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Sample records for photooxidation-induced transcriptome reprogramming

  1. Single-cell transcriptome and epigenomic reprogramming of cardiomyocyte-derived cardiac progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Chakravarty, Tushar; Zhang, Yiqiang; Li, Xiaojin; Zhong, Jiang F; Wang, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The molecular basis underlying the dedifferentiation of mammalian adult cardiomyocytes (ACMs) into myocyte-derived cardiac progenitor cells (mCPCs) during cardiac tissue regeneration is poorly understood. We present data integrating single-cell transcriptome and whole-genome DNA methylome analyses of mouse mCPCs to understand the epigenomic reprogramming governing their intrinsic cellular plasticity. Compared to parental cardiomyocytes, mCPCs display epigenomic reprogramming with many differentially-methylated regions, both hypermethylated and hypomethylated, across the entire genome. Correlating well with the methylome, our single-cell transcriptomic data show that the genes encoding cardiac structure and function proteins are remarkably down-regulated in mCPCs, while those for cell cycle, proliferation, and stemness are significantly up-regulated. In addition, implanting mCPCs into infarcted mouse myocardium improves cardiac function with augmented left ventricular ejection fraction. This dataset suggests that the cellular plasticity of mammalian cardiomyocytes is the result of a well-orchestrated epigenomic reprogramming and a subsequent global transcriptomic alteration. Understanding cardiomyocyte epigenomic reprogramming may enable the design of future clinical therapies that induce cardiac regeneration, and prevent heart failure. PMID:27622691

  2. Identification of Reprogrammed Myeloid Cell Transcriptomes in NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ravi; Fischer, Kari R.; Choi, Hyejin; El Rayes, Tina; Ryu, Seongho; Nasar, Abu; Spinelli, Cathy F.; Andrews, Weston; Elemento, Olivier; Nolan, Daniel; Stiles, Brendon; Rafii, Shahin; Narula, Navneet; Davuluri, Ramana; Altorki, Nasser K.; Mittal, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer related mortality worldwide, with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as the most prevalent form. Despite advances in treatment options including minimally invasive surgery, CT-guided radiation, novel chemotherapeutic regimens, and targeted therapeutics, prognosis remains dismal. Therefore, further molecular analysis of NSCLC is necessary to identify novel molecular targets that impact prognosis and the design of new-targeted therapies. In recent years, tumor “activated/reprogrammed” stromal cells that promote carcinogenesis have emerged as potential therapeutic targets. However, the contribution of stromal cells to NSCLC is poorly understood. Here, we show increased numbers of bone marrow (BM)-derived hematopoietic cells in the tumor parenchyma of NSCLC patients compared with matched adjacent non-neoplastic lung tissue. By sorting specific cellular fractions from lung cancer patients, we compared the transcriptomes of intratumoral myeloid compartments within the tumor bed with their counterparts within adjacent non-neoplastic tissue from NSCLC patients. The RNA sequencing of specific myeloid compartments (immature monocytic myeloid cells and polymorphonuclear neutrophils) identified differentially regulated genes and mRNA isoforms, which were inconspicuous in whole tumor analysis. Genes encoding secreted factors, including osteopontin (OPN), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 7 (CCL7) and thrombospondin 1 (TSP1) were identified, which enhanced tumorigenic properties of lung cancer cells indicative of their potential as targets for therapy. This study demonstrates that analysis of homogeneous stromal populations isolated directly from fresh clinical specimens can detect important stromal genes of therapeutic value. PMID:26046767

  3. Dual Transcriptome Profiling of Leishmania-Infected Human Macrophages Reveals Distinct Reprogramming Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Maria Cecilia; Dillon, Laura A. L.; Belew, Ashton Trey; Bravo, Hector Corrada; Mosser, David M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Macrophages are mononuclear phagocytes that constitute a first line of defense against pathogens. While lethal to many microbes, they are the primary host cells of Leishmania spp. parasites, the obligate intracellular pathogens that cause leishmaniasis. We conducted transcriptomic profiling of two Leishmania species and the human macrophage over the course of intracellular infection by using high-throughput RNA sequencing to characterize the global gene expression changes and reprogramming events that underlie the interactions between the pathogen and its host. A systematic exclusion of the generic effects of large-particle phagocytosis revealed a vigorous, parasite-specific response of the human macrophage early in the infection that was greatly tempered at later time points. An analogous temporal expression pattern was observed with the parasite, suggesting that much of the reprogramming that occurs as parasites transform into intracellular forms generally stabilizes shortly after entry. Following that, the parasite establishes an intracellular niche within macrophages, with minimal communication between the parasite and the host cell later during the infection. No significant difference was observed between parasite species transcriptomes or in the transcriptional response of macrophages infected with each species. Our comparative analysis of gene expression changes that occur as mouse and human macrophages are infected by Leishmania spp. points toward a general signature of the Leishmania-macrophage infectome. PMID:27165796

  4. Reprogrammed Transcriptome in Rhesus-Bovine Interspecies Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Otu, Hasan H.; Chen, Ying; Lee, Young; Latham, Keith; Cibelli, Jose B.

    2011-01-01

    Background Global activation of the embryonic genome (EGA), one of the most critical steps in early mammalian embryo development, is recognized as the time when interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) embryos fail to thrive. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we analyzed the EGA-related transcriptome of rhesus-bovine iSCNT 8- to 16-cell embryos and dissected the reprogramming process in terms of embryonic gene activation, somatic gene silencing, and maternal RNA degradation. Compared with fibroblast donor cells, two thousand and seven genes were activated in iSCNT embryos, one quarter of them reaching expression levels comparable to those found in in vitro fertilized (IVF) rhesus embryos. This suggested that EGA in iSCNT embryos had partially recapitulated rhesus embryonic development. Eight hundred and sixty somatic genes were not silenced properly and continued to be expressed in iSCNT embryos, which indicated incomplete nuclear reprogramming. We compared maternal RNA degradation in bovine oocytes between bovine-bovine SCNT and iSCNT embryos. While maternal RNA degradation occurred in both SCNT and iSCNT embryos, we saw more limited overall degradation of maternal RNA in iSCNT embryos than in SCNT embryos. Several important maternal RNAs, like GPF9, were not properly processed in SCNT embryos. Conclusions/Significance Our data suggested that iSCNT embryos are capable of triggering EGA, while a portion of somatic cell-associated genes maintain their expression. Maternal RNA degradation seems to be impaired in iSCNT embryos. Further understanding of the biological roles of these genes, networks, and pathways revealed by iSCNT may expand our knowledge about cell reprogramming, pluripotency, and differentiation. PMID:21799794

  5. Root Type-Specific Reprogramming of Maize Pericycle Transcriptomes by Local High Nitrate Results in Disparate Lateral Root Branching Patterns.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peng; Baldauf, Jutta A; Lithio, Andrew; Marcon, Caroline; Nettleton, Dan; Li, Chunjian; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2016-03-01

    The adaptability of root system architecture to unevenly distributed mineral nutrients in soil is a key determinant of plant performance. The molecular mechanisms underlying nitrate dependent plasticity of lateral root branching across the different root types of maize are only poorly understood. In this study, detailed morphological and anatomical analyses together with cell type-specific transcriptome profiling experiments combining laser capture microdissection with RNA-seq were performed to unravel the molecular signatures of lateral root formation in primary, seminal, crown, and brace roots of maize (Zea mays) upon local high nitrate stimulation. The four maize root types displayed divergent branching patterns of lateral roots upon local high nitrate stimulation. In particular, brace roots displayed an exceptional architectural plasticity compared to other root types. Transcriptome profiling revealed root type-specific transcriptomic reprogramming of pericycle cells upon local high nitrate stimulation. The alteration of the transcriptomic landscape of brace root pericycle cells in response to local high nitrate stimulation was most significant. Root type-specific transcriptome diversity in response to local high nitrate highlighted differences in the functional adaptability and systemic shoot nitrogen starvation response during development. Integration of morphological, anatomical, and transcriptomic data resulted in a framework underscoring similarity and diversity among root types grown in heterogeneous nitrate environments. PMID:26811190

  6. Transcriptome Sequencing Reveals Wide Expression Reprogramming of Basal and Unknown Genes in Leptospira biflexa Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Spangenberg, Lucía; Lopes Bastos, Bruno; Graña, Martín; Vasconcelos, Larissa; Almeida, Áurea; Greif, Gonzalo; Robello, Carlos; Ristow, Paula

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genus Leptospira is composed of pathogenic and saprophytic spirochetes. Pathogenic Leptospira is the etiological agent of leptospirosis, a globally spread neglected disease. A key ecological feature of some pathogenic species is their ability to survive both within and outside the host. For most leptospires, the ability to persist outside the host is associated with biofilm formation, a most important bacterial strategy to face and overcome hostile environmental conditions. The architecture and biochemistry of leptospiral biofilms are rather well understood; however, the genetic program underpinning biofilm formation remains mostly unknown. In this work, we used the saprophyte Leptospira biflexa as a model organism to assess over- and underrepresented transcripts during the biofilm state, using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) technology. Our results showed that some basal biological processes like DNA replication and cell division are downregulated in the mature biofilm. Additionally, we identified significant expression reprogramming for genes involved in motility, sugar/lipid metabolism, and iron scavenging, as well as for outer membrane-encoding genes. A careful manual annotation process allowed us to assign molecular functions to many previously uncharacterized genes that are probably involved in biofilm metabolism. We also provided evidence for the presence of small regulatory RNAs in this species. Finally, coexpression networks were reconstructed to pinpoint functionally related gene clusters that may explain how biofilm maintenance is regulated. Beyond elucidating some genetic aspects of biofilm formation, this work reveals a number of pathways whose functional dissection may impact our understanding of leptospiral biology, in particular how these organisms adapt to environmental changes. IMPORTANCE In this work, we describe the first transcriptome based on RNA-seq technology focused on studying transcriptional changes associated with biofilm

  7. Transcriptome Sequencing Reveals Wide Expression Reprogramming of Basal and Unknown Genes in Leptospira biflexa Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Iraola, Gregorio; Spangenberg, Lucía; Lopes Bastos, Bruno; Graña, Martín; Vasconcelos, Larissa; Almeida, Áurea; Greif, Gonzalo; Robello, Carlos; Ristow, Paula; Naya, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The genus Leptospira is composed of pathogenic and saprophytic spirochetes. Pathogenic Leptospira is the etiological agent of leptospirosis, a globally spread neglected disease. A key ecological feature of some pathogenic species is their ability to survive both within and outside the host. For most leptospires, the ability to persist outside the host is associated with biofilm formation, a most important bacterial strategy to face and overcome hostile environmental conditions. The architecture and biochemistry of leptospiral biofilms are rather well understood; however, the genetic program underpinning biofilm formation remains mostly unknown. In this work, we used the saprophyte Leptospira biflexa as a model organism to assess over- and underrepresented transcripts during the biofilm state, using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) technology. Our results showed that some basal biological processes like DNA replication and cell division are downregulated in the mature biofilm. Additionally, we identified significant expression reprogramming for genes involved in motility, sugar/lipid metabolism, and iron scavenging, as well as for outer membrane-encoding genes. A careful manual annotation process allowed us to assign molecular functions to many previously uncharacterized genes that are probably involved in biofilm metabolism. We also provided evidence for the presence of small regulatory RNAs in this species. Finally, coexpression networks were reconstructed to pinpoint functionally related gene clusters that may explain how biofilm maintenance is regulated. Beyond elucidating some genetic aspects of biofilm formation, this work reveals a number of pathways whose functional dissection may impact our understanding of leptospiral biology, in particular how these organisms adapt to environmental changes. IMPORTANCE In this work, we describe the first transcriptome based on RNA-seq technology focused on studying transcriptional changes associated with biofilm growth

  8. Reprogramming of Strawberry (Fragaria vesca) Root Transcriptome in Response to Phytophthora cactorum

    PubMed Central

    Blande, Daniel; Kärenlampi, Sirpa; Kokko, Harri

    2016-01-01

    Crown rot (Phytophthora cactorum) causes significant economic losses in strawberry production. The best control strategy would be to use resistant cultivars, but polygenically inherited resistance makes the breeding of the garden strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) challenging. The diploid wild strawberry Fragaria vesca Hawaii 4 genotype was shown previously to have resistance against crown rot. To explore the resistance mechanisms, we inoculated the roots of Hawaii 4 with P. cactorum in a novel in vitro hydroponic system to minimize interference caused by other microbes. Major reprogramming of the root transcriptome occurred, involving 30% of the genes. The surveillance system of the plant shifted from the development mode to the defense mode. Furthermore, the immune responses as well as many genes involved in the biosynthesis of the defense hormones jasmonic acid, ethylene and salicylic acid were up-regulated. Several major allergen-like genes encoding PR-10 proteins were highly expressed in the inoculated plants, suggesting that they also have a crucial role in the defense responses against P. cactorum. Additionally, flavonoids and terpenoids may be of vital importance, as several genes involved in their biosynthesis were up-regulated. The cell wall biosynthesis and developmental processes were down-regulated, possibly as a result of the down-regulation of the key genes involved in the biosynthesis of growth-promoting hormones brassinosteroids and auxin. Of particular interest was the expression of potential resistance genes in the recently identified P. cactorum resistance locus RPc-1. These new findings help to target the breeding efforts aiming at more resistant strawberry cultivars. PMID:27518577

  9. Transcriptome and metabolome reprogramming in Vitis vinifera cv. Trincadeira berries upon infection with Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Agudelo-Romero, Patricia; Erban, Alexander; Rego, Cecília; Carbonell-Bejerano, Pablo; Nascimento, Teresa; Sousa, Lisete; Martínez-Zapater, José M; Kopka, Joachim; Fortes, Ana Margarida

    2015-04-01

    Vitis vinifera berries are sensitive towards infection by the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea, leading to important economic losses worldwide. The combined analysis of the transcriptome and metabolome associated with fungal infection has not been performed previously in grapes or in another fleshy fruit. In an attempt to identify the molecular and metabolic mechanisms associated with the infection, peppercorn-sized fruits were infected in the field. Green and veraison berries were collected following infection for microarray analysis complemented with metabolic profiling of primary and other soluble metabolites and of volatile emissions. The results provided evidence of a reprogramming of carbohydrate and lipid metabolisms towards increased synthesis of secondary metabolites involved in plant defence, such as trans-resveratrol and gallic acid. This response was already activated in infected green berries with the putative involvement of jasmonic acid, ethylene, polyamines, and auxins, whereas salicylic acid did not seem to be involved. Genes encoding WRKY transcription factors, pathogenesis-related proteins, glutathione S-transferase, stilbene synthase, and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase were upregulated in infected berries. However, salicylic acid signalling was activated in healthy ripening berries along with the expression of proteins of the NBS-LRR superfamily and protein kinases, suggesting that the pathogen is able to shut down defences existing in healthy ripening berries. Furthermore, this study provided metabolic biomarkers of infection such as azelaic acid, a substance known to prime plant defence responses, arabitol, ribitol, 4-amino butanoic acid, 1-O-methyl- glucopyranoside, and several fatty acids that alone or in combination can be used to monitor Botrytis infection early in the vineyard. PMID:25675955

  10. Transcriptome and metabolome reprogramming in Vitis vinifera cv. Trincadeira berries upon infection with Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Agudelo-Romero, Patricia; Erban, Alexander; Rego, Cecília; Carbonell-Bejerano, Pablo; Nascimento, Teresa; Sousa, Lisete; Martínez-Zapater, José M.; Kopka, Joachim; Fortes, Ana Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Vitis vinifera berries are sensitive towards infection by the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea, leading to important economic losses worldwide. The combined analysis of the transcriptome and metabolome associated with fungal infection has not been performed previously in grapes or in another fleshy fruit. In an attempt to identify the molecular and metabolic mechanisms associated with the infection, peppercorn-sized fruits were infected in the field. Green and veraison berries were collected following infection for microarray analysis complemented with metabolic profiling of primary and other soluble metabolites and of volatile emissions. The results provided evidence of a reprogramming of carbohydrate and lipid metabolisms towards increased synthesis of secondary metabolites involved in plant defence, such as trans-resveratrol and gallic acid. This response was already activated in infected green berries with the putative involvement of jasmonic acid, ethylene, polyamines, and auxins, whereas salicylic acid did not seem to be involved. Genes encoding WRKY transcription factors, pathogenesis-related proteins, glutathione S-transferase, stilbene synthase, and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase were upregulated in infected berries. However, salicylic acid signalling was activated in healthy ripening berries along with the expression of proteins of the NBS-LRR superfamily and protein kinases, suggesting that the pathogen is able to shut down defences existing in healthy ripening berries. Furthermore, this study provided metabolic biomarkers of infection such as azelaic acid, a substance known to prime plant defence responses, arabitol, ribitol, 4-amino butanoic acid, 1-O-methyl- glucopyranoside, and several fatty acids that alone or in combination can be used to monitor Botrytis infection early in the vineyard. PMID:25675955

  11. Reprogramming of Strawberry (Fragaria vesca) Root Transcriptome in Response to Phytophthora cactorum.

    PubMed

    Toljamo, Anna; Blande, Daniel; Kärenlampi, Sirpa; Kokko, Harri

    2016-01-01

    Crown rot (Phytophthora cactorum) causes significant economic losses in strawberry production. The best control strategy would be to use resistant cultivars, but polygenically inherited resistance makes the breeding of the garden strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) challenging. The diploid wild strawberry Fragaria vesca Hawaii 4 genotype was shown previously to have resistance against crown rot. To explore the resistance mechanisms, we inoculated the roots of Hawaii 4 with P. cactorum in a novel in vitro hydroponic system to minimize interference caused by other microbes. Major reprogramming of the root transcriptome occurred, involving 30% of the genes. The surveillance system of the plant shifted from the development mode to the defense mode. Furthermore, the immune responses as well as many genes involved in the biosynthesis of the defense hormones jasmonic acid, ethylene and salicylic acid were up-regulated. Several major allergen-like genes encoding PR-10 proteins were highly expressed in the inoculated plants, suggesting that they also have a crucial role in the defense responses against P. cactorum. Additionally, flavonoids and terpenoids may be of vital importance, as several genes involved in their biosynthesis were up-regulated. The cell wall biosynthesis and developmental processes were down-regulated, possibly as a result of the down-regulation of the key genes involved in the biosynthesis of growth-promoting hormones brassinosteroids and auxin. Of particular interest was the expression of potential resistance genes in the recently identified P. cactorum resistance locus RPc-1. These new findings help to target the breeding efforts aiming at more resistant strawberry cultivars. PMID:27518577

  12. Nuclear transcriptome profiling of induced pluripotent stem cells and embryonic stem cells identify non-coding loci resistant to reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Fort, Alexandre; Yamada, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Kosuke; Koseki, Haruhiko; Carninci, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Identification of functionally relevant differences between induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) and reference embryonic stem cells (ESC) remains a central question for therapeutic applications. Differences in gene expression between iPSC and ESC have been examined by microarray and more recently with RNA-SEQ technologies. We here report an in depth analyses of nuclear and cytoplasmic transcriptomes, using the CAGE (cap analysis of gene expression) technology, for 5 iPSC clones derived from mouse lymphocytes B and 3 ESC lines. This approach reveals nuclear transcriptomes significantly more complex in ESC than in iPSC. Hundreds of yet not annotated putative non-coding RNAs and enhancer-associated transcripts specifically transcribed in ESC have been detected and supported with epigenetic and chromatin-chromatin interactions data. We identified super-enhancers transcriptionally active specifically in ESC and associated with genes implicated in the maintenance of pluripotency. Similarly, we detected non-coding transcripts of yet unknown function being regulated by ESC specific super-enhancers. Taken together, these results demonstrate that current protocols of iPSC reprogramming do not trigger activation of numerous cis-regulatory regions. It thus reinforces the need for already suggested deeper monitoring of the non-coding transcriptome when characterizing iPSC clones. Such differences in regulatory transcript expression may indeed impact their potential for clinical applications. PMID:25664506

  13. System-Wide Hypersensitive Response-Associated Transcriptome and Metabolome Reprogramming in Tomato1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Etalo, Desalegn W.; Stulemeijer, Iris J.E.; Peter van Esse, H.; de Vos, Ric C.H.; Bouwmeester, Harro J.; Joosten, Matthieu H.A.J.

    2013-01-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR) is considered to be the hallmark of the resistance response of plants to pathogens. To study HR-associated transcriptome and metabolome reprogramming in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), we used plants that express both a resistance gene to Cladosporium fulvum and the matching avirulence gene of this pathogen. In these plants, massive reprogramming occurred, and we found that the HR and associated processes are highly energy demanding. Ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation, hydrolysis of sugars, and lipid catabolism are used as alternative sources of amino acids, energy, and carbon skeletons, respectively. We observed strong accumulation of secondary metabolites, such as hydroxycinnamic acid amides. Coregulated expression of WRKY transcription factors and genes known to be involved in the HR, in addition to a strong enrichment of the W-box WRKY-binding motif in the promoter sequences of the coregulated genes, point to WRKYs as the most prominent orchestrators of the HR. Our study has revealed several novel HR-related genes, and reverse genetics tools will allow us to understand the role of each individual component in the HR. PMID:23719893

  14. Reversal of Aberrant Cancer Methylome and Transcriptome upon Direct Reprogramming of Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, Dashayini; Kong, Chiou Mee; Lai, Jason; Tay, Ling Lee; Yang, Henry; Wang, Xueying

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports on direct reprogramming of cancer cells (iPCs) which results in reduced tumorigenic potential has attributed the importance of epigenetics in tumorigenesis, but lacked genome-wide analysis. Here we describe successful generation of iPCs from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. Following reprogramming, they resembled embryonic stem and induced pluripotent stem cells in pluripotency markers expression, gene expression patterns and in vitro differentiation ability. Genome-wide methylation analysis revealed that aberrantly methylated promoters which were mostly developmental-associated genes and tumor suppressors; as well as commonly upregulated genes in NSCLC i.e. KRT19 and S100P were reversed in iPCs upon reprogramming. Also, the reversal of oncogenes and tumor suppressors status were partially explainable by DNA methylation. These findings suggest that DNA methylation patterns explain the downstream transcriptional effects, which potentially caused the reduced tumorigenicity in iPCs, thus providing evidence that reprogramming reverses the aberrantly dysregulated genes in NSCLC both epigenetically and transcriptionally. PMID:22912920

  15. Systems biology approach to identify transcriptome reprogramming and candidate microRNA targets during the progression of polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by cyst formation throughout the kidney parenchyma. It is caused by mutations in either of two genes, PKD1 and PKD2. Mice that lack functional Pkd1 (Pkd1-/-), develop rapidly progressive cystic disease during embryogenesis, and serve as a model to study human ADPKD. Genome wide transcriptome reprogramming and the possible roles of micro-RNAs (miRNAs) that affect the initiation and progression of cyst formation in the Pkd1-/- have yet to be studied. miRNAs are small, regulatory non-coding RNAs, implicated in a wide spectrum of biological processes. Their expression levels are altered in several diseases including kidney cancer, diabetic nephropathy and PKD. Results We examined the molecular pathways that modulate renal cyst formation and growth in the Pkd1-/- model by performing global gene-expression profiling in embryonic kidneys at days 14.5 and 17.5. Gene Ontology and gene set enrichment analysis were used to identify overrepresented signaling pathways in Pkd1-/- kidneys. We found dysregulation of developmental, metabolic, and signaling pathways (e.g. Wnt, calcium, TGF-β and MAPK) in Pkd1-/- kidneys. Using a comparative transcriptomics approach, we determined similarities and differences with human ADPKD: ~50% overlap at the pathway level among the mis-regulated pathways was observed. By using computational approaches (TargetScan, miRanda, microT and miRDB), we then predicted miRNAs that were suggested to target the differentially expressed mRNAs. Differential expressions of 9 candidate miRNAs, miRs-10a, -30a-5p, -96, -126-5p, -182, -200a, -204, -429 and -488, and 16 genes were confirmed by qPCR. In addition, 14 candidate miRNA:mRNA reciprocal interactions were predicted. Several of the highly regulated genes and pathways were predicted as targets of miRNAs. Conclusions We have described global transcriptional reprogramming during the progression of PKD in the Pkd1-/- model. We

  16. 5mC oxidation by Tet2 modulates enhancer activity and timing of transcriptome reprogramming during differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Hon, Gary C.; Song, Chun-Xiao; Du, Tingting; Jin, Fulai; Selvaraj, Siddarth; Lee, Ah Young; Yen, Chia-an; Ye, Zhen; Mao, Shi-Qing; Wang, Bang-An; Kuan, Samantha; Edsall, Lee E.; Zhao, Boxuan Simen; Xu, Guo-Liang; He, Chuan; Ren, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Summary In mammals, cytosine methylation (5mC) is widely distributed throughout the genome, but is notably depleted from active promoters and enhancers. While the role of DNA methylation in promoter silencing has been well documented, the function of this epigenetic mark at enhancers remains unclear. Recent experiments have demonstrated that enhancers are enriched for 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), an oxidization product of the Tet family of 5mC dioxygenases and an intermediate of DNA demethylation. These results support the involvement of Tet proteins in regulation of dynamic DNA methylation at enhancers. By mapping DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation at base resolution, we find that deletion of Tet2 causes extensive loss of 5hmC at enhancers, accompanied by enhancer hypermethylation, reduction of enhancer activity, and delayed gene induction in the early steps of differentiation. Our results reveal that DNA demethylation modulates enhancer activity, and its disruption influences the timing of transcriptome reprogramming during cellular differentiation. PMID:25263596

  17. Moderate drought causes dramatic floral transcriptomic reprogramming to ensure successful reproductive development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Drought is a major constraint that leads to extensive losses to agricultural yield worldwide. The potential yield is largely determined during inflorescence development. However, to date, most investigations on plant response to drought have focused on vegetative development. This study describes the morphological changes of reproductive development and the comparison of transcriptomes under various drought conditions. Results The plants grown were studied under two drought conditions: minimum for successful reproduction (45-50% soil water content, moderate drought, MD) and for survival (30-35%, severe drought, SD). MD plants can produce similar number of siliques on the main stem and similar number of seeds per silique comparing with well-water plants. The situation of SD plants was much worse than MD plants. The transcriptomes of inflorescences were further investigated at molecular level using microarrays. Our results showed more than four thousands genes with differential expression under severe drought and less than two thousand changed under moderate drought condition (with 2-fold change and q-value < 0.01). We found a group of genes with increased expression as the drought became more severe, suggesting putative adaptation to the dehydration. Interestingly, we also identified genes with alteration only under the moderate but not the severe drought condition, indicating the existence of distinct sets of genes responsive to different levels of water availability. Further cis-element analyses of the putative regulatory sequences provided more information about the underlying mechanisms for reproductive responses to drought, suggesting possible novel candidate genes that protect those developing flowers under drought stress. Conclusions Different pathways may be activated in response to moderate and severe drought in reproductive tissues, potentially helping plant to maximize its yield and balance the resource consumption between vegetative and

  18. Candidatus Liberibacter americanus induces significant reprogramming of the transcriptome of the susceptible citrus genotype

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Citrus huanglongbing (HLB) disease is caused by endogenous, phloem-restricted, Gram negative, uncultured bacteria named Candidatus Liberibacter africanus (CaLaf), Ca. L. asiaticus (CaLas), and Ca. L. americanus (CaLam), depending on the continent where the bacteria were first detected. The Asian citrus psyllid vector, Diaphorina citri, transmits CaLas and CaLam and both Liberibacter species are present in Brazil. Several studies of the transcriptional response of citrus plants manifesting HLB symptoms have been reported, but only for CaLas infection. This study evaluated the transcriptional reprogramming of a susceptible genotype of sweet orange challenged with CaLam, using a customized 385K microarray containing approximately 32,000 unigene transcripts. We analyzed global changes in gene expression of CaLam-infected leaves of sweet orange during the symptomatic stage of infection and compared the results with previously published microarray studies that used CaLas-infected plants. Twenty candidate genes were selected to validate the expression profiles in symptomatic and asymptomatic PCR-positive leaves infected with CaLas or CaLam. Results The microarray analysis identified 633 differentially expressed genes during the symptomatic stage of CaLam infection. Among them, 418 (66%) were upregulated and 215 (34%) were down regulated. Five hundred and fourteen genes (81%) were orthologs of genes from Arabidopsis thaliana. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) revealed that several of the transcripts encoded transporters associated with the endomembrane system, especially zinc transport. Among the most biologically relevant gene transcripts in GSEA were those related to signaling, metabolism and/or stimulus to hormones, genes responding to stress and pathogenesis, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, oxidative stress and transcription factors belonging to different families. Real time PCR of 20 candidate genes validated the expression pattern of some genes in

  19. Water limitation and rootstock genotype interact to alter grape berry metabolism through transcriptome reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Berdeja, Mariam; Nicolas, Philippe; Kappel, Christian; Dai, Zhan Wu; Hilbert, Ghislaine; Peccoux, Anthony; Lafontaine, Magali; Ollat, Nathalie; Gomès, Eric; Delrot, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Grapevine is a perennial crop often cultivated by grafting a scion cultivar on a suitable rootstock. Rootstocks influence scions, particularly with regard to water uptake and vigor. Therefore, one of the possibilities to adapt viticulture to the extended drought stress periods is to select rootstocks conferring increased tolerance to drought. However, the molecular mechanisms associated with the ability of rootstock/scion combination to influence grape berry metabolism under drought stress are still poorly understood. The transcriptomic changes induced by drought stress in grape berries (cv. Pinot noir) from vines grafted on either 110R (drought-tolerant) or 125AA (drought-sensitive) rootstock were compared. The experiments were conducted in the vineyard for two years and two grape berry developmental stages (50% and 100% veraison). The genome-wide microarray approach showed that water stress strongly impacts gene expression in the berries, through ontology categories that cover cell wall metabolism, primary and secondary metabolism, signaling, stress, and hormones, and that some of these effects strongly depend on the rootstock genotype. Indeed, under drought stress, berries from vines grafted on 110R displayed a different transcriptional response compared to 125AA-concerning genes related to jasmonate (JA), phenylpropanoid metabolism, and pathogenesis-related proteins. The data also suggest a link between JA and secondary metabolism in water-stressed berries. Overall, genes related to secondary metabolism and JA are more induced and/or less repressed by drought stress in the berries grafted on the drought-sensitive rootstock 125AA. These rootstock-dependent gene expression changes are relevant for berry composition and sensory properties. PMID:26504567

  20. Increasing the source/sink ratio in Vitis vinifera (cv Sangiovese) induces extensive transcriptome reprogramming and modifies berry ripening

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cluster thinning is an agronomic practice in which a proportion of berry clusters are removed from the vine to increase the source/sink ratio and improve the quality of the remaining berries. Until now no transcriptomic data have been reported describing the mechanisms that underlie the agronomic and biochemical effects of thinning. Results We profiled the transcriptome of Vitis vinifera cv. Sangiovese berries before and after thinning at veraison using a genome-wide microarray representing all grapevine genes listed in the latest V1 gene prediction. Thinning increased the source/sink ratio from 0.6 to 1.2 m2 leaf area per kg of berries and boosted the sugar and anthocyanin content at harvest. Extensive transcriptome remodeling was observed in thinned vines 2 weeks after thinning and at ripening. This included the enhanced modulation of genes that are normally regulated during berry development and the induction of a large set of genes that are not usually expressed. Conclusion Cluster thinning has a profound effect on several important cellular processes and metabolic pathways including carbohydrate metabolism and the synthesis and transport of secondary products. The integrated agronomic, biochemical and transcriptomic data revealed that the positive impact of cluster thinning on final berry composition reflects a much more complex outcome than simply enhancing the normal ripening process. PMID:22192855

  1. Supplementation of procyanidins B2 attenuates photooxidation-induced apoptosis in ARPE-19 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Weinan; Jiang, Yun; Sun, Tao; Yao, Xiaomin; Sun, Xiangjun

    2016-09-01

    During the aging process, dimers of dietary vitamin A accumulated in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. Vitamin A dimer-mediated photooxidation resulted in RPE apoptosis, which is associated with age-related degenerative disease of retina, leading to blindness. It has been reported that proanthocyanidin-rich grape seed extract reduces oxidative stress in the eye. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism of photooxidation-induced apoptosis inhibition by procyanidins B2 (PB2), one of the main components of grape seed proanthocyanidin. To mimic vitamin A dimer-mediated photooxidation, ARPE-19 cells that accumulated vitamin A dimer, A2E, were used as a model system. Exposure of A2E loaded ARPE-19 cells to blue light induced ER stress and resulted in significant apoptosis. Pretreatment of blue light-exposed A2E containing ARPE-19 cells with PB2 inhibited apoptosis, increased the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax in the mitochondria, attenuated ROS and cytochrome c release, and decreased caspase cleavage. Additionally, PB2 inhibited the phosphorylation of ER stress markers elF2α and IRE1α and reduced CHOP expression. Moreover, PB2 inhibition of apoptosis is dependent on the UPR chaperone GRP78, indicating PB2 inhibits vitamin A dimer-mediated apoptosis in RPE cells by activating the UPR. PMID:27251367

  2. Transcriptional profiling of an Fd-GOGAT1/GLU1 mutant in Arabidopsis thaliana reveals a multiple stress response and extensive reprogramming of the transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glutamate plays a central position in the synthesis of a variety of organic molecules in plants and is synthesised from nitrate through a series of enzymatic reactions. Glutamate synthases catalyse the last step in this pathway and two types are present in plants: NADH- or ferredoxin-dependent. Here we report a genome wide microarray analysis of the transcriptional reprogramming that occurs in leaves and roots of the A. thaliana mutant glu1-2 knocked-down in the expression of Fd-GOGAT1 (GLU1; At5g04140), one of the two genes of A. thaliana encoding ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase. Results Transcriptional profiling of glu1-2 revealed extensive changes with the expression of more than 5500 genes significantly affected in leaves and nearly 700 in roots. Both genes involved in glutamate biosynthesis and transformation are affected, leading to changes in amino acid compositions as revealed by NMR metabolome analysis. An elevated glutamine level in the glu1-2 mutant was the most prominent of these changes. An unbiased analysis of the gene expression datasets allowed us to identify the pathways that constitute the secondary response of an FdGOGAT1/GLU1 knock-down. Among the most significantly affected pathways, photosynthesis, photorespiratory cycle and chlorophyll biosynthesis show an overall downregulation in glu1-2 leaves. This is in accordance with their slight chlorotic phenotype. Another characteristic of the glu1-2 transcriptional profile is the activation of multiple stress responses, mimicking cold, heat, drought and oxidative stress. The change in expression of genes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis is also revealed. The expression of a substantial number of genes encoding stress-related transcription factors, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, glutathione S-transferases and UDP-glycosyltransferases is affected in the glu1-2 mutant. This may indicate an induction of the detoxification of secondary metabolites in the mutant. Conclusions Analysis

  3. An integrative analysis reveals coordinated reprogramming of the epigenome and the transcriptome in human skeletal muscle after training

    PubMed Central

    Lindholm, Maléne E; Marabita, Francesco; Gomez-Cabrero, David; Rundqvist, Helene; Ekström, Tomas J; Tegnér, Jesper; Sundberg, Carl Johan

    2014-01-01

    Regular endurance exercise training induces beneficial functional and health effects in human skeletal muscle. The putative contribution to the training response of the epigenome as a mediator between genes and environment has not been clarified. Here we investigated the contribution of DNA methylation and associated transcriptomic changes in a well-controlled human intervention study. Training effects were mirrored by significant alterations in DNA methylation and gene expression in regions with a homogeneous muscle energetics and remodeling ontology. Moreover, a signature of DNA methylation and gene expression separated the samples based on training and gender. Differential DNA methylation was predominantly observed in enhancers, gene bodies and intergenic regions and less in CpG islands or promoters. We identified transcriptional regulator binding motifs of MRF, MEF2 and ETS proteins in the proximity of the changing sites. A transcriptional network analysis revealed modules harboring distinct ontologies and, interestingly, the overall direction of the changes of methylation within each module was inversely correlated to expression changes. In conclusion, we show that highly consistent and associated modifications in methylation and expression, concordant with observed health-enhancing phenotypic adaptations, are induced by a physiological stimulus. PMID:25484259

  4. Sulphur dioxide evokes a large scale reprogramming of the grape berry transcriptome associated with oxidative signalling and biotic defence responses.

    PubMed

    Giraud, Estelle; Ivanova, Aneta; Gordon, Colin S; Whelan, James; Considine, Michael J

    2012-02-01

    The grape and wine industries are heavily reliant on sulphite preservatives. However, the view that sulphites act directly on bacterial and fungal pathogens may be simplistic. Mechanisms of sulphur-enhanced defences are largely unknown; many sulphur-rich compounds enhance plant defences and sulphite can also have oxidative consequences via production of H(2)O(2) or sulphitolysis. To investigate the effects of sulphur dioxide (SO(2) ) on fresh table grapes (Vitis vinifera L. 'Crimson Seedless'), transcriptome analysis was carried out on berries treated with SO(2) under commercial conditions for 21 d. We found a broad perturbation of metabolic processes, consistent with a large-scale stress response. Transcripts encoding putative sulphur-metabolizing enzymes indicated that sulphite was directed towards chelation and conjugation, and away from oxidation to sulphate. The results indicated that redox poise was altered dramatically by SO(2) treatment, evidenced by alterations in plastid and mitochondrial alternative electron transfer pathways, up-regulation of fermentation transcripts and numerous glutathione S-transferases, along with a down-regulation of components involved in redox homeostasis. Features of biotic stress were up-regulated, notably signalling via auxin, ethylene and jasmonates. Taken together, this inventory of transcriptional responses is consistent with a long-term cellular response to oxidative stress, similar to the effects of reactive oxygen species. PMID:21689113

  5. Deep sequencing reveals transcriptome re-programming of Polygonum multiflorum thunb. roots to the elicitation with methyl jasmonate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongchang; Wu, Wei; Hou, Kai; Chen, Junwen; Zhao, Zhi

    2016-02-01

    The phytohormone methyl jasmonate (MeJA) has been successfully used as an effective elicitor to enhance production of stilbenoid which is induced in plants as a secondary metabolite possibly in defense against herbivores and pathogens. However, the mechanism of MeJA-mediated stilbenoid biosynthesis remains unclear. Genomic information for Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. (P. multiflorum) is currently unavailable. To obtain insight into the global regulation mechanism of MeJA in the steady state of stilbene glucoside production (26 h after MeJA elicitation), especially on stilbene glucoside biosynthesis, we sequenced the transcriptomes of MeJA-treated and untreated P. multiflorum roots and obtained more than 51 million clean reads, from which 79,565 unigenes were obtained by de novo assembly. 56,972 unigenes were annotated against databases including Nr, Nt, Swiss-Prot, KEGG and COG. 18,677 genes expressed differentially between untreated and treated roots. Expression level analysis indicated that a large number of genes were associated with plant-pathogen interaction, plant hormone signal transduction, stilbenoid backbone biosynthesis, and phenylpropanoid biosynthesis. 15 known genes involved in the biosynthesis of stilbenoid backbone were found with 7 genes showing increased transcript abundance following elicitation of MeJA. The significantly up (down)-regulated changes of 70 genes in stilbenoid biosynthesis were validated by qRT-PCR assays and PCR product sequencing. According to the expression changes and the previously proposed enzyme functions, multiple candidates for the unknown steps in stilbene glucoside biosynthesis were identified. We also found some genes putatively involved in the transcription factors. This comprehensive description of gene expression information could greatly facilitate our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of MeJA-mediated stilbenoid biosynthesis in P. multiflorum roots. Our results shed new light on the global regulation

  6. Deep Sequencing Reveals Transcriptome Re-Programming of Taxus × media Cells to the Elicitation with Methyl Jasmonate

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Fuliang; Wen, Jian-Fan; Wu, Jianqiang; Wilson, Iain W.; Tang, Qi; Liu, Hongwei; Qiu, Deyou

    2013-01-01

    Background Plant cell culture represents an alternative source for producing high-value secondary metabolites including paclitaxel (Taxol®), which is mainly produced in Taxus and has been widely used in cancer chemotherapy. The phytohormone methyl jasmonate (MeJA) can significantly increase the production of paclitaxel, which is induced in plants as a secondary metabolite possibly in defense against herbivores and pathogens. In cell culture, MeJA also elicits the accumulation of paclitaxel; however, the mechanism is still largely unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings To obtain insight into the global regulation mechanism of MeJA in the steady state of paclitaxel production (7 days after MeJA addition), especially on paclitaxel biosynthesis, we sequenced the transcriptomes of MeJA-treated and untreated Taxus × media cells and obtained ∼ 32.5 M high quality reads, from which 40,348 unique sequences were obtained by de novo assembly. Expression level analysis indicated that a large number of genes were associated with transcriptional regulation, DNA and histone modification, and MeJA signaling network. All the 29 known genes involved in the biosynthesis of terpenoid backbone and paclitaxel were found with 18 genes showing increased transcript abundance following elicitation of MeJA. The significantly up-regulated changes of 9 genes in paclitaxel biosynthesis were validated by qRT-PCR assays. According to the expression changes and the previously proposed enzyme functions, multiple candidates for the unknown steps in paclitaxel biosynthesis were identified. We also found some genes putatively involved in the transport and degradation of paclitaxel. Potential target prediction of miRNAs indicated that miRNAs may play an important role in the gene expression regulation following the elicitation of MeJA. Conclusions/Significance Our results shed new light on the global regulation mechanism by which MeJA regulates the physiology of Taxus cells and is helpful to

  7. Acquired resistance to metformin in breast cancer cells triggers transcriptome reprogramming toward a degradome-related metastatic stem-like profile.

    PubMed

    Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Rodríguez-Gallego, Esther; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Joven, Jorge; Menendez, Javier A

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic interventions based on metabolic inhibitor-based therapies are expected to be less prone to acquired resistance. However, there has not been any study assessing the possibility that the targeting of the tumor cell metabolism may result in unforeseeable resistance. We recently established a pre-clinical model of estrogen-dependent MCF-7 breast cancer cells that were chronically adapted to grow (> 10 months) in the presence of graded, millimolar concentrations of the anti-diabetic biguanide metformin, an AMPK agonist/mTOR inhibitor that has been evaluated in multiple in vitro and in vivo cancer studies and is now being tested in clinical trials. To assess what impact the phenomenon of resistance might have on the metformin-like "dirty" drugs that are able to simultaneously hit several metabolic pathways, we employed the ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) software to functionally interpret the data from Agilent whole-human genome arrays in the context of biological processes, networks, and pathways. Our findings establish, for the first time, that a "global" targeting of metabolic reprogramming using metformin certainly imposes a great selective pressure for the emergence of new breast cancer cellular states. Intriguingly, acquired resistance to metformin appears to trigger a transcriptome reprogramming toward a metastatic stem-like profile, as many genes encoding the components of the degradome (KLK11, CTSF, FREM1, BACE-2, CASP, TMPRSS4, MMP16, HTRA1), cancer cell migration and invasion factors (TP63, WISP2, GAS3, DKK1, BCAR3, PABPC1, MUC1, SPARCL1, SEMA3B, SEMA6A), stem cell markers (DCLK1, FAK), and key pro-metastatic lipases (MAGL and Cpla2) were included in the signature. Because this convergent activation of pathways underlying tumor microenvironment interactions occurred in low-proliferative cancer cells exhibiting a notable downregulation of the G 2/M DNA damage checkpoint regulators that maintain genome stability (CCNB1, CCNB2, CDC20, CDC25C, AURKA

  8. Cellular Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kazutoshi

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear reprogramming technology was first established more than 50 years ago. It can rejuvenate somatic cells by erasing the epigenetic memories and reconstructing a new pluripotent order. The recent discovery reviewed here that induced pluripotency can be achieved by a small set of transcription factors has opened up unprecedented opportunities in the pharmaceutical industry, the clinic, and laboratories. This technology allows us to access pathological studies by using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. In addition, iPS cells are also expected to be a rising star for regenerative medicine, as sources of transplantation therapy. PMID:24492711

  9. Integrated network analysis identifies fight-club nodes as a class of hubs encompassing key putative switch genes that induce major transcriptome reprogramming during grapevine development.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Maria Concetta; Zenoni, Sara; Fasoli, Marianna; Massonnet, Mélanie; Farina, Lorenzo; Castiglione, Filippo; Pezzotti, Mario; Paci, Paola

    2014-12-01

    We developed an approach that integrates different network-based methods to analyze the correlation network arising from large-scale gene expression data. By studying grapevine (Vitis vinifera) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) gene expression atlases and a grapevine berry transcriptomic data set during the transition from immature to mature growth, we identified a category named "fight-club hubs" characterized by a marked negative correlation with the expression profiles of neighboring genes in the network. A special subset named "switch genes" was identified, with the additional property of many significant negative correlations outside their own group in the network. Switch genes are involved in multiple processes and include transcription factors that may be considered master regulators of the previously reported transcriptome remodeling that marks the developmental shift from immature to mature growth. All switch genes, expressed at low levels in vegetative/green tissues, showed a significant increase in mature/woody organs, suggesting a potential regulatory role during the developmental transition. Finally, our analysis of tomato gene expression data sets showed that wild-type switch genes are downregulated in ripening-deficient mutants. The identification of known master regulators of tomato fruit maturation suggests our method is suitable for the detection of key regulators of organ development in different fleshy fruit crops. PMID:25490918

  10. Leaf-mining by Phyllonorycter blancardella reprograms the host-leaf transcriptome to modulate phytohormones associated with nutrient mobilization and plant defense.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Body, Mélanie; Glevarec, Gaëlle; Reichelt, Michael; Unsicker, Sybille; Bruneau, Maryline; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Huguet, Elisabeth; Dubreuil, Géraldine; Giron, David

    2016-01-01

    Phytohormones have long been hypothesized to play a key role in the interactions between plant-manipulating organisms and their host-plants such as insect-plant interactions that lead to gall or 'green-islands' induction. However, mechanistic understanding of how phytohormones operate in these plant reconfigurations is lacking due to limited information on the molecular and biochemical phytohormonal modulation following attack by plant-manipulating insects. In an attempt to fill this gap, the present study provides an extensive characterization of how the leaf-miner Phyllonorycter blancardella modulates the major phytohormones and the transcriptional activity of plant cells in leaves of Malus domestica. We show here, that cytokinins strongly accumulate in mined tissues despite a weak expression of plant cytokinin-related genes. Leaf-mining is also associated with enhanced biosynthesis of jasmonic acid precursors but not the active form, a weak alteration of the salicylic acid pathway and a clear inhibition of the abscisic acid pathway. Our study consolidates previous results suggesting that insects may produce and deliver cytokinins to the plant as a strategy to manipulate the physiology of the leaf to create a favorable nutritional environment. We also demonstrate that leaf-mining by P. blancardella leads to a strong reprogramming of the plant phytohormonal balance associated with increased nutrient mobilization, inhibition of leaf senescence and mitigation of plant direct and indirect defense. PMID:26068004

  11. Advanced Technologies Lead iNto New Reprogramming Routes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Qian, Li

    2016-09-01

    Two recent papers provide new insights on transcriptional dynamics and epigenetic remodeling during reprogramming of induced neurons (iNs). Treutlein et al. (2016) applied single-cell transcriptomics to identify routes and detours during early iN induction, while in this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Black et al. (2016) employed gene editing to activate endogenous loci of the reprogramming factors. PMID:27588744

  12. [Reprogramming equals gambling?].

    PubMed

    David, Laurent; De Vos, John

    2013-04-01

    While somatic cell reprogramming is now part of our text books, we ignore most of the mechanisms governing this cellular transformation. The most enigmatic question is why only rare cells undergo reprogramming, and whether this is governed by stochastc or deterministic events. In the late 2012, several major studies have addressed this question through a clonal analysis of the reprogramming process in murine MEF. In this mini-review, we describe these results and discuss future perspectives based on these date to optimize and secure the derivation of iPSC. PMID:23621936

  13. Dissecting direct reprogramming from fibroblast to neuron using single-cell RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Treutlein, Barbara; Lee, Qian Yi; Camp, J Gray; Mall, Moritz; Koh, Winston; Shariati, Seyed Ali Mohammad; Sim, Sopheak; Neff, Norma F; Skotheim, Jan M; Wernig, Marius; Quake, Stephen R

    2016-06-16

    Direct lineage reprogramming represents a remarkable conversion of cellular and transcriptome states. However, the intermediate stages through which individual cells progress during reprogramming are largely undefined. Here we use single-cell RNA sequencing at multiple time points to dissect direct reprogramming from mouse embryonic fibroblasts to induced neuronal cells. By deconstructing heterogeneity at each time point and ordering cells by transcriptome similarity, we find that the molecular reprogramming path is remarkably continuous. Overexpression of the proneural pioneer factor Ascl1 results in a well-defined initialization, causing cells to exit the cell cycle and re-focus gene expression through distinct neural transcription factors. The initial transcriptional response is relatively homogeneous among fibroblasts, suggesting that the early steps are not limiting for productive reprogramming. Instead, the later emergence of a competing myogenic program and variable transgene dynamics over time appear to be the major efficiency limits of direct reprogramming. Moreover, a transcriptional state, distinct from donor and target cell programs, is transiently induced in cells undergoing productive reprogramming. Our data provide a high-resolution approach for understanding transcriptome states during lineage differentiation. PMID:27281220

  14. Reprogramming for cardiac regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Raynaud, Christophe Michel; Ahmad, Faizzan Syed; Allouba, Mona; Abou-Saleh, Haissam; Lui, Kathy O.; Yacoub, Magdi

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of cardiovascular diseases remains challenging considering the limited regeneration capacity of the heart muscle. Developments of reprogramming strategies to create in vitro and in vivo cardiomyocytes have been the focus point of a considerable amount of research in the past decades. The choice of cells to employ, the state-of-the-art methods for different reprogramming strategies, and their promises and future challenges before clinical entry, are all discussed here. PMID:25763379

  15. Reprogramming mammalian somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Osorio, N; Urrego, R; Cibelli, J B; Eilertsen, K; Memili, E

    2012-12-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), the technique commonly known as cloning, permits transformation of a somatic cell into an undifferentiated zygote with the potential to develop into a newborn animal (i.e., a clone). In somatic cells, chromatin is programmed to repress most genes and express some, depending on the tissue. It is evident that the enucleated oocyte provides the environment in which embryonic genes in a somatic cell can be expressed. This process is controlled by a series of epigenetic modifications, generally referred to as "nuclear reprogramming," which are thought to involve the removal of reversible epigenetic changes acquired during cell differentiation. A similar process is thought to occur by overexpression of key transcription factors to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), bypassing the need for SCNT. Despite its obvious scientific and medical importance, and the great number of studies addressing the subject, the molecular basis of reprogramming in both reprogramming strategies is largely unknown. The present review focuses on the cellular and molecular events that occur during nuclear reprogramming in the context of SCNT and the various approaches currently being used to improve nuclear reprogramming. A better understanding of the reprogramming mechanism will have a direct impact on the efficiency of current SCNT procedures, as well as iPSC derivation. PMID:22979962

  16. Reprogramming Roadblocks Are System Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Chantzoura, Eleni; Skylaki, Stavroula; Menendez, Sergio; Kim, Shin-Il; Johnsson, Anna; Linnarsson, Sten; Woltjen, Knut; Chambers, Ian; Kaji, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    Summary Since the first generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), several reprogramming systems have been used to study its molecular mechanisms. However, the system of choice largely affects the reprogramming efficiency, influencing our view on the mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that reprogramming triggered by less efficient polycistronic reprogramming cassettes not only highlights mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) as a roadblock but also faces more severe difficulties to attain a pluripotent state even post-MET. In contrast, more efficient cassettes can reprogram both wild-type and Nanog−/− fibroblasts with comparable efficiencies, routes, and kinetics, unlike the less efficient reprogramming systems. Moreover, we attribute a previously reported variation in the N terminus of KLF4 as a dominant factor underlying these critical differences. Our data establish that some reprogramming roadblocks are system dependent, highlighting the need to pursue mechanistic studies with close attention to the systems to better understand reprogramming. PMID:26278041

  17. The HIST1 Locus Escapes Reprogramming in Cloned Bovine Embryos.

    PubMed

    Min, Byungkuk; Cho, Sunwha; Park, Jung Sun; Jeon, Kyuheum; Kang, Yong-Kook

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic reprogramming is necessary in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos in order to erase the differentiation-associated epigenetic marks of donor cells. However, such epigenetic memories often persist throughout the course of clonal development, thus decreasing cloning efficiency. Here, we explored reprogramming-refractory regions in bovine SCNT blastocyst transcriptomes. We observed that histone genes residing in the 1.5 Mb spanning the cow HIST1 cluster were coordinately downregulated in SCNT blastocysts. In contrast, both the nonhistone genes of this cluster, and histone genes elsewhere remained unaffected. This indicated that the downregulation was specific to HIST1 histone genes. We found that, after trichostatin A treatment, HIST1 histone genes were derepressed, and DNA methylation at their promoters was decreased to the level of in vitro fertilization embryos. Therefore, our results indicate that the reduced expression of HIST1 histone genes is a consequence of poor epigenetic reprogramming in SCNT blastocysts. PMID:26976441

  18. The HIST1 Locus Escapes Reprogramming in Cloned Bovine Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Min, Byungkuk; Cho, Sunwha; Park, Jung Sun; Jeon, Kyuheum; Kang, Yong-Kook

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic reprogramming is necessary in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos in order to erase the differentiation-associated epigenetic marks of donor cells. However, such epigenetic memories often persist throughout the course of clonal development, thus decreasing cloning efficiency. Here, we explored reprogramming-refractory regions in bovine SCNT blastocyst transcriptomes. We observed that histone genes residing in the 1.5 Mb spanning the cow HIST1 cluster were coordinately downregulated in SCNT blastocysts. In contrast, both the nonhistone genes of this cluster, and histone genes elsewhere remained unaffected. This indicated that the downregulation was specific to HIST1 histone genes. We found that, after trichostatin A treatment, HIST1 histone genes were derepressed, and DNA methylation at their promoters was decreased to the level of in vitro fertilization embryos. Therefore, our results indicate that the reduced expression of HIST1 histone genes is a consequence of poor epigenetic reprogramming in SCNT blastocysts. PMID:26976441

  19. Mice produced by mitotic reprogramming of sperm injected into haploid parthenogenotes.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toru; Asami, Maki; Hoffmann, Martin; Lu, Xin; Gužvić, Miodrag; Klein, Christoph A; Perry, Anthony C F

    2016-01-01

    Sperm are highly differentiated and the activities that reprogram them for embryonic development during fertilization have historically been considered unique to the oocyte. We here challenge this view and demonstrate that mouse embryos in the mitotic cell cycle can also directly reprogram sperm for full-term development. Developmentally incompetent haploid embryos (parthenogenotes) injected with sperm developed to produce healthy offspring at up to 24% of control rates, depending when in the embryonic cell cycle injection took place. This implies that most of the first embryonic cell cycle can be bypassed in sperm genome reprogramming for full development. Remodelling of histones and genomic 5'-methylcytosine and 5'-hydroxymethylcytosine following embryo injection were distinct from remodelling in fertilization and the resulting 2-cell embryos consistently possessed abnormal transcriptomes. These studies demonstrate plasticity in the reprogramming of terminally differentiated sperm nuclei and suggest that different epigenetic pathways or kinetics can establish totipotency. PMID:27623537

  20. Integrated Network Analysis Identifies Fight-Club Nodes as a Class of Hubs Encompassing Key Putative Switch Genes That Induce Major Transcriptome Reprogramming during Grapevine Development[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Maria Concetta; Zenoni, Sara; Fasoli, Marianna; Massonnet, Mélanie; Farina, Lorenzo; Castiglione, Filippo; Pezzotti, Mario; Paci, Paola

    2014-01-01

    We developed an approach that integrates different network-based methods to analyze the correlation network arising from large-scale gene expression data. By studying grapevine (Vitis vinifera) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) gene expression atlases and a grapevine berry transcriptomic data set during the transition from immature to mature growth, we identified a category named “fight-club hubs” characterized by a marked negative correlation with the expression profiles of neighboring genes in the network. A special subset named “switch genes” was identified, with the additional property of many significant negative correlations outside their own group in the network. Switch genes are involved in multiple processes and include transcription factors that may be considered master regulators of the previously reported transcriptome remodeling that marks the developmental shift from immature to mature growth. All switch genes, expressed at low levels in vegetative/green tissues, showed a significant increase in mature/woody organs, suggesting a potential regulatory role during the developmental transition. Finally, our analysis of tomato gene expression data sets showed that wild-type switch genes are downregulated in ripening-deficient mutants. The identification of known master regulators of tomato fruit maturation suggests our method is suitable for the detection of key regulators of organ development in different fleshy fruit crops. PMID:25490918

  1. Reprogramming in vivo produces teratomas and iPS cells with totipotency features.

    PubMed

    Abad, María; Mosteiro, Lluc; Pantoja, Cristina; Cañamero, Marta; Rayon, Teresa; Ors, Inmaculada; Graña, Osvaldo; Megías, Diego; Domínguez, Orlando; Martínez, Dolores; Manzanares, Miguel; Ortega, Sagrario; Serrano, Manuel

    2013-10-17

    Reprogramming of adult cells to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) has opened new therapeutic opportunities; however, little is known about the possibility of in vivo reprogramming within tissues. Here we show that transitory induction of the four factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc in mice results in teratomas emerging from multiple organs, implying that full reprogramming can occur in vivo. Analyses of the stomach, intestine, pancreas and kidney reveal groups of dedifferentiated cells that express the pluripotency marker NANOG, indicative of in situ reprogramming. By bone marrow transplantation, we demonstrate that haematopoietic cells can also be reprogrammed in vivo. Notably, reprogrammable mice present circulating iPS cells in the blood and, at the transcriptome level, these in vivo generated iPS cells are closer to embryonic stem cells (ES cells) than standard in vitro generated iPS cells. Moreover, in vivo iPS cells efficiently contribute to the trophectoderm lineage, suggesting that they achieve a more plastic or primitive state than ES cells. Finally, intraperitoneal injection of in vivo iPS cells generates embryo-like structures that express embryonic and extraembryonic markers. We conclude that reprogramming in vivo is feasible and confers totipotency features absent in standard iPS or ES cells. These discoveries could be relevant for future applications of reprogramming in regenerative medicine. PMID:24025773

  2. An integrated systems biology approach identifies positive cofactor 4 as a factor that increases reprogramming efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Junghyun; Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Hyung Joon; Hong, Soomin; Lee, Jeoung Eun; Lee, Sung-Geum; Baek, Ahmi; Han, Heonjong; Lee, Jin Il; Lee, Insuk; Lee, Dong Ryul

    2016-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) can spontaneously dedifferentiate into embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like cells, which are designated as multipotent SSCs (mSSCs), without ectopic expression of reprogramming factors. Interestingly, SSCs express key pluripotency genes such as Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and Myc. Therefore, molecular dissection of mSSC reprogramming may provide clues about novel endogenous reprogramming or pluripotency regulatory factors. Our comparative transcriptome analysis of mSSCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) suggests that they have similar pluripotency states but are reprogrammed via different transcriptional pathways. We identified 53 genes as putative pluripotency regulatory factors using an integrated systems biology approach. We demonstrated a selected candidate, Positive cofactor 4 (Pc4), can enhance the efficiency of somatic cell reprogramming by promoting and maintaining transcriptional activity of the key reprograming factors. These results suggest that Pc4 has an important role in inducing spontaneous somatic cell reprogramming via up-regulation of key pluripotency genes. PMID:26740582

  3. Epigenomic Reprogramming of Adult Cardiomyocyte-Derived Cardiac Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Zhong, Jiang F; Qiu, Hongyu; MacLellan, W Robb; Marbán, Eduardo; Wang, Charles

    2015-01-01

    It has been believed that mammalian adult cardiomyocytes (ACMs) are terminally-differentiated and are unable to proliferate. Recently, using a bi-transgenic ACM fate mapping mouse model and an in vitro culture system, we demonstrated that adult mouse cardiomyocytes were able to dedifferentiate into cardiac progenitor-like cells (CPCs). However, little is known about the molecular basis of their intrinsic cellular plasticity. Here we integrate single-cell transcriptome and whole-genome DNA methylation analyses to unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the dedifferentiation and cell cycle reentry of mouse ACMs. Compared to parental cardiomyocytes, dedifferentiated mouse cardiomyocyte-derived CPCs (mCPCs) display epigenomic reprogramming with many differentially-methylated regions, both hypermethylated and hypomethylated, across the entire genome. Correlated well with the methylome, our transcriptomic data showed that the genes encoding cardiac structure and function proteins are remarkably down-regulated in mCPCs, while those for cell cycle, proliferation, and stemness are significantly up-regulated. In addition, implantation of mCPCs into infarcted mouse myocardium improves cardiac function with augmented left ventricular ejection fraction. Our study demonstrates that the cellular plasticity of mammalian cardiomyocytes is the result of a well-orchestrated epigenomic reprogramming and a subsequent global transcriptomic alteration. PMID:26657817

  4. Epigenomic Reprogramming of Adult Cardiomyocyte-Derived Cardiac Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Zhong, Jiang F; Qiu, Hongyu; Robb MacLellan, W.; Marbán, Eduardo; Wang, Charles

    2015-01-01

    It has been believed that mammalian adult cardiomyocytes (ACMs) are terminally-differentiated and are unable to proliferate. Recently, using a bi-transgenic ACM fate mapping mouse model and an in vitro culture system, we demonstrated that adult mouse cardiomyocytes were able to dedifferentiate into cardiac progenitor-like cells (CPCs). However, little is known about the molecular basis of their intrinsic cellular plasticity. Here we integrate single-cell transcriptome and whole-genome DNA methylation analyses to unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the dedifferentiation and cell cycle reentry of mouse ACMs. Compared to parental cardiomyocytes, dedifferentiated mouse cardiomyocyte-derived CPCs (mCPCs) display epigenomic reprogramming with many differentially-methylated regions, both hypermethylated and hypomethylated, across the entire genome. Correlated well with the methylome, our transcriptomic data showed that the genes encoding cardiac structure and function proteins are remarkably down-regulated in mCPCs, while those for cell cycle, proliferation, and stemness are significantly up-regulated. In addition, implantation of mCPCs into infarcted mouse myocardium improves cardiac function with augmented left ventricular ejection fraction. Our study demonstrates that the cellular plasticity of mammalian cardiomyocytes is the result of a well-orchestrated epigenomic reprogramming and a subsequent global transcriptomic alteration. PMID:26657817

  5. Reprogramming anti-tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Crompton, Joseph G.; Clever, David; Vizcardo, Raul; Rao, Mahendra; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2014-01-01

    Regenerative medicine holds great promise in replacing tissues and organs lost to degenerative disease and injury. Applying principles of cellular reprogramming for the treatment of cancer, however, are not well established. Here we present an overview of cell-based reprogramming techniques (i.e. lineage reprogramming and stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency) used in regenerative medicine, and within this context, envision how the scope of regenerative medicine may be expanded to treat metastatic cancer by revitalizing an exhausted and senescent immune system. PMID:24661777

  6. Reprogramming of somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Rajasingh, Johnson

    2012-01-01

    Reprogramming of adult somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells may provide an attractive source of stem cells for regenerative medicine. It has emerged as an invaluable method for generating patient-specific stem cells of any cell lineage without the use of embryonic stem cells. A revolutionary study in 2006 showed that it is possible to convert adult somatic cells directly into pluripotent stem cells by using a limited number of pluripotent transcription factors and is called as iPS cells. Currently, both genomic integrating viral and nonintegrating nonviral methods are used to generate iPS cells. However, the viral-based technology poses increased risk of safety, and more studies are now focused on nonviral-based technology to obtain autologous stem cells for clinical therapy. In this review, the pros and cons of the present iPS cell technology and the future direction for the successful translation of this technology into the clinic are discussed. PMID:22917226

  7. Advances in reprogramming to pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Alateeq, Suad; Fortuna, Patrick R J; Wolvetang, Ernst

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) derived from somatic cells represent a powerful experimental tool for investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease phenotype; with prospects to advance medical therapies. They also have significant potential as a renewable source of autologous cells for cellular therapy. Various approaches for PSC derivation from somatic cells have been reported in the literature. The method used for reprogramming is particularly relevant as it may affect the characteristics and quality of PSCs. This review will present an overview of the basic strategies and methods for reprogramming to pluripotency. These strategies will be briefly discussed in the context of how the mechanism of reprogramming could influence PSC characteristics with respect to safety and quality. Aspects of the reprogramming approach that can influence PSC properties, such as culture conditions and donor cell source, are also discussed. PMID:25697500

  8. Reprogramming cells with synthetic proteins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoxiao; Malik, Vikas; Jauch, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of one cell type into another cell type by forcibly expressing specific cocktails of transcription factors (TFs) has demonstrated that cell fates are not fixed and that cellular differentiation can be a two-way street with many intersections. These experiments also illustrated the sweeping potential of TFs to "read" genetically hardwired regulatory information even in cells where they are not normally expressed and to access and open up tightly packed chromatin to execute gene expression programs. Cellular reprogramming enables the modeling of diseases in a dish, to test the efficacy and toxicity of drugs in patient-derived cells and ultimately, could enable cell-based therapies to cure degenerative diseases. Yet, producing terminally differentiated cells that fully resemble their in vivocounterparts in sufficient quantities is still an unmet clinical need. While efforts are being made to reprogram cells nongenetically by using drug-like molecules, defined TF cocktails still dominate reprogramming protocols. Therefore, the optimization of TFs by protein engineering has emerged as a strategy to enhance reprogramming to produce functional, stable and safe cells for regenerative biomedicine. Engineering approaches focused on Oct4, MyoD, Sox17, Nanog and Mef2c and range from chimeric TFs with added transactivation domains, designer transcription activator-like effectors to activate endogenous TFs to reprogramming TFs with rationally engineered DNA recognition principles. Possibly, applying the complete toolkit of protein design to cellular reprogramming can help to remove the hurdles that, thus far, impeded the clinical use of cells derived from reprogramming technologies. PMID:25652623

  9. Totipotency, Pluripotency and Nuclear Reprogramming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitalipov, Shoukhrat; Wolf, Don

    Mammalian development commences with the totipotent zygote which is capable of developing into all the specialized cells that make up the adult animal. As development unfolds, cells of the early embryo proliferate and differentiate into the first two lineages, the pluripotent inner cell mass and the trophectoderm. Pluripotent cells can be isolated, adapted and propagated indefinitely in vitro in an undifferentiated state as embryonic stem cells (ESCs). ESCs retain their ability to differentiate into cells representing the three major germ layers: endoderm, mesoderm or ectoderm or any of the 200+ cell types present in the adult body. Since many human diseases result from defects in a single cell type, pluripotent human ESCs represent an unlimited source of any cell or tissue type for replacement therapy thus providing a possible cure for many devastating conditions. Pluripotent cells resembling ESCs can also be derived experimentally by the nuclear reprogramming of somatic cells. Reprogrammed somatic cells may have an even more important role in cell replacement therapies since the patient's own somatic cells can be used for reprogramming thereby eliminating immune based rejection of transplanted cells. In this review, we summarize two major approaches to reprogramming: (1) somatic cell nuclear transfer and (2) direct reprogramming using genetic manipulations.

  10. Totipotency, Pluripotency and Nuclear Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Mitalipov, Shoukhrat; Wolf, Don

    2009-01-01

    Mammalian development commences with the totipotent zygote which is capable of developing into all the specialized cells that make up the adult animal. As development unfolds, cells of the early embryo proliferate and differentiate into the first two lineages, the pluripotent inner cell mass and the trophectoderm. Pluripotent cells can be isolated, adapted and propagated indefinitely in vitro in an undifferentiated state as embryonic stem cells (ESCs). ESCs retain their ability to differentiate into cells representing the three major germ layers: endoderm, mesoderm or ectoderm or any of the 200+ cell types present in the adult body. Since many human diseases result from defects in a single cell type, pluripotent human ESCs represent an unlimited source of any cell or tissue type for replacement therapy thus providing a possible cure for many devastating conditions. Pluripotent cells resembling ESCs can also be derived experimentally by the nuclear reprogramming of somatic cells. Reprogrammed somatic cells may have an even more important role in cell replacement therapies since the patient’s own somatic cells can be used for reprogramming thereby eliminating immune based rejection of transplanted cells. In this review, we summarize two major approaches to reprogramming: (1) somatic cell nuclear transfer and (2) direct reprogramming using genetic manipulations. PMID:19343304

  11. Therapeutic cloning and cellular reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Ramon M; Ross, Pablo J; Cibelli, Jose B

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells are capable of differentiating into any cell-type present in an adult organism, and constitute a renewable source of tissue for regenerative therapies. The transplant of allogenic stem cells is challenging due to the risk of immune rejection. Nevertheless, somatic cell reprogramming techniques allow the generation of isogenic embryonic stem cells, genetically identical to the patient. In this chapter we will discuss the cellular reprogramming techniques in the context of regenerative therapy and the biological and technical barriers that they will need to overcome before clinical use. PMID:22457116

  12. Energy metabolism in nuclear reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Folmes, Clifford D L; Nelson, Timothy J; Terzic, Andre

    2011-12-01

    Nuclear reprogramming with stemness factors enables resetting of somatic differentiated tissue back to the pluripotent ground state. Recent evidence implicates mitochondrial restructuring and bioenergetic plasticity as key components underlying execution of orchestrated dedifferentiation and derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells. Aerobic to anaerobic transition of somatic oxidative energy metabolism into a glycolytic metabotype promotes proficient reprogramming, establishing a novel regulator of acquired stemness. Metabolomic profiling has further identified specific metabolic remodeling traits defining lineage redifferentiation of pluripotent cells. Therefore, mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism comprise a vital axis for biomarker discovery, intimately reflecting the molecular dynamics fundamental for the resetting and redirection of cell fate. PMID:22103608

  13. Energy metabolism in nuclear reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Folmes, Clifford DL; Nelson, Timothy J; Terzic, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear reprogramming with stemness factors enables resetting of somatic differentiated tissue back to the pluripotent ground state. Recent evidence implicates mitochondrial restructuring and bioenergetic plasticity as key components underlying execution of orchestrated dedifferentiation and derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells. Aerobic to anaerobic transition of somatic oxidative energy metabolism into a glycolytic metabotype promotes proficient reprogramming, establishing a novel regulator of acquired stemness. Metabolomic profiling has further identified specific metabolic remodeling traits defining lineage redifferentiation of pluripotent cells. Therefore, mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism comprise a vital axis for biomarker discovery, intimately reflecting the molecular dynamics fundamental for the resetting and redirection of cell fate. PMID:22103608

  14. Epigenetic reprogramming in plant sexual reproduction.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Tomokazu; Berger, Frédéric

    2014-09-01

    Epigenetic reprogramming consists of global changes in DNA methylation and histone modifications. In mammals, epigenetic reprogramming is primarily associated with sexual reproduction and occurs during both gametogenesis and early embryonic development. Such reprogramming is crucial not only to maintain genomic integrity through silencing transposable elements but also to reset the silenced status of imprinted genes. In plants, observations of stable transgenerational inheritance of epialleles have argued against reprogramming. However, emerging evidence supports that epigenetic reprogramming indeed occurs during sexual reproduction in plants and that it has a major role in maintaining genome integrity and a potential contribution to epiallelic variation. PMID:25048170

  15. Cell reprogramming: Into the groove

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Liu, Longqi; Laslett, Andrew L.; Esteban, Miguel A.

    2013-12-01

    Adult cells can be routinely reprogrammed into pluripotent stem cells by chemical and genetic means, such as the expression of a cocktail of exogenous transcription factors. It is now shown that growing cells on substrates with aligned features such as microgrooves can enhance this process.

  16. A twist in zygotic reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Messerschmidt, Daniel M

    2016-02-01

    The first hours of mammalian embryogenesis are devoted to extensive epigenetic reprogramming. One hallmark is active demethylation of the paternal genome by Tet (ten-eleven translocation) enzymes. However, the process is now shown to be Tet-independent at first, with Tet enzymes only counteracting hitherto underappreciated de novo DNA methylation activity in later zygotic stages. PMID:26820436

  17. Extensive Nuclear Reprogramming Underlies Lineage Conversion into Functional Trophoblast Stem-like Cells.

    PubMed

    Benchetrit, Hana; Herman, Shay; van Wietmarschen, Niek; Wu, Tao; Makedonski, Kirill; Maoz, Noam; Yom Tov, Nataly; Stave, Danielle; Lasry, Rachel; Zayat, Valery; Xiao, Andrew; Lansdorp, Peter M; Sebban, Shulamit; Buganim, Yosef

    2015-11-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) undergo extensive nuclear reprogramming and are generally indistinguishable from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in their functional capacity and transcriptome and DNA methylation profiles. However, direct conversion of cells from one lineage to another often yields incompletely reprogrammed, functionally compromised cells, raising the question of whether pluripotency is required to achieve a high degree of nuclear reprogramming. Here, we show that transient expression of Gata3, Eomes, and Tfap2c in mouse fibroblasts induces stable, transgene-independent trophoblast stem-like cells (iTSCs). iTSCs possess transcriptional profiles highly similar to blastocyst-derived TSCs, with comparable methylation and H3K27ac patterns and genome-wide H2A.X deposition. iTSCs generate trophoectodermal lineages upon differentiation, form hemorrhagic lesions, and contribute to developing placentas in chimera assays, indicating a high degree of nuclear reprogramming, with no evidence of passage through a transient pluripotent state. Together, these data demonstrate that extensive nuclear reprogramming can be achieved independently of pluripotency. PMID:26412562

  18. Extended Self-Renewal and Accelerated Reprogramming in the Absence of Kdm5b

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Gangqing; Yu, Zu-Xi; Liu, Chengyu

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cell pluripotency is thought to be regulated in part by H3K4 methylation. However, it is unclear how H3K4 demethylation contributes to ES cell function and participates in induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell reprogramming. Here, we show that KDM5B, which demethylates H3K4, is important for ES cell differentiation and presents a barrier to the reprogramming process. Depletion of Kdm5b leads to an extension in the self-renewal of ES cells in the absence of LIF. Transcriptome analysis revealed the persistent expression of pluripotency genes and underexpression of developmental genes during differentiation in the absence of Kdm5b, suggesting that KDM5B plays a key role in cellular fate changes. We also observed accelerated reprogramming of differentiated cells in the absence of Kdm5b, demonstrating that KDM5B is a barrier to the reprogramming process. Expression analysis revealed that mesenchymal master regulators associated with the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) are downregulated during reprogramming in the absence of Kdm5b. Moreover, global analysis of H3K4me3/2 revealed that enhancers of fibroblast genes are rapidly deactivated in the absence of Kdm5b, and genes associated with EMT lose H3K4me3/2 during the early reprogramming process. These findings provide functional insight into the role for KDM5B in regulating ES cell differentiation and as a barrier to the reprogramming process. PMID:24100015

  19. Cellular reprogramming and hepatocellular carcinoma development.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yun-Wen; Nie, Yun-Zhong; Taniguchi, Hideki

    2013-12-21

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers, and is also the leading cause of death worldwide. Studies have shown that cellular reprogramming contributes to chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy resistance and the recurrence of cancers. In this article, we summarize and discuss the latest findings in the area of cellular reprogramming in HCC. The aberrant expression of transcription factors OCT4, KLF4, SOX2, c-MYC, NANOG, and LIN28 have been also observed, and the expression of these transcription factors is associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes in HCC. Studies indicate that cellular reprogramming may play a critical role in the occurrence and recurrence of HCC. Recent reports have shown that DNA methylation, miRNAs, tumor microenvironment, and signaling pathways can induce the expression of stemness transcription factors, which leads to cellular reprogramming in HCC. Furthermore, studies indicate that therapies based on cellular reprogramming could revolutionize HCC treatment. Finally, a novel therapeutic concept is discussed: reprogramming control therapy. A potential reprogramming control therapy method could be developed based on the reprogramming demonstrated in HCC studies and applied at two opposing levels: differentiation and reprogramming. Our increasing understanding and control of cellular programming should facilitate the exploitation of this novel therapeutic concept and its application in clinical HCC treatment, which may represent a promising strategy in the future that is not restricted to liver cancer. PMID:24379607

  20. Primary cancer cell culture: mammary-optimized vs conditional reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Alamri, Ahmad M; Kang, Keunsoo; Groeneveld, Svenja; Wang, Weisheng; Zhong, Xiaogang; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Hennighausen, Lothar; Liu, Xuefeng; Furth, Priscilla A

    2016-07-01

    The impact of different culture conditions on biology of primary cancer cells is not always addressed. Here, conditional reprogramming (CRC) was compared with mammary-optimized EpiCult-B (EpiC) for primary mammary epithelial cell isolation and propagation, allograft generation, and genome-wide transcriptional consequences using cancer and non-cancer mammary tissue from mice with different dosages of Brca1 and p53 Selective comparison to DMEM was included. Primary cultures were established with all three media, but CRC was most efficient for initial isolation (P<0.05). Allograft development was faster using cells grown in EpiC compared with CRC (P<0.05). Transcriptome comparison of paired CRC and EpiC cultures revealed 1700 differentially expressed genes by passage 20. CRC promoted Trp53 gene family upregulation and increased expression of epithelial differentiation genes, whereas EpiC elevated expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition genes. Differences did not persist in allografts where both methods yielded allografts with relatively similar transcriptomes. Restricting passage (<7) reduced numbers of differentially expressed genes below 50. In conclusion, CRC was most efficient for initial cell isolation but EpiC was quicker for allograft generation. The extensive culture-specific gene expression patterns that emerged with longer passage could be limited by reducing passage number when both culture transcriptomes were equally similar to that of the primary tissue. Defining impact of culture condition and passage on the transcriptome of primary cells could assist experimental design and interpretation. For example, differences that appear with passage and culture condition are potentially exploitable for comparative studies targeting specific biological networks in different transcriptional environments. PMID:27267121

  1. Dynamic culture improves cell reprogramming efficiency.

    PubMed

    Sia, Junren; Sun, Raymond; Chu, Julia; Li, Song

    2016-06-01

    Cell reprogramming to pluripotency is an inefficient process and various approaches have been devised to improve the yield of induced pluripotent stem cells. However, the effect of biophysical factors on cell reprogramming is not well understood. Here we showed that, for the first time, dynamic culture with orbital shaking significantly improved the reprogramming efficiency in adherent cells. Manipulating the viscosity of the culture medium suggested that the improved efficiency is mainly attributed to convective mixing rather than hydrodynamic shear stress. Temporal studies demonstrated that the enhancement of reprogramming efficiency required the dynamic culture in the middle but not early phase. In the early phase, fibroblasts had a high proliferation rate, but as the culture became over-confluent in the middle phase, expression of p57 was upregulated to inhibit cell proliferation and consequently, cell reprogramming. Subjecting the over confluent culture to orbital shaking prevented the upregulation of p57, thus improving reprogramming efficiency. Seeding cells at low densities to avoid over-confluency resulted in a lower efficiency, and optimal reprogramming efficiency was attained at a high seeding density with dynamic culture. Our findings provide insight into the underlying mechanisms of how dynamic culture condition regulate cell reprogramming, and will have broad impact on cell engineering for regenerative medicine and disease modeling. PMID:27031931

  2. Chinese Herbs Interfering with Cancer Reprogramming Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zhangfeng; Qiang, William W.; Tan, Wen; Zhang, Haotian; Wang, Shengpeng; Wang, Chunming; Qiang, Wenan; Wang, Yitao

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence promotes a reassessment of metabolic reprogramming regulation in cancer research. Although there exists a long history of Chinese herbs applied in cancer treatment, few reports have addressed the effects of Chinese herbal components on metabolic reprogramming, which is a central cancer hallmark involved in the slowing or prevention of chemoresistance in cancer cells. In this review, we have focused on four core elements altered by metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells. These include glucose transport, glycolysis, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and fatty acid synthesis. With this focus, we have summarized recent advances in metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells in response to specific Chinese herbal components. We propose that exploring Chinese herbal interference in cancer metabolic reprogramming might identify new therapeutic targets for cancer and more ways in which to approach metabolism-related diseases. PMID:27242914

  3. Reprogramming cell fate: a changing story

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Direct reprogramming of adult, lineage-determined cells from one cell fate to another has long been an elusive goal in developmental biology. Recent studies have demonstrated that forced expression of lineage-specific transcription factors in various differentiated cell types can promote the adoption of different lineages. These seminal findings have the potential to revolutionize the field of regenerative medicine by providing replacement cells for various degenerative disorders. Current reprogramming protocols, however, are inefficient in that relatively few cells in a given population can be made to undergo reprogramming and the completeness and extent of reprogramming that occurs has been questioned. At present, the fundamental molecular mechanisms involved are still being elucidated. Although the potential clinical applications are extensive, these issues will need to be addressed before direct reprogramming may be used clinically. This review will give an overview of pioneering studies in the field, will describe what is known about direct reprogramming to specific lineage types, will summarize what is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in reprogramming and will discuss challenges for the future. PMID:25364753

  4. Transcriptomic Features of Bovine Blastocysts Derived by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Min, Byungkuk; Cho, Sunwha; Park, Jung Sun; Lee, Yun-Gyeong; Kim, Namshin; Kang, Yong-Kook

    2015-01-01

    Reprogramming incompletely occurs in most somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos, which results in misregulation of developmentally important genes and subsequent embryonic malfunction and lethality. Here we examined transcriptome profiles in single bovine blastocysts derived by in vitro fertilization (IVF) and SCNT. Different types of donor cells, cumulus cell and ear-skin fibroblast, were used to derive cSCNT and fSCNT blastocysts, respectively. SCNT blastocysts expressed 13,606 genes on average, similar to IVF (13,542). Correlation analysis found that both cSCNT and fSCNT blastocyst groups had transcriptomic features distinctive from the IVF group, with the cSCNT transcriptomes closer to the IVF ones than the fSCNT. Gene expression analysis identified 56 underrepresented and 78 overrepresented differentially expressed genes in both SCNT groups. A 400-kb locus harboring zinc-finger protein family genes in chromosome 18 were found coordinately down-regulated in fSCNT blastocysts, showing a feature of reprogramming-resistant regions. Probing into different categories of genes important for blastocyst development revealed that genes involved in trophectoderm development frequently were underrepresented, and those encoding epigenetic modifiers tended to be overrepresented in SCNT blastocysts. Our effort to identify reprogramming-resistant, differentially expressed genes can help map reprogramming error-prone loci onto the genome and elucidate how to handle the stochastic events of reprogramming to improve cloning efficiency. PMID:26342001

  5. Transcriptomic Features of Bovine Blastocysts Derived by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer.

    PubMed

    Min, Byungkuk; Cho, Sunwha; Park, Jung Sun; Lee, Yun-Gyeong; Kim, Namshin; Kang, Yong-Kook

    2015-12-01

    Reprogramming incompletely occurs in most somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos, which results in misregulation of developmentally important genes and subsequent embryonic malfunction and lethality. Here we examined transcriptome profiles in single bovine blastocysts derived by in vitro fertilization (IVF) and SCNT. Different types of donor cells, cumulus cell and ear-skin fibroblast, were used to derive cSCNT and fSCNT blastocysts, respectively. SCNT blastocysts expressed 13,606 genes on average, similar to IVF (13,542). Correlation analysis found that both cSCNT and fSCNT blastocyst groups had transcriptomic features distinctive from the IVF group, with the cSCNT transcriptomes closer to the IVF ones than the fSCNT. Gene expression analysis identified 56 underrepresented and 78 overrepresented differentially expressed genes in both SCNT groups. A 400-kb locus harboring zinc-finger protein family genes in chromosome 18 were found coordinately down-regulated in fSCNT blastocysts, showing a feature of reprogramming-resistant regions. Probing into different categories of genes important for blastocyst development revealed that genes involved in trophectoderm development frequently were underrepresented, and those encoding epigenetic modifiers tended to be overrepresented in SCNT blastocysts. Our effort to identify reprogramming-resistant, differentially expressed genes can help map reprogramming error-prone loci onto the genome and elucidate how to handle the stochastic events of reprogramming to improve cloning efficiency. PMID:26342001

  6. Mechanisms and models of somatic cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Buganim, Yosef; Faddah, Dina A.; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Conversion of somatic cells to pluripotency by defined factors is a long and complex process that yields embryonic stem cell-like cells that vary in their developmental potential. To improve the quality of resulting induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which is important for potential therapeutic applications, and to address fundamental questions about control of cell identity, molecular mechanisms of the reprogramming process must be understood. Here we discuss recent discoveries regarding the role of reprogramming factors in remodeling the genome, including new insights into the function of c-Myc, and describe the different phases, markers and emerging models of reprogramming. PMID:23681063

  7. Restoring totipotency through epigenetic reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Wasson, Jadiel A.; Ruppersburg, Chelsey C.

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications are implicated in the maintenance and regulation of transcriptional memory by marking genes that were previously transcribed to facilitate transmission of these expression patterns through cell division. During germline specification and maintenance, extensive epigenetic modifications are acquired. Yet somehow at fertilization, the fusion of the highly differentiated sperm and egg results in formation of the totipotent zygote. This massive change in cell fate implies that the selective erasure and maintenance of epigenetic modifications at fertilization may be critical for the re-establishment of totipotency. In this review, we discuss recent studies that provide insight into the extensive epigenetic reprogramming that occurs around fertilization and the mechanisms that may be involved in the re-establishment of totipotency in the embryo. PMID:23117862

  8. Transcriptional reprogramming of gene expression in bovine somatic cell chromatin transfer embryos

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Osorio, Nelida; Wang, Zhongde; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Page, Grier P; Robl, James M; Memili, Erdogan

    2009-01-01

    Background Successful reprogramming of a somatic genome to produce a healthy clone by somatic cells nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a rare event and the mechanisms involved in this process are poorly defined. When serial or successive rounds of cloning are performed, blastocyst and full term development rates decline even further with the increasing rounds of cloning. Identifying the "cumulative errors" could reveal the epigenetic reprogramming blocks in animal cloning. Results Bovine clones from up to four generations of successive cloning were produced by chromatin transfer (CT). Using Affymetrix bovine microarrays we determined that the transcriptomes of blastocysts derived from the first and the fourth rounds of cloning (CT1 and CT4 respectively) have undergone an extensive reprogramming and were more similar to blastocysts derived from in vitro fertilization (IVF) than to the donor cells used for the first and the fourth rounds of chromatin transfer (DC1 and DC4 respectively). However a set of transcripts in the cloned embryos showed a misregulated pattern when compared to IVF embryos. Among the genes consistently upregulated in both CT groups compared to the IVF embryos were genes involved in regulation of cytoskeleton and cell shape. Among the genes consistently upregulated in IVF embryos compared to both CT groups were genes involved in chromatin remodelling and stress coping. Conclusion The present study provides a data set that could contribute in our understanding of epigenetic errors in somatic cell chromatin transfer. Identifying "cumulative errors" after serial cloning could reveal some of the epigenetic reprogramming blocks shedding light on the reprogramming process, important for both basic and applied research. PMID:19393066

  9. Molecular features of cellular reprogramming and development.

    PubMed

    Smith, Zachary D; Sindhu, Camille; Meissner, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Differentiating somatic cells are progressively restricted to specialized functions during ontogeny, but they can be experimentally directed to form other cell types, including those with complete embryonic potential. Early nuclear reprogramming methods, such as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and cell fusion, posed significant technical hurdles to precise dissection of the regulatory programmes governing cell identity. However, the discovery of reprogramming by ectopic expression of a defined set of transcription factors, known as direct reprogramming, provided a tractable platform to uncover molecular characteristics of cellular specification and differentiation, cell type stability and pluripotency. We discuss the control and maintenance of cellular identity during developmental transitions as they have been studied using direct reprogramming, with an emphasis on transcriptional and epigenetic regulation. PMID:26883001

  10. Cellular reprogramming: a small molecule perspective

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Baoming; Wang, Haixia; Laurent, Timothy; Ding, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    The discovery that somatic cells can be reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by the expression of a few transcription factors has attracted enormous interest in biomedical research and the field of regenerative medicine. iPSCs nearly identically resemble embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and can give rise to all cell types in the body, and thus have opened new opportunities for personalized regenerative medicine and new ways of modeling human diseases. Although some studies have raised concerns about genomic stability and epigenetic memory in the resulting cells, better understanding and control of the reprogramming process should enable enhanced efficiency and higher fidelity in reprogramming. Therefore, small molecules regulating reprogramming mechanisms are valuable tools to probe the process of reprogremming and harness cell fate transitions for various applications. PMID:22959962

  11. Stem cell reprogramming: A 3D boost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abilez, Oscar J.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2016-03-01

    Biophysical factors in an optimized three-dimensional microenvironment enhance the reprogramming efficiency of human somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells when compared to traditional cell-culture substrates.

  12. Conversion of Prostate Adenocarcinoma to Small Cell Carcinoma-Like by Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Borges, Gisely T; Vêncio, Eneida F; Quek, Sue-Ing; Chen, Adeline; Salvanha, Diego M; Vêncio, Ricardo Z N; Nguyen, Holly M; Vessella, Robert L; Cavanaugh, Christopher; Ware, Carol B; Troisch, Pamela; Liu, Alvin Y

    2016-09-01

    The lineage relationship between prostate adenocarcinoma and small cell carcinoma was studied by using the LuCaP family of xenografts established from primary neoplasm to metastasis. Expression of four stem cell transcription factor (TF) genes, LIN28A, NANOG, POU5F1, SOX2, were analyzed in the LuCaP lines. These genes, when force expressed in differentiated cells, can reprogram the recipients into stem-like induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Most LuCaP lines expressed POU5F1, while LuCaP 145.1, representative of small cell carcinoma, expressed all four. Through transcriptome database query, many small cell carcinoma genes were also found in stem cells. To test the hypothesis that prostate cancer progression from "differentiated" adenocarcinoma to "undifferentiated" small cell carcinoma could involve re-expression of stem cell genes, the four TF genes were transduced via lentiviral vectors into five adenocarcinoma LuCaP lines-70CR, 73CR, 86.2, 92, 105CR-as done in iPS cell reprogramming. The resultant cells from these five transductions displayed a morphology of small size and dark appearing unlike the parentals. Transcriptome analysis of LuCaP 70CR* ("*" to denote transfected progeny) revealed a unique gene expression close to that of LuCaP 145.1. In a prostate principal components analysis space based on cell-type transcriptomes, the different LuCaP transcriptome datapoints were aligned to suggest a possible ordered sequence of expression changes from the differentiated luminal-like adenocarcinoma cell types to the less differentiated, more stem-like small cell carcinoma types, and LuCaP 70CR*. Prostate cancer progression can thus be molecularly characterized by loss of differentiation with re-expression of stem cell genes. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2040-2047, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26773436

  13. Dynamic transcriptome landscape of maize embryo and endosperm development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Zeng, Biao; Zhang, Mei; Xie, Shaojun; Wang, Gaokui; Hauck, Andrew; Lai, Jinsheng

    2014-09-01

    Maize (Zea mays) is an excellent cereal model for research on seed development because of its relatively large size for both embryo and endosperm. Despite the importance of seed in agriculture, the genome-wide transcriptome pattern throughout seed development has not been well characterized. Using high-throughput RNA sequencing, we developed a spatiotemporal transcriptome atlas of B73 maize seed development based on 53 samples from fertilization to maturity for embryo, endosperm, and whole seed tissues. A total of 26,105 genes were found to be involved in programming seed development, including 1,614 transcription factors. Global comparisons of gene expression highlighted the fundamental transcriptomic reprogramming and the phases of development. Coexpression analysis provided further insight into the dynamic reprogramming of the transcriptome by revealing functional transitions during maturation. Combined with the published nonseed high-throughput RNA sequencing data, we identified 91 transcription factors and 1,167 other seed-specific genes, which should help elucidate key mechanisms and regulatory networks that underlie seed development. In addition, correlation of gene expression with the pattern of DNA methylation revealed that hypomethylation of the gene body region should be an important factor for the expressional activation of seed-specific genes, especially for extremely highly expressed genes such as zeins. This study provides a valuable resource for understanding the genetic control of seed development of monocotyledon plants. PMID:25037214

  14. Quantitative-Proteomic Comparison of Alpha and Beta Cells to Uncover Novel Targets for Lineage Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Mertins, Philipp; Udeshi, Namrata D.; Dančík, Vlado; Fomina-Yadlin, Dina; Kubicek, Stefan; Clemons, Paul A.; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Carr, Steven A.; Wagner, Bridget K.

    2014-01-01

    Type-1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease in which insulin-secreting pancreatic beta cells are destroyed by the immune system. An emerging strategy to regenerate beta-cell mass is through transdifferentiation of pancreatic alpha cells to beta cells. We previously reported two small molecules, BRD7389 and GW8510, that induce insulin expression in a mouse alpha cell line and provide a glimpse into potential intermediate cell states in beta-cell reprogramming from alpha cells. These small-molecule studies suggested that inhibition of kinases in particular may induce the expression of several beta-cell markers in alpha cells. To identify potential lineage reprogramming protein targets, we compared the transcriptome, proteome, and phosphoproteome of alpha cells, beta cells, and compound-treated alpha cells. Our phosphoproteomic analysis indicated that two kinases, BRSK1 and CAMKK2, exhibit decreased phosphorylation in beta cells compared to alpha cells, and in compound-treated alpha cells compared to DMSO-treated alpha cells. Knock-down of these kinases in alpha cells resulted in expression of key beta-cell markers. These results provide evidence that perturbation of the kinome may be important for lineage reprogramming of alpha cells to beta cells. PMID:24759943

  15. bFGF signaling-mediated reprogramming of porcine primordial germ cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Ma, Jing; Li, Hai; Lv, Jiawei; Wei, Renyue; Cong, Yimei; Liu, Zhonghua

    2016-05-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) have the ability to be reprogrammed into embryonic germ cells (EGCs) in vitro and are an alternative source of embryonic stem cells. Other than for the mouse, the systematic characterization of mammalian PGCs is still lacking, especially the process by which PGCs convert to pluripotency. This hampers the understanding of germ cell development and the derivation of authenticated EGCs from other species. We observed the morphological development of the genital ridge from Bama miniature pigs and found primary sexual differentiation in the E28 porcine embryo, coinciding with Blimp1 nuclear exclusion in PGCs. To explore molecular events involved in porcine PGC reprogramming, transcriptome data of porcine EGCs and fetal fibroblasts (FFs) were assembled and 1169 differentially expressed genes were used for Gene Ontology analysis. These genes were significantly enriched in cell-surface receptor-linked signal transduction, in agreement with the activation of LIF/Stat3 signaling and FGF signaling during the derivation of porcine EG-like cells. Using a growth-factor-defined culture system, we explored the effects of bFGF on the process and found that bFGF not only functioned at the very beginning of PGC dedifferentiation by impeding Blimp1 nuclear expression via a PI3K/AKT-dependent pathway but also maintained the viability of cultured PGCs thereafter. These results provide further insights into the development of germ cells from livestock and the mechanism of porcine PGC reprogramming. PMID:26613602

  16. Reprogrammed pluripotent stem cells from somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Soo; Choi, Hyun Woo; Choi, Sol; Do, Jeong Tae

    2011-06-01

    Pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic stem (ES) cells, can differentiate into all cell types. So, these cells can be a biological resource for regenerative medicine. However, ES cells known as standard pluripotent cells have problem to be used for cell therapy because of ethical issue of the origin and immune response on the graft. Hence, recently reprogrammed pluripotent cells have been suggested as an alternative source for regenerative medicine. Somatic cells can acquire the ES cell-like pluripotency by transferring somatic cell nuclei into oocytes, by cell fusion with pluripotent cells. Retroviral-mediated introduction of four factors, Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc can successfully reprogram somatic cells into ES cell-like pluripotent stem cells, known as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. These cells closely resemble ES cells in gene expression pattern, cell biologic and phenotypic characteristics. However, to reach the eventual goal of clinical application, it is necessary to overcome the major drawbacks such as low reprogramming efficiency and genomic alterations due to viral integration. In this review, we discuss the current reprogramming techniques and mechanisms of nuclear reprogramming induced by transcription factor transduction. PMID:24298328

  17. Oncometabolic Nuclear Reprogramming of Cancer Stemness.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Javier A; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Cuyàs, Elisabet; García, María G; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Fernández, Agustín F; Joven, Jorge; Fraga, Mario F; Alarcón, Tomás

    2016-03-01

    By impairing histone demethylation and locking cells into a reprogramming-prone state, oncometabolites can partially mimic the process of induced pluripotent stem cell generation. Using a systems biology approach, combining mathematical modeling, computation, and proof-of-concept studies with live cells, we found that an oncometabolite-driven pathological version of nuclear reprogramming increases the speed and efficiency of dedifferentiating committed epithelial cells into stem-like states with only a minimal core of stemness transcription factors. Our biomathematical model, which introduces nucleosome modification and epigenetic regulation of cell differentiation genes to account for the direct effects of oncometabolites on nuclear reprogramming, demonstrates that oncometabolites markedly lower the "energy barriers" separating non-stem and stem cell attractors, diminishes the average time of nuclear reprogramming, and increases the size of the basin of attraction of the macrostate occupied by stem cells. These findings establish the concept of oncometabolic nuclear reprogramming of stemness as a bona fide metabolo-epigenetic mechanism for generation of cancer stem-like cells. PMID:26876667

  18. Oncometabolic Nuclear Reprogramming of Cancer Stemness

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, Javier A.; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Cuyàs, Elisabet; García, María G.; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Fernández, Agustín F.; Joven, Jorge; Fraga, Mario F.; Alarcón, Tomás

    2016-01-01

    Summary By impairing histone demethylation and locking cells into a reprogramming-prone state, oncometabolites can partially mimic the process of induced pluripotent stem cell generation. Using a systems biology approach, combining mathematical modeling, computation, and proof-of-concept studies with live cells, we found that an oncometabolite-driven pathological version of nuclear reprogramming increases the speed and efficiency of dedifferentiating committed epithelial cells into stem-like states with only a minimal core of stemness transcription factors. Our biomathematical model, which introduces nucleosome modification and epigenetic regulation of cell differentiation genes to account for the direct effects of oncometabolites on nuclear reprogramming, demonstrates that oncometabolites markedly lower the “energy barriers” separating non-stem and stem cell attractors, diminishes the average time of nuclear reprogramming, and increases the size of the basin of attraction of the macrostate occupied by stem cells. These findings establish the concept of oncometabolic nuclear reprogramming of stemness as a bona fide metabolo-epigenetic mechanism for generation of cancer stem-like cells. PMID:26876667

  19. Global transcriptional analysis of nuclear reprogramming in the transition from MEFs to iPSCs.

    PubMed

    Dong, Fulu; Song, Zhenwei; Zhang, Jinping; Lu, Youde; Song, Chunlei; Jiang, BaoChun; Zhang, Baole; Cong, Peiqing; Sun, Hongyan; Shi, Fangxiong; Liu, Honglin

    2013-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are flourishing in the investigation of cell reprogramming. However, we still know little about the sequential molecular mechanism during somatic cell reprogramming (SCR). Here, we first observed rapid generation of colonies whereas mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) were induced by OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 (OSK), and vitamin C for 7 days. The colony's global transcriptional profiles were analyzed using Affymetrix microarray. Microarray data confirmed that SCR was a process in which transcriptome got reversed and pluripotent genes expressed de novo. There were many changes, especially substantial growth expression of epigenetic factors, on transcriptome during the transition from Day 7 to iPSCs indicating that this period may provide 'flexibility' genome structure, chromatin remodeling, and epigenetic modifications to rebind to the transcriptional factors. Several biological processes such as viral immune response, apoptosis, cell fate specification, and cell communication were mainly involved before Day 7 whereas cell cycle, DNA methylation, and histone modification were mainly involved after Day 7. Furthermore, it was suggested that p53 signaling contributed to the transition 'hyperdynamic plastic' cell state and assembled cell niche for SCR, and small molecular compounds useful for chromatin remodeling can enhance iPSCs by exciting epigenetic modification rather than the exogenous expression of more TFs vectors. PMID:23231677

  20. X Chromosome Reactivation Dynamics Reveal Stages of Reprogramming to Pluripotency

    PubMed Central

    Pasque, Vincent; Tchieu, Jason; Karnik, Rahul; Uyeda, Molly; Dimashkie, Anupama Sadhu; Case, Dana; Papp, Bernadett; Bonora, Giancarlo; Patel, Sanjeet; Ho, Ritchie; Schmidt, Ryan; McKee, Robin; Sado, Takashi; Tada, Takashi; Meissner, Alexander; Plath, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Reprogramming to iPSCs resets the epigenome of somatic cells, including the reversal of X chromosome inactivation. We sought to gain insight into the steps underlying the reprogramming process by examining the means by which reprogramming leads to X chromosome reactivation (XCR). Analyzing single cells in situ, we found that hallmarks of the inactive X (Xi) change sequentially, providing a direct readout of reprogramming progression. Several epigenetic changes on the Xi occur in the inverse order of developmental X inactivation, whereas others are uncoupled from this sequence. Among the latter, DNA methylation has an extraordinary long persistence on the Xi during reprogramming, and, like Xist expression, is erased only after pluripotency genes are activated. Mechanistically, XCR requires both DNA demethylation and Xist silencing, ensuring that only cells undergoing faithful reprogramming initiate XCR. Our study defines the epigenetic state of multiple sequential reprogramming intermediates and establishes a paradigm for studying cell fate transitions during reprogramming. PMID:25525883

  1. Optical reprogramming with ultrashort femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchugonova, Aisada; Breunig, Hans G.; Batista, Ana; König, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    The use of sub-15 femtosecond laser pulses in stem cell research is explored with particular emphasis on the optical reprogramming of somatic cells. The reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be evoked through the ectopic expression of defined transcription factors. Conventional approaches utilize retro/lenti-viruses to deliver genes/transcription factors as well as to facilitate the integration of transcription factors into that of the host genome. However, the use of viruses may result in insertional mutations caused by the random integration of genes and as a result, this may limit the use within clinical applications due to the risk of the formation of cancer. In this study, a new approach is demonstrated in realizing non-viral reprogramming through the use of ultrashort laser pulses, to introduce transcription factors into the cell so as to generate iPS cells.

  2. The cytotoxic and immunogenic hurdles associated with non-viral mRNA-mediated reprogramming of human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Drews, Katharina; Tavernier, Geertrui; Demeester, Joseph; Lehrach, Hans; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Rejman, Joanna; Adjaye, James

    2012-06-01

    Delivery of reprogramming factor-encoding mRNAs by means of lipofection in somatic cells is a desirable method for deriving integration-free iPSCs. However, the lack of reproducibility implies there are major hurdles to overcome before this protocol becomes universally accepted. This study demonstrates the functionality of our in-house synthesized mRNAs expressing the reprogramming factors (OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, c-MYC) within the nucleus of human fibroblasts. However, upon repeated transfections, the mRNAs induced severe loss of cell viability as demonstrated by MTT cytotoxicity assays. Microarray-derived transcriptome data revealed that the poor cell survival was mainly due to the innate immune response triggered by the exogenous mRNAs. We validated the influence of mRNA transfection on key immune response-associated transcript levels, including IFNB1, RIG-I, PKR, IL12A, IRF7 and CCL5, by quantitative real-time PCR and directly compared these with the levels induced by other methods previously published to mediate reprogramming in somatic cells. Finally, we evaluated chemical compounds (B18R, chloroquine, TSA, Pepinh-TRIF, Pepinh-MYD), known for their ability to suppress cellular innate immune responses. However, none of these had the desired effect. The data presented here should provide the basis for further investigations into other immunosuppressing strategies that might facilitate efficient mRNA-mediated cellular reprogramming in human cells. PMID:22381475

  3. Direct Reprogramming of Human Fibroblasts to Hepatocyte-Like Cells by Synthetic Modified mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Simeonov, Kamen P.; Uppal, Hirdesh

    2014-01-01

    Direct reprogramming by overexpression of defined transcription factors is a promising new method of deriving useful but rare cell types from readily available ones. While the method presents numerous advantages over induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell approaches, a focus on murine conversions and a reliance on retroviral vectors limit potential human applications. Here we address these concerns by demonstrating direct conversion of human fibroblasts to hepatocyte-like cells via repeated transfection with synthetic modified mRNAs. Hepatic induction was achieved with as little as three transcription factor mRNAs encoding HNF1A plus any two of the factors, FOXA1, FOXA3, or HNF4A in the presence of an optimized hepatic growth medium. We show that the absolute necessity of exogenous HNF1A mRNA delivery is explained both by the factor's inability to be activated by any other factors screened and its simultaneous ability to strongly induce expression of other master hepatic transcription factors. Further analysis of factor interaction showed that a series of robust cross-activations exist between factors that induce a hepatocyte-like state. Transcriptome and small RNA sequencing during conversion toward hepatocyte-like cells revealed global preferential activation of liver genes and miRNAs over those associated with other endodermal tissues, as well as downregulation of fibroblast-associated genes. Induced hepatocyte-like cells also exhibited hepatic morphology and protein expression. Our data provide insight into the process by which direct hepatic reprogramming occurs in human cells. More importantly, by demonstrating that it is possible to achieve direct reprogramming without the use of retroviral gene delivery, our results supply a crucial step toward realizing the potential of direct reprogramming in regenerative medicine. PMID:24963715

  4. Dynamics of 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine during germ cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Shinpei; Hong, Kwonho; Liu, Rui; Inoue, Azusa; Shen, Li; Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Yi

    2013-03-01

    Previous studies have revealed that mouse primordial germ cells (PGCs) undergo genome-wide DNA methylation reprogramming to reset the epigenome for totipotency. However, the precise 5-methylcytosine (5mC) dynamics and its relationship with the generation of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) are not clear. Here we analyzed the dynamics of 5mC and 5hmC during PGC reprograming and germ cell development. Unexpectedly, we found a specific period (E8.5-9.5) during which both 5mC and 5hmC levels are low. Subsequently, 5hmC levels increase reaching its peak at E11.5 and gradually decrease until E13.5 likely by replication-dependent dilution. Interestingly, 5hmC is enriched in chromocenters during this period. While this germ cell-specific 5hmC subnuclear localization pattern is maintained in female germ cells even in mature oocytes, such pattern is gradually lost in male germ cells as mitotic proliferation resumes during the neonatal stage. Pericentric 5hmC plays an important role in silencing major satellite repeat, especially in female PGCs. Global transcriptome analysis by RNA-seq revealed that the great majority of differentially expressed genes from E9.5 to 13.5 are upregulated in both male and female PGCs. Although only female PGCs enter meiosis during the prenatal stage, meiosis-related and a subset of imprinted genes are significantly upregulated in both male and female PGCs at E13.5. Thus, our study not only reveals the dynamics of 5mC and 5hmC during PGC reprogramming and germ cell development, but also their potential role in epigenetic reprogramming and transcriptional regulation of meiotic and imprinted genes. PMID:23399596

  5. Metabolic reprogramming of the tumour microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yazhi; Zhao, Shimin; Zhou, Binhua P; Mi, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Tumour cells, stromal cells and the stroma comprise the tumour microenvironment. The metabolism of both tumour cells and several types of tumour stromal cells, such as cancer-associated fibroblasts and tumour-associated macrophages, is reprogrammed. Current studies have found that stromal cells promote tumour progression and metastasis, through not only the paracrine secretion of cytokines or chemokines, but also intermediate metabolites. Here, we summarize the latest insights into the mechanism of metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells, cancer-associated fibroblasts and tumour-associated macrophages, and their potential roles in tumour progression and metastasis. PMID:26255648

  6. Open chromatin in pluripotency and reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Meshorer, Eran; Ramalho-Santos, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells can be derived from embryos or induced from adult cells by reprogramming. They are unique from any other stem cell in that they can give rise to all cell types of the body. Recent findings indicate that a particularly open chromatin state contributes to maintenance of pluripotency. Two emerging principles are that: specific factors maintain a globally open chromatin state that is accessible for transcriptional activation; and other chromatin regulators contribute locally to the silencing of lineage-specific genes until differentiation is triggered. These same principles may apply during reacquisition of an open chromatin state upon reprogramming to pluripotency, and during de-differentiation in cancer. PMID:21179060

  7. Genomic stability during cellular reprogramming: Mission impossible?

    PubMed

    von Joest, Mathieu; Búa Aguín, Sabela; Li, Han

    2016-06-01

    The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from adult somatic cells is one of the most exciting discoveries in recent biomedical research. It holds tremendous potential in drug discovery and regenerative medicine. However, a series of reports highlighting genomic instability in iPSCs raises concerns about their clinical application. Although the mechanisms cause genomic instability during cellular reprogramming are largely unknown, several potential sources have been suggested. This review summarizes current knowledge on this active research field and discusses the latest efforts to alleviate the genomic insults during cellular reprogramming to generate iPSCs with enhanced quality and safety. PMID:26851988

  8. Direct lineage reprogramming to neural cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Janghwan; Ambasudhan, Rajesh; Ding, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Recently we have witnessed an array of studies on direct reprogramming that describe induced inter conversion of mature cell types from higher organisms including human. While these studies reveal an unexpected level of plasticity of differentiated somatic cells, they also provide unprecedented opportunities to develop regenerative therapies for many debilitating disorders and model these ‘diseases-in-a-dish’ for studying their pathophysiology. Here we review the current state of the art in direct lineage reprogramming to neural cells, and discuss the challenges that need to be addressed toward achieving the full potential of this exciting new technology. PMID:22652035

  9. Epigenetic Landscapes Explain Partially Reprogrammed Cells and Identify Key Reprogramming Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Alex H.; Li, Hu; Collins, James J.; Mehta, Pankaj

    2014-01-01

    A common metaphor for describing development is a rugged “epigenetic landscape” where cell fates are represented as attracting valleys resulting from a complex regulatory network. Here, we introduce a framework for explicitly constructing epigenetic landscapes that combines genomic data with techniques from spin-glass physics. Each cell fate is a dynamic attractor, yet cells can change fate in response to external signals. Our model suggests that partially reprogrammed cells are a natural consequence of high-dimensional landscapes, and predicts that partially reprogrammed cells should be hybrids that co-express genes from multiple cell fates. We verify this prediction by reanalyzing existing datasets. Our model reproduces known reprogramming protocols and identifies candidate transcription factors for reprogramming to novel cell fates, suggesting epigenetic landscapes are a powerful paradigm for understanding cellular identity. PMID:25122086

  10. Pluripotent reprogramming and lineage reprogramming: promises and challenges in cardiovascular regeneration.

    PubMed

    He, Wen-Jun; Hou, Qian; Han, Qing-Wang; Han, Wei-Dong; Fu, Xiao-Bing

    2014-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death in industrialized countries. Scientists are trying to generate cardiomyocytes in vitro and in vivo to repair damaged heart tissue. Pluripotent reprogramming brings an alternative source of embryonic-like stem cells, and the possibility of regenerating mammalian tissues by first reverting somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells, followed by redifferentiating these cells into cardiomyocytes. More recently, lineage reprogramming of fibroblasts directly into functional cardiomyocytes has been reported. The procedure does not involve reverting cells back to a pluripotent stage, and, thus, would presumably reduce tumorigenic potential. Interestingly, lineage reprogramming could be used for in situ conversion of cell fate. Moreover, zebrafish-like regenerative mechanism in mammalian heart tissue, which was observed in mice within the first week of postpartum, should be further addressed. Here, we review the landmark progresses of the two major reprogramming strategies, compare their pros and cons in cardiovascular regeneration, and forecast the future directions of cardiac repair. PMID:24063625

  11. Direct Cardiomyocyte Reprogramming: A New Direction for Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Yi, B. Alexander; Mummery, Christine L.; Chien, Kenneth R.

    2013-01-01

    The past few years have seen unexpected new developments in direct cardiomyocyte reprogramming. Direct cardiomyocyte reprogramming potentially offers an entirely novel approach to cardiovascular regenerative medicine by converting cardiac fibroblasts into functional cardiomyocytes in situ. There is much to be learned, however, about the mechanisms of direct reprogramming in order that the process can be made more efficient. Early efforts have suggested that this new technology can be technically challenging. Moreover, new methods of inducing heart reprogramming will need to be developed before this approach can be translated to the bedside. Despite this, direct cardiomyocyte reprogramming may lead to new therapeutic options for sufferers of heart disease. PMID:24003244

  12. The plasticity of the grapevine berry transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Phenotypic plasticity refers to the range of phenotypes a single genotype can express as a function of its environment. These phenotypic variations are attributable to the effect of the environment on the expression and function of genes influencing plastic traits. We investigated phenotypic plasticity in grapevine by comparing the berry transcriptome in a single clone of the vegetatively-propagated common grapevine species Vitis vinifera cultivar Corvina through 3 consecutive growth years cultivated in 11 different vineyards in the Verona area of Italy. Results Most of the berry transcriptome clustered by year of growth rather than common environmental conditions or viticulture practices, and transcripts related to secondary metabolism showed high sensitivity towards different climates, as confirmed also by metabolomic data obtained from the same samples. When analyzed in 11 vineyards during 1 growth year, the environmentally-sensitive berry transcriptome comprised 5% of protein-coding genes and 18% of the transcripts modulated during berry development. Plastic genes were particularly enriched in ontology categories such as transcription factors, translation, transport, and secondary metabolism. Specific plastic transcripts were associated with groups of vineyards sharing common viticulture practices or environmental conditions, and plastic transcriptome reprogramming was more intense in the year characterized by extreme weather conditions. We also identified a set of genes that lacked plasticity, showing either constitutive expression or similar modulation in all berries. Conclusions Our data reveal candidate genes potentially responsible for the phenotypic plasticity of grapevine and provide the first step towards the characterization of grapevine transcriptome plasticity under different agricultural systems. PMID:23759170

  13. Reprogramming cellular identity for regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Anne B.C.; Daley, George Q.

    2012-01-01

    The choreographed development of over 200 distinct differentiated cell types from a single zygote is a complex and poorly understood process. Whereas development leads unidirectionally towards more restricted cell fates, recent work in cellular reprogramming has proven that striking conversions of one cellular identity into another can be engineered, promising countless applications in biomedical research and paving the way for modeling disease with patient-derived stem cells. To date, there has been little discussion of which disease models are likely to be most informative. We here review evidence demonstrating that because environmental influences and epigenetic signatures are largely erased during reprogramming, patient-specific models of diseases with strong genetic bases and high penetrance are likely to prove most informative in the near term. However, manipulating in vitro culture conditions may ultimately enable cell-based models to recapitulate gene-environment interactions. Here, we discuss the implications of the new reprogramming paradigm in biomedicine and outline how reprogramming of cell identities is enhancing our understanding of cell differentiation and prospects for cellular therapies and in vivo regeneration. PMID:22424223

  14. Blood pressure reprogramming adapter assists signal recording

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vick, H. A.

    1967-01-01

    Blood pressure reprogramming adapter separates the two components of a blood pressure signal, a dc pressure signal and an ac Korotkoff sounds signal, so that the Korotkoff sounds are recorded on one channel as received while the dc pressure signal is converted to FM and recorded on a second channel.

  15. The microenvironment reprograms circuits in tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qingchun; Xu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    In the course of multistep oncogenesis, initially normal cells acquire several new functions that render them malignant. We have recently demonstrated that the peritoneal microenvironment promotes resistance to anoikis in ovarian cancer cells by reprogramming SRC/AKT/ERK signaling and metabolism. These findings have prognostic and therapeutic implications. PMID:27308400

  16. In Vivo Cellular Reprogramming: The Next Generation.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Deepak; DeWitt, Natalie

    2016-09-01

    Cellular reprogramming technology has created new opportunities in understanding human disease, drug discovery, and regenerative medicine. While a combinatorial code was initially found to reprogram somatic cells to pluripotency, a "second generation" of cellular reprogramming involves lineage-restricted transcription factors and microRNAs that directly reprogram one somatic cell to another. This technology was enabled by gene networks active during development, which induce global shifts in the epigenetic landscape driving cell fate decisions. A major utility of direct reprogramming is the potential of harnessing resident support cells within damaged organs to regenerate lost tissue by converting them into the desired cell type in situ. Here, we review the progress in direct cellular reprogramming, with a focus on the paradigm of in vivo reprogramming for regenerative medicine, while pointing to hurdles that must be overcome to translate this technology into future therapeutics. PMID:27610565

  17. Novel Approaches for Fungal Transcriptomics from Host Samples

    PubMed Central

    Amorim-Vaz, Sara; Sanglard, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans adaptation to the host requires a profound reprogramming of the fungal transcriptome as compared to in vitro laboratory conditions. A detailed knowledge of the C. albicans transcriptome during the infection process is necessary in order to understand which of the fungal genes are important for host adaptation. Such genes could be thought of as potential targets for antifungal therapy. The acquisition of the C. albicans transcriptome is, however, technically challenging due to the low proportion of fungal RNA in host tissues. Two emerging technologies were used recently to circumvent this problem. One consists of the detection of low abundance fungal RNA using capture and reporter gene probes which is followed by emission and quantification of resulting fluorescent signals (nanoString). The other is based first on the capture of fungal RNA by short biotinylated oligonucleotide baits covering the C. albicans ORFome permitting fungal RNA purification. Next, the enriched fungal RNA is amplified and subjected to RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). Here we detail these two transcriptome approaches and discuss their advantages and limitations and future perspectives in microbial transcriptomics from host material. PMID:26834721

  18. Reprogramming of germ cells into pluripotency

    PubMed Central

    Sekita, Yoichi; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Kimura, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are precursors of all gametes, and represent the founder cells of the germline. Although developmental potency is restricted to germ-lineage cells, PGCs can be reprogrammed into a pluripotent state. Specifically, PGCs give rise to germ cell tumors, such as testicular teratomas, in vivo, and to pluripotent stem cells known as embryonic germ cells in vitro. In this review, we highlight the current knowledge on signaling pathways, transcriptional controls, and post-transcriptional controls that govern germ cell differentiation and de-differentiation. These regulatory processes are common in the reprogramming of germ cells and somatic cells, and play a role in the pathogenesis of human germ cell tumors. PMID:27621759

  19. Reprogramming of germ cells into pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Sekita, Yoichi; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Kimura, Tohru

    2016-08-26

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are precursors of all gametes, and represent the founder cells of the germline. Although developmental potency is restricted to germ-lineage cells, PGCs can be reprogrammed into a pluripotent state. Specifically, PGCs give rise to germ cell tumors, such as testicular teratomas, in vivo, and to pluripotent stem cells known as embryonic germ cells in vitro. In this review, we highlight the current knowledge on signaling pathways, transcriptional controls, and post-transcriptional controls that govern germ cell differentiation and de-differentiation. These regulatory processes are common in the reprogramming of germ cells and somatic cells, and play a role in the pathogenesis of human germ cell tumors. PMID:27621759

  20. Matrix identity and tractional forces influence indirect cardiac reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yen P.; Carrion, Bita; Singh, Rahul K.; Putnam, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Heart regeneration through in vivo cardiac reprogramming has been demonstrated as a possible regenerative strategy. While it has been reported that cardiac reprogramming in vivo is more efficient than in vitro, the influence of the extracellular microenvironment on cardiac reprogramming remains incompletely understood. This understanding is necessary to improve the efficiency of cardiac reprogramming in order to implement this strategy successfully. Here we have identified matrix identity and cell-generated tractional forces as key determinants of the dedifferentiation and differentiation stages during reprogramming. Cell proliferation, matrix mechanics, and matrix microstructure are also important, but play lesser roles. Our results suggest that the extracellular microenvironment can be optimized to enhance cardiac reprogramming. PMID:24326998

  1. Early epigenetic reprogramming in fertilized, cloned, and parthenogenetic embryos.

    PubMed

    Sepulveda-Rincon, Lessly P; Solanas, Edgar Del Llano; Serrano-Revuelta, Elisa; Ruddick, Lydia; Maalouf, Walid E; Beaujean, Nathalie

    2016-07-01

    Despite ongoing research in a number of species, the efficiency of embryo production by nuclear transfer remains low. Incomplete epigenetic reprogramming of the nucleus introduced in the recipient oocyte is one factor proposed to limit the success of this technique. Nonetheless, knowledge of reprogramming factors has increased-thanks to comparative studies on reprogramming of the paternal genome brought by sperm on fertilization-and will be reviewed here. Another valuable model of reprogramming is the one obtained in the absence of sperm fertilization through artificial activation-the parthenote-and will also be introduced. Altogether the objective of this review is to have a better understanding on the mechanisms responsible for the resistance to reprogramming, not only because it could improve embryonic development but also as it could benefit therapeutic reprogramming research. PMID:27156679

  2. Reprogramming of human somatic cells by bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ito, Naofumi; Ohta, Kunimasa

    2015-05-01

    In general, it had been believed that the cell fate restriction of terminally differentiated somatic cells was irreversible. In 1952, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) was introduced to study early embryonic development in frogs. So far, various mammalian species have been successfully cloned using the SCNT technique, though its efficiency is very low. Embryonic stem (ES) cells were the first pluripotent cells to be isolated from an embryo and have a powerful potential to differentiate into more than 260 types of cells. The generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells was a breakthrough in stem cell research, and the use of these iPS cells has solved problems such as low efficiency and cell fate restriction. These cells have since been used for clinical application, disease investigation, and drug selection. As it is widely accepted that the endosymbiosis of Archaea into eukaryotic ancestors resulted in the generation of eukaryotic cells, we examined whether bacterial infection could alter host cell fate. We previously showed that when human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cells were incorporated with lactic acid bacteria (LAB), the LAB-incorporated HDF cells formed clusters and expressed a subset of common pluripotent markers. Moreover, LAB-incorporated cell clusters could differentiate into cells derived from each of the three germinal layers both in vivo and in vitro, indicating successful reprogramming of host HDF cells by LAB. In the current review, we introduce the existing examples of cellular reprogramming by bacteria and discuss their nuclear reprogramming mechanisms. PMID:25866152

  3. Constitutive heterochromatin reorganization during somatic cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Fussner, Eden; Djuric, Ugljesa; Strauss, Mike; Hotta, Akitsu; Perez-Iratxeta, Carolina; Lanner, Fredrik; Dilworth, F Jeffrey; Ellis, James; Bazett-Jones, David P

    2011-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell reprogramming is a gradual epigenetic process that reactivates the pluripotent transcriptional network by erasing and establishing repressive epigenetic marks. In contrast to loci-specific epigenetic changes, heterochromatin domains undergo epigenetic resetting during the reprogramming process, but the effect on the heterochromatin ultrastructure is not known. Here, we characterize the physical structure of heterochromatin domains in full and partial mouse iPS cells by correlative electron spectroscopic imaging. In somatic and partial iPS cells, constitutive heterochromatin marked by H3K9me3 is highly compartmentalized into chromocentre structures of densely packed chromatin fibres. In contrast, chromocentre boundaries are poorly defined in pluripotent embryonic stem and full iPS cells, and are characterized by unusually dispersed 10 nm heterochromatin fibres in high Nanog-expressing cells, including pluripotent cells of the mouse blastocyst before differentiation. This heterochromatin reorganization accompanies retroviral silencing during conversion of partial iPS cells by MEK/GSK3 2i inhibitor treatment. Thus, constitutive heterochromatin is compacted in partial iPS cells but reorganizes into dispersed 10 nm chromatin fibres as the fully reprogrammed iPS cell state is acquired. PMID:21468033

  4. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Krause, Marie N; Sancho-Martinez, Ignacio; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2016-05-01

    Despite the profound and rapid advancements in reprogramming technologies since the generation of the first induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in 2006[1], the molecular basics of the process and its implications are still not fully understood. Recent work has suggested that a subset of TFs, so called "Pioneer TFs", play an important role during the stochastic phase of iPSC reprogramming [2-6]. Pioneer TFs activities differ from conventional transcription factors in their mechanism of action. They bind directly to condensed chromatin and elicit a series of chromatin remodeling events that lead to opening of the chromatin. Chromatin decondensation by pioneer factors progressively occurs during cell division and in turn exposes specific gene promoters in the DNA to which TFs can now directly bind to promoters that are readily accessible[2, 6]. Here, we will summarize recent advancements on our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying reprogramming to iPSC as well as the implications that pioneer Transcription Factor activities might play during different lineage conversion processes. PMID:26655812

  5. Cell reprogramming. Histone chaperone ASF1A is required for maintenance of pluripotency and cellular reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Muñoz, Elena; Arboleda-Estudillo, Yohanna; Otu, Hasan H; Cibelli, Jose B

    2014-08-15

    Unfertilized oocytes have the intrinsic capacity to remodel sperm and the nuclei of somatic cells. The discoveries that cells can change their phenotype from differentiated to embryonic state using oocytes or specific transcription factors have been recognized as two major breakthroughs in the biomedical field. Here, we show that ASF1A, a histone-remodeling chaperone specifically enriched in the metaphase II human oocyte, is necessary for reprogramming of human adult dermal fibroblasts (hADFs) into undifferentiated induced pluripotent stem cell. We also show that overexpression of just ASF1A and OCT4 in hADFs exposed to the oocyte-specific paracrine growth factor GDF9 can reprogram hADFs into pluripotent cells. Our Report underscores the importance of studying the unfertilized MII oocyte as a means to understand the molecular pathways governing somatic cell reprogramming. PMID:25035411

  6. Effect of biophysical cues on reprogramming to cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Sia, Junren; Yu, Pengzhi; Srivastava, Deepak; Li, Song

    2016-10-01

    Reprogramming of fibroblasts to cardiomyocytes offers exciting potential in cell therapy and regenerative medicine, but has low efficiency. We hypothesize that physical cues may positively affect the reprogramming process, and studied the effects of periodic mechanical stretch, substrate stiffness and microgrooved substrate on reprogramming yield. Subjecting reprogramming fibroblasts to periodic mechanical stretch and different substrate stiffness did not improve reprogramming yield. On the other hand, culturing the cells on microgrooved substrate enhanced the expression of cardiomyocyte genes by day 2 and improved the yield of partially reprogrammed cells at day 10. By combining microgrooved substrate with an existing optimized culture protocol, yield of reprogrammed cardiomyocytes with striated cardiac troponin T staining and spontaneous contractile activity was increased. We identified the regulation of Mkl1 activity as a new mechanism by which microgroove can affect reprogramming. Biochemical approach could only partially recapitulate the effect of microgroove. Microgroove demonstrated an additional effect of enhancing organization of sarcomeric structure, which could not be recapitulated by biochemical approach. This study provides insights into new mechanisms by which topographical cues can affect cellular reprogramming. PMID:27376554

  7. Kinetic Measurement and Real Time Visualization of Somatic Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Quintanilla, Rene H; Asprer, Joanna; Sylakowski, Kyle; Lakshmipathy, Uma

    2016-01-01

    Somatic reprogramming has enabled the conversion of adult cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) from diverse genetic backgrounds and disease phenotypes. Recent advances have identified more efficient and safe methods for introduction of reprogramming factors. However, there are few tools to monitor and track the progression of reprogramming. Current methods for monitoring reprogramming rely on the qualitative inspection of morphology or staining with stem cell-specific dyes and antibodies. Tools to dissect the progression of iPSC generation can help better understand the process under different conditions from diverse cell sources. This study presents key approaches for kinetic measurement of reprogramming progression using flow cytometry as well as real-time monitoring via imaging. To measure the kinetics of reprogramming, flow analysis was performed at discrete time points using antibodies against positive and negative pluripotent stem cell markers. The combination of real-time visualization and flow analysis enables the quantitative study of reprogramming at different stages and provides a more accurate comparison of different systems and methods. Real-time, image-based analysis was used for the continuous monitoring of fibroblasts as they are reprogrammed in a feeder-free medium system. The kinetics of colony formation was measured based on confluence in the phase contrast or fluorescence channels after staining with live alkaline phosphatase dye or antibodies against SSEA4 or TRA-1-60. The results indicated that measurement of confluence provides semi-quantitative metrics to monitor the progression of reprogramming. PMID:27500543

  8. Reprogramming the genome to totipotency in mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li-quan; Dean, Jurrien

    2015-02-01

    Despite investigative interest, the artificial derivation of pluripotent stem cells remains inefficient and incomplete reprogramming hinders its potential as a reliable tool in regenerative medicine. By contrast, fusion of terminally differentiated gametes at fertilization activates efficient epigenetic reprogramming to ensure totipotency of early embryos. Understanding the epigenetic mechanisms required for the transition from the fertilized egg to the embryo can improve efforts to reprogram differentiated cells to pluripotent/totipotent cells for therapeutic use. We review recent discoveries that are providing insight into the molecular mechanisms required for epigenetic reprogramming to totipotency in vivo. PMID:25448353

  9. Reprogramming the genome to totipotency in mouse embryos

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li-quan; Dean, Jurrien

    2014-01-01

    Despite investigative interest, the artificial derivation of pluripotent stem cells remains inefficient and incomplete reprogramming hinders its potential as a reliable tool in regenerative medicine. By contrast, fusion of terminally differentiated gametes at fertilization activates efficient epigenetic reprogramming to ensure totipotency of early embryos. Understanding the epigenetic mechanisms required for the transition from the fertilized egg to the embryo can improve efforts to reprogram differentiated cells to pluripotent/totipotent cells for therapeutic use. We review recent discoveries that are providing insight into the molecular mechanisms required for epigenetic reprogramming to totipotency in vivo. PMID:25448353

  10. Reprogramming stem cells is a microenvironmental task

    SciTech Connect

    Bissell, Mina J; Inman, Jamie

    2008-10-14

    That tumor cells for all practical purposes are unstable and plastic could be expected. However, the astonishing ability of the nuclei from cells of normal adult tissues to be reprogrammed - given the right embryonic context - found its final truth even for mammals in the experiments that allowed engineering Dolly (1). The landmark experiments showed that nuclei originating from cells of frozen mammary tissues were capable of being reprogrammed by the embryonic cytoplasm and its microenvironment to produce a normal sheep. The rest is history. However, whether microenvironments other than those of the embryos can also reprogram adult cells of different tissue origins still containing their cytoplasm is of obvious interest. In this issue of PNAS, the laboratory of Gilbert Smith (2) reports on how the mammary gland microenvironment can reprogram both embryonic and adult stem neuronal cells. The work is a follow-up to their previous report on testis stem cells that were reprogrammed by the mammary microenvironment (3). They demonstrated that cells isolated from the seminiferous tubules of the mature testis, mixed with normal mammary epithelial cells, contributed a sizable number of epithelial progeny to normal mammary outgrowths in transplanted mammary fat pads. However, in those experiments they were unable to distinguish which subpopulation of the testis cells contributed progeny to the mammary epithelial tree. The current work adds new, compelling, and provocative information to our understanding of stem cell plasticity. Booth et al. (2) use neuronal stem cells (NSCs) isolated from WAP-cre/R26R mice combined with unlabeled mammary epithelial cells that subsequently are implanted in cleared mammary fat pads. In this new microenvironment, the NSCs that are incorporated into the branching mammary tree make chimeric glands (Fig. 1) that remarkably can also express the milk protein {beta}-casein, progesterone receptor, and estrogen receptor {alpha}. Remarkably, the

  11. 25-Hydroxycholesterol Activates the Integrated Stress Response to Reprogram Transcription and Translation in Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Norihito; Carlin, Aaron F.; Spann, Nathanael J.; Saijo, Kaoru; Morello, Christopher S.; McDonald, Jeffrey G.; Romanoski, Casey E.; Maurya, Mano R.; Kaikkonen, Minna U.; Lam, Michael T.; Crotti, Andrea; Reichart, Donna; Fox, Jesse N.; Quehenberger, Oswald; Raetz, Christian R. H.; Sullards, M. Cameron; Murphy, Robert C.; Merrill, Alfred H.; Brown, H. Alex; Dennis, Edward A.; Fahy, Eoin; Subramaniam, Shankar; Cavener, Douglas R.; Spector, Deborah H.; Russell, David W.; Glass, Christopher K.

    2013-01-01

    25-Hydroxycholesterol (25OHC) is an enzymatically derived oxidation product of cholesterol that modulates lipid metabolism and immunity. 25OHC is synthesized in response to interferons and exerts broad antiviral activity by as yet poorly characterized mechanisms. To gain further insights into the basis for antiviral activity, we evaluated time-dependent responses of the macrophage lipidome and transcriptome to 25OHC treatment. In addition to altering specific aspects of cholesterol and sphingolipid metabolism, we found that 25OHC activates integrated stress response (ISR) genes and reprograms protein translation. Effects of 25OHC on ISR gene expression were independent of liver X receptors and sterol-response element-binding proteins and instead primarily resulted from activation of the GCN2/eIF2α/ATF4 branch of the ISR pathway. These studies reveal that 25OHC activates the integrated stress response, which may contribute to its antiviral activity. PMID:24189069

  12. Yap reprograms glutamine metabolism to increase nucleotide biosynthesis and enable liver growth.

    PubMed

    Cox, Andrew G; Hwang, Katie L; Brown, Kristin K; Evason, Kimberley J; Beltz, Sebastian; Tsomides, Allison; O'Connor, Keelin; Galli, Giorgio G; Yimlamai, Dean; Chhangawala, Sagar; Yuan, Min; Lien, Evan C; Wucherpfennig, Julia; Nissim, Sahar; Minami, Akihiro; Cohen, David E; Camargo, Fernando D; Asara, John M; Houvras, Yariv; Stainier, Didier Y R; Goessling, Wolfram

    2016-08-01

    The Hippo pathway is an important regulator of organ size and tumorigenesis. It is unclear, however, how Hippo signalling provides the cellular building blocks required for rapid growth. Here, we demonstrate that transgenic zebrafish expressing an activated form of the Hippo pathway effector Yap1 (also known as YAP) develop enlarged livers and are prone to liver tumour formation. Transcriptomic and metabolomic profiling identify that Yap1 reprograms glutamine metabolism. Yap1 directly enhances glutamine synthetase (glul) expression and activity, elevating steady-state levels of glutamine and enhancing the relative isotopic enrichment of nitrogen during de novo purine and pyrimidine biosynthesis. Genetic or pharmacological inhibition of GLUL diminishes the isotopic enrichment of nitrogen into nucleotides, suppressing hepatomegaly and the growth of liver cancer cells. Consequently, Yap-driven liver growth is susceptible to nucleotide inhibition. Together, our findings demonstrate that Yap1 integrates the anabolic demands of tissue growth during development and tumorigenesis by reprogramming nitrogen metabolism to stimulate nucleotide biosynthesis. PMID:27428308

  13. Sustained Reprogramming of the Estrogen Response After Chronic Exposure to Endocrine Disruptors

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Andrea R.; Mo, Xiaokui; Shapiro, Ali; Wernke, Karen E.; Archer, Trevor K.

    2015-01-01

    The pervasive nature of estrogenic industrial and dietary compounds is a growing health concern linked to cancer, obesity, and neurological disorders. Prior analyses of endocrine disruptor action have focused primarily on the short-term consequences of exposure. However, these studies are unlikely to reflect the consequences of constant exposures common to industrialized countries. Here we examined the global effects of long-term endocrine disruption on gene transcription and estrogen signaling. Estrogen-dependent breast cancer cell lines were chronically treated with physiologically relevant levels of bisphenol A or genistein for more than 70 passages. Microarray analysis demonstrated global reprogramming of the transcriptome when compared with a similarly cultured control cell line. Estrogen-responsive targets showed diminished expression in both the presence and absence of estrogen. Estrogen receptor recruitment, H3K4 monomethylation, and deoxyribonuclease accessibility were reduced at nearby response elements. Based on these observations, we investigated the potential of long-term endocrine disruptor exposure to initiate persistent transcriptional reprogramming. Culture of chronically exposed cell lines in the absence of the endocrine disruptors did not reverse many of the signaling defects that accumulated during treatment. Taken together, these data demonstrate that chronic exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds can permanently alter physiological hormone signaling. PMID:25594248

  14. Early reprogramming regulators identified by prospective isolation and mass cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Lujan, Ernesto; Zunder, Eli R.; Ng, Yi Han; Goronzy, Isabel N.; Nolan, Garry P.; Wernig, Marius

    2015-01-01

    In the context of most induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell reprogramming methods, heterogeneous populations of nonproductive and staggered productive intermediates arise at different reprogramming time points1–11. Despite recent reports claiming substantially increased reprogramming efficiencies using genetically modified donor cells12,13 prospectively isolating distinct reprogramming intermediates remains an important goal to decipher reprogramming mechanisms. Previous attempts to identify surface markers of intermediate cell populations were based on the assumption that during reprogramming cells progressively lose donor cell identity and gradually acquire iPS cell properties1,2,7,8,10. Here, we report that iPS cell and epithelial markers, such as SSEA1 and EpCAM, respectively, are not predictive of reprogramming during early phases. Instead, in a systematic functional surface marker screen we find that early reprogramming-prone cells express a unique set of surface markers, including CD73, CD49d and CD200 that are absent in fibroblasts and iPS cells. Single cell mass cytometry and prospective isolation show that these distinct intermediates are transient and bridge the gap between donor cell silencing and pluripotency marker acquisition during the early, presumably stochastic reprogramming phase2. Expression profiling revealed early upregulation of the transcriptional regulators Nr0b1 and Etv5 in this reprogramming state, preceding activation of key pluripotency regulators such as Rex1, Dppa2, Nanog and Sox2. Both factors are required for the generation of the early intermediate state and fully reprogrammed iPS cells, and thus mark some of the earliest known regulators of iPS cell induction. Our study deconvolutes the first steps in a hierarchical series of events that lead to pluripotency acquisition. PMID:25830878

  15. Chromatin-modifying enzymes as modulators of reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Onder, Tamer T; Kara, Nergis; Cherry, Anne; Sinha, Amit U; Zhu, Nan; Bernt, Kathrin M; Cahan, Patrick; Marcarci, B Ogan; Unternaehrer, Juli; Gupta, Piyush B; Lander, Eric S; Armstrong, Scott A; Daley, George Q

    2012-03-29

    Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by somatic cell reprogramming involves global epigenetic remodelling. Whereas several proteins are known to regulate chromatin marks associated with the distinct epigenetic states of cells before and after reprogramming, the role of specific chromatin-modifying enzymes in reprogramming remains to be determined. To address how chromatin-modifying proteins influence reprogramming, we used short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) to target genes in DNA and histone methylation pathways, and identified positive and negative modulators of iPSC generation. Whereas inhibition of the core components of the polycomb repressive complex 1 and 2, including the histone 3 lysine 27 methyltransferase EZH2, reduced reprogramming efficiency, suppression of SUV39H1, YY1 and DOT1L enhanced reprogramming. Specifically, inhibition of the H3K79 histone methyltransferase DOT1L by shRNA or a small molecule accelerated reprogramming, significantly increased the yield of iPSC colonies, and substituted for KLF4 and c-Myc (also known as MYC). Inhibition of DOT1L early in the reprogramming process is associated with a marked increase in two alternative factors, NANOG and LIN28, which play essential functional roles in the enhancement of reprogramming. Genome-wide analysis of H3K79me2 distribution revealed that fibroblast-specific genes associated with the epithelial to mesenchymal transition lose H3K79me2 in the initial phases of reprogramming. DOT1L inhibition facilitates the loss of this mark from genes that are fated to be repressed in the pluripotent state. These findings implicate specific chromatin-modifying enzymes as barriers to or facilitators of reprogramming, and demonstrate how modulation of chromatin-modifying enzymes can be exploited to more efficiently generate iPSCs with fewer exogenous transcription factors. PMID:22388813

  16. Identification of Oct4-activating compounds that enhance reprogramming efficiency.

    PubMed

    Li, Wendong; Tian, E; Chen, Zhao-Xia; Sun, Guoqiang; Ye, Peng; Yang, Su; Lu, Dave; Xie, Jun; Ho, Thach-Vu; Tsark, Walter M; Wang, Charles; Horne, David A; Riggs, Arthur D; Yip, M L Richard; Shi, Yanhong

    2012-12-18

    One of the hurdles for practical application of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) is the low efficiency and slow process of reprogramming. Octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct4) has been shown to be an essential regulator of embryonic stem cell (ESC) pluripotency and key to the reprogramming process. To identify small molecules that enhance reprogramming efficiency, we performed a cell-based high-throughput screening of chemical libraries. One of the compounds, termed Oct4-activating compound 1 (OAC1), was found to activate both Oct4 and Nanog promoter-driven luciferase reporter genes. Furthermore, when added to the reprogramming mixture along with the quartet reprogramming factors (Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc, and Klf4), OAC1 enhanced the iPSC reprogramming efficiency and accelerated the reprogramming process. Two structural analogs of OAC1 also activated Oct4 and Nanog promoters and enhanced iPSC formation. The iPSC colonies derived using the Oct4-activating compounds along with the quartet factors exhibited typical ESC morphology, gene-expression pattern, and developmental potential. OAC1 seems to enhance reprogramming efficiency in a unique manner, independent of either inhibition of the p53-p21 pathway or activation of the Wnt-β-catenin signaling. OAC1 increases transcription of the Oct4-Nanog-Sox2 triad and Tet1, a gene known to be involved in DNA demethylation. PMID:23213213

  17. Aberrant DNA methylation reprogramming in bovine SCNT preimplantation embryos

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng; Chen, Xin; Wang, Fang; An, Xinglan; Tang, Bo; Zhang, Xueming; Sun, Liguang; Li, Ziyi

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation reprogramming plays important roles in mammalian embryogenesis. Mammalian somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos with reprogramming defects fail to develop. Thus, we compared DNA methylation reprogramming in preimplantation embryos from bovine SCNT and in vitro fertilization (IVF) and analyzed the influence of vitamin C (VC) on the reprogramming of DNA methylation. The results showed that global DNA methylation followed a typical pattern of demethylation and remethylation in IVF preimplantation embryos; however, the global genome remained hypermethylated in SCNT preimplantation embryos. Compared with the IVF group, locus DNA methylation reprogramming showed three patterns in the SCNT group. First, some pluripotency genes (POU5F1 and NANOG) and repeated elements (satellite I and α-satellite) showed insufficient demethylation and hypermethylation in the SCNT group. Second, a differentially methylated region (DMR) of an imprint control region (ICR) in H19 exhibited excessive demethylation and hypomethylation. Third, some pluripotency genes (CDX2 and SOX2) were hypomethylated in both the IVF and SCNT groups. Additionally, VC improved the DNA methylation reprogramming of satellite I, α-satellite and H19 but not that of POU5F1 and NANOG in SCNT preimplantation embryos. These results indicate that DNA methylation reprogramming was aberrant and that VC influenced DNA methylation reprogramming in SCNT embryos in a locus-specific manner. PMID:27456302

  18. Combining small molecules for cell reprogramming through an interatomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Feltes, Bruno César; Bonatto, Diego

    2013-11-01

    The knowledge available about the application and generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) has grown since their discovery, and new techniques to enhance the reprogramming process have been described. Among the new approaches to induce iPSC that have gained great attention is the use of small molecules for reprogramming. The application of small molecules, unlike genetic manipulation, provides for control of the reprogramming process through the shifting of concentrations and the combination of different molecules. However, different researchers have reported the use of "reprogramming cocktails" with variable results and drug combinations. Thus, the proper combination of small molecules for successful and enhanced reprogramming is a matter for discussion. However, testing all potential drug combinations in different cell lineages is very costly and time-consuming. Therefore, in this article, we discuss the use of already employed molecules for iPSC generation, followed by the application of systems chemo-biology tools to create different data sets of protein-protein (PPI) and chemical-protein (CPI) interaction networks based on the knowledge of already used and new reprogramming cocktail combinations. We further analyzed the biological processes associated with PPI-CPI networks and provided new potential protein targets to be inhibited or expressed for stem cell reprogramming. In addition, we applied a new interference analysis to prospective targets that could negatively affect the classical pluripotency-associated factors (SOX2, NANOG, KLF4 and OCT4) and thus potentially improve reprogramming protocols. PMID:24056910

  19. Looping around Reprogramming: The Topological Memory of Induced Pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Kevin Andrew Uy; Ng, Huck-Hui

    2016-05-01

    Genome architecture is associated with cellular identity, but how this organization changes during reprogramming is not well understood. Now in Cell Stem Cell, Krijger et al. (2016) and Beagan et al. (2016) report 3D chromatin interaction maps before and after reprogramming, providing evidence for topological memory in induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:27152435

  20. Sir John Gurdon: father of nuclear reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Blau, Helen M

    2014-07-01

    Sir John Gurdon founded the field of nuclear reprogramming. His work set the stage for the ever burgeoning area of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. Here I provide personal reflections on times I shared with John Gurdon and professional reflections of the impact of his ground-breaking research on my own development as a scientist and on the field in general. His paradigm-shifting experiments will continue to provoke scientists to think outside the box for many years to come. PMID:24954777

  1. Sir John Gurdon: Father of nuclear reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Blau, Helen M.

    2015-01-01

    Sir John Gurdon founded the field of nuclear reprogramming. His work set the stage for the ever burgeoning area of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. Here I provide personal reflections on times I shared with John Gurdon and professional reflections of the impact of his ground-breaking research on my own development as a scientist and on the field in general. His paradigm-shifting experiments will continue to provoke scientists to think outside the box for many years to come. PMID:24954777

  2. Changes in Parthenogenetic Imprinting Patterns during Reprogramming by Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyun Sik; Hong, Yean Ju; Choi, Hyun Woo; Song, Hyuk; Byun, Sung June; Uhm, Sang Jun; Seo, Han Geuk; Do, Jeong Tae

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated somatic cells can be reprogrammed into the pluripotent state by cell-cell fusion. In the pluripotent state, reprogrammed cells may then self-renew and differentiate into all three germ layers. Fusion-induced reprogramming also epigenetically modifies the somatic cell genome through DNA demethylation, X chromosome reactivation, and histone modification. In this study, we investigated whether fusion with embryonic stem cells (ESCs) also reprograms genomic imprinting patterns in somatic cells. In particular, we examined imprinting changes in parthenogenetic neural stem cells fused with biparental ESCs, as well as in biparental neural stem cells fused with parthenogenetic ESCs. The resulting hybrid cells expressed the pluripotency markers Oct4 and Nanog. In addition, methylation of several imprinted genes except Peg3 was comparable between hybrid cells and ESCs. This finding indicates that reprogramming by cell fusion does not necessarily reverse the status of all imprinted genes to the state of pluripotent fusion partner. PMID:27232503

  3. Molecular barriers to processes of genetic reprogramming and cell transformation.

    PubMed

    Chestkov, I V; Khomyakova, E A; Vasilieva, E A; Lagarkova, M A; Kiselev, S L

    2014-12-01

    Genetic reprogramming by ectopic expression of transcription factor genes induces the pluripotent state in somatic cells. This technology provides an opportunity to establish pluripotent stem cells for each person, as well as to get better understanding of epigenetic mechanisms controlling cell state. Interestingly, some of the molecular processes that accompany somatic cell reprogramming in vitro are also characteristic for tumor manifestation. Thus, similar "molecular barriers" that control the stability of epigenetic state exist for both processes of pluripotency induction and malignant transformation. The reprogramming of tumor cells is interesting in two aspects: first, it will determine the contribution of epigenetic changes in carcinogenesis; second, it gives an approach to evaluate tumor stem cells that are supposed to form the entire cell mass of the tumor. This review discusses the key stages of genetic reprogramming, the similarity and difference between the reprogramming process and malignant transformation. PMID:25716723

  4. Transgenerational Epigenetic Programming of the Embryonic Testis Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Anway, Matthew D.; Rekow, Stephen S.; Skinner, Michael K.

    2008-01-01

    Embryonic exposure to the endocrine disruptor vinclozolin during gonadal sex determination appears to promote an epigenetic reprogramming of the male germ-line that is associated with transgenerational adult onset disease states. Transgenerational effects on the embryonic day 16 (E16) testis demonstrated reproducible changes in the testis transcriptome for multiple generations (F1-F3). The expression of 196 genes were found to be influenced, with the majority of gene expression being decreased or silenced. Dramatic changes in the gene expression of methyltransferases during gonadal sex determination were observed in the F1 and F2 vinclozolin generation (E16) embryonic testis, but the majority returned to control generation levels by the F3 generation. The most dramatic effects were on the germ-line associated Dnmt3A and Dnmt3L isoforms. Observations demonstrate that an embryonic exposure to vinclozolin appears to promote an epigenetic reprogramming of the male germ-line that correlates with transgenerational alterations in the testis transcriptome in subsequent generations. PMID:18042343

  5. Metabolic reprogramming: a hallmark of viral oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lévy, P; Bartosch, B

    2016-08-11

    More than 1 in 10 cases of cancer in the world are due to chronic viral infections. Viruses induce oncogenesis by targeting the same pathways known to be responsible for neoplasia in tumor cells, such as control of cell cycle progression, cell migration, proliferation and evasion from cell death and the host's immune defense. In addition, metabolic reprogramming has been identified over a century ago as a requirement for growth of transformed cells. Renewed interest in this topic has emerged recently with the discovery that basically all metabolic changes in tumor cells are finely orchestrated by oncogenes and tumor suppressors. Indeed, cancer cells activate biosynthetic pathways in order to provide them with sufficient levels of energy and building blocks to proliferate. Interestingly, viruses introduce into their host cells similar metabolic adaptations, and importantly, it seems that they depend on these changes for their persistence and amplification. The central carbon metabolism, for example, is not only frequently altered in tumor cells but also modulated by human papillomavirus, hepatitis B and C viruses, Epstein-Barr virus and Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated virus. Moreover, adenoviruses (Ad) and human cytomegalovirus, which are not directly oncogenic but present oncomodulatory properties, also divert cellular metabolism in a tumor cell-like mnner. Thus, metabolic reprogramming appears to be a hallmark of viral infection and provides an interesting therapeutic target, in particular, for oncogenic viruses. Therapeutic targeting of metabolic pathways may not only allow to eliminate or control the viral infection but also to prevent virus-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:26686092

  6. Forward engineering neuronal diversity using direct reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Tsunemoto, Rachel K; Eade, Kevin T; Blanchard, Joel W; Baldwin, Kristin K

    2015-06-01

    The nervous system is comprised of a vast diversity of distinct neural cell types. Differences between neuronal subtypes drive the assembly of neuronal circuits and underlie the subtype specificity of many neurological diseases. Yet, because neurons are irreversibly post-mitotic and not readily available from patients, it has not been feasible to study specific subtypes of human neurons in larger numbers. A powerful means to study neuronal diversity and neurological disease is to establish methods to produce desired neuronal subtypes in vitro. Traditionally this has been accomplished by treating pluripotent or neural stem cells with growth factors and morphogens that recapitulate exogenous developmental signals. These approaches often require extended periods of culture, which can limit their utility. However, more recently, it has become possible to produce neurons directly from fibroblasts using transcription factors and/or microRNAs. This technique referred to as direct reprogramming or transdifferentiation has proven to be a rapid, robust, and reproducible method to generate mature neurons of many different subtypes from multiple cell sources. Here, we highlight recent advances in generating neurons of specific subtypes using direct reprogramming and outline various scenarios in which induced neurons may be applied to studies of neuronal function and neurological disease. PMID:25908841

  7. Direct Cardiac Reprogramming: Advances in Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Olivia; Qian, Li

    2015-01-01

    Heart disease is one of the lead causes of death worldwide. Many forms of heart disease, including myocardial infarction and pressure-loading cardiomyopathies, result in irreversible cardiomyocyte death. Activated fibroblasts respond to cardiac injury by forming scar tissue, but ultimately this response fails to restore cardiac function. Unfortunately, the human heart has little regenerative ability and long-term outcomes following acute coronary events often include chronic and end-stage heart failure. Building upon years of research aimed at restoring functional cardiomyocytes, recent advances have been made in the direct reprogramming of fibroblasts toward a cardiomyocyte cell fate both in vitro and in vivo. Several experiments show functional improvements in mouse models of myocardial infarction following in situ generation of cardiomyocyte-like cells from endogenous fibroblasts. Though many of these studies are in an early stage, this nascent technology holds promise for future applications in regenerative medicine. In this review, we discuss the history, progress, methods, challenges, and future directions of direct cardiac reprogramming. PMID:26176012

  8. Exploiting the hypoxia sensitive non-coding genome for organ-specific physiologic reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Bischof, Corinne; Krishnan, Jaya

    2016-07-01

    In this review we highlight the role of non-coding RNAs in the development and progression of cardiac pathology and explore the possibility of disease-associated RNAs serving as targets for cardiac-directed therapeutics. Contextually, we focus on the role of stress-induced hypoxia as a driver of disease development and progression through activation of hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) and explore mechanisms underlying HIFα function as an enforcer of cardiac pathology through direct transcriptional coupling with the non-coding transcriptome. In the interest of clarity, we will confine our analysis to cardiac pathology and focus on three defining features of the diseased state, namely metabolic, growth and functional reprogramming. It is the aim of this review to explore possible mechanisms through which HIF1α regulation of the non-coding transcriptome connects to spatiotemporal control of gene expression to drive establishment of the diseased state, and to propose strategies for the exploitation of these unique RNAs as targets for clinical therapy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel. PMID:26851074

  9. Reconstructed Metabolic Network Models Predict Flux-Level Metabolic Reprogramming in Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Özcan, Emrah; Çakır, Tunahan

    2016-01-01

    Developments in genome scale metabolic modeling techniques and omics technologies have enabled the reconstruction of context-specific metabolic models. In this study, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), one of the most common and aggressive malignant brain tumors, is investigated by mapping GBM gene expression data on the growth-implemented brain specific genome-scale metabolic network, and GBM-specific models are generated. The models are used to calculate metabolic flux distributions in the tumor cells. Metabolic phenotypes predicted by the GBM-specific metabolic models reconstructed in this work reflect the general metabolic reprogramming of GBM, reported both in in-vitro and in-vivo experiments. The computed flux profiles quantitatively predict that major sources of the acetyl-CoA and oxaloacetic acid pool used in TCA cycle are pyruvate dehydrogenase from glycolysis and anaplerotic flux from glutaminolysis, respectively. Also, our results, in accordance with recent studies, predict a contribution of oxidative phosphorylation to ATP pool via a slightly active TCA cycle in addition to the major contributor aerobic glycolysis. We verified our results by using different computational methods that incorporate transcriptome data with genome-scale models and by using different transcriptome datasets. Correct predictions of flux distributions in glycolysis, glutaminolysis, TCA cycle and lipid precursor metabolism validate the reconstructed models for further use in future to simulate more specific metabolic patterns for GBM. PMID:27147948

  10. Reconstructed Metabolic Network Models Predict Flux-Level Metabolic Reprogramming in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, Emrah; Çakır, Tunahan

    2016-01-01

    Developments in genome scale metabolic modeling techniques and omics technologies have enabled the reconstruction of context-specific metabolic models. In this study, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), one of the most common and aggressive malignant brain tumors, is investigated by mapping GBM gene expression data on the growth-implemented brain specific genome-scale metabolic network, and GBM-specific models are generated. The models are used to calculate metabolic flux distributions in the tumor cells. Metabolic phenotypes predicted by the GBM-specific metabolic models reconstructed in this work reflect the general metabolic reprogramming of GBM, reported both in in-vitro and in-vivo experiments. The computed flux profiles quantitatively predict that major sources of the acetyl-CoA and oxaloacetic acid pool used in TCA cycle are pyruvate dehydrogenase from glycolysis and anaplerotic flux from glutaminolysis, respectively. Also, our results, in accordance with recent studies, predict a contribution of oxidative phosphorylation to ATP pool via a slightly active TCA cycle in addition to the major contributor aerobic glycolysis. We verified our results by using different computational methods that incorporate transcriptome data with genome-scale models and by using different transcriptome datasets. Correct predictions of flux distributions in glycolysis, glutaminolysis, TCA cycle and lipid precursor metabolism validate the reconstructed models for further use in future to simulate more specific metabolic patterns for GBM. PMID:27147948

  11. Dynamic Transcriptome Landscape of Maize Embryo and Endosperm Development1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Zeng, Biao; Zhang, Mei; Xie, Shaojun; Wang, Gaokui; Hauck, Andrew; Lai, Jinsheng

    2014-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays) is an excellent cereal model for research on seed development because of its relatively large size for both embryo and endosperm. Despite the importance of seed in agriculture, the genome-wide transcriptome pattern throughout seed development has not been well characterized. Using high-throughput RNA sequencing, we developed a spatiotemporal transcriptome atlas of B73 maize seed development based on 53 samples from fertilization to maturity for embryo, endosperm, and whole seed tissues. A total of 26,105 genes were found to be involved in programming seed development, including 1,614 transcription factors. Global comparisons of gene expression highlighted the fundamental transcriptomic reprogramming and the phases of development. Coexpression analysis provided further insight into the dynamic reprogramming of the transcriptome by revealing functional transitions during maturation. Combined with the published nonseed high-throughput RNA sequencing data, we identified 91 transcription factors and 1,167 other seed-specific genes, which should help elucidate key mechanisms and regulatory networks that underlie seed development. In addition, correlation of gene expression with the pattern of DNA methylation revealed that hypomethylation of the gene body region should be an important factor for the expressional activation of seed-specific genes, especially for extremely highly expressed genes such as zeins. This study provides a valuable resource for understanding the genetic control of seed development of monocotyledon plants. PMID:25037214

  12. Comparison of American mink embryonic stem and induced pluripotent stem cell transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Recently fibroblasts of many mammalian species have been reprogrammed to pluripotent state using overexpression of several transcription factors. This technology allows production of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells with properties similar to embryonic stem (ES) cells. The completeness of reprogramming process is well studied in such species as mouse and human but there is not enough data on other species. We produced American mink (Neovison vison) ES and iPS cells and compared these cells using transcriptome analysis. Results We report the generation of 10 mink ES and 22 iPS cell lines. The majority of the analyzed cell lines had normal diploid chromosome number. The only ES cell line with XX chromosome set had both X-chromosomes in active state that is characteristic of pluripotent cells. The pluripotency of ES and iPS cell lines was confirmed by formation of teratomas with cell types representing all three germ layers. Transcriptome analysis of mink embryonic fibroblasts (EF), two ES and two iPS cell lines allowed us to identify 11831 assembled contigs which were annotated. These led to a number of 6891 unique genes. Of these 3201 were differentially expressed between mink EF and ES cells. We analyzed expression levels of these genes in iPS cell lines. This allowed us to show that 80% of genes were correctly reprogrammed in iPS cells, whereas approximately 6% had an intermediate expression pattern, about 7% were not reprogrammed and about 5% had a "novel" expression pattern. We observed expression of pluripotency marker genes such as Oct4, Sox2 and Rex1 in ES and iPS cell lines with notable exception of Nanog. Conclusions We had produced and characterized American mink ES and iPS cells. These cells were pluripotent by a number of criteria and iPS cells exhibited effective reprogramming. Interestingly, we had showed lack of Nanog expression and consider it as a species-specific feature. PMID:26694224

  13. T. cacao Transcriptome Sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To compliment the T. cacao genome sequencing initiative and to build a reference set of expressed genes for functional studies, a broad and state-of-the-art approach to transcriptome sequencing is underway. Using newly optimized methods, transcriptome sequencing libraries were prepared from RNA of o...

  14. Direct neuronal reprogramming: learning from and for development.

    PubMed

    Masserdotti, Giacomo; Gascón, Sergio; Götz, Magdalena

    2016-07-15

    The key signalling pathways and transcriptional programmes that instruct neuronal diversity during development have largely been identified. In this Review, we discuss how this knowledge has been used to successfully reprogramme various cell types into an amazing array of distinct types of functional neurons. We further discuss the extent to which direct neuronal reprogramming recapitulates embryonic development, and examine the particular barriers to reprogramming that may exist given a cell's unique developmental history. We conclude with a recently proposed model for cell specification called the 'Cook Islands' model, and consider whether it is a fitting model for cell specification based on recent results from the direct reprogramming field. PMID:27436039

  15. Metabolic reprogramming, caloric restriction and aging

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Rozalyn M.; Weindruch, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) without malnutrition slows the aging process and extends lifespan in diverse species by unknown mechanisms. The inverse linear relationship between calorie intake and lifespan suggests that regulators of energy metabolism are important in CR’s actions. Studies in several species reveal tissue-specific changes in energy metabolism with CR and suggest that metabolic reprogramming plays a critical role in its mechanism of aging retardation. We herein describe common signatures of CR and suggest how they may slow aging. We discuss recent advances in understanding the function of key metabolic regulators that likely coordinate the response to altered nutrient availability with CR, and how the pathways they regulate may retard the aging process. PMID:20004110

  16. Wound signaling of regenerative cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Lup, Samuel Daniel; Tian, Xin; Xu, Jian; Pérez-Pérez, José Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Plants are sessile organisms that must deal with various threats resulting in tissue damage, such as herbivore feeding, and physical wounding by wind, snow or crushing by animals. During wound healing, phytohormone crosstalk orchestrates cellular regeneration through the establishment of tissue-specific asymmetries. In turn, hormone-regulated transcription factors and their downstream targets coordinate cellular responses, including dedifferentiation, cell cycle reactivation and vascular regeneration. By comparing different examples of wound-induced tissue regeneration in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, a number of key regulators of developmental plasticity of plant cells have been identified. We present the relevance of these findings and of the dynamic establishment of differential auxin gradients for cell reprogramming after wounding. PMID:27457994

  17. Spin glass model for dynamics of cell reprogramming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusuluri, Sai Teja; Lang, Alex H.; Mehta, Pankaj; Castillo, Horacio E.

    2015-03-01

    Recent experiments show that differentiated cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent stem cells. The possible cell fates can be modeled as attractors in a dynamical system, the ``epigenetic landscape.'' Both cellular differentiation and reprogramming can be described in the landscape picture as motion from one attractor to another attractor. We perform Monte Carlo simulations in a simple model of the landscape. This model is based on spin glass theory and it can be used to construct a simulated epigenetic landscape starting from the experimental genomic data. We re-analyse data from several cell reprogramming experiments and compare with our simulation results. We find that the model can reproduce some of the main features of the dynamics of cell reprogramming.

  18. In Vivo Reprogramming for Brain and Spinal Cord Repair.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gong; Wernig, Marius; Berninger, Benedikt; Nakafuku, Masato; Parmar, Malin; Zhang, Chun-Li

    2015-01-01

    Cell reprogramming technologies have enabled the generation of various specific cell types including neurons from readily accessible patient cells, such as skin fibroblasts, providing an intriguing novel cell source for autologous cell transplantation. However, cell transplantation faces several difficult hurdles such as cell production and purification, long-term survival, and functional integration after transplantation. Recently, in vivo reprogramming, which makes use of endogenous cells for regeneration purpose, emerged as a new approach to circumvent cell transplantation. There has been evidence for in vivo reprogramming in the mouse pancreas, heart, and brain and spinal cord with various degrees of success. This mini review summarizes the latest developments presented in the first symposium on in vivo reprogramming glial cells into functional neurons in the brain and spinal cord, held at the 2014 annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience in Washington, DC. PMID:26730402

  19. A Cell Electrofusion Chip for Somatic Cells Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Zeng, Yuxiao; Yang, Jun; Xu, Haiwei; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2015-01-01

    Cell fusion is a potent approach to explore the mechanisms of somatic cells reprogramming. However, previous fusion methods, such as polyethylene glycol (PEG) mediated cell fusion, are often limited by poor fusion yields. In this study, we developed a simplified cell electrofusion chip, which was based on a micro-cavity/ discrete microelectrode structure to improve the fusion efficiency and to reduce multi-cell electrofusion. Using this chip, we could efficiently fuse NIH3T3 cells and mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) to induce somatic cells reprogramming. We also found that fused cells demethylated gradually and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) was involved in the demethylation during the reprogramming. Thus, the cell electrofusion chip would facilitate reprogramming mechanisms research by improving efficiency of cell fusion and reducing workloads. PMID:26177036

  20. Anti-Aging Strategies Based on Cellular Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Ocampo, Alejandro; Reddy, Pradeep; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Aging can be defined as the progressive decline in the ability of a cell or organism to resist stress and disease. Recent advances in cellular reprogramming technologies have enabled detailed analyses of the aging process, often involving cell types derived from aged individuals, or patients with premature aging syndromes. In this review we discuss how cellular reprogramming allows the recapitulation of aging in a dish, describing novel experimental approaches to investigate the aging process. Finally, we explore the role of epigenetic dysregulation as a driver of aging, discussing how epigenetic reprogramming may be harnessed to ameliorate aging hallmarks, both in vitro and in vivo. A better understanding of the reprogramming process may indeed assist the development of novel therapeutic strategies to extend a healthy lifespan. PMID:27426043

  1. Genetic background affects susceptibility to tumoral stem cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    García-Ramírez, Idoia; Ruiz-Roca, Lucía; Martín-Lorenzo, Alberto; Blanco, Óscar; García-Cenador, María Begoña; García-Criado, Francisco Javier; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2013-01-01

    The latest studies of the interactions between oncogenes and its target cell have shown that certain oncogenes may act as passengers to reprogram tissue-specific stem/progenitor cell into a malignant cancer stem cell state. In this study, we show that the genetic background influences this tumoral stem cell reprogramming capacity of the oncogenes using as a model the Sca1-BCRABLp210 mice, where the type of tumor they develop, chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), is a function of tumoral stem cell reprogramming. Sca1-BCRABLp210 mice containing FVB genetic components were significantly more resistant to CML. However, pure Sca1-BCRABLp210 FVB mice developed thymomas that were not seen in the Sca1-BCRABLp210 mice into the B6 background. Collectively, our results demonstrate for the first time that tumoral stem cell reprogramming fate is subject to polymorphic genetic control. PMID:23839033

  2. Signaling involved in stem cell reprogramming and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Shihori

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell differentiation is regulated by multiple signaling events. Recent technical advances have revealed that differentiated cells can be reprogrammed into stem cells. The signals involved in stem cell programming are of major interest in stem cell research. The signaling mechanisms involved in regulating stem cell reprogramming and differentiation are the subject of intense study in the field of life sciences. In this review, the molecular interactions and signaling pathways related to stem cell differentiation are discussed. PMID:26328015

  3. Conversion of genomic imprinting by reprogramming and redifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Choi, Hyun Woo; Jang, Hyo Jin; Chung, Hyung Min; Arauzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Schöler, Hans R; Do, Jeong Tae

    2013-06-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), generated from somatic cells by overexpression of transcription factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc have the same characteristics as pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs). iPSCs reprogrammed from differentiated cells undergo epigenetic modification during reprogramming, and ultimately acquire a similar epigenetic state to that of ESCs. In this study, these epigenetic changes were observed in reprogramming of uniparental parthenogenetic somatic cells. The parthenogenetic pattern of imprinted genes changes during the generation of parthenogenetic maternal iPSCs (miPSCs), a process referred to as pluripotent reprogramming. We determined whether altered imprinted genes are maintained or revert to the parthenogenetic state when the reprogrammed cells are redifferentiated into specialized cell types. To address this question, we redifferentiated miPSCs into neural stem cells (miPS-NSCs) and compared them with biparental female NSCs (fNSCs) and parthenogenetic NSCs (pNSCs). We found that pluripotent reprogramming of parthenogenetic somatic cells could reset parthenogenetic DNA methylation patterns in imprinted genes, and that alterations in DNA methylation were maintained even after miPSCs were redifferentiated into miPS-NSCs. Notably, maternally methylated imprinted genes (Peg1, Peg3, Igf2r, Snrpn and Ndn), whose differentially methylated regions were fully methylated in pNSCs, were demethylated and their expression levels were found to be close to the levels in normal biparental fNSCs after reprogramming and redifferentiation. Our findings suggest that pluripotent reprogramming of parthenogenetic somatic cells followed by redifferentiation leads to changes in DNA methylation of imprinted genes and the reestablishment of gene expression levels to those of normal biparental cells. PMID:23525019

  4. Advances in Reprogramming-Based Study of Neurologic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Kristin K.

    2015-01-01

    The technology to convert adult human non-neural cells into neural lineages, through induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), somatic cell nuclear transfer, and direct lineage reprogramming or transdifferentiation has progressed tremendously in recent years. Reprogramming-based approaches aimed at manipulating cellular identity have enormous potential for disease modeling, high-throughput drug screening, cell therapy, and personalized medicine. Human iPSC (hiPSC)-based cellular disease models have provided proof of principle evidence of the validity of this system. However, several challenges remain before patient-specific neurons produced by reprogramming can provide reliable insights into disease mechanisms or be efficiently applied to drug discovery and transplantation therapy. This review will first discuss limitations of currently available reprogramming-based methods in faithfully and reproducibly recapitulating disease pathology. Specifically, we will address issues such as culture heterogeneity, interline and inter-individual variability, and limitations of two-dimensional differentiation paradigms. Second, we will assess recent progress and the future prospects of reprogramming-based neurologic disease modeling. This includes three-dimensional disease modeling, advances in reprogramming technology, prescreening of hiPSCs and creating isogenic disease models using gene editing. PMID:25749371

  5. Reprogramming of Xist against the pluripotent state in fusion hybrids.

    PubMed

    Do, Jeong Tae; Han, Dong Wook; Gentile, Luca; Sobek-Klocke, Ingeborg; Wutz, Anton; Schöler, Hans R

    2009-11-15

    The fusion of somatic cells with pluripotent cells results in the generation of pluripotent hybrid cells. Because the ;memory' of somatic cells seems to be erased during fusion-induced reprogramming, genetic reprogramming is thought to be a largely unidirectional process. Here we show that fusion-induced reprogramming, which brings about the formation of pluripotent hybrids, does not always follow a unidirectional route. Xist is a unique gene in that it is reprogrammed to the state of somatic cells in fusion-induced pluripotent hybrids. In hybrids formed from the cell fusion of embryonal carcinoma cells (ECCs) with male neural stem cells (mNSCs), the Xist gene was found to be reprogrammed to the somatic cell state, whereas the pluripotency-related and tissue-specific marker genes were reprogrammed to the pluripotent cell state. Specifically, Xist is not expressed in hybrids, because the ;memory' of the somatic cell has been retained (i.e. mNSCs do not exhibit Xist expression) and that of the pluripotent cell erased (i.e. inactivation of the partially active Xist gene of ECCs, complete methylation of the Xist region). The latter phenomenon is induced by male, but not by female, NSCs. PMID:19843582

  6. Susceptibility of pancreatic cancer stem cells to reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Kozo; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Konno, Masamitsu; Kawamoto, Koichi; Nishida, Naohiro; Koseki, Jun; Wada, Hiroshi; Marubashi, Shigeru; Nagano, Hiroaki; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Ishii, Hideshi

    2015-01-01

    Previous reports have indicated that reprogramming technologies may be useful for altering the malignant phenotype of cancer cells. Although somatic stem cells in normal tissues are more sensitive to reprogramming induction than differentiated cells, it remains to be elucidated whether any specific subpopulations are sensitive to reprogramming in heterogeneous tumor tissues. Here we examined the susceptibility of pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSC) and non-CSC to reprogramming. To characterize CSC populations, we focused on c-Met signaling, which has been identified as a marker of CSC in mouse experiments in vivo. Cells that expressed high levels of c-Met showed higher CSC properties, such as tumor-initiating capacity, and resistance to gemcitabine. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in cells expressing high levels of c-Met revealed endogenous expression of reprogramming factors, such as OCT3/4, SOX2, KLF4 and cMYC. Introduction of these four factors resulted in higher alkaline phosphatase staining in cells with high c-Met expression than in controls. Therefore, the study results demonstrate that cellular reprogramming may be useful for extensive epigenetic modification of malignant features of pancreatic CSC. PMID:26298849

  7. Transient Expression of WNT2 Promotes Somatic Cell Reprogramming by Inducing β-Catenin Nuclear Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Mizuki; Nakajima-Koyama, May; Lee, Joonseong; Nishida, Eisuke

    2016-06-14

    Treatment with several Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway regulators can change the cellular reprogramming efficiency; however, the dynamics and role of endogenous Wnt/β-catenin signaling in reprogramming remain largely unanswered. Here we identify the upregulation of WNT2 and subsequent β-catenin nuclear accumulation as key events in reprogramming. Transient nuclear accumulation of β-catenin occurs early in MEF reprogramming. Wnt2 is strongly expressed in the early stage of reprogramming. Wnt2 knockdown suppresses the nuclear accumulation of β-catenin and reduces the reprogramming efficiency. WNT2 overexpression promotes β-catenin nuclear accumulation and enhances the reprogramming efficiency. WNT2 contributes to the promotion of cell proliferation. Experiments with several drugs that control the Wnt pathway also indicate the importance of β-catenin nuclear accumulation in reprogramming. Our findings reveal the role of WNT2/β-catenin signaling in reprogramming. PMID:27211212

  8. Calcineurin-NFAT Signaling Controls Somatic Cell Reprogramming in a Stage-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming; Liao, Bing; Tao, Yu; Chen, Hao; Xiao, Feng; Gu, Junjie; Gao, Shaorong; Jin, Ying

    2016-05-01

    Calcineurin-NFAT signaling is critical for early lineage specification of mouse embryonic stem cells and early embryos. However, its roles in somatic cell reprogramming remain unknown. Here, we report that calcineurin-NFAT signaling has a dynamic activity and plays diverse roles at different stages of reprogramming. At the early stage, calcineurin-NFAT signaling is transiently activated and its activation is required for successful reprogramming. However, at the late stage of reprogramming, activation of calcineurin-NFAT signaling becomes a barrier for reprogramming and its inactivation is critical for successful induction of pluripotency. Mechanistically, calcineurin-NFAT signaling contributes to the reprogramming through regulating multiple early events during reprogramming, including mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET), cell adhesion and emergence of SSEA1(+) intermediate cells. Collectively, this study reveals for the first time the important roles of calcineurin-NFAT signaling during somatic cell reprogramming and provides new insights into the molecular regulation of reprogramming. PMID:26448199

  9. Integrating Phosphoproteome and Transcriptome Reveals New Determinants of Macrophage Multinucleation*

    PubMed Central

    Rotival, Maxime; Ko, Jeong-Hun; Srivastava, Prashant K.; Kerloc'h, Audrey; Montoya, Alex; Mauro, Claudio; Faull, Peter; Cutillas, Pedro R.; Petretto, Enrico; Behmoaras, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage multinucleation (MM) is essential for various biological processes such as osteoclast-mediated bone resorption and multinucleated giant cell-associated inflammatory reactions. Here we study the molecular pathways underlying multinucleation in the rat through an integrative approach combining MS-based quantitative phosphoproteomics (LC-MS/MS) and transcriptome (high-throughput RNA-sequencing) to identify new regulators of MM. We show that a strong metabolic shift toward HIF1-mediated glycolysis occurs at transcriptomic level during MM, together with modifications in phosphorylation of over 50 proteins including several ARF GTPase activators and polyphosphate inositol phosphatases. We use shortest-path analysis to link differential phosphorylation with the transcriptomic reprogramming of macrophages and identify LRRFIP1, SMARCA4, and DNMT1 as novel regulators of MM. We experimentally validate these predictions by showing that knock-down of these latter reduce macrophage multinucleation. These results provide a new framework for the combined analysis of transcriptional and post-translational changes during macrophage multinucleation, prioritizing essential genes, and revealing the sequential events leading to the multinucleation of macrophages. PMID:25532521

  10. Transcriptome 2002 Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Quackenbush, John

    2002-01-01

    The Transcriptome 2002 meeting was held March 11-13, 2002 in Seattle, Washington with attendance by more than 300 scientists representing the international community. The scientific program was developed by an international organizing committee. In association with the main meeting, an Image Consortium invitational meeting was organized by Charles Auffray of CNRS and held with approximately 40 participants immediately following the conclusion of the Transcriptome meeting.

  11. Reprogramming: A Preventive Strategy in Hypertension Focusing on the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Tain, You-Lin; Joles, Jaap A.

    2015-01-01

    Adulthood hypertension can be programmed in response to a suboptimal environment in early life. However, developmental plasticity also implies that one can prevent hypertension in adult life by administrating appropriate compounds during early development. We have termed this reprogramming. While the risk of hypertension has been assessed in many mother-child cohorts of human developmental programming, interventions necessary to prove causation and provide a reprogramming strategy are lacking. Since the developing kidney is particularly vulnerable to environmental insults and blood pressure is determined by kidney function, renal programming is considered key in developmental programming of hypertension. Common pathways, whereby both genetic and acquired developmental programming converge into the same phenotype, have been recognized. For instance, the same reprogramming interventions aimed at shifting nitric oxide (NO)-reactive oxygen species (ROS) balance, such as perinatal citrulline or melatonin supplements, can be protective in both genetic and developmentally programmed hypertension. Furthermore, a significantly increased expression of gene Ephx2 (soluble epoxide hydrolase) was noted in both genetic and acquired animal models of hypertension. Since a suboptimal environment is often multifactorial, such common reprogramming pathways are a practical finding for translation to the clinic. This review provides an overview of potential clinical applications of reprogramming strategies to prevent programmed hypertension. We emphasize the kidney in the following areas: mechanistic insights from human studies and animal models to interpret programmed hypertension; identified risk factors of human programmed hypertension from mother-child cohorts; and the impact of reprogramming strategies on programmed hypertension from animal models. It is critical that the observed effects on developmental reprogramming in animal models are replicated in human studies. PMID

  12. Cyclodextrin promotes atherosclerosis regression via macrophage reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Sebastian; Grebe, Alena; Bakke, Siril S.; Bode, Niklas; Halvorsen, Bente; Ulas, Thomas; Skjelland, Mona; De Nardo, Dominic; Labzin, Larisa I.; Kerksiek, Anja; Hempel, Chris; Heneka, Michael T.; Hawxhurst, Victoria; Fitzgerald, Michael L; Trebicka, Jonel; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Westerterp, Marit; Tall, Alan R.; Wright, Samuel D.; Espevik, Terje; Schultze, Joachim L.; Nickenig, Georg; Lütjohann, Dieter; Latz, Eicke

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease linked to elevated blood cholesterol levels. Despite ongoing advances in the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Continuous retention of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins in the subendothelial space causes a local overabundance of free cholesterol. Since cholesterol accumulation and deposition of cholesterol crystals (CCs) triggers a complex inflammatory response, we tested the efficacy of the cyclic oligosaccharide 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (CD), a compound that increases cholesterol solubility, in preventing and reversing atherosclerosis. Here we show that CD treatment of murine atherosclerosis reduced atherosclerotic plaque size and CC load, and promoted plaque regression even with a continued cholesterol-rich diet. Mechanistically, CD increased oxysterol production in both macrophages and human atherosclerotic plaques, and promoted liver X receptor (LXR)-mediated transcriptional reprogramming to improve cholesterol efflux and exert anti-inflammatory effects. In vivo, this CD-mediated LXR agonism was required for the anti-atherosclerotic and anti-inflammatory effects of CD as well as for augmented reverse cholesterol transport. Since CD treatment in humans is safe and CD beneficially affects key mechanisms of atherogenesis, it may therefore be used clinically to prevent or treat human atherosclerosis. PMID:27053774

  13. Cyclodextrin promotes atherosclerosis regression via macrophage reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Sebastian; Grebe, Alena; Bakke, Siril S; Bode, Niklas; Halvorsen, Bente; Ulas, Thomas; Skjelland, Mona; De Nardo, Dominic; Labzin, Larisa I; Kerksiek, Anja; Hempel, Chris; Heneka, Michael T; Hawxhurst, Victoria; Fitzgerald, Michael L; Trebicka, Jonel; Björkhem, Ingemar; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Westerterp, Marit; Tall, Alan R; Wright, Samuel D; Espevik, Terje; Schultze, Joachim L; Nickenig, Georg; Lütjohann, Dieter; Latz, Eicke

    2016-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease linked to elevated blood cholesterol concentrations. Despite ongoing advances in the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Continuous retention of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins in the subendothelial space causes a local overabundance of free cholesterol. Because cholesterol accumulation and deposition of cholesterol crystals (CCs) trigger a complex inflammatory response, we tested the efficacy of the cyclic oligosaccharide 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (CD), a compound that increases cholesterol solubility in preventing and reversing atherosclerosis. We showed that CD treatment of murine atherosclerosis reduced atherosclerotic plaque size and CC load and promoted plaque regression even with a continued cholesterol-rich diet. Mechanistically, CD increased oxysterol production in both macrophages and human atherosclerotic plaques and promoted liver X receptor (LXR)-mediated transcriptional reprogramming to improve cholesterol efflux and exert anti-inflammatory effects. In vivo, this CD-mediated LXR agonism was required for the antiatherosclerotic and anti-inflammatory effects of CD as well as for augmented reverse cholesterol transport. Because CD treatment in humans is safe and CD beneficially affects key mechanisms of atherogenesis, it may therefore be used clinically to prevent or treat human atherosclerosis. PMID:27053774

  14. Next-generation transcriptome assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jeffrey A.; Wang, Zhong

    2011-09-01

    Transcriptomics studies often rely on partial reference transcriptomes that fail to capture the full catalog of transcripts and their variations. Recent advances in sequencing technologies and assembly algorithms have facilitated the reconstruction of the entire transcriptome by deep RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), even without a reference genome. However, transcriptome assembly from billions of RNA-seq reads, which are often very short, poses a significant informatics challenge. This Review summarizes the recent developments in transcriptome assembly approaches - reference-based, de novo and combined strategies-along with some perspectives on transcriptome assembly in the near future.

  15. Crosstalk between Two bZIP Signaling Pathways Orchestrates Salt-Induced Metabolic Reprogramming in Arabidopsis Roots

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Laura; Pedrotti, Lorenzo; Weiste, Christoph; Fekete, Agnes; Schierstaedt, Jasper; Göttler, Jasmin; Kempa, Stefan; Krischke, Markus; Dietrich, Katrin; Mueller, Martin J.; Vicente-Carbajosa, Jesus; Hanson, Johannes; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Soil salinity increasingly causes crop losses worldwide. Although roots are the primary targets of salt stress, the signaling networks that facilitate metabolic reprogramming to induce stress tolerance are less understood than those in leaves. Here, a combination of transcriptomic and metabolic approaches was performed in salt-treated Arabidopsis thaliana roots, which revealed that the group S1 basic leucine zipper transcription factors bZIP1 and bZIP53 reprogram primary C- and N-metabolism. In particular, gluconeogenesis and amino acid catabolism are affected by these transcription factors. Importantly, bZIP1 expression reflects cellular stress and energy status in roots. In addition to the well-described abiotic stress response pathway initiated by the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) and executed by SnRK2 (Snf1-RELATED-PROTEIN-KINASE2) and AREB-like bZIP factors, we identify a structurally related ABA-independent signaling module consisting of SnRK1s and S1 bZIPs. Crosstalk between these signaling pathways recruits particular bZIP factor combinations to establish at least four distinct gene expression patterns. Understanding this signaling network provides a framework for securing future crop productivity. PMID:26276836

  16. Crosstalk between Two bZIP Signaling Pathways Orchestrates Salt-Induced Metabolic Reprogramming in Arabidopsis Roots.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Laura; Pedrotti, Lorenzo; Weiste, Christoph; Fekete, Agnes; Schierstaedt, Jasper; Göttler, Jasmin; Kempa, Stefan; Krischke, Markus; Dietrich, Katrin; Mueller, Martin J; Vicente-Carbajosa, Jesus; Hanson, Johannes; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang

    2015-08-01

    Soil salinity increasingly causes crop losses worldwide. Although roots are the primary targets of salt stress, the signaling networks that facilitate metabolic reprogramming to induce stress tolerance are less understood than those in leaves. Here, a combination of transcriptomic and metabolic approaches was performed in salt-treated Arabidopsis thaliana roots, which revealed that the group S1 basic leucine zipper transcription factors bZIP1 and bZIP53 reprogram primary C- and N-metabolism. In particular, gluconeogenesis and amino acid catabolism are affected by these transcription factors. Importantly, bZIP1 expression reflects cellular stress and energy status in roots. In addition to the well-described abiotic stress response pathway initiated by the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) and executed by SnRK2 (Snf1-RELATED-PROTEIN-KINASE2) and AREB-like bZIP factors, we identify a structurally related ABA-independent signaling module consisting of SnRK1s and S1 bZIPs. Crosstalk between these signaling pathways recruits particular bZIP factor combinations to establish at least four distinct gene expression patterns. Understanding this signaling network provides a framework for securing future crop productivity. PMID:26276836

  17. Gene-For-Gene-Mediated Transcriptome Reprogramming in Barley-Powdery Mildew Interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley has a complex interaction with powdery mildew [Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh)] that begins with early recognition of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) from the pathogen. During Bgh invasion of the epidermis, the fate of cells is decided by the presence of resistance (R) gen...

  18. Active transcriptomic and proteomic reprogramming in the C. elegans nucleotide excision repair mutant xpa-1.

    PubMed

    Kassahun, Henok; Nilsen, Hilde

    2013-10-01

    Oxidative stress promotes human aging and contributes to common neurodegenerative diseases. Endogenous DNA damage induced by oxidative stress is believed to be an important promoter of neurodegenerative diseases. Although a large amount of evidence correlates a reduced DNA repair capacity with aging and neurodegenerative disease, there is little direct evidence of causality. Moreover, the contribution of oxidative DNA damage to the aging process is poorly understood. We have used the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to study the contribution of oxidative DNA damage and repair to aging. C. elegans is particularly well suited to tackle this problem because it has a minimum complexity DNA repair system, which enables us to circumvent the important limitation presented by the extensive redundancy of DNA repair enzymes in mammals. PMID:24744987

  19. The grapevine expression atlas reveals a deep transcriptome shift driving the entire plant into a maturation program.

    PubMed

    Fasoli, Marianna; Dal Santo, Silvia; Zenoni, Sara; Tornielli, Giovanni Battista; Farina, Lorenzo; Zamboni, Anita; Porceddu, Andrea; Venturini, Luca; Bicego, Manuele; Murino, Vittorio; Ferrarini, Alberto; Delledonne, Massimo; Pezzotti, Mario

    2012-09-01

    We developed a genome-wide transcriptomic atlas of grapevine (Vitis vinifera) based on 54 samples representing green and woody tissues and organs at different developmental stages as well as specialized tissues such as pollen and senescent leaves. Together, these samples expressed ∼91% of the predicted grapevine genes. Pollen and senescent leaves had unique transcriptomes reflecting their specialized functions and physiological status. However, microarray and RNA-seq analysis grouped all the other samples into two major classes based on maturity rather than organ identity, namely, the vegetative/green and mature/woody categories. This division represents a fundamental transcriptomic reprogramming during the maturation process and was highlighted by three statistical approaches identifying the transcriptional relationships among samples (correlation analysis), putative biomarkers (O2PLS-DA approach), and sets of strongly and consistently expressed genes that define groups (topics) of similar samples (biclustering analysis). Gene coexpression analysis indicated that the mature/woody developmental program results from the reiterative coactivation of pathways that are largely inactive in vegetative/green tissues, often involving the coregulation of clusters of neighboring genes and global regulation based on codon preference. This global transcriptomic reprogramming during maturation has not been observed in herbaceous annual species and may be a defining characteristic of perennial woody plants. PMID:22948079

  20. Efficient Reprogramming of Human Fibroblasts and Blood-Derived Endothelial Progenitor Cells Using Nonmodified RNA for Reprogramming and Immune Evasion.

    PubMed

    Poleganov, Marco Alexander; Eminli, Sarah; Beissert, Tim; Herz, Stephanie; Moon, Jung-Il; Goldmann, Johanna; Beyer, Arianne; Heck, Rosario; Burkhart, Isabell; Barea Roldan, Diana; Türeci, Özlem; Yi, Kevin; Hamilton, Brad; Sahin, Ugur

    2015-11-01

    mRNA reprogramming results in the generation of genetically stable induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells while avoiding the risks of genomic integration. Previously published mRNA reprogramming protocols have proven to be inconsistent and time-consuming and mainly restricted to fibroblasts, thereby demonstrating the need for a simple but reproducible protocol applicable to various cell types. So far there have been no published reports using mRNA to reprogram any cell type derived from human blood. Nonmodified synthetic mRNAs are immunogenic and activate cellular defense mechanisms, which can lead to cell death and inhibit mRNA translation upon repetitive transfection. Hence, to overcome RNA-related toxicity we combined nonmodified reprogramming mRNAs (OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, cMYC, NANOG, and LIN28 [OSKMNL]) with immune evasion mRNAs (E3, K3, and B18R [EKB]) from vaccinia virus. Additionally, we included mature, double-stranded microRNAs (miRNAs) from the 302/367 cluster, which are known to enhance the reprogramming process, to develop a robust reprogramming protocol for the generation of stable iPS cell lines from both human fibroblasts and human blood-outgrowth endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Our novel combination of RNAs enables the cell to tolerate repetitive transfections for the generation of stable iPS cell colonies from human fibroblasts within 11 days while requiring only four transfections. Moreover, our method resulted in the first known mRNA-vectored reprogramming of human blood-derived EPCs within 10 days while requiring only eight daily transfections. PMID:26381596

  1. Upping the Ante: Recent Advances in Direct Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Lars UW; Daley, George Q; Williams, David A

    2009-01-01

    The concept of reversing the characteristics of differentiated tissues to pluripotency through reprogramming was introduced over 50 years ago in the first somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) experiments. More recently, direct reprogramming of differentiated somatic cells by gene transfer of a small number of defined transcription factors has been shown to yield cells that are indistinguishable from inner cell mass–derived embryonic stem (ES) cells. These cells, termed induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, offer exciting possibilities for studying mechanism of pluripotency, establishing models for disease-specific investigations, and enabling future applications in regenerative medicine. In this review, we discuss the basic foundation of reestablishing pluripotency and recent progress toward enhancing the efficiency and safety of the process through optimization of the reprogramming factor combination, identification of small molecules that augment efficiency, and assessment of distinct target cells in reprogramming efficiency. We also highlight recent advances that eliminate stable genetic modification from the reprogramming process, and summarize preclinical models that provide proof-of-concept for ES/iPS cell-based regenerative medicine. PMID:19337233

  2. Non-stochastic reprogramming from a privileged somatic cell state

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shangqin; Zi, Xiaoyuan; Schulz, Vincent P.; Cheng, Jijun; Zhong, Mei; Koochaki, Sebastian H.J.; Megyola, Cynthia M.; Pan, Xinghua; Heydari, Kartoosh; Weissman, Sherman M.; Gallagher, Patrick G.; Krause, Diane S.; Fan, Rong; Lu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Reprogramming somatic cells to induced pluripotency by Yamanaka factors is usually slow and inefficient, and is thought to be a stochastic process. We identified a privileged somatic cell state, from which acquisition of pluripotency could occur in a non-stochastic manner. Subsets of murine hematopoietic progenitors are privileged, whose progeny cells predominantly adopt the pluripotent fate with activation of endogenous Oct4 locus after 4–5 divisions in reprogramming conditions. Privileged cells display an ultrafast cell cycle of ~8 hours. In fibroblasts, a subpopulation cycling at a similar ultrafast speed is observed after 6 days of factor expression, and is increased by p53-knockdown. This ultrafast-cycling population accounts for >99% of the bulk reprogramming activity in wildtype or p53-knockdown fibroblasts. Our data demonstrate that the stochastic nature of reprogramming can be overcome in a privileged somatic cell state, and suggest that cell cycle acceleration toward a critical threshold is an important bottleneck for reprogramming. PMID:24486105

  3. Epigenetic reprogramming in mammalian species after SCNT-based cloning.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Heiner

    2016-07-01

    The birth of "Dolly," the first mammal cloned from an adult mammary epithelial cell, abolished the decades-old scientific dogma implying that a terminally differentiated cell cannot be reprogrammed into a pluripotent embryonic state. The most dramatic epigenetic reprogramming occurs in SCNT when the expression profile of a differentiated cell is abolished and a new embryo-specific expression profile, involving 10,000 to 12,000 genes, and thus, most genes of the entire genome is established, which drives embryonic and fetal development. The initial release from somatic cell epigenetic constraints is followed by establishment of post-zygotic expression patterns, X-chromosome inactivation, and adjustment of telomere length. Somatic cell nuclear transfer may be associated with a variety of pathologic changes of the fetal and placental phenotype in a proportion of cloned offspring, specifically in ruminants, that are thought to be caused by aberrant epigenetic reprogramming. Improvements in our understanding of this dramatic epigenetic reprogramming event will be instrumental in realizing the great potential of SCNT for basic research and for important agricultural and biomedical applications. Here, current knowledge on epigenetic reprogramming after use of SCNT in livestock is reviewed, with emphasis on gene-specific and global DNA methylation, imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation, and telomere length restoration in early development. PMID:27160443

  4. Regulation of somatic cell reprogramming through inducible mir-302 expression.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shi-Lung; Chang, Donald C; Lin, Chun-Hung; Ying, Shao-Yao; Leu, Davey; Wu, David T S

    2011-02-01

    Global demethylation is required for early zygote development to establish stem cell pluripotency, yet our findings reiterate this epigenetic reprogramming event in somatic cells through ectopic introduction of mir-302 function. Here, we report that induced mir-302 expression beyond 1.3-fold of the concentration in human embryonic stem (hES) H1 and H9 cells led to reprogramming of human hair follicle cells (hHFCs) to induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. This reprogramming mechanism functioned through mir-302-targeted co-suppression of four epigenetic regulators, AOF2 (also known as KDM1 or LSD1), AOF1, MECP1-p66 and MECP2. Silencing AOF2 also caused DNMT1 deficiency and further enhanced global demethylation during somatic cell reprogramming (SCR) of hHFCs. Re-supplementing AOF2 in iPS cells disrupted such global demethylation and induced cell differentiation. Given that both hES and iPS cells highly express mir-302, our findings suggest a novel link between zygotic reprogramming and SCR, providing a regulatory mechanism responsible for global demethylation in both events. As the mechanism of conventional iPS cell induction methods remains largely unknown, understanding this microRNA (miRNA)-mediated SCR mechanism may shed light on the improvements of iPS cell generation. PMID:20870751

  5. Netrin-1 regulates somatic cell reprogramming and pluripotency maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Ozmadenci, Duygu; Féraud, Olivier; Markossian, Suzy; Kress, Elsa; Ducarouge, Benjamin; Gibert, Benjamin; Ge, Jian; Durand, Isabelle; Gadot, Nicolas; Plateroti, Michela; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Gil, Jesus; Deng, Hongkui; Bernet, Agnes; Mehlen, Patrick; Lavial, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    The generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells holds great promise in regenerative medicine. The use of the transcription factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc for reprogramming is extensively documented, but comparatively little is known about soluble molecules promoting reprogramming. Here we identify the secreted cue Netrin-1 and its receptor DCC, described for their respective survival/death functions in normal and oncogenic contexts, as reprogramming modulators. In various somatic cells, we found that reprogramming is accompanied by a transient transcriptional repression of Netrin-1 mediated by an Mbd3/Mta1/Chd4-containing NuRD complex. Mechanistically, Netrin-1 imbalance induces apoptosis mediated by the receptor DCC in a p53-independent manner. Correction of the Netrin-1/DCC equilibrium constrains apoptosis and improves reprogramming efficiency. Our work also sheds light on Netrin-1's function in protecting embryonic stem cells from apoptosis mediated by its receptor UNC5b, and shows that the treatment with recombinant Netrin-1 improves the generation of mouse and human iPS cells. PMID:26154507

  6. The acetyllysine reader BRD3R promotes human nuclear reprogramming and regulates mitosis.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhicheng; Zhang, Ruowen; Khodadadi-Jamayran, Alireza; Chen, Bo; Crowley, Michael R; Festok, Muhamad A; Crossman, David K; Townes, Tim M; Hu, Kejin

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that both recipient cells and donor nuclei demonstrate a mitotic advantage as observed in the traditional reprogramming with somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). However, it is not known whether a specific mitotic factor plays a critical role in reprogramming. Here we identify an isoform of human bromodomain-containing 3 (BRD3), BRD3R (BRD3 with Reprogramming activity), as a reprogramming factor. BRD3R positively regulates mitosis during reprogramming, upregulates a large set of mitotic genes at early stages of reprogramming, and associates with mitotic chromatin. Interestingly, a set of the mitotic genes upregulated by BRD3R constitutes a pluripotent molecular signature. The two BRD3 isoforms display differential binding to acetylated histones. Our results suggest a molecular interpretation for the mitotic advantage in reprogramming and show that mitosis may be a driving force of reprogramming. PMID:26947130

  7. The acetyllysine reader BRD3R promotes human nuclear reprogramming and regulates mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zhicheng; Zhang, Ruowen; Khodadadi-Jamayran, Alireza; Chen, Bo; Crowley, Michael R.; Festok, Muhamad A.; Crossman, David K.; Townes, Tim M.; Hu, Kejin

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that both recipient cells and donor nuclei demonstrate a mitotic advantage as observed in the traditional reprogramming with somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). However, it is not known whether a specific mitotic factor plays a critical role in reprogramming. Here we identify an isoform of human bromodomain-containing 3 (BRD3), BRD3R (BRD3 with Reprogramming activity), as a reprogramming factor. BRD3R positively regulates mitosis during reprogramming, upregulates a large set of mitotic genes at early stages of reprogramming, and associates with mitotic chromatin. Interestingly, a set of the mitotic genes upregulated by BRD3R constitutes a pluripotent molecular signature. The two BRD3 isoforms display differential binding to acetylated histones. Our results suggest a molecular interpretation for the mitotic advantage in reprogramming and show that mitosis may be a driving force of reprogramming. PMID:26947130

  8. p53, Stem Cells, and Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Spike, Benjamin T.; Wahl, Geoffrey M.

    2011-01-01

    p53 is well recognized as a potent tumor suppressor. In its classic role, p53 responds to genotoxic insults by inducing cell cycle exit or programmed cell death to limit the propagation of cells with corrupted genomes. p53 is also implicated in a variety of other cellular processes in which its involvement is less well understood including self-renewal, differentiation, and reprogramming. These activities represent an emerging area of intense interest for cancer biologists, as they provide potential mechanistic links between p53 loss and the stem cell–like cellular plasticity that has been suggested to contribute to tumor cell heterogeneity and to drive tumor progression. Despite accumulating evidence linking p53 loss to stem-like phenotypes in cancer, it is not yet understood how p53 contributes to acquisition of “stemness” at the molecular level. Whether and how stem-like cells confer survival advantages to propagate the tumor also remain to be resolved. Furthermore, although it seems reasonable that the combination of p53 deficiency and the stem-like state could contribute to the genesis of cancers that are refractory to treatment, direct linkages and mechanistic underpinnings remain under investigation. Here, we discuss recent findings supporting the connection between p53 loss and the emergence of tumor cells bearing functional and molecular similarities to stem cells. We address several potential molecular and cellular mechanisms that may contribute to this link, and we discuss implications of these findings for the way we think about cancer progression. PMID:21779509

  9. The Role of microRNAs in Animal Cell Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Santos, María Concepción; Aragón-Raygoza, Alejandro; Espinal-Centeno, Annie; Arteaga-Vázquez, Mario; Cruz-Hernández, Andrés; Bako, Laszlo; Cruz-Ramírez, Alfredo

    2016-07-15

    Our concept of cell reprogramming and cell plasticity has evolved since John Gurdon transferred the nucleus of a completely differentiated cell into an enucleated Xenopus laevis egg, thereby generating embryos that developed into tadpoles. More recently, induced expression of transcription factors, oct4, sox2, klf4, and c-myc has evidenced the plasticity of the genome to change the expression program and cell phenotype by driving differentiated cells to the pluripotent state. Beyond these milestone achievements, research in artificial cell reprogramming has been focused on other molecules that are different than transcription factors. Among the candidate molecules, microRNAs (miRNAs) stand out due to their potential to control the levels of proteins that are involved in cellular processes such as self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation. Here, we review the role of miRNAs in the maintenance and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, epimorphic regeneration, and somatic cell reprogramming to induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:27224014

  10. Direct reprogramming of fibroblasts into myocytes to reverse fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Muraoka, Naoto; Ieda, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Heart disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The low regenerative capacity of adult human hearts has thus far limited the available therapeutic approaches for heart failure. Therefore, new therapies that can regenerate damaged myocardium and improve heart function are urgently needed. Although cell transplantation-based therapies may hold great potential, direct reprogramming of endogenous cardiac fibroblasts, which represent more than half of the cells in the heart, into functional cardiomyocytes in situ may be an alternative strategy by which to regenerate the heart. We and others demonstrated that functional cardiomyocytes can be directly generated from fibroblasts by using several combinations of cardiac-enriched factors in mouse and human. In vivo gene delivery of cardiac reprogramming factors generates new cardiac muscle and improved heart function after myocardial infarction in mouse. This article reviews recent progress in cardiac reprogramming research and discusses the perspectives and challenges of this new technology for future regenerative therapy. PMID:24079415

  11. Transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms of cellular reprogramming to induced pluripotency.

    PubMed

    van den Hurk, Mark; Kenis, Gunter; Bardy, Cedric; van den Hove, Daniel L; Gage, Fred H; Steinbusch, Harry W; Rutten, Bart P

    2016-08-01

    Enforced ectopic expression of a cocktail of pluripotency-associated genes such as Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc can reprogram somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The remarkable proliferation ability of iPSCs and their aptitude to redifferentiate into any cell lineage makes these cells a promising tool for generating a variety of human tissue in vitro. Yet, pluripotency induction is an inefficient process, as cells undergoing reprogramming need to overcome developmentally imposed epigenetic barriers. Recent work has shed new light on the molecular mechanisms that drive the reprogramming of somatic cells to iPSCs. Here, we present current knowledge on the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of pluripotency induction and discuss how variability in epigenetic states impacts iPSCs' inherent biological properties. PMID:27419933

  12. Small-Molecule-Based Lineage Reprogramming Creates Functional Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Tian, E; Sun, Guoqiang; Sun, Guihua; Chao, Jianfei; Ye, Peng; Warden, Charles; Riggs, Arthur D; Shi, Yanhong

    2016-07-19

    Growing evidence indicates important roles for astrocytes in neurodevelopment and diseases. However, astrocytes and their roles in these processes remain poorly understood. Despite recent progress in reprogramming somatic cells into different types of neural cells, reprogramming to astrocytes has lagged. Here, we show that functional astrocytes can be generated from mammalian fibroblasts using only small molecules. Induced mouse astrocytes resemble primary astrocytes in astrocytic gene expression and epigenomic status and exhibit functional properties in promoting neuronal maturation, glutamate uptake, and calcium signaling. Moreover, these cells can recapitulate the Alexander disease phenotype of protein aggregation when expressing Gfap with a disease-causing mutation. The same compounds can also reprogram human fibroblasts into astroglial progenitor cells that can further mature into functional astrocytes. These chemically induced astrocytes may provide cellular models to uncover roles of astrocytes in normal neurodevelopment and pathogenesis of neurological diseases. PMID:27396343

  13. Electromagnetic fields mediate efficient cell reprogramming into a pluripotent state.

    PubMed

    Baek, Soonbong; Quan, Xiaoyuan; Kim, Soochan; Lengner, Christopher; Park, Jung-Keug; Kim, Jongpil

    2014-10-28

    Life on Earth is constantly exposed to natural electromagnetic fields (EMFs), and it is generally accepted that EMFs may exert a variety of effects on biological systems. Particularly, extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (EL-EMFs) affect biological processes such as cell development and differentiation; however, the fundamental mechanisms by which EMFs influence these processes remain unclear. Here we show that EMF exposure induces epigenetic changes that promote efficient somatic cell reprogramming to pluripotency. These epigenetic changes resulted from EMF-induced activation of the histone lysine methyltransferase Mll2. Remarkably, an EMF-free system that eliminates Earth's naturally occurring magnetic field abrogates these epigenetic changes, resulting in a failure to undergo reprogramming. Therefore, our results reveal that EMF directly regulates dynamic epigenetic changes through Mll2, providing an efficient tool for epigenetic reprogramming including the acquisition of pluripotency. PMID:25248035

  14. Toward Reprogramming Bacteria with Small Molecules and RNA

    PubMed Central

    Gallivan, Justin P.

    2007-01-01

    Summary A major goal of synthetic biology is to reprogram bacteria to carry out complex tasks, such as synthesizing and delivering drugs, and seeking and destroying environmental pollutants. Advances in molecular biology and bacterial genetics have made it straightforward to modify, insert, or delete genes in many bacterial strains, and advances in gene synthesis have opened the door to replacing entire genomes. However, rewriting the underlying genetic code is only part of the challenge of reprogramming cellular behavior. A remaining challenge is to control how and when the modified genes are expressed. Several recent studies have highlighted how synthetic riboswitches, which are RNA sequences that undergo a ligand-induced conformational change to alter gene expression, can be used to reprogram how bacteria respond to small molecules. PMID:17967431

  15. Cell Reprogramming, IPS Limitations, and Overcoming Strategies in Dental Bioengineering

    PubMed Central

    Ibarretxe, Gaskon; Alvarez, Antonia; Cañavate, Maria-Luz; Hilario, Enrique; Aurrekoetxea, Maitane; Unda, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The procurement of induced pluripotent stem cells, or IPS cells, from adult differentiated animal cells has the potential to revolutionize future medicine, where reprogrammed IPS cells may be used to repair disease-affected tissues on demand. The potential of IPS cell technology is tremendous, but it will be essential to improve the methodologies for IPS cell generation and to precisely evaluate each clone and subclone of IPS cells for their safety and efficacy. Additionally, the current state of knowledge on IPS cells advises that research on their regenerative properties is carried out in appropriate tissue and organ systems that permit a safe assessment of the long-term behavior of these reprogrammed cells. In the present paper, we discuss the mechanisms of cell reprogramming, current technical limitations of IPS cells for their use in human tissue engineering, and possibilities to overcome them in the particular case of dental regeneration. PMID:22690226

  16. Toward reprogramming bacteria with small molecules and RNA.

    PubMed

    Gallivan, Justin P

    2007-12-01

    A major goal of synthetic biology is to reprogram bacteria to carry out complex tasks, such as synthesizing and delivering drugs, and seeking and destroying environmental pollutants. Advances in molecular biology and bacterial genetics have made it straightforward to modify, insert, or delete genes in many bacterial strains, and advances in gene synthesis have opened the door to replacing entire genomes. However, rewriting the underlying genetic code is only part of the challenge of reprogramming cellular behavior. A remaining challenge is to control how and when the modified genes are expressed. Several recent studies have highlighted how synthetic riboswitches, which are RNA sequences that undergo a ligand-induced conformational change to alter gene expression, can be used to reprogram how bacteria respond to small molecules. PMID:17967431

  17. Pleurotus eryngii Polysaccharide Promotes Pluripotent Reprogramming via Facilitating Epigenetic Modification.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wenwen; Cao, Xia; Wang, Yan; Yu, Qingtong; Zhang, Zhijian; Qu, Rui; Chen, Jingjing; Shao, Genbao; Gao, Xiangdong; Xu, Ximing; Yu, Jiangnan

    2016-02-17

    Pleurotus eryngii is a medicinal/edible mushroom with great nutritional value and bioactivity. Its polysaccharide has recently been developed into an effective gene vector via cationic modification. In the present study, cationized P. eryngii polysaccharide (CPS), hybridized with calcium phosphate (CP), was used to codeliver plasmids (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, c-Myc) for generating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The results revealed that the hybrid nanoparticles could significantly enhance the process and efficiency of reprogramming (1.6-fold increase) compared with the CP nanoparticles. The hybrid CPS also facilitated epigenetic modification during the reprogramming. Moreover, these hybrid nanoparticles exhibited multiple pathways (both caveolae- and clathrin-mediated endocytosis) in their cellular internalization, which accounted for the improved iPSCs generation. These findings therefore present a novel application of P. eryngii polysaccharide in pluripotent reprogramming via active epigenetic modification. PMID:26809505

  18. Defining the diversity of phenotypic respecification using multiple cell lines and reprogramming regimens.

    PubMed

    Alicea, Bradly; Murthy, Shashanka; Keaton, Sarah A; Cobbett, Peter; Cibelli, Jose B; Suhr, Steven T

    2013-10-01

    To better understand the basis of variation in cellular reprogramming, we performed experiments with two primary objectives: first, to determine the degree of difference, if any, in reprogramming efficiency among cells lines of a similar type after accounting for technical variables, and second, to compare the efficiency of conversion of multiple similar cell lines to two separate reprogramming regimens-induced neurons and induced skeletal muscle. Using two reprogramming regimens, it could be determined whether converted cells are likely derived from a distinct subpopulation that is generally susceptible to reprogramming or are derived from cells with an independent capacity for respecification to a given phenotype. Our results indicated that when technical components of the reprogramming regimen were accounted for, reprogramming efficiency was reproducible within a given primary fibroblast line but varied dramatically between lines. The disparity in reprogramming efficiency between lines was of sufficient magnitude to account for some discrepancies in published results. We also found that the efficiency of conversion to one phenotype was not predictive of reprogramming to the alternate phenotype, suggesting that the capacity for reprogramming does not arise from a specific subpopulation with a generally "weak grip" on cellular identity. Our findings suggest that parallel testing of multiple cell lines from several sources may be needed to accurately assess the efficiency of direct reprogramming procedures, and that testing a larger number of fibroblast lines--even lines with similar origins--is likely the most direct means of improving reprogramming efficiency. PMID:23672680

  19. Defining the Diversity of Phenotypic Respecification Using Multiple Cell Lines and Reprogramming Regimens

    PubMed Central

    Alicea, Bradly; Murthy, Shashanka; Keaton, Sarah A.; Cobbett, Peter; Cibelli, Jose B.

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the basis of variation in cellular reprogramming, we performed experiments with two primary objectives: first, to determine the degree of difference, if any, in reprogramming efficiency among cells lines of a similar type after accounting for technical variables, and second, to compare the efficiency of conversion of multiple similar cell lines to two separate reprogramming regimens–induced neurons and induced skeletal muscle. Using two reprogramming regimens, it could be determined whether converted cells are likely derived from a distinct subpopulation that is generally susceptible to reprogramming or are derived from cells with an independent capacity for respecification to a given phenotype. Our results indicated that when technical components of the reprogramming regimen were accounted for, reprogramming efficiency was reproducible within a given primary fibroblast line but varied dramatically between lines. The disparity in reprogramming efficiency between lines was of sufficient magnitude to account for some discrepancies in published results. We also found that the efficiency of conversion to one phenotype was not predictive of reprogramming to the alternate phenotype, suggesting that the capacity for reprogramming does not arise from a specific subpopulation with a generally “weak grip” on cellular identity. Our findings suggest that parallel testing of multiple cell lines from several sources may be needed to accurately assess the efficiency of direct reprogramming procedures, and that testing a larger number of fibroblast lines—even lines with similar origins—is likely the most direct means of improving reprogramming efficiency. PMID:23672680

  20. Nuclear Reprogramming and Mitosis – how does mitosis enhance changes in gene expression?

    PubMed Central

    Halley-Stott, Richard P

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Nuclear reprogramming changes the identity of cells by changing gene expression programmes. Two recent pieces of work have highlighted the role that mitosis plays in enhancing the success of nuclear reprogramming. This Point of View article examines this work in the context of nuclear reprogramming. PMID:25668203

  1. Cell signalling pathways underlying induced pluripotent stem cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Kate; Joy, Shona; McKay, Tristan

    2014-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, somatic cells reprogrammed to the pluripotent state by forced expression of defined factors, represent a uniquely valuable resource for research and regenerative medicine. However, this methodology remains inefficient due to incomplete mechanistic understanding of the reprogramming process. In recent years, various groups have endeavoured to interrogate the cell signalling that governs the reprogramming process, including LIF/STAT3, BMP, PI3K, FGF2, Wnt, TGFβ and MAPK pathways, with the aim of increasing our understanding and identifying new mechanisms of improving safety, reproducibility and efficiency. This has led to a unified model of reprogramming that consists of 3 stages: initiation, maturation and stabilisation. Initiation of reprogramming occurs in almost all cells that receive the reprogramming transgenes; most commonly Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and cMyc, and involves a phenotypic mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition. The initiation stage is also characterised by increased proliferation and a metabolic switch from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis. The maturation stage is considered the major bottleneck within the process, resulting in very few “stabilisation competent” cells progressing to the final stabilisation phase. To reach this stage in both mouse and human cells, pre-iPS cells must activate endogenous expression of the core circuitry of pluripotency, comprising Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog, and thus reach a state of transgene independence. By the stabilisation stage, iPS cells generally use the same signalling networks that govern pluripotency in embryonic stem cells. These pathways differ between mouse and human cells although recent work has demonstrated that this is context dependent. As iPS cell generation technologies move forward, tools are being developed to interrogate the process in more detail, thus allowing a greater understanding of this intriguing biological phenomenon. PMID:25426259

  2. Cellular reprogramming for understanding and treating human disease.

    PubMed

    Kanherkar, Riya R; Bhatia-Dey, Naina; Makarev, Evgeny; Csoka, Antonei B

    2014-01-01

    In the last two decades we have witnessed a paradigm shift in our understanding of cells so radical that it has rewritten the rules of biology. The study of cellular reprogramming has gone from little more than a hypothesis, to applied bioengineering, with the creation of a variety of important cell types. By way of metaphor, we can compare the discovery of reprogramming with the archeological discovery of the Rosetta stone. This stone slab made possible the initial decipherment of Egyptian hieroglyphics because it allowed us to see this language in a way that was previously impossible. We propose that cellular reprogramming will have an equally profound impact on understanding and curing human disease, because it allows us to perceive and study molecular biological processes such as differentiation, epigenetics, and chromatin in ways that were likewise previously impossible. Stem cells could be called "cellular Rosetta stones" because they allow also us to perceive the connections between development, disease, cancer, aging, and regeneration in novel ways. Here we present a comprehensive historical review of stem cells and cellular reprogramming, and illustrate the developing synergy between many previously unconnected fields. We show how stem cells can be used to create in vitro models of human disease and provide examples of how reprogramming is being used to study and treat such diverse diseases as cancer, aging, and accelerated aging syndromes, infectious diseases such as AIDS, and epigenetic diseases such as polycystic ovary syndrome. While the technology of reprogramming is being developed and refined there have also been significant ongoing developments in other complementary technologies such as gene editing, progenitor cell production, and tissue engineering. These technologies are the foundations of what is becoming a fully-functional field of regenerative medicine and are converging to a point that will allow us to treat almost any disease. PMID

  3. Cellular reprogramming for understanding and treating human disease

    PubMed Central

    Kanherkar, Riya R.; Bhatia-Dey, Naina; Makarev, Evgeny; Csoka, Antonei B.

    2014-01-01

    In the last two decades we have witnessed a paradigm shift in our understanding of cells so radical that it has rewritten the rules of biology. The study of cellular reprogramming has gone from little more than a hypothesis, to applied bioengineering, with the creation of a variety of important cell types. By way of metaphor, we can compare the discovery of reprogramming with the archeological discovery of the Rosetta stone. This stone slab made possible the initial decipherment of Egyptian hieroglyphics because it allowed us to see this language in a way that was previously impossible. We propose that cellular reprogramming will have an equally profound impact on understanding and curing human disease, because it allows us to perceive and study molecular biological processes such as differentiation, epigenetics, and chromatin in ways that were likewise previously impossible. Stem cells could be called “cellular Rosetta stones” because they allow also us to perceive the connections between development, disease, cancer, aging, and regeneration in novel ways. Here we present a comprehensive historical review of stem cells and cellular reprogramming, and illustrate the developing synergy between many previously unconnected fields. We show how stem cells can be used to create in vitro models of human disease and provide examples of how reprogramming is being used to study and treat such diverse diseases as cancer, aging, and accelerated aging syndromes, infectious diseases such as AIDS, and epigenetic diseases such as polycystic ovary syndrome. While the technology of reprogramming is being developed and refined there have also been significant ongoing developments in other complementary technologies such as gene editing, progenitor cell production, and tissue engineering. These technologies are the foundations of what is becoming a fully-functional field of regenerative medicine and are converging to a point that will allow us to treat almost any disease. PMID

  4. RNA-Seq Profiling of Intact and Enucleated Oocyte SCNT Embryos Reveals the Role of Pig Oocyte Nucleus in Somatic Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lin; Li, Mengqi; Sun, Junli; Yang, Xiaogan; Lu, Yangqing; Lu, Shengsheng; Lu, Kehuan

    2016-01-01

    The specific molecular mechanisms involved in somatic reprogramming remain unidentified. Removal of the oocyte genome is one of the primary causes of developmental failure in cloned embryos, whereas intact oocyte shows stronger reprogramming capability than enucleated oocyte. To identify the reason for the low efficiency of cloning and elucidate the mechanisms involved in somatic reprogramming by the oocyte nucleus, we injected pig cumulus cells into 539 intact MII oocytes and 461 enucleated MII oocytes. Following activation, 260 polyploidy embryos developed to the blastocyst stage whereas only 93 traditionally cloned embryos (48.2% vs. 20.2%, P < 0.01) reached blastocyst stage. Blastocysts generated from intact oocytes also had more cells than those generated from enucleated oocytes (60.70 vs. 46.65, P < 0.01). To identify the genes that contribute to this phenomenon, two early embryos in 2-cell and 4-cell stages were collected for single-cell RNA sequencing. The two kinds of embryos were found to have dramatically different transcriptome profiles. Intact oocyte nuclear transfer embryos showed 1,738 transcripts that were up-regulated relative to enucleated cloned embryos at the 2-cell stage and 728 transcripts that were down-regulated (|log2Ratio| ≥ 5). They showed 2,941 transcripts that were up-regulated during the 4-cell stage and 1,682 that were down-regulated (|log2Ratio| ≥ 5). The most significantly enriched gene ontology categories were those involved in the regulation of binding, catalytic activity, and molecular transducer activity. Other genes that were notably up-regulated and expressed in intact oocyte nuclear transfer embryos were metabolic process. This study provides a comprehensive profile of the differences in gene expression between intact oocyte nuclear transfer embryos and traditional nuclear transfer embryos. This work thus paves the way for further research on the mechanisms underlying somatic reprogramming by oocytes. PMID:27070804

  5. RNA-Seq Profiling of Intact and Enucleated Oocyte SCNT Embryos Reveals the Role of Pig Oocyte Nucleus in Somatic Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Lin; Li, Mengqi; Sun, Junli; Yang, Xiaogan; Lu, Yangqing; Lu, Shengsheng; Lu, Kehuan

    2016-01-01

    The specific molecular mechanisms involved in somatic reprogramming remain unidentified. Removal of the oocyte genome is one of the primary causes of developmental failure in cloned embryos, whereas intact oocyte shows stronger reprogramming capability than enucleated oocyte. To identify the reason for the low efficiency of cloning and elucidate the mechanisms involved in somatic reprogramming by the oocyte nucleus, we injected pig cumulus cells into 539 intact MII oocytes and 461 enucleated MII oocytes. Following activation, 260 polyploidy embryos developed to the blastocyst stage whereas only 93 traditionally cloned embryos (48.2% vs. 20.2%, P < 0.01) reached blastocyst stage. Blastocysts generated from intact oocytes also had more cells than those generated from enucleated oocytes (60.70 vs. 46.65, P < 0.01). To identify the genes that contribute to this phenomenon, two early embryos in 2-cell and 4-cell stages were collected for single-cell RNA sequencing. The two kinds of embryos were found to have dramatically different transcriptome profiles. Intact oocyte nuclear transfer embryos showed 1,738 transcripts that were up-regulated relative to enucleated cloned embryos at the 2-cell stage and 728 transcripts that were down-regulated (|log2Ratio| ≥ 5). They showed 2,941 transcripts that were up-regulated during the 4-cell stage and 1,682 that were down-regulated (|log2Ratio| ≥ 5). The most significantly enriched gene ontology categories were those involved in the regulation of binding, catalytic activity, and molecular transducer activity. Other genes that were notably up-regulated and expressed in intact oocyte nuclear transfer embryos were metabolic process. This study provides a comprehensive profile of the differences in gene expression between intact oocyte nuclear transfer embryos and traditional nuclear transfer embryos. This work thus paves the way for further research on the mechanisms underlying somatic reprogramming by oocytes. PMID:27070804

  6. RNA-binding proteins in pluripotency, differentiation, and reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    GUALLAR, Diana; WANG, Jianlong

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic stem cell maintenance, differentiation, and somatic cell reprogramming require the interplay of multiple pluripotency factors, epigenetic remodelers, and extracellular signaling pathways. RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are involved in a wide range of regulatory pathways, from RNA metabolism to epigenetic modifications. In recent years we have witnessed more and more studies on the discovery of new RBPs and the assessment of their functions in a variety of biological systems, including stem cells. We review the current studies on RBPs and focus on those that have functional implications in pluripotency, differentiation, and/or reprogramming in both the human and mouse systems. PMID:25554730

  7. Isonitrosoacetophenone drives transcriptional reprogramming in Nicotiana tabacum cells in support of innate immunity and defense.

    PubMed

    Djami-Tchatchou, Arnaud T; Maake, Mmapula P; Piater, Lizelle A; Dubery, Ian A

    2015-01-01

    Plants respond to various stress stimuli by activating broad-spectrum defense responses both locally as well as systemically. As such, identification of expressed genes represents an important step towards understanding inducible defense responses and assists in designing appropriate intervention strategies for disease management. Genes differentially expressed in tobacco cell suspensions following elicitation with isonitrosoacetophenone (INAP) were identified using mRNA differential display and pyro-sequencing. Sequencing data produced 14579 reads, which resulted in 198 contigs and 1758 singletons. Following BLAST analyses, several inducible plant defense genes of interest were identified and classified into functional categories including signal transduction, transcription activation, transcription and protein synthesis, protein degradation and ubiquitination, stress-responsive, defense-related, metabolism and energy, regulation, transportation, cytoskeleton and cell wall-related. Quantitative PCR was used to investigate the expression of 17 selected target genes within these categories. Results indicate that INAP has a sensitising or priming effect through activation of salicylic acid-, jasmonic acid- and ethylene pathways that result in an altered transcriptome, with the expression of genes involved in perception of pathogens and associated cellular re-programming in support of defense. Furthermore, infection assays with the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci confirmed the establishment of a functional anti-microbial environment in planta. PMID:25658943

  8. Characterization of Functional Reprogramming during Osteoclast Development Using Quantitative Proteomics and mRNA Profiling*

    PubMed Central

    An, Eunkyung; Narayanan, Manikandan; Manes, Nathan P.; Nita-Lazar, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    In addition to forming macrophages and dendritic cells, monocytes in adult peripheral blood retain the ability to develop into osteoclasts, mature bone-resorbing cells. The extensive morphological and functional transformations that occur during osteoclast differentiation require substantial reprogramming of gene and protein expression. Here we employ -omic-scale technologies to examine in detail the molecular changes at discrete developmental stages in this process (precursor cells, intermediate osteoclasts, and multinuclear osteoclasts), quantitatively comparing their transcriptomes and proteomes. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000471. Our analysis identified mitochondrial changes, along with several alterations in signaling pathways, as central to the development of mature osteoclasts, while also confirming changes in pathways previously implicated in osteoclast biology. In particular, changes in the expression of proteins involved in metabolism and redirection of energy flow from basic cellular function toward bone resorption appeared to play a key role in the switch from monocytic immune system function to specialized bone-turnover function. These findings provide new insight into the differentiation program involved in the generation of functional osteoclasts. PMID:25044017

  9. Metabolic Reprogramming and Dependencies Associated with Epithelial Cancer Stem Cells Independent of the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Program.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Esther; Marin de Mas, Igor; Zodda, Erika; Marin, Silvia; Morrish, Fionnuala; Selivanov, Vitaly; Meca-Cortés, Óscar; Delowar, Hossain; Pons, Mònica; Izquierdo, Inés; Celià-Terrassa, Toni; de Atauri, Pedro; Centelles, Josep J; Hockenbery, David; Thomson, Timothy M; Cascante, Marta

    2016-05-01

    In solid tumors, cancer stem cells (CSCs) can arise independently of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In spite of recent efforts, the metabolic reprogramming associated with CSC phenotypes uncoupled from EMT is poorly understood. Here, by using metabolomic and fluxomic approaches, we identify major metabolic profiles that differentiate metastatic prostate epithelial CSCs (e-CSCs) from non-CSCs expressing a stable EMT. We have found that the e-CSC program in our cellular model is characterized by a high plasticity in energy substrate metabolism, including an enhanced Warburg effect, a greater carbon and energy source flexibility driven by fatty acids and amino acid metabolism and an essential reliance on the proton buffering capacity conferred by glutamine metabolism. An analysis of transcriptomic data yielded a metabolic gene signature for our e-CSCs consistent with the metabolomics and fluxomics analyses that correlated with tumor progression and metastasis in prostate cancer and in 11 additional cancer types. Interestingly, an integrated metabolomics, fluxomics, and transcriptomics analysis allowed us to identify key metabolic players regulated at the post-transcriptional level, suggesting potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets to effectively forestall metastasis. Stem Cells 2016;34:1163-1176. PMID:27146024

  10. Heterogeneity of osteosarcoma cell lines led to variable responses in reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Choong, Pei Feng; Teh, Hui Xin; Teoh, Hoon Koon; Ong, Han Kiat; Choo, Kong Bung; Sugii, Shigeki; Cheong, Soon Keng; Kamarul, Tunku

    2014-01-01

    Four osteosarcoma cell lines, Saos-2, MG-63, G-292 and U-2 OS, were reprogrammed to pluripotent state using Yamanaka factors retroviral transduction method. Embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like clusters started to appear between 15 to 20 days post transduction. Morphology of the colonies resembled that of ESC colonies with defined border and tightly-packed cells. The reprogrammed sarcomas expressed alkaline phosphatase and pluripotency markers, OCT4, SSEA4, TRA-1-60 and TRA-1-81, as in ESC up to Passage 15. All reprogrammed sarcomas could form embryoid body-like spheres when cultured in suspension in a low attachment dish for up to 10 days. Further testing on the directed differentiation capacity of the reprogrammed sarcomas showed all four reprogrammed sarcoma lines could differentiate into adipocytes while reprogrammed Saos-2-REP, MG-63-REP and G-292-REP could differentiate into osteocytes. Among the 4 osteosarcoma cell lines, U-2 OS reported the highest transduction efficiency but recorded the lowest reprogramming stability under long term culture. Thus, there may be intrinsic differences governing the variable responses of osteosarcoma cell lines towards reprogramming and long term culture effect of the reprogrammed cells. This is a first report to associate intrinsic factors in different osteosarcoma cell lines with variable reprogramming responses and effects on the reprogrammed cells after prolonged culture. PMID:25170299

  11. Vitamin C modulates TET1 function during somatic cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiekai; Guo, Lin; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Haoyu; Yang, Jiaqi; Liu, He; Wang, Xiaoshan; Hu, Xiao; Gu, Tianpeng; Zhou, Zhiwei; Liu, Jing; Liu, Jiadong; Wu, Hongling; Mao, Shi-Qing; Mo, Kunlun; Li, Yingying; Lai, Keyu; Qi, Jing; Yao, Hongjie; Pan, Guangjin; Xu, Guo-Liang; Pei, Duanqing

    2013-12-01

    Vitamin C, a micronutrient known for its anti-scurvy activity in humans, promotes the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) through the activity of histone demethylating dioxygenases. TET hydroxylases are also dioxygenases implicated in active DNA demethylation. Here we report that TET1 either positively or negatively regulates somatic cell reprogramming depending on the absence or presence of vitamin C. TET1 deficiency enhances reprogramming, and its overexpression impairs reprogramming in the context of vitamin C by modulating the obligatory mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET). In the absence of vitamin C, TET1 promotes somatic cell reprogramming independent of MET. Consistently, TET1 regulates 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) formation at loci critical for MET in a vitamin C-dependent fashion. Our findings suggest that vitamin C has a vital role in determining the biological outcome of TET1 function at the cellular level. Given its benefit to human health, vitamin C should be investigated further for its role in epigenetic regulation. PMID:24162740

  12. How microRNAs facilitate reprogramming to pluripotency

    PubMed Central

    Anokye-Danso, Frederick; Snitow, Melinda; Morrisey, Edward E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The ability to generate pluripotent stem cells from a variety of cell and tissue sources through the ectopic expression of a specific set of transcription factors has revolutionized regenerative biology. The development of this reprogramming technology not only makes it possible to perform basic research on human stem cells that do not have to be derived from embryos, but also allows patient-specific cells and tissues to be generated for therapeutic use. Optimizing this process will probably lead to a better and more efficient means of generating pluripotent stem cells. Here, we discuss recent findings that show that, in addition to transcription factors, microRNAs can promote pluripotent reprogramming and can even substitute for these pluripotency transcription factors in some cases. Taking into consideration that microRNAs have the potential to be used as small-molecule therapeutics, such findings open new possibilities for both pluripotent stem cell reprogramming and the reprogramming of cells into other cell lineages. PMID:23077173

  13. Cellular Reprogramming Using Defined Factors and MicroRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Eguchi, Takanori; Kuboki, Takuo

    2016-01-01

    Development of human bodies, organs, and tissues contains numerous steps of cellular differentiation including an initial zygote, embryonic stem (ES) cells, three germ layers, and multiple expertized lineages of cells. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have been recently developed using defined reprogramming factors such as Nanog, Klf5, Oct3/4 (Pou5f1), Sox2, and Myc. This outstanding innovation is largely changing life science and medicine. Methods of direct reprogramming of cells into myocytes, neurons, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts have been further developed using modified combination of factors such as N-myc, L-myc, Sox9, and microRNAs in defined cell/tissue culture conditions. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are also emerging multipotent stem cells with particular microRNA expression signatures. It was shown that miRNA-720 had a role in cellular reprogramming through targeting the pluripotency factor Nanog and induction of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). This review reports histories, topics, and idea of cellular reprogramming. PMID:27382371

  14. In vivo reprogramming of murine cardiac fibroblasts into induced cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Li; Huang, Yu; Spencer, C. Ian; Foley, Amy; Vedantham, Vasanth; Liu, Lei; Conway, Simon J.; Fu, Ji-dong; Srivastava, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The reprogramming of adult cells into pluripotent cells or directly into alternative adult cell types holds great promise for regenerative medicine. We reported that cardiac fibroblasts, which represent 50% of the cells in the mammalian heart, can be directly reprogrammed to adult cardiomyocyte-like cells in vitro by the addition of Gata4, Mef2c and Tbx5 (GMT). Here, we use genetic lineage-tracing to show that resident non-myocytes in the murine heart can be reprogrammed into cardiomyocyte-like cells in vivo by local delivery of GMT after coronary ligation. Induced cardiomyocytes became bi-nucleate, assembled sarcomeres and had cardiomyocyte-like gene expression. Analysis of single cells revealed ventricular cardiomyocyte-like action potentials, beating upon electrical stimulation, and evidence of electrical coupling. In vivo delivery of GMT decreased infarct size and modestly attenuated cardiac dysfunction up to 3 months after coronary ligation. Delivery of the pro-angiogenic and fibroblast activating peptide, Thymosin β4, along with GMT, resulted in further improvements in scar area and cardiac function. These findings demonstrate that cardiac fibroblasts can be reprogrammed into cardiomyocyte-like cells in their native environment for potential regenerative purposes. PMID:22522929

  15. Molecular Imaging of Metabolic Reprograming in Mutant IDH Cells

    PubMed Central

    Viswanath, Pavithra; Chaumeil, Myriam M.; Ronen, Sabrina M.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the metabolic enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) have recently been identified as drivers in the development of several tumor types. Most notably, cytosolic IDH1 is mutated in 70–90% of low-grade gliomas and upgraded glioblastomas, and mitochondrial IDH2 is mutated in ~20% of acute myeloid leukemia cases. Wild-type IDH catalyzes the interconversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). Mutations in the enzyme lead to loss of wild-type enzymatic activity and a neomorphic activity that converts α-KG to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). In turn, 2-HG, which has been termed an “oncometabolite,” inhibits key α-KG-dependent enzymes, resulting in alterations of the cellular epigenetic profile and, subsequently, inhibition of differentiation and initiation of tumorigenesis. In addition, it is now clear that the IDH mutation also induces a broad metabolic reprograming that extends beyond 2-HG production, and this reprograming often differs from what has been previously reported in other cancer types. In this review, we will discuss in detail what is known to date about the metabolic reprograming of mutant IDH cells, and how this reprograming has been investigated using molecular metabolic imaging. We will describe how metabolic imaging has helped shed light on the basic biology of mutant IDH cells, and how this information can be leveraged to identify new therapeutic targets and to develop new clinically translatable imaging methods to detect and monitor mutant IDH tumors in vivo. PMID:27014635

  16. Reprogram to pluripotency: a new logic and a chemical cocktail

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hongjun; Ming, Guo-li

    2015-01-01

    Somatic cells from animals and humans can be reprogrammed into pluripotent stem cells by pluripotency factors. Hongkui Deng and colleagues discovered that pluripotency can also be induced with exogenous lineage specifiers via balancing competing differentiation forces. In a related study they achieved, for the first time, restoration of pluripotency in adult somatic cells using a chemical cocktail alone. PMID:26998393

  17. Somatic Cell Dedifferentiation/Reprogramming for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Thiyagarajan; Lee, Sun-Hee; Lee, Choon-Soo; Kwon, Yoo-Wook; Cho, Hyun-Jai

    2009-01-01

    The concept of dedifferentiation or reprogramming of a somatic cell into a pluripotent embryonic stem cell-like cell (ES-like cell), which give rise to three germ layers and differentiate various cell types, opens a new era in stem cell biology and provides potential therapeutic modality in regenerative medicine. Here, we outline current dedifferentiation/reprogramming methods and their technical hurdles, and the safety and therapeutic applications of reprogrammed pluripotent stem cells in regenerative medicine. This review summarizes the concept and data of somatic cell nuclear transfer, fusion of somatic cells with ES cells, viral or non-viral transduction of pluripotency-related genes into somatic cells, introduction of extract (or proteins) of pluripotent cells into somatic cells. Dedifferentiated/reprogrammed ES-like cells could be a perfect genetic match (autologous or tailored pluripotent stem cells) for future applications. Further studies regarding technical refinements as well as mechanistic analysis of dedifferentiation induction and re-differentiation into specific cell types will provide us with the substantial application of pluripotent stem cells to therapeutic purposes. PMID:24855516

  18. Aberrant DNA methylation reprogramming during induced pluripotent stem cell generation is dependent on the choice of reprogramming factors.

    PubMed

    Planello, Aline C; Ji, Junfeng; Sharma, Vivek; Singhania, Rajat; Mbabaali, Faridah; Müller, Fabian; Alfaro, Javier A; Bock, Christoph; De Carvalho, Daniel D; Batada, Nizar N

    2014-01-01

    The conversion of somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells via overexpression of reprogramming factors involves epigenetic remodeling. DNA methylation at a significant proportion of CpG sites in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) differs from that of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Whether different sets of reprogramming factors influence the type and extent of aberrant DNA methylation in iPSCs differently remains unknown. In order to help resolve this critical question, we generated human iPSCs from a common fibroblast cell source using either the Yamanaka factors (OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and cMYC) or the Thomson factors (OCT4, SOX2, NANOG and LIN28), and determined their genome-wide DNA methylation profiles. In addition to shared DNA methylation aberrations present in all our iPSCs, we identified Yamanaka-iPSC (Y-iPSC)-specific and Thomson-iPSC (T-iPSC)-specific recurrent aberrations. Strikingly, not only were the genomic locations of the aberrations different but also their types: reprogramming with Yamanaka factors mainly resulted in failure to demethylate CpGs, whereas reprogramming with Thomson factors mainly resulted in failure to methylate CpGs. Differences in the level of transcripts encoding DNMT3b and TET3 between Y-iPSCs and T-iPSCs may contribute partially to the distinct types of aberrations. Finally, de novo aberrantly methylated genes in Y-iPSCs were enriched for NANOG targets that are also aberrantly methylated in some cancers. Our study thus reveals that the choice of reprogramming factors influences the amount, location, and class of DNA methylation aberrations in iPSCs. These findings may provide clues into how to produce human iPSCs with fewer DNA methylation abnormalities. PMID:25408883

  19. Weighted enrichment method for prediction of transcription regulators from transcriptome and global chromatin immunoprecipitation data

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Eiryo; Nakaoka, Shinji; Ohta, Tazro; Kitano, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Predicting responsible transcription regulators on the basis of transcriptome data is one of the most promising computational approaches to understanding cellular processes and characteristics. Here, we present a novel method employing vast amounts of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experimental data to address this issue. Global high-throughput ChIP data was collected to construct a comprehensive database, containing 8 578 738 binding interactions of 454 transcription regulators. To incorporate information about heterogeneous frequencies of transcription factor (TF)-binding events, we developed a flexible framework for gene set analysis employing the weighted t-test procedure, namely weighted parametric gene set analysis (wPGSA). Using transcriptome data as an input, wPGSA predicts the activities of transcription regulators responsible for observed gene expression. Validation of wPGSA with published transcriptome data, including that from over-expressed TFs, showed that the method can predict activities of various TFs, regardless of cell type and conditions, with results totally consistent with biological observations. We also applied wPGSA to other published transcriptome data and identified potential key regulators of cell reprogramming and influenza virus pathogenesis, generating compelling hypotheses regarding underlying regulatory mechanisms. This flexible framework will contribute to uncovering the dynamic and robust architectures of biological regulation, by incorporating high-throughput experimental data in the form of weights. PMID:27131787

  20. Transcriptomics using axolotls.

    PubMed

    Voss, S Randal; Athippozhy, Antony; Woodcock, M Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Microarray and RNA-sequencing technology now exists for the characterization of the Ambystoma mexicanum transcriptome. With sufficient replication, these tools give the opportunity to truly investigate gene expression in a variety of experimental paradigms. Analysis of data from the Amby002 array and RNA-sequencing technology can identify genes that change expression levels in concert with each other, which in turn may reveal mechanisms associated with biological processes and molecular functions. PMID:25740496

  1. Cancer Reduces Transcriptome Specialization

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Octavio; Reyes-Valdés, M. Humberto; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2010-01-01

    A central goal of cancer biology is to understand how cells from this family of genetic diseases undergo specific morphological and physiological changes and regress to a de-regulated state of the cell cycle. The fact that tumors are unable to perform most of the specific functions of the original tissue led us to hypothesize that the degree of specialization of the transcriptome of cancerous tissues must be less than their normal counterparts. With the aid of information theory tools, we analyzed four datasets derived from transcriptomes of normal and tumor tissues to quantitatively test the hypothesis that cancer reduces transcriptome specialization. Here, we show that the transcriptional specialization of a tumor is significantly less than the corresponding normal tissue and comparable with the specialization of dedifferentiated embryonic stem cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the drop in specialization in cancerous tissues is largely due to a decrease in expression of genes that are highly specific to the normal organ. This approach gives us a better understanding of carcinogenesis and offers new tools for the identification of genes that are highly influential in cancer progression. PMID:20454660

  2. Deacetylation by SIRT1 Reprograms Inflammation and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Charles E.

    2013-01-01

    NAD+-dependent deacetylase SIRT1 is a master regulator of nucleosome positioning and chromatin structure, thereby reprogramming gene expression. In acute inflammation, chromatin departs from, and returns to, homeostasis in an orderly sequence. This sequence depends on shifts in NAD+ availability for SIRT1 activation and deacetylation of signaling proteins, which support orderly gene reprogramming during acute inflammation by switching between euchromatin and heterochromatin. In contrast, in chronic inflammation and cancer, limited availability of NAD+ and reduced expression of SIRT1 may sustain aberrant chromatin structure and functions. SIRT1 also influences inflammation and cancer by directly deacetylating targets like NFκB p65 and p53. Here, we review SIRT1 in the context of inflammation and cancer. PMID:24020005

  3. Development-Inspired Reprogramming of the Mammalian Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Amamoto, Ryoji; Arlotta, Paola

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka shared the Nobel Prize for the exciting demonstration that the identity of differentiated cells is not irreversibly determined but can be changed back to a pluripotent state under appropriate instructive signals. The principle that differentiated cells can revert to an embryonic state and even be converted directly from one cell-type into another not only turns fundamental principles of development on their head but also has profound implications for regenerative medicine. Replacement of diseased tissue with newly reprogrammed cells and modeling of human disease are concrete opportunities. Here, we focus on the central nervous system to consider whether and how reprogramming of cell identity may impact regeneration and modeling of a system historically considered immutable and hardwired. PMID:24482482

  4. Reprogramming of adult rod photoreceptors prevents retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Montana, Cynthia L.; Kolesnikov, Alexander V.; Shen, Susan Q.; Myers, Connie A.; Kefalov, Vladimir J.; Corbo, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    A prime goal of regenerative medicine is to direct cell fates in a therapeutically useful manner. Retinitis pigmentosa is one of the most common degenerative diseases of the eye and is associated with early rod photoreceptor death followed by secondary cone degeneration. We hypothesized that converting adult rods into cones, via knockdown of the rod photoreceptor determinant Nrl, could make the cells resistant to the effects of mutations in rod-specific genes, thereby preventing secondary cone loss. To test this idea, we engineered a tamoxifen-inducible allele of Nrl to acutely inactivate the gene in adult rods. This manipulation resulted in reprogramming of rods into cells with a variety of cone-like molecular, histologic, and functional properties. Moreover, reprogramming of adult rods achieved cellular and functional rescue of retinal degeneration in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa. These findings suggest that elimination of Nrl in adult rods may represent a unique therapy for retinal degeneration. PMID:23319618

  5. Metabolic reprogramming in macrophages and dendritic cells in innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Beth; O'Neill, Luke AJ

    2015-01-01

    Activation of macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) by pro-inflammatory stimuli causes them to undergo a metabolic switch towards glycolysis and away from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), similar to the Warburg effect in tumors. However, it is only recently that the mechanisms responsible for this metabolic reprogramming have been elucidated in more detail. The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) plays an important role under conditions of both hypoxia and normoxia. The withdrawal of citrate from the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle has been shown to be critical for lipid biosynthesis in both macrophages and DCs. Interference with this process actually abolishes the ability of DCs to activate T cells. Another TCA cycle intermediate, succinate, activates HIF-1α and promotes inflammatory gene expression. These new insights are providing us with a deeper understanding of the role of metabolic reprogramming in innate immunity. PMID:26045163

  6. Regeneration through reprogramming adult cell identity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Smith, Derek K; Zhang, Chun-Li

    2015-10-01

    The discovery and in vivo application of cell fate reprogramming concepts have jumpstarted new technologies aimed at the functional regeneration of damaged tissues. As most adult organ systems retain only a limited potential for self-regeneration after trauma, the production of fate-specific cells by in vivo transdifferentiation offers a targeted method for tissue bioengineering. Proof-of-principle studies have demonstrated the induction of neural precursor cells, neurons, cardiomyocytes, and insulin-producing β islet cells. Each of these induced cell types survive, mature, and integrate into the local environment in a functionally meaningful manner. Here, we briefly highlight recent advances in the in vivo reprogramming of cell identity and the current challenges that face the clinical relevance of these methods. PMID:26056931

  7. Oxamflatin Treatment Enhances Cloned Porcine Embryo Development and Nuclear Reprogramming*

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jiude; Zhao, Ming-Tao; Whitworth, Kristin M.; Spate, Lee D.; Walters, Eric M.; O'Gorman, Chad; Lee, Kiho; Samuel, Melissa S.; Murphy, Clifton N.; Wells, Kevin; Rivera, Rocio M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Faulty epigenetic reprogramming of somatic nuclei is thought to be the main reason for low cloning efficiency by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), such as Scriptaid, improve developmental competence of SCNT embryos in several species. Another HDACi, Oxamflatin, is about 100 times more potent than Scriptaid in the ability to inhibit nuclear-specific HDACs. The present study determined the effects of Oxamflatin treatment on embryo development, DNA methylation, and gene expression. Oxamflatin treatment enhanced blastocyst formation of SCNT embryos in vitro. Embryo transfer produced more pigs born and fewer mummies from the Oxamflatin-treated group compared to the Scriptaid-treated positive control. Oxamflatin also decreased DNA methylation of POU5F1 regulatory elements and centromeric repeat elements in day-7 blastocysts. When compared to in vitro–fertilized (IVF) embryos, the methylation status of POU5F1, NANOG, and centromeric repeat was similar in the cloned embryos, indicating these genes were successfully reprogrammed. However, compared to the lack of methylation of XIST in day-7 IVF embryos, a higher methylation level in day-7 cloned embryos was observed, implying that X chromosomes were activated in day-7 IVF blastocysts, but were not fully activated in cloned embryos, i.e., reprogramming of XIST was delayed. A time-course analysis of XIST DNA methylation on day-13, -15, -17, and -19 in vivo embryos revealed that XIST methylation initiated at about day 13 and was not completed by day 19. The methylation of the XIST gene in day-19 control cloned embryos was delayed again when compared to in vivo embryos. However, methylation of XIST in Oxamflatin-treated embryos was comparable with in vivo embryos, which further demonstrated that Oxamflatin could accelerate the delayed reprogramming of XIST gene and thus might improve cloning efficiency. PMID:25548976

  8. Phosphatidic Acid Improves Reprogramming to Pluripotency by Reducing Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuan; Du, Mingxia; Wu, Menghua; Zhu, Yanbing; Zhao, Xing; Cao, Xu; Li, Xin; Long, Peipei; Li, Wei; Hu, Baoyang

    2016-01-01

    Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) requires a considerable amount of lipids, such as phosphatidic acid (PA), to meet the needs of subsequent rapid cell division and proliferation. However, it is unclear whether PA, a biosynthetic precursor of lipids, affects reprogramming. By using lentiviral expression of the Yamanaka factors in mouse embryonic fibroblasts for reprogramming, we identified that PA is beneficial for the generation of iPS colonies. Inhibiting the generation of cellular PA dramatically decreased the number of iPSCs. Consistently, 400 μM PA improved iPSC generation by more than 4- to 5-fold. iPSCs generated in the presence of PA (PA-iPS) expressed pluripotent markers such as Oct4 and Nanog, differentiated into cells of the three germ layers in vitro, and contributed to chimeric mice when injected into blastocysts. The improved efficiency was primarily due to reduction of apoptosis as sufficient PA increased the accumulation of cardiolipin in the inner membrane of the mitochondria, which reduced the release of cytochrome c and, in turn, suppressed apoptosis by inhibiting caspase-7. The relatively higher amount of Bcl-2 in PA treatment also inhibited apoptosis. In addition, an accompanied sequential change from epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) at the initial phase of reprogramming to mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) was also detected. Our microarray data, which also supported our results, indicated the presence of significant membrane enrichment genes, thus suggesting that PA may function through membrane-anchored proteins. We thus identified a novel type of culture supplement that improves the efficiency of reprogramming and could be valuable for the generation of high-quality iPS cells. PMID:26451619

  9. Oncogenic KRAS and BRAF Drive Metabolic Reprogramming in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Josiah E; Wang, Xiaojing; Zimmerman, Lisa J; Slebos, Robbert J C; Trenary, Irina A; Young, Jamey D; Li, Ming; Liebler, Daniel C

    2016-09-01

    Metabolic reprogramming, in which altered utilization of glucose and glutamine supports rapid growth, is a hallmark of most cancers. Mutations in the oncogenes KRAS and BRAF drive metabolic reprogramming through enhanced glucose uptake, but the broader impact of these mutations on pathways of carbon metabolism is unknown. Global shotgun proteomic analysis of isogenic DLD-1 and RKO colon cancer cell lines expressing mutant and wild type KRAS or BRAF, respectively, failed to identify significant differences (at least 2-fold) in metabolic protein abundance. However, a multiplexed parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) strategy targeting 73 metabolic proteins identified significant protein abundance increases of 1.25-twofold in glycolysis, the nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathway, glutamine metabolism, and the phosphoserine biosynthetic pathway in cells with KRAS G13D mutations or BRAF V600E mutations. These alterations corresponded to mutant KRAS and BRAF-dependent increases in glucose uptake and lactate production. Metabolic reprogramming and glucose conversion to lactate in RKO cells were proportional to levels of BRAF V600E protein. In DLD-1 cells, these effects were independent of the ratio of KRAS G13D to KRAS wild type protein. A study of 8 KRAS wild type and 8 KRAS mutant human colon tumors confirmed the association of increased expression of glycolytic and glutamine metabolic proteins with KRAS mutant status. Metabolic reprogramming is driven largely by modest (<2-fold) alterations in protein expression, which are not readily detected by the global profiling methods most commonly employed in proteomic studies. The results indicate the superiority of more precise, multiplexed, pathway-targeted analyses to study functional proteome systems. Data are available through MassIVE Accession MSV000079486 at ftp://MSV000079486@massive.ucsd.edu. PMID:27340238

  10. Exploring the Mechanisms of Differentiation, Dedifferentiation, Reprogramming and Transdifferentiation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Jin

    2014-01-01

    We explored the underlying mechanisms of differentiation, dedifferentiation, reprogramming and transdifferentiation (cell type switchings) from landscape and flux perspectives. Lineage reprogramming is a new regenerative method to convert a matured cell into another cell including direct transdifferentiation without undergoing a pluripotent cell state and indirect transdifferentiation with an initial dedifferentiation-reversion (reprogramming) to a pluripotent cell state. Each cell type is quantified by a distinct valley on the potential landscape with higher probability. We investigated three driving forces for cell fate decision making: stochastic fluctuations, gene regulation and induction, which can lead to cell type switchings. We showed that under the driving forces the direct transdifferentiation process proceeds from a differentiated cell valley to another differentiated cell valley through either a distinct stable intermediate state or a certain series of unstable indeterminate states. The dedifferentiation process proceeds through a pluripotent cell state. Barrier height and the corresponding escape time from the valley on the landscape can be used to quantify the stability and efficiency of cell type switchings. We also uncovered the mechanisms of the underlying processes by quantifying the dominant biological paths of cell type switchings on the potential landscape. The dynamics of cell type switchings are determined by both landscape gradient and flux. The flux can lead to the deviations of the dominant biological paths for cell type switchings from the naively expected landscape gradient path. As a result, the corresponding dominant paths of cell type switchings are irreversible. We also classified the mechanisms of cell fate development from our landscape theory: super-critical pitchfork bifurcation, sub-critical pitchfork bifurcation, sub-critical pitchfork with two saddle-node bifurcation, and saddle-node bifurcation. Our model showed good

  11. The androgen receptor cistrome is extensively reprogrammed in human prostate tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pomerantz, Mark M.; Li, Fugen; Takeda, David; Lenci, Romina; Chonkar, Apurva; Chabot, Matthew; Cejas, Paloma; Vazquez, Francisca; Cook, Jennifer; Shivdasani, Ramesh A.; Bowden, Michaela; Lis, Rosina; Hahn, William C.; Kantoff, Philip W.; Brown, Myles; Loda, Massimo; Long, Henry W.; Freedman, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    Master transcription factors interact with DNA to establish cell-type identity and to regulate gene expression in mammalian cells1,2. The genome-wide map of these transcription factor binding sites has been termed the cistrome3. Here we show that the androgen receptor (AR) cistrome undergoes extensive reprogramming during prostate epithelial transformation in man. Using human prostate tissue, we observed a core set of AR binding sites that are consistently reprogrammed in tumors. FOXA1 and HOXB13, co-localized with the reprogrammed AR sites in human tumor tissue. Introduction of FOXA1 and HOXB13 into an immortalized prostate cell line reprogrammed the AR cistrome to resemble that of a prostate tumor, functionally linking these specific factors to AR reprogramming. These findings offer mechanistic insights into a key set of events that drive normal prostate epithelium towards transformation and establish the centrality of epigenetic reprogramming in human prostate tumorigenesis. PMID:26457646

  12. Myc and SAGA rewire an alternative splicing network during early somatic cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Calley L; Coban Akdemir, Zeynep; Wang, Li; Jayakumaran, Gowtham; Trcka, Dan; Weiss, Alexander; Hernandez, J Javier; Pan, Qun; Han, Hong; Xu, Xueping; Xia, Zheng; Salinger, Andrew P; Wilson, Marenda; Vizeacoumar, Frederick; Datti, Alessandro; Li, Wei; Cooney, Austin J; Barton, Michelle C; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Wrana, Jeffrey L; Dent, Sharon Y R

    2015-04-15

    Embryonic stem cells are maintained in a self-renewing and pluripotent state by multiple regulatory pathways. Pluripotent-specific transcriptional networks are sequentially reactivated as somatic cells reprogram to achieve pluripotency. How epigenetic regulators modulate this process and contribute to somatic cell reprogramming is not clear. Here we performed a functional RNAi screen to identify the earliest epigenetic regulators required for reprogramming. We identified components of the SAGA histone acetyltransferase complex, in particular Gcn5, as critical regulators of reprogramming initiation. Furthermore, we showed in mouse pluripotent stem cells that Gcn5 strongly associates with Myc and that, upon initiation of somatic reprogramming, Gcn5 and Myc form a positive feed-forward loop that activates a distinct alternative splicing network and the early acquisition of pluripotency-associated splicing events. These studies expose a Myc-SAGA pathway that drives expression of an essential alternative splicing regulatory network during somatic cell reprogramming. PMID:25877919

  13. Stress Response and Perinatal Reprogramming: Unraveling (Mal)adaptive Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Musazzi, Laura; Marrocco, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    Environmental stressors induce coping strategies in the majority of individuals. The stress response, involving the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis and the consequent release of corticosteroid hormones, is indeed aimed at promoting metabolic, functional, and behavioral adaptations. However, behavioral stress is also associated with fast and long-lasting neurochemical, structural, and behavioral changes, leading to long-term remodeling of glutamate transmission, and increased susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders. Of note, early-life events, both in utero and during the early postnatal life, trigger reprogramming of the stress response, which is often associated with loss of stress resilience and ensuing neurobehavioral (mal)adaptations. Indeed, adverse experiences in early life are known to induce long-term stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders in vulnerable individuals. Here, we discuss recent findings about stress remodeling of excitatory neurotransmission and brain morphology in animal models of behavioral stress. These changes are likely driven by epigenetic factors that lie at the core of the stress-response reprogramming in individuals with a history of perinatal stress. We propose that reprogramming mechanisms may underlie the reorganization of excitatory neurotransmission in the short- and long-term response to stressful stimuli. PMID:27057367

  14. Telomere Dynamics in Human Cells Reprogrammed to Pluripotency

    PubMed Central

    Suhr, Steven T.; Chang, Eun Ah; Rodriguez, Ramon M.; Wang, Kai; Ross, Pablo J.; Beyhan, Zeki; Murthy, Shashanka; Cibelli, Jose B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Human induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs) have enormous potential in the development of cellular models of human disease and represent a potential source of autologous cells and tissues for therapeutic use. A question remains as to the biological age of IPSCs, in particular when isolated from older subjects. Studies of cloned animals indicate that somatic cells reprogrammed to pluripotency variably display telomere elongation, a common indicator of cell “rejuvenation.” Methodology/Principal Findings We examined telomere lengths in human skin fibroblasts isolated from younger and older subjects, fibroblasts converted to IPSCs, and IPSCs redifferentiated through teratoma formation and explant culture. In IPSCs analyzed at passage five (P5), telomeres were significantly elongated in 6/7 lines by >40% and approximated telomere lengths in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). In cell lines derived from three IPSC-teratoma explants cultured to P5, two displayed telomeres shortened to lengths similar to input fibroblasts while the third line retained elongated telomeres. Conclusions/Significance While these results reveal some heterogeneity in the reprogramming process with respect to telomere length, human somatic cells reprogrammed to pluripotency generally displayed elongated telomeres that suggest that they will not age prematurely when isolated from subjects of essentially any age. PMID:19956585

  15. Metabolic reprogramming orchestrates cancer stem cell properties in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yao-An; Wang, Chia-Yu; Hsieh, Yi-Tao; Chen, Yann-Jang; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a subpopulation of tumor cells endowed with self-renewal capacity and are considered as an underlying cause of tumor recurrence and metastasis. The metabolic signatures of CSCs and the mechanisms involved in the regulation of their stem cell-like properties still remain elusive. We utilized nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) CSCs as a model to dissect their metabolic signatures and found that CSCs underwent metabolic shift and mitochondrial resetting distinguished from their differentiated counterparts. In metabolic shift, CSCs showed a greater reliance on glycolysis for energy supply compared with the parental cells. In mitochondrial resetting, the quantity and function of mitochondria of CSCs were modulated by the biogenesis of the organelles, and the round-shaped mitochondria were distributed in a peri-nuclear manner similar to those seen in the stem cells. In addition, we blocked the glycolytic pathway, increased the ROS levels, and depolarized mitochondrial membranes of CSCs, respectively, and examined the effects of these metabolic factors on CSC properties. Intriguingly, the properties of CSCs were curbed when we redirected the quintessential metabolic reprogramming, which indicates that the plasticity of energy metabolism regulated the balance between acquisition and loss of the stemness status. Taken together, we suggest that metabolic reprogramming is critical for CSCs to sustain self-renewal, deter from differentiation and enhance the antioxidant defense mechanism. Characterization of metabolic reprogramming governing CSC properties is paramount to the design of novel therapeutic strategies through metabolic intervention of CSCs. PMID:25483072

  16. Stress Response and Perinatal Reprogramming: Unraveling (Mal)adaptive Strategies.

    PubMed

    Musazzi, Laura; Marrocco, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    Environmental stressors induce coping strategies in the majority of individuals. The stress response, involving the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis and the consequent release of corticosteroid hormones, is indeed aimed at promoting metabolic, functional, and behavioral adaptations. However, behavioral stress is also associated with fast and long-lasting neurochemical, structural, and behavioral changes, leading to long-term remodeling of glutamate transmission, and increased susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders. Of note, early-life events, both in utero and during the early postnatal life, trigger reprogramming of the stress response, which is often associated with loss of stress resilience and ensuing neurobehavioral (mal)adaptations. Indeed, adverse experiences in early life are known to induce long-term stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders in vulnerable individuals. Here, we discuss recent findings about stress remodeling of excitatory neurotransmission and brain morphology in animal models of behavioral stress. These changes are likely driven by epigenetic factors that lie at the core of the stress-response reprogramming in individuals with a history of perinatal stress. We propose that reprogramming mechanisms may underlie the reorganization of excitatory neurotransmission in the short- and long-term response to stressful stimuli. PMID:27057367

  17. Metabolic reprogramming orchestrates cancer stem cell properties in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yao-An; Wang, Chia-Yu; Hsieh, Yi-Tao; Chen, Yann-Jang; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a subpopulation of tumor cells endowed with self-renewal capacity and are considered as an underlying cause of tumor recurrence and metastasis. The metabolic signatures of CSCs and the mechanisms involved in the regulation of their stem cell-like properties still remain elusive. We utilized nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) CSCs as a model to dissect their metabolic signatures and found that CSCs underwent metabolic shift and mitochondrial resetting distinguished from their differentiated counterparts. In metabolic shift, CSCs showed a greater reliance on glycolysis for energy supply compared with the parental cells. In mitochondrial resetting, the quantity and function of mitochondria of CSCs were modulated by the biogenesis of the organelles, and the round-shaped mitochondria were distributed in a peri-nuclear manner similar to those seen in the stem cells. In addition, we blocked the glycolytic pathway, increased the ROS levels, and depolarized mitochondrial membranes of CSCs, respectively, and examined the effects of these metabolic factors on CSC properties. Intriguingly, the properties of CSCs were curbed when we redirected the quintessential metabolic reprogramming, which indicates that the plasticity of energy metabolism regulated the balance between acquisition and loss of the stemness status. Taken together, we suggest that metabolic reprogramming is critical for CSCs to sustain self-renewal, deter from differentiation and enhance the antioxidant defense mechanism. Characterization of metabolic reprogramming governing CSC properties is paramount to the design of novel therapeutic strategies through metabolic intervention of CSCs. PMID:25483072

  18. Biophysical regulation of epigenetic state and cell reprogramming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downing, Timothy L.; Soto, Jennifer; Morez, Constant; Houssin, Timothee; Fritz, Ashley; Yuan, Falei; Chu, Julia; Patel, Shyam; Schaffer, David V.; Li, Song

    2013-12-01

    Biochemical factors can help reprogram somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells, yet the role of biophysical factors during reprogramming is unknown. Here, we show that biophysical cues, in the form of parallel microgrooves on the surface of cell-adhesive substrates, can replace the effects of small-molecule epigenetic modifiers and significantly improve reprogramming efficiency. The mechanism relies on the mechanomodulation of the cells’ epigenetic state. Specifically, decreased histone deacetylase activity and upregulation of the expression of WD repeat domain 5 (WDR5)—a subunit of H3 methyltranferase—by microgrooved surfaces lead to increased histone H3 acetylation and methylation. We also show that microtopography promotes a mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition in adult fibroblasts. Nanofibrous scaffolds with aligned fibre orientation produce effects similar to those produced by microgrooves, suggesting that changes in cell morphology may be responsible for modulation of the epigenetic state. These findings have important implications in cell biology and in the optimization of biomaterials for cell-engineering applications.

  19. Implications and limitations of cellular reprogramming for psychiatric drug development.

    PubMed

    Tobe, Brian T D; Brandel, Michael G; Nye, Jeffrey S; Snyder, Evan Y

    2013-01-01

    Human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) derived from somatic cells of patients have opened possibilities for in vitro modeling of the physiology of neural (and other) cells in psychiatric disease states. Issues in early stages of technology development include (1) establishing a library of cells from adequately phenotyped patients, (2) streamlining laborious, costly hiPSC derivation and characterization, (3) assessing whether mutations or other alterations introduced by reprogramming confound interpretation, (4) developing efficient differentiation strategies to relevant cell types, (5) identifying discernible cellular phenotypes meaningful for cyclic, stress induced or relapsing-remitting diseases, (6) converting phenotypes to screening assays suitable for genome-wide mechanistic studies or large collection compound testing and (7) controlling for variability in relation to disease specificity amidst low sample numbers. Coordination of material for reprogramming from patients well-characterized clinically, genetically and with neuroimaging are beginning, and initial studies have begun to identify cellular phenotypes. Finally, several psychiatric drugs have been found to alter reprogramming efficiency in vitro, suggesting further complexity in applying hiPSCs to psychiatric diseases or that some drugs influence neural differentiation moreso than generally recognized. Despite these challenges, studies utilizing hiPSCs may eventually serve to fill essential niches in the translational pipeline for the discovery of new therapeutics. PMID:24232258

  20. Identification of Spectral Modifications Occurring during Reprogramming of Somatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sandt, Christophe; Féraud, Olivier; Oudrhiri, Noufissa; Bonnet, Marie Laure; Meunier, Marie Claude; Valogne, Yannick; Bertrand, Angelina; Raphaël, Martine; Griscelli, Frank; Turhan, Ali G.; Dumas, Paul; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise

    2012-01-01

    Recent technological advances in cell reprogramming by generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) offer major perspectives in disease modelling and future hopes for providing novel stem cells sources in regenerative medicine. However, research on iPSC still requires refining the criteria of the pluripotency stage of these cells and exploration of their equivalent functionality to human embryonic stem cells (ESC). We report here on the use of infrared microspectroscopy to follow the spectral modification of somatic cells during the reprogramming process. We show that induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) adopt a chemical composition leading to a spectral signature indistinguishable from that of embryonic stem cells (ESC) and entirely different from that of the original somatic cells. Similarly, this technique allows a distinction to be made between partially and fully reprogrammed cells. We conclude that infrared microspectroscopy signature is a novel methodology to evaluate induced pluripotency and can be added to the tests currently used for this purpose. PMID:22514597

  1. Direct reprogramming of human neural stem cells by OCT4.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Beom; Greber, Boris; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Meyer, Johann; Park, Kook In; Zaehres, Holm; Schöler, Hans R

    2009-10-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have been generated from mouse and human somatic cells by ectopic expression of four transcription factors (OCT4 (also called POU5F1), SOX2, c-Myc and KLF4). We previously reported that Oct4 alone is sufficient to reprogram directly adult mouse neural stem cells to iPS cells. Here we report the generation of one-factor human iPS cells from human fetal neural stem cells (one-factor (1F) human NiPS cells) by ectopic expression of OCT4 alone. One-factor human NiPS cells resemble human embryonic stem cells in global gene expression profiles, epigenetic status, as well as pluripotency in vitro and in vivo. These findings demonstrate that the transcription factor OCT4 is sufficient to reprogram human neural stem cells to pluripotency. One-factor iPS cell generation will advance the field further towards understanding reprogramming and generating patient-specific pluripotent stem cells. PMID:19718018

  2. Reprogramming microbes to be pathogen-seeking killers.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In Young; Tan, Mui Hua; Koh, Elvin; Ho, Chun Loong; Poh, Chueh Loo; Chang, Matthew Wook

    2014-04-18

    Recent examples of new genetic circuits that enable cells to acquire biosynthetic capabilities, such as specific pathogen killing, present an attractive therapeutic application of synthetic biology. Herein, we demonstrate a novel genetic circuit that reprograms Escherichia coli to specifically recognize, migrate toward, and eradicate both dispersed and biofilm-encased pathogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells. The reprogrammed E. coli degraded the mature biofilm matrix and killed the latent cells encapsulated within by expressing and secreting the antimicrobial peptide microcin S and the nuclease DNaseI upon the detection of quorum sensing molecules naturally secreted by P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, the reprogrammed E. coli exhibited directed motility toward the pathogen through regulated expression of CheZ in response to the quorum sensing molecules. By integrating the pathogen-directed motility with the dual antimicrobial activity in E. coli, we achieved signifincantly improved killing activity against planktonic and mature biofilm cells due to target localization, thus creating an active pathogen seeking killer E. coli. PMID:24020906

  3. Polycomb Repressed Genes have Permissive Enhancers that Initiate Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Taberlay, Phillippa C.; Kelly, Theresa K.; Liu, Chun-Chi; You, Jueng Soo; de Carvalho, Daniel D.; Miranda, Tina B.; Zhou, Xianghong J.; Liang, Gangning; Jones, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Key regulatory genes, suppressed by Polycomb and H3K27me3, become active during normal differentiation and induced reprogramming. Using the well-characterized enhancer/promoter pair of MYOD1 as a model, we have identified a critical role for enhancers in reprogramming. We observed an unexpected nucleosome depleted region (NDR) at the H3K4me1-enriched enhancer at which transcriptional regulators initially bind, leading to subsequent changes in the chromatin at the cognate promoter. Exogenous Myod1 activates its own transcription by binding first at the enhancer leading to an NDR and transcription-permissive chromatin at the associated MYOD1 promoter. Exogenous OCT4 also binds first to the permissive MYOD1 enhancer, but has a different effect on the cognate promoter, where the monovalent H3K27me3-marks are converted to the bivalent state characteristic of stem cells. Genome-wide, a high percentage of Polycomb targets are associated with putative enhancers in permissive states, suggesting they may provide a widespread avenue for the initiation of cell-fate reprogramming. PMID:22153073

  4. Leaf-galling phylloxera on grapes reprograms host metabolism and morphology

    PubMed Central

    Nabity, Paul D.; Haus, Miranda J.; Berenbaum, May R.; DeLucia, Evan H.

    2013-01-01

    Endoparasitism by gall-forming insects dramatically alters the plant phenotype by altering growth patterns and modifying plant organs in ways that appear to directly benefit the gall former. Because these morphological and physiological changes are linked to the presence of the insect, the induced phenotype is said to function as an extension of the parasite, albeit by unknown mechanisms. Here we report the gall-forming aphid-like parasite phylloxera, Daktulosphaira vitifoliae, induces stomata on the adaxial surface of grape leaves where stomata typically do not occur. We characterized the function of the phylloxera-induced stomata by tracing transport of assimilated carbon. Because induction of stomata suggests a significant manipulation of primary metabolism, we also characterized the gall transcriptome to infer the level of global reconfiguration of primary metabolism and the subsequent changes in downstream secondary metabolism. Phylloxera feeding induced stomata formation in proximity to the insect and promoted the assimilation and importation of carbon into the gall. Gene expression related to water, nutrient, and mineral transport; glycolysis; and fermentation increased in leaf-gall tissues. This shift from an autotrophic to a heterotrophic profile occurred concurrently with decreased gene expression for nonmevalonate and terpenoid synthesis and increased gene expression in shikimate and phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, secondary metabolite systems that alter defense status in grapes. These functional insect-induced stomata thus comprise part of an extended phenotype, whereby D. vitifoliae globally reprograms grape leaf development to alter patterns of primary metabolism, nutrient mobilization, and defense investment in favor of the galling habit. PMID:24067657

  5. Leaf-galling phylloxera on grapes reprograms host metabolism and morphology.

    PubMed

    Nabity, Paul D; Haus, Miranda J; Berenbaum, May R; DeLucia, Evan H

    2013-10-01

    Endoparasitism by gall-forming insects dramatically alters the plant phenotype by altering growth patterns and modifying plant organs in ways that appear to directly benefit the gall former. Because these morphological and physiological changes are linked to the presence of the insect, the induced phenotype is said to function as an extension of the parasite, albeit by unknown mechanisms. Here we report the gall-forming aphid-like parasite phylloxera, Daktulosphaira vitifoliae, induces stomata on the adaxial surface of grape leaves where stomata typically do not occur. We characterized the function of the phylloxera-induced stomata by tracing transport of assimilated carbon. Because induction of stomata suggests a significant manipulation of primary metabolism, we also characterized the gall transcriptome to infer the level of global reconfiguration of primary metabolism and the subsequent changes in downstream secondary metabolism. Phylloxera feeding induced stomata formation in proximity to the insect and promoted the assimilation and importation of carbon into the gall. Gene expression related to water, nutrient, and mineral transport; glycolysis; and fermentation increased in leaf-gall tissues. This shift from an autotrophic to a heterotrophic profile occurred concurrently with decreased gene expression for nonmevalonate and terpenoid synthesis and increased gene expression in shikimate and phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, secondary metabolite systems that alter defense status in grapes. These functional insect-induced stomata thus comprise part of an extended phenotype, whereby D. vitifoliae globally reprograms grape leaf development to alter patterns of primary metabolism, nutrient mobilization, and defense investment in favor of the galling habit. PMID:24067657

  6. Fibroblast Growth Factors and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Promote Cardiac Reprogramming under Defined Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yamakawa, Hiroyuki; Muraoka, Naoto; Miyamoto, Kazutaka; Sadahiro, Taketaro; Isomi, Mari; Haginiwa, Sho; Kojima, Hidenori; Umei, Tomohiko; Akiyama, Mizuha; Kuishi, Yuki; Kurokawa, Junko; Furukawa, Tetsushi; Fukuda, Keiichi; Ieda, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Summary Fibroblasts can be directly reprogrammed into cardiomyocyte-like cells (iCMs) by overexpression of cardiac transcription factors, including Gata4, Mef2c, and Tbx5; however, this process is inefficient under serum-based culture conditions, in which conversion of partially reprogrammed cells into fully reprogrammed functional iCMs has been a major hurdle. Here, we report that a combination of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 2, FGF10, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), termed FFV, promoted cardiac reprogramming under defined serum-free conditions, increasing spontaneously beating iCMs by 100-fold compared with those under conventional serum-based conditions. Mechanistically, FFV activated multiple cardiac transcriptional regulators and converted partially reprogrammed cells into functional iCMs through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphoinositol 3-kinase/AKT pathways. Moreover, FFV enabled cardiac reprogramming with only Mef2c and Tbx5 through the induction of cardiac reprogramming factors, including Gata4. Thus, defined culture conditions promoted the quality of cardiac reprogramming, and this finding provides new insight into the mechanism of cardiac reprogramming. PMID:26626177

  7. MiR-31/SDHA Axis Regulates Reprogramming Efficiency through Mitochondrial Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Man Ryul; Mantel, Charlie; Lee, Sang A; Moon, Sung-Hwan; Broxmeyer, Hal E

    2016-07-12

    Metabolism is remodeled when somatic cells are reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), but the majority of iPSCs are not fully reprogrammed. In a shift essential for reprogramming, iPSCs use less mitochondrial respiration but increased anaerobic glycolysis for bioenergetics. We found that microRNA 31 (miR-31) suppressed succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit A (SDHA) expression, vital for mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complex II. MiR-31 overexpression in partially reprogrammed iPSCs lowered SDHA expression levels and oxygen consumption rates to that of fully reprogrammed iPSCs, but did not increase the proportion of fully reprogrammed TRA1-60(+) cells in colonies unless miR-31 was co-transduced with Yamanaka factors, which resulted in a 2.7-fold increase in full reprogramming. Thus switching from mitochondrial respiration to glycolytic metabolism through regulation of the miR-31/SDHA axis is critical for lowering the reprogramming threshold. This is supportive of multi-stage reprogramming whereby metabolic remodeling is fundamental. PMID:27346679

  8. Directed Dedifferentiation Using Partial Reprogramming Induces Invasive Phenotype in Melanoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Knappe, Nathalie; Novak, Daniel; Weina, Kasia; Bernhardt, Mathias; Reith, Maike; Larribere, Lionel; Hölzel, Michael; Tüting, Thomas; Gebhardt, Christoffer; Umansky, Viktor; Utikal, Jochen

    2016-04-01

    The combination of cancer-focused studies and research related to nuclear reprogramming has gained increasing importance since both processes-reprogramming towards pluripotency and malignant transformation-share essential features. Studies have revealed that incomplete reprogramming of somatic cells leads to malignant transformation indicating that epigenetic regulation associated with iPSC generation can drive cancer development [J Mol Cell Biol 2011;341-350; Cell 2012;151:1617-1632; Cell 2014;156:663-677]. However, so far it is unclear whether incomplete reprogramming also affects cancer cells and their function. In the context of melanoma, dedifferentiation correlates to therapy resistance in mouse studies and has been documented in melanoma patients [Nature 2012;490:412-416; Clin Cancer Res 2014;20:2498-2499]. Therefore, we sought to investigate directed dedifferentiation using incomplete reprogramming of melanoma cells. Using a murine model we investigated the effects of partial reprogramming on the cellular plasticity of melanoma cells. We demonstrate for the first time that induced partial reprogramming results in a reversible phenotype switch in melanoma cells. Partially reprogrammed cells at day 12 after transgene induction display elevated invasive potential in vitro and increased lung colonization in vivo. Additionally, using global gene expression analysis of partially reprogrammed cells, we identified SNAI3 as a novel invasion-related marker in human melanoma. SNAI3 expression correlates with tumor thickness in primary melanomas and thus, may be of prognostic value. In summary, we show that investigating intermediate states during the process of reprogramming melanoma cells can reveal novel insights into the pathogenesis of melanoma progression. We propose that deeper analysis of partially reprogrammed melanoma cells may contribute to identification of yet unknown signaling pathways that can drive melanoma progression. Stem Cells 2016;34:832-846. PMID

  9. The human mitochondrial transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Tim R.; Neph, Shane; Dinger, Marcel E.; Crawford, Joanna; Smith, Martin A.; Shearwood, Anne-Marie J.; Haugen, Eric; Bracken, Cameron P.; Rackham, Oliver; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Mattick, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The human mitochondrial genome comprises a distinct genetic system transcribed as precursor polycistronic transcripts that are subsequently cleaved to generate individual mRNAs, tRNAs and rRNAs. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of the human mitochondrial transcriptome across multiple cell lines and tissues. Using directional deep sequencing and parallel analysis of RNA ends, we demonstrate wide variation in mitochondrial transcript abundance and precisely resolve transcript processing and maturation events. We identify previously undescribed transcripts, including small RNAs, and observe the enrichment of several nuclear RNAs in mitochondria. Using high-throughput in vivo DNaseI footprinting, we establish the global profile of DNA-binding protein occupancy across the mitochondrial genome at single nucleotide resolution, revealing regulatory features at mitochondrial transcription initiation sites and functional insights into disease-associated variants. This integrated analysis of the mitochondrial transcriptome reveals unexpected complexity in the regulation, expression, and processing of mitochondrial RNA, and provides a resource for future studies of mitochondrial function (accessed at mitochondria.matticklab.com). PMID:21854988

  10. p18 inhibits reprogramming through inactivation of Cdk4/6

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shaohua; Cao, Jiani; Sun, Hongyan; Liu, Kun; Li, Yaqiong; Zhao, Tongbiao

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), including embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), show atypical cell cycle regulation characterized by a high proliferation rate and a shorter G1 phase compared with somatic cells. The mechanisms by which somatic cells remodel their cell cycle to achieve the high proliferation rate of PSCs during reprogramming are unclear. Here we identify that the Ink4 protein p18, which is expressed at high levels in somatic cells but at low levels in PSCs, is a roadblock to successful reprogramming. Mild inhibition of p18 expression enhances reprogramming efficiency, while ectopic expression of p18 completely blocks reprogramming. Mechanistic studies show that expression of wild-type p18, but not a p18D68N mutant which cannot inhibit Cdk4/6, down-regulates expression of Cdk4/6 target genes involved in DNA synthesis (TK, TS, DHFR, PCNA) and cell cycle regulation (CDK1 and CCNA2) and thus inhibits reprogramming. These results indicate that p18 blocks reprogramming by targeting Cdk4/6-mediated cell cycle regulation. Taken together, our results define a novel pathway that inhibits somatic cell reprogramming, and provide a new target to enhance reprogramming efficiency. PMID:27484146

  11. Study of mitochondrial respiratory defects on reprogramming to human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hung, Sandy S C; Van Bergen, Nicole J; Jackson, Stacey; Liang, Helena; Mackey, David A; Hernández, Damián; Lim, Shiang Y; Hewitt, Alex W; Trounce, Ian; Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C B

    2016-05-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells into a pluripotent state is known to be accompanied by extensive restructuring of mitochondria and switch in metabolic requirements. Here we utilized Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) as a mitochondrial disease model to study the effects of homoplasmic mtDNA mutations and subsequent oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) defects in reprogramming. We obtained fibroblasts from a total of 6 LHON patients and control subjects, and showed a significant defect in complex I respiration in LHON fibroblasts by high-resolution respiratory analysis. Using episomal vector reprogramming, our results indicated that human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) generation is feasible in LHON fibroblasts. In particular, LHON-specific OXPHOS defects in fibroblasts only caused a mild reduction and did not significantly affect reprogramming efficiency, suggesting that hiPSC reprogramming can tolerate a certain degree of OXPHOS defects. Our results highlighted the induction of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis (TFAM, NRF1), mitochondrial fusion (MFN1, MFN2) and glycine production (GCAT) during reprogramming. However, LHON-associated OXPHOS defects did not alter the kinetics or expression levels of these genes during reprogramming. Together, our study provides new insights into the effects of mtDNA mutation and OXPHOS defects in reprogramming and genes associated with various aspects of mitochondrial biology. PMID:27127184

  12. Single transcription factor reprogramming of hair follicle dermal papilla cells to induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Su-Yi; Bouwman, Britta Am; Ang, Yen-Sin; Kim, Soo Jeong; Lee, Dung-Fang; Lemischka, Ihor R; Rendl, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Reprogramming patient-specific somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has great potential to develop feasible regenerative therapies. However, several issues need to be resolved such as ease, efficiency, and safety of generation of iPS cells. Many different cell types have been reprogrammed, most conveniently even peripheral blood mononuclear cells. However, they typically require the enforced expression of several transcription factors, posing mutagenesis risks as exogenous genetic material. To reduce this risk, iPS cells were previously generated with Oct4 alone from rather inaccessible neural stem cells that endogenously express the remaining reprogramming factors and very recently from fibroblasts with Oct4 alone in combination with additional small molecules. Here, we exploit that dermal papilla (DP) cells from hair follicles in the skin express all but one reprogramming factors to show that these accessible cells can be reprogrammed into iPS cells with the single transcription factor Oct4 and without further manipulation. Reprogramming was already achieved after 3 weeks and with efficiencies similar to other cell types reprogrammed with four factors. Dermal papilla-derived iPS cells are comparable to embryonic stem cells with respect to morphology, gene expression, and pluripotency. We conclude that DP cells may represent a preferred cell type for reprogramming accessible cells with less manipulation and for ultimately establishing safe conditions in the future by replacing Oct4 with small molecules. PMID:21563278

  13. Study of mitochondrial respiratory defects on reprogramming to human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Sandy S.C.; Van Bergen, Nicole J.; Jackson, Stacey; Liang, Helena; Mackey, David A.; Hernández, Damián; Lim, Shiang Y.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Trounce, Ian; Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C.B.

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells into a pluripotent state is known to be accompanied by extensive restructuring of mitochondria and switch in metabolic requirements. Here we utilized Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) as a mitochondrial disease model to study the effects of homoplasmic mtDNA mutations and subsequent oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) defects in reprogramming. We obtained fibroblasts from a total of 6 LHON patients and control subjects, and showed a significant defect in complex I respiration in LHON fibroblasts by high-resolution respiratory analysis. Using episomal vector reprogramming, our results indicated that human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) generation is feasible in LHON fibroblasts. In particular, LHON-specific OXPHOS defects in fibroblasts only caused a mild reduction and did not significantly affect reprogramming efficiency, suggesting that hiPSC reprogramming can tolerate a certain degree of OXPHOS defects. Our results highlighted the induction of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis (TFAM, NRF1), mitochondrial fusion (MFN1, MFN2) and glycine production (GCAT) during reprogramming. However, LHON-associated OXPHOS defects did not alter the kinetics or expression levels of these genes during reprogramming. Together, our study provides new insights into the effects of mtDNA mutation and OXPHOS defects in reprogramming and genes associated with various aspects of mitochondrial biology. PMID:27127184

  14. SCL/TAL1 in Hematopoiesis and Cellular Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Hoang, T; Lambert, J A; Martin, R

    2016-01-01

    SCL, a transcription factor of the basic helix-loop-helix family, is a master regulator of hematopoiesis. Scl specifies lateral plate mesoderm to a hematopoietic fate and establishes boundaries by inhibiting the cardiac lineage. A combinatorial interaction between Scl and Vegfa/Flk1 sets in motion the first wave of primitive hematopoiesis. Subsequently, definitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) emerge from the embryo proper via an endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition controlled by Runx1, acting with Scl and Gata2. Past this stage, Scl in steady state HSCs is redundant with Lyl1, a highly homologous factor. However, Scl is haploinsufficient in stress response, when a rare subpopulation of HSCs with very long term repopulating capacity is called into action. SCL activates transcription by recruiting a core complex on DNA that necessarily includes E2A/HEB, GATA1-3, LIM-only proteins LMO1/2, LDB1, and an extended complex comprising ETO2, RUNX1, ERG, or FLI1. These interactions confer multifunctionality to a complex that can control cell proliferation in erythroid progenitors or commitment to terminal differentiation through variations in single component. Ectopic SCL and LMO1/2 expression in immature thymocytes activates of a stem cell gene network and reprogram cells with a finite lifespan into self-renewing preleukemic stem cells (pre-LSCs), an initiating event in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias. Interestingly, fate conversion of fibroblasts to hematoendothelial cells requires not only Scl and Lmo2 but also Gata2, Runx1, and Erg, indicating a necessary collaboration between these transcription factors for hematopoietic reprogramming. Nonetheless, full reprogramming into self-renewing multipotent HSCs may require additional factors and most likely, a permissive microenvironment. PMID:27137657

  15. Zfp296 is a novel, pluripotent-specific reprogramming factor.

    PubMed

    Fischedick, Gerrit; Klein, Diana C; Wu, Guangming; Esch, Daniel; Höing, Susanne; Han, Dong Wook; Reinhardt, Peter; Hergarten, Kerstin; Tapia, Natalia; Schöler, Hans R; Sterneckert, Jared L

    2012-01-01

    Expression of the four transcription factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc (OSKM) is sufficient to reprogram somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPSCs). However, this process is slow and inefficient compared with the fusion of somatic cells with embryonic stem cells (ESCs), indicating that ESCs express additional factors that can enhance the efficiency of reprogramming. We had previously developed a method to detect and isolate early neural induction intermediates during the differentiation of mouse ESCs. Using the gene expression profiles of these intermediates, we identified 23 ESC-specific transcripts and tested each for the ability to enhance iPSC formation. Of the tested factors, zinc finger protein 296 (Zfp296) led to the largest increase in mouse iPSC formation. We confirmed that Zfp296 was specifically expressed in pluripotent stem cells and germ cells. Zfp296 in combination with OSKM induced iPSC formation earlier and more efficiently than OSKM alone. Through mouse chimera and teratoma formation, we demonstrated that the resultant iPSCs were pluripotent. We showed that Zfp296 activates transcription of the Oct4 gene via the germ cell-specific conserved region 4 (CR4), and when overexpressed in mouse ESCs leads to upregulation of Nanog expression and downregulation of the expression of differentiation markers, including Sox17, Eomes, and T, which is consistent with the observation that Zfp296 enhances the efficiency of reprogramming. In contrast, knockdown of Zfp296 in ESCs leads to the expression of differentiation markers. Finally, we demonstrated that expression of Zfp296 in ESCs inhibits, but does not block, differentiation into neural cells. PMID:22485183

  16. Cellular reprogramming through mitogen-activated protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Justin; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Lassowskat, Ines; Böttcher, Christoph; Scheel, Dierk

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are conserved eukaryote signaling modules where MAPKs, as the final kinases in the cascade, phosphorylate protein substrates to regulate cellular processes. While some progress in the identification of MAPK substrates has been made in plants, the knowledge on the spectrum of substrates and their mechanistic action is still fragmentary. In this focused review, we discuss the biological implications of the data in our original paper (Sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase activation reprograms defense metabolism and phosphoprotein profile in Arabidopsis thaliana; Frontiers in Plant Science 5: 554) in the context of related research. In our work, we mimicked in vivo activation of two stress-activated MAPKs, MPK3 and MPK6, through transgenic manipulation of Arabidopsis thaliana and used phosphoproteomics analysis to identify potential novel MAPK substrates. Here, we plotted the identified putative MAPK substrates (and downstream phosphoproteins) as a global protein clustering network. Based on a highly stringent selection confidence level, the core networks highlighted a MAPK-induced cellular reprogramming at multiple levels of gene and protein expression—including transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational, post-translational (such as protein modification, folding, and degradation) steps, and also protein re-compartmentalization. Additionally, the increase in putative substrates/phosphoproteins of energy metabolism and various secondary metabolite biosynthesis pathways coincides with the observed accumulation of defense antimicrobial substances as detected by metabolome analysis. Furthermore, detection of protein networks in phospholipid or redox elements suggests activation of downstream signaling events. Taken in context with other studies, MAPKs are key regulators that reprogram cellular events to orchestrate defense signaling in eukaryotes. PMID:26579181

  17. Zfp296 Is a Novel, Pluripotent-Specific Reprogramming Factor

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guangming; Esch, Daniel; Höing, Susanne; Han, Dong Wook; Reinhardt, Peter; Hergarten, Kerstin; Tapia, Natalia; Schöler, Hans R.; Sterneckert, Jared L.

    2012-01-01

    Expression of the four transcription factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc (OSKM) is sufficient to reprogram somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPSCs). However, this process is slow and inefficient compared with the fusion of somatic cells with embryonic stem cells (ESCs), indicating that ESCs express additional factors that can enhance the efficiency of reprogramming. We had previously developed a method to detect and isolate early neural induction intermediates during the differentiation of mouse ESCs. Using the gene expression profiles of these intermediates, we identified 23 ESC-specific transcripts and tested each for the ability to enhance iPSC formation. Of the tested factors, zinc finger protein 296 (Zfp296) led to the largest increase in mouse iPSC formation. We confirmed that Zfp296 was specifically expressed in pluripotent stem cells and germ cells. Zfp296 in combination with OSKM induced iPSC formation earlier and more efficiently than OSKM alone. Through mouse chimera and teratoma formation, we demonstrated that the resultant iPSCs were pluripotent. We showed that Zfp296 activates transcription of the Oct4 gene via the germ cell–specific conserved region 4 (CR4), and when overexpressed in mouse ESCs leads to upregulation of Nanog expression and downregulation of the expression of differentiation markers, including Sox17, Eomes, and T, which is consistent with the observation that Zfp296 enhances the efficiency of reprogramming. In contrast, knockdown of Zfp296 in ESCs leads to the expression of differentiation markers. Finally, we demonstrated that expression of Zfp296 in ESCs inhibits, but does not block, differentiation into neural cells. PMID:22485183

  18. Hacker within! Ehrlichia chaffeensis Effector Driven Phagocyte Reprogramming Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Lina, Taslima T.; Farris, Tierra; Luo, Tian; Mitra, Shubhajit; Zhu, Bing; McBride, Jere W.

    2016-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is a small, gram negative, obligately intracellular bacterium that preferentially infects mononuclear phagocytes. It is the etiologic agent of human monocytotropic ehrlichiosis (HME), an emerging life-threatening tick-borne zoonosis. Mechanisms by which E. chaffeensis establishes intracellular infection, and avoids host defenses are not well understood, but involve functionally relevant host-pathogen interactions associated with tandem and ankyrin repeat effector proteins. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie Ehrlichia host cellular reprogramming strategies that enable intracellular survival. PMID:27303657

  19. Reprogramming for Cardiac Regeneration-Strategies for Innovation.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Galera, Teresa; Lucia, Alejandro; Gallardo, María Esther

    2016-09-01

    It is well-known that the human myocardium has a low capacity for self-regeneration. This fact is especially important after acute myocardial infarction with subsequent heart failure and adverse tissue remodeling. New potential strategies have recently emerged for treating heart diseases, such as the possibility of generating large quantities of cardiomyocytes through genetic iPSC reprogramming, transdifferentiation for in vitro disease modeling, in vivo therapies or telomerase gene reactivation. Approaches based on these techniques may represent the new horizon in cardiology with an appropriate 180-degree turn perspective. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1849-1851, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27128961

  20. Reprogramming of cassava (Manihot esculenta) microspores towards sporophytic development.

    PubMed

    Perera, P I P; Ordoñez, C A; Dedicova, B; Ortega, P E M

    2014-01-01

    Gametes have the unique potential to enter the sporophytic pathway, called androgenesis. The plants produced are usually haploid and recombinant due to the preceding meiosis and they can double their chromosome number to form doubled haploids, which are completely homozygous. Availability of the doubled haploids facilitates mapping the genes of agronomically important traits, shortening the time of the breeding process required to produce new hybrids and homozygous varieties, and saving the time and cost for inbreeding. This study aimed to test the feasibility of using isolated and in vitro cultured immature cassava (Manihot esculenta) microspores to reprogramme and initiate sporophytic development. Different culture media and different concentrations of two ion components (Cu(2+) and Fe(2+)) were tested in two genotypes of cassava. External structural changes, nuclear divisions and cellular changes during reprogramming were analysed by scanning electron microscopy, by staining with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, and through classical histology and transmission electron microscopy. In two cassava genotypes, different developmental stages of microspores were found to initiate sporophytic cell divisions, that is, with tetrads of TMS 60444 and with mid or late uni-nucleate microspores of SM 1219-9. In the modified NLN medium (NLNS), microspore enlargements were observed. The medium supplemented with either sodium ferrous ethylene-diamine-tetraacetic acid (NaFeEDTA) or CuSO4·5H2O induced sporophytic cell division in both genotypes. A low frequency of the reprogramming and the presence of non-responsive microspores among the responsive ones in tetrads were found to be related to the viability and exine formation of the microspores. The present study clearly demonstrated that reprogramming occurs much faster in isolated microspore culture than in anther culture. This paves the way for the development of an efficient technique for the production of homozygous lines in

  1. Metabolic Reprogramming: A Cancer Hallmark Even Warburg Did Not Anticipate

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Patrick S.; Thompson, Craig B.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer metabolism has long been equated with aerobic glycolysis, seen by early biochemists as primitive and inefficient. Despite these early beliefs, the metabolic signatures of cancer cells are not passive responses to damaged mitochondria, but result from oncogene-directed metabolic reprogramming required to support anabolic growth. Recent evidence suggests that metabolites themselves can be oncogenic by altering cell signaling and blocking cellular differentiation. No longer can cancer-associated alterations in metabolism be viewed as an indirect response to cell proliferation and survival signals. We contend that altered metabolism has attained the status of a core hallmark of cancer. PMID:22439925

  2. Reprogrammed viruses as cancer therapeutics: targeted, armed and shielded

    PubMed Central

    Cattaneo, Roberto; Miest, Tanner; Shashkova, Elena V.; Barry, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Virotherapy is currently undergoing a renaissance, based on our improved understanding of virus biology and genetics and our better knowledge of many different types of cancer. Viruses can be reprogrammed into oncolytic vectors by combining three types of modification: targeting, arming and shielding. Targeting introduces multiple layers of cancer specificity and improves safety and efficacy; arming occurs through the expression of prodrug convertases and cytokines; and coating with polymers and the sequential usage of different envelopes or capsids provides shielding from the host immune response. Virus-based therapeutics are beginning to find their place in cancer clinical practice, in combination with chemotherapy and radiation. PMID:18552863

  3. Reprogramming of cassava (Manihot esculenta) microspores towards sporophytic development

    PubMed Central

    Perera, P. I. P.; Ordoñez, C. A.; Dedicova, B.; Ortega, P. E. M.

    2014-01-01

    Gametes have the unique potential to enter the sporophytic pathway, called androgenesis. The plants produced are usually haploid and recombinant due to the preceding meiosis and they can double their chromosome number to form doubled haploids, which are completely homozygous. Availability of the doubled haploids facilitates mapping the genes of agronomically important traits, shortening the time of the breeding process required to produce new hybrids and homozygous varieties, and saving the time and cost for inbreeding. This study aimed to test the feasibility of using isolated and in vitro cultured immature cassava (Manihot esculenta) microspores to reprogramme and initiate sporophytic development. Different culture media and different concentrations of two ion components (Cu2+ and Fe2+) were tested in two genotypes of cassava. External structural changes, nuclear divisions and cellular changes during reprogramming were analysed by scanning electron microscopy, by staining with 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, and through classical histology and transmission electron microscopy. In two cassava genotypes, different developmental stages of microspores were found to initiate sporophytic cell divisions, that is, with tetrads of TMS 60444 and with mid or late uni-nucleate microspores of SM 1219-9. In the modified NLN medium (NLNS), microspore enlargements were observed. The medium supplemented with either sodium ferrous ethylene-diamine-tetraacetic acid (NaFeEDTA) or CuSO4·5H2O induced sporophytic cell division in both genotypes. A low frequency of the reprogramming and the presence of non-responsive microspores among the responsive ones in tetrads were found to be related to the viability and exine formation of the microspores. The present study clearly demonstrated that reprogramming occurs much faster in isolated microspore culture than in anther culture. This paves the way for the development of an efficient technique for the production of homozygous lines in

  4. Aging, Rejuvenation, and Epigenetic Reprogramming: Resetting the Aging Clock

    PubMed Central

    Rando, Thomas A.; Chang, Howard Y.

    2012-01-01

    The underlying cause of aging remains one of the central mysteries of biology. Recent studies in several different systems suggest that not only may the rate of aging be modified by environmental and genetic factors, but also that the aging clock can be reversed, restoring characteristics of youthfulness to aged cells and tissues. This Review focuses on the emerging biology of rejuvenation through the lens of epigenetic reprogramming. By defining youthfulness and senescence as epigenetic states, a framework for asking new questions about the aging process emerges. PMID:22265401

  5. Hacker within! Ehrlichia chaffeensis Effector Driven Phagocyte Reprogramming Strategy.

    PubMed

    Lina, Taslima T; Farris, Tierra; Luo, Tian; Mitra, Shubhajit; Zhu, Bing; McBride, Jere W

    2016-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is a small, gram negative, obligately intracellular bacterium that preferentially infects mononuclear phagocytes. It is the etiologic agent of human monocytotropic ehrlichiosis (HME), an emerging life-threatening tick-borne zoonosis. Mechanisms by which E. chaffeensis establishes intracellular infection, and avoids host defenses are not well understood, but involve functionally relevant host-pathogen interactions associated with tandem and ankyrin repeat effector proteins. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie Ehrlichia host cellular reprogramming strategies that enable intracellular survival. PMID:27303657

  6. Elucidation of the molecular responses to waterlogging in Jatropha roots by transcriptome profiling

    PubMed Central

    Juntawong, Piyada; Sirikhachornkit, Anchalee; Pimjan, Rachaneeporn; Sonthirod, Chutima; Sangsrakru, Duangjai; Yoocha, Thippawan; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke; Srinives, Peerasak

    2014-01-01

    Jatropha (Jatropha curcas) is a promising oil-seed crop for biodiesel production. However, the species is highly sensitive to waterlogging, which can result in stunted growth and yield loss. To date, the molecular mechanisms underlying the responses to waterlogging in Jatropha remain elusive. Here, the transcriptome adjustment of Jatropha roots to waterlogging was examined by high-throughput RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq). The results indicated that 24 h of waterlogging caused significant changes in mRNA abundance of 1968 genes. Comprehensive gene ontology and functional enrichment analysis of root transcriptome revealed that waterlogging promoted responses to hypoxia and anaerobic respiration. On the other hand, the stress inhibited carbohydrate synthesis, cell wall biogenesis, and growth. The results also highlighted the roles of ethylene, nitrate, and nitric oxide in waterlogging acclimation. In addition, transcriptome profiling identified 85 waterlogging-induced transcription factors including members of AP2/ERF, MYB, and WRKY families implying that reprogramming of gene expression is a vital mechanism for waterlogging acclimation. Comparative analysis of differentially regulated transcripts in response to waterlogging among Arabidopsis, gray poplar, Jatropha, and rice further revealed not only conserved but species-specific regulation. Our findings unraveled the molecular responses to waterlogging in Jatropha and provided new perspectives for developing a waterlogging tolerant cultivar in the future. PMID:25520726

  7. Elucidation of the molecular responses to waterlogging in Jatropha roots by transcriptome profiling.

    PubMed

    Juntawong, Piyada; Sirikhachornkit, Anchalee; Pimjan, Rachaneeporn; Sonthirod, Chutima; Sangsrakru, Duangjai; Yoocha, Thippawan; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke; Srinives, Peerasak

    2014-01-01

    Jatropha (Jatropha curcas) is a promising oil-seed crop for biodiesel production. However, the species is highly sensitive to waterlogging, which can result in stunted growth and yield loss. To date, the molecular mechanisms underlying the responses to waterlogging in Jatropha remain elusive. Here, the transcriptome adjustment of Jatropha roots to waterlogging was examined by high-throughput RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq). The results indicated that 24 h of waterlogging caused significant changes in mRNA abundance of 1968 genes. Comprehensive gene ontology and functional enrichment analysis of root transcriptome revealed that waterlogging promoted responses to hypoxia and anaerobic respiration. On the other hand, the stress inhibited carbohydrate synthesis, cell wall biogenesis, and growth. The results also highlighted the roles of ethylene, nitrate, and nitric oxide in waterlogging acclimation. In addition, transcriptome profiling identified 85 waterlogging-induced transcription factors including members of AP2/ERF, MYB, and WRKY families implying that reprogramming of gene expression is a vital mechanism for waterlogging acclimation. Comparative analysis of differentially regulated transcripts in response to waterlogging among Arabidopsis, gray poplar, Jatropha, and rice further revealed not only conserved but species-specific regulation. Our findings unraveled the molecular responses to waterlogging in Jatropha and provided new perspectives for developing a waterlogging tolerant cultivar in the future. PMID:25520726

  8. Chondrocyte channel transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Rebecca; May, Hannah; Mobasheri, Ali; Barrett-Jolley, Richard

    2013-01-01

    To date, a range of ion channels have been identified in chondrocytes using a number of different techniques, predominantly electrophysiological and/or biomolecular; each of these has its advantages and disadvantages. Here we aim to compare and contrast the data available from biophysical and microarray experiments. This letter analyses recent transcriptomics datasets from chondrocytes, accessible from the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI). We discuss whether such bioinformatic analysis of microarray datasets can potentially accelerate identification and discovery of ion channels in chondrocytes. The ion channels which appear most frequently across these microarray datasets are discussed, along with their possible functions. We discuss whether functional or protein data exist which support the microarray data. A microarray experiment comparing gene expression in osteoarthritis and healthy cartilage is also discussed and we verify the differential expression of 2 of these genes, namely the genes encoding large calcium-activated potassium (BK) and aquaporin channels. PMID:23995703

  9. Establishing Substantial Equivalence: Transcriptomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudo, María Marcela; Powers, Stephen J.; Mitchell, Rowan A. C.; Shewry, Peter R.

    Regulatory authorities in Western Europe require transgenic crops to be substantially equivalent to conventionally bred forms if they are to be approved for commercial production. One way to establish substantial equivalence is to compare the transcript profiles of developing grain and other tissues of transgenic and conventionally bred lines, in order to identify any unintended effects of the transformation process. We present detailed protocols for transcriptomic comparisons of developing wheat grain and leaf material, and illustrate their use by reference to our own studies of lines transformed to express additional gluten protein genes controlled by their own endosperm-specific promoters. The results show that the transgenes present in these lines (which included those encoding marker genes) did not have any significant unpredicted effects on the expression of endogenous genes and that the transgenic plants were therefore substantially equivalent to the corresponding parental lines.

  10. Phylogenomics Using Transcriptome Data.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Johanna Taylor; Kocot, Kevin Michael

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents a generalized protocol for conducting phylogenetic analyses using large-scale molecular datasets, specifically using transcriptome data from the Illumina sequencing platform. The general molecular lab bench protocol consists of RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and sequencing, in this case via Illumina. After sequences have been obtained, bioinformatics methods are used to assemble raw reads, identify coding regions, and categorize sequences from different species into groups of orthologous genes (OGs). The specific OGs to be used for phylogenetic inference are selected using a custom shell script. Finally, the selected orthologous groups are concatenated into a supermatrix. Generalized methods for phylogenomic inference using maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference software are presented. PMID:27460370