950's demonstration of the glass fibres with dielectric cladding [1]. Transmission applications of fibre optics have become a dominant modern day technology not least because nonlinearities present in - or introduced into - glass and enhanced by the tight focusing of the fibre modes allow for numerous light processing techniques, such as amplification, frequency conversion, pulse shaping, and many others. For these reasons, and because of the rich fundamental physics behind it, nonlinear fibre optics has become a blossoming discipline in its own right [1]. The 1990's witnessed another important development in fibre optics. Once again it came from a new approach to the fibre cladding, comprising a periodic pattern of air holes separated by glass membranes forming a photonic crystal structure [2, 3]. This prompted the name Photonic Crystal Fibres (PCFs). The fascinating story behind the invention of PCF and research into various fibre designs can be found, e.g., in [4]. Our aim here is to review the role played by PCFs in nonlinear and quantum optics, which is becoming the mainstream of the PCF related research and applications. Our focus will be on the areas where PCFs have brought to life effects and applications which were previously difficult, impossible to observe or simply not thought about.

  18. Maximizing Photoluminescence Extraction in Silicon Photonic Crystal Slabs

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, Ali; Sarau, George; Xavier, Jolly; Paraïso, Taofiq K.; Christiansen, Silke; Vollmer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Photonic crystal modes can be tailored for increasing light matter interactions and light extraction efficiencies. These PhC properties have been explored for improving the device performance of LEDs, solar cells and precision biosensors. Tuning the extended band structure of 2D PhC provides a means for increasing light extraction throughout a planar device. This requires careful design and fabrication of PhC with a desirable mode structure overlapping with the spectral region of emission. We show a method for predicting and maximizing light extraction from 2D photonic crystal slabs, exemplified by maximizing silicon photoluminescence (PL). Systematically varying the lattice constant and filling factor, we predict the increases in PL intensity from band structure calculations and confirm predictions in micro-PL experiments. With the near optimal design parameters of PhC, we demonstrate more than 500-fold increase in PL intensity, measured near band edge of silicon at room temperature, an enhancement by an order of magnitude more than what has been reported. PMID:27113674

  19. Analysis of photonic crystal double heterostructure resonant cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mock, Adam

    Two-dimensional photonic crystals represent a versatile technology platform for constructing photonic integrated circuits. Low-loss and small footprint waveguides and cavities can be combined to make delay lines, modulators, filters and lasers for efficient optical signal processing. However, this diverse functionality comes at the expense of higher complexity in both the fabrication and themodeling of these devices. This Thesis discusses the finite-difference time-domain numerical modeling of large quality factor photonic crystal cavities for chip-scale laser applications. In Chapter 2 the role of the quality factor in estimating laser threshold is derived starting from Maxwell's equations. Expressions for modal loss and gain are derived. Chapter 3 discusses methods for extracting the quality factor from finite-difference time-domain simulations. Even with large-scale parallel computing, only a short record of the time evolution of the fields can be recorded. To get around this issue, Pade functions are fitted to the available data in the frequency domain. Once the analysis tools have been described and demonstrated, they are applied to the photonic crystal double heterostructure cavity which has been shown to have quality factors in excess of one million and mode volumes on the order of a cubic wavelength. A detailed description of the spectral and modal properties of heterostructure cavities is presented, and a method for mode discrimination is discussed. The effect of heat sinking dielectric lower substrates on the optical loss of the heterostructure cavity is investigated, and it is seen that the quality factor is significantly reduced as the index of the lower substrate is increased. A modified heterostructure cavity with glide plane symmetry is shown to have significantly reduced out-of-plane leakage. An optimized design is proposed for continuous wave edge-emitting laser operation. Finally, a novel approach for laser simulation is introduced in which a

  20. CMOS compatible high-Q photonic crystal nanocavity fabricated with photolithography on silicon photonic platform

    PubMed Central

    Ooka, Yuta; Tetsumoto, Tomohiro; Fushimi, Akihiro; Yoshiki, Wataru; Tanabe, Takasumi

    2015-01-01

    Progress on the fabrication of ultrahigh-Q photonic-crystal nanocavities (PhC-NCs) has revealed the prospect for new applications including silicon Raman lasers that require a strong confinement of light. Among various PhC-NCs, the highest Q has been recorded with silicon. On the other hand, microcavity is one of the basic building blocks in silicon photonics. However, the fusion between PhC-NCs and silicon photonics has yet to be exploited, since PhC-NCs are usually fabricated with electron-beam lithography and require an air-bridge structure. Here we show that a 2D-PhC-NC fabricated with deep-UV photolithography on a silica-clad silicon-on-insulator (SOI) structure will exhibit a high-Q of 2.2 × 105 with a mode-volume of ~1.7(λ/n)3. This is the highest Q demonstrated with photolithography. We also show that this device exhibits an efficient thermal diffusion and enables high-speed switching. The demonstration of the photolithographic fabrication of high-Q silica-clad PhC-NCs will open possibility for mass-manufacturing and boost the fusion between silicon photonics and CMOS devices. PMID:26086849

  1. Preparation of metallo-dielectric photonic crystals by multi-photon direct laser writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuebler, Stephen M.; Tal, Amir; Chen, Yun-Sheng

    2008-02-01

    Metallo-dielectric photonic crystals (MDPCs) can exhibit intriguing and potentially useful optical properties, including ultra-wide photonic bandgaps, engineered thermal emission, and negative refractive index. But access to such materials has been limited by the lack of suitable methods for their preparation. We have developed a route to three-dimensional (3D) MDPCs that involves fabricating a polymeric pre-form by multi-photon direct laser writing and then conformally depositing metal onto the pre-form by electroless metallization. We use the approach to prepare silver- and copper-plated "woodpile" PCs having face-centered tetragonal symmetry and unit-cell period of several micrometers. The resulting 3D metallized structures exhibit mid-infrared reflectance that is consistent with theory and experimental observations obtained for MDPCs prepared by other routes. These data indicate that multi-photon direct laser writing coupled with electroless metallization is a viable route to complex 3D MDPCs of many symmetries and basis sets and provides a path for integrating such structures with other micron-scale optical elements.

  2. CMOS compatible high-Q photonic crystal nanocavity fabricated with photolithography on silicon photonic platform.

    PubMed

    Ooka, Yuta; Tetsumoto, Tomohiro; Fushimi, Akihiro; Yoshiki, Wataru; Tanabe, Takasumi

    2015-01-01

    Progress on the fabrication of ultrahigh-Q photonic-crystal nanocavities (PhC-NCs) has revealed the prospect for new applications including silicon Raman lasers that require a strong confinement of light. Among various PhC-NCs, the highest Q has been recorded with silicon. On the other hand, microcavity is one of the basic building blocks in silicon photonics. However, the fusion between PhC-NCs and silicon photonics has yet to be exploited, since PhC-NCs are usually fabricated with electron-beam lithography and require an air-bridge structure. Here we show that a 2D-PhC-NC fabricated with deep-UV photolithography on a silica-clad silicon-on-insulator (SOI) structure will exhibit a high-Q of 2.2 × 10(5) with a mode-volume of ~ 1.7(λ/n)(3). This is the highest Q demonstrated with photolithography. We also show that this device exhibits an efficient thermal diffusion and enables high-speed switching. The demonstration of the photolithographic fabrication of high-Q silica-clad PhC-NCs will open possibility for mass-manufacturing and boost the fusion between silicon photonics and CMOS devices. PMID:26086849

  3. Nanostructured Surfaces and Detection Instrumentation for Photonic Crystal Enhanced Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhery, Vikram; George, Sherine; Lu, Meng; Pokhriyal, Anusha; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2013-01-01

    Photonic crystal (PC) surfaces have been demonstrated as a compelling platform for improving the sensitivity of surface-based fluorescent assays used in disease diagnostics and life science research. PCs can be engineered to support optical resonances at specific wavelengths at which strong electromagnetic fields are utilized to enhance the intensity of surface-bound fluorophore excitation. Meanwhile, the leaky resonant modes of PCs can be used to direct emitted photons within a narrow range of angles for more efficient collection by a fluorescence detection system. The multiplicative effects of enhanced excitation combined with enhanced photon extraction combine to provide improved signal-to-noise ratios for detection of fluorescent emitters, which in turn can be used to reduce the limits of detection of low concentration analytes, such as disease biomarker proteins. Fabrication of PCs using inexpensive manufacturing methods and materials that include replica molding on plastic, nano-imprint lithography on quartz substrates result in devices that are practical for single-use disposable applications. In this review, we will describe the motivation for implementing high-sensitivity fluorescence detection in the context of molecular diagnosis and gene expression analysis though the use of PC surfaces. Recent efforts to improve the design and fabrication of PCs and their associated detection instrumentation are summarized, including the use of PCs coupled with Fabry-Perot cavities and external cavity lasers. PMID:23624689

  4. Experimental GVD engineering in slow light slot photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serna, Samuel; Colman, Pierre; Zhang, Weiwei; Le Roux, Xavier; Caer, Charles; Vivien, Laurent; Cassan, Eric

    2016-05-01

    The use in silicon photonics of the new optical materials developed in soft matter science (e.g. polymers, liquids) is delicate because their low refractive index weakens the confinement of light and prevents an efficient control of the dispersion properties through the geometry. We experimentally demonstrate that such materials can be incorporated in 700 μm long slot photonic crystal waveguides, and hence can benefit from both slow-light field enhancement effect and slot-induced ultra-small effective areas. Additionally, we show that their dispersion can be engineered from anomalous to normal regions, along with the presence of multiple zero group velocity dispersion (ZGVD) points exhibiting Normalized Delay Bandwidth Product as high as 0.156. The reported results provide experimental evidence for an accurate control of the dispersion properties of fillable periodical slotted structures in silicon photonics, which is of direct interest for on-chip all-optical data treatment using nonlinear optical effects in hybrid-on-silicon technologies.

  5. Optical study of Sb-S-I glass photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starczewska, Anna; Kępińska, Mirosława; Nowak, Marian; Szperlich, Piotr

    2015-12-01

    This work is focused on optical investigations of Sb-S-I glass photonic crystals based on three-dimensional opal template with a closed-packed face centered cubic (fcc) lattice prepared from monodisperse silicon (SiO2) spheres by gravity sedimentation. Three types of photonic structures have been examined: SiO2-opals, opals filled with Sb-S-I glass (direct opals) and Sb-S-I inverted opals obtained after removing SiO2 templates. Optical properties have been investigated by reflectance spectroscopy for wavelengths from 250 nm to 1100 nm. These measurements exhibit Bragg's peaks connected with photonic band gap that is tunable in position and width by varying the diameter of spheres and medium filling the opal. Values of the real parts of refractive index of the Sb-S-I in the fabricated inverted opals nmed[λ ∈ (850-950) nm] = 2.42 ± 0.08 and nmed[λ ∈ (675-750) nm] = 2.39 ± 0.11 have been determined.

  6. Experimental GVD engineering in slow light slot photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Serna, Samuel; Colman, Pierre; Zhang, Weiwei; Le Roux, Xavier; Caer, Charles; Vivien, Laurent; Cassan, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The use in silicon photonics of the new optical materials developed in soft matter science (e.g. polymers, liquids) is delicate because their low refractive index weakens the confinement of light and prevents an efficient control of the dispersion properties through the geometry. We experimentally demonstrate that such materials can be incorporated in 700 μm long slot photonic crystal waveguides, and hence can benefit from both slow-light field enhancement effect and slot-induced ultra-small effective areas. Additionally, we show that their dispersion can be engineered from anomalous to normal regions, along with the presence of multiple zero group velocity dispersion (ZGVD) points exhibiting Normalized Delay Bandwidth Product as high as 0.156. The reported results provide experimental evidence for an accurate control of the dispersion properties of fillable periodical slotted structures in silicon photonics, which is of direct interest for on-chip all-optical data treatment using nonlinear optical effects in hybrid-on-silicon technologies. PMID:27243377

  7. Photonic crystal structures with tunable structure color as colorimetric sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2013-01-01

    Colorimetric sensing, which transduces environmental changes into visible color changes, provides a simple yet powerful detection mechanism that is well-suited to the development of low-cost and low-power sensors. A new approach in colorimetric sensing exploits the structural color of photonic crystals (PCs) to create environmentally-influenced color-changeable materials. PCs are composed of periodic dielectrics or metallo-dielectric nanostructures that affect the propagation of electromagnetic waves (EM) by defining the allowed and forbidden photonic bands. Simultaneously, an amazing variety of naturally occurring biological systems exhibit iridescent color due to the presence of PC structures throughout multi-dimensional space. In particular, some kinds of the structural colors in living organisms can be reversibly changed in reaction to external stimuli. Based on the lessons learned from natural photonic structures, some specific examples of PCs-based colorimetric sensors are presented in detail to demonstrate their unprecedented potential in practical applications, such as the detections of temperature, pH, ionic species, solvents, vapor, humidity, pressure and biomolecules. The combination of the nanofabrication technique, useful design methodologies inspired by biological systems and colorimetric sensing will lead to substantial developments in low-cost, miniaturized and widely deployable optical sensors. PMID:23539027

  8. Remote macroscopic entanglement on a photonic crystal architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flayac, H.; Minkov, M.; Savona, V.

    2015-10-01

    The outstanding progress in nanostructure fabrication and cooling technologies allows what was unthinkable a few decades ago: bringing single-mode mechanical vibrations to the quantum regime. The coupling between photon and phonon excitations is a natural source of nonclassical states of light and mechanical vibrations, and its study within the field of cavity optomechanics is developing lightning fast. Photonic crystal cavities are highly integrable architectures that have demonstrated the strongest optomechanical coupling to date and should therefore play a central role for such hybrid quantum-state engineering. In this context, we propose a realistic heralding protocol for the on-chip preparation of remotely entangled mechanical states, relying on the state-of-the-art optomechanical parameters of a silicon-based nanobeam structure. Pulsed sideband excitation of a Stokes process, combined with single-photon detection, allows the writing of a delocalized mechanical Bell state in the system, signatures of which can then be read out in the optical field. A measure of entanglement in this protocol is provided by the visibility of a characteristic quantum interference pattern in the emitted light.

  9. Experimental GVD engineering in slow light slot photonic crystal waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Serna, Samuel; Colman, Pierre; Zhang, Weiwei; Le Roux, Xavier; Caer, Charles; Vivien, Laurent; Cassan, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The use in silicon photonics of the new optical materials developed in soft matter science (e.g. polymers, liquids) is delicate because their low refractive index weakens the confinement of light and prevents an efficient control of the dispersion properties through the geometry. We experimentally demonstrate that such materials can be incorporated in 700 μm long slot photonic crystal waveguides, and hence can benefit from both slow-light field enhancement effect and slot-induced ultra-small effective areas. Additionally, we show that their dispersion can be engineered from anomalous to normal regions, along with the presence of multiple zero group velocity dispersion (ZGVD) points exhibiting Normalized Delay Bandwidth Product as high as 0.156. The reported results provide experimental evidence for an accurate control of the dispersion properties of fillable periodical slotted structures in silicon photonics, which is of direct interest for on-chip all-optical data treatment using nonlinear optical effects in hybrid-on-silicon technologies. PMID:27243377

  10. Photonic Crystal Structures with Tunable Structure Color as Colorimetric Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2013-01-01

    Colorimetric sensing, which transduces environmental changes into visible color changes, provides a simple yet powerful detection mechanism that is well-suited to the development of low-cost and low-power sensors. A new approach in colorimetric sensing exploits the structural color of photonic crystals (PCs) to create environmentally-influenced color-changeable materials. PCs are composed of periodic dielectrics or metallo-dielectric nanostructures that affect the propagation of electromagnetic waves (EM) by defining the allowed and forbidden photonic bands. Simultaneously, an amazing variety of naturally occurring biological systems exhibit iridescent color due to the presence of PC structures throughout multi-dimensional space. In particular, some kinds of the structural colors in living organisms can be reversibly changed in reaction to external stimuli. Based on the lessons learned from natural photonic structures, some specific examples of PCs-based colorimetric sensors are presented in detail to demonstrate their unprecedented potential in practical applications, such as the detections of temperature, pH, ionic species, solvents, vapor, humidity, pressure and biomolecules. The combination of the nanofabrication technique, useful design methodologies inspired by biological systems and colorimetric sensing will lead to substantial developments in low-cost, miniaturized and widely deployable optical sensors. PMID:23539027

  11. Ultracompact variable optical attenuator based on photonic crystal waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiang; Cui, Kaiyu; Huang, Yidong

    2011-12-01

    We demonstrated and fabricated a 20μm-long ultra-compact variable optical attenuator based on thermo-optical effect with slow light photonic crystal waveguide (PCWG). In simulation, we optimize the line-defect width and radius/period ratio (r/a) of the PCWG for deep photonic band gap and large slope photonic band edge. An r/a=140nm/410nm W1 PCWG is selected for its -60dB depth and 36dB variable attenuation range when the tunable refractive index change is 0.01. We also study different shapes of micro-heaters for low power consumption and high heat transfer efficiency. A 24.6mW and 75.9% heat transfer efficiency are achieved in a 2μm-wide right-angle-shaped micro-heater. In experiment, A 4.6nm red shift at the cutoff wavelength of the fundamental mode and a 10dB tunable attenuation range are achieved through tuning the temperature of the W1 PCWG by an 4.7μm-wide aluminum micro-heater with a maximum power consumption as low as 30.7mW.

  12. Observation of soliton compression in silicon photonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Redondo, A.; Husko, C.; Eades, D.; Zhang, Y.; Li, J.; Krauss, T.F.; Eggleton, B.J.

    2014-01-01

    Solitons are nonlinear waves present in diverse physical systems including plasmas, water surfaces and optics. In silicon, the presence of two photon absorption and accompanying free carriers strongly perturb the canonical dynamics of optical solitons. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of soliton-effect pulse compression of picosecond pulses in silicon, despite two photon absorption and free carriers. Here we achieve compression of 3.7 ps pulses to 1.6 ps with <10 pJ energy. We demonstrate a ~1-ps free-carrier-induced pulse acceleration and show that picosecond input pulses are critical to these observations. These experiments are enabled by a dispersion-engineered slow-light photonic crystal waveguide and an ultra-sensitive frequency-resolved electrical gating technique to detect the ultralow energies in the nanostructured device. Strong agreement with a nonlinear Schrödinger model confirms the measurements. These results further our understanding of nonlinear waves in silicon and open the way to soliton-based functionalities in complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor-compatible platforms. PMID:24423977

  13. Trapped Atoms in One-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimble, H.

    2013-05-01

    I describe one-dimensional photonic crystals that support a guided mode suitable for atom trapping within a unit cell, as well as a second probe mode with strong atom-photon interactions. A new hybrid trap is analyzed that combines optical and Casimir-Polder forces to form stable traps for neutral atoms in dielectric nanostructures. By suitable design of the band structure, the atomic spontaneous emission rate into the probe mode can exceed the rate into all other modes by more than tenfold. The unprecedented single-atom reflectivity r0 ~= 0 . 9 for the guided probe field could create new scientific opportunities, including quantum many-body physics for 1 D atom chains with photon-mediated interactions and high-precision studies of vacuum forces. Towards these goals, my colleagues and I are pursuing numerical simulation, device fabrication, and cold-atom experiments with nanoscopic structures. Funding is provided by by the IQIM, an NSF PFC with support of the Moore Foundation, by the AFOSR QuMPASS MURI, by the DoD NSSEFF program (HJK), and by NSF Grant PHY0652914 (HJK). DEC acknowledges funding from Fundacio Privada Cellex Barcelona.

  14. Magnetic-field tunable defect modes in a photonic-crystal/liquid-crystal cell.

    PubMed

    Zyryanov, Victor Ya; Myslivets, Sergey A; Gunyakov, Vladimir A; Parshin, Alexander M; Arkhipkin, Vasily G; Shabanov, Vasily F; Lee, Wei

    2010-01-18

    Light transmission spectrum of a multilayer photonic crystal with a central liquid-crystal defect layer placed between crossed polarizers has been studied. Transmittance was varied due to the magnetically induced reorientation of the nematic director from homeotropic to planar alignment. Two notable effects were observed for this scheme: the spectral shift of defect modes corresponding to the extraordinary light wave and its superposition with the ordinary one. As a result, the optical cell allows controlling the intensity of interfering defect modes by applied magnetic field. PMID:20173953

  15. Photonic bandgap crystal resonator enhanced, laser controlled modulations of optical interconnects for photonic integrated circuits.

    PubMed

    Teo, Selin H G; Liu, A Q; Zhang, J B; Hong, M H; Singh, J; Yu, M B; Singh, N; Lo, G Q

    2008-05-26

    Ultrafast high-density photonic integrated circuit devices (PICDs) are not easily obtained using traditional index-guiding mechanisms. In this paper, photonic bandgap crystal resonator enhanced, laser-controlled modulations of optical interconnect PICDs were achieved in slab-type mix-guiding configuration - through developed CMOS-compatible processing technologies. The devices, with smallest critical dimensions of 90 nm have footprints of less than 5 x 5 microm(2). Quality-factors an order larger than previously realized was achieved. Through use of effective coupling structures; simultaneous alignment for probing and pumping laser beams, optical measurements of both instantaneous free carriers induced device modulations were obtained together with thermo-optical effects characterizations. PMID:18545494

  16. Coded output photonic A/D converter based on photonic crystal slow-light structures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Sunkyu; Koo, Sukmo; Park, Namkyoo

    2008-09-01

    A photonic analog-to-digital converter (PADC) utilizing a slow-light photonic crystal Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) is proposed, to enable the optically coded output of a PADC with reduced device size and power consumption. Assuming an index modulation for the MZI on the Taylor's PADC structure, limiting factors in device size, speed, and effective number of bits are derived considering the signal transition time of the light and the slow light dispersion effects. Details of the device design and results of a time domain assessment of the device performance is described with discussions on the feasibility of sub-mm size, 20GS/s operation of the device having the ENOB (effective number of bits) > 5. PMID:18772986

  17. Etched distributed Bragg reflectors as three-dimensional photonic crystals: photonic bands and density of states.

    PubMed

    Pavarini, E; Andreani, L C

    2002-09-01

    The photonic band dispersion and density of states (DOS) are calculated for the three-dimensional (3D) hexagonal structure corresponding to a distributed Bragg reflector patterned with a 2D triangular lattice of circular holes. Results for the Si/SiO(2) and GaAs/Al(x)Ga(1-x)As systems determine the optimal parameters for which a gap in the 2D plane occurs and overlaps the 1D gap of the multilayer. The DOS is considerably reduced in correspondence with the overlap of 2D and 1D gaps. Also, the local density of states (i.e., the DOS weighted with the squared electric field at a given point) has strong variations depending on the position. Both results imply substantial changes of spontaneous emission rates and patterns for a local emitter embedded in the structure and make this system attractive for the fabrication of a 3D photonic crystal with controlled radiative properties. PMID:12366275

  18. The Photonic Band Gaps in the Two-Dimensional Plasma Photonic Crystals with Rhombus Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kaiming; Sun, Dongsheng

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, under two different electromagnetic modes, the photonic band gaps (PBGs) in the two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals (PPCs) are theoretically investigated based on the plane wave expansion method. The proposed PPCs are arranged in rhombus lattices, in which the homogeneous unmagnetized plasma rods are immersed in the isotropic dielectric background. The computed results showed that PBGs can be easily tuned by the angle of rhombus lattices, and a cutoff frequency and a flatbands region can be observed under the TM and TE polarized waves, respectively. The relationships between the relative bandwidths of first PBGs and the parameters of PPCs in two such cases also are discussed. The numerical simulations showed that the PBGs can be manipulated obviously by the parameters as mentioned above. The proposed results can be used to design the waveguide and filter based on the PPCs.

  19. Photonic band structures of one-dimensional photonic crystals doped with plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, B.; Xie, M. Q.; Peng, L.

    2012-07-01

    The photonic band structures (PBSs) of oblique incidence propagation in one-dimensional plasma-doped photonic crystals (PCs) are investigated carefully. When the lattice constant of plasma-doped PCs is less than the incident wavelength, the PC becomes anisotropic. Therefore, the dielectric constant of PC is converted into a complex tensor dielectric constant. This determines the PBSs of PCs. In the present paper, one-dimensional PCs are taken as an example to study both normal and absorption PBSs. Using both the effective medium approximation and the transfer matrix method, we can derive the dispersion relation for PCs. The dependence of the plasma filling factor on the effective dielectric constant and PBSs is calculated and discussed.

  20. Effect of implementation of a Bragg reflector in the photonic band structure of the Suzuki-phase photonic crystal lattice.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Luis Javier; Alija, Alfonso Rodriguez; Postigo, Pablo Aitor; Galisteo-López, J F; Galli, Matteo; Andreani, Lucio Claudio; Seassal, Christian; Viktorovitch, Pierre

    2008-06-01

    We investigate the change of the photonic band structure of the Suzuki-phase photonic crystal lattice when the horizontal mirror symmetry is broken by an underlying Bragg reflector. The structure consists of an InP photonic crystal slab including four InAsP quantum wells, a SiO(2) bonding layer, and a bottom high index contrast Si/SiO(2) Bragg mirror deposited on a Si wafer. Angle- and polarization-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy has been used for measuring the photonic band structure and for investigating the coupling to a polarized plane wave in the far field. A drastic change in the k-space photonic dispersion between the structure with and without Bragg reflector is measured. An important enhancement on the photoluminescence emission up to seven times has been obtained for a nearly flat photonic band, which is characteristic of the Suzuki-phase lattice. PMID:18545565

  1. Optimization and Design of 2d Honeycomb Lattice Photonic Crystal Modulated by Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Caihong; Zheng, Jihong; Gui, Kun; Zhang, Menghua; Zhuang, Songlin

    2013-12-01

    Photonic crystals (PCs) with infiltrating liquid crystals (LCs) have many potential applications because of their ability to continuously modulate the band-gaps. Using the plane-wave expansion method (PWM), we simulate the band-gap distribution of 2D honeycomb lattice PC with different pillar structures (circle, hexagonal and square pillar) and with different filling ratios, considering both when the LC is used as filling pillar material and semiconductors (Si, Ge) are used in the substrate, and when the semiconductors (Si, Ge) are pillar material and the LC is the substrate. Results show that unlike LC-based triangle lattice PC, optimized honeycomb lattice PC has the ability to generate absolute photonic band-gaps for fabricating optical switches. We provide optimization parameters for LC infiltrating honeycomb lattice PC structure based on simulation results and analysis.

  2. Photonic crystal fibre enables short-wavelength two-photon laser scanning fluorescence microscopy with fura-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Gail; Riis, Erling

    2004-10-01

    We report on a novel and compact reliable laser source capable of short-wavelength two-photon laser scanning fluorescence microscopy based on soliton self-frequency shift effects in photonic crystal fibre. We demonstrate the function of the system by performing two-photon microscopy of smooth muscle cells and cardiac myocytes from the rat pulmonary vein and Chinese hamster ovary cells loaded with the fluorescent calcium indicator fura-2/AM.

  3. Symmetry-protected topological photonic crystal in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ling; Fang, Chen; Fu, Liang; Johnson, Steven G.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin

    2016-04-01

    Topology of electron wavefunctions was first introduced to characterize the quantum Hall states in two dimensions discovered in 1980 (ref. ). Over the past decade, it has been recognized that symmetry plays a crucial role in the classification of topological phases, leading to the broad notion of symmetry-protected topological phases. As a primary example, topological insulators are distinguished from normal insulators in the presence of time-reversal symmetry (). A three-dimensional (3D) topological insulator exhibits an odd number of protected surface Dirac cones, a unique property that cannot be realized in any 2D systems. Importantly, the existence of topological insulators requires Kramers’ degeneracy in spin-orbit coupled electronic materials; this forbids any direct analogue in boson systems. In this report, we discover a 3D topological photonic crystal phase hosting a single surface Dirac cone, which is protected by a crystal symmetry--the nonsymmorphic glide reflection rather than . Such a gapless surface state is fully robust against random disorder of any type. This bosonic topological band structure is achieved by applying alternating magnetization to gap out the 3D `generalized Dirac points’ discovered in the bulk of our crystal. The Z2 bulk invariant is characterized through the evolution of Wannier centres. Our proposal--readily realizable using ferrimagnetic materials at microwave frequencies--expands the scope of 3D topological materials from fermions to bosons.

  4. Extraordinary wavelength reduction in terahertz graphene-cladded photonic crystal slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Ian A. D.; Mousavi, S. Hossein; Wang, Zheng

    2016-05-01

    Photonic crystal slabs have been widely used in nanophotonics for light confinement, dispersion engineering, nonlinearity enhancement, and other unusual effects arising from their structural periodicity. Sub-micron device sizes and mode volumes are routine for silicon-based photonic crystal slabs, however spectrally they are limited to operate in the near infrared. Here, we show that two single-layer graphene sheets allow silicon photonic crystal slabs with submicron periodicity to operate in the terahertz regime, with an extreme 100× wavelength reduction from graphene’s large kinetic inductance. The atomically thin graphene further leads to excellent out-of-plane confinement, and consequently photonic-crystal-slab band structures that closely resemble those of ideal two-dimensional photonic crystals, with broad band gaps even when the slab thickness approaches zero. The overall photonic band structure not only scales with the graphene Fermi level, but more importantly scales to lower frequencies with reduced slab thickness. Just like ideal 2D photonic crystals, graphene-cladded photonic crystal slabs confine light along line defects, forming waveguides with the propagation lengths on the order of tens of lattice constants. The proposed structure opens up the possibility to dramatically reduce the size of terahertz photonic systems by orders of magnitude.

  5. Extraordinary wavelength reduction in terahertz graphene-cladded photonic crystal slabs.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Ian A D; Mousavi, S Hossein; Wang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Photonic crystal slabs have been widely used in nanophotonics for light confinement, dispersion engineering, nonlinearity enhancement, and other unusual effects arising from their structural periodicity. Sub-micron device sizes and mode volumes are routine for silicon-based photonic crystal slabs, however spectrally they are limited to operate in the near infrared. Here, we show that two single-layer graphene sheets allow silicon photonic crystal slabs with submicron periodicity to operate in the terahertz regime, with an extreme 100× wavelength reduction from graphene's large kinetic inductance. The atomically thin graphene further leads to excellent out-of-plane confinement, and consequently photonic-crystal-slab band structures that closely resemble those of ideal two-dimensional photonic crystals, with broad band gaps even when the slab thickness approaches zero. The overall photonic band structure not only scales with the graphene Fermi level, but more importantly scales to lower frequencies with reduced slab thickness. Just like ideal 2D photonic crystals, graphene-cladded photonic crystal slabs confine light along line defects, forming waveguides with the propagation lengths on the order of tens of lattice constants. The proposed structure opens up the possibility to dramatically reduce the size of terahertz photonic systems by orders of magnitude. PMID:27143314

  6. Extraordinary wavelength reduction in terahertz graphene-cladded photonic crystal slabs

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Ian A. D.; Mousavi, S. Hossein; Wang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Photonic crystal slabs have been widely used in nanophotonics for light confinement, dispersion engineering, nonlinearity enhancement, and other unusual effects arising from their structural periodicity. Sub-micron device sizes and mode volumes are routine for silicon-based photonic crystal slabs, however spectrally they are limited to operate in the near infrared. Here, we show that two single-layer graphene sheets allow silicon photonic crystal slabs with submicron periodicity to operate in the terahertz regime, with an extreme 100× wavelength reduction from graphene’s large kinetic inductance. The atomically thin graphene further leads to excellent out-of-plane confinement, and consequently photonic-crystal-slab band structures that closely resemble those of ideal two-dimensional photonic crystals, with broad band gaps even when the slab thickness approaches zero. The overall photonic band structure not only scales with the graphene Fermi level, but more importantly scales to lower frequencies with reduced slab thickness. Just like ideal 2D photonic crystals, graphene-cladded photonic crystal slabs confine light along line defects, forming waveguides with the propagation lengths on the order of tens of lattice constants. The proposed structure opens up the possibility to dramatically reduce the size of terahertz photonic systems by orders of magnitude. PMID:27143314

  7. Polarization beam splitters based on a two-dimensional photonic crystal of negative refraction.

    PubMed

    Ao, Xianyu; He, Sailing

    2005-08-15

    A two-dimensional metallo-dielectric photonic crystal of negative refraction was designed for the application of polarization beam splitters. To match the refractive index of air, the effective refractive index of the designed photonic crystal is -1 for TE polarization and +1 for TM polarization. Two types of polarization beam splitter are presented. PMID:16127940

  8. Transfer of Preformed Three-Dimensional Photonic Crystals onto Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mihi, Agustín; Zhang, Chunjie; Braun, Paul V.

    2011-05-09

    Preformed self-assembled 3D photonic crystals can be infilled with a polycarbonate matrix for mechanical stability and transferred onto rough and porous optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices. This technique allows the incorporation of photonic crystals onto independently processed devices, in which the transferred films have high optical quality.

  9. Current status of three-dimensional silicon photonic crystals operating at infrared wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    LIN,SHAWN-YU; FLEMING,JAMES G.; SIGALAS,M.M.; BISWAS,R.; HO,K.M.

    2000-05-11

    In this paper, the experimental realization and promises of three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals in the infrared and optical wavelengths will be described. Emphasis will be placed on the development of new 3D photonic crystals, the micro- and nano-fabrication techniques, the construction of high-Q micro-cavities and the creation of 3D waveguides.

  10. Experimental studies of polarization properties of supercontinua generated in a birefringent photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhaoming; Brown, Thomas

    2004-03-01

    Besides coherence degradations, supercontinuum spectra generated in birefringent photonic crystal fibers also suffer from polarization fluctuations because of noise in the input pump pulse. This paper describes an experimental study of polarization properties of supercontinuum spectra generated in a birefringent photonic crystal fiber, validating previous numerical simulations. PMID:19474887

  11. Genetically designed L3 photonic crystal nanocavities with measured quality factor exceeding one million

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Y.; Badolato, A.; Pirotta, S.; Urbinati, G.; Gerace, D.; Galli, M.; Minkov, M.; Savona, V.

    2014-06-16

    We report on the experimental realization of ultra-high quality factor (Q) designs of the L3-type photonic crystal nanocavity. Based on genetic optimization of the positions of few nearby holes, our design drastically improves the performance of the conventional L3 as experimentally confirmed by direct measurement of Q ≃ 2 × 10{sup 6} in a silicon-based photonic crystal membrane. Our devices rank among the highest Q/V ratios ever reported in photonic crystal cavities, holding great promise for the realization of integrated photonic platforms based on ultra-high-Q resonators.

  12. Analysis of plasma-magnetic photonic crystal with a tunable band gap

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdian, H.; Mohammadzahery, Z.; Hasanbeigi, A.

    2013-04-15

    In this paper, electromagnetic wave propagation through the one-dimensional plasma-magnetic photonic crystal in the presence of external magnetic field has been analyzed. The dispersion relation, transmission and reflection coefficients have been obtained by using the transfer matrix method. It is investigated how photonic band gap of photonic crystals will be tuned when both dielectric function {epsilon} and magnetic permeability {mu} of the constitutive materials, depend on applied magnetic field. This is shown by one dimensional photonic crystals consisting of plasma and ferrite material layers stacked alternately.

  13. Parametric down-conversion with optimized spectral properties in nonlinear photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Corona, Maria; U'Ren, Alfred B.

    2007-10-15

    We study the joint spectral properties of photon pairs generated by spontaneous parametric down-conversion in a one-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystal in a collinear, degenerate, type-II geometry. We show that the photonic crystal properties may be exploited to compensate for material dispersion and obtain photon pairs that are nearly factorable, in principle, for arbitrary materials and spectral regions, limited by the ability to fabricate the nonlinear crystal with the required periodic variation in the refractive indices for the ordinary and extraordinary waves.

  14. Photonic crystal slab waveguides in moderate index contrast media: Generalized transverse Bragg waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burckel, David Bruce

    One of the anticipated advantages of photonic crystal waveguides is the ability to tune waveguide dispersion and propagation characteristics to achieve desired properties. The majority of research into photonic crystal waveguides centers around high index contrast photonic crystal waveguides with complete in-plane bandgaps in the photonic crystal cladding. This work focuses on linear photonic crystal waveguides in moderate index materials, with insufficient index contrast to guarantee a complete in-plane bandgap. Using a technique called Interferometric Lithography (IL) as well as standard semiconductor processing steps, a process flow for creating large area (˜cm 2), linear photonic crystal waveguides in a spin-deposited photocurable polymer is outlined. The study of such low index contrast photonic crystal waveguides offers a unique opportunity to explore the mechanisms governing waveguide confinement and photonic crystal behavior in general. Results from two optical characterization experiments are provided. In the first set of experiments, rhodamine 590 organic laser dye was incorporated into the polymer prior to fabrication of the photonic crystal slab. Emission spectra from waveguide core modes exhibit no obvious spectral selectivity owing to variation in the periodicity or geometry of the photonic crystal. In addition, grating coupled waveguides were fabricated, and a single frequency diode laser was coupled into the waveguide in order to study the transverse mode structure. To this author's knowledge, the optical mode profile images are the first taken of photonic crystal slab waveguides, exhibiting both simple low order mode structure as well as complex high order mode structure inconsistent with effective index theory. However, no obvious correlation between the mode structure and photonic crystal period or geometry was evident. Furthermore, in both the laser dye-doped and grating coupled waveguides, low loss waveguiding was observed regardless of

  15. Metallo-dielectric diamond and zinc-blende photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, Alexander

    2002-09-01

    Diamond and zinc-blende photonic crystals are studied both in the purely dielectric case and in the presence of small inclusions of a low absorbing metal. It is shown that small metal inclusions can have a dramatic effect on the photonic band structure. Several complete photonic band gaps (CPBG's) can open in the spectrum, between the second and third, fifth and sixth, and eighth and ninth bands. Unlike in the purely dielectric case, in the presence of small inclusions of a low absorbing metal the largest CPBG for a moderate dielectric constant (ɛ<=10) turns out to be the second to third CPBG. The second to third CPBG is the most important CPBG, because it is the most stable against disorder. For a diamond and zinc-blende structure of nonoverlapping dielectric and metallo-dielectric spheres, a CPBG begins to decrease with an increasing dielectric contrast roughly at the point where another CPBG starts to open-a kind of gap competition. A CPBG can even shrink to zero when the dielectric contrast increases further. Metal inclusions have the biggest effect for the dielectric constant ɛ∈[2,12], which is a typical dielectric constant at near infrared and in the visible for many materials, including semiconductors and polymers. It is shown that one can create a sizeable and robust second to third CPBG at near-infrared and visible wavelengths even for a photonic crystal which is composed of more than 97% low refractive index materials (n<=1.45, i.e., that of silica glass or a polymer). In the case of silica spheres with a silver core, the second to third CPBG opens for a metal volume fraction fm~1.1% and has a gap width to midgap frequency ratio of 5% for fm~2.5%. Within the second to third CPBG of 5%, absorption remains very small (<=2.6% once the CPBG is centered at a wavelength λ>=750 nm), which should be tolerable in most practical applications. The metallo-dielectric structures display a scalinglike behavior, which makes it possible to scale the CPBG from

  16. Optical nonreciprocal transmission in an asymmetric silicon photonic crystal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zheng; Chen, Juguang; Ji, Mengxi; Huang, Qingzhong; Xia, Jinsong; Wang, Yi E-mail: ywangwnlo@mail.hust.edu.cn; Wu, Ying E-mail: ywangwnlo@mail.hust.edu.cn

    2015-11-30

    An optical nonreciprocal transmission (ONT) is realized by employing the nonlinear effects in a compact asymmetric direct-coupled nanocavity-waveguide silicon photonic crystal structure with a high loaded quality factor (Q{sub L}) of 42 360 and large extinction ratio exceeding 30 dB. Applying a single step lithography and successive etching, the device can realize the ONT in an individual nanocavity, alleviating the requirement to accurately control the resonance of the cavities. A maximum nonreciprocal transmission ratio of 21.1 dB as well as a working bandwidth of 280 pm in the telecommunication band are obtained at a low input power of 76.7 μW. The calculated results by employing a nonlinear coupled-mode model are in good agreement with the experiment.

  17. Properties of surface modes in one dimensional plasma photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, S.; Prasad, S. Singh, V.

    2015-02-15

    Properties of surface modes supported at the interface of air and a semi-infinite one dimensional plasma photonic crystal are analyzed. The surface mode equation is obtained by using transfer matrix method and applying continuity conditions of electric fields and its derivatives at the interface. It is observed that with increase in the width of cap layer, frequencies of surface modes are shifted towards lower frequency side, whereas increase in tangential component of wave-vector increases the mode frequency and total energy carried by the surface modes. With increase in plasma frequency, surface modes are found to shift towards higher frequency side. The group velocity along interface is found to control by cap layer thickness.

  18. Nonlinear switching dynamics in a photonic-crystal nanocavity

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yi Palushani, Evarist; Heuck, Mikkel; Vukovic, Dragana; Peucheret, Christophe; Yvind, Kresten; Mork, Jesper

    2014-08-18

    We report the experimental observation of nonlinear switching dynamics in an InP photonic crystal nanocavity. Usually, the regime of relatively small cavity perturbations is explored, where the signal transmitted through the cavity follows the temporal variation of the cavity resonance. When the cavity is perturbed by strong pulses, we observe several nonlinear effects, i.e., saturation of the switching contrast, broadening of the switching window, and even initial reduction of the transmission. The effects are analyzed by comparison with nonlinear coupled mode theory and explained in terms of large dynamical variations of the cavity resonance in combination with nonlinear losses. The results provide insight into the nonlinear optical processes that govern the dynamics of nanocavities and are important for applications in optical signal processing, where one wants to optimize the switching contrast.

  19. Pressure sensor based on flexible photonic crystal membrane.

    PubMed

    Karrock, Torben; Gerken, Martina

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate a pressure sensor based on deformation of a periodically nanostructured Bragg grating waveguide on a flexible 50 µm polydimethylsiloxane membrane and remote optical read out. A pressure change causes deformation of this 2 mm diameter photonic crystal membrane sealing a reference volume. The resulting shift of the guided mode resonances is observed by a remote camera as localized color change. Crossed polarization filters are employed for enhancing the visibility of the guided mode resonances. Pressure values are calculated from the intensity change in the green color channel using a calibration curve in the range of 2000 Pa to 4000 Pa. A limit of detection (LOD) of 160 Pa is estimated. This LOD combined with the small size of the sensor and its biocompatibility render it promising for application as an implantable intraocular pressure sensor. PMID:26713204

  20. Locally pressed photonic crystal fiber interferometer for multiparameter sensing.

    PubMed

    Villatoro, Joel; Minkovich, Vladimir P; Zubia, Joseba

    2014-05-01

    A mode interferometer consisting of a short section of photonic crystal fiber (PCF) fusion spliced to a standard single-mode optical fiber with localized perturbations is proposed for multiparameter sensing. In this sensing configuration, the parameter being sensed changes the visibility (an absolute parameter) of the interference pattern and also causes a shift (a relative parameter) to the interference pattern. To achieve this dual effect, a portion of the PCF is squeezed on localized regions with a serrated mechanical piece. In this manner, we introduce attenuation losses and effective refractive index changes to the interfering modes, hence, visibility changes and a shift to the interference pattern. Our device is suitable for monitoring diverse physical parameters, such as weight, lateral force, pressure, load, etc., with the advantage that compensation to temperature or power fluctuations is not required. Moreover, the sensor sensitivity can be adjusted in a simple manner. PMID:24784050

  1. Photonic crystals cause active colour change in chameleons

    PubMed Central

    Teyssier, Jérémie; Saenko, Suzanne V.; van der Marel, Dirk; Milinkovitch, Michel C.

    2015-01-01

    Many chameleons, and panther chameleons in particular, have the remarkable ability to exhibit complex and rapid colour changes during social interactions such as male contests or courtship. It is generally interpreted that these changes are due to dispersion/aggregation of pigment-containing organelles within dermal chromatophores. Here, combining microscopy, photometric videography and photonic band-gap modelling, we show that chameleons shift colour through active tuning of a lattice of guanine nanocrystals within a superficial thick layer of dermal iridophores. In addition, we show that a deeper population of iridophores with larger crystals reflects a substantial proportion of sunlight especially in the near-infrared range. The organization of iridophores into two superposed layers constitutes an evolutionary novelty for chameleons, which allows some species to combine efficient camouflage with spectacular display, while potentially providing passive thermal protection. PMID:25757068

  2. Photonic crystal fiber for supporting 26 orbital angular momentum modes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zi-Ang; Huang, Yu-Qi; Luo, Ai-Ping; Cui, Hu; Luo, Zhi-Chao; Xu, Wen-Cheng

    2016-07-25

    We propose and numerically investigate a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) based on As2S3 for supporting the orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes up to 26. The designed PCF is composed of four well-ordered air hole rings in the cladding and an air hole at the center. The OAM modes can be well separated due to the large effective index difference of above 10-4 between the eigenmodes and maintain single-mode condition radially. In addition, the dispersions of the modes increase slowly with wavelengths, while the confinement loss keeps as low as 10-9 dB/m. The proposed PCF increases the supported OAM modes which could have some potential applications in short-distance, high-capacity transmission. PMID:27464177

  3. Photonic crystal-based RGB primary colour optical filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Brahm Raj; Rawal, Swati; Sinha, R. K.

    2016-08-01

    We have presented an RGB optical filter, based on photonic crystal (PhC) waveguides, with the hexagonal arrangement of GaP rods in air. It filters out the three primary colours of the visible range, red (R, λ = 648 nm), green (G, λ = 540 nm) and blue (B, λ = 470 nm). The plane wave expansion method is applied for estimating the dispersion curves and finite element method is utilized in examining the propagation characteristics of the designed PhC-based optical filter. Transmittance, extinction ratio and tolerance analysis have further been calculated to confirm the performance of the proposed optical filter to work in the visible range of optical spectrum and filter out the three primary colours (red, green, blue) along different output ports.

  4. Band gaps of two-dimensional antiferromagnetic photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yu-Ling; Ta, Jin-Xing; Wang, Xuan-Zhang

    2011-07-01

    In an external magnetic field, the band structure of a two-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) composed of parallel antiferromagnetic cylinders in a background dielectric is investigated with a Green's function method. The cylinders with two resonant frequencies form a square lattice and are characterized by a magnetic permeability tensor. In our numerical calculation, we find that this method allows fast convergence and is available in both the resonant and non-resonant frequency ranges. In the non-resonant range, the PC is similar in band structure to an ordinary dielectric PC. Two electromagnetic band gaps, however, appear in the resonant frequency region, and their frequency positions and widths are governed by the external field. The dependence of the electromagnetic gaps on the cylinder radius also is discussed.

  5. Ultrafast modulators based on nonlinear photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhifu; Li, Jianheng; Tu, Yongming; Ho, Seng-Tiong; Wessels, Bruce W.

    2011-03-01

    Nonlinear photonic crystal (PhC) waveguides are being developed for ultrafast modulators. To enable phase velocity matching we have investigated one- and two-dimensional structures. Photonic crystal (PhC) waveguides based on epitaxial barium titanate (BTO) thin film in a Si3N4/BTO/MgO multilayer structure were fabricated by electron beam lithography or focused ion beam (FIB) milling. For both one- and two-dimensional PhCs, simulation shows that sufficient refractive index contrast is achieved to form a stop band. For one-dimensional Bragg reflector, we measured its slow light properties and the group refractive index of optical wave. For a millimeter long waveguide a 27 nm wide stop band was obtained at 1550 nm. A slowing of the light was observed, the group refractive indices at the mid band gap and at the band edges were estimated to be between 8.0 and 12 for the transverse electric (TE) mode, and 6.9 and 13 for the transverse magnetic (TM) mode. For TE optical modes, the enhancement factor of EO coefficient ranges from 7 to 13, and for the TM mode, the factor ranges from 5.9 to 15. Measurements indicate that near velocity phase matching can be realized. Upon realizing the phase velocity matching condition, devices with a small foot print with bandwidths at 490 GHz can be attained. Two-dimensional PhC crystal with a hexagonal lattice was also investigated. The PhCs were fabricated from epitaxial BTO thin film multilayers using focused ion beam milling. The PhCs are based on BTO slab waveguide and air hole arrays defined within Si3N4 and BTO thin films. A refractive index contrast of 0.4 between the barium titanate thin film multilayers and the air holes enables strong light confinement. For the TE optical mode, the hexagonal photonic crystal lattice with a diameter of 155 nm and a lattice constant of 740 nm yields a photonic bandgap over the wavelength range from 1525 to 1575 nm. The transmission spectrum of the PhC waveguide exhibits stronger Fabry Perot

  6. Hexagonal photonic crystal waveguide based on barium titanate thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianheng; Liu, Zhifu; Wessels, Bruce W.; Tu, Yongming; Ho, Seng-Tiong; Joshi-Imre, Alexandra; Ocola, Leonidas E.

    2011-03-01

    The simulation, fabrication and measurement of nonlinear photonic crystals (PhCs) with hexagonal symmetry in epitaxial BaTiO3 were investigated. The optical transmission properties of a PhC were simulated by a 2-D finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method. A complete bandgap exists for both the TE and TM optical modes. The fabricated PhC has a well-defined stop band over the spectral region of 1525 to 1575 nm. A microcavity structure was also fabricated by incorporation of a line defect in the PhC. Transmission of the microcavity structure over the spectral region from 1456 to 1584nm shows a well-defined 5 nm wide window at 1495nm. Simulations indicate that the phase velocity matched PhC microcavity device of 0.5 mm long can potentially serve as modulator with a 3 dB bandwidth of 4 THz.

  7. Photonic Crystals from Order to Disorder: Perturbative Methods in Nanophotonics

    ScienceCinema

    Johnson, Steven G. [MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

    2010-01-08

    Photonic crystals are periodic dielectric structures in which light can behave much differently than in a homogeneous medium. This talk gives an overview of some of the interesting properties and applications of these media, from switching in subwavelength microcavities to slow-light devices, to guiding light in air. However, some of the most interesting and challenging problems occur when the periodicity is disturbed, either by design or by inevitable fabrication imperfections. The talk focuses especially on small perturbations that have important effects, from slow-light tapers to surface roughness disorder, and will show that many classic perturbative approaches must be rethought for high-contrast nanophotonics. The combination of strong periodicity with large field discontinuities at interfaces causes standard methods to fail, but succumbs to new generalizations, while some problems remain open.

  8. Highly sensitive biological sensor based on photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzam, Shaimaa I. H.; Hameed, Mohamed F.; Obayya, S. S. A.

    2014-05-01

    A photonic crystal fiber (PCF) surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based sensor is proposed and analysed. The proposed sensor consists of microuidic slots enclosing a dodecagonal layer of air holes cladding and a central air hole. The sensor can perform analyte detection using both HEx 11 and HEy 11 modes with a relatively high sensitivities up to 4000 nm=RIU and 3000 nm=RIU and resolutions of 2.5×10-5 RIU-1 and 3.33×10-5 RIU-1 with HEx11 and HEy11, respectively, with regards to spectral interrogation which to our knowledge are higher than those reported in the literature. Moreover, the structure of the suggested sensor is simple with no fabrication complexities which makes it easy to fabricate with standard PCF fabrication technologies.

  9. Tailoring of nearly zero flattened dispersion photonic crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jui-Ming

    2016-02-01

    This work theoretically tailored the dispersion in a photonic crystal fiber (PCF), and then designed two types of nearly zero dispersion flattened PCFs (DFPCFs) by rod-doping or liquid-filling some of the cladding holes. The numeric results show that the DFPCF type 1, rod-doped with arbitrary indices, achieves the dispersion values between 0±1 ps/nm km over a bandwidth range of 460 nm. The DFPCF type 2, filled with the available liquids, performs the dispersion values between 0±1.5 ps/nm km over a bandwidth range of 520 nm. Finally, the confinement losses of the two types of DFPCFs are estimated. The numeric results show that the confinement losses of the two types of the proposed DFPCFs are extremely low, in the order of 10-5 or 10-6 dB/km, which even can be disregarded.

  10. Photonic crystals cause active colour change in chameleons.

    PubMed

    Teyssier, Jérémie; Saenko, Suzanne V; van der Marel, Dirk; Milinkovitch, Michel C

    2015-01-01

    Many chameleons, and panther chameleons in particular, have the remarkable ability to exhibit complex and rapid colour changes during social interactions such as male contests or courtship. It is generally interpreted that these changes are due to dispersion/aggregation of pigment-containing organelles within dermal chromatophores. Here, combining microscopy, photometric videography and photonic band-gap modelling, we show that chameleons shift colour through active tuning of a lattice of guanine nanocrystals within a superficial thick layer of dermal iridophores. In addition, we show that a deeper population of iridophores with larger crystals reflects a substantial proportion of sunlight especially in the near-infrared range. The organization of iridophores into two superposed layers constitutes an evolutionary novelty for chameleons, which allows some species to combine efficient camouflage with spectacular display, while potentially providing passive thermal protection. PMID:25757068

  11. Pressure sensor based on flexible photonic crystal membrane

    PubMed Central

    Karrock, Torben; Gerken, Martina

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a pressure sensor based on deformation of a periodically nanostructured Bragg grating waveguide on a flexible 50 µm polydimethylsiloxane membrane and remote optical read out. A pressure change causes deformation of this 2 mm diameter photonic crystal membrane sealing a reference volume. The resulting shift of the guided mode resonances is observed by a remote camera as localized color change. Crossed polarization filters are employed for enhancing the visibility of the guided mode resonances. Pressure values are calculated from the intensity change in the green color channel using a calibration curve in the range of 2000 Pa to 4000 Pa. A limit of detection (LOD) of 160 Pa is estimated. This LOD combined with the small size of the sensor and its biocompatibility render it promising for application as an implantable intraocular pressure sensor. PMID:26713204

  12. Supercontinuum generated in a dispersion-flattened photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingliang; Zhang, Shumin; Han, Mengmeng; Zhang, Huaxing; Yang, Hong; Yuan, Ting

    2014-11-01

    We have experimentally investigated supercontinuum generated by using different pulse dynamics patterns as the pump pulses. These patterns, which include conventional mode-locked single pulse, condensed phase pulses and pulsed bunches, were all directly produced from a mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser based on a multi-layer graphene saturable absorber. The strong third-order optical nonlinearity of graphene and all fiber cavity configuration led to the multi-pulses operation states at a low pump power. A flat supercontinuum with 20-dB width of 550 nm from 1200 nm to 1750 nm have all been obtained by seeding the amplified conventional mode-locked single pulse and condensed phase pulses into a segment of photonic crystal fiber. On the other hand, experimental results also show that the pulsed bunches was not conducive to form a flat supercontinuum.

  13. Terahertz wave filter based on cinquefoil photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chao; Li, Jiu-sheng

    2012-03-01

    There are increasing demands for experiments in terahertz frequencies, in different areas such as biotechnology, nanotechnology, space science, security, terahertz wave communications, and plasma diagnostics. For potential applications, the functional devices, such as beam polarizers, modulators and filters, are crucuial components for a terahertz system. As a dispensable device for ultrafast information processing and interconnection of terahertz wave communication, terahertz wave filter has attracted considerable attention. In this paper, we design the terahertz wave filter structure based on three kinds of photonic crystals structures. The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) has been employed to analysis the performances of these terahertz wave filters. The simulation results show that these designed filters exhibit excellent transmission performance such as high transmission at the central frequency, adjustable bandpass, and good rejection of the sideband frequencies. Three kinds of compact and integrated terahertz wave filters are obtained.

  14. Terahertz wave filter based on cinquefoil photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chao; Li, Jiu-sheng

    2011-11-01

    There are increasing demands for experiments in terahertz frequencies, in different areas such as biotechnology, nanotechnology, space science, security, terahertz wave communications, and plasma diagnostics. For potential applications, the functional devices, such as beam polarizers, modulators and filters, are crucuial components for a terahertz system. As a dispensable device for ultrafast information processing and interconnection of terahertz wave communication, terahertz wave filter has attracted considerable attention. In this paper, we design the terahertz wave filter structure based on three kinds of photonic crystals structures. The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) has been employed to analysis the performances of these terahertz wave filters. The simulation results show that these designed filters exhibit excellent transmission performance such as high transmission at the central frequency, adjustable bandpass, and good rejection of the sideband frequencies. Three kinds of compact and integrated terahertz wave filters are obtained.

  15. Narrow bandpass tunable terahertz filter based on photonic crystal cavity.

    PubMed

    He, Jinglong; Liu, Pingan; He, Yalan; Hong, Zhi

    2012-02-20

    We have fabricated a very narrow bandpass tunable terahertz (THz) filter based on a one-dimensional photonic crystal cavity. Since the filter consists of silicon wafers and air spacers, it has a very high quality factor of about 1500. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the passband is only about 200 MHz, and the peak transmission is higher than -4 dB. Besides, the central frequency can be tuned rapidly over the entire bandgap with the length of cavity adjusted by a motorized linear stage. Further analytical calculations indicate that a high-Q tunable filter with both high peak transmission and wide tunable range is possible if thinner silicon layers are used. PMID:22358169

  16. A photonic crystal fiber glucose sensor filled with silver nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X. C.; Lu, Y.; Wang, M. T.; Yao, J. Q.

    2016-01-01

    We report a photonic crystal fiber glucose sensor filled with silver nanowires in this paper. The proposed sensor is both analyzed by COMSOL multiphysics software and demonstrated by experiments. The extremely high average spectral sensitivity 19009.17 nm/RIU for experimental measurement is obtained, equivalent to 44.25 mg/dL of glucose in water, which is lower than 70 mg/dL for efficient detection of hypoglycemia episodes. The silver nanowires diameter which may affect the sensor's spectral sensitivity is also discussed and an optimal range of silver nanowires diameter 90-120 nm is obtained. We expect that the sensor can provide an effective platform for glucose sensing and potentially leading to a further development towards minimal-invasive glucose measurement.

  17. Ultrafast adiabatic manipulation of slow light in a photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Kampfrath, T.; Kuipers, L.; Beggs, D. M.; White, T. P.; Krauss, T. F.; Melloni, A.

    2010-04-15

    We demonstrate by experiment and theory that a light pulse propagating through a Si-based photonic-crystal waveguide is adiabatically blueshifted when the refractive index of the Si is reduced on a femtosecond time scale. Thanks to the use of slow-light modes, we are able to shift a 1.3-ps pulse at telecom frequencies by 0.3 THz with an efficiency as high as 80% in a waveguide as short as 19{mu}m. An analytic theory reproduces the experimental data excellently, which shows that adiabatic dynamics are possible even on the femtosecond time scale as long as the external stimulus conserves the spatial symmetry of the system.

  18. Dual negative refraction in a two dimension square photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derbali, J.; AbdelMalek, F.

    2015-09-01

    Dual refraction effect based on the overlapping bands in a two dimensional (2D) photonic crystal (PhC) is demonstrated. The PhC consists of alumina rods with a dielectric constant ε=8.9, arranged in a square lattice in air. To disperse light which has special excitation frequency and a specific incident angle, by this PhC we optimize his structural parameters such as the radius of dielectric rods). It is shown that two focusing phenomena are formed in the PhC image plan; the degeneracy of modes can be applied to realize optical interference and wave front division. The simulation results are obtained by employing the PWM for analyzing bands structure and the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) to predict the evolution of the electric fields.

  19. Using metallic photonic crystals as visible light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousov, Sergei; Bogdanova, Maria; Deinega, Alexei; Eyderman, Sergey; Valuev, Ilya; Lozovik, Yurii; Polischuk, Ilya; Potapkin, Boris; Ramamurthi, Badri; Deng, Tao; Midha, Vikas

    2012-11-01

    In this paper we study numerically and experimentally the possibility of using metallic photonic crystals (PC's) of different geometries (log-piles, direct and inverse opals) as visible light sources. It is found that by tuning geometrical parameters of a direct opal PC one can achieve substantial reduction of the emissivity in the infrared along with its increase in the visible. We take into account disorder of the PC elements in their sizes and positions, and we get quantitative agreement between the numerical and experimental results. We analyze the influence of known temperature-resistant refractory host materials necessary for fixing the PC elements, and we find that PC effects become completely destroyed at high temperatures due to the host absorption. Therefore, creating PC-based visible light sources requires that low-absorbing refractory materials for the embedding medium be found.

  20. Robust spin squeezing preservation in photonic crystal cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Wo-Jun; Li, Yan-Ling; Xiao, Xing; Xie, Ying-Mao

    2016-08-01

    We show that the robust spin squeezing preservation can be achieved by utilizing detuning modification for an ensemble of N separate two-level atoms embedded in photonic crystal cavities (PCC). In particular, we explore the different dynamical behaviors of spin squeezing between isotropic and anisotropic PCC cases when the atomic frequency is inside the band gap. In both cases, it is shown that the robust preservation of spin squeezing is completely determined by the formation of bound states. Intriguingly, we find that unlike the isotropic case where steady-state spin squeezing varies smoothly when the atomic frequency moves from the inside to the outside band edge, a sudden transition occurs for the anisotropic case. The present results may be of direct importance for, e.g. quantum metrology in open quantum systems.

  1. Integrated polarizers based on tapered highly birefringent photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, Priscila; Biazoli, Claudecir R; Franco, Marcos A R; Cordeiro, Cristiano M B; de Matos, Christiano J S

    2014-07-28

    This paper proposes and demonstrates the creation of sections with a high polarization dependent loss (PDL) in a commercial highly birefringent (polarization maintaining) photonic crystal fiber (PCF), via tapering with pressure applied to the holes. The tapers had a 1-cm-long uniform section with a 66% scale reduction, in which the original microstructure aspect ratio was kept by the pressure application. The resulting waveguides show polarizing action across the entire tested wavelength range, 1510-1600 nm, with a peak PDL of 35.3 dB/cm (c.f. ~1 dB/cm for a typical commercial polarizing fiber). The resulting structure, as well as its production, is extremely simple, and enable a small section with a high PDL to be obtained in a polarization maintaining PCF, meaning that the polarization axes in the polarizing and polarization maintaining sections are automatically aligned. PMID:25089397

  2. Hydrostatic Pressure Sensing with High Birefringence Photonic Crystal Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Fávero, Fernando C.; Quintero, Sully M. M.; Martelli, Cicero; Braga, Arthur M.B.; Silva, Vinícius V.; Carvalho, Isabel C. S.; Llerena, Roberth W. A.; Valente, Luiz C. G.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of hydrostatic pressure on the waveguiding properties of high birefringence photonic crystal fibers (HiBi PCF) is evaluated both numerically and experimentally. A fiber design presenting form birefringence induced by two enlarged holes in the innermost ring defining the fiber core is investigated. Numerical results show that modal sensitivity to the applied pressure depends on the diameters of the holes, and can be tailored by independently varying the sizes of the large or small holes. Numerical and experimental results are compared showing excellent agreement. A hydrostatic pressure sensor is proposed and demonstrated using an in-fiber modal interferometer where the two orthogonally polarized modes of a HiBi PCF generate fringes over the optical spectrum of a broad band source. From the analysis of experimental results, it is concluded that, in principle, an operating limit of 92 MPa in pressure could be achieved with 0.0003% of full scale resolution. PMID:22163435

  3. Piconewton force measurement using a nanometric photonic crystal diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Jo, Wonuk; Digonnet, Michel J F

    2014-08-01

    A compact force fiber sensor capable of measuring forces at the piconewton level is reported. It consists of a miniature Fabry-Perot cavity fabricated at the tip a single-mode fiber, in which the external reflector is a compliant photonic-crystal diaphragm that deflects when subjected to a force. In the laboratory environment, this sensor was able to detect a force of only ∼4  pN generated by the radiation pressure of a laser beam. Its measured minimum detectable force (MDF) at 3 kHz was as weak as 1.3  pN/√Hz. In a quiet environment, the measured noise was ∼16 times lower, and the MDF predicted to be ∼76  fN/√Hz. PMID:25078221

  4. Magnetic Field Measurements Based on Terfenol Coated Photonic Crystal Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, Sully M. M.; Martelli, Cicero; Braga, Arthur M. B.; Valente, Luiz C. G.; Kato, Carla C.

    2011-01-01

    A magnetic field sensor based on the integration of a high birefringence photonic crystal fiber and a composite material made of Terfenol particles and an epoxy resin is proposed. An in-fiber modal interferometer is assembled by evenly exciting both eigenemodes of the HiBi fiber. Changes in the cavity length as well as the effective refractive index are induced by exposing the sensor head to magnetic fields. The magnetic field sensor has a sensitivity of 0.006 (nm/mT) over a range from 0 to 300 mT with a resolution about ±1 mT. A fiber Bragg grating magnetic field sensor is also fabricated and employed to characterize the response of Terfenol composite to the magnetic field. PMID:22247655

  5. Functionalized photonic crystal for the sensing of Sarin agents.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chunxiao; Qi, Fenglian; Li, Shuguang; Xu, Jiayu; Liu, Chao; Meng, Zihui; Qiu, Lili; Xue, Min; Lu, Wei; Yan, Zequn

    2016-10-01

    The indiscriminate use of nerve agents by terrorist groups has attracted attention of the scientific communities toward the development of novel sensor technique for these deadly chemicals. A photonic crystal (PhC) hydrogel immobilized with butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) was firstly prepared for the sensing of Sarin agents. Periodic polystyrene colloidal (240nm) array was embedded inside an acrylamide hydrogel, and then BuChE was immobilized inside the hydrogel matrix via condensation with 3-(diethoxyphosphoryloxy)-1,2,3-benzotriazin-4(3h)-one (DEPBT). It indicated that a total of 3.7 units of BuChE were immobilized onto the PhC hydrogel. The functionalized hydrogel recognized the Sarin agent and then shrunk, thus the diffraction of PhC hydrogel blue shifted significantly, and a limit of detection (LOD) of 10(-15)molL(-1) was achieved. PMID:27474325

  6. Optical properties and diffraction effects in opal photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Balestreri, Alessandra; Andreani, Lucio Claudio; Agio, Mario

    2006-09-01

    Optical properties of fcc opals oriented along the [111] direction are calculated by means of a scattering-matrix approach based on approximating each sphere with cylindrical slices. The use of a plane-wave basis in each layer allows distinguishing zero-order reflection and transmission from higher-order (diffraction) spectra. Optical spectra at large values of the angle of incidence indicate the presence of diffraction effects and of polarization mixing along the LW orientation. Reflectance and transmittance in the high-energy region show a rich spectral dependence and compare reasonably well with recent experimental observations on polystyrene opals. Diffraction spectra as a function of the number of layers display an oscillatory behavior, pointing to the existence of a Pendellösung phenomenon, related to the exchange of energy between two propagating modes in the investigated three-dimensional photonic crystal. This phenomenon could be observed in transmittance experiments on high-quality opals with controlled thickness. PMID:17025760

  7. Bandgap characteristics of one-dimensional plasma photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Yan; Ma Yanyun; Tian Chenglin; Shao Fuqiu; Xu Han; Zhuo Hongbin; Yu, M. Y.

    2009-10-15

    When two pump laser pulses intersect in an underdense plasma, plasma Bragg grating (PBG) is induced by the slow-varying ponderomotive force [Z. M. Sheng et al., Appl. Phys. B: Lasers Opt. 77, 673 (2003)]. Such a PBG can be considered as a one-dimensional (1D) plasma photonic crystal (PPC). Here the bandgap characteristic of 1D PPC composed of plasma layers of different densities is investigated theoretically and numerically. It is found that when the maximum density is lower than the critical density of the pump laser, there is only one normal-incidence bandgap. When the maximum density is higher than the critical density of the pump laser, high-order bandgaps are found. The theoretical results are verified by 1D particle-in-cell simulations.

  8. One-dimensional photonic crystal fishbone hybrid nanocavity with nanoposts

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Tsan-Wen; Lin, Pin-Tso; Lee, Po-Tsung

    2014-05-12

    We propose and investigate a one-dimensional photonic crystal (PhC) fishbone (FB) hybrid nanocavity lying on silver substrate with a horizontal air slot. With very few PhC periods, the confined transverse-magnetic, TM{sub 10} hybrid mode concentrated within the air slot shows high quality factor over effective mode volume ratio larger than 10{sup 5}λ{sup −3}. Most importantly, this FB hybrid nanocavity allows formation of low-index nanoposts within the air slot without significantly affecting the mode properties. These nanoposts guarantee the structural stabilities under different environmental perturbations. Furthermore, capabilities of our proposed design in serving as optical sensors and tweezers for bio-sized nanoparticles are also investigated.

  9. Photonic crystals cause active colour change in chameleons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssier, Jérémie; Saenko, Suzanne V.; van der Marel, Dirk; Milinkovitch, Michel C.

    2015-03-01

    Many chameleons, and panther chameleons in particular, have the remarkable ability to exhibit complex and rapid colour changes during social interactions such as male contests or courtship. It is generally interpreted that these changes are due to dispersion/aggregation of pigment-containing organelles within dermal chromatophores. Here, combining microscopy, photometric videography and photonic band-gap modelling, we show that chameleons shift colour through active tuning of a lattice of guanine nanocrystals within a superficial thick layer of dermal iridophores. In addition, we show that a deeper population of iridophores with larger crystals reflects a substantial proportion of sunlight especially in the near-infrared range. The organization of iridophores into two superposed layers constitutes an evolutionary novelty for chameleons, which allows some species to combine efficient camouflage with spectacular display, while potentially providing passive thermal protection.

  10. Large Area Printing of 3D Photonic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, James J.; Beaulieu, Michael R.; Hendricks, Nicholas R.; Kothari, Rohit

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a readily scalable print, lift, and stack approach for producing large area, 3D photonic crystal (PC) structures. UV-assisted nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) was used to pattern grating structures comprised of highly filled nanoparticle polymer composite resists with tune-able refractive indices (RI). The gratings were robust and upon release from a support substrate were oriented and stacked to yield 3D PCs. The RI of the composite resists was tuned between 1.58 and 1.92 at 800 nm while maintaining excellent optical transparency. The grating structure dimensions, line width, depth, and pitch, were easily varied by simply changing the imprint mold. For example, a 6 layer log-pile stack was prepared using a composite resist a RI of 1.72 yielding 72 % reflection at 900 nm. The process is scalable for roll-to-roll (R2R) production. Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing - an NSF Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center.

  11. Hybrid polymer photonic crystal fiber with integrated chalcogenide glass nanofilms.

    PubMed

    Markos, Christos; Kubat, Irnis; Bang, Ole

    2014-01-01

    The combination of chalcogenide glasses with polymer photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) is a difficult and challenging task due to their different thermo-mechanical material properties. Here we report the first experimental realization of a hybrid polymer-chalcogenide PCF with integrated As2S3 glass nanofilms at the inner surface of the air-channels of a poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA) PCF. The integrated high refractive index glass films introduce distinct antiresonant transmission bands in the 480-900 nm wavelength region. We demonstrate that the ultra-high Kerr nonlinearity of the chalcogenide glass makes the polymer PCF nonlinear and provides a possibility to shift the transmission band edges as much as 17 nm by changing the intensity. The proposed fabrication technique constitutes a new highway towards all-fiber nonlinear tunable devices based on polymer PCFs, which at the moment is not possible with any other fabrication method. PMID:25317501

  12. Tuning photonic crystal nanocavity modes by wet chemical digital etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennessy, K.; Badolato, A.; Tamboli, A.; Petroff, P. M.; Hu, E.; Atatüre, M.; Dreiser, J.; Imamoǧlu, A.

    2005-07-01

    We have developed a wet chemical digital etching technique for tuning the resonant wavelengths of photonic crystal (PC) nanocavities over a wide range of 80nm in precise 2-3nm steps while preserving high cavity quality factors. In one tuning step, a few monolayers of material are removed from the cavity surface by etching a self-formed native oxide in 1mol citric acid. Due to the self-limiting oxide thickness, total tuning range is based only on the number of etch steps, resulting in a highly controlled, digital tuning ability. We have characterized the tuning behavior of GaAs PC defect cavities of both square and triangular lattice symmetry and proven the effectiveness of this method by tuning a mode into resonance with the charged exciton, and then later the biexciton, transition of a single InAs /GaAs self-assembled quantum dot.

  13. Experimental study of solitonic dispersive wave in photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Surajit; Roy, Samudra; Bhadra, Shyamal K.

    2015-06-01

    We experimentally observed the emission of phase-matched resonant radiation in the form of solitonic dispersive wave in a fabricated photonic crystal fiber by pumping picosecond and femtosecond pulses close to zero-dispersion wavelength in normal dispersion regime. The generation of such phase matched radiation does not require a soliton to be formed and red-shifted in nature. Shock front from the leading edge of the input pump initiates the resonant radiation. The radiation develops in the anomalous dispersion domain and found to be confined both in spectral and temporal domain. The resonance mechanism can be well explained from the numerical simulation governed by generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

  14. Brilliant camouflage: photonic crystals in the diamond weevil, Entimus imperialis

    PubMed Central

    Wilts, Bodo D.; Michielsen, Kristel; Kuipers, Jeroen; De Raedt, Hans; Stavenga, Doekele G.

    2012-01-01

    The neotropical diamond weevil, Entimus imperialis, is marked by rows of brilliant spots on the overall black elytra. The spots are concave pits with intricate patterns of structural-coloured scales, consisting of large domains of three-dimensional photonic crystals that have a diamond-type structure. Reflectance spectra measured from individual scale domains perfectly match model spectra, calculated with anatomical data and finite-difference time-domain methods. The reflections of single domains are extremely directional (observed with a point source less than 5°), but the special arrangement of the scales in the concave pits significantly broadens the angular distribution of the reflections. The resulting virtually angle-independent green coloration of the weevil closely approximates the colour of a foliaceous background. While the close-distance colourful shininess of E. imperialis may facilitate intersexual recognition, the diffuse green reflectance of the elytra when seen at long-distance provides cryptic camouflage. PMID:22378806

  15. Enhanced photodetection in graphene-integrated photonic crystal cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Shiue, Ren-Jye; Englund, Dirk; Gan, Xuetao; Li, Luozhou; Yao, Xinwen; Gao, Yuanda; Hone, James; Szep, Attila; Walker, Dennis

    2013-12-09

    We demonstrate the controlled enhancement of photoresponsivity in a graphene photodetector by coupling to slow light modes in a long photonic crystal linear defect cavity. Near the Brillouin zone (BZ) boundary, spectral coupling of multiple cavity modes results in broad-band photocurrent enhancement from 1530 nm to 1540 nm. Away from the BZ boundary, individual cavity resonances enhance the photocurrent eight-fold in narrow resonant peaks. Optimization of the photocurrent via critical coupling of the incident field with the graphene-cavity system is discussed. The enhanced photocurrent demonstrates the feasibility of a wavelength-scale graphene photodetector for efficient photodetection with high spectral selectivity and broadband response.

  16. Measuring mechanical strain and twist using helical photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Xi, Xiaoming; Wong, Gordon K L; Weiss, Thomas; Russell, Philip St J

    2013-12-15

    Solid-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with a permanent helical twist exhibits dips in its transmission spectrum at certain wavelengths. These are associated with the formation of orbital angular momentum states in the cladding. Here we investigate the tuning of these states with mechanical torque and axial tension. The dip wavelengths are found to scale linearly with both axial strain and mechanical twist rate. Analysis shows that the tension-induced shift in resonance wavelength is determined both by the photoelastic effect and by the change in twist rate, while the torsion-induced wavelength shift depends only on the change in twist rate. Twisted PCF can act as an effective optically monitored torque-tension transducer, twist sensor, or strain gauge. PMID:24322268

  17. Strong Optomechanical Interaction in Hybrid Plasmonic-Photonic Crystal Nanocavities with Surface Acoustic Waves

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzy-Rong; Lin, Chiang-Hsin; Hsu, Jin-Chen

    2015-01-01

    We propose dynamic modulation of a hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystal nanocavity using monochromatic coherent acoustic phonons formed by ultrahigh-frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) to achieve strong optomechanical interaction. The crystal nanocavity used in this study consisted of a defective photonic crystal beam coupled to a metal surface with a nanoscale air gap in between and provided hybridization of a highly confined plasmonic-photonic mode with a high quality factor and deep subwavelength mode volume. Efficient photon-phonon interaction occurs in the air gap through the SAW perturbation of the metal surface, strongly coupling the optical and acoustic frequencies. As a result, a large modulation bandwidth and optical resonance wavelength shift for the crystal nanocavity are demonstrated at telecommunication wavelengths. The proposed SAW-based modulation within the hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystal nanocavities beyond the diffraction limit provides opportunities for various applications in enhanced sound-light interaction and fast coherent acoustic control of optomechanical devices. PMID:26346448

  18. Orbital angular momentum entanglement via fork-poling nonlinear photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Lu, L L; Xu, P; Zhong, M L; Bai, Y F; Zhu, S N

    2015-01-26

    We report a compact scheme for the generation and manipulation of photon pairs entangled in the orbital angular momentum (OAM) from the fork-poling quadratic nonlinear crystal. The χ(2)-modulation in this crystal is designed for fulfilling a tilted quasi-phase-matching geometry to ensure the efficient generation of entangled photons as well as for transferring of topological charge of the crystal to the photon pairs. Numerical results show that the OAM of photon pair is anti-correlated and the degree of OAM entanglement can be enhanced by modulating the topological charge of crystal, which indicates a feasible extension to high-dimensional OAM entanglement. These studies suggest that the fork-poling nonlinear photonic crystal a unique platform for compact generation and manipulation of high-dimensional and high-order OAM entanglement, which may have potential applications in quantum communication, quantum cryptography and quantum remote sensing. PMID:25835879

  19. Efficient modeling of photonic crystals with local Hermite polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, C. R.; Li, Zehao; Albrecht, J. D.; Ram-Mohan, L. R.

    2014-04-01

    Developing compact algorithms for accurate electrodynamic calculations with minimal computational cost is an active area of research given the increasing complexity in the design of electromagnetic composite structures such as photonic crystals, metamaterials, optical interconnects, and on-chip routing. We show that electric and magnetic (EM) fields can be calculated using scalar Hermite interpolation polynomials as the numerical basis functions without having to invoke edge-based vector finite elements to suppress spurious solutions or to satisfy boundary conditions. This approach offers several fundamental advantages as evidenced through band structure solutions for periodic systems and through waveguide analysis. Compared with reciprocal space (plane wave expansion) methods for periodic systems, advantages are shown in computational costs, the ability to capture spatial complexity in the dielectric distributions, the demonstration of numerical convergence with scaling, and variational eigenfunctions free of numerical artifacts that arise from mixed-order real space basis sets or the inherent aberrations from transforming reciprocal space solutions of finite expansions. The photonic band structure of a simple crystal is used as a benchmark comparison and the ability to capture the effects of spatially complex dielectric distributions is treated using a complex pattern with highly irregular features that would stress spatial transform limits. This general method is applicable to a broad class of physical systems, e.g., to semiconducting lasers which require simultaneous modeling of transitions in quantum wells or dots together with EM cavity calculations, to modeling plasmonic structures in the presence of EM field emissions, and to on-chip propagation within monolithic integrated circuits.

  20. Efficient modeling of photonic crystals with local Hermite polynomials

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher, C. R.; Li, Zehao; Albrecht, J. D.; Ram-Mohan, L. R.

    2014-04-21

    Developing compact algorithms for accurate electrodynamic calculations with minimal computational cost is an active area of research given the increasing complexity in the design of electromagnetic composite structures such as photonic crystals, metamaterials, optical interconnects, and on-chip routing. We show that electric and magnetic (EM) fields can be calculated using scalar Hermite interpolation polynomials as the numerical basis functions without having to invoke edge-based vector finite elements to suppress spurious solutions or to satisfy boundary conditions. This approach offers several fundamental advantages as evidenced through band structure solutions for periodic systems and through waveguide analysis. Compared with reciprocal space (plane wave expansion) methods for periodic systems, advantages are shown in computational costs, the ability to capture spatial complexity in the dielectric distributions, the demonstration of numerical convergence with scaling, and variational eigenfunctions free of numerical artifacts that arise from mixed-order real space basis sets or the inherent aberrations from transforming reciprocal space solutions of finite expansions. The photonic band structure of a simple crystal is used as a benchmark comparison and the ability to capture the effects of spatially complex dielectric distributions is treated using a complex pattern with highly irregular features that would stress spatial transform limits. This general method is applicable to a broad class of physical systems, e.g., to semiconducting lasers which require simultaneous modeling of transitions in quantum wells or dots together with EM cavity calculations, to modeling plasmonic structures in the presence of EM field emissions, and to on-chip propagation within monolithic integrated circuits.

  1. Graded photonic crystals curve the flow of light: An experimental demonstration by the mirage effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akmansoy, Eric; Centeno, Emmanuel; Vynck, Kevin; Cassagne, David; Lourtioz, Jean-Michel

    2008-03-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of a beam curvature in graded photonic crystals via a spectacular mirage effect. A two-dimensional structure of metallic rods is constructed to produce this effect in the microwave domain near 10GHz. Experimental results are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions, thus, proving the versatility of graded photonic crystals in view of their integration in future photonic circuits.

  2. Photonic crystal planar waveguide devices exploiting the thermo-optic effect (Keynote Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Rue, Richard M.; Chong, Harold; Camargo, Edilson; Ciminelli, Caterina; Armenise, Mario

    2005-07-01

    Photonic crystal devices are now being produced for a variety of functions-and the need to provide thermal control of the behaviour suggests the use of thermo-optic effects. It has emerged that thermo-optic effects can provide useful modulation, switching and tuning capability. Future trends indicate fast, low-power, thermo-optically operated photonic crystal and photonic wire devices-and the possibility of simultaneous athermal characteristics.

  3. Light scattering in opal-based photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limonov, M. F.

    2010-05-01

    We present a new light scattering pattern in low-contrast opal-based photonic crystals (PhCs). The structure of real opals is always imperfect because of the a-SiO2 particles being inherently inhomogeneous and nonuniform in size and average dielectric permittivity. We found that opals possess all predictable properties of multi-component PhCs, which we define as periodic structures consisting of inhomogeneous or multiple (three or more) components. By theory, by properly tuning the permittivity of one of the components in ordered, low-contrast multi-component PhCs (for instance, of the filler ɛf in an opal), one can produce selective disappearance of any non-resonant (hkl) stop band. A study of transmission spectra of opals revealed that stop bands exhibit different (including resonant) behavior under variation of ɛf. Experiment did not, however, substantiate complete disappearance of stop bands predicted by theory for an ordered PhC. In the region of the predicted disappearance, a new effect has been observed, namely flip-over of the Bragg band, i.e., transformation of the Bragg dip into a Bragg rise. The flip-over effect, which has been studied in considerable detail in the particular example of the (111) stop band, originates from the nonuniformity of a-SiO2 particles. This nonuniformity leads to additional broad-band light scattering, the character of which is determined by Mie scattering. Thus, Mie scattering is responsible for two components in opal transmission spectra, more specifically, narrow Bragg bands and broad-band background. Their interference gives rise to formation of the Fano resonance, which in opal spectra becomes manifest, first, in a Bragg band asymmetry, and, second, in the flip-over effect, i.e., transformation of a photonic stop band into a photonic pass band.

  4. High-Q CMOS-integrated photonic crystal microcavity devices

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Karan K.; Orcutt, Jason S.; Tehar-Zahav, Ofer; Sternberg, Zvi; Bafrali, Reha; Meade, Roy; Ram, Rajeev J.

    2014-01-01

    Integrated optical resonators are necessary or beneficial in realizations of various functions in scaled photonic platforms, including filtering, modulation, and detection in classical communication systems, optical sensing, as well as addressing and control of solid state emitters for quantum technologies. Although photonic crystal (PhC) microresonators can be advantageous to the more commonly used microring devices due to the former's low mode volumes, fabrication of PhC cavities has typically relied on electron-beam lithography, which precludes integration with large-scale and reproducible CMOS fabrication. Here, we demonstrate wavelength-scale polycrystalline silicon (pSi) PhC microresonators with Qs up to 60,000 fabricated within a bulk CMOS process. Quasi-1D resonators in lateral p-i-n structures allow for resonant defect-state photodetection in all-silicon devices, exhibiting voltage-dependent quantum efficiencies in the range of a few 10 s of %, few-GHz bandwidths, and low dark currents, in devices with loaded Qs in the range of 4,300–9,300; one device, for example, exhibited a loaded Q of 4,300, 25% quantum efficiency (corresponding to a responsivity of 0.31 A/W), 3 GHz bandwidth, and 30 nA dark current at a reverse bias of 30 V. This work demonstrates the possibility for practical integration of PhC microresonators with active electro-optic capability into large-scale silicon photonic systems. PMID:24518161

  5. Wavelength division demultiplexing with photonic crystal self-collimation interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yufei; Qiu, Yishen; Chen, Xiyao; Lin, Guimin; Hong, Hailian

    2007-11-01

    A theoretical model of wavelength division demultiplexer (WDD), which is based on an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer (AMZI) constructed in a two-dimensional photonic crystal (2D PhC), is proposed and numerically demonstrated. The 2D PhC consists of a square lattice of cylindric air holes in silicon. The AMZI includes two mirrors and two splitters. Lights propagate between them employing self-collimation effect. The two interferometer branches have different path lengths. By using the finite-difference time-domain method, the calculation results show that the transmission spectras at two AMZI output ports are in the shape of sinusoidal curves and have a uniform peak spacing in the frequency range from 0.26c/a to 0.27c/a. When the path length of the longer branch is increased and the shorter one is fixed, the peaks shift to the lower frequencies and the peak spacing decreases nonlinearly. Consequently, the transmission can be designed to meet various application demands by changing the length difference between the two branches. For the dimensions of the WDD are about tens of operating wavelengths, this PhC WDD may be applied in future photonic integrated circuits.

  6. Suspended 2-D photonic crystal aluminum nitride membrane reflector.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chong Pei; Pitchappa, Prakash; Soon, Bo Woon; Lee, Chengkuo

    2015-04-20

    We experimentally demonstrated a free-standing two-dimensional (2-D) photonic crystal (PhC) aluminum nitride (AlN) membrane to function as a free space (or out-of-plane) reflector working in the mid infrared region. By etching circular holes of radius 620nm in a 330nm thick AlN slab, greater than 90% reflection was measured from 3.08μm to 3.78μm, with the peak reflection of 96% at 3.16μm. Due to the relatively low refractive index of AlN, we also investigated the importance of employing methods such as sacrificial layer release to enhance the performance of the PhC. In addition, characterization of the AlN based PhC was also done up to 450°C to examine the impact of thermo-optic effect on the performance. Despite the high temperature operation, the redshift in the peak reflection wavelengths of the device was estimated to be only 14.1nm. This equates to a relatively low thermo-optic coefficient 2.22 × 10(-5) K(-1) for AlN. Such insensitivity to thermo-optic effect makes AlN based 2-D PhC a promising technology to be used as photonic components for high temperature applications such as Fabry-Perot interferometer used for gas sensing in down-hole oil drilling and ruggedized electronics. PMID:25969099

  7. Transmission properties of one-dimensional ternary plasma photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiveshwari, Laxmi; Awasthi, S. K.

    2015-09-01

    Omnidirectional photonic band gaps (PBGs) are found in one-dimensional ternary plasma photonic crystals (PPC) composed of single negative metamaterials. The band characteristics and transmission properties are investigated through the transfer matrix method. We show that the proposed structure can trap light in three-dimensional space due to the elimination of Brewster's angle transmission resonance allowing the existence of complete PBG. The results are discussed in terms of incident angle, layer thickness, dielectric constant of the dielectric material, and number of unit cells (N) for TE and TM polarizations. It is seen that PBG characteristics is apparent even in an N ≥ 2 system, which is weakly sensitive to the incident angle and completely insensitive to the polarization. Finite PPC could be used for multichannel transmission filter without introducing any defect in the geometry. We show that the locations of the multichannel transmission peaks are in the allowed band of the infinite structure. The structure can work as a single or multichannel filter by varying the number of unit cells. Binary PPC can also work as a polarization sensitive tunable filter.

  8. Transmission properties of one-dimensional ternary plasma photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shiveshwari, Laxmi; Awasthi, S. K.

    2015-09-15

    Omnidirectional photonic band gaps (PBGs) are found in one-dimensional ternary plasma photonic crystals (PPC) composed of single negative metamaterials. The band characteristics and transmission properties are investigated through the transfer matrix method. We show that the proposed structure can trap light in three-dimensional space due to the elimination of Brewster's angle transmission resonance allowing the existence of complete PBG. The results are discussed in terms of incident angle, layer thickness, dielectric constant of the dielectric material, and number of unit cells (N) for TE and TM polarizations. It is seen that PBG characteristics is apparent even in an N ≥ 2 system, which is weakly sensitive to the incident angle and completely insensitive to the polarization. Finite PPC could be used for multichannel transmission filter without introducing any defect in the geometry. We show that the locations of the multichannel transmission peaks are in the allowed band of the infinite structure. The structure can work as a single or multichannel filter by varying the number of unit cells. Binary PPC can also work as a polarization sensitive tunable filter.

  9. A Smart Colorful Supercapacitor with One Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cihui; Liu, Xing; Xuan, Hongyun; Ren, Jiaoyu; Ge, Liqin

    2015-01-01

    To meet the pressing demands for portable and flexible equipment in contemporary society, developing flexible, lightweight, and sustainable supercapacitor systems with large power densities, long cycle life, and ease of strongly required. However, estimating the state-of-charge of existing supercapacitors is difficult, and thus their service life is limited. In this study, we fabricate a flexible color indicative supercapacitor device with mesoporous polyaniline (mPANI)/Poly(N-Isopropyl acrylamide-Graphene Oxide-Acrylic Acid) (P(NiPPAm-GO-AA)) one dimensional photonic crystals (1DPCs) as the electrode material through a low-cost, eco-friendly, and scalable fabrication process. We found that the state-of-charge could be monitored by the structural color oscillation due to the change in the photonic band gap position of the 1DPCs. The flexible 1DPCs supercapacitor is thin at 3 mm and exhibits good specific capacitance of 22.6 F g−1 with retention of 91.1% after 3,000 cycles. This study shows the application of the 1DPCs supercapacitor as a visual ultrathin power source. The technology may find many applications in future wearable electronics. PMID:26689375

  10. High index contrast hole-free photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipovskii, Andrey; Anan'ev, Anatoly; Maksimov, Leonid; Polukhin, Vladimir; Tagantsev, Dmitry; Tatarintsev, Boris

    2007-05-01

    A couple of multicomponent glasses was used to produce solid hole-free photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with high contrast of index. These glasses were a high index barium-lanthanum flint-glass (n~1.8) and a low index cron-glass (n~1.5). The compositions of selected glasses provided the coincidence of their viscosities in the temperature range of drawing, close thermal expansion coefficients, and chemical compatibility. To produce the PCF densely packed bundles of glass rods (elements) of 1 mm diameter assembled in a given structures were multiply co-drawn down to 0.2-2.0 microns diameter of a single element. This procedure allowed scaling of initial structures and resulted in two PCF structures: axially symmetrical eight-period structure and five-period "birefringent" structure. Optical transmission of the resultant PCF demonstrates the existence of photonic band-gaps, and intensity distribution of propagating mode corresponds to the results of numerical simulation performed.

  11. A Smart Colorful Supercapacitor with One Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cihui; Liu, Xing; Xuan, Hongyun; Ren, Jiaoyu; Ge, Liqin

    2015-12-01

    To meet the pressing demands for portable and flexible equipment in contemporary society, developing flexible, lightweight, and sustainable supercapacitor systems with large power densities, long cycle life, and ease of strongly required. However, estimating the state-of-charge of existing supercapacitors is difficult, and thus their service life is limited. In this study, we fabricate a flexible color indicative supercapacitor device with mesoporous polyaniline (mPANI)/Poly(N-Isopropyl acrylamide-Graphene Oxide-Acrylic Acid) (P(NiPPAm-GO-AA)) one dimensional photonic crystals (1DPCs) as the electrode material through a low-cost, eco-friendly, and scalable fabrication process. We found that the state-of-charge could be monitored by the structural color oscillation due to the change in the photonic band gap position of the 1DPCs. The flexible 1DPCs supercapacitor is thin at 3 mm and exhibits good specific capacitance of 22.6 F g-1 with retention of 91.1% after 3,000 cycles. This study shows the application of the 1DPCs supercapacitor as a visual ultrathin power source. The technology may find many applications in future wearable electronics.

  12. Angular dependences of the luminescence and density of photon states in a chiral liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Umanskii, B A; Blinov, L M; Palto, S P

    2013-11-30

    Luminescence spectra of a laser dye-doped chiral liquid crystal have been studied in a wide range of angles (up to 60°) to the axis of its helical structure using a semicylindrical quartz prism, which made it possible to observe the shift and evolution of the photonic band gap in response to changes in angle. Using measured spectra and numerical simulation, we calculated the spectral distributions of the density of photon states in such a cholesteric crystal for polarised and unpolarised light, which characterise its structure as that of a chiral one-dimensional photonic crystal. (optics of liquid crystals)

  13. Optical Properties and Wave Propagation in Semiconductor-Based Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Mario Agio

    2002-12-31

    This work is a theoretical investigation on the physical properties of semiconductor-based two-dimensional photonic crystals, in particular for what concerns systems embedded in planar dielectric waveguides (GaAs/AlGaAs, GaInAsP/InP heterostructures, and self-standing membranes) or based on macro-porous silicon. The photonic-band structure of photonic crystals and photonic-crystal slabs is numerically computed and the associated light-line problem is discussed, which points to the issue of intrinsic out-of-lane diffraction losses for the photonic bands lying above the light line. The photonic states are then classified by the group theory formalism: each mode is related to an irreducible representation of the corresponding small point group. The optical properties are investigated by means of the scattering matrix method, which numerically implements a variable-angle-reflectance experiment; comparison with experiments is also provided. The analysis of surface reflectance proves the existence of selection rules for coupling an external wave to a certain photonic mode. Such rules can be directly derived from symmetry considerations. Lastly, the control of wave propagation in weak-index contrast photonic-crystal slabs is tackled in view of designing building blocks for photonic integrated circuits. The proposed designs are found to comply with the major requirements of low-loss propagation, high and single-mode transmission. These notions are then collected to model a photonic-crystal combiner for an integrated multi-wavelength-source laser.

  14. Resonance fluorescence spectra from coherently driven quantum dots coupled to slow-light photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy-Choudhury, Kaushik; Mann, Nishan; Manson, Ross; Hughes, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    Using a polaron master equation approach, we investigate the resonance fluorescence spectra from coherently driven quantum dots (QDs) coupled to an acoustic phonon bath and photonic crystal waveguides with a rich local density of photon states (LDOS). Resonance fluorescence spectra from QDs in semiconductor crystals are known to show strong signatures of electron-phonon interactions, but when coupled to a structured photonic reservoir, the QD emission properties are also determined by the frequency dependence of the LDOS of the photon reservoir. Here, we investigate the simultaneous role of coupled photon and phonon baths on the characteristic Mollow triplet spectra from a strongly driven QD. As an example structured photonic reservoir, we first study a photonic crystal coupled cavity waveguide, and find that photons and phonons have counterinteracting effects near the upper mode edge of the coupled-cavity waveguide, thus establishing the importance of their separate roles in determining the emission spectra. The general theory is developed for arbitrary photonic reservoirs and is further applied to determine the resonance fluorescence spectra from a realistic, disordered W1 photonic crystal waveguide showing important photon-phonon interaction effects that are directly relevant to emerging experiments and theoretical proposals.

  15. Tunable Mach-Zehnder interferometer in a two-dimensional photonic crystal with liquid crystal infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiyao; Dong, Xinyong; Hu, Juan Juan; Shum, Ping; Wang, Yufei; Qiu, Yishen; Lin, Guimin; Hong, Hailian

    2007-09-01

    A theoretical model of a tunable Mach-Zehnder interferometer (TMZI) constructed in a 2D photonic crystal is proposed. The 2D PhC consists of a square lattice of cylindric air holes in silicon. The TMZI includes two mirrors and two splitters. Lights propagate between them employing self-collimation effect. The two interferometer branches have different path lengths. Parts of the longer branch are infiltrated with a kind of liquid crystal (LC) whose ordinary and extraordinary refractive indices are 1.522 and 1.706, respectively. The transmission spectra at two MZI output ports are in the shape of sinusoidal curves and have a uniform peak spacing 0.0017c/a in the frequency range from 0.26c/a to 0.27c/a. When the effective refractive index n eff of the liquid crystal is increased from 1.522 to 1.706, the peaks shift to the lower frequencies over 0.0017c/a while the peak spacing is almost kept unchanged. So this TMZI can work as a tunble power splitter or an optical switch. For the central operating wavelength around 1550nm, its dimensions are only about tens of microns. So this device may be applied to photonic integrated circuits.

  16. An optical analog of the Borrmann effect in photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanova, M. V. Lozovik, Yu. E.; Eiderman, S. L.

    2010-04-15

    Numerical simulation using the layered Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker (LKKR) method is applied to calculate the reflection and absorption spectra of an s-polarized electromagnetic wave incident on a faced-centered cubic photonic crystal (PC) with opal structure whose sites are occupied by two-layer metal-dielectric spheres. The reflection and absorption coefficients of the PC are analyzed as a function of the angle of incidence of the electromagnetic wave on the crystal surface. A range of wavelengths {lambda} and angles of inclination {theta} to the normal is found in which the absorption experiences a sharp change under small variations of the above parameters. The appearance of peaks in the absorption spectrum of the PC is analyzed, and the spectrum is compared with the behavior of the reduced density of states. By the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method applied to the Maxwell equations, the spatial distribution of the energy density of electromagnetic field inside each of five layers of the PC is obtained at angles of incidence of 23{sup o} and 30{sup o} for a wave-length of 455 nm. It is demonstrated that the sharp maxima of the density of electromagnetic-field energy that are localized on the surfaces of absorbing metal spheres correspond to the absorption maximum. At the same time, at the absorption minimum, the maxima of the field energy density in each of the five layers are localized mainly between the lattice sites of the PC. An analogy between this phenomenon and the Borrmann effect, which is known in X-ray spectroscopy of ordinary crystals, is analyzed.

  17. Synthesis of Two-Photon Materials and Two-Photon Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramaniam, Girija

    2001-01-01

    The duration of the grant was interrupted by two major accidents that the PI met with-- an auto accident in Pasadena, CA during her second summer at JPL which took almost eight months for recovery and a second accident during Fall 2000 that left her in crutches for the entire semester. Further, the time released agreed by the University was not given in a timely fashion. The candidate has been given post-grant expire time off. In spite of all these problems, the PI synthesized a number of new two-photon materials and studied the structure-activity correlation to arrive at the best-optimized structure. The PI's design proved to be one of the best in the sense that these materials has a hitherto unreported two-photon absorption cross section. Many materials based on PI's design was later made by the NASA colleague. This is Phase 1. Phase II of this grant is to orate liquid crystalline nature into this potentially useful materials and is currently in progress. Recent observations of nano- and pico-second response time of homeotropically aligned liquid crystals suggest their inherent potentials to act as laser hardening materials, i.e., as protective devices against short laser pulses. The objective of the current project is to exploit this potential by the synthesis of liquid crystals with high optical nonlinearity and optimizing their performance. The PI is trying structural variations to bring in liquid crystalline nature without losing the high two-photon cross section. Both Phase I and Phase II led to many invited presentations and publications in reputed journals like 'Science' and 'Molecular Crystals'. The list of presentations and reprints are enclosed. Another important and satisfying outcome of this grant is the opportunity that this grant offered to the budding undergraduate scientists to get involved in a visible research of international importance. All the students had a chance to learn a lot during research, had the opportunity to present their work at

  18. Multiple omnidirectional defect modes and nonlinear magnetic-field effects in metamaterial photonic superlattices with a polaritonic defect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles-Uriza, A. X.; Reyes Gómez, F.; Mejía-Salazar, J. R.

    2016-09-01

    We report the existence of multiple omnidirectional defect modes in the zero-nbar gap of photonic stacks, made of alternate layers of conventional dielectric and double-negative metamaterial, with a polaritonic defect layer. In the case of nonlinear magnetic metamaterials, the optical bistability phenomenon leads to switching from negligible to perfect transmission around these defect modes. We hope these findings have potential applications in the design and development of multichannel optical filters, power limiters, optical-diodes and optical-transistors.

  19. Reflectance properties of one-dimensional metal-dielectric ternary photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, G. N.; Kumar, Narendra; Thapa, Khem B.; Ojha, S. P.

    2016-05-01

    Metallic photonic crystal has a very important application in absorption enhancement in solar cells. It has been found that an ultra-thin metallic layer becomes transparent due to internal scattering of light through the each interface of the dielectric and metal surfaces. The metal has absorption due to their surface plasmon and the plasmon has important parameters for changing optical properties of the metal. We consider ternary metallic-dielectric photonic crystal (MDPC) for having large probabilities to change the optical properties of the MDPC and the photonic crystals may be changed by changing dimensionality, symmetry, lattice parameters, Filling fraction and effective refractive index refractive index contrast. In this present communication, we try to show that the photonic band gap in ternary metal-dielectric photonic crystal can be significantly enlarged when air dielectric constant is considered. All the theoretical analyses are made based on the transfer matrix method together with the Drude model of metal.

  20. Fabrication of defects in periodic photonic crystals using a phase only spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, David; Lutkenhaus, Jeffrey; Arigong, Bayaner; Zhang, Hualiang; Philipose, Usha; Lin, Yuankun

    2014-03-01

    Here we present single exposure holographic fabrication of embedded defects in photonic crystal structures in a negative photoresist using a spatial light modulator (SLM). A phase pattern is engineered to form a desired interference pattern and displayed on a phase-only SLM. The resulting first order beams at the Fourier plane are used to recreate the interference pattern. Negative and positive defects are added to the photonic crystal in the following ways. A void-type defect is produced in two dimensional photonic crystal structures by replacing the phase of the engineered phase pattern with a constant value at the points where the defect is desired. And a positive bump defect can be made by allowing the zeroth order beam to interfere with the first order beams. Through these methods, it is possible to fabricate arbitrary shaped defect structures in photonic crystals through a single exposure process, thus improving cost effectiveness and simplifying the fabrication process of integrated photonics.