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Sample records for photoreceptor cell patterning

  1. Two temporal functions of Glass: Ommatidium patterning and photoreceptor differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xulong; Mahato, Simpla; Hemmerich, Chris; Zelhof, Andrew C

    2016-06-01

    Much progress has been made in elucidating the molecular networks required for specifying retinal cells, including photoreceptors, but the downstream mechanisms that maintain identity and regulate differentiation remain poorly understood. Here, we report that the transcription factor Glass has a dual role in establishing a functional Drosophila eye. Utilizing conditional rescue approaches, we confirm that persistent defects in ommatidium patterning combined with cell death correlate with the overall disruption of eye morphology in glass mutants. In addition, we reveal that Glass exhibits a separable role in regulating photoreceptor differentiation. In particular, we demonstrate the apparent loss of glass mutant photoreceptors is not only due to cell death but also a failure of the surviving photoreceptors to complete differentiation. Moreover, the late reintroduction of Glass in these developmentally stalled photoreceptors is capable of restoring differentiation in the absence of correct ommatidium patterning. Mechanistically, transcription profiling at the time of differentiation reveals that Glass is necessary for the expression of many genes implicated in differentiation, i.e. rhabdomere morphogenesis, phototransduction, and synaptogenesis. Specifically, we show Glass directly regulates the expression of Pph13, which encodes a transcription factor necessary for opsin expression and rhabdomere morphogenesis. Finally, we demonstrate the ability of Glass to choreograph photoreceptor differentiation is conserved between Drosophila and Tribolium, two holometabolous insects. Altogether, our work identifies a fundamental regulatory mechanism to generate the full complement of cells required for a functional rhabdomeric visual system and provides a critical framework to investigate the basis of differentiation and maintenance of photoreceptor identity. PMID:27105580

  2. Melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion-cell photoreceptors: cellular diversity and role in pattern vision

    PubMed Central

    Ecker, Jennifer L.; Dumitrescu, Olivia N.; Wong, Kwoon Y.; Alam, Nazia M.; Chen, Shih-Kuo; LeGates, Tara; Renna, Jordan M.; Prusky, Glen T.; Berson, David M.; Hattar, Samer

    2010-01-01

    Using the photopigment melanopsin, intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) respond directly to light to drive circadian clock resetting and pupillary constriction. We now report that ipRGCs are more abundant and diverse than previously appreciated, project more widely within the brain, and can support spatial visual perception. A Cre-based melanopsin reporter mouse line revealed at least five subtypes of ipRGCs with distinct morphological and physiological characteristics. Collectively, these cells project beyond the known brain targets of ipRGCs to heavily innervate the superior colliculus and dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus, retinotopically-organized nuclei mediating object localization and discrimination. Mice lacking classical rod-cone photoreception, and thus entirely dependent on melanopsin for light detection, were able to discriminate grating stimuli from equiluminant gray, and had measurable visual acuity. Thus, non-classical retinal photoreception occurs within diverse cell types, and influences circuits and functions encompassing luminance as well as spatial information. PMID:20624591

  3. Avian photoreceptor patterns represent a disordered hyperuniform solution to a multiscale packing problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Yang; Lau, Timothy; Hatzikirou, Haralampos; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Corbo, Joseph C.; Torquato, Salvatore

    2014-02-01

    Optimal spatial sampling of light rigorously requires that identical photoreceptors be arranged in perfectly regular arrays in two dimensions. Examples of such perfect arrays in nature include the compound eyes of insects and the nearly crystalline photoreceptor patterns of some fish and reptiles. Birds are highly visual animals with five different cone photoreceptor subtypes, yet their photoreceptor patterns are not perfectly regular. By analyzing the chicken cone photoreceptor system consisting of five different cell types using a variety of sensitive microstructural descriptors, we find that the disordered photoreceptor patterns are "hyperuniform" (exhibiting vanishing infinite-wavelength density fluctuations), a property that had heretofore been identified in a unique subset of physical systems, but had never been observed in any living organism. Remarkably, the patterns of both the total population and the individual cell types are simultaneously hyperuniform. We term such patterns "multihyperuniform" because multiple distinct subsets of the overall point pattern are themselves hyperuniform. We have devised a unique multiscale cell packing model in two dimensions that suggests that photoreceptor types interact with both short- and long-ranged repulsive forces and that the resultant competition between the types gives rise to the aforementioned singular spatial features characterizing the system, including multihyperuniformity. These findings suggest that a disordered hyperuniform pattern may represent the most uniform sampling arrangement attainable in the avian system, given intrinsic packing constraints within the photoreceptor epithelium. In addition, they show how fundamental physical constraints can change the course of a biological optimization process. Our results suggest that multihyperuniform disordered structures have implications for the design of materials with novel physical properties and therefore may represent a fruitful area for future

  4. Avian photoreceptor patterns represent a disordered hyperuniform solution to a multiscale packing problem.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yang; Lau, Timothy; Hatzikirou, Haralampos; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Joseph C Corbo; Torquato, Salvatore

    2014-02-01

    Optimal spatial sampling of light rigorously requires that identical photoreceptors be arranged in perfectly regular arrays in two dimensions. Examples of such perfect arrays in nature include the compound eyes of insects and the nearly crystalline photoreceptor patterns of some fish and reptiles. Birds are highly visual animals with five different cone photoreceptor subtypes, yet their photoreceptor patterns are not perfectly regular. By analyzing the chicken cone photoreceptor system consisting of five different cell types using a variety of sensitive microstructural descriptors, we find that the disordered photoreceptor patterns are "hyperuniform" (exhibiting vanishing infinite-wavelength density fluctuations), a property that had heretofore been identified in a unique subset of physical systems, but had never been observed in any living organism. Remarkably, the patterns of both the total population and the individual cell types are simultaneously hyperuniform. We term such patterns "multihyperuniform" because multiple distinct subsets of the overall point pattern are themselves hyperuniform. We have devised a unique multiscale cell packing model in two dimensions that suggests that photoreceptor types interact with both short- and long-ranged repulsive forces and that the resultant competition between the types gives rise to the aforementioned singular spatial features characterizing the system, including multihyperuniformity. These findings suggest that a disordered hyperuniform pattern may represent the most uniform sampling arrangement attainable in the avian system, given intrinsic packing constraints within the photoreceptor epithelium. In addition, they show how fundamental physical constraints can change the course of a biological optimization process. Our results suggest that multihyperuniform disordered structures have implications for the design of materials with novel physical properties and therefore may represent a fruitful area for future

  5. Photoreceptor cell death and rescue in retinal detachment and degenerations

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Yusuke; Notomi, Shoji; Hisatomi, Toshio; Nakazawa, Toru; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Miller, Joan W.; Vavvas, Demetrios G.

    2013-01-01

    Photoreceptor cell death is the ultimate cause of vision loss in various retinal disorders, including retinal detachment (RD). Photoreceptor cell death has been thought to occur mainly through apoptosis, which is the most characterized form of programmed cell death. The caspase family of cysteine proteases plays a central role for inducing apoptosis, and in experimental models of RD, dying photoreceptor cells exhibit caspase activation; however, there is a paradox that caspase inhibition alone does not provide a sufficient protection against photoreceptor cell loss, suggesting that other mechanisms of cell death are involved. Recent accumulating evidence demonstrates that non-apoptotic forms of cell death, such as autophagy and necrosis, are also regulated by specific molecular machinery, such as those mediated by autophagy-related proteins and receptor-interacting protein kinases, respectively. Here we summarize the current knowledge of cell death signaling and its roles in photoreceptor cell death after RD and other retinal degenerative diseases. A body of studies indicate that not only apoptotic but also autophagic and necrotic signaling are involved in photoreceptor cell death, and that combined targeting of these pathways may be an effective neuroprotective strategy for retinal diseases associated with photoreceptor cell loss. PMID:23994436

  6. Protein sorting, targeting and trafficking in photoreceptor cells

    PubMed Central

    Pearring, Jillian N.; Salinas, Raquel Y.; Baker, Sheila A.; Arshavsky, Vadim Y.

    2013-01-01

    Vision is the most fundamental of our senses initiated when photons are absorbed by the rod and cone photoreceptor neurons of the retina. At the distal end of each photoreceptor resides a light-sensing organelle, called the outer segment, which is a modified primary cilium highly enriched with proteins involved in visual signal transduction. At the proximal end, each photoreceptor has a synaptic terminal, which connects this cell to the downstream neurons for further processing of the visual information. Understanding the mechanisms involved in creating and maintaining functional compartmentalization of photoreceptor cells remains among the most fascinating topics in ocular cell biology. This review will discuss how photoreceptor compartmentalization is supported by protein sorting, targeting and trafficking, with an emphasis on the best-studied cases of outer segment-resident proteins. PMID:23562855

  7. Expression of Drosophila rhodopsins during photoreceptor cell differentiation: insights into R7 and R8 cell subtype commitment.

    PubMed

    Earl, James B; Britt, Steven G

    2006-10-01

    The R7 and R8 photoreceptor cells of the Drosophila retina are thought to mediate color discrimination and polarized light detection. This is based on the patterned expression of different visual pigments, rhodopsins, in different photoreceptor cells. In this report, we examined the developmental timing of retinal patterning. There is genetic evidence that over the majority of the eye, patterned expression of opsin genes is regulated by a signal from one subtype of R7 cells to adjacent R8 cells. We examined the onset of expression of the rhodopsin genes to determine the latest time point by which photoreceptor subtype commitment must have occurred. We found that the onset of rhodopsin expression in all photoreceptors of the compound eye occurs during a narrow window from 79% to 84% of pupal development (approximately 8 h), pupal stages P12-P14. Rhodopsin 1 has the earliest onset, followed by Rhodopsins 3, 4, and 5 at approximately the same time, and finally Rhodopsin 6. This sequence mimics the model for how R7 and R8 photoreceptor cells are specified, and defines the timing of photoreceptor cell fate decisions with respect to other events in eye development. PMID:16495161

  8. The ventral photoreceptor cells of Limulus. I. The microanatomy.

    PubMed

    Clark, A W; Millecchia, R; Mauro, A

    1969-09-01

    The ventral photoreceptor cells of Limulus polyphemus resemble the retinular cells of the lateral eyes both in electrical behavior and in morphology. Because of the great size of the ventral photoreceptor cells they are easy to impale with glass capillary micropipettes. Their location along the length of the ventral eye nerve makes them easy to dissect out and fix for electron microscopy. Each cell has a large, ellipsoidal soma that tapers into an axon whose length depends upon the distance of the cell from the brain. The cell body contains a rich variety of cytoplasmic organelles with an especially abundant endoplasmic reticulum. The most prominent structural feature is the microvillous rhabdomere, a highly modified infolding of the plasmalemma. The microvilli are tightly packed together within the rhabdomere, and quintuple-layered junctions are encountered wherever microvillar membranes touch each other. Glial cells cover the surface of the photoreceptor cell and send long, sheet-like projections of their cytoplasm into the cell body of the photoreceptor cell. Some of these projections penetrate the rhabdomere deep within the cell and form quintuple-layered junctions with the microvilli. Junctions between glial cells and the photoreceptor cell and between adjacent glial cells are rarely encountered elsewhere, indicating that there is an open pathway between the intermicrovillous space and the extracellular medium. The axon has a normal morphology but it is electrically inexcitable. PMID:5806591

  9. Outer Segment Formation of Transplanted Photoreceptor Precursor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Eberle, Dominic; Kurth, Thomas; Santos-Ferreira, Tiago; Wilson, John; Corbeil, Denis; Ader, Marius

    2012-01-01

    Transplantation of photoreceptor precursor cells (PPCs) into the retina represents a promising treatment for cell replacement in blinding diseases characterized by photoreceptor loss. In preclinical studies, we and others demonstrated that grafted PPCs integrate into the host outer nuclear layer (ONL) and develop into mature photoreceptors. However, a key feature of light detecting photoreceptors, the outer segment (OS) with natively aligned disc membrane staples, has not been studied in detail following transplantation. Therefore, we used as donor cells PPCs isolated from neonatal double transgenic reporter mice in which OSs are selectively labeled by green fluorescent protein while cell bodies are highlighted by red fluorescent protein. PPCs were enriched using CD73-based magnetic associated cell sorting and subsequently transplanted into either adult wild-type or a model of autosomal-dominant retinal degeneration mice. Three weeks post-transplantation, donor photoreceptors were identified based on fluorescent-reporter expression and OS formation was monitored at light and electron microscopy levels. Donor cells that properly integrated into the host wild-type retina developed OSs with the formation of a connecting cilium and well-aligned disc membrane staples similar to the surrounding native cells of the host. Surprisingly, the majority of not-integrated PPCs that remained in the sub-retinal space also generated native-like OSs in wild-type mice and those affected by retinal degeneration. Moreover, they showed an improved photoreceptor maturation and OS formation by comparison to donor cells located on the vitreous side suggesting that environmental cues influence the PPC differentiation and maturation. We conclude that transplanted PPCs, whether integrated or not into the host ONL, are able to generate the cellular structure for effective light detection, a phenomenon observed in wild-type as well as in degenerated retinas. Given that patients suffering from

  10. Diacylglycerol kinase epsilon in bovine and rat photoreceptor cells. Light-dependent distribution in photoreceptor cells.

    PubMed

    Natalini, Paola M; Zulian, Sandra E; Ilincheta de Boschero, Mónica G; Giusto, Norma M

    2013-07-01

    The present study shows the selective light-dependent distribution of 1,2-diacylglycerol kinase epsilon (DAGKɛ) in photoreceptor cells from bovine and albino rat retina. Immunofluorescence microscopy in isolated rod outer segments from bleached bovine retinas (BBROS) revealed a higher DAGKɛ signal than that found in rod outer segments from dark-adapted bovine retinas (BDROS). The light-dependent outer segment localization of DAGKɛ was also observed by immunohistochemistry in retinas from albino rats. DAGK activity, measured in terms of phosphatidic acid formation from a) [(3)H]DAG and ATP in the presence of EGTA and R59022, a type I DAGK inhibitor, or b) [γ-(32)P]ATP and 1-stearoyl, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (SAG), was found to be significantly higher in BBROS than in BDROS. Higher light-dependent DAGK activity (condition b) was also found when ROS were isolated from dark-adapted rat retinas exposed to light. Western blot analysis of isolated ROS proteins from bovine and rat retinas confirmed that illumination increases DAGKɛ content in the outer segments of these two species. Light-dependent DAGKɛ localization in the outer segment was not observed when U73122, a phospholipase C inhibitor, was present prior to the exposure of rat eyecups (in situ model) to light. Furthermore, no increased PA synthesis from [(3)H]DAG and ATP was observed in the presence of neomycin prior to the exposure of bovine eyecups to light. Interestingly, when BBROS were pre-phosphorylated with ATP in the presence of 1,2-dioctanoyl sn-glycerol (di-C8) or phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu) as PKC activation conditions, higher DAGK activity was observed than in dephosphorylated controls. Taken together, our findings suggest that the selective distribution of DAGKɛ in photoreceptor cells is a light-dependent mechanism that promotes increased SAG removal and synthesis of 1-stearoyl, 2-arachidonoyl phosphatidic acid in the sensorial portion of this cell, thus demonstrating a novel mechanism of light

  11. Genetic Dissection of Dual Roles for the Transcription Factor six7 in Photoreceptor Development and Patterning in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Sotolongo-Lopez, Mailin; Alvarez-Delfin, Karen; Saade, Carole J; Vera, Daniel L; Fadool, James M

    2016-04-01

    The visual system of a particular species is highly adapted to convey detailed ecological and behavioral information essential for survival. The consequences of structural mutations of opsins upon spectral sensitivity and environmental adaptation have been studied in great detail, but lacking is knowledge of the potential influence of alterations in gene regulatory networks upon the diversity of cone subtypes and the variation in the ratio of rods and cones observed in numerous diurnal and nocturnal species. Exploiting photoreceptor patterning in cone-dominated zebrafish, we uncovered two independent mechanisms by which the sine oculis homeobox homolog 7 (six7) regulates photoreceptor development. In a genetic screen, we isolated the lots-of-rods-junior (ljrp23ahub) mutation that resulted in an increased number and uniform distribution of rods in otherwise normal appearing larvae. Sequence analysis, genome editing using TALENs and knockdown strategies confirm ljrp23ahub as a hypomorphic allele of six7, a teleost orthologue of six3, with known roles in forebrain patterning and expression of opsins. Based on the lack of predicted protein-coding changes and a deletion of a conserved element upstream of the transcription start site, a cis-regulatory mutation is proposed as the basis of the reduced expression of six7 in ljrp23ahub. Comparison of the phenotypes of the hypomorphic and knock-out alleles provides evidence of two independent roles in photoreceptor development. EdU and PH3 labeling show that the increase in rod number is associated with extended mitosis of photoreceptor progenitors, and TUNEL suggests that the lack of green-sensitive cones is the result of cell death of the cone precursor. These data add six7 to the small but growing list of essential genes for specification and patterning of photoreceptors in non-mammalian vertebrates, and highlight alterations in transcriptional regulation as a potential source of photoreceptor variation across species

  12. Genetic Dissection of Dual Roles for the Transcription Factor six7 in Photoreceptor Development and Patterning in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Sotolongo-Lopez, Mailin; Alvarez-Delfin, Karen; Saade, Carole J.; Vera, Daniel L.; Fadool, James M.

    2016-01-01

    The visual system of a particular species is highly adapted to convey detailed ecological and behavioral information essential for survival. The consequences of structural mutations of opsins upon spectral sensitivity and environmental adaptation have been studied in great detail, but lacking is knowledge of the potential influence of alterations in gene regulatory networks upon the diversity of cone subtypes and the variation in the ratio of rods and cones observed in numerous diurnal and nocturnal species. Exploiting photoreceptor patterning in cone-dominated zebrafish, we uncovered two independent mechanisms by which the sine oculis homeobox homolog 7 (six7) regulates photoreceptor development. In a genetic screen, we isolated the lots-of-rods-junior (ljrp23ahub) mutation that resulted in an increased number and uniform distribution of rods in otherwise normal appearing larvae. Sequence analysis, genome editing using TALENs and knockdown strategies confirm ljrp23ahub as a hypomorphic allele of six7, a teleost orthologue of six3, with known roles in forebrain patterning and expression of opsins. Based on the lack of predicted protein-coding changes and a deletion of a conserved element upstream of the transcription start site, a cis-regulatory mutation is proposed as the basis of the reduced expression of six7 in ljrp23ahub. Comparison of the phenotypes of the hypomorphic and knock-out alleles provides evidence of two independent roles in photoreceptor development. EdU and PH3 labeling show that the increase in rod number is associated with extended mitosis of photoreceptor progenitors, and TUNEL suggests that the lack of green-sensitive cones is the result of cell death of the cone precursor. These data add six7 to the small but growing list of essential genes for specification and patterning of photoreceptors in non-mammalian vertebrates, and highlight alterations in transcriptional regulation as a potential source of photoreceptor variation across species

  13. Photoreceptor Cells Produce Inflammatory Mediators That Contribute to Endothelial Cell Death in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tonade, Deoye; Liu, Haitao; Kern, Timothy S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies suggest that photoreceptor cells regulate local inflammation in the retina in diabetes. The purpose of this study was to determine if photoreceptor cells themselves produce inflammatory proteins in diabetes and if soluble factors released by photoreceptors in elevated glucose induce inflammatory changes in nearby cells. Methods Laser capture microdissection was used to isolate the outer retina (photoreceptors) from the inner retina in nondiabetic and diabetic mice. Diabetes-induced changes in the expression of inflammatory targets were assessed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Cell culture experiments were carried out to determine if photoreceptors in vitro and ex vivo release soluble mediators that can stimulate nearby cells. Photoreceptor contribution to leukocyte-mediated endothelial cell death was tested using coculture models. Results Messenger ribonucleic acid and protein expression levels for inflammatory proteins intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) were increased in photoreceptors cells in diabetes. In vitro and ex vivo studies show that photoreceptor cells in elevated glucose release mediators that can induce tumor necrosis factor-α in leukocytes and endothelial cells, but not in glia. The soluble mediators released by photoreceptor cells in elevated glucose are regulated by transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NADPH oxidase) signaling. In contrast to enhanced leukocyte-mediated killing of endothelial cells by leukocytes from wild-type diabetic mice, leukocytes from diabetic mice lacking photoreceptor cells (opsin−/−) did not kill endothelial cells. Conclusions These data indicate that photoreceptor cells are a source of inflammatory proteins in diabetes, and their release of soluble mediators can contribute to the death of retinal capillaries

  14. Proteome changes during bone mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into photoreceptor-like cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yu; Xu, Guo-Xing

    2011-01-01

    Human bone marrow stem cell (BMSC) may be directed to differentiate into multiple cell types, including adipocyte, chondrocyte, osteocyte and photoreceptor, among others. At present, little is known about the features of the BMSC and the protein control mechanism underlying their differentiation into photoreceptor-like cells. In the present study, BMSCs are induced to differentiate into photoreceptor-like cells in an in vitro model simulating the in vivo microenvironment. Up to 32 proteins are identified and differentially expressed through two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry to establish a differential protein database for photoreceptor-like cells from BMSC-induced differentiation. Western blot analysis further confirms the expression of some of the identified proteins. The present study proposes the total protein expression and possible molecular mechanism during the differentiation of BMSCs into photoreceptor cells. PMID:22553704

  15. DNA methylation and differential gene regulation in photoreceptor cell death

    PubMed Central

    Farinelli, P; Perera, A; Arango-Gonzalez, B; Trifunovic, D; Wagner, M; Carell, T; Biel, M; Zrenner, E; Michalakis, S; Paquet-Durand, F; Ekström, P A R

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) defines a group of inherited degenerative retinal diseases causing progressive loss of photoreceptors. To this day, RP is still untreatable and rational treatment development will require a thorough understanding of the underlying cell death mechanisms. Methylation of the DNA base cytosine by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) is an important epigenetic factor regulating gene expression, cell differentiation, cell death, and survival. Previous studies suggested an involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in RP, and in this study, increased cytosine methylation was detected in dying photoreceptors in the rd1, rd2, P23H, and S334ter rodent models for RP. Ultrastructural analysis of photoreceptor nuclear morphology in the rd1 mouse model for RP revealed a severely altered chromatin structure during retinal degeneration that coincided with an increased expression of the DNMT isozyme DNMT3a. To identify disease-specific differentially methylated DNA regions (DMRs) on a genomic level, we immunoprecipitated methylated DNA fragments and subsequently analyzed them with a targeted microarray. Genome-wide comparison of DMRs between rd1 and wild-type retina revealed hypermethylation of genes involved in cell death and survival as well as cell morphology and nervous system development. When correlating DMRs with gene expression data, we found that hypermethylation occurred alongside transcriptional repression. Consistently, motif analysis showed that binding sites of several important transcription factors for retinal physiology were hypermethylated in the mutant model, which also correlated with transcriptional silencing of their respective target genes. Finally, inhibition of DNMTs in rd1 organotypic retinal explants using decitabine resulted in a substantial reduction of photoreceptor cell death, suggesting inhibition of DNA methylation as a potential novel treatment in RP. PMID:25476906

  16. DNA methylation and differential gene regulation in photoreceptor cell death.

    PubMed

    Farinelli, P; Perera, A; Arango-Gonzalez, B; Trifunovic, D; Wagner, M; Carell, T; Biel, M; Zrenner, E; Michalakis, S; Paquet-Durand, F; Ekström, P A R

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) defines a group of inherited degenerative retinal diseases causing progressive loss of photoreceptors. To this day, RP is still untreatable and rational treatment development will require a thorough understanding of the underlying cell death mechanisms. Methylation of the DNA base cytosine by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) is an important epigenetic factor regulating gene expression, cell differentiation, cell death, and survival. Previous studies suggested an involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in RP, and in this study, increased cytosine methylation was detected in dying photoreceptors in the rd1, rd2, P23H, and S334ter rodent models for RP. Ultrastructural analysis of photoreceptor nuclear morphology in the rd1 mouse model for RP revealed a severely altered chromatin structure during retinal degeneration that coincided with an increased expression of the DNMT isozyme DNMT3a. To identify disease-specific differentially methylated DNA regions (DMRs) on a genomic level, we immunoprecipitated methylated DNA fragments and subsequently analyzed them with a targeted microarray. Genome-wide comparison of DMRs between rd1 and wild-type retina revealed hypermethylation of genes involved in cell death and survival as well as cell morphology and nervous system development. When correlating DMRs with gene expression data, we found that hypermethylation occurred alongside transcriptional repression. Consistently, motif analysis showed that binding sites of several important transcription factors for retinal physiology were hypermethylated in the mutant model, which also correlated with transcriptional silencing of their respective target genes. Finally, inhibition of DNMTs in rd1 organotypic retinal explants using decitabine resulted in a substantial reduction of photoreceptor cell death, suggesting inhibition of DNA methylation as a potential novel treatment in RP. PMID:25476906

  17. Neurogenin1 effectively reprograms cultured chick RPE cells to differentiate towards photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Run-Tao; Liang, Lina; Ma, Wenxin; Li, Xiumei; Xie, Wenlian; Wang, Shu-Zhen

    2009-01-01

    Photoreceptors are highly specialized sensory neurons in the retina, and their degeneration results in blindness. Replacement with developing photoreceptor cells promises to be an effective therapy, but it requires a supply of new photoreceptors, because the neural retina in human eyes lacks regeneration capability. We report efficient generation of differentiating, photoreceptor-like neurons from chick retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells propagated in culture through reprogramming with neurogenin1 (ngn1). In reprogrammed culture, a large number of the cells (85.0 ± 5.9%) began to differentiate towards photoreceptors. Reprogrammed cells expressed transcription factors that set in motion photoreceptor differentiation, including Crx, Nr2E3, NeuroD, and RXRγ, and phototransduction pathway components, including transducin, cGMP-gated channel, and red opsin of cone photoreceptors (equivalent to rhodopsin of rod photoreceptors). They developed inner segments rich in mitochondria. Furthermore, they responded to light by decreasing their cellular free calcium (Ca2+) levels and responded to 9-cis-retinal by increasing their Ca2+ levels after photobleaching, hallmarks of photoreceptor physiology. The high efficiency and the advanced photoreceptor differentiation indicate ngn1 as a gene of choice to reprogram RPE progeny cells to differentiate into photoreceptor neurons in future cell replacement studies. PMID:20029995

  18. Photoreceptor Cells Influence Retinal Vascular Degeneration in Mouse Models of Retinal Degeneration and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haitao; Tang, Jie; Du, Yunpeng; Saadane, Aicha; Tonade, Deoye; Samuels, Ivy; Veenstra, Alex; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Kern, Timothy S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Loss of photoreceptor cells is associated with retinal vascular degeneration in retinitis pigmentosa, whereas the presence of photoreceptor cells is implicated in vascular degeneration in diabetic retinopathy. To investigate how both the absence and presence of photoreceptors could damage the retinal vasculature, we compared two mouse models of photoreceptor degeneration (opsin−/− and RhoP23H/P23H ) and control C57Bl/5J mice, each with and without diabetes. Methods Retinal thickness, superoxide, expression of inflammatory proteins, ERG and optokinetic responses, leukocyte cytotoxicity, and capillary degeneration were evaluated at 1 to 10 months of age using published methods. Results Retinal photoreceptor cells degenerated completely in the opsin mutants by 2 to 4 months of age, and visual function subsided correspondingly. Retinal capillary degeneration was substantial while photoreceptors were still present, but slowed after the photoreceptors degenerated. Diabetes did not further exacerbate capillary degeneration in these models of photoreceptor degeneration, but did cause capillary degeneration in wild-type animals. Photoreceptor cells, however, did not degenerate in wild-type diabetic mice, presumably because the stress responses in these cells were less than in the opsin mutants. Retinal superoxide and leukocyte damage to retinal endothelium contributed to the degeneration of retinal capillaries in diabetes, and leukocyte-mediated damage was increased in both opsin mutants during photoreceptor cell degeneration. Conclusions Photoreceptor cells affect the integrity of the retinal microvasculature. Deterioration of retinal capillaries in opsin mutants was appreciable while photoreceptor cells were present and stressed, but was less after photoreceptors degenerated. This finding proves relevant to diabetes, where persistent stress in photoreceptors likewise contributes to capillary degeneration. PMID:27548901

  19. The ventral photoreceptor cells of Limulus. II. The basic photoresponse.

    PubMed

    Millecchia, R; Mauro, A

    1969-09-01

    The ventral photoreceptors of Limulus polyphemus are unipolar cells with large, ellipsoidal somas located long both "lateral olfactory nerves." As a consequence of their size and location, the cells are easily impaled with microelectrodes. The cells have an average resting potential of -48 mv. The resting potential is a function of the external concentration of K. When the cell is illuminated, it gives rise to the typical "receptor potential" seen in most invertebrate photoreceptors which consists of a transient phase followed by a maintained phase of depolarization. The amplitude of the transient phase depends on both the state of adaptation of the cell and the intensity of the illumination, while the amplitude of the maintained phase depends only on the intensity of the illumination. The over-all size of the receptor potential depends on the external concentration of Na, e.g. in sodium-free seawater the receptor potential is markedly reduced, but not abolished. On the other hand lowering the Ca concentration produces a marked enhancement of both components of the response, but predominantly of the steady-state component. Slow potential fluctuations are seen in the dark-adapted cell when it is illuminated with a low intensity light. A spike-like regenerative process can be evoked by either the receptor potential or a current applied via a microelectrode. No evidence of impulse activity has been found in the axons of these cells. The ventral photoreceptor cell has many properties in common with a variety of retinular cells and therefore should serve as a convenient model of the primary receptor cell in many invertebrate eyes. PMID:5806592

  20. Protein and Signaling Networks in Vertebrate Photoreceptor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Karl-Wilhelm; Dell’Orco, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrate photoreceptor cells are exquisite light detectors operating under very dim and bright illumination. The photoexcitation and adaptation machinery in photoreceptor cells consists of protein complexes that can form highly ordered supramolecular structures and control the homeostasis and mutual dependence of the secondary messengers cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and Ca2+. The visual pigment in rod photoreceptors, the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin is organized in tracks of dimers thereby providing a signaling platform for the dynamic scaffolding of the G protein transducin. Illuminated rhodopsin is turned off by phosphorylation catalyzed by rhodopsin kinase (GRK1) under control of Ca2+-recoverin. The GRK1 protein complex partly assembles in lipid raft structures, where shutting off rhodopsin seems to be more effective. Re-synthesis of cGMP is another crucial step in the recovery of the photoresponse after illumination. It is catalyzed by membrane bound sensory guanylate cyclases (GCs) and is regulated by specific neuronal Ca2+-sensor proteins called guanylate cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs). At least one GC (ROS-GC1) was shown to be part of a multiprotein complex having strong interactions with the cytoskeleton and being controlled in a multimodal Ca2+-dependent fashion. The final target of the cGMP signaling cascade is a cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel that is a hetero-oligomeric protein located in the plasma membrane and interacting with accessory proteins in highly organized microdomains. We summarize results and interpretations of findings related to the inhomogeneous organization of signaling units in photoreceptor outer segments. PMID:26635520

  1. Survival of some photoreceptor cells in albino rats following long-term exposure to continuous light.

    PubMed

    La Vail, M M

    1976-01-01

    Fischer albino rats, seven weeks of age, were exposed to continuous light at 65 foot-candle incident illuminance for up to 264 days. Other Fischer rats, seven months of age, were exposed to continuous light at 140 foot-candle incident illuminance for up to 147 days. In all cases, a small percentage of the photoreceptors survived. The identification of the surviving cells as photoreceptors was made by light microscopy on the basis of nuclear heterochromatin pattern and staining and by electron microscopy by the presence of ribbon synapses and ciliary basal bodies with ciliary filaments. No outer segment membranes were observed. The percentage of cones progressively increased from the normal 1.5 per cent to about 60 per cent with increasing exposure time, indicating that cone cells are more resistant than rods to destruction by constant light. PMID:1245384

  2. Melatonin modulates M4-type ganglion-cell photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Pack, W; Hill, D D; Wong, K Y

    2015-09-10

    In the retina, melatonin is secreted at night by rod/cone photoreceptors and serves as a dark-adaptive signal. Melatonin receptors have been found in many retinal neurons including melanopsin-containing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs), suggesting it could modulate the physiology of these inner retinal photoreceptors. Here, we investigated whether melatonin modulates the alpha-like M4-type ipRGCs, which are believed to mediate image-forming vision as well as non-image-forming photoresponses. Applying melatonin during daytime (when endogenous melatonin secretion is low) caused whole-cell-recorded M4 cells' rod/cone-driven depolarizing photoresponses to become broader and larger, whereas the associated elevation in spike rate was reduced. Melanopsin-based light responses were not affected significantly. Nighttime application of the melatonin receptor antagonist luzindole also altered M4 cells' rod/cone-driven light responses but in the opposite ways: the duration and amplitude of the graded depolarization were reduced, whereas the accompanying spiking increase was enhanced. These luzindole-induced changes confirmed that M4 cells are modulated by endogenous melatonin. Melatonin could induce the above effects by acting directly on M4 cells because immunohistochemistry detected MT1 receptors in these cells, although it could also act presynaptically. Interestingly, the daytime and nighttime recordings showed significant differences in resting membrane potential, spontaneous spike rate and rod/cone-driven light responses, suggesting that M4 cells are under circadian control. This is the first report of a circadian variation in ipRGCs' resting properties and synaptic input, and of melatoninergic modulation of ipRGCs. PMID:26141846

  3. In vitro transdifferentiation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to photoreceptor-like cells.

    PubMed

    Komuta, Yukari; Ishii, Toshiyuki; Kaneda, Makoto; Ueda, Yasuji; Miyamoto, Kiyoko; Toyoda, Masashi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Seko, Yuko

    2016-01-01

    Direct reprogramming is a promising, simple and low-cost approach to generate target cells from somatic cells without using induced pluripotent stem cells. Recently, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) have attracted considerable attention as a somatic cell source for reprogramming. As a cell source, PBMCs have an advantage over dermal fibroblasts with respect to the ease of collecting tissues. Based on our studies involving generation of photosensitive photoreceptor cells from human iris cells and human dermal fibroblasts by transduction of photoreceptor-related transcription factors via retrovirus vectors, we transduced these transcription factors into PBMCs via Sendai virus vectors. We found that retinal disease-related genes were efficiently detected in CRX-transduced cells, most of which are crucial to photoreceptor functions. In functional studies, a light-induced inward current was detected in some CRX-transduced cells. Moreover, by modification of the culture conditions including additional transduction of RAX1 and NEUROD1, we found a greater variety of retinal disease-related genes than that observed in CRX-transduced PBMCs. These data suggest that CRX acts as a master control gene for reprogramming PBMCs into photoreceptor-like cells and that our induced photoreceptor-like cells might contribute to individualized drug screening and disease modeling of inherited retinal degeneration. PMID:27170256

  4. In vitro transdifferentiation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to photoreceptor-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Komuta, Yukari; Ishii, Toshiyuki; Kaneda, Makoto; Ueda, Yasuji; Miyamoto, Kiyoko; Toyoda, Masashi; Umezawa, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Direct reprogramming is a promising, simple and low-cost approach to generate target cells from somatic cells without using induced pluripotent stem cells. Recently, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) have attracted considerable attention as a somatic cell source for reprogramming. As a cell source, PBMCs have an advantage over dermal fibroblasts with respect to the ease of collecting tissues. Based on our studies involving generation of photosensitive photoreceptor cells from human iris cells and human dermal fibroblasts by transduction of photoreceptor-related transcription factors via retrovirus vectors, we transduced these transcription factors into PBMCs via Sendai virus vectors. We found that retinal disease-related genes were efficiently detected in CRX-transduced cells, most of which are crucial to photoreceptor functions. In functional studies, a light-induced inward current was detected in some CRX-transduced cells. Moreover, by modification of the culture conditions including additional transduction of RAX1 and NEUROD1, we found a greater variety of retinal disease-related genes than that observed in CRX-transduced PBMCs. These data suggest that CRX acts as a master control gene for reprogramming PBMCs into photoreceptor-like cells and that our induced photoreceptor-like cells might contribute to individualized drug screening and disease modeling of inherited retinal degeneration. PMID:27170256

  5. The functional cycle of visual arrestins in photoreceptor cells

    PubMed Central

    Gurevich, Vsevolod V.; Hanson, Susan M.; Song, Xiufeng; Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A.; Gurevich, Eugenia V.

    2011-01-01

    Visual arrestin-1 plays a key role in the rapid and reproducible shutoff of rhodopsin signaling. Its highly selective binding to light-activated phosphorylated rhodopsin is an integral part of the functional perfection of rod photoreceptors. Structure-function studies revealed key elements of the sophisticated molecular mechanism ensuring arrestin-1 selectivity and paved the way to the targeted manipulation of the arrestin-1 molecule to design mutants that can compensate for congenital defects in rhodopsin phosphorylation. Arrestin-1 self-association and light-dependent translocation in photoreceptor cells work together to keep a constant supply of active rhodopsin-binding arrestin-1 monomer in the outer segment. Recent discoveries of arrestin-1 interaction with other signaling proteins suggest that it is a much more versatile signaling regulator than previously thought, affecting the function of the synaptic terminals and rod survival. Elucidation of the fine molecular mechanisms of arrestin-1 interactions with rhodopsin and other binding partners is necessary for the comprehensive understanding of rod function and for devising novel molecular tools and therapeutic approaches to the treatment of visual disorders. PMID:21824527

  6. Function of human pluripotent stem cell-derived photoreceptor progenitors in blind mice

    PubMed Central

    Barnea-Cramer, Alona O.; Wang, Wei; Lu, Shi-Jiang; Singh, Mandeep S.; Luo, Chenmei; Huo, Hongguang; McClements, Michelle E.; Barnard, Alun R.; MacLaren, Robert E.; Lanza, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Photoreceptor degeneration due to retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a primary cause of inherited retinal blindness. Photoreceptor cell-replacement may hold the potential for repair in a completely degenerate retina by reinstating light sensitive cells to form connections that relay information to downstream retinal layers. This study assessed the therapeutic potential of photoreceptor progenitors derived from human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (ESCs and iPSCs) using a protocol that is suitable for future clinical trials. ESCs and iPSCs were cultured in four specific stages under defined conditions, resulting in generation of a near-homogeneous population of photoreceptor-like progenitors. Following transplantation into mice with end-stage retinal degeneration, these cells differentiated into photoreceptors and formed a cell layer connected with host retinal neurons. Visual function was partially restored in treated animals, as evidenced by two visual behavioral tests. Furthermore, the magnitude of functional improvement was positively correlated with the number of engrafted cells. Similar efficacy was observed using either ESCs or iPSCs as source material. These data validate the potential of human pluripotent stem cells for photoreceptor replacement therapies aimed at photoreceptor regeneration in retinal disease. PMID:27405580

  7. Function of human pluripotent stem cell-derived photoreceptor progenitors in blind mice.

    PubMed

    Barnea-Cramer, Alona O; Wang, Wei; Lu, Shi-Jiang; Singh, Mandeep S; Luo, Chenmei; Huo, Hongguang; McClements, Michelle E; Barnard, Alun R; MacLaren, Robert E; Lanza, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Photoreceptor degeneration due to retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a primary cause of inherited retinal blindness. Photoreceptor cell-replacement may hold the potential for repair in a completely degenerate retina by reinstating light sensitive cells to form connections that relay information to downstream retinal layers. This study assessed the therapeutic potential of photoreceptor progenitors derived from human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (ESCs and iPSCs) using a protocol that is suitable for future clinical trials. ESCs and iPSCs were cultured in four specific stages under defined conditions, resulting in generation of a near-homogeneous population of photoreceptor-like progenitors. Following transplantation into mice with end-stage retinal degeneration, these cells differentiated into photoreceptors and formed a cell layer connected with host retinal neurons. Visual function was partially restored in treated animals, as evidenced by two visual behavioral tests. Furthermore, the magnitude of functional improvement was positively correlated with the number of engrafted cells. Similar efficacy was observed using either ESCs or iPSCs as source material. These data validate the potential of human pluripotent stem cells for photoreceptor replacement therapies aimed at photoreceptor regeneration in retinal disease. PMID:27405580

  8. Reprogramming Müller glia via in vivo cell fusion regenerates murine photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Sanges, Daniela; Simonte, Giacoma; Di Vicino, Umberto; Romo, Neus; Pinilla, Isabel; Nicolás, Marta; Cosma, Maria Pia

    2016-08-01

    Vision impairments and blindness caused by retinitis pigmentosa result from severe neurodegeneration that leads to a loss of photoreceptors, the specialized light-sensitive neurons that enable vision. Although the mammalian nervous system is unable to replace neurons lost due to degeneration, therapeutic approaches to reprogram resident glial cells to replace retinal neurons have been proposed. Here, we demonstrate that retinal Müller glia can be reprogrammed in vivo into retinal precursors that then differentiate into photoreceptors. We transplanted hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) into retinas affected by photoreceptor degeneration and observed spontaneous cell fusion events between Müller glia and the transplanted cells. Activation of Wnt signaling in the transplanted HSPCs enhanced survival and proliferation of Müller-HSPC hybrids as well as their reprogramming into intermediate photoreceptor precursors. This suggests that Wnt signaling drives the reprogrammed cells toward a photoreceptor progenitor fate. Finally, Müller-HSPC hybrids differentiated into photoreceptors. Transplantation of HSPCs with activated Wnt functionally rescued the retinal degeneration phenotype in rd10 mice, a model for inherited retinitis pigmentosa. Together, these results suggest that photoreceptors can be generated by reprogramming Müller glia and that this approach may have potential as a strategy for reversing retinal degeneration. PMID:27427986

  9. Transcriptional analysis of Volvox photoreceptors suggests the existence of different cell-type specific light-signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kianianmomeni, Arash; Hallmann, Armin

    2015-02-01

    Photosynthetic organisms, e.g., plants including green algae, use a sophisticated light-sensing system, composed of primary photoreceptors and additional downstream signaling components, to monitor changes in the ambient light environment towards adjust their growth and development. Although a variety of cellular processes, e.g., initiation of cleavage division and final cellular differentiation, have been shown to be light-regulated in the green alga Volvox carteri, little is known about the underlying light perception and signaling pathways. This multicellular alga possesses at least 12 photoreceptors, i.e., one phototropin (VcPhot), four cryptochromes (VcCRYa, VcCRYp, VcCRYd1, and VcCRYd2), and seven members of rhodopsin-like photoreceptors (VR1, VChR1, VChR2, VcHKR1, VcHKR2, VcHKR3, and VcHKR4), which display distinct light-dependent chemical processes based on their protein architectures and associated chromophores. Gene expression analyses could show that the transcript levels of some of the photoreceptor genes (e.g., VChR1 and VcHKR1) accumulate during division cleavages, while others (e.g., VcCRYa, VcCRYp, and VcPhot) accumulate during final cellular differentiation. However, the pattern of transcript accumulation changes when the alga switches to the sexual development. Eight photoreceptor genes, e.g., VcPhot, VcCRYp, and VcHKR1, are highly expressed in the somatic cells, while only the animal-type rhodopsin VR1 was found to be highly expressed in the reproductive cells/embryos during both asexual and sexual life cycles. Moreover, accumulation of VChR1 and VcCRYa transcripts is more sensitive to light and changes in response to more than one light quality. Obviously, different regulatory mechanisms underlying gene expression control transcript accumulation of photoreceptors not only during development, but also in a cell-type specific way and in response to various external signals such as light quality. The transcriptional patterns described in this study

  10. Transcriptome profiling of developing photoreceptor subtypes reveals candidate genes involved in avian photoreceptor diversification

    PubMed Central

    Enright, Jennifer M.; Lawrence, Karen A.; Hadzic, Tarik; Corbo, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    Avian photoreceptors are a diverse class of neurons, comprised of four single cones, the two members of the double cone, and rods. The signaling events and transcriptional regulators driving the differentiation of these diverse photoreceptors are currently unknown. In addition, many distinctive features of photoreceptor subtypes, including spectral tuning, oil droplet size and pigmentation, synaptic targets and spatial patterning, have been well characterized, but the molecular mechanisms underlying these attributes have not been explored. To identify genes specifically expressed in distinct chicken (Gallus gallus) photoreceptor subtypes, we developed fluorescent reporters that label photoreceptor subpopulations, isolated these subpopulations using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and subjected them to next-generation sequencing. By comparing the expression profiles of photoreceptors labeled with rhodopsin, red opsin, green opsin, and violet opsin reporters, we have identified hundreds of differentially expressed genes that may underlie the distinctive features of these photoreceptor subtypes. These genes are involved in a variety of processes, including phototransduction, transcriptional regulation, cell adhesion, maintenance of intra- and extra-cellular structure, and metabolism. Of particular note are a variety of differentially expressed transcription factors, which may drive and maintain photoreceptor diversity, and cell adhesion molecules that may mediate spatial patterning of photoreceptors and act to establish retinal circuitry. These analyses provide a framework for future studies that will dissect the role of these various factors in the differentiation of avian photoreceptor subtypes. PMID:25349106

  11. Transcriptome profiling of developing photoreceptor subtypes reveals candidate genes involved in avian photoreceptor diversification.

    PubMed

    Enright, Jennifer M; Lawrence, Karen A; Hadzic, Tarik; Corbo, Joseph C

    2015-03-01

    Avian photoreceptors are a diverse class of neurons, comprised of four single cones, the two members of the double cone, and rods. The signaling events and transcriptional regulators driving the differentiation of these diverse photoreceptors are largely unknown. In addition, many distinctive features of photoreceptor subtypes, including spectral tuning, oil droplet size and pigmentation, synaptic targets, and spatial patterning, have been well characterized, but the molecular mechanisms underlying these attributes have not been explored. To identify genes specifically expressed in distinct chicken (Gallus gallus) photoreceptor subtypes, we developed fluorescent reporters that label photoreceptor subpopulations, isolated these subpopulations by using fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and subjected them to next-generation sequencing. By comparing the expression profiles of photoreceptors labeled with rhodopsin, red opsin, green opsin, and violet opsin reporters, we have identified hundreds of differentially expressed genes that may underlie the distinctive features of these photoreceptor subtypes. These genes are involved in a variety of processes, including phototransduction, transcriptional regulation, cell adhesion, maintenance of intra- and extracellular structure, and metabolism. Of particular note are a variety of differentially expressed transcription factors, which may drive and maintain photoreceptor diversity, and cell adhesion molecules, which may mediate spatial patterning of photoreceptors and act to establish retinal circuitry. These analyses provide a framework for future studies that will dissect the role of these various factors in the differentiation of avian photoreceptor subtypes. PMID:25349106

  12. Macrophage- and RIP3-dependent inflammasome activation exacerbates retinal detachment-induced photoreceptor cell death

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, K; Matsumoto, H; Kaneko, H; Notomi, S; Takeuchi, K; Sweigard, J H; Atik, A; Murakami, Y; Connor, K M; Terasaki, H; Miller, J W; Vavvas, D G

    2015-01-01

    Detachment of photoreceptors from the retinal pigment epithelium is seen in various retinal disorders, resulting in photoreceptor death and subsequent vision loss. Cell death results in the release of endogenous molecules that activate molecular platforms containing caspase-1, termed inflammasomes. Inflammasome activation in retinal diseases has been reported in some cases to be protective and in others to be detrimental, causing neuronal cell death. Moreover, the cellular source of inflammasomes in retinal disorders is not clear. Here, we demonstrate that patients with photoreceptor injury by retinal detachment (RD) have increased levels of cleaved IL-1β, an end product of inflammasome activation. In an animal model of RD, photoreceptor cell death led to activation of endogenous inflammasomes, and this activation was diminished by Rip3 deletion. The major source of Il1b expression was found to be infiltrating macrophages in the subretinal space, rather than dying photoreceptors. Inflammasome inhibition attenuated photoreceptor death after RD. Our data implicate the infiltrating macrophages as a source of damaging inflammasomes after photoreceptor detachment in a RIP3-dependent manner and suggest a novel therapeutic target for treatment of retinal diseases. PMID:25906154

  13. Adiponectin receptor 1 conserves docosahexaenoic acid and promotes photoreceptor cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Dennis S.; Calandria, Jorgelina M.; Gordon, William C.; Jun, Bokkyoo; Zhou, Yongdong; Gelfman, Claire M.; Li, Songhua; Jin, Minghao; Knott, Eric J.; Chang, Bo; Abuin, Alex; Issa, Tawfik; Potter, David; Platt, Kenneth A.; Bazan, Nicolas G.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of pathways necessary for photoreceptor and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) function is critical to uncover therapies for blindness. Here we report the discovery of adiponectin receptor 1 (AdipoR1) as a regulator of these cells’ functions. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is avidly retained in photoreceptors, while mechanisms controlling DHA uptake and retention are unknown. Thus, we demonstrate that AdipoR1 ablation results in DHA reduction. In situ hybridization reveals photoreceptor and RPE cell AdipoR1 expression, blunted in AdipoR1−/− mice. We also find decreased photoreceptor-specific phosphatidylcholine containing very long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and severely attenuated electroretinograms. These changes precede progressive photoreceptor degeneration in AdipoR1−/− mice. RPE-rich eyecup cultures from AdipoR1−/− reveal impaired DHA uptake. AdipoR1 overexpression in RPE cells enhances DHA uptake, whereas AdipoR1 silencing has the opposite effect. These results establish AdipoR1 as a regulatory switch of DHA uptake, retention, conservation and elongation in photoreceptors and RPE, thus preserving photoreceptor cell integrity. PMID:25736573

  14. Expression pattern in retinal photoreceptors of POMGnT1, a protein involved in muscle-eye-brain disease

    PubMed Central

    Uribe, Mary Luz; Haro, Carmen; Campello, Laura; Cruces, Jesús; Martín-Nieto, José

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The POMGNT1 gene, encoding protein O-linked-mannose β-1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 1, is associated with muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB) and other dystroglycanopathies. This gene’s lack of function or expression causes hypoglycosylation of α-dystroglycan (α-DG) in the muscle and the central nervous system, including the brain and the retina. The ocular symptoms of patients with MEB include retinal degeneration and detachment, glaucoma, and abnormal electroretinogram. Nevertheless, the POMGnT1 expression pattern in the healthy mammalian retina has not yet been investigated. In this work, we address the expression of the POMGNT1 gene in the healthy retina of a variety of mammals and characterize the distribution pattern of this gene in the adult mouse retina and the 661W photoreceptor cell line. Methods Using reverse transcription (RT)–PCR and immunoblotting, we studied POMGNT1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels in various mammalian species, from rodents to humans. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy analyses were performed to characterize the distribution profile of its protein product in mouse retinal sections and in 661W cultured cells. The intranuclear distribution of POMT1 and POMT2, the two enzymes preceding POMGnT1 in the α-DG O-mannosyl glycosylation pathway, was also analyzed. Results POMGNT1 mRNA and its encoded protein were expressed in the neural retina of all mammals studied. POMGnT1 was located in the cytoplasmic fraction in the mouse retina and concentrated in the myoid portion of the photoreceptor inner segments, where the protein colocalized with GM130, a Golgi complex marker. The presence of POMGnT1 in the Golgi complex was also evident in 661W cells. However, and in contrast to retinal tissue, POMGnT1 additionally accumulated in the nucleus of the 661W photoreceptors. Colocalization was found within this organelle between POMGnT1 and POMT1/2, the latter associated with euchromatic regions of the nucleus. Conclusions

  15. Adalimumab Reduces Photoreceptor Cell Death in A Mouse Model of Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Fernández de la Cámara, Cristina; Hernández-Pinto, Alberto M.; Olivares-González, Lorena; Cuevas-Martín, Carmen; Sánchez-Aragó, María; Hervás, David; Salom, David; Cuezva, José M.; de la Rosa, Enrique J.; Millán, José M; Rodrigo, Regina

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that inflammation is involved in the progression of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) both in patients and in animal models. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Adalimumab, a monoclonal anti-TNFα antibody, on retinal degeneration in a murine model of human autosomal recessive RP, the rd10 mice at postnatal day (P) 18. In our housing conditions, rd10 retinas were seriously damaged at P18. Adalimumab reduced photoreceptor cell death, as determined by scoring the number of TUNEL-positive cells. In addition, nuclear poly (ADP) ribose (PAR) content, an indirect measure of PAR polymerase (PARP) activity, was also reduced after treatment. The blockade of TNFα ameliorated reactive gliosis, as visualized by decreased GFAP and IBA1 immunolabelling (Müller cell and microglial markers, respectively) and decreased up-regulation of TNFα gene expression. Adalimumab also improved antioxidant response by restoring total antioxidant capacity and superoxide dismutase activity. Finally, we observed that Adalimumab normalized energetic and metabolic pattern in rd10 mouse retinas. Our study suggests that the TNFα blockade could be a successful therapeutic approach to increase photoreceptor survival during the progression of RP. Further studies are needed to characterize its effect along the progression of the disease. PMID:26170250

  16. A FRAP-Based Method for Monitoring Molecular Transport in Ciliary Photoreceptor Cells In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Kirsten A; Wolfrum, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    The outer segment of rod and cone photoreceptor cells represents a highly modified primary sensory cilium. It renews on a daily basis throughout lifetime and effective vectorial transport to the cilium is essential for the maintenance of the photoreceptor cell function. Defects in molecules of transport modules lead to severe retinal ciliopathies. We have recently established a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP)-based method to monitor molecular trafficking in living rodent photoreceptor cells. We irreversibly bleach the fluorescence of tagged molecules (e.g. eGFP-Rhodopsin) in photoreceptor cells of native vibratome sections through the retina by high laser intensity. In the laser scanning microscope, the recovery of the fluorescent signal is monitored over time and the kinetics of movements of molecules can be quantitatively ascertained. PMID:27514918

  17. Synergistically acting agonists and antagonists of G protein–coupled receptors prevent photoreceptor cell degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Palczewska, Grazyna; Masuho, Ikuo; Gao, Songqi; Jin, Hui; Dong, Zhiqian; Gieser, Linn; Brooks, Matthew J.; Kiser, Philip D.; Kern, Timothy S.; Martemyanov, Kirill A.; Swaroop, Anand; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Photoreceptor cell degeneration leads to visual impairment and blindness in several types of retinal disease. However, the discovery of safe and effective therapeutic strategies conferring photoreceptor cell protection remains challenging. Targeting distinct cellular pathways with low doses of different drugs that produce a functionally synergistic effect could provide a strategy for preventing or treating retinal dystrophies. We took a systems pharmacology approach to identify potential combination therapies using a mouse model of light-induced retinal degeneration. We showed that a combination of U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved drugs that act on different G protein (guanine nucleotide–binding protein)–coupled receptors (GPCRs) exhibited synergistic activity that protected retinas from light-induced degeneration even when each drug was administered at a low dose. In functional assays, the combined effects of these drugs were stimulation of Gi/o signaling by activating the dopamine receptors D2R and D4R, as well as inhibition of Gs and Gq signaling by antagonizing D1R and the α1A-adrenergic receptor ADRA1A, respectively. Moreover, transcriptome analyses demonstrated that such combined GPCR-targeted treatments preserved patterns of retinal gene expression that were more similar to those of the normal retina than did higher-dose monotherapy. Our study thus supports a systems pharmacology approach to identify treatments for retinopathies, an approach that could extend to other complex disorders. PMID:27460988

  18. Synergistically acting agonists and antagonists of G protein-coupled receptors prevent photoreceptor cell degeneration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Palczewska, Grazyna; Masuho, Ikuo; Gao, Songqi; Jin, Hui; Dong, Zhiqian; Gieser, Linn; Brooks, Matthew J; Kiser, Philip D; Kern, Timothy S; Martemyanov, Kirill A; Swaroop, Anand; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Photoreceptor cell degeneration leads to visual impairment and blindness in several types of retinal disease. However, the discovery of safe and effective therapeutic strategies conferring photoreceptor cell protection remains challenging. Targeting distinct cellular pathways with low doses of different drugs that produce a functionally synergistic effect could provide a strategy for preventing or treating retinal dystrophies. We took a systems pharmacology approach to identify potential combination therapies using a mouse model of light-induced retinal degeneration. We showed that a combination of U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs that act on different G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) exhibited synergistic activity that protected retinas from light-induced degeneration even when each drug was administered at a low dose. In functional assays, the combined effects of these drugs were stimulation of Gi/o signaling by activating the dopamine receptors D2R and D4R, as well as inhibition of Gs and Gq signaling by antagonizing D1R and the α1A-adrenergic receptor ADRA1A, respectively. Moreover, transcriptome analyses demonstrated that such combined GPCR-targeted treatments preserved patterns of retinal gene expression that were more similar to those of the normal retina than did higher-dose monotherapy. Our study thus supports a systems pharmacology approach to identify treatments for retinopathies, an approach that could extend to other complex disorders. PMID:27460988

  19. Common Transcriptional Mechanisms for Visual Photoreceptor Cell Differentiation among Pancrustaceans

    PubMed Central

    Mahato, Simpla; Morita, Shinichi; Tucker, Abraham E.; Liang, Xulong; Jackowska, Magdalena; Friedrich, Markus; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Zelhof, Andrew C.

    2014-01-01

    A hallmark of visual rhabdomeric photoreceptors is the expression of a rhabdomeric opsin and uniquely associated phototransduction molecules, which are incorporated into a specialized expanded apical membrane, the rhabdomere. Given the extensive utilization of rhabdomeric photoreceptors in the eyes of protostomes, here we address whether a common transcriptional mechanism exists for the differentiation of rhabdomeric photoreceptors. In Drosophila, the transcription factors Pph13 and Orthodenticle (Otd) direct both aspects of differentiation: rhabdomeric opsin transcription and rhabdomere morphogenesis. We demonstrate that the orthologs of both proteins are expressed in the visual systems of the distantly related arthropod species Tribolium castaneum and Daphnia magna and that their functional roles are similar in these species. In particular, we establish that the Pph13 homologs have the ability to bind a subset of Rhodopsin core sequence I sites and that these sites are present in key phototransduction genes of both Tribolium and Daphnia. Furthermore, Pph13 and Otd orthologs are capable of executing deeply conserved functions of photoreceptor differentiation as evidenced by the ability to rescue their respective Drosophila mutant phenotypes. Pph13 homologs are equivalent in their ability to direct both rhabdomere morphogenesis and opsin expression within Drosophila, whereas Otd paralogs demonstrate differential abilities to regulate photoreceptor differentiation. Finally, loss-of-function analyses in Tribolium confirm the conserved requirement of Pph13 and Otd in regulating both rhabdomeric opsin transcription and rhabdomere morphogenesis. Taken together, our data identify components of a regulatory framework for rhabdomeric photoreceptor differentiation in Pancrustaceans, providing a foundation for defining ancestral regulatory modules of rhabdomeric photoreceptor differentiation. PMID:24991928

  20. Comparative study of photoreceptor and retinal ganglion cell topography and spatial resolving power in Dipsadidae snakes.

    PubMed

    Hauzman, Einat; Bonci, Daniela M O; Grotzner, Sonia R; Mela, Maritana; Liber, André M P; Martins, Sonia L; Ventura, Dora F

    2014-01-01

    The diurnal Dipsadidae snakes Philodryas olfersii and P. patagoniensis are closely related in their phylogeny but inhabit different ecological niches. P. olfersii is arboreal, whereas P. patagoniensis is preferentially terrestrial. The goal of the present study was to compare the density and topography of neurons, photoreceptors, and cells in the ganglion cell layer in the retinas of these two species using immunohistochemistry and Nissl staining procedures and estimate the spatial resolving power of their eyes based on the ganglion cell peak density. Four morphologically distinct types of cones were observed by scanning electron microscopy, 3 of which were labeled with anti-opsin antibodies: large single cones and double cones labeled by the antibody JH492 and small single cones labeled by the antibody JH455. The average densities of photoreceptors and neurons in the ganglion cell layer were similar in both species (∼10,000 and 7,000 cells·mm(-2), respectively). The estimated spatial resolving power was also similar, ranging from 2.4 to 2.7 cycles·degree(-1). However, the distribution of neurons had different specializations. In the arboreal P. olfersii, the isodensity maps had a horizontal visual streak, with a peak density in the central region and a lower density in the dorsal retina. This organization might be relevant for locomotion and hunting behavior in the arboreal layer. In the terrestrial P. patagoniensis, a concentric pattern of decreasing cell density emanated from an area centralis located in the naso-ventral retina. Lower densities were observed in the dorsal region. The ventrally high density improves the resolution in the superior visual field and may be an important adaptation for terrestrial snakes to perceive the approach of predators from above. PMID:25342570

  1. TrkB/BDNF Signaling Regulates Photoreceptor Progenitor Cell Fate Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Brian A.; Sparrow, Janet; Cai, Bolin; Monroe, Julie; Mikawa, Takashi; Hempstead, Barbara L.

    2008-01-01

    Neurotrophins, via activation of Trk receptor tyrosine kinases, serve as mitogens, survival factors and regulators of arborization during retinal development. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and TrkB regulate neuronal arborization and survival in late retinal development. However, TrkB is expressed during early retinal developmet where its functions are unclear. To assess TrkB/BDNF actions in the early chick retina, replication-incompetent retroviruses were utilized to over-express a dominant negative truncated form of TrkB (trunc TrkB), or BDNF and effects were assessed at E15. Clones expressing trunc TrkB were smaller than controls, and proliferation and apoptosis assays suggest that decreased clone size correlated with increased cell death when BDNF/TrkB signaling was impaired. Analysis of clonal composition revealed that trunc TrkB over-expression decreased photoreceptor numbers (41%) and increased cell numbers in the middle third of the inner nuclear layer (INL) (23%). Conversely, BDNF over-expression increased photoreceptor numbers (25%) and decreased INL numbers (17%). Photoreceptors over-expressing trunc TrkB demonstrated no increase in apoptosis nor abnormalities in lamination suggesting that TrkB activation is not required for photoreceptor cell survival or migration. These studies suggest that TrkB signaling regulates commitment to and/or differentiation of photoreceptor cells from retinal progenitor cells, identifying a novel role for TrkB/BDNF in regulating cell fate decisions. PMID:17005175

  2. Knockdown of ttc26 disrupts ciliogenesis of the photoreceptor cells and the pronephros in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Liu, Qin; Austin, Chrissy; Drummond, Iain; Pierce, Eric A

    2012-08-01

    In our effort to understand genetic disorders of the photoreceptor cells of the retina, we have focused on intraflagellar transport in photoreceptor sensory cilia. From previous mouse proteomic data we identified a cilia protein Ttc26, orthologue of dyf-13 in Caenorhabditis elegans, as a target. We localized Ttc26 to the transition zone of photoreceptor and to the transition zone of cilia in cultured murine inner medullary collecting duct 3 (mIMCD3) renal cells. Knockdown of Ttc26 in mIMCD3 cells produced shortened and defective primary cilia, as revealed by immunofluorescence and scanning electron microscopy. To study Ttc26 function in sensory cilia in vivo, we utilized a zebrafish vertebrate model system. Morpholino knockdown of ttc26 in zebrafish embryos caused ciliary defects in the pronephric kidney at 27 h postfertilization and distension/dilation of pronephros at 5 d postfertilization (dpf). In the eyes, the outer segments of photoreceptor cells appeared shortened or absent, whereas cellular lamination appeared normal in retinas at 5 dpf. This suggests that loss of ttc26 function prevents normal ciliogenesis and differentiation in the photoreceptor cells, and that ttc26 is required for normal development and differentiation in retina and pronephros. Our studies support the importance of Ttc26 function in ciliogenesis and suggest that screening for TTC26 mutations in human ciliopathies is justified. PMID:22718903

  3. Photoreceptor Cells With Profound Structural Deficits Can Support Useful Vision in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Stewart; Blodi, Frederick R.; Lee, Swan; Welder, Chris R.; Mullins, Robert F.; Tucker, Budd A.; Stasheff, Steven F.; Stone, Edwin M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. In animal models of degenerative photoreceptor disease, there has been some success in restoring photoreception by transplanting stem cell–derived photoreceptor cells into the subretinal space. However, only a small proportion of transplanted cells develop extended outer segments, considered critical for photoreceptor cell function. The purpose of this study was to determine whether photoreceptor cells that lack a fully formed outer segment could usefully contribute to vision. Methods. Retinal and visual function was tested in wild-type and Rds mice at 90 days of age (RdsP90). Photoreceptor cells of mice homozygous for the Rds mutation in peripherin 2 never develop a fully formed outer segment. The electroretinogram and multielectrode recording of retinal ganglion cells were used to test retinal responses to light. Three distinct visual behaviors were used to assess visual capabilities: the optokinetic tracking response, the discrimination-based visual water task, and a measure of the effect of vision on wheel running. Results. RdsP90 mice had reduced but measurable electroretinogram responses to light, and exhibited light-evoked responses in multiple types of retinal ganglion cells, the output neurons of the retina. In optokinetic and discrimination-based tests, acuity was measurable but reduced, most notably when contrast was decreased. The wheel running test showed that RdsP90 mice needed 3 log units brighter luminance than wild type to support useful vision (10 cd/m2). Conclusions. Photoreceptors that lack fully formed outer segments can support useful vision. This challenges the idea that normal cellular structure needs to be completely reproduced for transplanted cells to contribute to useful vision. PMID:24569582

  4. Hypoxia-induced metabolic stress in retinal pigment epithelial cells is sufficient to induce photoreceptor degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kurihara, Toshihide; Westenskow, Peter D; Gantner, Marin L; Usui, Yoshihiko; Schultz, Andrew; Bravo, Stephen; Aguilar, Edith; Wittgrove, Carli; Friedlander, Mollie SH; Paris, Liliana P; Chew, Emily; Siuzdak, Gary; Friedlander, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Photoreceptors are the most numerous and metabolically demanding cells in the retina. Their primary nutrient source is the choriocapillaris, and both the choriocapillaris and photoreceptors require trophic and functional support from retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. Defects in RPE, photoreceptors, and the choriocapillaris are characteristic of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a common vision-threatening disease. RPE dysfunction or death is a primary event in AMD, but the combination(s) of cellular stresses that affect the function and survival of RPE are incompletely understood. Here, using mouse models in which hypoxia can be genetically triggered in RPE, we show that hypoxia-induced metabolic stress alone leads to photoreceptor atrophy. Glucose and lipid metabolism are radically altered in hypoxic RPE cells; these changes impact nutrient availability for the sensory retina and promote progressive photoreceptor degeneration. Understanding the molecular pathways that control these responses may provide important clues about AMD pathogenesis and inform future therapies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14319.001 PMID:26978795

  5. Phosducin regulates transmission at the photoreceptor-to-ON-bipolar cell synapse

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Rolf; Lobanova, Ekaterina S.; Hammond, Timothy; Kessler, Christopher; Burns, Marie E.; Frishman, Laura J.; Arshavsky, Vadim Y.

    2010-01-01

    The rate of synaptic transmission between photoreceptors and bipolar cells has been long known to depend on conditions of ambient illumination. However, the molecular mechanisms that mediate and regulate transmission at this ribbon synapse are poorly understood. We conducted electroretinographic recordings from dark- and light-adapted mice lacking the abundant photoreceptor-specific protein, phosducin, and found that the ON-bipolar cell responses in these animals have a reduced light-sensitivity in the dark-adapted state. Further desensitization of their responses, normally caused by steady background illumination was also diminished compared to wild type animals. This effect was observed in both rod- and cone-driven pathways, with the latter affected to a larger degree. The underlying mechanism is likely to be photoreceptor-specific because phosducin is not expressed in other retina neurons and transgenic expression of phosducin in rods of phosducin knockout mice rescued the rod-specific phenotype. The underlying mechanism functions downstream from the phototransduction cascade, as evident from the sensitivity of phototransduction in phosducin knockout rods being affected to a much lesser degree than b-wave responses. These data indicate that a major regulatory component responsible for setting the sensitivity of signal transmission between photoreceptors and ON-bipolar cells is confined to photoreceptors and that phosducin participates in the underlying molecular mechanism. PMID:20203183

  6. Geranylgeranylacetone Suppresses N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea-Induced Photoreceptor Cell Loss in Mice.

    PubMed

    Koriyama, Yoshiki; Ogai, Kazuhiro; Sugitani, Kayo; Hisano, Suguru; Kato, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a disease characterized by the loss of photoreceptor cells. The N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced retinal degeneration model is widely used to study the mechanism of these retinal degenerative disorders because of its selective photoreceptor cell death. As for the cell death mechanism of MNU, calcium-calpain activation and lipid peroxidation processes are involved in the initiation of this cell death. Although such molecular mechanisms of the MNU-induced cell death have been described, the total image of the cell death is still obscure. Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) has been shown to function as a chaperon molecule to protect cells against environmental and physiological stresses. In this study, we investigated the effect of geranylgeranylacetone (GGA), an accylic polyisoprenoid, on MNU-induced photoreceptor cell loss. HSP70 induction by GGA was effective against MNU-induced photoreceptor cell loss as a result of its ability to prevent HSP70 degradation. The data indicate that GGA may help to suppress the onset and progression of retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:26427417

  7. Serial sectioning for examination of photoreceptor cell architecture by focused ion beam technology

    PubMed Central

    Mustafi, Debarshi; Avishai, Amir; Avishai, Nanthawan; Engel, Andreas; Heuer, Arthur; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    Structurally deciphering complex neural networks requires technology with sufficient resolution to allow visualization of single cells and their intimate surrounding connections. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), coupled with serial ion ablation (SIA) technology, presents a new avenue to study these networks. SIA allows ion ablation to remove nanometer sections of tissue for SEM imaging, resulting in serial section data collection for three-dimensional reconstruction. Here we highlight a method for preparing retinal tissues for imaging of photoreceptors by SIA-SEM technology. We show that this technique can be used to visualize whole rod photoreceptors and the internal disc elements from wild-type (wt) mice. The distance parameters of the discs and photoreceptors are in good agreement with previous work with other methods. Moreover, we show that large planes of retinal tissue can be imaged at high resolution to display the packing of normal rods. Finally, SIA-SEM imaging of retinal tissue from a mouse model (Nrl−/−) with phenotypic changes akin to the human disease enhanced S-cone syndrome (ESCS) revealed a structural profile of overall photoreceptor ultrastructure and internal elements that accompany this disease. Overall, this work presents a new method to study photoreceptor cells at high structural resolution that has a broad applicability to the visual neuroscience field. PMID:21439323

  8. Potassium activity in photoreceptors, glial cells and extracellular space in the drone retina: changes during photostimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Coles, J A; Tsacopoulos, M

    1979-01-01

    1. A double-barrelled potassium-sensitive micro-electrode was developed that was fine enough to record intracellular electrical potentials and potassium activities (aK) in the drone retina. 2. aK was measured in the photoreceptor cells, in the pigment (glial) cells, and in the extracellular space, in the superfused, cut, retina. The effect of photostimulation was studied: 20 msec light flashes, intense enough to evoke receptor potentials of maximum amplitude were presented, 1/sec, in a train lasting about 2 min. 3. In photoreceptors with membrane potentials greater than or equal to 50 mV aK in the dark was 79 mM, S.D. = 27 mM, n = 11. During photostimulation aK fell by 21.5 +/- 9.5 mM with a half-time of 30 +/- 22 sec. (A tentative conversion from activities to free concentrations can be made by taking the activity coefficient as 0.70 its value in the Ringer solution). 4. In pigment cells with membrane potentials greater than or equal to 50 mV, aK in the dark was 52 mM, S.D. = 13 mM, n = 11. During photostimulation aK increased by 14 +/- 5 mM. 5. In the extracellular space aK increased during photostimulation with a mean half-time of less than 1.3 sec to a maximum (mean value 14 mM, S.D. = 8.4 mM, n = 22), and then fell to a plateau. 6. It is estimated from the anatomy that the photoreceptors occupy approximately 38% of the total volume of the retina, the pigment cells 57%, and extracellular space 5%. Hence, it seems possible that during photostimulation nearly all the net loss of potassium from the photoreceptors is temporarily stored in the pigment cells. 7. Recordings were made in the extracellular space of the intact animal by passing the electrode through a hole in the cornea. The mean aK in the dark was 7.7 mM, S.E. = 0.4 mM, n = 22. In the superfused retina, aK in the dark was 6.3 mM, S.E. = 0.7 mM, n = 22, even though aK in the Ringer solution was 2.2 mM. Increasing the aK of the Ringer solution to 7.0 mM had no apparent effect on aK in the extracellular

  9. Predicted molecular signaling guiding photoreceptor cell migration following transplantation into damaged retina

    PubMed Central

    Unachukwu, Uchenna John; Warren, Alice; Li, Ze; Mishra, Shawn; Zhou, Jing; Sauane, Moira; Lim, Hyungsik; Vazquez, Maribel; Redenti, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    To replace photoreceptors lost to disease or trauma and restore vision, laboratories around the world are investigating photoreceptor replacement strategies using subretinal transplantation of photoreceptor precursor cells (PPCs) and retinal progenitor cells (RPCs). Significant obstacles to advancement of photoreceptor cell-replacement include low migration rates of transplanted cells into host retina and an absence of data describing chemotactic signaling guiding migration of transplanted cells in the damaged retinal microenvironment. To elucidate chemotactic signaling guiding transplanted cell migration, bioinformatics modeling of PPC transplantation into light-damaged retina was performed. The bioinformatics modeling analyzed whole-genome expression data and matched PPC chemotactic cell-surface receptors to cognate ligands expressed in the light-damaged retinal microenvironment. A library of significantly predicted chemotactic ligand-receptor pairs, as well as downstream signaling networks was generated. PPC and RPC migration in microfluidic ligand gradients were analyzed using a highly predicted ligand-receptor pair, SDF-1α – CXCR4, and both PPCs and RPCs exhibited significant chemotaxis. This work present a systems level model and begins to elucidate molecular mechanisms involved in PPC and RPC migration within the damaged retinal microenvironment. PMID:26935401

  10. Predicted molecular signaling guiding photoreceptor cell migration following transplantation into damaged retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unachukwu, Uchenna John; Warren, Alice; Li, Ze; Mishra, Shawn; Zhou, Jing; Sauane, Moira; Lim, Hyungsik; Vazquez, Maribel; Redenti, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    To replace photoreceptors lost to disease or trauma and restore vision, laboratories around the world are investigating photoreceptor replacement strategies using subretinal transplantation of photoreceptor precursor cells (PPCs) and retinal progenitor cells (RPCs). Significant obstacles to advancement of photoreceptor cell-replacement include low migration rates of transplanted cells into host retina and an absence of data describing chemotactic signaling guiding migration of transplanted cells in the damaged retinal microenvironment. To elucidate chemotactic signaling guiding transplanted cell migration, bioinformatics modeling of PPC transplantation into light-damaged retina was performed. The bioinformatics modeling analyzed whole-genome expression data and matched PPC chemotactic cell-surface receptors to cognate ligands expressed in the light-damaged retinal microenvironment. A library of significantly predicted chemotactic ligand-receptor pairs, as well as downstream signaling networks was generated. PPC and RPC migration in microfluidic ligand gradients were analyzed using a highly predicted ligand-receptor pair, SDF-1α - CXCR4, and both PPCs and RPCs exhibited significant chemotaxis. This work present a systems level model and begins to elucidate molecular mechanisms involved in PPC and RPC migration within the damaged retinal microenvironment.

  11. Predicted molecular signaling guiding photoreceptor cell migration following transplantation into damaged retina.

    PubMed

    Unachukwu, Uchenna John; Warren, Alice; Li, Ze; Mishra, Shawn; Zhou, Jing; Sauane, Moira; Lim, Hyungsik; Vazquez, Maribel; Redenti, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    To replace photoreceptors lost to disease or trauma and restore vision, laboratories around the world are investigating photoreceptor replacement strategies using subretinal transplantation of photoreceptor precursor cells (PPCs) and retinal progenitor cells (RPCs). Significant obstacles to advancement of photoreceptor cell-replacement include low migration rates of transplanted cells into host retina and an absence of data describing chemotactic signaling guiding migration of transplanted cells in the damaged retinal microenvironment. To elucidate chemotactic signaling guiding transplanted cell migration, bioinformatics modeling of PPC transplantation into light-damaged retina was performed. The bioinformatics modeling analyzed whole-genome expression data and matched PPC chemotactic cell-surface receptors to cognate ligands expressed in the light-damaged retinal microenvironment. A library of significantly predicted chemotactic ligand-receptor pairs, as well as downstream signaling networks was generated. PPC and RPC migration in microfluidic ligand gradients were analyzed using a highly predicted ligand-receptor pair, SDF-1α - CXCR4, and both PPCs and RPCs exhibited significant chemotaxis. This work present a systems level model and begins to elucidate molecular mechanisms involved in PPC and RPC migration within the damaged retinal microenvironment. PMID:26935401

  12. Protection of photoreceptor cells from phototoxicity by transplanted retinal pigment epithelial cells expressing different neurotrophic factors.

    PubMed

    Abe, Toshiaki; Saigo, Yoko; Hojo, Masayoshi; Kano, Tetsuya; Wakusawa, Ryosuke; Tokita, Yumi; Tamai, Makoto

    2005-01-01

    Transplantation of cells or tissues and the intravitreal injection of neurotrophic factors are two methods that have been used to treat retinal diseases. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of combining both methods: the transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells expressing different neurotrophic factors. The neutrophic factors were Axokine, brain derived-neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). The enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP) gene was used as a reporter gene. These genes were transduced into RPE cells by lipofection, selected by antibiotics, and transplanted into the subretinal space of 108 rats. The rats were examined at 1 week and 3 months after the transplantation to determine whether the transduced cells were present, were expressing the protein, and were able to protect photoreceptors against phototoxicity. The survival of the transplanted cells was monitored by the presence of eGFP. The degree of protection was determined by the thickness of the outer nuclear layer. Our results showed that the degree of photoreceptor protection was different for the different types of neurotrophic factors at 1 week. After 3 months, the number of surviving transplanted cell was markedly reduced, and protection was observed only with the BDNF-transduced RPE cells. A significant degree of rescue was also observed by BDNF-transduced RPE cells in the nontransplanted area of the retina at both the early and late times. Lymphocytic infiltration was not detected in the vitreous, retina, and choroid at any time. We conclude that the transplantation of BDNF-transduced RPE cells can reduce the photoreceptor damage induced by phototoxicity in the transplanted area and weakly in the nontransplanted area. PMID:16454354

  13. Dysfunction of Heterotrimeric Kinesin-2 in Rod Photoreceptor Cells and the Role of Opsin Mislocalization in Rapid Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Vanda S.; Jimeno, David; Khanobdee, Kornnika; Song, Xiaodan; Chen, Bryan; Nusinowitz, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Due to extensive elaboration of the photoreceptor cilium to form the outer segment, axonemal transport (IFT) in photoreceptors is extraordinarily busy, and retinal degeneration is a component of many ciliopathies. Functional loss of heterotrimeric kinesin-2, a major anterograde IFT motor, causes mislocalized opsin, followed by rapid cell death. Here, we have analyzed the nature of protein mislocalization and the requirements for the death of kinesin-2-mutant rod photoreceptors. Quantitative immuno EM showed that opsin accumulates initially within the inner segment, and then in the plasma membrane. The light-activated movement of arrestin to the outer segment is also impaired, but this defect likely results secondarily from binding to mislocalized opsin. Unlike some other retinal degenerations, neither opsin–arrestin complexes nor photoactivation were necessary for cell loss. In contrast, reduced rod opsin expression provided enhanced rod and cone photoreceptor survival and function, as measured by photoreceptor cell counts, apoptosis assays, and ERG analysis. The cell death incurred by loss of kinesin-2 function was almost completely negated by Rho−/−. Our results indicate that mislocalization of opsin is a major cause of photoreceptor cell death from kinesin-2 dysfunction and demonstrate the importance of accumulating mislocalized protein per se, rather than specific signaling properties of opsin, stemming from photoactivation or arrestin binding. PMID:20926680

  14. Induction of Neuronal Morphology in the 661W Cone Photoreceptor Cell Line with Staurosporine

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Alex F.; Crowe, Megan E.; Lieven, Christopher J.; Levin, Leonard A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose RGC-5 cells undergo differentiation into a neuronal phenotype with low concentrations of staurosporine. Although the RGC-5 cell line was initially thought to be of retinal ganglion cell origin, recent evidence suggests that the RGC-5 line could have been the result of contamination with 661W mouse cone photoreceptor cells. This raised the possibility that a cone photoreceptor cell line could be multipotent and could be differentiated to a neuronal phenotype. Methods 661W and RGC-5 cells, non-neuronal retinal astrocytes, retinal endothelial cells, retinal pericytes, M21 melanoma cells, K562 chronic myelogenous leukemia cells, and Daudi Burkitt lymphoma cells, were differentiated with staurosporine. The resulting morphology was quantitated using NeuronJ with respect to neurite counts and topology. Results Treatment with staurosporine induced similar-appearing morphological differentiation in both 661W and RGC-5 cells. The following measures were not significantly different between 661W and RGC-5 cells: number of neurites per cell, total neurite field length, number of neurite branch points, and cell viability. Neuronal-like differentiation was not observed in the other cell lines tested. Conclusions 661W and RGC-5 cells have virtually identical and distinctive morphology when differentiated with low concentrations of staurosporine. This result demonstrates that a retinal neuronal precursor cell with cone photoreceptor lineage can be differentiated to express a neuronal morphology. PMID:26684837

  15. Transcriptome Dynamics of Developing Photoreceptors in Three-Dimensional Retina Cultures Recapitulates Temporal Sequence of Human Cone and Rod Differentiation Revealing Cell Surface Markers and Gene Networks.

    PubMed

    Kaewkhaw, Rossukon; Kaya, Koray Dogan; Brooks, Matthew; Homma, Kohei; Zou, Jizhong; Chaitankar, Vijender; Rao, Mahendra; Swaroop, Anand

    2015-12-01

    The derivation of three-dimensional (3D) stratified neural retina from pluripotent stem cells has permitted investigations of human photoreceptors. We have generated a H9 human embryonic stem cell subclone that carries a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter under the control of the promoter of cone-rod homeobox (CRX), an established marker of postmitotic photoreceptor precursors. The CRXp-GFP reporter replicates endogenous CRX expression in vitro when the H9 subclone is induced to form self-organizing 3D retina-like tissue. At day 37, CRX+ photoreceptors appear in the basal or middle part of neural retina and migrate to apical side by day 67. Temporal and spatial patterns of retinal cell type markers recapitulate the predicted sequence of development. Cone gene expression is concomitant with CRX, whereas rod differentiation factor neural retina leucine zipper protein (NRL) is first observed at day 67. At day 90, robust expression of NRL and its target nuclear receptor NR2E3 is evident in many CRX+ cells, while minimal S-opsin and no rhodopsin or L/M-opsin is present. The transcriptome profile, by RNA-seq, of developing human photoreceptors is remarkably concordant with mRNA and immunohistochemistry data available for human fetal retina although many targets of CRX, including phototransduction genes, exhibit a significant delay in expression. We report on temporal changes in gene signatures, including expression of cell surface markers and transcription factors; these expression changes should assist in isolation of photoreceptors at distinct stages of differentiation and in delineating coexpression networks. Our studies establish the first global expression database of developing human photoreceptors, providing a reference map for functional studies in retinal cultures. PMID:26235913

  16. Rax Homeoprotein Regulates Photoreceptor Cell Maturation and Survival in Association with Crx in the Postnatal Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Irie, Shoichi; Sanuki, Rikako; Muranishi, Yuki; Kato, Kimiko; Chaya, Taro

    2015-01-01

    The Rax homeobox gene plays essential roles in multiple processes of vertebrate retina development. Many vertebrate species possess Rax and Rax2 genes, and different functions have been suggested. In contrast, mice contain a single Rax gene, and its functional roles in late retinal development are still unclear. To clarify mouse Rax function in postnatal photoreceptor development and maintenance, we generated conditional knockout mice in which Rax in maturing or mature photoreceptor cells was inactivated by tamoxifen treatment (Rax iCKO mice). When Rax was inactivated in postnatal Rax iCKO mice, developing photoreceptor cells showed a significant decrease in the level of the expression of rod and cone photoreceptor genes and mature adult photoreceptors exhibited a specific decrease in cone cell numbers. In luciferase assays, we found that Rax and Crx cooperatively transactivate Rhodopsin and cone opsin promoters and that an optimum Rax expression level to transactivate photoreceptor gene expression exists. Furthermore, Rax and Crx colocalized in maturing photoreceptor cells, and their coimmunoprecipitation was observed in cultured cells. Taken together, these results suggest that Rax plays essential roles in the maturation of both cones and rods and in the survival of cones by regulating photoreceptor gene expression with Crx in the postnatal mouse retina. PMID:25986607

  17. The Hippo Pathway Controls a Switch between Retinal Progenitor Cell Proliferation and Photoreceptor Cell Differentiation in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Asaoka, Yoichi; Hata, Shoji; Namae, Misako; Furutani-Seiki, Makoto; Nishina, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The precise regulation of numbers and types of neurons through control of cell cycle exit and terminal differentiation is an essential aspect of neurogenesis. The Hippo signaling pathway has recently been identified as playing a crucial role in promoting cell cycle exit and terminal differentiation in multiple types of stem cells, including in retinal progenitor cells. When Hippo signaling is activated, the core Mst1/2 kinases activate the Lats1/2 kinases, which in turn phosphorylate and inhibit the transcriptional cofactor Yap. During mouse retinogenesis, overexpression of Yap prolongs progenitor cell proliferation, whereas inhibition of Yap decreases this proliferation and promotes retinal cell differentiation. However, to date, it remains unknown how the Hippo pathway affects the differentiation of distinct neuronal cell types such as photoreceptor cells. In this study, we investigated whether Hippo signaling regulates retinogenesis during early zebrafish development. Knockdown of zebrafish mst2 induced early embryonic defects, including altered retinal pigmentation and morphogenesis. Similar abnormal retinal phenotypes were observed in zebrafish embryos injected with a constitutively active form of yap [(yap (5SA)]. Loss of Yap’s TEAD-binding domain, two WW domains, or transcription activation domain attenuated the retinal abnormalities induced by yap (5SA), indicating that all of these domains contribute to normal retinal development. Remarkably, yap (5SA)-expressing zebrafish embryos displayed decreased expression of transcription factors such as otx5 and crx, which orchestrate photoreceptor cell differentiation by activating the expression of rhodopsin and other photoreceptor cell genes. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that Rx1 is a novel interacting partner of Yap that regulates photoreceptor cell differentiation. Our results suggest that Yap suppresses the differentiation of photoreceptor cells from retinal progenitor cells by repressing Rx1

  18. EXPLORING RPE AS A SOURCE OF PHOTORECEPTORS: DIFFERENTIATION AND INTEGRATION OF TRANSDIFFERENTIATING CELLS GRAFTED INTO EMBRYONIC CHICK EYES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The possibility of generating photoreceptors through programming retina pigment epithelium (RPE) transdifferentiation by examining cell differentiation after transplantation into the developing chicken eye was examined. RPE cells were dissociated, cultured, and guided to transdifferentiate by infec...

  19. Progranulin promotes the retinal precursor cell proliferation and the photoreceptor differentiation in the mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Kuse, Yoshiki; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Sugitani, Sou; Izawa, Hiroshi; Ohno, Yuta; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    Progranulin (PGRN) is a secreted growth factor associated with embryo development, tissue repair, and inflammation. In a previous study, we showed that adipose-derived stem cell-conditioned medium (ASC-CM) is rich in PGRN. In the present study, we investigated whether PGRN is associated with retinal regeneration in the mammalian retina. We evaluated the effect of ASC-CM using the N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced retinal damage model in mice. ASC-CM promoted the differentiation of photoreceptor cells following retinal damage. PGRN increased the number of BrdU+ cells in the outer nuclear layer following retinal damage some of which were Rx (retinal precursor cell marker) positive. PGRN also increased the number of rhodopsin+ photoreceptor cells in primary retinal cell cultures. SU11274, a hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor inhibitor, attenuated the increase. These findings suggest that PGRN may affect the differentiation of retinal precursor cells to photoreceptor cells through the HGF receptor signaling pathway. PMID:27030285

  20. Efficient Production of Photoreceptor Precursor Cells from Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Yanai, Anat; Laver, Christopher; Joe, Aaron W; Gregory-Evans, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of photoreceptor precursor cells (PPCs) differentiated from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is a promising approach to treat common blinding diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. However, existing PPC generation methods are inefficient. To enhance differentiation protocols for rapid and high-yield production of PPCs, we focused on optimizing the handling of the cells by including feeder-independent growth of hESCs, using size-controlled embryoid bodies (EBs), and addition of triiodothyronine (T3) and taurine to the differentiation medium, with subsequent removal of undifferentiated cells via negative cell-selection. Our novel protocol produces higher yields of PPCs than previously reported while reducing the time required for differentiation, which will help understand retinal diseases and facilitate large-scale preclinical trials. PMID:24301073

  1. Determination of Photoreceptor Cell Spectral Sensitivity in an Insect Model from In Vivo Intracellular Recordings.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Kyle J; Osorio, Daniel; Briscoe, Adriana D

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular recording is a powerful technique used to determine how a single cell may respond to a given stimulus. In vision research, intracellular recording has historically been a common technique used to study sensitivities of individual photoreceptor cells to different light stimuli that is still being used today. However, there remains a dearth of detailed methodology in the literature for researchers wishing to replicate intracellular recording experiments in the eye. Here we present the insect as a model for examining eye physiology more generally. Insect photoreceptor cells are located near the surface of the eye and are therefore easy to reach, and many of the mechanisms involved in vision are conserved across animal phyla. We describe the basic procedure for in vivo intracellular recording of photoreceptor cells in the eye of a butterfly, with the goal of making this technique more accessible to researchers with little prior experience in electrophysiology. We introduce the basic equipment needed, how to prepare a live butterfly for recording, how to insert a glass microelectrode into a single cell, and finally the recording procedure itself. We also explain the basic analysis of raw response data for determining spectral sensitivity of individual cell types. Although our protocol focuses on determining spectral sensitivity, other stimuli (e.g., polarized light) and variations of the method are applicable to this setup. PMID:26966935

  2. Derivation of Human Differential Photoreceptor-like Cells from the Iris by Defined Combinations of CRX, RX and NEUROD

    PubMed Central

    Seko, Yuko; Azuma, Noriyuki; Kaneda, Makoto; Nakatani, Kei; Miyagawa, Yoshitaka; Noshiro, Yuuki; Kurokawa, Reiko; Okano, Hideyuki; Umezawa, Akihiro

    2012-01-01

    Examples of direct differentiation by defined transcription factors have been provided for beta-cells, cardiomyocytes and neurons. In the human visual system, there are four kinds of photoreceptors in the retina. Neural retina and iris-pigmented epithelium (IPE) share a common developmental origin, leading us to test whether human iris cells could differentiate to retinal neurons. We here define the transcription factor combinations that can determine human photoreceptor cell fate. Expression of rhodopsin, blue opsin and green/red opsin in induced photoreceptor cells were dependent on combinations of transcription factors: A combination of CRX and NEUROD induced rhodopsin and blue opsin, but did not induce green opsin; a combination of CRX and RX induced blue opsin and green/red opsin, but did not induce rhodopsin. Phototransduction-related genes as well as opsin genes were up-regulated in those cells. Functional analysis; i.e. patch clamp recordings, clearly revealed that generated photoreceptor cells, induced by CRX, RX and NEUROD, responded to light. The response was an inward current instead of the typical outward current. These data suggest that photosensitive photoreceptor cells can be generated by combinations of transcription factors. The combination of CRX and RX generate immature photoreceptors: and additional NEUROD promotes maturation. These findings contribute substantially to a major advance toward eventual cell-based therapy for retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:22558175

  3. Injection of guanosine and adenosine nucleotides into Limulus ventral photoreceptor cells

    PubMed Central

    Bolsover, S. R.; Brown, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    1. Several nucleotide and nucleotide analogues had striking effects when pressure-injected into Limulus ventral photoreceptor cells. The poorly hydrolysable GTP analogues guanosine 5′-0-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTPγS), guanylyl imidodiphosphate (Gpp[NH]p) and guanylyl (β, γ methylene) diphosphonate (Gpp[CH2]p) produced large increases in the frequency of `discrete events' that were recorded from photoreceptors in darkness. This effect was only observed after the injected cell was exposed to light. Injection of the ATP analogue ATPγS had effects similar to those of the GTP analogues. 2. We conclude that GTPγS, Gpp[NH]p, Gpp[CH2]p and ATPγS act at a common site to cause a light-dependent, long-term activation of the excitation mechanism of the photoreceptor. 3. Injection of GTP or GDP at pH 4.8 was followed by a smooth, transient depolarization that was observed neither when GTP at pH 7.5 was injected nor when ATP, 5′GMP or 2-[N-morpholino] ethane sulphonic acid (MES) were injected at pH 4.8. The reversal potential of the current induced by GTP injection was significantly more positive than the reversal potential of the light-induced current. 4. We conclude that GTP injection induces changes of membrane conductance either in addition to, or different from, the light-induced change of membrane conductance. 5. Injection of the ATP analogue adenylyl imidodiphosphate (App[NH]p), and the pyrophosphate analogue imidodiphosphate (p[NH]p) produced a drastic decrease in the sensitivity of photoreceptors to light. This decrease in sensitivity was partially reversed when the concentration of calcium ions in the bathing medium was reduced. 6. We suggest that App[NH]p and p[NH]p injections act by increasing the cytoplasmic concentration of calcium ions. PMID:7153930

  4. Cobalamin C Deficiency Shows a Rapidly Progressing Maculopathy With Severe Photoreceptor and Ganglion Cell Loss

    PubMed Central

    Bonafede, Lucas; Ficicioglu, Can H.; Serrano, Leona; Han, Grace; Morgan, Jessica I. W.; Mills, Monte D.; Forbes, Brian J.; Davidson, Stefanie L.; Binenbaum, Gil; Kaplan, Paige B.; Nichols, Charles W.; Verloo, Patrick; Leroy, Bart P.; Maguire, Albert M.; Aleman, Tomas S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe in detail the retinal structure and function of a group of patients with cobalamin C (cblC) disease. Methods Patients (n = 11, age 4 months to 15 years) with cblC disease (9/11, early onset) diagnosed by newborn screening underwent complete ophthalmic examinations, fundus photography, near-infrared reflectance imaging, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Electroretinograms (ERGs) were performed in a subset of patients. Results Patients carried homozygous or compound heterozygote mutations in the methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type C (MMACHC) gene. Late-onset patients had a normal exam. All early-onset patients showed a maculopathy; older subjects had a retina-wide degeneration (n = 4; >7 years of age). In general, retinal changes were first observed before 1 year of age and progressed within months to a well-established maculopathy. Pseudocolobomas were documented in three patients. Measurable visual acuities ranged from 20/200 to 20/540. Nystagmus was present in 8/11 patients; 5/6 patients had normal ERGs; 1/6 had reduced rod-mediated responses. Spectral-domain OCT showed macular thinning, with severe ganglion cell layer (GCL) and outer nuclear layer (ONL) loss. Inner retinal thickening was observed in areas of total GCL/ONL loss. A normal lamination pattern in the peripapillary nasal retina was often seen despite severe central and/or retina-wide disease. Conclusions Patients with early-onset cblC and MMACHC mutations showed an early-onset, unusually fast-progressing maculopathy with severe central ONL and GCL loss. An abnormally thickened inner retina supports a remodeling response to both photoreceptor and ganglion cell degeneration and/or an interference with normal development in early-onset cblC. PMID:26658511

  5. A role of Heat Shock Protein 70 in Photoreceptor Cell Death: Potential as a Novel Therapeutic Target in Retinal Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Ayako; Koriyama, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases (RDs) such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by night blindness and peripheral vision loss, which caused by the dysfunction and death of photoreceptor cells. Although many causative gene mutations have been reported, the final common end stage is photoreceptor cell death. Unfortunately, no effective treatments or therapeutic agents have been discovered. Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is highly conserved and has antiapoptotic activities. A few reports have shown that HSP70 plays a role in RDs. Thus, we focused on the role of HSP70 in photoreceptor cell death. Using the N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced photoreceptor cell death model in mice, we could examine two stages of the novel cell death mechanism; the early stage, including HSP70 cleavage through protein carbonylation by production of reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation and Ca(2+) influx/calpain activation, and the late stage of cathepsin and/or caspase activation. The upregulation of intact HSP70 expression by its inducer is likely to protect photoreceptor cells. In this review, we focus on the role of HSP70 and the novel cell death signaling process in RDs. We also describe candidate therapeutic agents for RDs. PMID:26507240

  6. Transition of differential histone H3 methylation in photoreceptors and other retinal cells during retinal differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Kazuko; Iwagawa, Toshiro; Kuribayashi, Hiroshi; Baba, Yukihiro; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Murakami, Akira; Nagasaki, Masao; Suzuki, Yutaka; Watanabe, Sumiko

    2016-01-01

    To analyze cell lineage-specific transitions in global transcriptional and epigenetic changes during retinogenesis, we purified retinal cells from normal mice during postnatal development into two fractions, namely, photoreceptors and other retinal cells, based on Cd73 expression, and performed RNA sequencing and ChIP sequencing of H3K27me3 and H3K4me3. Genes expressed in the photoreceptor lineage were marked with H3K4me3 in the Cd73-positive cell fraction; however, the level of H3K27me3 was very low in both Cd73-positive and -negative populations. H3K27me3 may be involved in spatio-temporal onset of a subset of bipolar-related genes. Subsets of genes expressed in amacrine and retinal ganglion cells, which are early-born retinal cell types, were suggested to be maintained in a silent state by H3K27me3 during late-stage retinogenesis. In the outer nuclear layer, upregulation of Rho and rod-related genes were observed in Ezh2-ablated retina, suggesting a role for H3K27me3 in the maintenance of proper expression levels. Taken together, our data on the transition of lineage-specific molecular signatures during development suggest that histone methylation is involved in retinal differentiation and maintenance through cell lineage-specific mechanisms. PMID:27377164

  7. Transition of differential histone H3 methylation in photoreceptors and other retinal cells during retinal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Kazuko; Iwagawa, Toshiro; Kuribayashi, Hiroshi; Baba, Yukihiro; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Murakami, Akira; Nagasaki, Masao; Suzuki, Yutaka; Watanabe, Sumiko

    2016-01-01

    To analyze cell lineage-specific transitions in global transcriptional and epigenetic changes during retinogenesis, we purified retinal cells from normal mice during postnatal development into two fractions, namely, photoreceptors and other retinal cells, based on Cd73 expression, and performed RNA sequencing and ChIP sequencing of H3K27me3 and H3K4me3. Genes expressed in the photoreceptor lineage were marked with H3K4me3 in the Cd73-positive cell fraction; however, the level of H3K27me3 was very low in both Cd73-positive and -negative populations. H3K27me3 may be involved in spatio-temporal onset of a subset of bipolar-related genes. Subsets of genes expressed in amacrine and retinal ganglion cells, which are early-born retinal cell types, were suggested to be maintained in a silent state by H3K27me3 during late-stage retinogenesis. In the outer nuclear layer, upregulation of Rho and rod-related genes were observed in Ezh2-ablated retina, suggesting a role for H3K27me3 in the maintenance of proper expression levels. Taken together, our data on the transition of lineage-specific molecular signatures during development suggest that histone methylation is involved in retinal differentiation and maintenance through cell lineage-specific mechanisms. PMID:27377164

  8. A cell cycle-dependent co-repressor mediates photoreceptor cell-specific nuclear receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Takezawa, Shinichiro; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Okada, Maiko; Fujiki, Ryoji; Iriyama, Aya; Yanagi, Yasuo; Ito, Hiroaki; Takada, Ichiro; Kishimoto, Masahiko; Miyajima, Atsushi; Takeyama, Ken-ichi; Umesono, Kazuhiko; Kitagawa, Hirochika; Kato, Shigeaki

    2007-01-01

    Photoreceptor cell-specific nuclear receptor (PNR) (NR2E3) acts as a sequence-specific repressor that controls neuronal differentiation in the developing retina. We identified a novel PNR co-repressor, Ret-CoR, that is expressed in the developing retina and brain. Biochemical purification of Ret-CoR identified a multiprotein complex that included E2F/Myb-associated proteins, histone deacetylases (HDACs) and NCoR/HDAC complex-related components. Ret-CoR appeared to function as a platform protein for the complex, and interacted with PNR via two CoRNR motifs. Purified Ret-CoR complex exhibited HDAC activity, co-repressed PNR transrepression function in vitro, and co-repressed PNR function in PNR target gene promoters, presumably in the retinal progenitor cells. Notably, the appearance of Ret-CoR protein was cell-cycle-stage-dependent (from G1 to S). Therefore, Ret-CoR appears to act as a component of an HDAC co-repressor complex that supports PNR repression function in the developing retina, and may represent a co-regulator class that supports transcriptional regulator function via cell-cycle-dependent expression. PMID:17255935

  9. Inhibitory Smads and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) modulate anterior photoreceptor cell number during planarian eye regeneration.

    PubMed

    González-Sastre, Alejandro; Molina, Ma Dolores; Saló, Emili

    2012-01-01

    Planarians represent an excellent model to study the processes of body axis and organ re-specification during regeneration. Previous studies have revealed a conserved role for the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway and its intracellular mediators Smad1/5/8 and Smad4 in planarian dorsoventral (DV) axis re-establishment. In an attempt to gain further insight into the role of this signalling pathway in planarians, we have isolated and functionally characte-rized the inhibitory Smads (I-Smads) in Schmidtea mediterranea. Two I-Smad homologues have been identified: Smed-smad6/7-1 and Smed-smad6/7-2. Expression of smad6/7-1 was detected in the parenchyma, while smad6/7-2 was found to be ex-pressed in the central nervous system and the eyes. Neither single smad6/7-1 and smad6/7-2 nor double smad6/7-1,-2 silencing gave rise to any apparent disruption of the DV axis. However, both regenerating and intact smad6/7-2 (RNAi) planarians showed defects in eye morphogenesis and displayed small, rounded eyes that lacked the anterior subpopulation of photoreceptor cells. The number of pigment cells was also reduced in these animals at later stages of regeneration. In contrast, after low doses of Smed-bmp(RNAi), planarians regenerated larger eyes in which the anterior subpopulation of photoreceptor cells was expanded. Our results suggest that Smed-smad6/7-2 and Smed-bmp control the re-specification and maintenance of anterior photoreceptor cell number in S. mediterranea. PMID:22451003

  10. Absence of phosphoglucose isomerase-1 in retinal photoreceptor, pigment epithelium and Muller cells.

    PubMed

    Archer, Simon N; Ahuja, Poonam; Caffé, Romeo; Mikol, Catherine; Foster, Russell G; van Veen, Theo; von Schantz, Malcolm

    2004-06-01

    Macroarray analysis was used to compare equal amounts of cDNA from wild-type and rd/rd (retinal degeneration) mice, collected at P90 when photoreceptor degeneration is virtually complete. A stronger signal for the glycolytic enzyme phosphoglucose isomerase (Gpi1) was observed in the rd/rd sample. Extracellularly, Gpi1 may act as a cytokine, independently described as neuroleukin and autocrine motility factor. Retinal Gpi1 expression was investigated by Northern and Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Double-labelling was performed with antibodies against Gpi1 and calbindin-D, glutamine synthetase, RPE65, calretinin and ultraviolet opsin in order to provide positive cell type identification. Northern and Western blots showed double expression levels per microgram of RNA and protein, respectively, in the rd/rd retina compared with wild-type. However, the total amount of Gpi1 protein per retina was indistinguishable. Gpi1 immunoreactivity was found in ganglion, amacrine, horizontal and bipolar cells, but not in rods, cones, pigment epithelium and Muller cells. This distribution explains why the absolute amounts of Gpi1 protein were not appreciably different between wild-type and the rd/rd phenotype, where rods and cones are absent, whilst the relative contribution of Gpi1 to the total protein and RNA pools differed. Some extracellular immunoreactivity was observed in the photoreceptor matrix around cones in freshly fixed tissue only, which could possibly reflect a role as a cytokine. We propose that glycolysis in Gpi1-negative cells proceeds entirely through the pentose phosphate pathway, creating NADPH at the cost of organic carbon. We hypothesize that the unique metabolic needs of photoreceptors justify this trade-off. PMID:15182299

  11. An Electrogenic Sodium Pump in Limulus Ventral Photoreceptor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. E.; Lisman, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    A hyperpolarization can be recorded intracellularly following either a single bright light stimulus or the intracellular injection of Na+. This after-hyperpolarization is abolished by bathing in 5 x 10-6 M strophanthidin or removal of extracellular K+. Both treatments also lead to a small, rapid depolarization of the dark-adapted cell. When either treatment is prolonged, light responses can still be elicited, although with repetitive stimuli the responses are slowly and progressively diminished in size. The rate of diminution is greater for higher values of [Ca++]out; with [Ca++]out = 0.1 mM, there is almost no progressive diminution of repetitive responses produced by either K+-free seawater or strophanthidin. We propose that an electrogenic Na+ pump contributes directly to dark-adapted membrane voltage and also generates the after-hyperpolarizations, but does not directly generate the receptor potential. Inhibition of this pump leads to intracellular accumulation of sodium ions, which in turn leads to an increase in intracellular Ca++ (provided there is sufficient extracellular Ca++). This increase in intracellular calcium probably accounts for the progressive decrease in the size of the receptor potential seen when the pump is inhibited. PMID:5025747

  12. Damage to the photoreceptor cells of the rabbit retina from 56Fe ions: effect of age at exposure, 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, G. R.; Lett, J. T.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Optic and proximate tissues of New Zealand white (NZW) rabbits at ages (approximately 3.5 years) near the middle of their median lifespan (5-7 years) were given 0.5-3.5 Gy of 465 MeV u-1 56Fe ions in the Bragg plateau region of energy deposition at a linear energy transfer (LET infinity) of 220 +/- 31 keV micrometer-1. Dose-dependent losses of retinal photoreceptor cells (rods) occurred until 1-2 years after irradiation, the period of this interim report. Similar cumulative losses of photoreceptor cells were seen during the period 1-2 years post-irradiation for rabbits given comparable exposures when young (6-9 weeks old). Since losses of photoreceptor cells at early times had not been determined previously, the current experiment, which was designed to simulate the responses of mature astronauts, redressed that deficiency.

  13. Limulus ventral eye. Physiological properties of photoreceptor cells in an organ culture medium

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    Ventral photoreceptor cells bathed in an organ culture medium typically have resting potentials of -85 mV and membrane resistances of 35 Momega and, when dark-adapted, exhibit large potential fluctuations (LPFs) of 60 mV and small potential fluctuations (SPFs) of less than 30 mV. LPFs appear to be regenerative events triggered by SPFs, the well-known quantum bumps. In the dark, SPFs and LPFs occur spontaneously. At intensities near threshold, the rate of occurrence is directly proportional to light intensity, indicating that SPFs and LPFs are elicited by single photon events. At higher intensities, SPFs and LPFs sum to produce a receptor potential that is graded over approximately a 9-log-unit range of light intensity. Amplitude histograms of the discrete potential waves are bimodal, reflecting the SPF and LPF populations. Histograms of current waves are unimodal. SPFs and LPFs are insensitive to 1 microgram tetrodotoxin. I-V characteristics show initial inward currents of approximately 15 nA for voltage clamps to - 40 mV and steady-state outward currents for all clamp potentials. Photoreceptor cells bathed in organ culture medium retain these properties for periods of at least 75 days. PMID:722278

  14. Cellular synthesis and axonal transport of gamma-aminobutyric acid in a photoreceptor cell of the barnacle.

    PubMed Central

    Koike, H; Tsuda, K

    1980-01-01

    1. [3H]glutamate or [3H]gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was injected into the photoreceptor cell of the lateral ocellus of Balanus eburneus, in order to study the transmitter substance of the cell. 2. The photoreceptor cell synthesized [3H]GABA from injected [3H]glutamate. 3. The newly formed [3H]GABA moved inside the photoreceptor axon towards the axon terminal with a velocity of about 0.9 mm/hr. Injected [3H]GABA moved at 0.9 mm/hr and also at 0.4 mm/hr. 4. Axonally transported [3H]GABA reached the axon terminal within several hours following the injection. It did not accumulate at the terminal, but gradually disappeared. 5. Light-microscope and electron-microscope autoradiography following the injection of [3H]GABA revealed that [3H]-reacted silver grains were present in a certain type of axon terminal. The terminal thus identified as that of a photoreceptor cell contains many clear, polymorphic synaptic vesicles about 300-500 A in diameter, some dense-cored vesicles 700-1300 A in diameter, and glycogen granules. The terminal forms many synapses, and each synapse has a synaptic dense body. The terminal always faces two post-synaptic elements at the synapse, forming a triad with a gap distance of about 160-200 A. 6. A GABA analogue, [3H]di-aminobutyric acid, was selectively taken up into the terminals previously identified as those of photoreceptors. 7. These results support the notion that the transmitter substance of the photoreceptor cell of the barnacle is GABA. Images Plate 1 Plate 2 PMID:6160239

  15. Photoreceptor engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Thea; Möglich, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Sensory photoreceptors not only control diverse adaptive responses in Nature, but as light-regulated actuators they also provide the foundation for optogenetics, the non-invasive and spatiotemporally precise manipulation of cellular events by light. Novel photoreceptors have been engineered that establish control by light over manifold biological processes previously inaccessible to optogenetic intervention. Recently, photoreceptor engineering has witnessed a rapid development, and light-regulated actuators for the perturbation of a plethora of cellular events are now available. Here, we review fundamental principles of photoreceptors and light-regulated allostery. Photoreceptors dichotomize into associating receptors that alter their oligomeric state as part of light-regulated allostery and non-associating receptors that do not. A survey of engineered photoreceptors pinpoints light-regulated association reactions and order-disorder transitions as particularly powerful and versatile design principles. Photochromic photoreceptors that are bidirectionally toggled by two light colors augur enhanced spatiotemporal resolution and use as photoactivatable fluorophores. By identifying desirable traits in engineered photoreceptors, we provide pointers for the design of future, light-regulated actuators. PMID:26137467

  16. Rapamycin attenuates visible light-induced injury in retinal photoreceptor cells via inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang-Yu; Fan, Bin; Jiao, Ying-Ying

    2014-05-14

    An extended exposure of the retina to visible light may lead to photochemical damage in retinal photoreceptor cells. The exact mechanism of retinal light damage remains unknown, and an effective therapy is still unavailable. Here, we demonstrated that rapamycin, an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), markedly protected 661W photoreceptor cells from visible light exposure-induced damage at the nanomolar level. We also observed by transmission electron microscopy that light exposure led to severe endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in 661W cells as well as abnormal endomembranes and ER membranes. In addition, obvious upregulated ER stress markers were monitored by western blot at the protein level and by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) at the mRNA level. Interestingly, rapamycin pretreatment significantly suppressed light-induced ER stress and all three major branches of the unfolded protein response (UPR), including the RNA-dependent protein kinase-like ER kinase (PERK), inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1), and activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) pathways both at the protein and mRNA levels. Additionally, the inhibition of ER stress by rapamycin was further confirmed with a dithiothreitol (DTT; a classical ER stress inducer)-damaged 661W cell model. Meanwhile, our results also revealed that rapamycin was able to remarkably inhibit the activation of mTOR and its downstream factors eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1), p-4EBP1, p70, p-p70, and phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p-S6K) in the light-injured 661W cells. Thus, these data indicate that visible light induces ER stress in 661W cells; whereas the mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, effectively protects 661W cells from light injury through suppressing the ER stress pathway. PMID:24607296

  17. Damage of photoreceptor-derived cells in culture induced by light emitting diode-derived blue light.

    PubMed

    Kuse, Yoshiki; Ogawa, Kenjiro; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    Our eyes are increasingly exposed to light from the emitting diode (LED) light of video display terminals (VDT) which contain much blue light. VDTs are equipped with televisions, personal computers, and smart phones. The present study aims to clarify the mechanism underlying blue LED light-induced photoreceptor cell damage. Murine cone photoreceptor-derived cells (661 W) were exposed to blue, white, or green LED light (0.38 mW/cm(2)). In the present study, blue LED light increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, altered the protein expression level, induced the aggregation of short-wavelength opsins (S-opsin), resulting in severe cell damage. While, blue LED light damaged the primary retinal cells and the damage was photoreceptor specific. N-Acetylcysteine (NAC), an antioxidant, protected against the cellular damage induced by blue LED light. Overall, the LED light induced cell damage was wavelength-, but not energy-dependent and may cause more severe retinal photoreceptor cell damage than the other LED light. PMID:24909301

  18. Damage of photoreceptor-derived cells in culture induced by light emitting diode-derived blue light

    PubMed Central

    Kuse, Yoshiki; Ogawa, Kenjiro; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    Our eyes are increasingly exposed to light from the emitting diode (LED) light of video display terminals (VDT) which contain much blue light. VDTs are equipped with televisions, personal computers, and smart phones. The present study aims to clarify the mechanism underlying blue LED light-induced photoreceptor cell damage. Murine cone photoreceptor-derived cells (661 W) were exposed to blue, white, or green LED light (0.38 mW/cm2). In the present study, blue LED light increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, altered the protein expression level, induced the aggregation of short-wavelength opsins (S-opsin), resulting in severe cell damage. While, blue LED light damaged the primary retinal cells and the damage was photoreceptor specific. N-Acetylcysteine (NAC), an antioxidant, protected against the cellular damage induced by blue LED light. Overall, the LED light induced cell damage was wavelength-, but not energy-dependent and may cause more severe retinal photoreceptor cell damage than the other LED light. PMID:24909301

  19. CULD is required for rhodopsin and TRPL channel endocytic trafficking and survival of photoreceptor cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Wang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Endocytosis of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and associated channels contributes to desensitization and adaptation of a variety of signaling cascades. In Drosophila melanogaster, the main light-sensing rhodopsin (Rh1; encoded by ninaE) and the downstream ion channel, transient receptor potential like (TRPL), are endocytosed in response to light, but the mechanism is unclear. By using an RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) approach, we discovered a protein we named CULD, a photoreceptor-cell enriched CUB- and LDLa-domain transmembrane protein, that is required for endocytic trafficking of Rh1 and TRPL. CULD localized to endocytic Rh1-positive or TRPL-positive vesicles. Mutations in culd resulted in the accumulation of Rh1 and TRPL within endocytic vesicles, and disrupted the regular turnover of endocytic Rh1 and TRPL. In addition, loss of CULD induced light- and age-dependent retinal degeneration, and reduced levels of Rh1, but not of TRPL, suppressed retinal degeneration in culd-null mutant flies. Our data demonstrate that CULD plays an important role in the endocytic turnover of Rh1 and TRPL, and suggest that CULD-dependent rhodopsin endocytic trafficking is required for maintaining photoreceptor integrity. PMID:26598556

  20. Physiological Properties of Rod Photoreceptor Cells in Green-sensitive Cone Pigment Knock-in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Keisuke; Onishi, Akishi; Imai, Hiroo; Chisaka, Osamu; Ueda, Yoshiki; Usukura, Jiro; Nakatani, Kei; Shichida, Yoshinori

    2007-01-01

    Rod and cone photoreceptor cells that are responsible for scotopic and photopic vision, respectively, exhibit photoresponses different from each other and contain similar phototransduction proteins with distinctive molecular properties. To investigate the contribution of the different molecular properties of visual pigments to the responses of the photoreceptor cells, we have generated knock-in mice in which rod visual pigment (rhodopsin) was replaced with mouse green-sensitive cone visual pigment (mouse green). The mouse green was successfully transported to the rod outer segments, though the expression of mouse green in homozygous retina was ∼11% of rhodopsin in wild-type retina. Single-cell recordings of wild-type and homozygous rods suggested that the flash sensitivity and the single-photon responses from mouse green were three to fourfold lower than those from rhodopsin after correction for the differences in cell volume and levels of several signal transduction proteins. Subsequent measurements using heterozygous rods expressing both mouse green and rhodopsin E122Q mutant, where these pigments in the same rod cells can be selectively irradiated due to their distinctive absorption maxima, clearly showed that the photoresponse of mouse green was threefold lower than that of rhodopsin. Noise analysis indicated that the rate of thermal activations of mouse green was 1.7 × 10−7 s−1, about 860-fold higher than that of rhodopsin. The increase in thermal activation of mouse green relative to that of rhodopsin results in only 4% reduction of rod photosensitivity for bright lights, but would instead be expected to severely affect the visual threshold under dim-light conditions. Therefore, the abilities of rhodopsin to generate a large single photon response and to retain high thermal stability in darkness are factors that have been necessary for the evolution of scotopic vision. PMID:17591985

  1. cGMP production of patient-specific iPSCs and photoreceptor precursor cells to treat retinal degenerative blindness.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Luke A; Burnight, Erin R; DeLuca, Adam P; Anfinson, Kristin R; Cranston, Cathryn M; Kaalberg, Emily E; Penticoff, Jessica A; Affatigato, Louisa M; Mullins, Robert F; Stone, Edwin M; Tucker, Budd A

    2016-01-01

    Immunologically-matched, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived photoreceptor precursor cells have the potential to restore vision to patients with retinal degenerative diseases like retinitis pigmentosa. The purpose of this study was to develop clinically-compatible methods for manufacturing photoreceptor precursor cells from adult skin in a non-profit cGMP environment. Biopsies were obtained from 35 adult patients with inherited retinal degeneration and fibroblast lines were established under ISO class 5 cGMP conditions. Patient-specific iPSCs were then generated, clonally expanded and validated. Post-mitotic photoreceptor precursor cells were generated using a stepwise cGMP-compliant 3D differentiation protocol. The recapitulation of the enhanced S-cone phenotype in retinal organoids generated from a patient with NR2E3 mutations demonstrated the fidelity of these protocols. Transplantation into immune compromised animals revealed no evidence of abnormal proliferation or tumor formation. These studies will enable clinical trials to test the safety and efficiency of patient-specific photoreceptor cell replacement in humans. PMID:27471043

  2. cGMP production of patient-specific iPSCs and photoreceptor precursor cells to treat retinal degenerative blindness

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, Luke A.; Burnight, Erin R.; DeLuca, Adam P.; Anfinson, Kristin R.; Cranston, Cathryn M.; Kaalberg, Emily E.; Penticoff, Jessica A.; Affatigato, Louisa M.; Mullins, Robert F.; Stone, Edwin M.; Tucker, Budd A.

    2016-01-01

    Immunologically-matched, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived photoreceptor precursor cells have the potential to restore vision to patients with retinal degenerative diseases like retinitis pigmentosa. The purpose of this study was to develop clinically-compatible methods for manufacturing photoreceptor precursor cells from adult skin in a non-profit cGMP environment. Biopsies were obtained from 35 adult patients with inherited retinal degeneration and fibroblast lines were established under ISO class 5 cGMP conditions. Patient-specific iPSCs were then generated, clonally expanded and validated. Post-mitotic photoreceptor precursor cells were generated using a stepwise cGMP-compliant 3D differentiation protocol. The recapitulation of the enhanced S-cone phenotype in retinal organoids generated from a patient with NR2E3 mutations demonstrated the fidelity of these protocols. Transplantation into immune compromised animals revealed no evidence of abnormal proliferation or tumor formation. These studies will enable clinical trials to test the safety and efficiency of patient-specific photoreceptor cell replacement in humans. PMID:27471043

  3. Mouse retinal adaptive response to proton irradiation: Correlation with DNA repair and photoreceptor cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tronov, V. A.; Vinogradova, Yu. V.; Poplinskaya, V. A.; Nekrasova, E. I.; Ostrovsky, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging body of data indicate protecting effect of low level of stress (preconditioning) on retina. Our previous study revealed non-linear dose-response relationship for cytotoxicity of both ionizing radiation and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) on mouse retina. Moreover, non cytotoxic dose of MNU increased tolerance of retina to following challenge dose of MNU. This result displays protection of retina through mechanism of recovery. In present study we used the mouse model for MNU-induced retinal degeneration to evaluate adaptive response of retina to proton irradiation and implication in it of glial Muller cells. The data showed that the recovery of retina after genotoxic agents has been associated with increased efficacy of DNA damage repair and lowered death of retinal photoreceptor cells.

  4. Systemic immunotherapy delays photoreceptor cell loss and prevents vascular pathology in Royal College of Surgeons rats

    PubMed Central

    Adamus, Grazyna; Kyger, Madison; Worley, Aneta; Burrows, Gregory G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Degenerative retinopathies, including retinitis pigmentosa, age-related retinal degeneration, autoimmune retinopathy, and related diseases affect millions of people around the world. Currently, there is no effective treatment for most of those diseases. We investigated systemic recombinant T-cell receptor ligand (RTL) immunotherapy for preventing retinal degeneration and vascular damage in the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat model of retinal degeneration. Methods RCS rats were treated with RTL220 tethered to interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein (IRBP) peptide or control RTL101 without peptide by subcutaneous administration starting at the onset of photoreceptor degeneration or after the degenerative process began daily or every other day and performed for a 13-week period. The retinal cross sections and whole mounts were prepared to determine histopathology, leaking vessels, and formation of vascular complexes. Immunofluorescent studies evaluated microglia and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 chemokine in treated retinas. Optokinetic studies were performed to determine visual acuity. Results Systemic treatment with RTL220 prevented decreases in outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness and showed a significantly higher number of nuclei than control rats treated with RTL101 or vehicle. RTL220 was also effective in protecting retinal vasculature from leakage and the formation of abnormal vascular complexes even when the treatment was administered after the degenerative process was initiated. Visual acuity measurement showed that rats treated with RTL220 performed significantly better than those with RTL101 and untreated age-matched controls at P60 and P90. Biodistribution studies showed that RTL220 cleared slowly from the administration site. Moreover, RTL220-treated retinas had a significantly reduced number of activated microglia in the subretinal space, decreased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production in the retina, inhibited T-cell

  5. Photoreceptors in the crayfish compound eye: electrical interactions between cells as related to polarized-light sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Kenneth J.

    1973-01-01

    1. The sensitivity to plane-polarized light and the electrical interactions of photoreceptors were examined with intracellular and extracellular micro-electrodes in excised compound eyes of the crayfish. 2. There are two types of photoreceptor: each photoreceptor cell responds best to polarized light when the electric-vector of the light is oriented in one of two orthogonal directions. Seven cells, representing each type, are grouped together to form ommatidia. 3. In each ommatidium, cells that are sensitive to the same orientation of the electric-vector of polarized light are coupled electrically. Cells having orthogonal polarized-light sensitivities are not coupled. 4. Nearly all cells studied were sensitive to orange light. A few cells of both types were found that were sensitive to blue light. Blue-sensitive cells were not coupled to orange-sensitive cells. 5. The photocurrents of both cell types produce negative extracellular potentials which can be greater than 10 mV when measured near the photoreceptive membranes within ommatidia. Evidence suggests that the extracellular potentials produced by one type of cell can effectively reduce the receptor potentials recorded in the other cell type. It is proposed that such a mutual non-synaptic interaction can make a cell more sensitive to the orientation of polarized-light than would be predicted from the cell's differential absorption of polarized light (i.e. its dichroic ratio). ImagesAB PMID:4759681

  6. Synaptic plasticity in the rod terminals after partial photoreceptor cell loss in the heterozygous rds mutant mouse.

    PubMed

    Jansen, H G; Sanyal, S

    1992-02-01

    In the retina of mice heterozygous for the retinal degeneration slow gene (rds/+) the photoreceptor cells, both rods and cones, develop abnormal outer segments but establish normal synaptic contacts. The other retinal layers also show normal structural organization. Starting from the age of 2 months, a very slow loss of photoreceptor cells progresses throughout life. As a result, the photoreceptor cell population in the retina of the affected mice is reduced to less than half at the age of 9-18 months. In some of the surviving rod terminals during this period, an increase in the number of synaptic ribbons is recorded. At the same time, the profiles of processes originating from the second order neurons and participating in these synapses are also increased in number so that the multiple ribbons appear as centres of multiple synaptic sites. Morphometric measurements of the perimeter of the synaptic profiles in rod terminals show a significant increase in the rds/+ retina over that of the control retina. Observations based on serial electron microscopy indicate that multiple synaptic sites are developed while the number of the second order neuronal processes, entering the terminals, remains unchanged. The frequency of terminals with multiple synapses in the rds/+ retina increases with progressive photoreceptor cell loss. Similar changes do not occur in the terminals of the cones. It is postulated that loss of some rod photoreceptor cells within a group that is presynaptic to common bipolars or horizontal cells results in partial deafferentation which in turn stimulates the growth of the remaining synaptic elements. The possible compensatory effect and functional significance of such synaptic growth are discussed. PMID:1573048

  7. DEFECTIVE TRAFFICKING OF CONE PHOTORECEPTOR CNG CHANNELS INDUCES THE UNFOLDED PROTEIN RESPONSE AND ER STRESS-ASSOCIATED CELL DEATH

    PubMed Central

    Duricka, Deborah L.; Brown, R. Lane; Varnum, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Mutations that perturb the function of photoreceptor cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels are associated with several human retinal disorders, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to photoreceptor dysfunction and degeneration remain unclear. Many loss-of-function mutations result in intracellular accumulation of CNG channel subunits. Accumulation of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is known to cause ER stress and trigger the unfolded protein response (UPR), an evolutionarily conserved cellular program that results in either adaptation via increased protein processing capacity or apoptotic cell death. We hypothesize that defective trafficking of cone photoreceptor CNG channels can induce UPR-mediated cell death. To test this idea, CNGA3 subunits bearing the R563H and Q655X mutations were expressed in photoreceptor-derived 661W cells with CNGB3 subunits. Compared to wild type, R563H and Q655X subunits displayed altered degradation rates and/or were retained in the ER. ER retention was associated with increased expression of UPR-related markers of ER stress and with decreased cell viability. Chemical and pharmacological chaperones (TUDCA, 4PBA, and the cGMP analog CPT-cGMP) differentially reduced degradation and/or promoted plasma-membrane localization of defective subunits. Improved subunit maturation was concordant with reduced expression of ER stress markers and improved viability of cells expressing localization-defective channels. These results indicate that ER stress can arise from expression of localization defective CNG channels, and may represent a contributing factor for photoreceptor degeneration. PMID:21992067

  8. Analysis of Photoreceptor Rod Outer Segment Phagocytosis by RPE Cells In Situ

    PubMed Central

    Sethna, Saumil; Finnemann, Silvia C.

    2013-01-01

    Counting rhodopsin-positive phagosomes residing in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in the eye at different times of day allows a quantitative assessment of engulfment and digestion phases of diurnal RPE phagocytosis, which efficiently clears shed photoreceptor outer segment fragments (POS) from the neural retina. Comparing such activities among age- and background-matched experimental wild-type and mutant mice or rats serves to identify roles for specific proteins in the phagocytic process. Here, we describe experimental procedures for mouse eye harvest, embedding, sectioning, immunofluorescence labeling of rod POS phagosomes in RPE cells in sagittal eye sections, imaging of POS phagosomes in the RPE by laser scanning confocal microscopy, and POS quantification. PMID:23150373

  9. In vivo cGMP levels in frog photoreceptor cells as a function of light exposure.

    PubMed

    Barbehenn, E K; Klotz, K L; Noelker, D M; Nelson, R; Chader, G J; Passonneau, J V

    1986-11-01

    By employing a combination of highly sensitive radioimmunoassays and histochemical techniques, an in vivo time course of cGMP levels has been determined in the outer segment, photoreceptor cell and outer plexiform layers of frog retina. Frogs (Rana pipiens) were dark-adapted overnight and either frozen rapidly (approximately 3 sec) in liquid nitrogen or exposed to periods of light varying between 0.1 sec and 2 hr before freezing. Frozen retinal sections were cut, freeze-dried, and samples of individual layers dissected out and analysed for cGMP. In the outer plexiform layer, there was a 42% drop in cGMP concentration after 2 sec of light (250 ft candles) followed by a 34% rise after 2 min; a steep concentration gradient formed around the layer after the 2 min exposure. In both the outer-segment layer and photoreceptor-cell layer (which includes outer segments, inner segments and outer nuclear layers), cGMP levels declined from a dark value of 56 mumol kg-1 (dry) to 9 mumol kg-1 (dry) as a result of increasing exposure to several types of light source: levels appear to be primarily a function of total ft candle min. Cyclic GMP concentrations at the longest exposures (2 min with a fiber optic light source or 2 hr with fluorescent room light) reached identical minimum levels. In the outer segments, a 15% decrease in cGMP was observed after 0.1 sec of light exposure. Although the freezing time is too long to be able to say whether the 15% decrease in cGMP at the 0.1 sec exposure is involved in transduction, the low identical levels reached gradually after longer exposures appear to indicate that a light-induced biochemical adjustment in cGMP metabolism occurs over a relatively long time period separate from the msec time course of the transduction process. PMID:3026825

  10. Regulatory arrestin cycle secures the fidelity and maintenance of the fly photoreceptor cell.

    PubMed Central

    Byk, T; Bar-Yaacov, M; Doza, Y N; Minke, B; Selinger, Z

    1993-01-01

    Excitation of fly photoreceptor cells is initiated by photoisomerization of rhodopsin to the active form of metarhodopsin. Fly metarhodopsin is thermostable, does not bleach, and does not regenerate spontaneously to rhodopsin. For this reason, the activity of metarhodopsin must be stopped by an effective termination reaction. On the other hand, there is also a need to restore the inactivated photopigment to an excitable state in order to keep a sufficient number of photopigment molecules available for excitation. The following findings reveal how these demands are met. The photopigment undergoes rapid phosphorylation upon photoconversion of rhodopsin to metarhodopsin and an efficient Ca2+ dependent dephosphorylation upon regeneration of metarhodopsin to rhodopsin. Phosphorylation decreases the ability of metarhodopsin to activate the guanine nucleotide-binding protein. Binding of 49-kDa arrestin further quenches the activity of metarhodopsin and protects it from dephosphorylation. Light-dependent binding and release of 49-kDa arrestin from metarhodopsin- and rhodopsin-containing membranes, respectively, directs the dephosphorylation reaction toward rhodopsin. This ensures the return of phosphorylated metarhodopsin to the rhodopsin pool without initiating transduction in the dark. Assays of rhodopsin dephosphorylation in the Drosophila retinal degeneration C (rdgC) mutant, a mutant in a gene previously cloned and predicted to encode a serine/threonine protein phosphatase, reveal that phosphorylated rhodopsin is a major substrate for the rdgC phosphatase. We propose that mutations resulting in either a decrease or an improper regulation of rhodopsin phosphatase activity bring about degeneration of the fly photoreceptor cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8446607

  11. Targeted Deletion of Vesicular GABA Transporter from Retinal Horizontal Cells Eliminates Feedback Modulation of Photoreceptor Calcium Channels.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Arlene A; Liu, Xue; Boulter, Jim; Grove, James; Pérez de Sevilla Müller, Luis; Barnes, Steven; Brecha, Nicholas C

    2016-01-01

    The cellular mechanisms underlying feedback signaling from horizontal cells to photoreceptors, which are important for the formation of receptive field surrounds of early visual neurons, remain unsettled. Mammalian horizontal cells express a complement of synaptic proteins that are necessary and sufficient for calcium-dependent exocytosis of inhibitory neurotransmitters at their contacts with photoreceptor terminals, suggesting that they are capable of releasing GABA via vesicular release. To test whether horizontal cell vesicular release is involved in feedback signaling, we perturbed inhibitory neurotransmission in these cells by targeted deletion of the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT), the protein responsible for the uptake of inhibitory transmitter by synaptic vesicles. To manipulate horizontal cells selectively, an iCre mouse line with Cre recombinase expression controlled by connexin57 (Cx57) regulatory elements was generated. In Cx57-iCre mouse retina, only horizontal cells expressed Cre protein, and its expression occurred in all retinal regions. After crossing with a VGAT(flox/flox) mouse line, VGAT was selectively eliminated from horizontal cells, which was confirmed immunohistochemically. Voltage-gated ion channel currents in horizontal cells of Cx57-VGAT(-/-) mice were the same as Cx57-VGAT(+/+) controls, as were the cell responses to the ionotropic glutamate receptor agonist kainate, but the response to the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol in Cx57-VGAT(-/-) mice was larger. In contrast, the feedback inhibition of photoreceptor calcium channels, which in control animals is induced by horizontal cell depolarization, was completely absent in Cx57-VGAT(-/-) mice. The results suggest that vesicular release of GABA from horizontal cells is required for feedback inhibition of photoreceptors. PMID:27022629

  12. Targeted Deletion of Vesicular GABA Transporter from Retinal Horizontal Cells Eliminates Feedback Modulation of Photoreceptor Calcium Channels123

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xue; Boulter, Jim; Grove, James; Pérez de Sevilla Müller, Luis; Barnes, Steven; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The cellular mechanisms underlying feedback signaling from horizontal cells to photoreceptors, which are important for the formation of receptive field surrounds of early visual neurons, remain unsettled. Mammalian horizontal cells express a complement of synaptic proteins that are necessary and sufficient for calcium-dependent exocytosis of inhibitory neurotransmitters at their contacts with photoreceptor terminals, suggesting that they are capable of releasing GABA via vesicular release. To test whether horizontal cell vesicular release is involved in feedback signaling, we perturbed inhibitory neurotransmission in these cells by targeted deletion of the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT), the protein responsible for the uptake of inhibitory transmitter by synaptic vesicles. To manipulate horizontal cells selectively, an iCre mouse line with Cre recombinase expression controlled by connexin57 (Cx57) regulatory elements was generated. In Cx57-iCre mouse retina, only horizontal cells expressed Cre protein, and its expression occurred in all retinal regions. After crossing with a VGATflox/flox mouse line, VGAT was selectively eliminated from horizontal cells, which was confirmed immunohistochemically. Voltage-gated ion channel currents in horizontal cells of Cx57-VGAT−/− mice were the same as Cx57-VGAT+/+ controls, as were the cell responses to the ionotropic glutamate receptor agonist kainate, but the response to the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol in Cx57-VGAT−/− mice was larger. In contrast, the feedback inhibition of photoreceptor calcium channels, which in control animals is induced by horizontal cell depolarization, was completely absent in Cx57-VGAT−/− mice. The results suggest that vesicular release of GABA from horizontal cells is required for feedback inhibition of photoreceptors. PMID:27022629

  13. Simultaneous Whole-cell Recordings from Photoreceptors and Second-order Neurons in an Amphibian Retinal Slice Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Van Hook, Matthew J.; Thoreson, Wallace B.

    2013-01-01

    One of the central tasks in retinal neuroscience is to understand the circuitry of retinal neurons and how those connections are responsible for shaping the signals transmitted to the brain. Photons are detected in the retina by rod and cone photoreceptors, which convert that energy into an electrical signal, transmitting it to other retinal neurons, where it is processed and communicated to central targets in the brain via the optic nerve. Important early insights into retinal circuitry and visual processing came from the histological studies of Cajal1,2 and, later, from electrophysiological recordings of the spiking activity of retinal ganglion cells - the output cells of the retina3,4. A detailed understanding of visual processing in the retina requires an understanding of the signaling at each step in the pathway from photoreceptor to retinal ganglion cell. However, many retinal cell types are buried deep in the tissue and therefore relatively inaccessible for electrophysiological recording. This limitation can be overcome by working with vertical slices, in which cells residing within each of the retinal layers are clearly visible and accessible for electrophysiological recording. Here, we describe a method for making vertical sections of retinas from larval tiger salamanders (Ambystoma tigrinum). While this preparation was originally developed for recordings with sharp microelectrodes5,6, we describe a method for dual whole-cell voltage clamp recordings from photoreceptors and second-order horizontal and bipolar cells in which we manipulate the photoreceptor's membrane potential while simultaneously recording post-synaptic responses in horizontal or bipolar cells. The photoreceptors of the tiger salamander are considerably larger than those of mammalian species, making this an ideal preparation in which to undertake this technically challenging experimental approach. These experiments are described with an eye toward probing the signaling properties of the

  14. Human neural progenitor cells decrease photoreceptor degeneration, normalize opsin distribution and support synapse structure in cultured porcine retina.

    PubMed

    Mollick, Tanzina; Mohlin, Camilla; Johansson, Kjell

    2016-09-01

    Retinal neurodegenerative disorders like retinitis pigmentosa, age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and retinal detachment decrease retinal functionality leading to visual impairment. The pathological events are characterized by photoreceptor degeneration, synaptic disassembly, remodeling of postsynaptic neurons and activation of glial cells. Despite intense research, no effective treatment has been found for these disorders. The current study explores the potential of human neural progenitor cell (hNPC) derived factors to slow the degenerative processes in adult porcine retinal explants. Retinas were cultured for 3 days with or without hNPCs as a feeder layer and investigated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), immunohistochemical, western blot and quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) techniques. TUNEL showed that hNPCs had the capacity to limit photoreceptor cell death. Among cone photoreceptors, hNPC coculture resulted in better maintenance of cone outer segments and reduced opsin mislocalization. Additionally, maintained synaptic structural integrity and preservation of second order calbindin positive horizontal cells was also observed. However, Müller cell gliosis only seemed to be alleviated in terms of reduced Müller cell density. Our observations indicate that at 3 days of coculture, hNPC derived factors had the capacity to protect photoreceptors, maintain synaptic integrity and support horizontal cell survival. Human neural progenitor cell applied treatment modalities may be an effective strategy to help maintain retinal functionality in neurodegenerative pathologies. Whether hNPCs can independently hinder Müller cell gliosis by utilizing higher concentrations or by combination with other pharmacological agents still needs to be determined. PMID:27369448

  15. Differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into cone photoreceptors through simultaneous inhibition of BMP, TGFβ and Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shufeng; Flamier, Anthony; Abdouh, Mohamed; Tétreault, Nicolas; Barabino, Andrea; Wadhwa, Shashi; Bernier, Gilbert

    2015-10-01

    Cone photoreceptors are required for color discrimination and high-resolution central vision and are lost in macular degenerations, cone and cone/rod dystrophies. Cone transplantation could represent a therapeutic solution. However, an abundant source of human cones remains difficult to obtain. Work performed in model organisms suggests that anterior neural cell fate is induced 'by default' if BMP, TGFβ and Wnt activities are blocked, and that photoreceptor genesis operates through an S-cone default pathway. We report here that Coco (Dand5), a member of the Cerberus gene family, is expressed in the developing and adult mouse retina. Upon exposure to recombinant COCO, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) differentiated into S-cone photoreceptors, developed an inner segment-like protrusion, and could degrade cGMP when exposed to light. Addition of thyroid hormone resulted in a transition from a unique S-cone population toward a mixed M/S-cone population. When cultured at confluence for a prolonged period of time, COCO-exposed hESCs spontaneously developed into a cellular sheet composed of polarized cone photoreceptors. COCO showed dose-dependent and synergistic activity with IGF1 at blocking BMP/TGFβ/Wnt signaling, while its cone-inducing activity was blocked in a dose-dependent manner by exposure to BMP, TGFβ or Wnt-related proteins. Our work thus provides a unique platform to produce human cones for developmental, biochemical and therapeutic studies and supports the hypothesis that photoreceptor differentiation operates through an S-cone default pathway during human retinal development. PMID:26443633

  16. Light-Dependent Phosphorylation of Bardet Biedl Syndrome 5 in Photoreceptor Cells Modulates its Interaction with Arrestin1

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tyler S.; Spitzbarth, Benjamin; Li, Jian; Dugger, Donald R.; Stern-Schneider, Gabi; Sehn, Elisabeth; Bolch, Susan N.; McDowell, J. Hugh; Tipton, Jeremiah; Wolfrum, Uwe; Smith, W. Clay

    2013-01-01

    Arrestins are dynamic proteins which move between cell compartments triggered by stimulation of G-protein-coupled receptors. Even more dynamically in vertebrate photoreceptors, arrestin1 (Arr1) moves between the inner and outer segments according to the lighting conditions. Previous studies have shown that the light-driven translocation of Arr1 in rod photoreceptors is initiated by rhodopsin through a phospholipase C/protein kinase C (PKC) signaling cascade. The purpose of this study is to identify the PKC substrate that regulates the translocation of Arr1. Mass spectrometry was used to identify the primary phosphorylated proteins in extracts prepared from PKC-stimulated mouse eye cups, confirming the finding with in vitro phosphorylation assays. Our results show that BBS5 is the principal protein phosphorylated either by phorbol ester stimulation or by light stimulation of PKC. Via immunoprecipitation of BBS5 in rod outer segments, Arr1 was pulled down; phosphorylation of BBS5 reduced this co-precipitation of Arr1. Immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy showed that BBS5 principally localizes along the axonemes of rods and cones, but also in photoreceptor inner segments, and synaptic regions. Our principal findings in this study are three-fold. First, we demonstrate that BBS5 is post-translationally regulated by phosphorylation via PKC, an event that is triggered by light in photoreceptor cells. Second, we find a direct interaction between BBS5 and Arr1, an interaction that is modulated by phosphorylation of BBS5. Finally, we show that BBS5 is distributed along the photoreceptor axoneme, co-localizing with Arr1 in the dark. These findings suggest a role for BBS5 in regulating light-dependent translocation of Arr1 and a model describing its role in Arr1 translocation is proposed. PMID:23817741

  17. Essential function of Drosophila Sec6 in apical exocytosis of epithelial photoreceptor cells.

    PubMed

    Beronja, Slobodan; Laprise, Patrick; Papoulas, Ophelia; Pellikka, Milena; Sisson, John; Tepass, Ulrich

    2005-05-23

    Polarized exocytosis plays a major role in development and cell differentiation but the mechanisms that target exocytosis to specific membrane domains in animal cells are still poorly understood. We characterized Drosophila Sec6, a component of the exocyst complex that is believed to tether secretory vesicles to specific plasma membrane sites. sec6 mutations cause cell lethality and disrupt plasma membrane growth. In developing photoreceptor cells (PRCs), Sec6 but not Sec5 or Sec8 shows accumulation at adherens junctions. In late PRCs, Sec6, Sec5, and Sec8 colocalize at the rhabdomere, the light sensing subdomain of the apical membrane. PRCs with reduced Sec6 function accumulate secretory vesicles and fail to transport proteins to the rhabdomere, but show normal localization of proteins to the apical stalk membrane and the basolateral membrane. Furthermore, we show that Rab11 forms a complex with Sec5 and that Sec5 interacts with Sec6 suggesting that the exocyst is a Rab11 effector that facilitates protein transport to the apical rhabdomere in Drosophila PRCs. PMID:15897260

  18. Induction of the Unfolded Protein Response by Constitutive G-protein Signaling in Rod Photoreceptor Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tian; Chen, Jeannie

    2014-01-01

    Phototransduction is a G-protein signal transduction cascade that converts photon absorption to a change in current at the plasma membrane. Certain genetic mutations affecting the proteins in the phototransduction cascade cause blinding disorders in humans. Some of these mutations serve as a genetic source of “equivalent light” that activates the cascade, whereas other mutations lead to amplification of the light response. How constitutive phototransduction causes photoreceptor cell death is poorly understood. We showed that persistent G-protein signaling, which occurs in rod arrestin and rhodopsin kinase knock-out mice, caused a rapid and specific induction of the PERK pathway of the unfolded protein response. These changes were not observed in the cGMP-gated channel knock-out rods, an equivalent light condition that mimics light-stimulated channel closure. Thus transducin signaling, but not channel closure, triggers rapid cell death in light damage caused by constitutive phototransduction. Additionally, we show that in the albino light damage model cell death was not associated with increase in global protein ubiquitination or unfolded protein response induction. Taken together, these observations provide novel mechanistic insights into the cell death pathway caused by constitutive phototransduction and identify the unfolded protein response as a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25183010

  19. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated stimulation of retinal ganglion cell photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, Puneet; Hartwick, Andrew T E

    2016-09-01

    Melanopsin-dependent phototransduction in intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) involves a Gq-coupled phospholipase C (PLC) signaling cascade. Acetylcholine, released in the mammalian retina by starburst amacrine cells, can also activate Gq-PLC pathways through certain muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). Using multielectrode array recordings of rat retinas, we demonstrate that robust spiking responses can be evoked in neonatal and adult ipRGCs after bath application of the muscarinic agonist carbachol. The stimulatory action of carbachol on ipRGCs was a direct effect, as confirmed through calcium imaging experiments on isolated ipRGCs in purified cultures. Using flickering (6 Hz) yellow light stimuli at irradiances below the threshold for melanopsin activation, spiking responses could be elicited in ipRGCs that were suppressed by mAChR antagonism. Therefore, this work identified a novel melanopsin-independent pathway for stimulating sustained spiking in ganglion cell photoreceptors. This mAChR-mediated pathway could enhance ipRGC spiking responses in conditions known to evoke retinal acetylcholine release, such as those involving flickering or moving visual stimuli. Furthermore, this work identifies a pharmacological approach for light-independent ipRGC stimulation that could be targeted by mAChR agonists. PMID:27055770

  20. Small Molecules that Protect Mitochondrial Function from Metabolic Stress Decelerate Loss of Photoreceptor Cells in Murine Retinal Degeneration Models.

    PubMed

    Beeson, Craig; Lindsey, Chris; Nasarre, Cecile; Bandyopadhyay, Mausumi; Perron, Nathan; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2016-01-01

    One feature common to many of the pathways implicated in retinal degeneration is increased metabolic stress leading to impaired mitochondrial function. We found that exposure of cells to calcium ionophores or oxidants as metabolic stressors diminish maximal mitochondrial capacity. A library of 50,000 structurally diverse "drug-like" molecules was screened for protection against loss of calcium-induced loss of mitochondrial capacity in 661W rod-derived cells and C6 glioblastomas. Initial protective hits were then tested for protection against IBMX-induced loss of mitochondrial capacity as measured via respirometry. Molecules that protected mitochondria were then evaluated for protection of rod photoreceptor cells in retinal explants from rd1 mice. Two of the molecules attenuated loss of photoreceptor cells in the rd1 model. In the 661W cells, exposure to calcium ionophore or tert-butylhydroperoxide caused mitochondrial fragmentation that was blocked with the both compounds. Our studies have identified molecules that protect mitochondria and attenuate loss of photoreceptors in models of retinal degeneration suggesting that they could be good leads for development of therapeutic drugs for treatment of a wide variety of retinal dystrophies. PMID:26427445

  1. Colored lenses suppress blue light-emitting diode light-induced damage in photoreceptor-derived cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiromoto, Kaho; Kuse, Yoshiki; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Tadokoro, Nobuyuki; Kaneko, Nobuyuki; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2016-03-01

    Blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in liquid crystal displays emit high levels of blue light, exposure to which is harmful to the retina. Here, we investigated the protective effects of colored lenses in blue LED light-induced damage to 661W photoreceptor-derived cells. We used eight kinds of colored lenses and one lens that reflects blue light. Moreover, we evaluated the relationship between the protective effects of the lens and the transmittance of lens at 464 nm. Lenses of six colors, except for the SY, PN, and reflective coating lenses, strongly decreased the reduction in cell damage induced by blue LED light exposure. The deep yellow lens showed the most protective effect from all the lenses, but the reflective coating lens and pink lens did not show any effects on photoreceptor-derived cell damage. Moreover, these results were correlated with the lens transmittance of blue LED light (464 nm). These results suggest that lenses of various colors, especially deep yellow lenses, may protect retinal photoreceptor cells from blue LED light in proportion to the transmittance for the wavelength of blue LED and the suppression of reactive oxygen species production and cell damage.

  2. High content of creatine kinase in chicken retina: compartmentalized localization of creatine kinase isoenzymes in photoreceptor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wallimann, T; Wegmann, G; Moser, H; Huber, R; Eppenberger, H M

    1986-01-01

    Two isoforms of creatine kinase (CK; ATP:creatine N-phosphotransferase, E.C. 2.7.3.2), brain type (BB-CK) and mitochondrial type (MiMi-CK), but not the muscle types (MM- or hybrid MB-CK), were identified by cellulose polyacetate electrophoresis and immunoblots in retina from adult chickens. Indirect immunofluorescence labeling of cryosections of retinas revealed high concentrations of BB-CK in both rod and cone photoreceptor cells. Most of the fluorescence staining with anti-B-CK antibodies was found within the myoid and the ellipsoid portions of inner segments and the peripheral region of the outer segments. Significant staining with anti-B-CK antibodies was also found in horizontal cells and in the optical nerve fibers, with additional stratified staining in the inner plexiform layer. MiMi-CK was solely demonstrated in the ellipsoid portion of the photoreceptor cells. The presence of high concentrations of compartmentalized CK isoenzymes within photoreceptor cells (approximately equal to 30 enzyme units/mg) as well as the relatively high concentration of total creatine in these cells (approximately equal to 10-15 mM) indicates an important physiological function for CK and phosphocreatine in the energy transduction of vision. Images PMID:3520556

  3. Membrane-bound and soluble Fas ligands have opposite functions in photoreceptor cell death following separation from the retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, H; Murakami, Y; Kataoka, K; Notomi, S; Mantopoulos, D; Trichonas, G; Miller, J W; Gregory, M S; Ksander, B R; Marshak-Rothstein, A; Vavvas, D G

    2015-01-01

    Fas ligand (FasL) triggers apoptosis of Fas-positive cells, and previous reports described FasL-induced cell death of Fas-positive photoreceptors following a retinal detachment. However, as FasL exists in membrane-bound (mFasL) and soluble (sFasL) forms, and is expressed on resident microglia and infiltrating monocyte/macrophages, the current study examined the relative contribution of mFasL and sFasL to photoreceptor cell death after induction of experimental retinal detachment in wild-type, knockout (FasL−/−), and mFasL-only knock-in (ΔCS) mice. Retinal detachment in FasL−/− mice resulted in a significant reduction of photoreceptor cell death. In contrast, ΔCS mice displayed significantly more apoptotic photoreceptor cell death. Photoreceptor loss in ΔCS mice was inhibited by a subretinal injection of recombinant sFasL. Thus, Fas/FasL-triggered cell death accounts for a significant amount of photoreceptor cell loss following the retinal detachment. The function of FasL was dependent upon the form of FasL expressed: mFasL triggered photoreceptor cell death, whereas sFasL protected the retina, indicating that enzyme-mediated cleavage of FasL determines, in part, the extent of vision loss following the retinal detachment. Moreover, it also indicates that treatment with sFasL could significantly reduce photoreceptor cell loss in patients with retinal detachment. PMID:26583327

  4. Undersized Dendritic Arborizations in Retinal Ganglion Cells of the Rd1 Mutant Mouse: A Paradigm of Early Onset Photoreceptor Degeneration*

    PubMed Central

    Damiani, Devid; Novelli, Elena; Mazzoni, Francesca; Strettoi, Enrica

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a family of inherited diseases causing progressive photoreceptor death. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) form the biological substrate for various therapeutic approaches designed to restore vision in RP individuals. Assessment of survival and preservation of RGCs in animal paradigms mimicking the human disease is of key importance for appropriate implementation of vision repair strategies. Here we studied the survival of RGCs in the rd1 mutant mouse, a known model of early onset, autosomic recessive RP, at various stages of photoreceptor degeneration. Furthermore, we analyzed the morphology of various types of RGCs using the newly generated transgenic mouse rd1/Thy1-GFP, in which the rd1 mutation is associated with green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression in a small population of different RGCs. We found excellent survival of cells at up to 1 year of age, a time at which the inner retina is known to have severely reorganized and partially degenerated. However, 50% of the cells analyzed within all RGC types exhibit an undersized dendritic tree, spanning about half of the normal area. Undersized cells are found both in adult and in very young (1-month-old) mice. This suggests that their aberrant phenotype is due to incomplete dendritic development, possibly as a consequence of altered visual input at the time of dendritic arbor refinement. These data show the importance of the timing of photoreceptor death in RGC dendritic development. PMID:22102216

  5. Calpain and PARP Activation during Photoreceptor Cell Death in P23H and S334ter Rhodopsin Mutant Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Jasvir; Mencl, Stine; Sahaboglu, Ayse; Farinelli, Pietro; van Veen, Theo; Zrenner, Eberhart; Ekström, Per; Paquet-Durand, François; Arango-Gonzalez, Blanca

    2011-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited neurodegenerative diseases affecting photoreceptors and causing blindness. Many human cases are caused by mutations in the rhodopsin gene. An important question regarding RP pathology is whether different genetic defects trigger the same or different cell death mechanisms. To answer this question, we analysed photoreceptor degeneration in P23H and S334ter transgenic rats carrying rhodopsin mutations that affect protein folding and sorting respectively. We found strong activation of calpain and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in both mutants, concomitant with calpastatin down-regulation, increased oxidative DNA damage and accumulation of PAR polymers. These parameters were strictly correlated with the temporal progression of photoreceptor degeneration, mirroring earlier findings in the phosphodiesterase-6 mutant rd1 mouse, and suggesting execution of non-apoptotic cell death mechanisms. Interestingly, activation of caspases-3 and -9 and cytochrome c leakage—key events in apoptotic cell death—were observed only in the S334ter mutant, which also showed increased expression of PARP-1. The identification of the same metabolic markers triggered by different mutations in two different species suggests the existence of common cell death mechanisms, which is a major consideration for any mutation independent treatment. PMID:21765948

  6. Transplantation of Photoreceptor Precursors Isolated via a Cell Surface Biomarker Panel From Embryonic Stem Cell‐Derived Self‐Forming Retina

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez‐Cordero, Anai; West, Emma L.; Han, Ya‐Ting; Welby, Emily; Naeem, Arifa; Blackford, Samuel J. I.; Bainbridge, James W. B.; Pearson, Rachael A.; Ali, Robin R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Loss of photoreceptors due to retinal degeneration is a major cause of untreatable blindness. Cell replacement therapy, using pluripotent stem cell‐derived photoreceptor cells, may be a feasible future treatment. Achieving safe and effective cell replacement is critically dependent on the stringent selection and purification of optimal cells for transplantation. Previously, we demonstrated effective transplantation of post‐mitotic photoreceptor precursor cells labelled by fluorescent reporter genes. As genetically labelled cells are not desirable for therapy, here we developed a surface biomarker cell selection strategy for application to complex pluripotent stem cell differentiation cultures. We show that a five cell surface biomarker panel CD73(+)CD24(+)CD133(+)CD47(+)CD15(−) facilitates the isolation of photoreceptor precursors from three‐dimensional self‐forming retina differentiated from mouse embryonic stem cells. Importantly, stem cell‐derived cells isolated using the biomarker panel successfully integrate and mature into new rod photoreceptors in the adult mouse retinae after subretinal transplantation. Conversely, unsorted or negatively selected cells do not give rise to newly integrated rods after transplantation. The biomarker panel also removes detrimental proliferating cells prior to transplantation. Notably, we demonstrate how expression of the biomarker panel is conserved in the human retina and propose that a similar selection strategy will facilitate isolation of human transplantation‐competent cells for therapeutic application. Stem Cells 2015;33:2469—2482 PMID:25982268

  7. The rat retina has five types of ganglion-cell photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Reifler, Aaron N; Chervenak, Andrew P; Dolikian, Michael E; Benenati, Brian A; Meyers, Benjamin S; Demertzis, Zachary D; Lynch, Andrew M; Li, Benjamin Y; Wachter, Rebecca D; Abufarha, Fady S; Dulka, Eden A; Pack, Weston; Zhao, Xiwu; Wong, Kwoon Y

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) are inner retinal photoreceptors that mediate non-image-forming visual functions, e.g. pupillary constriction, regulation of pineal melatonin release, and circadian photoentrainment. Five types of ipRGCs were recently discovered in mouse, but whether they exist in other mammals remained unknown. We report that the rat also has five types of ipRGCs, whose morphologies match those of mouse ipRGCs; this is the first demonstration of all five cell types in a non-mouse species. Through immunostaining and λmax measurements, we showed that melanopsin is likely the photopigment of all rat ipRGCs. The various cell types exhibited diverse spontaneous spike rates, with the M1 type spiking the least and M4 spiking the most, just like we had observed for their mouse counterparts. Also similar to mouse, all ipRGCs in rat generated not only sluggish intrinsic photoresponses but also fast, synaptically driven ones. However, we noticed two significant differences between these species. First, whereas we learned previously that all mouse ipRGCs had equally sustained synaptic light responses, rat M1 cells' synaptic photoresponses were far more transient than those of M2-M5. Since M1 cells provide all input to the circadian clock, this rat-versus-mouse discrepancy could explain the difference in photoentrainment threshold between mouse and other species. Second, rat ipRGCs' melanopsin-based spiking photoresponses could be classified into three varieties, but only two were discerned for mouse ipRGCs. This correlation of spiking photoresponses with cell types will help researchers classify ipRGCs in multielectrode-array (MEA) spike recordings. PMID:25450063

  8. The ventral photoreceptor cells of Limulus. 3. A voltage-clamp study.

    PubMed

    Millecchia, R; Mauro, A

    1969-09-01

    In the dark, the ventral photoreceptor of Limulus exhibits time-variant currents under voltage-clamp conditions; that is, if the membrane potential of the cell is clamped to a depolarized value there is an initial large outward current which slowly declines to a steady level. The current-voltage relation of the cell in the dark is nonlinear. The only ion tested which has any effect on the current-voltage relation is potassium; high potassium shifts the reversal potential towards zero and introduces a negative slope-conductance region. When the cell is illuminated under voltage-clamp conditions, an additional current, the light-induced current, flows across the cell membrane. The time course of this current mimics the time course of the light response (receptor potential) in the unclamped cell; namely, an initial transient phase is followed by a steady-state phase. The amplitude of the peak transient current can be as large as 60 times the amplitude of the steady-state current, while in the unclamped cell the amplitude of the peak transient voltage never exceeds 4 times the amplitude of the steady-state voltage. The current-voltage relations of the additional light-induced current obtained for different instants of time are also nonlinear, but differ from the current-voltage relations of the dark current. The ions tested which have the greatest effect on the light-induced current are sodium and calcium; low sodium decreases the current, while low calcium increases the current. The data strongly support the hypothesis that two systems of electric current exist in the membrane. Thus the total ionic current which flows in the membrane is accounted for as the sum of a dark current and a light-induced current. PMID:5806593

  9. Sodium formate induces autophagy and apoptosis via the JNK signaling pathway of photoreceptor cells

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YING; XU, SHAO-LIN; XU, WEN-JING; YANG, HAI-YAN; HU, PING; LI, YU-XIN

    2016-01-01

    Incidents associated with methanol intoxication resulting from the consumption of fake wine occur not infrequently worldwide. Certain individuals are made blind due to methanol poisoning. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of sodium formate exposure on photoreceptor cells (661W cells). The 661W cells were exposed to sodium formate for 6–24 h and cell viability was determined using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Subsequently, the 661W cells were exposed to 15 or 30 mM sodium formate for 24 h. The level of apoptosis was determined using Hoechst 33342/propidium iodide staining, visualizing the cells under a fluorescence microscope, and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate staining, using flow cytometric analysis. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured using 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) staining, followed by flow cytometric analysis. Autophagy of the 661W cells was measured by monodansylcadaverine staining. The activation of phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK), B-cell lymphoma (Bcl-2), Bcl-2-associated X protein, cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9 and microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3) was assessed by western blotting. The effects of Z-VAD-fmk (a pan-caspase inhibitor) and SP600125 (a JNK inhibitor) on the viability of the sodium formate-induced 661W cells were determined using an MTT assay. Sodium formate treatment induced a decrease in the viability of the 661W cells in a time- and a dose-dependent manner. In addition, sodium formate at concentrations of 15 or 30 mM markedly increased the level of apoptosis and the ROS levels, as measured by DCFH-DA staining of the 661W cells. Additionally, 661W cells exposed to sodium formate for 24 h exhibited increased levels of p-JNK, Bax, cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9 and LC3II (the phosphatidylethanolamine-modified form of LC3), although the level of Bcl-2 was decreased

  10. Sodium formate induces autophagy and apoptosis via the JNK signaling pathway of photoreceptor cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Xu, Shao-Lin; Xu, Wen-Jing; Yang, Hai-Yan; Hu, Ping; Li, Yu-Xin

    2016-02-01

    Incidents associated with methanol intoxication resulting from the consumption of fake wine occur not infrequently worldwide. Certain individuals are made blind due to methanol poisoning. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of sodium formate exposure on photoreceptor cells (661W cells). The 661W cells were exposed to sodium formate for 6‑24 h and cell viability was determined using a 3‑(4,5‑dimethylthiazol‑2‑yl)‑2,5‑diphenyl‑2H‑tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Subsequently, the 661W cells were exposed to 15 or 30 mM sodium formate for 24 h. The level of apoptosis was determined using Hoechst 33342/propidium iodide staining, visualizing the cells under a fluorescence microscope, and annexin V‑fluorescein isothiocyanate staining, using flow cytometric analysis. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured using 2',7'‑dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH‑DA) staining, followed by flow cytometric analysis. Autophagy of the 661W cells was measured by monodansylcadaverine staining. The activation of phosphorylated c‑Jun N‑terminal kinase (p‑JNK), B‑cell lymphoma (Bcl‑2), Bcl‑2‑associated X protein, cleaved caspase‑3, cleaved caspase‑9 and microtubule‑associated protein 1A/1B‑light chain 3 (LC3) was assessed by western blotting. The effects of Z‑VAD‑fmk (a pan‑caspase inhibitor) and SP600125 (a JNK inhibitor) on the viability of the sodium formate‑induced 661W cells were determined using an MTT assay. Sodium formate treatment induced a decrease in the viability of the 661W cells in a time‑ and a dose‑dependent manner. In addition, sodium formate at concentrations of 15 or 30 mM markedly increased the level of apoptosis and the ROS levels, as measured by DCFH‑DA staining of the 661W cells. Additionally, 661W cells exposed to sodium formate for 24 h exhibited increased levels of p‑JNK, Bax, cleaved caspase‑3, cleaved caspase‑9 and LC3II (the phosphatidylethanolamine‑modified form

  11. Functional coupling of a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent nitric oxide synthase and a soluble guanylyl cyclase in vertebrate photoreceptor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, K W; Lambrecht, H G; Haberecht, M; Redburn, D; Schmidt, H H

    1994-01-01

    Electrophysiological recordings on retinal rod cells, horizontal cells and on-bipolar cells indicate that exogenous nitric oxide (NO) has neuromodulatory effects in the vertebrate retina. We report here endogenous NO formation in mammalian photoreceptor cells. Photoreceptor NO synthase resembled the neuronal NOS type I from mammalian brain. NOS activity utilized the substrate L-arginine (Km = 4 microM) and the cofactors NADPH, FAD, FMN and tetrahydrobiopterin. The activity showed a complete dependence on the free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]) and was mediated by calmodulin. NO synthase activity was sufficient to activate an endogenous soluble guanylyl cyclase that copurified in photoreceptor preparations. This functional coupling was strictly controlled by the free [Ca2+] (EC50 = 0.84 microM). Activation of the soluble guanylyl cyclase by endogenous NO was up to 100% of the maximal activation of this enzyme observed with the exogenous NO donor compound sodium nitroprusside. This NO/cGMP pathway was predominantly localized in inner and not in outer segments of photoreceptors. Immunocytochemically, we localized NO synthase type I mainly in the ellipsoid region of the inner segments and a soluble guanylyl cyclase in cell bodies of cone photoreceptor cells. We conclude that in photoreceptors endogenous NO is functionally coupled to a soluble guanylyl cyclase and suggest that it has a neuromodulatory role in visual transduction and in synaptic transmission in the outer retina. Images PMID:7519146

  12. Luminescence- and nanoparticle-mediated increase of light absorption by photoreceptor cells: Converting UV light to visible light

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Sahi, Sunil K.; Peng, Mingying; Lee, Eric B.; Ma, Lun; Wojtowicz, Jennifer L.; Malin, John H.; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We developed new optic devices – singly-doped luminescence glasses and nanoparticle-coated lenses that convert UV light to visible light – for improvement of visual system functions. Tb3+ or Eu3+ singly-doped borate glasses or CdS-quantum dot (CdS-QD) coated lenses efficiently convert UV light to 542 nm or 613 nm wavelength narrow-band green or red light, or wide-spectrum white light, and thereby provide extra visible light to the eye. In zebrafish (wild-type larvae and adult control animals, retinal degeneration mutants, and light-induced photoreceptor cell degeneration models), the use of Tb3+ or Eu3+ doped luminescence glass or CdS-QD coated glass lenses provide additional visible light to the rod and cone photoreceptor cells, and thereby improve the visual system functions. The data provide proof-of-concept for the future development of optic devices for improvement of visual system functions in patients who suffer from photoreceptor cell degeneration or related retinal diseases. PMID:26860393

  13. Luminescence- and nanoparticle-mediated increase of light absorption by photoreceptor cells: Converting UV light to visible light.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Sahi, Sunil K; Peng, Mingying; Lee, Eric B; Ma, Lun; Wojtowicz, Jennifer L; Malin, John H; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We developed new optic devices - singly-doped luminescence glasses and nanoparticle-coated lenses that convert UV light to visible light - for improvement of visual system functions. Tb(3+) or Eu(3+) singly-doped borate glasses or CdS-quantum dot (CdS-QD) coated lenses efficiently convert UV light to 542 nm or 613 nm wavelength narrow-band green or red light, or wide-spectrum white light, and thereby provide extra visible light to the eye. In zebrafish (wild-type larvae and adult control animals, retinal degeneration mutants, and light-induced photoreceptor cell degeneration models), the use of Tb(3+) or Eu(3+) doped luminescence glass or CdS-QD coated glass lenses provide additional visible light to the rod and cone photoreceptor cells, and thereby improve the visual system functions. The data provide proof-of-concept for the future development of optic devices for improvement of visual system functions in patients who suffer from photoreceptor cell degeneration or related retinal diseases. PMID:26860393

  14. Two Light-Induced Processes in the Photoreceptor Cells of Limulus Ventral Eye

    PubMed Central

    Lisman, J. E.; Brown, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    The dark-adapted current-voltage (I-V) curve of a ventral photoreceptor cell of Limulus, measured by a voltage-clamp technique, has a high slope-resistance region more negative than resting voltage, a lower slope-resistance region between resting voltage and zero, and a negative slope-resistance region more positive than 0 v. With illumination, we find no unique voltage at which there is no light-induced current. At the termination of illumination, the I-V curve changes quickly, then recovers very slowly to a dark-adapted configuration. The voltage-clamp currents during and after illumination can be interpreted to arise from two separate processes. One process (fast) changes quickly with change in illumination, has a reversal potential at +20 mv, and has an I-V curve with positive slope resistance at all voltages. These properties are consistent with a light-induced change in membrane conductance to sodium ions. The other process (slow) changes slowly with changes in illumination, generates light-activated current at +20 mv, and has an I-V curve with a large region of negative slope resistance. The mechanism of this process cannot as yet be identified. PMID:5122373

  15. Erythropoietin Slows Photoreceptor Cell Death in a Mouse Model of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Kasmala, Lorraine; Bond, Wesley S.; de Lucas Cerrillo, Ana M.; Wynn, Kristi; Lewin, Alfred S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To test the efficacy of systemic gene delivery of a mutant form of erythropoietin (EPO-R76E) that has attenuated erythropoietic activity, in a mouse model of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Methods Ten-day old mice carrying one copy of human rhodopsin with the P23H mutation and both copies of wild-type mouse rhodopsin (hP23H RHO+/-,mRHO+/+) were injected into the quadriceps with recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) carrying either enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) or EpoR76E. Visual function (electroretinogram) and retina structure (optical coherence tomography, histology, and immunohistochemistry) were assessed at 7 and 12 months of age. Results The outer nuclear layer thickness decreased over time at a slower rate in rAAV.EpoR76E treated as compared to the rAAV.eGFP injected mice. There was a statistically significant preservation of the electroretinogram at 7, but not 12 months of age. Conclusions Systemic EPO-R76E slows death of the photoreceptors and vision loss in hP23H RHO+/-,mRHO+/+ mice. Treatment with EPO-R76E may widen the therapeutic window for retinal degeneration patients by increasing the number of viable cells. Future studies might investigate if co-treatment with EPO-R76E and gene replacement therapy is more effective than gene replacement therapy alone. PMID:27299810

  16. Hessian-LoG filtering for enhancement and detection of photoreceptor cells in adaptive optics retinal images.

    PubMed

    Lazareva, Anfisa; Liatsis, Panos; Rauscher, Franziska G

    2016-01-01

    Automated analysis of retinal images plays a vital role in the examination, diagnosis, and prognosis of healthy and pathological retinas. Retinal disorders and the associated visual loss can be interpreted via quantitative correlations, based on measurements of photoreceptor loss. Therefore, it is important to develop reliable tools for identification of photoreceptor cells. In this paper, an automated algorithm is proposed, based on the use of the Hessian-Laplacian of Gaussian filter, which allows enhancement and detection of photoreceptor cells. The performance of the proposed technique is evaluated on both synthetic and high-resolution retinal images, in terms of packing density. The results on the synthetic data were compared against ground truth as well as cone counts obtained by the Li and Roorda algorithm. For the synthetic datasets, our method showed an average detection accuracy of 98.8%, compared to 93.9% for the Li and Roorda approach. The packing density estimates calculated on the retinal datasets were validated against manual counts and the results obtained by a proprietary software from Imagine Eyes and the Li and Roorda algorithm. Among the tested methods, the proposed approach showed the closest agreement with manual counting. PMID:26831589

  17. Ciliary photoreceptors in the cerebral eyes of a protostome larva

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Eyes in bilaterian metazoans have been described as being composed of either ciliary or rhabdomeric photoreceptors. Phylogenetic distribution, as well as distinct morphologies and characteristic deployment of different photopigments (ciliary vs. rhabdomeric opsins) and transduction pathways argue for the co-existence of both of these two photoreceptor types in the last common bilaterian ancestor. Both receptor types exist throughout the Bilateria, but only vertebrates are thought to use ciliary photoreceptors for directional light detection in cerebral eyes, while all other invertebrate bilaterians studied utilize rhabdomeric photoreceptors for this purpose. In protostomes, ciliary photoreceptors that express c-opsin have been described only from a non-visual deep-brain photoreceptor. Their homology with vertebrate rods and cones of the human eye has been hypothesized to represent a unique functional transition from non-visual to visual roles in the vertebrate lineage. Results To test the hypothesis that protostome cerebral eyes employ exclusively rhabdomeric photoreceptors, we investigated the ultrastructure of the larval eyes in the brachiopod Terebratalia transversa. We show that these pigment-cup eyes consist of a lens cell and a shading pigment cell, both of which are putative photoreceptors, deploying a modified, enlarged cilium for light perception, and have axonal connections to the larval brain. Our investigation of the gene expression patterns of c-opsin, Pax6 and otx in these eyes confirms that the larval eye spots of brachiopods are cerebral eyes that deploy ciliary type photoreceptors for directional light detection. Interestingly, c-opsin is also expressed during early embryogenesis in all potential apical neural cells, becoming restricted to the anterior neuroectoderm, before expression is initiated in the photoreceptor cells of the eyes. Coincident with the expression of c-opsin in the presumptive neuroectoderm, we found that middle

  18. Drosophila chaoptin, a member of the leucine-rich repeat family, is a photoreceptor cell-specific adhesion molecule.

    PubMed Central

    Krantz, D E; Zipursky, S L

    1990-01-01

    Drosophila chaoptin, required for photoreceptor cell morphogenesis, is a member of the leucine-rich repeat family of proteins. On the basis of biochemical and genetic analyses we previously proposed that chaoptin might function as a cell adhesion molecule. To test this hypothesis, chaoptin cDNA driven by the hsp 70 promoter was transfected into non-self-adherent Drosophila Schneider line 2 (S2) cells. Following heat shock induction of chaoptin expression, the transfected S2 cells formed multicellular aggregates. Mixing experiments of chaoptin expressing and non-expressing cells suggest that chaoptin expressing cells adhere homotypically. Previously it was shown that chaoptin is exclusively localized to photoreceptor cells. Thus, chaoptin is a cell-type-specific adhesion molecule. Biochemical analyses presented in this paper demonstrate that chaoptin is linked to the extracellular surface of the plasma membrane by covalent attachment to glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol. We propose that chaoptin and several other members of the leucine-rich repeat family of proteins define a new class of cell adhesion molecules. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 8. PMID:2189727

  19. Mouse cortical collecting duct cells show nonselective cation channel activity and express a gene related to the cGMP-gated rod photoreceptor channel.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, I; Korbmacher, C; Segal, A S; Cheung, P; Boulpaep, E L; Barnstable, C J

    1992-01-01

    Apical nonselective cation channels with an average single-channel conductance of 34 +/- 2.3 pS were found in M-1 mouse cortical collecting duct cells. Channel activity is increased by depolarization and abolished by cytoplasmic calcium removal. Cytoplasmic application of 0.1 mM cGMP decreases channel open probability by 27%. cDNAs corresponding to approximately 40% of the coding region of the photoreceptor channel were isolated by the polymerase chain reaction from M-1 cells and a rat kidney cDNA library. The rat kidney-derived sequence differs by a single base, and the M-1-cell-derived sequence differs by only two bases, from the photoreceptor sequence. A second clone from M-1 cells differs by 20 out of 426 bases from the photoreceptor sequence. In all three clones, the deduced amino acid sequence is identical to that of the rat photoreceptor channel. Northern blot analysis of poly(A)+ RNA from M-1 cells reveals the presence of a 3.2-kilobase band hybridizing with a retinal cGMP-gated cation channel probe. The results suggest the expression in M-1 cells of more than one gene coding for nonselective cation channels or channel subunits, one of which is identical to the cGMP-gated cation channel gene of rod photoreceptors. Images PMID:1279673

  20. Solar cell grid patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasui, R. K.; Berman, P. A. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A grid pattern is described for a solar cell of the type which includes a semiconductive layer doped to a first polarity and a top counter-doped layer. The grid pattern comprises a plurality of concentric conductive grids of selected geometric shapes which are centered about the center of the exposed active surface of the counter-doped layer. Connected to the grids is one or more conductors which extend to the cell's periphery. For the pattern area, the grids and conductors are arranged in the pattern to minimize the maximum distance which any injected majority carriers have to travel to reach any of the grids or conductors. The pattern has a multiaxes symmetry with respect to the cell center to minimize the maximum temperature differentials between points on the cell surface and to provide a more uniform temperature distribution across the cell face.

  1. Plasticity of photoreceptor-generating retinal progenitors revealed by prolonged retinoic acid exposure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Retinoic acid (RA) is important for vertebrate eye morphogenesis and is a regulator of photoreceptor development in the retina. In the zebrafish, RA treatment of postmitotic photoreceptor precursors has been shown to promote the differentiation of rods and red-sensitive cones while inhibiting the differentiation of blue- and UV-sensitive cones. The roles played by RA and its receptors in modifying photoreceptor fate remain to be determined. Results Treatment of zebrafish embryos with RA, beginning at the time of retinal progenitor cell proliferation and prior to photoreceptor terminal mitosis, resulted in a significant alteration of rod and cone mosaic patterns, suggesting an increase in the production of rods at the expense of red cones. Quantitative pattern analyses documented increased density of rod photoreceptors and reduced local spacing between rod cells, suggesting rods were appearing in locations normally occupied by cone photoreceptors. Cone densities were correspondingly reduced and cone photoreceptor mosaics displayed expanded and less regular spacing. These results were consistent with replacement of approximately 25% of positions normally occupied by red-sensitive cones, with additional rods. Analysis of embryos from a RA-signaling reporter line determined that multiple retinal cell types, including mitotic cells and differentiating rods and cones, are capable of directly responding to RA. The RA receptors RXRγ and RARαb are expressed in patterns consistent with mediating the effects of RA on photoreceptors. Selective knockdown of RARαb expression resulted in a reduction in endogenous RA signaling in the retina. Knockdown of RARαb also caused a reduced production of rods that was not restored by simultaneous treatments with RA. Conclusions These data suggest that developing retinal cells have a dynamic sensitivity to RA during retinal neurogenesis. In zebrafish RA may influence the rod vs. cone cell fate decision. The RARαb receptor

  2. Cell-specific DNA methylation patterns of retina-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Merbs, Shannath L; Khan, Miriam A; Hackler, Laszlo; Oliver, Verity F; Wan, Jun; Qian, Jiang; Zack, Donald J

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that epigenetic mechanisms are important in the regulation of gene expression during embryogenesis, gametogenesis, and other forms of tissue-specific gene regulation. We sought to explore the possible role of epigenetics, specifically DNA methylation, in the establishment and maintenance of cell type-restricted gene expression in the retina. To assess the relationship between DNA methylation status and expression level of retinal genes, bisulfite sequence analysis of the 1000 bp region around the transcription start sites (TSS) of representative rod and cone photoreceptor-specific genes and gene expression analysis were performed in the WERI and Y79 human retinoblastoma cell lines. Next, the homologous genes in mouse were bisulfite sequenced in the retina and in non-expressing tissues. Finally, bisulfite sequencing was performed on isolated photoreceptor and non-photoreceptor retinal cells isolated by laser capture microdissection. Differential methylation of rhodopsin (RHO), retinal binding protein 3 (RBP3, IRBP) cone opsin, short-wave-sensitive (OPN1SW), cone opsin, middle-wave-sensitive (OPN1MW), and cone opsin, long-wave-sensitive (OPN1LW) was found in the retinoblastoma cell lines that inversely correlated with gene expression levels. Similarly, we found tissue-specific hypomethylation of the promoter region of Rho and Rbp3 in mouse retina as compared to non-expressing tissues, and also observed hypomethylation of retinal-expressed microRNAs. The Rho and Rbp3 promoter regions were unmethylated in expressing photoreceptor cells and methylated in non-expressing, non-photoreceptor cells from the inner nuclear layer. A third regional hypomethylation pattern of photoreceptor-specific genes was seen in a subpopulation of non-expressing photoreceptors (Rho in cones from the Nrl -/- mouse and Opn1sw in rods). These results demonstrate that a number of photoreceptor-specific genes have cell-specific differential DNA methylation that

  3. The Comparative Protective Effects of Ganoderma Spores Lipid and Fish Oil on N-Methyl-N-Nitrosourea-Induced Photoreceptor Cell Lesion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yang; Deng, Xin-Guo; Li, Na; Luo, Guang-Wei; Chung, Peter C. K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To compare Ganoderma spores lipid (GSL) and fish oil (FO) in inhibiting retinal photoreceptor cell lesions induced by N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) in rats. Methods. 120 rats were untreated (normal control, NC group) or treated with a single intraperitoneal injection of 40 mg/kg MNU (MNU group) then treated with GSL (GSL group) or FO (FO group). Eyes were obtained at 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10 days. Results. Light microscopy assay demonstrated that GSL and FO alleviated rat retinal photoreceptor cell damage (GSL and FO versus MNU group P < .001) similarly (GSL versus FO group P = .980). Electron microscopy confirmed that GSL and FO reversed damage to photoreceptor segments and photoreceptor cell nuclei. GSL-treated rats showed significantly elevated a-wave and b-wave amplitudes over MNU group (P < .05) but less than NC group (P < .05) and not significantly different from FO group (P > .05). Conclusion. GSL, like FO, alleviates rat retinal photoreceptor cell damage induced by MNU. PMID:21660315

  4. Differentiation of Retinal Ganglion Cells and Photoreceptor Precursors from Mouse Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Carrying an Atoh7/Math5 Lineage Reporter

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Takao; Tien, Amy H.; Chen, Andrew; Ge, Jian; Yang, Xian-Jie

    2014-01-01

    The neural retina is a critical component of the visual system, which provides the majority of sensory input in humans. Various retinal degenerative diseases can result in the permanent loss of retinal neurons, especially the light-sensing photoreceptors and the centrally projecting retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The replenishment of lost RGCs and the repair of optic nerve damage are particularly challenging, as both RGC specification and their subsequent axonal growth and projection involve complex and precise regulation. To explore the developmental potential of pluripotent stem cell-derived neural progenitors, we have established mouse iPS cells that allow cell lineage tracing of progenitors that have expressed Atoh7/Math5, a bHLH transcription factor required for RGC production. These Atoh7 lineage reporter iPS cells encode Cre to replace one copy of the endogenous Atoh7 gene and a Cre-dependent YFP reporter in the ROSA locus. In addition, they express pluripotent markers and are capable of generating teratomas in vivo. Under anterior neural induction and neurogenic conditions in vitro, the Atoh7-Cre/ROSA-YFP iPS cells differentiate into neurons that co-express various RGC markers and YFP, indicating that these neurons are derived from Atoh7-expressing progenitors. Consistent with previous in vivo cell lineage studies, the Atoh7-Cre/ROSA-YFP iPS cells also give rise to a subset of Crx-positive photoreceptor precursors. Furthermore, inhibition of Notch signaling in the iPSC cultures results in a significant increase of YFP-positive RGCs and photoreceptor precursors. Together, these results show that Atoh7-Cre/ROSA-YFP iPS cells can be used to monitor the development and survival of RGCs and photoreceptors from pluripotent stem cells. PMID:25401462

  5. Differentiation of retinal ganglion cells and photoreceptor precursors from mouse induced pluripotent stem cells carrying an Atoh7/Math5 lineage reporter.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bin-Bin; Zhang, Xiang-Mei; Hashimoto, Takao; Tien, Amy H; Chen, Andrew; Ge, Jian; Yang, Xian-Jie

    2014-01-01

    The neural retina is a critical component of the visual system, which provides the majority of sensory input in humans. Various retinal degenerative diseases can result in the permanent loss of retinal neurons, especially the light-sensing photoreceptors and the centrally projecting retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The replenishment of lost RGCs and the repair of optic nerve damage are particularly challenging, as both RGC specification and their subsequent axonal growth and projection involve complex and precise regulation. To explore the developmental potential of pluripotent stem cell-derived neural progenitors, we have established mouse iPS cells that allow cell lineage tracing of progenitors that have expressed Atoh7/Math5, a bHLH transcription factor required for RGC production. These Atoh7 lineage reporter iPS cells encode Cre to replace one copy of the endogenous Atoh7 gene and a Cre-dependent YFP reporter in the ROSA locus. In addition, they express pluripotent markers and are capable of generating teratomas in vivo. Under anterior neural induction and neurogenic conditions in vitro, the Atoh7-Cre/ROSA-YFP iPS cells differentiate into neurons that co-express various RGC markers and YFP, indicating that these neurons are derived from Atoh7-expressing progenitors. Consistent with previous in vivo cell lineage studies, the Atoh7-Cre/ROSA-YFP iPS cells also give rise to a subset of Crx-positive photoreceptor precursors. Furthermore, inhibition of Notch signaling in the iPSC cultures results in a significant increase of YFP-positive RGCs and photoreceptor precursors. Together, these results show that Atoh7-Cre/ROSA-YFP iPS cells can be used to monitor the development and survival of RGCs and photoreceptors from pluripotent stem cells. PMID:25401462

  6. Formation of lipofuscin in cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells exposed to pre-oxidized photoreceptor outer segments.

    PubMed

    Wihlmark, U; Wrigstad, A; Roberg, K; Brunk, U T; Nilsson, S E

    1996-04-01

    Accumulation of lipofuscin in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) with increasing age may affect essential supportive functions for the photoreceptors. Earlier, we described a model system for the study of lipofuscinogenesis in RPE cell cultures and showed that mild oxidative stress enhances lipofuscin formation from phagocytized photoreceptor outer segments (POS). In the present study, bovine POS were photo-oxidized, and turned into a lipofuscin-like material, by irradiation with UV light. Transmission electron microscopy of irradiated POS showed loss of the normal stacks of the disk membranes with conversion into an amorphous osmiophilic electron-dense mass. The formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), estimated during the irradiation process, indicated lipid peroxidation. Irradiated POS also showed a strong granular yellow autofluorescence. RPE cell cultures, kept at 21% ambient oxygen, were fed daily for 3, 5 or 7 days with either (i) UV-peroxidized POS, (ii) native POS or (iii) culture medium only. RPE cells fed irradiated POS showed significantly higher levels of lipofuscin-specific autofluorescence compared to cells exposed to native POS after 3 days (p = 0.0056), 5 days (p = 0.0037) and 7 days (p = 0.0020), and to the non-exposed control cells (3 days: p = 0.005, 5 days: p = 0.0037, 7 days: p = 0.0094). The lipofuscin content of cells exposed to irradiated POS increased significantly between days 3 and 7 (p = 0.0335). Ultrastructural studies showed much more numerous and larger lipofuscin-like inclusions in RPE cells fed irradiated POS compared to cells exposed to native POS. In the control cells, lipofuscin-like granules were small and sparse. It appears that exposing RPE cells to previously peroxidized POS, thus artificially converted to lipofuscin and obviously not digestible by the lysosomal enzymes, accelerates the formation of severely lipofuscin-loaded cells. The results will be useful for further studies of possible harmful

  7. Effects of photoreceptor metabolism on interstitial and glial cell pH in bee retina: evidence of a role for NH4+.

    PubMed Central

    Coles, J A; Marcaggi, P; Véga, C; Cotillon, N

    1996-01-01

    1. Measurements were made with pH microelectrodes in superfused slices of the retina of the honey-bee drone. In the dark, the mean +/- S.E.M. pH values in the three compartments of the tissue were: neurones (photoreceptors), 6.99 +/- 0.04; glial cells (outer pigment cells), 7.31 +/- 0.03; extracellular space, 6.60 +/- 0.03. 2. Stimulation of the photoreceptors with light caused transient pH changes: a decrease in the photoreceptors (pHn) and in the glial cells (pHg), and an increase in the interstitial clefts (pHo). 3. The effects of inhibition and activation of aerobic metabolism showed that part, perhaps all, of the light-induced delta pHo resulted from the increased aerobic metabolism in the photoreceptors. 4. Addition of 2 mM NH4+ to the superfusate produced changes in pHo and pHg of the same sign as and similar amplitude to those caused by light stimulation. Manipulation of transmembrane pH gradients had similar effects on changes in pHo induced by light or by exogenous NH4+. 5. Measurements with NH(4+)-sensitive microelectrodes showed that stimulation of aerobic metabolism in the photoreceptors increased [NH4+]o and also that exogenous NH4+/NH3 was taken up by cells, presumably the glial cells. 6. We conclude that within seconds of an increase in the aerobic metabolism in the photoreceptors, they release an increased amount of NH4+/NH3 which affects pHo and enters glial cells. Other evidence suggests that in drone retina the glial cells supply the neurones with amino acids as substrates of energy metabolism; the present results suggest that fixed nitrogen is returned to the glial cells as NH4+/NH3. Images Figure 1 PMID:8887745

  8. Effects of photoreceptor metabolism on interstitial and glial cell pH in bee retina: evidence of a role for NH4+.

    PubMed

    Coles, J A; Marcaggi, P; Véga, C; Cotillon, N

    1996-09-01

    1. Measurements were made with pH microelectrodes in superfused slices of the retina of the honey-bee drone. In the dark, the mean +/- S.E.M. pH values in the three compartments of the tissue were: neurones (photoreceptors), 6.99 +/- 0.04; glial cells (outer pigment cells), 7.31 +/- 0.03; extracellular space, 6.60 +/- 0.03. 2. Stimulation of the photoreceptors with light caused transient pH changes: a decrease in the photoreceptors (pHn) and in the glial cells (pHg), and an increase in the interstitial clefts (pHo). 3. The effects of inhibition and activation of aerobic metabolism showed that part, perhaps all, of the light-induced delta pHo resulted from the increased aerobic metabolism in the photoreceptors. 4. Addition of 2 mM NH4+ to the superfusate produced changes in pHo and pHg of the same sign as and similar amplitude to those caused by light stimulation. Manipulation of transmembrane pH gradients had similar effects on changes in pHo induced by light or by exogenous NH4+. 5. Measurements with NH(4+)-sensitive microelectrodes showed that stimulation of aerobic metabolism in the photoreceptors increased [NH4+]o and also that exogenous NH4+/NH3 was taken up by cells, presumably the glial cells. 6. We conclude that within seconds of an increase in the aerobic metabolism in the photoreceptors, they release an increased amount of NH4+/NH3 which affects pHo and enters glial cells. Other evidence suggests that in drone retina the glial cells supply the neurones with amino acids as substrates of energy metabolism; the present results suggest that fixed nitrogen is returned to the glial cells as NH4+/NH3. PMID:8887745

  9. Pax6a and Pax6b are required at different points in neuronal progenitor cell proliferation during zebrafish photoreceptor regeneration.

    PubMed

    Thummel, Ryan; Enright, Jennifer M; Kassen, Sean C; Montgomery, Jacob E; Bailey, Travis J; Hyde, David R

    2010-05-01

    The light-damaged zebrafish retina results in the death of photoreceptor cells and the subsequent regeneration of the missing rod and cone cells. Photoreceptor regeneration initiates with asymmetric Müller glial cell division to produce neuronal progenitor cells, which amplify, migrate to the outer nuclear layer (ONL), and differentiate into both classes of photoreceptor cells. In this study, we examined the role of the Pax6 protein in regeneration. In zebrafish, there are two Pax6 proteins, one encoded by the pax6a gene and the other encoded by the pax6b gene. We intravitreally injected and electroporated morpholinos that were complementary to either the pax6a or pax6b mRNA to knockdown the translation of the corresponding protein. Loss of Pax6b expression did not affect Müller glial cell division, but blocked the subsequent first cell division of the neuronal progenitors. In contrast, the paralogous Pax6a protein was required for later neuronal progenitor cell divisions, which maximized the number of neuronal progenitors. Without neuronal progenitor cell amplification, proliferation of resident ONL rod precursor cells, which can only regenerate rods, increased inversely proportional to the number of INL neuronal progenitor cells. This confirmed that Müller glial-derived neuronal progenitor cells are necessary to regenerate cones and that distinct mechanisms selectively regenerate rod and cone photoreceptors. This work also defines distinct roles for Pax6a and Pax6b in regulating neuronal progenitor cell proliferation in the adult zebrafish retina and increases our understanding of the molecular pathways required for photoreceptor cell regeneration. PMID:20152834

  10. NLRP3 inflammasome activation drives bystander cone photoreceptor cell death in a P23H rhodopsin model of retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Viringipurampeer, Ishaq A; Metcalfe, Andrew L; Bashar, Abu E; Sivak, Olena; Yanai, Anat; Mohammadi, Zeinabsadat; Moritz, Orson L; Gregory-Evans, Cheryl Y; Gregory-Evans, Kevin

    2016-04-15

    The molecular signaling leading to cell death in hereditary neurological diseases such as retinal degeneration is incompletely understood. Previous neuroprotective studies have focused on apoptotic pathways; however, incomplete suppression of cell death with apoptosis inhibitors suggests that other mechanisms are at play. Here, we report that different signaling pathways are activated in rod and cone photoreceptors in the P23H rhodopsin mutant rat, a model representing one of the commonest forms of retinal degeneration. Up-regulation of the RIP1/RIP3/DRP1 axis and markedly improved survival with necrostatin-1 treatment highlighted necroptosis as a major cell-death pathway in degenerating rod photoreceptors. Conversely, up-regulation of NLRP3 and caspase-1, expression of mature IL-1β and IL-18 and improved cell survival with N-acetylcysteine treatment suggested that inflammasome activation and pyroptosis was the major cause of cone cell death. This was confirmed by generation of the P23H mutation on an Nlrp3-deficient background, which preserved cone viability. Furthermore, Brilliant Blue G treatment inhibited inflammasome activation, indicating that the 'bystander cell death' phenomenon was mediated through the P2RX7 cell-surface receptor. Here, we identify a new pathway in cones for bystander cell death, a phenomenon important in development and disease in many biological systems. In other retinal degeneration models different cell-death pathways are activated, which suggests that the particular pathways that are triggered are to some extent genotype-specific. This also implies that neuroprotective strategies to limit retinal degeneration need to be customized; thus, different combinations of inhibitors will be needed to target the specific pathways in any given disease. PMID:27008885

  11. The Effects of Diabetic Retinopathy and Pan-Retinal Photocoagulation on Photoreceptor Cell Function as Assessed by Dark Adaptometry

    PubMed Central

    Bavinger, J. Clay; Dunbar, Grace E.; Stem, Maxwell S.; Blachley, Taylor S.; Kwark, Leon; Farsiu, Sina; Jackson, Gregory R.; Gardner, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The pathophysiology of vision loss in persons with diabetic retinopathy (DR) is complex and incompletely defined. We hypothesized that retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and rod and cone photoreceptor dysfunction, as measured by dark adaptometry, would increase with severity of DR, and that pan-retinal photocoagulation (PRP) would exacerbate this dysfunction. Methods Dark adaptation (DA) was measured in subjects with diabetes mellitus and healthy controls. Dark adaptation was measured at 5° superior to the fovea following a flash bleach, and the data were analyzed to yield cone and rod sensitivity curves. Retinal layer thicknesses were quantified using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). Results The sample consisted of 23 controls and 73 diabetic subjects. Subjects with moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) exhibited significant impairment of rod recovery rate compared with control subjects (P = 0.04). Cone sensitivity was impaired in subjects with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) (type 1 diabetes mellitus [T1DM]: P = 0.0047; type 2 diabetes mellitus [T2DM]: P < 0.001). Subjects with untreated PDR compared with subjects treated with PRP exhibited similar rod recovery rates and cone sensitivities. Thinner RPE as assessed by OCT was associated with slower rod recovery and lower cone sensitivity, and thinner photoreceptor inner segment/outer segment layer was associated with lower cone sensitivity. Conclusions The results suggest that RPE and photoreceptor cell dysfunction, as assessed by cone sensitivity level and rod- and RPE-mediated dark adaptation, progresses with worsening DR, and rod recovery dysfunction occurs earlier than cone dysfunction. Function was preserved following PRP. The findings suggest multiple defects in retinoid function and provide potential points to improve visual function in persons with PDR. PMID:26803796

  12. Maqui berry (Aristotelia chilensis) and the constituent delphinidin glycoside inhibit photoreceptor cell death induced by visible light.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Junji; Kadekaru, Takashi; Ogawa, Kenjirou; Hitoe, Shoketsu; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Hara, Hideaki

    2013-08-15

    The protective effects of maqui berry (Aristotelia chilensis) extract (MBE) and its major anthocyanins [delphinidin 3,5-O-diglucoside (D3G5G) and delphinidin 3-O-sambubioside-5-O-glucoside (D3S5G)] against light-induced murine photoreceptor cells (661W) death were evaluated. Viability of 661W after light treatment for 24 h, assessed by the tetrazolium salt (WST-8) assay and Hoechst 33342 nuclear staining, was improved by addition of MBE, D3G5G, and D3S5G. Intracellular radical activation in 661W, evaluated using the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-sensitive probe 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2,7-dichlorodihydro fluorescein diacetate acetyl ester (CM-H2DCFDA), was reduced by MBE and its anthocyanins. The anti-apoptosis mechanism of MBE was evaluated by light-induced phosphorylation of p38. MBE significantly suppressed the light-induced phosphorylation of p38. These findings indicate that MBE and its anthocyanidins suppress the light-induced photoreceptor cell death by inhibiting ROS production, suggesting that the inhibition of phosphorylated-p38 may be involved in the underlying mechanism. PMID:23561088

  13. Pharmacological inhibitions of glutamate transporters EAAT1 and EAAT2 compromise glutamate transport in photoreceptor to ON- bipolar cell synapses

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Dennis Y.; Chung, Inyoung; Wu, Samuel M.

    2015-01-01

    To maintain reliable signal transmission across a synapse, free synaptic neurotransmitters must be removed from the cleft in a timely manner. In the first visual synapse, this critical task is mainly undertaken by glutamate transporters (EAATs). Here we study the differential roles of the EAAT1, EAAT2 and EAAT5 subtypes in glutamate (GLU) uptake at the photoreceptor-to-depolarizing bipolar cell synapse in intact dark-adapted retina. Various doses of EAAT blockers and/or GLU were injected into the eye before the electroretinogram (ERG) was measured. Their effectiveness and potency in inhibiting the ERG b-wave were studied to determine their relative contributions to the GLU clearing activity at the synapse. The results showed that EAAT1 and EAAT2 plays different roles. Selectively blocking glial EAAT1 alone using UCPH101 inhibited the b-wave 2–24 hours following injection, suggesting a dominating role of EAAT1 in the overall GLU clearing capacity in the synaptic cleft. Selectively blocking EAAT2 on photoreceptor terminals had no significant effect on the b-wave, but increased the potency of exogenous GLU in inhibiting the b-wave. These suggest that EAAT2 play a secondary yet significant role in the GLU reuptake activity at the rod and the cone output synapses. Additionally, we have verified our electrophysiological findings with double-label immunohistochemistry, and extend the literature on the spatial distribution of EAAT2 splice variants in the mouse retina. PMID:25152321

  14. Tracking Quantum Dot–Tagged Calcium Channels at Vertebrate Photoreceptor Synapses: Retinal Slices and Dissociated Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Aaron J.; Thoreson, Wallace B.

    2013-01-01

    At synapses in the central nervous system, precisely localized assemblies of presynaptic proteins, neurotransmitter-filled vesicles, and postsynaptic receptors are required to communicate messages between neurons. Our understanding of synaptic function has been significantly advanced using electrophysiological methods, but the dynamic spatial behavior and real-time organization of synapses remains poorly understood. In this unit, we describe a method for labeling individual presynaptic calcium channels with photo-stable quantum dots for single-particle tracking analysis. We have used this technique to examine the mobility of L-type calcium channels in the presynaptic membrane of rod and cone photoreceptors in the retina. These channels control release of glutamate-filled synaptic vesicles at the ribbon synapses in photoreceptor terminals. This technique offers the advantage of providing a real-time biophysical readout of ion channel mobility and can be manipulated by pharmacological or electrophysiological methods. For example, the combination of electrophysiological and single-particle tracking experiments has revealed that fusion of nearby vesicles influences calcium channel mobility and changes in channel mobility can influence release. These approaches can also be readily adapted to examine membrane proteins in other systems. PMID:23315944

  15. Necrotic enlargement of cone photoreceptor cells and the release of high-mobility group box-1 in retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Y; Ikeda, Y; Nakatake, S; Tachibana, T; Fujiwara, K; Yoshida, N; Notomi, S; Nakao, S; Hisatomi, T; Miller, J W; Vavvas, DG; Sonoda, KH; Ishibashi, T

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) refers to a group of inherited retinal degenerations resulting form rod and cone photoreceptor cell death. The rod cell death due to deleterious genetic mutations has been shown to occur mainly through apoptosis, whereas the mechanisms and features of the secondary cone cell death have not been fully elucidated. Our previous study showed that the cone cell death in rd10 mice, an animal model of RP, involves necrotic features and is partly mediated by the receptor interacting protein kinase. However, the relevancy of necrotic cone cell death in human RP patients remains unknown. In the present study, we showed that dying cone cells in rd10 mice exhibited cellular enlargement, along with necrotic changes such as cellular swelling and mitochondrial rupture. In human eyes, live imaging of cone cells by adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy revealed significantly increased percentages of enlarged cone cells in the RP patients compared with the control subjects. The vitreous of the RP patients contained significantly higher levels of high-mobility group box-1, which is released extracellularly associated with necrotic cell death. These findings suggest that necrotic enlargement of cone cells is involved in the process of cone degeneration, and that necrosis may be a novel target to prevent or delay the loss of cone-mediated central vision in RP. PMID:27551484

  16. Midkine-a Protein Localization in the Developing and Adult Retina of the Zebrafish and Its Function During Photoreceptor Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Scott; Thummel, Ryan; Hitchcock, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    Midkine is a heparin binding growth factor with important functions in neuronal development and survival, but little is known about its function in the retina. Previous studies show that in the developing zebrafish, Midkine-a (Mdka) regulates cell cycle kinetics in retinal progenitors, and following injury to the adult zebrafish retina, mdka is strongly upregulated in Müller glia and the injury-induced photoreceptor progenitors. Here we provide the first data describing Mdka protein localization during different stages of retinal development and during the regeneration of photoreceptors in adults. We also experimentally test the role of Mdka during photoreceptor regeneration. The immuno-localization of Mdka reflects the complex spatiotemporal pattern of gene expression and also reveals the apparent secretion and extracellular trafficking of this protein. During embryonic retinal development the Mdka antibodies label all mitotically active cells, but at the onset of neuronal differentiation, immunostaining is also localized to the nascent inner plexiform layer. Starting at five days post fertilization through the juvenile stage, Mdka immunostaining labels the cytoplasm of horizontal cells and the overlying somata of rod photoreceptors. Double immunolabeling shows that in adult horizontal cells, Mdka co-localizes with markers of the Golgi complex. Together, these data are interpreted to show that Mdka is synthesized in horizontal cells and secreted into the outer nuclear layer. In adults, Mdka is also present in the end feet of Müller glia. Similar to mdka gene expression, Mdka in horizontal cells is regulated by circadian rhythms. After the light-induced death of photoreceptors, Mdka immuonolabeling is localized to Müller glia, the intrinsic stem cells of the zebrafish retina, and proliferating photoreceptor progenitors. Knockdown of Mdka during photoreceptor regeneration results in less proliferation and diminished regeneration of rod photoreceptors. These data

  17. CNTF-mediated protection of photoreceptors requires initial activation of the cytokine receptor gp130 in Müller glial cells

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Kun Do; Nusinowitz, Steven; Chao, Kevin; Yu, Fei; Bok, Dean; Yang, Xian-Jie

    2013-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) acts as a potent neuroprotective agent in multiple retinal degeneration animal models. Recently, CNTF has been evaluated in clinical trials for the inherited degenerative disease retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and for dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Despite its potential as a broad-spectrum therapeutic treatment for blinding diseases, the target cells of exogenous CNTF and its mechanism of action remain poorly understood. We have shown previously that constitutive expression of CNTF prevents photoreceptor death but alters the retinal transcriptome and suppresses visual function. Here, we use a lentivirus to deliver the same secreted human CNTF used in clinical trials to a mouse model of RP. We found that low levels of CNTF halt photoreceptor death, improve photoreceptor morphology, and correct opsin mislocalization. However, we did not detect corresponding improvement of retinal function as measured by the electroretinogram. Disruption of the cytokine receptor gp130 gene in Müller glia reduces CNTF-dependent photoreceptor survival and prevents phosphorylation of STAT3 and ERK in Müller glia and the rest of the retina. Targeted deletion of gp130 in rods also demolishes neuroprotection by CNTF and prevents further activation of Müller glia. Moreover, CNTF elevates the expression of LIF and endothelin 2, thus positively promoting Müller and photoreceptor interactions. We propose that exogenous CNTF initially targets Müller glia, and subsequently induces cytokines acting through gp130 in photoreceptors to promote neuronal survival. These results elucidate a cellular mechanism for exogenous CNTF-triggered neuroprotection and provide insight into the complex cellular responses induced by CNTF in diseased retinas. PMID:24191003

  18. Position along the nasal/temporal plane affects synaptic development by adult photoreceptors, revealed by micropatterning.

    PubMed

    Kung, Frank; Wang, Jianfeng; Perez-Castillejos, Raquel; Townes-Anderson, Ellen

    2015-03-01

    In retinal degeneration, death of photoreceptors causes blindness. Repair of the retina by transplanting photoreceptors has resulted in limited functional connectivity between transplanted and host neurons. We hypothesize that absence of appropriate biological cues, specifically positional (retinotopographic) cues, reduces synaptogenesis. Here we use micropatterning to test whether regional origin affects the early synaptic development of photoreceptors. Right and left retinas from salamanders were first labelled with dextran tetramethyl-rhodamine and fluorescein, respectively, bisected into nasal (N)/temporal (T) or dorsal (D)/ventral (V) halves, individually dissociated, mixed, and cultured for 1 week. Origin of cells was identified by the fluorescent label. Interactions between photoreceptors and neighboring (target) cells were assessed by the number of neuritic contacts with a presynaptic swelling (varicosity). Randomly-plated photoreceptors showed no preference for cellular origin, likely due to multiple potential interactions available to each cell. To reduce cell-cell interactions, culture substrate was patterned using a microfluidic device with 10 μm-wide channels separated by 200 μm, thus allowing only 1-2 targets per photoreceptor. In patterned cultures, 36.89% of N rod cells contacted T targets but only 27.42% of N rod cells contacted N targets; similarly 35.05% of T rod cells contacted N cells but only 17.08% contacted T cells. Thus, opposite regions were more permissive of contact. However, neither cone nor D/V rod cells showed preferences for positional origin of targets. In conclusion, micropatterning demonstrated that neuritic differentiation by rod cells depends on retinotopographic cues along the nasal/temporal plane, suggesting that transplanting rod cells of known positional origin will increase transplant success. PMID:25616113

  19. Studying rod photoreceptor development in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Morris, A.C.; Fadool, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The zebrafish has rapidly become a favored model vertebrate organism, well suited for studies of developmental processes using large-scale genetic screens. In particular, zebrafish morphological and behavioral genetic screens have led to the identification of genes important for development of the retinal photoreceptors. This may help clarify the genetic mechanisms underlying human photoreceptor development and dysfunction in retinal diseases. In this review, we present the advantages of zebrafish as a vertebrate model organism, summarize retinal and photoreceptor cell development in zebrafish, with emphasis on the rod photoreceptors, and describe zebrafish visual behaviors that can be used for genetic screens. We then describe some of the photoreceptor cell mutants that have been isolated in morphological and behavioral screens and discuss the limitations of current screening methods for uncovering mutations that specifically affect rod function. Finally, we present some alternative strategies to target the rod developmental pathway in zebrafish. PMID:16199068

  20. The GTP- and Phospholipid-Binding Protein TTD14 Regulates Trafficking of the TRPL Ion Channel in Drosophila Photoreceptor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cerny, Alexander C.; Altendorfer, André; Schopf, Krystina; Baltner, Karla; Maag, Nathalie; Sehn, Elisabeth; Wolfrum, Uwe; Huber, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Recycling of signaling proteins is a common phenomenon in diverse signaling pathways. In photoreceptors of Drosophila, light absorption by rhodopsin triggers a phospholipase Cβ-mediated opening of the ion channels transient receptor potential (TRP) and TRP-like (TRPL) and generates the visual response. The signaling proteins are located in a plasma membrane compartment called rhabdomere. The major rhodopsin (Rh1) and TRP are predominantly localized in the rhabdomere in light and darkness. In contrast, TRPL translocates between the rhabdomeral plasma membrane in the dark and a storage compartment in the cell body in the light, from where it can be recycled to the plasma membrane upon subsequent dark adaptation. Here, we identified the gene mutated in trpl translocation defective 14 (ttd14), which is required for both TRPL internalization from the rhabdomere in the light and recycling of TRPL back to the rhabdomere in the dark. TTD14 is highly conserved in invertebrates and binds GTP in vitro. The ttd14 mutation alters a conserved proline residue (P75L) in the GTP-binding domain and abolishes binding to GTP. This indicates that GTP binding is essential for TTD14 function. TTD14 is a cytosolic protein and binds to PtdIns(3)P, a lipid enriched in early endosome membranes, and to phosphatidic acid. In contrast to TRPL, rhabdomeral localization of the membrane proteins Rh1 and TRP is not affected in the ttd14 P75L mutant. The ttd14 P75L mutation results in Rh1-independent photoreceptor degeneration and larval lethality suggesting that other processes are also affected by the ttd14 P75L mutation. In conclusion, TTD14 is a novel regulator of TRPL trafficking, involved in internalization and subsequent sorting of TRPL into the recycling pathway that enables this ion channel to return to the plasma membrane. PMID:26509977

  1. The GTP- and Phospholipid-Binding Protein TTD14 Regulates Trafficking of the TRPL Ion Channel in Drosophila Photoreceptor Cells.

    PubMed

    Cerny, Alexander C; Altendorfer, André; Schopf, Krystina; Baltner, Karla; Maag, Nathalie; Sehn, Elisabeth; Wolfrum, Uwe; Huber, Armin

    2015-10-01

    Recycling of signaling proteins is a common phenomenon in diverse signaling pathways. In photoreceptors of Drosophila, light absorption by rhodopsin triggers a phospholipase Cβ-mediated opening of the ion channels transient receptor potential (TRP) and TRP-like (TRPL) and generates the visual response. The signaling proteins are located in a plasma membrane compartment called rhabdomere. The major rhodopsin (Rh1) and TRP are predominantly localized in the rhabdomere in light and darkness. In contrast, TRPL translocates between the rhabdomeral plasma membrane in the dark and a storage compartment in the cell body in the light, from where it can be recycled to the plasma membrane upon subsequent dark adaptation. Here, we identified the gene mutated in trpl translocation defective 14 (ttd14), which is required for both TRPL internalization from the rhabdomere in the light and recycling of TRPL back to the rhabdomere in the dark. TTD14 is highly conserved in invertebrates and binds GTP in vitro. The ttd14 mutation alters a conserved proline residue (P75L) in the GTP-binding domain and abolishes binding to GTP. This indicates that GTP binding is essential for TTD14 function. TTD14 is a cytosolic protein and binds to PtdIns(3)P, a lipid enriched in early endosome membranes, and to phosphatidic acid. In contrast to TRPL, rhabdomeral localization of the membrane proteins Rh1 and TRP is not affected in the ttd14P75L mutant. The ttd14P75L mutation results in Rh1-independent photoreceptor degeneration and larval lethality suggesting that other processes are also affected by the ttd14P75L mutation. In conclusion, TTD14 is a novel regulator of TRPL trafficking, involved in internalization and subsequent sorting of TRPL into the recycling pathway that enables this ion channel to return to the plasma membrane. PMID:26509977

  2. Cell polarity: mechanochemical patterning.

    PubMed

    Goehring, Nathan W; Grill, Stephan W

    2013-02-01

    Nearly every cell type exhibits some form of polarity, yet the molecular mechanisms vary widely. Here we examine what we term 'chemical systems' where cell polarization arises through biochemical interactions in signaling pathways, 'mechanical systems' where cells polarize due to forces, stresses and transport, and 'mechanochemical systems' where polarization results from interplay between mechanics and chemical signaling. To reveal potentially unifying principles, we discuss mathematical conceptualizations of several prototypical examples. We suggest that the concept of local activation and global inhibition - originally developed to explain spatial patterning in reaction-diffusion systems - provides a framework for understanding many cases of cell polarity. Importantly, we find that the core ingredients in this framework - symmetry breaking, self-amplifying feedback, and long-range inhibition - involve processes that can be chemical, mechanical, or even mechanochemical in nature. PMID:23182746

  3. chaoptin, prominin, eyes shut and crumbs form a genetic network controlling the apical compartment of Drosophila photoreceptor cells

    PubMed Central

    Gurudev, Nagananda; Yuan, Michaela; Knust, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The apical surface of epithelial cells is often highly specialised to fulfil cell type-specific functions. Many epithelial cells expand their apical surface by forming microvilli, actin-based, finger-like membrane protrusions. The apical surface of Drosophila photoreceptor cells (PRCs) forms tightly packed microvilli, which are organised into the photosensitive rhabdomeres. As previously shown, the GPI-anchored adhesion protein Chaoptin is required for the stability of the microvilli, whereas the transmembrane protein Crumbs is essential for proper rhabdomere morphogenesis. Here we show that chaoptin synergises with crumbs to ensure optimal rhabdomere width. In addition, reduction of crumbs ameliorates morphogenetic defects observed in PRCs mutant for prominin and eyes shut, known antagonists of chaoptin. These results suggest that these four genes provide a balance of adhesion and anti-adhesion to maintain microvilli development and maintenance. Similar to crumbs mutant PRCs, PRCs devoid of prominin or eyes shut undergo light-dependent retinal degeneration. Given the observation that human orthologues of crumbs, prominin and eyes shut result in progressive retinal degeneration and blindness, the Drosophila eye is ideally suited to unravel the genetic and cellular mechanisms that ensure morphogenesis of PRCs and their maintenance under light-mediated stress. PMID:24705015

  4. Structural and Functional Analysis of the Native Peripherin-ROM1 Complex Isolated from Photoreceptor Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Kevany, Brian M.; Tsybovsky, Yaroslav; Campuzano, Iain D. G.; Schnier, Paul D.; Engel, Andreas; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Peripherin and its homologue ROM1 are retina-specific members of the tetraspanin family of integral membrane proteins required for morphogenesis and maintenance of photoreceptor outer segments, regions that collect light stimuli. Over 100 pathogenic mutations in peripherin cause inherited rod- and cone-related dystrophies in humans. Peripherin and ROM1 interact in vivo and are predicted to form a core heterotetrameric complex capable of creating higher order oligomers. However, structural analysis of tetraspanin proteins has been hampered by their resistance to crystallization. Here we present a simplified methodology for high yield purification of peripherin-ROM1 from bovine retinas that permitted its biochemical and biophysical characterization. Using size exclusion chromatography and blue native gel electrophoresis, we confirmed that the core native peripherin-ROM1 complex exists as a tetramer. Peripherin, but not ROM1, is glycosylated and we examined the glycosylation site and glycan composition of ROM1 by liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometry. Mass spectrometry was used to analyze the native complex in detergent micelles, demonstrating its tetrameric state. Our electron microscopy-generated structure solved to 18 Å displayed the tetramer as an elongated structure with an apparent 2-fold symmetry. Finally, we demonstrated that peripherin-ROM1 tetramers induce membrane curvature when reconstituted in lipid vesicles. These results provide critical insights into this key retinal component with a poorly defined function. PMID:24196967

  5. Light-induced hydrogen bonding pattern and driving force of electron transfer in AppA BLUF domain photoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Ishikita, Hiroshi

    2008-11-01

    The AppA BLUF (blue light sensing using FAD) domain from Rhodobacter sphaeroides serves as a blue light-sensing photoreceptor. The charge separation process between Tyr-21 and flavin plays an important role in the light signaling state by transforming the dark state conformation to the light state one. By solving the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation, I calculated E(m) for Tyr-21, flavin, and redox-active Trp-104 and revealed the electron transfer (ET) driving energy. Rotation of the Gln-63 side chain that converts protein conformation from the dark state to the light state is responsible for the decrease of 150 mV in E(m) for Tyr-21, leading to the significantly larger ET driving energy in the light state conformation. The pK(a) values of protonation for flavin anions are essentially the same in both dark and light state crystal structures. In contrast to the ET via Tyr-21, formation of the W state results in generation of only the dark state conformation (even if the initial conformation is in the light state); this could explain why Trp-104-mediated ET deactivates the light-sensing yield and why the activity of W104A mutant is similar to that of the light-adapted native BLUF. PMID:18647748

  6. Missed connections: photoreceptor axon seeks target neuron for synaptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Astigarraga, Sergio; Hofmeyer, Kerstin; Treisman, Jessica E

    2010-08-01

    Extending axons must choose the appropriate synaptic target cells in order to assemble functional neural circuitry. The axons of the Drosophila color-sensitive photoreceptors R7 and R8 project as a single fascicle from each ommatidium, but their terminals are segregated into distinct layers within their target region. Recent studies have begun to reveal the molecular mechanisms that establish this projection pattern. Both homophilic adhesion molecules and specific ligand-receptor interactions make important contributions to stabilizing R7 and R8 terminals in the appropriate target layers. These cell recognition molecules are regulated by the same transcription factors that control R7 and R8 cell fates. Autocrine and repulsive signaling mechanisms prevent photoreceptor terminals from encroaching on their neighbors, preserving the spatial resolution of visual information. PMID:20434326

  7. Mfsd2a Is a Transporter for the Essential ω-3 Fatty Acid Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) in Eye and Is Important for Photoreceptor Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Wong, Bernice H; Chan, Jia Pei; Cazenave-Gassiot, Amaury; Poh, Rebecca W; Foo, Juat Chin; Galam, Dwight L A; Ghosh, Sujoy; Nguyen, Long N; Barathi, Veluchamy A; Yeo, Sia W; Luu, Chi D; Wenk, Markus R; Silver, David L

    2016-05-13

    Eye photoreceptor membrane discs in outer rod segments are highly enriched in the visual pigment rhodopsin and the ω-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). The eye acquires DHA from blood, but transporters for DHA uptake across the blood-retinal barrier or retinal pigment epithelium have not been identified. Mfsd2a is a newly described sodium-dependent lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) symporter expressed at the blood-brain barrier that transports LPCs containing DHA and other long-chain fatty acids. LPC transport via Mfsd2a has been shown to be necessary for human brain growth. Here we demonstrate that Mfsd2a is highly expressed in retinal pigment epithelium in embryonic eye, before the development of photoreceptors, and is the primary site of Mfsd2a expression in the eye. Eyes from whole body Mfsd2a-deficient (KO) mice, but not endothelium-specific Mfsd2a-deficient mice, were DHA-deficient and had significantly reduced LPC/DHA transport in vivo Fluorescein angiography indicated normal blood-retinal barrier function. Histological and electron microscopic analysis indicated that Mfsd2a KO mice exhibited a specific reduction in outer rod segment length, disorganized outer rod segment discs, and mislocalization of and reduction in rhodopsin early in postnatal development without loss of photoreceptors. Minor photoreceptor cell loss occurred in adult Mfsd2a KO mice, but electroretinography indicated visual function was normal. The developing eyes of Mfsd2a KO mice had activated microglia and up-regulation of lipogenic and cholesterogenic genes, likely adaptations to loss of LPC transport. These findings identify LPC transport via Mfsd2a as an important pathway for DHA uptake in eye and for development of photoreceptor membrane discs. PMID:27008858

  8. Calcium overload is associated with lipofuscin formation in human retinal pigment epithelial cells fed with photoreceptor outer segments

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L; Hui, Y-N; Wang, Y-S; Ma, J-X; Wang, J-B; Ma, L-N

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the role of Ca2+ in lipofuscin formation in human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells that phagocytize bovine photoreceptor outer segments (POSs). Methods Cultured human RPE cells fed with 2 × 107 per l bovine POS were treated with flunarizine, an antagonist of Ca2+ channel, or/and centrophenoxine, a lipofuscin scavenger. The Ca2+ changes and lipofuscin formation were measured with fluoresence dye Fluo-3/AM ester, laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) and flow cytometry (FCM). The activity of RPE cells was measured by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay and argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) assay. Results The Ca2+ fluorescence intensity (CFI) of RPE cells fed with POS was significantly increased compared with the controls (165.36±29.92 U). It reached a peak with 777.33±63.86 U (P<0.01) at 12 h, and then decreased but still maintained a high level of 316.90±36.07 U (P<0.01) for 4 days. Flunarizine and centrophenoxine significantly decreased the Ca2+ overload to 227.18±14.00 U at 12 h and 211.06±20.45 U at 4 days. FCM confirmed these changes. The drugs also showed an inhibitory effect on the lipofuscin formation. The proliferation rate of the cells fed with POS increased significantly. Both drugs had inhibitory effects on the activity of the cultured cells. This tendency was confirmed by AgNORs assay. Conclusions The Ca2+ inflow initiated lipofuscin accumulation in RPE cells fed with POS. Flunarizine and centrophenoxine can decrease Ca2+ overload and lipofuscin formation in RPE cells, accompanied by maintaining cellular vitality. PMID:21311572

  9. The Musashi 1 Controls the Splicing of Photoreceptor-Specific Exons in the Vertebrate Retina

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Daniel; Carstens, Russ

    2016-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing expands the coding capacity of eukaryotic genomes, potentially enabling a limited number of genes to govern the development of complex anatomical structures. Alternative splicing is particularly prevalent in the vertebrate nervous system, where it is required for neuronal development and function. Here, we show that photoreceptor cells, a type of sensory neuron, express a characteristic splicing program that affects a broad set of transcripts and is initiated prior to the development of the light sensing outer segments. Surprisingly, photoreceptors lack prototypical neuronal splicing factors and their splicing profile is driven to a significant degree by the Musashi 1 (MSI1) protein. A striking feature of the photoreceptor splicing program are exons that display a "switch-like" pattern of high inclusion levels in photoreceptors and near complete exclusion outside of the retina. Several ubiquitously expressed genes that are involved in the biogenesis and function of primary cilia produce highly photoreceptor specific isoforms through use of such “switch-like” exons. Our results suggest a potential role for alternative splicing in the development of photoreceptors and the conversion of their primary cilia to the light sensing outer segments. PMID:27541351

  10. The Musashi 1 Controls the Splicing of Photoreceptor-Specific Exons in the Vertebrate Retina.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Daniel; Cieply, Benjamin; Carstens, Russ; Ramamurthy, Visvanathan; Stoilov, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing expands the coding capacity of eukaryotic genomes, potentially enabling a limited number of genes to govern the development of complex anatomical structures. Alternative splicing is particularly prevalent in the vertebrate nervous system, where it is required for neuronal development and function. Here, we show that photoreceptor cells, a type of sensory neuron, express a characteristic splicing program that affects a broad set of transcripts and is initiated prior to the development of the light sensing outer segments. Surprisingly, photoreceptors lack prototypical neuronal splicing factors and their splicing profile is driven to a significant degree by the Musashi 1 (MSI1) protein. A striking feature of the photoreceptor splicing program are exons that display a "switch-like" pattern of high inclusion levels in photoreceptors and near complete exclusion outside of the retina. Several ubiquitously expressed genes that are involved in the biogenesis and function of primary cilia produce highly photoreceptor specific isoforms through use of such "switch-like" exons. Our results suggest a potential role for alternative splicing in the development of photoreceptors and the conversion of their primary cilia to the light sensing outer segments. PMID:27541351

  11. Visual Coding in Locust Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Faivre, Olivier; Juusola, Mikko

    2008-01-01

    Information capture by photoreceptors ultimately limits the quality of visual processing in the brain. Using conventional sharp microelectrodes, we studied how locust photoreceptors encode random (white-noise, WN) and naturalistic (1/f stimuli, NS) light patterns in vivo and how this coding changes with mean illumination and ambient temperature. We also examined the role of their plasma membrane in shaping voltage responses. We found that brightening or warming increase and accelerate voltage responses, but reduce noise, enabling photoreceptors to encode more information. For WN stimuli, this was accompanied by broadening of the linear frequency range. On the contrary, with NS the signaling took place within a constant bandwidth, possibly revealing a ‘preference’ for inputs with 1/f statistics. The faster signaling was caused by acceleration of the elementary phototransduction current - leading to bumps - and their distribution. The membrane linearly translated phototransduction currents into voltage responses without limiting the throughput of these messages. As the bumps reflected fast changes in membrane resistance, the data suggest that their shape is predominantly driven by fast changes in the light-gated conductance. On the other hand, the slower bump latency distribution is likely to represent slower enzymatic intracellular reactions. Furthermore, the Q10s of bump duration and latency distribution depended on light intensity. Altogether, this study suggests that biochemical constraints imposed upon signaling change continuously as locust photoreceptors adapt to environmental light and temperature conditions. PMID:18478123

  12. Effects of 40Ar and 56Fe ions on retinal photoreceptor cells of the rabbit: implications for manned missions to Mars.

    PubMed

    Williams, G R; Lett, J T

    1994-10-01

    Losses of photoreceptor cells (rods) from the retinas of New Zealand white (NZW) rabbits were detectable within 2 years after localized acute irradiation of optic and proximal tissues with > or = 7 Gy of 530 MeV u-1 40Ar ions or > or = 2 Gy of 465 MeV u-1 56Fe ions in the Bragg plateau region of energy deposition. Those limits were determined only from an analysis of variance of dose groups because the shapes of the dose response curves at early post-irradiation times are not known, a concern being addressed by experiments in progress. Losses of photoreceptor cells for the period 0.5-2.5 years post-irradiation, determined by provisional linear regression analysis, were approximately 1.7% Gy-1 and 2.5% Gy-1 for 40Ar and 56Fe ions, respectively. PMID:11539955

  13. Effects of 40Ar and 56Fe ions on retinal photoreceptor cells of the rabbit: implications for manned missions to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, G. R.; Lett, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    Losses of photoreceptor cells (rods) from the retinas of New Zealand white (NZW) rabbits were detectable within 2 years after localized acute irradiation of optic and proximal tissues with > or = 7 Gy of 530 MeV u-1 40Ar ions or > or = 2 Gy of 465 MeV u-1 56Fe ions in the Bragg plateau region of energy deposition. Those limits were determined only from an analysis of variance of dose groups because the shapes of the dose response curves at early post-irradiation times are not known, a concern being addressed by experiments in progress. Losses of photoreceptor cells for the period 0.5-2.5 years post-irradiation, determined by provisional linear regression analysis, were approximately 1.7% Gy-1 and 2.5% Gy-1 for 40Ar and 56Fe ions, respectively.

  14. Effects of Ar-40 and Fe-56 ions on retinal photoreceptor cells of the rabbit: Implications for manned missions to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, G. R.; Lett, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    Losses of photoreceptor cells (rods) from the retinas of New Zealand white (NZW) rabbits were detectable within 2 years after localized acute irradiation of optic and proximal tissues with greater than or equal to 7 Gy of 530 MeV u(exp -1) Ar-40 ions or greater than or equal to 2 Gy of 465 MeV u(exp -1) Fe-56 ions in the Bragg plateau region of energy deposition. Those limits were determined only from an analysis of variance of dose groups because the shapes of the dose response curves at early post-irradiation times are not known, a concern being addressed by experiments in progress. Losses of photoreceptor cells for the period 0.5-2.5 years post-irradiation, determined by provisional linear regression analysis, were approxiamtely 1.7% Gy(exp -1) and 2.5% Gy(exp.-1) for Ar-40 and Fe-56 ions, respectively.

  15. Harmonin (Ush1c) is required in zebrafish Müller glial cells for photoreceptor synaptic development and function

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Jennifer B.; Blanco-Sanchez, Bernardo; Lentz, Jennifer J.; Tallafuss, Alexandra; Khanobdee, Kornnika; Sampath, Srirangan; Jacobs, Zachary G.; Han, Philip F.; Mishra, Monalisa; Titus, Tom A.; Williams, David S.; Keats, Bronya J.; Washbourne, Philip; Westerfield, Monte

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Usher syndrome is the most prevalent cause of hereditary deaf-blindness, characterized by congenital sensorineural hearing impairment and progressive photoreceptor degeneration beginning in childhood or adolescence. Diagnosis and management of this disease are complex, and the molecular changes underlying sensory cell impairment remain poorly understood. Here we characterize two zebrafish models for a severe form of Usher syndrome, Usher syndrome type 1C (USH1C): one model is a mutant with a newly identified ush1c nonsense mutation, and the other is a morpholino knockdown of ush1c. Both have defects in hearing, balance and visual function from the first week of life. Histological analyses reveal specific defects in sensory cell structure that are consistent with these behavioral phenotypes and could implicate Müller glia in the retinal pathology of Usher syndrome. This study shows that visual defects associated with loss of ush1c function in zebrafish can be detected from the onset of vision, and thus could be applicable to early diagnosis for USH1C patients. PMID:21757509

  16. The Influence of Photoreceptor Size and Distribution on Optical Sensitivity in the Eyes of Lanternfishes (Myctophidae)

    PubMed Central

    de Busserolles, Fanny; Fitzpatrick, John L.; Marshall, N. Justin; Collin, Shaun P.

    2014-01-01

    The mesopelagic zone of the deep-sea (200-1000 m) is characterised by exponentially diminishing levels of downwelling sunlight and by the predominance of bioluminescence emissions. The ability of mesopelagic organisms to detect and behaviourally react to downwelling sunlight and/or bioluminescence will depend on the visual task and ultimately on the eyes and their capacity for detecting low levels of illumination and intermittent point sources of bioluminescent light. In this study, we investigate the diversity of the visual system of the lanternfish (Myctophidae). We focus specifically on the photoreceptor cells by examining their size, arrangement, topographic distribution and contribution to optical sensitivity in 53 different species from 18 genera. We also examine the influence(s) of both phylogeny and ecology on these photoreceptor variables using phylogenetic comparative analyses in order to understand the constraints placed on the visual systems of this large group of mesopelagic fishes at the first stage of retinal processing. We report great diversity in the visual system of the Myctophidae at the level of the photoreceptors. Photoreceptor distribution reveals clear interspecific differences in visual specialisations (areas of high rod photoreceptor density), indicating potential interspecific differences in interactions with prey, predators and/or mates. A great diversity in photoreceptor design (length and diameter) and density is also present. Overall, the myctophid eye is very sensitive compared to other teleosts and each species seems to be specialised for the detection of a specific signal (downwelling light or bioluminescence), potentially reflecting different visual demands for survival. Phylogenetic comparative analyses highlight several relationships between photoreceptor characteristics and the ecological variables tested (depth distribution and luminous tissue patterns). Depth distribution at night was a significant factor in most of the

  17. Male germ cells and photoreceptors, both dependent on close cell-cell interactions, degenerate upon ClC-2 Cl(-) channel disruption.

    PubMed

    Bösl, M R; Stein, V; Hübner, C; Zdebik, A A; Jordt, S E; Mukhopadhyay, A K; Davidoff, M S; Holstein, A F; Jentsch, T J

    2001-03-15

    The functions of some CLC Cl(-) channels are evident from human diseases that result from their mutations, but the role of the broadly expressed ClC-2 Cl(-) channel is less clear. Several important functions have been attributed to ClC-2, but contrary to these expectations ClC-2-deficient mice lacked overt abnormalities except for a severe degeneration of the retina and the testes, which led to selective male infertility. Seminiferous tubules did not develop lumina and germ cells failed to complete meiosis. Beginning around puberty there was a massive death of primary spermatocytes and later also of spermatogonia. Tubules were filled with abnormal Sertoli cells, which normally express ClC-2 in patches adjacent to germ cells. In the retina, photoreceptors lacked normal outer segments and degenerated between days P10 and P30. The current across the retinal pigment epithelium was severely reduced at P36. Thus, ClC-2 disruption entails the death of two cell types which depend on supporting cells that form the blood-testes and blood-retina barriers. We propose that ClC-2 is crucial for controlling the ionic environment of these cells. PMID:11250895

  18. Differential effects of P2Y1 deletion on glial activation and survival of photoreceptors and amacrine cells in the ischemic mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Pannicke, T; Frommherz, I; Biedermann, B; Wagner, L; Sauer, K; Ulbricht, E; Härtig, W; Krügel, U; Ueberham, U; Arendt, T; Illes, P; Bringmann, A; Reichenbach, A; Grosche, A

    2014-01-01

    Gliosis of retinal Müller glial cells may have both beneficial and detrimental effects on neurons. To investigate the role of purinergic signaling in ischemia-induced reactive gliosis, transient retinal ischemia was evoked by elevation of the intraocular pressure in wild-type (Wt) mice and in mice deficient in the glia-specific nucleotide receptor P2Y1 (P2Y1 receptor-deficient (P2Y1R-KO)). While control retinae of P2Y1R-KO mice displayed reduced cell numbers in the ganglion cell and inner nuclear layers, ischemia induced apoptotic death of cells in all retinal layers in both, Wt and P2Y1R-KO mice, but the damage especially on photoreceptors was more pronounced in retinae of P2Y1R-KO mice. In contrast, gene expression profiling and histological data suggest an increased survival of amacrine cells in the postischemic retina of P2Y1R-KO mice. Interestingly, measuring the ischemia-induced downregulation of inwardly rectifying potassium channel (Kir)-mediated K+ currents as an indicator, reactive Müller cell gliosis was found to be weaker in P2Y1R-KO (current amplitude decreased by 18%) than in Wt mice (decrease by 68%). The inner retina harbors those neurons generating action potentials, which strongly rely on an intact ion homeostasis. This may explain why especially these cells appear to benefit from the preserved Kir4.1 expression in Müller cells, which should allow them to keep up their function in the context of spatial buffering of potassium. Especially under ischemic conditions, maintenance of this Müller cell function may dampen cytotoxic neuronal hyperexcitation and subsequent neuronal cell loss. In sum, we found that purinergic signaling modulates the gliotic activation pattern of Müller glia and lack of P2Y1 has janus-faced effects. In the end, the differential effects of a disrupted P2Y1 signaling onto neuronal survival in the ischemic retina call the putative therapeutical use of P2Y1-antagonists into question. PMID:25077539

  19. Differential effects of P2Y1 deletion on glial activation and survival of photoreceptors and amacrine cells in the ischemic mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Pannicke, T; Frommherz, I; Biedermann, B; Wagner, L; Sauer, K; Ulbricht, E; Härtig, W; Krügel, U; Ueberham, U; Arendt, T; Illes, P; Bringmann, A; Reichenbach, A; Grosche, A

    2014-01-01

    Gliosis of retinal Müller glial cells may have both beneficial and detrimental effects on neurons. To investigate the role of purinergic signaling in ischemia-induced reactive gliosis, transient retinal ischemia was evoked by elevation of the intraocular pressure in wild-type (Wt) mice and in mice deficient in the glia-specific nucleotide receptor P2Y1 (P2Y1 receptor-deficient (P2Y1R-KO)). While control retinae of P2Y1R-KO mice displayed reduced cell numbers in the ganglion cell and inner nuclear layers, ischemia induced apoptotic death of cells in all retinal layers in both, Wt and P2Y1R-KO mice, but the damage especially on photoreceptors was more pronounced in retinae of P2Y1R-KO mice. In contrast, gene expression profiling and histological data suggest an increased survival of amacrine cells in the postischemic retina of P2Y1R-KO mice. Interestingly, measuring the ischemia-induced downregulation of inwardly rectifying potassium channel (Kir)-mediated K(+) currents as an indicator, reactive Müller cell gliosis was found to be weaker in P2Y1R-KO (current amplitude decreased by 18%) than in Wt mice (decrease by 68%). The inner retina harbors those neurons generating action potentials, which strongly rely on an intact ion homeostasis. This may explain why especially these cells appear to benefit from the preserved Kir4.1 expression in Müller cells, which should allow them to keep up their function in the context of spatial buffering of potassium. Especially under ischemic conditions, maintenance of this Müller cell function may dampen cytotoxic neuronal hyperexcitation and subsequent neuronal cell loss. In sum, we found that purinergic signaling modulates the gliotic activation pattern of Müller glia and lack of P2Y1 has janus-faced effects. In the end, the differential effects of a disrupted P2Y1 signaling onto neuronal survival in the ischemic retina call the putative therapeutical use of P2Y1-antagonists into question. PMID:25077539

  20. Subcellular calcium localization and AT0-dependent Ca2+-uptake by smooth endoplasmic reticulum in an invertebrate photoreceptor cell. An ultrastrucutral, cytochemical and X-ray microanalytical study.

    PubMed

    Walz, B

    1979-10-01

    In Hirudo medicinalis an extensive and highly elaborate three dimensional network of smooth endoplasmic reticulum cisternae is found in very close structural relationship to the receptive (microvillar) membrane, as reported for many other invertebrates. A variant of the potassium pyroantimonate technique showed that these submicrovillar endoplasmic reticulum cisternae (SMC) and mitochondria are major intracellular calcium stores. Furthermore, using saponine-skinned photoreceptors for an in situ accumulation experiment, calcium oxalate precipitates in SMC demonstrate that this organelle is able to accumulate Ca2+ from a concentration of 2 x 10(-5) M, when ATP, Mg2+, and oxalate ions are present in the accumulation medium. This result provides direct evidence for the hypothesis that SMC may play a particularly important role in the regulation of intracellular ionized calcium in invertebrate photoreceptor cells. Morphological evidence supports this view. PMID:160317

  1. Coupling Mechanical Deformations and Planar Cell Polarity to Create Regular Patterns in the Zebrafish Retina

    PubMed Central

    Salbreux, Guillaume; Barthel, Linda K.; Raymond, Pamela A.; Lubensky, David K.

    2012-01-01

    The orderly packing and precise arrangement of epithelial cells is essential to the functioning of many tissues, and refinement of this packing during development is a central theme in animal morphogenesis. The mechanisms that determine epithelial cell shape and position, however, remain incompletely understood. Here, we investigate these mechanisms in a striking example of planar order in a vertebrate epithelium: The periodic, almost crystalline distribution of cone photoreceptors in the adult teleost fish retina. Based on observations of the emergence of photoreceptor packing near the retinal margin, we propose a mathematical model in which ordered columns of cells form as a result of coupling between planar cell polarity (PCP) and anisotropic tissue-scale mechanical stresses. This model recapitulates many observed features of cone photoreceptor organization during retinal growth and regeneration. Consistent with the model's predictions, we report a planar-polarized distribution of Crumbs2a protein in cone photoreceptors in both unperturbed and regenerated tissue. We further show that the pattern perturbations predicted by the model to occur if the imposed stresses become isotropic closely resemble defects in the cone pattern in zebrafish lrp2 mutants, in which intraocular pressure is increased, resulting in altered mechanical stress and ocular enlargement. Evidence of interactions linking PCP, cell shape, and mechanical stresses has recently emerged in a number of systems, several of which show signs of columnar cell packing akin to that described here. Our results may hence have broader relevance for the organization of cells in epithelia. Whereas earlier models have allowed only for unidirectional influences between PCP and cell mechanics, the simple, phenomenological framework that we introduce here can encompass a broad range of bidirectional feedback interactions among planar polarity, shape, and stresses; our model thus represents a conceptual framework

  2. Opsin expression, physiological characterization and identification of photoreceptor cells in the dorsal rim area and main retina of the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria.

    PubMed

    Schmeling, Fabian; Wakakuwa, Motohiro; Tegtmeier, Jennifer; Kinoshita, Michiyo; Bockhorst, Tobias; Arikawa, Kentaro; Homberg, Uwe

    2014-10-01

    For compass orientation many insects rely on the pattern of sky polarization, but some species also exploit the sky chromatic contrast. Desert locusts, Schistocerca gregaria, detect polarized light through a specialized dorsal rim area (DRA) in their compound eye. To better understand retinal mechanisms underlying visual navigation, we compared opsin expression, spectral and polarization sensitivities and response-stimulus intensity functions in the DRA and main retina of the locust. In addition to previously characterized opsins of long-wavelength-absorbing (Lo1) and blue-absorbing visual pigments (Lo2), we identified an opsin of an ultraviolet-absorbing visual pigment (LoUV). DRA photoreceptors exclusively expressed Lo2, had peak spectral sensitivities at 441 nm and showed high polarization sensitivity (PS 1.3-31.7). In contrast, ommatidia in the main eye co-expressed Lo1 and Lo2 in five photoreceptors, expressed Lo1 in two proximal photoreceptors, and Lo2 or LoUV in one distal photoreceptor. Correspondingly, we found broadband blue- and green-peaking spectral sensitivities in the main eye and one narrowly tuned UV peaking receptor. Polarization sensitivity in the main retina was low (PS 1.3-3.8). V-log I functions in the DRA were steeper than in the main retina, supporting a role in polarization vision. Desert locusts occur as two morphs, a day-active gregarious and a night-active solitarious form. In solitarious locusts, sensitivities in the main retina were generally shifted to longer wavelengths, particularly in ventral eye regions, supporting a nocturnal lifestyle at low light levels. The data support the role of the DRA in polarization vision and suggest trichromatic colour vision in the desert locust. PMID:25104757

  3. Blue- and green-absorbing visual pigments of Drosophila: ectopic expression and physiological characterization of the R8 photoreceptor cell-specific Rh5 and Rh6 rhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Salcedo, E; Huber, A; Henrich, S; Chadwell, L V; Chou, W H; Paulsen, R; Britt, S G

    1999-12-15

    Color discrimination requires the input of different photoreceptor cells that are sensitive to different wavelengths of light. The Drosophila visual system contains multiple classes of photoreceptor cells that differ in anatomical location, synaptic connections, and spectral sensitivity. The Rh5 and Rh6 opsins are expressed in nonoverlapping sets of R8 cells and are the only Drosophila visual pigments that remain uncharacterized. In this study, we ectopically expressed Rh5 and Rh6 in the major class of photoreceptor cells (R1-R6) and show them to be biologically active in their new environment. The expression of either Rh5 or Rh6 in "blind" ninaE(17) mutant flies, which lack the gene encoding the visual pigment of the R1-R6 cells, fully rescues the light response. Electrophysiological analysis showed that the maximal spectral sensitivity of the R1-R6 cells is shifted to 437 or 508 nm when Rh5 or Rh6, respectively, is expressed in these cells. These spectral sensitivities are in excellent agreement with intracellular recordings of the R8p and R8y cells measured in Calliphora and Musca. Spectrophotometric analyses of Rh5 and Rh6 in vivo by microspectrophotometry, and of detergent-extracted pigments in vitro, showed that Rh5 is reversibly photoconverted to a stable metarhodopsin (lambda(max) = 494 nm), whereas Rh6 appears to be photoconverted to a metarhodopsin (lambda(max) = 468 nm) that is less thermally stable. Phylogenetically, Rh5 belongs to a group of short-wavelength-absorbing invertebrate visual pigments, whereas Rh6 is related to a group of long-wavelength-absorbing pigments and is the first member of this class to be functionally characterized. PMID:10594055

  4. Cell-type specific photoreceptors and light signaling pathways in the multicellular green alga Volvox carteri and their potential role in cellular differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kianianmomeni, Arash

    2015-01-01

    The formation of multicellular organisms requires genetically predefined signaling pathways in various cell types. Besides differences in size, energy balance and life time, cell types should be enable to modulate appropriate developmental and adaptive responses in ever-changing surrounding environment. One of the most important environmental cues is light which regulates a variety of physiological and cellular processes. During evolution, diverse light-sensitive proteins, so-called photoreceptors, and corresponding signaling pathways have evolved, in almost all kingdoms of life, to monitor light continuously and adjust their growth and development accordingly. However, considering the fact that different cell types should be enable to trigger distinct light signaling pathways according to their needs, cell-type specific light signaling pathways are required to guarantee cell type-matched modulation of cellular and developmental processes in response to different light signals. The multicellular green alga Volvox carteri, which has only 2 cell types with clear division of labor, possesses cell-type specific photoreceptors and light signaling pathways which allow differential regulation of genes involved in various cellular and metabolic pathways in response to environmental light. The existence of cell-type specific light signaling pathways in multicellular organism like Volvox reflects an early development of cell-type specific signaling mechanisms during evolution to ensure maintenance of differentiation. PMID:25874475

  5. Sustained Delivery of Bioactive GDNF from Collagen and Alginate-Based Cell-Encapsulating Gel Promoted Photoreceptor Survival in an Inherited Retinal Degeneration Model

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Barbara P.; Lo, Amy C. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Encapsulated-cell therapy (ECT) is an attractive approach for continuously delivering freshly synthesized therapeutics to treat sight-threatening posterior eye diseases, circumventing repeated invasive intravitreal injections and improving local drug availability clinically. Composite collagen-alginate (CAC) scaffold contains an interpenetrating network that integrates the physical and biological merits of its constituents, including biocompatibility, mild gelling properties and availability. However, CAC ECT properties and performance in the eye are not well-understood. Previously, we reported a cultured 3D CAC system that supported the growth of GDNF-secreting HEK293 cells with sustainable GDNF delivery. Here, the system was further developed into an intravitreally injectable gel with 1x104 or 2x105 cells encapsulated in 2mg/ml type I collagen and 1% alginate. Gels with lower alginate concentration yielded higher initial cell viability but faster spheroid formation while increasing initial cell density encouraged cell growth. Continuous GDNF delivery was detected in culture and in healthy rat eyes for at least 14 days. The gels were well-tolerated with no host tissue attachment and contained living cell colonies. Most importantly, gel-implanted in dystrophic Royal College of Surgeons rat eyes for 28 days retained photoreceptors while those containing higher initial cell number yielded better photoreceptor survival. CAC ECT gels offers flexible system design and is a potential treatment option for posterior eye diseases. PMID:27441692

  6. Sustained Delivery of Bioactive GDNF from Collagen and Alginate-Based Cell-Encapsulating Gel Promoted Photoreceptor Survival in an Inherited Retinal Degeneration Model.

    PubMed

    Wong, Francisca S Y; Wong, Calvin C H; Chan, Barbara P; Lo, Amy C Y

    2016-01-01

    Encapsulated-cell therapy (ECT) is an attractive approach for continuously delivering freshly synthesized therapeutics to treat sight-threatening posterior eye diseases, circumventing repeated invasive intravitreal injections and improving local drug availability clinically. Composite collagen-alginate (CAC) scaffold contains an interpenetrating network that integrates the physical and biological merits of its constituents, including biocompatibility, mild gelling properties and availability. However, CAC ECT properties and performance in the eye are not well-understood. Previously, we reported a cultured 3D CAC system that supported the growth of GDNF-secreting HEK293 cells with sustainable GDNF delivery. Here, the system was further developed into an intravitreally injectable gel with 1x104 or 2x105 cells encapsulated in 2mg/ml type I collagen and 1% alginate. Gels with lower alginate concentration yielded higher initial cell viability but faster spheroid formation while increasing initial cell density encouraged cell growth. Continuous GDNF delivery was detected in culture and in healthy rat eyes for at least 14 days. The gels were well-tolerated with no host tissue attachment and contained living cell colonies. Most importantly, gel-implanted in dystrophic Royal College of Surgeons rat eyes for 28 days retained photoreceptors while those containing higher initial cell number yielded better photoreceptor survival. CAC ECT gels offers flexible system design and is a potential treatment option for posterior eye diseases. PMID:27441692

  7. Photoreceptor Sensory Cilium: Traversing the Ciliary Gate

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Hemant

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are antenna-like extensions of the plasma membrane found in nearly all cell types. In the retina of the eye, photoreceptors develop unique sensory cilia. Not much was known about the mechanisms underlying the formation and function of photoreceptor cilia, largely because of technical limitations and the specific structural and functional modifications that cannot be modeled in vitro. With recent advances in microscopy techniques and molecular and biochemical approaches, we are now beginning to understand the molecular basis of photoreceptor ciliary architecture, ciliary function and its involvement in human diseases. Here, I will discuss the studies that have revealed new knowledge of how photoreceptor cilia regulate their identity and function while coping with high metabolic and trafficking demands associated with processing light signal. PMID:26501325

  8. Inhibition of mTOR signaling protects photoreceptor cells against serum deprivation by reducing oxidative stress and inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    FAN, BIN; LI, FU-QAING; SONG, JING-YAO; CHEN, XU; LI, GUANG-YU

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is a crucial cellular signaling hub, which integrates internal and external cues to modulate the cell cycle, protein synthesis and metabolism. The present study hypothesized that inhibiting mTOR signaling may induce cells to enter lower and more stable bioenergetic states, in which neurons have greater resistance to various insults. Neurotrophin withdrawal from photoreceptor cells (661W cells) was mimicked using serum deprivation, and the neuroprotective mechanisms were studied following suppression of the mTOR pathway. Treatment with an mTOR specific inhibitor, rapamycin, reduced intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species, suppressed oxidative stress, and attenuated mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, inhibiting mTOR signaling induced a G2/M cell cycle arrest, thus providing an opportunity to repair damaged DNA and block the cell death cascade. These results suggested that inhibition of mTOR had a neuroprotective effect on serum-deprived 661W cells. In conclusion, the mTOR pathway is a critical molecular signal for cell cycle regulation and energy metabolism, and inhibiting the mTOR pathway may attenuate neurotrophin withdrawal-induced damage. These observations may provide evidence for the treatment of retinal degenerative disease, since inducing neurons into a lower and more stable bioenergetic state by blocking mTOR signaling may slow the progression of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27035647

  9. Sustained Neural Stem Cell-Based Intraocular Delivery of CNTF Attenuates Photoreceptor Loss in the nclf Mouse Model of Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Jankowiak, Wanda; Kruszewski, Katharina; Flachsbarth, Kai; Skevas, Christos; Richard, Gisbert; Rüther, Klaus; Braulke, Thomas; Bartsch, Udo

    2015-01-01

    A sustained intraocular administration of neurotrophic factors is among the strategies aimed at establishing treatments for currently untreatable degenerative retinal disorders. In the present study we have analyzed the neuroprotective effects of a continuous neural stem (NS) cell-based intraocular delivery of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) on photoreceptor cells in the nclf mouse, an animal model of the neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder variant late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (vLINCL). To this aim, we genetically modified adherently cultivated NS cells with a polycistronic lentiviral vector encoding a secretable variant of CNTF together with a Venus reporter gene (CNTF-NS cells). NS cells for control experiments (control-NS cells) were modified with a vector encoding the reporter gene tdTomato. Clonal CNTF-NS and control-NS cell lines were established using fluorescent activated cell sorting and intravitreally grafted into 14 days old nclf mice at the onset of retinal degeneration. The grafted cells preferentially differentiated into astrocytes that were attached to the posterior side of the lenses and the vitreal side of the retinas and stably expressed the transgenes for at least six weeks, the latest post-transplantation time point analyzed. Integration of donor cells into host retinas, ongoing proliferation of grafted cells or adverse effects of the donor cells on the morphology of the host eyes were not observed. Quantitative analyses of host retinas two, four and six weeks after cell transplantation revealed the presence of significantly more photoreceptor cells in eyes with grafted CNTF-NS cells than in eyes with grafted control-NS cells. This is the first demonstration that a continuous intraocular administration of a neurotrophic factor attenuates retinal degeneration in an animal model of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. PMID:25992714

  10. Drosophila Fatty Acid Transport Protein Regulates Rhodopsin-1 Metabolism and Is Required for Photoreceptor Neuron Survival

    PubMed Central

    Dourlen, Pierre; Bertin, Benjamin; Chatelain, Gilles; Robin, Marion; Napoletano, Francesco; Roux, Michel J.; Mollereau, Bertrand

    2012-01-01

    Tight regulation of the visual response is essential for photoreceptor function and survival. Visual response dysregulation often leads to photoreceptor cell degeneration, but the causes of such cell death are not well understood. In this study, we investigated a fatty acid transport protein (fatp) null mutation that caused adult-onset and progressive photoreceptor cell death. Consistent with fatp having a role in the retina, we showed that fatp is expressed in adult photoreceptors and accessory cells and that its re-expression in photoreceptors rescued photoreceptor viability in fatp mutants. The visual response in young fatp-mutant flies was abnormal with elevated electroretinogram amplitudes associated with high levels of Rhodopsin-1 (Rh1). Reducing Rh1 levels in rh1 mutants or depriving flies of vitamin A rescued photoreceptor cell death in fatp mutant flies. Our results indicate that fatp promotes photoreceptor survival by regulating Rh1 abundance. PMID:22844251

  11. Separable transcriptional regulatory domains within Otd control photoreceptor terminal differentiation events

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Elizabeth C.; Xie, Baotong; Workman, Michael; Charlton-Perkins, Mark; Terrell, David A.; Reischl, Joachim; Wimmer, Ernst A.; Gebelein, Brian A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Orthodenticle (Otd)-related transcription factors are essential for anterior patterning and brain morphogenesis from Cnidaria to Mammals, and genetically underlie several human retinal pathologies. Despite their key developmental functions, relatively little is known regarding the molecular basis of how these factors regulate downstream effectors in a cell- or tissue-specific manner. Many invertebrate and vertebrate species encode two to three Otd proteins, whereas Drosophila encodes a single Otd protein. In the fly retina, Otd controls rhabdomere morphogenesis of all photoreceptors and regulates distinct Rhodopsin-encoding genes in a photoreceptor subtype-specific manner. Here, we performed a structure-function analysis of Otd during Drosophila eye development using in vivo rescue experiments and in vitro transcriptional regulatory assays. Our findings indicate that Otd requires at least three distinct transcriptional regulatory domains to control photoreceptor-specific rhodopsin gene expression and photoreceptor morphogenesis. Our results also uncover a previously unknown role for Otd in preventing co-expression of sensory receptors in blue vs. green-sensitive R8 photoreceptors. Sequence analysis indicates that many of the transcriptional regulatory domains identified here are conserved in multiple Diptera Otd-related proteins. Thus, these studies provide a basis for identifying shared molecular pathways involved in a wide range of developmental processes. PMID:20732315

  12. Dense pattern multiple pass cells

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, Joel A.; Bomse, David S.

    2010-09-21

    An optical cell and a method of operating an optical cell comprising employing a first mirror comprising a first hole therein at approximately a center of the first mirror and through which laser light enters the cell, employing a second mirror comprising a second hole therein at approximately a center of the second mirror and through which laser light exits the cell, and forming a Lissajous pattern of spots on the mirrors by repeated reflection of laser light entering the cell.

  13. Visual pigment processes and prolonged pupillary responses in insect photoreceptor cells.

    PubMed

    Stavenga, D G

    1979-01-01

    The visual pigment in the peripheral retinular cells of the hoverfly Syrphus balteatus was investigated by absorbance difference measurements. Different visual pigments were found in the dorsal versus the ventral part of the eye in the male, but not in the female. In the male in the dorsal part of the eye the visual pigment has an isosbestic point at 513 nm; in the ventral part this value is 490 nm. The latter value is found in the female in both parts of the eye. Prolonged pupillary responses were studied in the male Syrphus and appeared to be most marked in the ventral part of the eye. In both hoverfly and blowfly prolonged pupillary responses are induced by short wavelength light only; i.e., by light which excessively can convert rhodopsin into metarhodopsin. By contrast, in butterflies red light (and a long dark adaptation time) is necessary to evoke a prolonged pupillary response. It was demonstrated in both hoverfly and blowfly that long wavelength light, which reconverts metarhodopsin into rhodopsin, inhibits a prolonged pupillary response; or, accelerates pupil opening. PMID:22730591

  14. Sectorial loss of retinal ganglion cells in inherited photoreceptor degeneration is due to RGC death

    PubMed Central

    García-Ayuso, Diego; Salinas-Navarro, Manuel; Nadal-Nicolás, Francisco Manuel; Ortín-Martínez, Arturo; Agudo-Barriuso, Marta; Vidal-Sanz, Manuel; Villegas-Pérez, María P

    2014-01-01

    Aims To investigate the cause of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss in dystrophic aged Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats. Methods RCS-p+ (dystrophic) female rats of postnatal times (P365, P450 and P540) and age-matched RCS-p1 rdy+ (non-dystrophic) rats were used. In whole-mounted retinas, RGCs were doubly labelled with Fluorogold (FG) retrogradely transported from the superior colliculi and Brn3a immunohistochemistry. RGC axons were labelled with anti-neurofilament antibodies. Automatic image analysis techniques allowed quantification of the total population of RGCs per retina and construction of isodensity maps to investigate RGC topology. Results Dystrophic retinas showed at all times studied wedge-shaped sectors devoid of FG+ and Brn3a+ RGCs. These sectors were also devoid of neurofilament-labelled axons. The total number of FG+RGC and Brn3a+RGC per retina was significantly smaller in dystrophic rats at P540, revealing RGC death at this age. The total number of FG+RGCs was smaller than those of Brn3a+RGCs at P540, indicating a disturbance of the retrograde axonal transport at this age. Conclusions RGC double labelling documents that sectorial RGC loss in aged dystrophic RCS rats is mainly due to RGC death, although a deficit of the retrograde axonal transport exists also at the more advanced ages. PMID:24326325

  15. Kinesin-2 Family Motors in the Unusual Photoreceptor Cilium

    PubMed Central

    Malicki, Jarema; Besharse, Joseph C.

    2012-01-01

    This review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of kinesin-2 family motors in vertebrate photoreceptor development. Zebrafish photoreceptors develop by the 3rd day of embryogenesis, making it possible to study mutant phenotypes without the use of conditional alleles. Recent work using a zebrafish kif3b mutant allele validates the concept that the heterotrimeric kinesin II motor is generally required for ciliogenesis. In zebrafish photoreceptors, however, loss of kif3b function delays but does not block cilium formation. This is thought to occur because both kif3b or kif3c can dimerize with kif3a and function redundantly. The second ciliary kinesin thought to function in photoreceptor cells is kif17. Prior work has shown that either morpholino knockdown of this gene or the overexpression of its dominant negative form can reduce or delay photoreceptor cilium development without any evident impact on ciliogenesis in general. This has led to the idea that kif17 may play an important role only in some specialized cilium types, such the one in photoreceptor cells. In a recently identified kif17 mutant, however, photoreceptor outer segments are formed by 5 dpf and an obvious delay of outer segment formation is seen only at the earliest stage analyzed (3 dpf). This work suggests that kif17 plays a significant role mainly at an early stage of photoreceptor development. Taken together, these studies lead to an intriguing concept that as they differentiate photoreceptors alter their kinesin repertoire. PMID:23123805

  16. Kinesin-2 family motors in the unusual photoreceptor cilium.

    PubMed

    Malicki, Jarema; Besharse, Joseph C

    2012-12-15

    This review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of kinesin-2 family motors in vertebrate photoreceptor development. Zebrafish photoreceptors develop by the 3rd day of embryogenesis, making it possible to study mutant phenotypes without the use of conditional alleles. Recent work using a zebrafish kif3b mutant allele validates the concept that the heterotrimeric kinesin II motor is generally required for ciliogenesis. In zebrafish photoreceptors, however, loss of kif3b function delays but does not block cilium formation. This is thought to occur because both kif3b or kif3c can dimerize with kif3a and function redundantly. The second ciliary kinesin thought to function in photoreceptor cells is kif17. Prior work has shown that either morpholino knockdown of this gene or the overexpression of its dominant negative form can reduce or delay photoreceptor cilium development without any evident impact on ciliogenesis in general. This has led to the idea that kif17 may play an important role only in some specialized cilium types, such the one in photoreceptor cells. In a recently identified kif17 mutant, however, photoreceptor outer segments are formed by 5 dpf and an obvious delay of outer segment formation is seen only at the earliest stage analyzed (3 dpf). This work suggests that kif17 plays a significant role mainly at an early stage of photoreceptor development. Taken together, these studies lead to an intriguing concept that as they differentiate photoreceptors alter their kinesin repertoire. PMID:23123805

  17. Separation of Function for Classical and Ganglion Cell Photoreceptors with Respect to Circadian Rhythm Entrainment and Induction of Photosomnolence

    PubMed Central

    Morin, L.P.; Studholme, K.M.

    2011-01-01

    Four studies were performed to further clarify the contribution of rod/cone and intrinsically photoreceptive retinal ganglion cells to measures of entrainment, light-induced locomotor suppression and photosomnolence. Wildtype (WT), retinally degenerate (rd/rd) and melanopsin-less (OPN4−/−) mouse strains were compared. In Expt. 1, mice were exposed to a graded photoperiod in which approximately 0.26 μW/cm2 irradiance diminished to dark over a 6 hr interval. This method enabled “phase angle titration,” with individual animals assuming activity onsets according to their sensitivity to light. WT and OPN4−/− animals entrained with identical phase angles (effective irradiance=0.078 μW/cm2), but rd/rd mice required a more intense irradiance (0.161 μW/cm2) and entrainment occurred about 2.5 hr earlier. In Expt. 2, all three strains preferred the dark side of a divided light-dark chamber until the irradiance dropped to 0.5 μW/cm2 at which point, rd/rd mice no longer showed a preference. Expts. 3 and 4 determined that WT and rd/rd mice showed equivalent light-induced locomotor suppression, but the response was greatly impaired in OPN4−/− mice. Closer examination of open field locomotion using infrared video-based methods and Any-mazetm software revealed two opposing effects of light. Locomotor suppression was equivalent in WT and rd/rd mice. Responses by OPN4−/− mice varied from being absent (N=17) to normal (similar to WT and rd/rd mice; N=8). Light onset was associated with a significant, but brief, locomotion increase in WT and OPN4−/− mice, but not in rd/rd mice. Any-mazetm analysis supports the view that light-induced locomotor quiescence is followed by behavioral sleep (photosomnolence), a fact that was visually validated from the raw video files. The data show that a) classical photoreceptors, most likely rods, allow mice to prefer and entrain to very dim light such as found in natural twilight; b) the presence of melanopsin photopigment

  18. Systematic Analyses of the Cytotoxic Effects of Compound 11a, a Putative Synthetic Agonist of Photoreceptor-Specific Nuclear Receptor (PNR), in Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zibo; Wang, Lu; Wen, Zhi; Ayaz-guner, Serife; Wang, Yidan; Ahlquist, Paul; Xu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Photoreceptor cell-specific receptor (PNR/NR2E3) is an orphan nuclear receptor that plays a critical role in retinal development and photoreceptor maintenance. The disease-causing mutations in PNR have a pleiotropic effect resulting in varying retinal diseases. Recently, PNR has been implicated in control of cellular functions in cancer cells. PNR was reported to be a novel regulator of ERα expression in breast cancer cells, and high PNR expression correlates with favorable response to tamoxifen treatment. Moreover, PNR was shown to increase p53 stability in HeLa cells, implying that PNR may be a therapeutic target in this and other cancers that retain a wild type p53 gene. To facilitate further understanding of PNR functions in cancer, we characterized compound 11a, a synthetic, putative PNR agonist in several cell-based assays. Interestingly, we showed that 11a failed to activate PNR and its cytotoxicity was independent of PNR expression, excluding PNR as a mediator for 11a cytotoxicity. Systematic analyses of the cytotoxic effects of 11a in NCI-60 cell lines revealed a strong positive correlation of cytotoxicity with p53 status, i.e., p53 wild type cell lines were significantly more sensitive to 11a than p53 mutated or null cell lines. Furthermore, using HCT116 p53+/+ and p53-/- isogenic cell lines we revealed that the mechanism of 11a-induced cytotoxicity occurred through G1/S phase cell cycle arrest rather than apoptosis. In conclusion, we observed a correlation of 11a sensitivity with p53 status but not with PNR expression, suggesting that tumors expressing wild type p53 might be responsive to this compound. PMID:24066170

  19. Selective Photoreceptor Gene Knock-out Reveals a Regulatory Role for the Growth Behavior of Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rashmi; Pathak, Gopal; Drepper, Thomas; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    The plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae (Ps) is a well-established model organism for bacterial infection of plants. The genome sequences of two pathovars, pv. syringae and pv. tomato, revealed one gene encoding a blue and two genes encoding red/far red light-sensing photoreceptors. Continuing former molecular characterization of the photoreceptor proteins, we here report selective photoreceptor gene disruption for pv. tomato aiming at identification of potentially regulatory functions of these photoreceptors. Transformation of Ps cells with linear DNA constructs yielded interposon mutations of the corresponding genes. Cell growth studies of the generated photoreceptor knock-out mutants revealed their role in light-dependent regulation of cell growth and motility. Disruption of the blue-light (BL) receptor gene caused a growth deregulation, in line with an observed increased virulence of this mutant (Moriconi et al., Plant J., 2013, 76, 322). Bacterial phytochrome-1 (BphP1) deletion mutant caused unaltered cell growth, but a stronger swarming capacity. Inactivation of its ortholog, BphP2, however, caused reduced growth and remarkably altered dendritic swarming behavior. Combined knock-out of both bacteriophytochromes reproduced the swarming pattern observed for the BphP2 mutant alone. A triple knock-out mutant showed a growth rate between that of the BL (deregulation) and the phytochrome-2 mutant (growth reduction). PMID:27289014

  20. Intravitreous transplantation of encapsulated fibroblasts secreting the human fibroblast growth factor 2 delays photoreceptor cell degeneration in Royal College of Surgeons rats

    PubMed Central

    Uteza, Yves; Rouillot, Jean-Sébastien; Kobetz, Alexandra; Marchant, Dominique; Pecqueur, Sèverine; Arnaud, Emmanuelle; Prats, Hervé; Honiger, Jiri; Dufier, Jean-Louis; Abitbol, Marc; Neuner-Jehle, Martin

    1999-01-01

    We developed an experimental approach with genetically engineered and encapsulated mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts to delay the progressive degeneration of photoreceptor cells in dark-eyed Royal College of Surgeons rats. These xenogeneic fibroblasts can survive in 1.5-mm-long microcapsules made of the biocompatible polymer AN69 for at least 90 days under in vitro and in vivo conditions because of their stable transfection with the gene for the 18-kDa form of the human basic fibroblast growth factor (hFGF-2). Furthermore, when transferred surgically into the vitreous cavity of 21-day-old Royal College of Surgeons rats, the microencapsulated hFGF-2-secreting fibroblasts provoked a local delay of photoreceptor cell degeneration, as seen at 45 days and 90 days after transplantation. This effect was limited to 2.08 mm2 (45 days) and 0.95 mm2 (90 days) of the retinal surface. In both untreated eyes and control globes with encapsulated hFGF-2-deficient fibroblasts, the rescued area (of at most 0.08 mm2) was significantly smaller at both time points. Although, in a few ocular globes, surgical trauma induced a reorganization of the retinal cytoarchitecture, neither microcapsule rejection nor hFGF-2-mediated tumor formation were detected in any treated eyes. These findings indicate that encapsulated fibroblasts secreting hFGF-2 or perhaps other agents can be applied as potential therapeutic tools to treat retinal dystrophies. PMID:10077648

  1. Brain photoreceptor pathways contributing to circadian rhythmicity in crayfish.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Jeremy M; Genco, Maria C; Marlow, Elizabeth D; Benton, Jeanne L; Beltz, Barbara S; Sandeman, David C

    2009-08-01

    Freshwater crayfish have three known photoreceptive systems: the compound eyes, extraretinal brain photoreceptors, and caudal photoreceptors. The primary goal of the work described here was to explore the contribution of the brain photoreceptors to circadian locomotory activity and define some of the underlying neural pathways. Immunocytochemical studies of the brain photoreceptors in the parastacid (southern hemisphere) crayfish Cherax destructor reveal their expression of the blue light-sensitive photopigment cryptochrome and the neurotransmitter histamine. The brain photoreceptors project to two small protocerebral neuropils, the brain photoreceptor neuropils (BPNs), where they terminate among fibers expressing the neuropeptide pigment-dispersing hormone (PDH), a signaling molecule in arthropod circadian systems. Comparable pathways are also described in the astacid (northern hemisphere) crayfish Procambarus clarkii. Despite exhibiting markedly different diurnal locomotor activity rhythms, removal of the compound eyes and caudal photoreceptors in both C. destructor and P. clarkii (leaving the brain photoreceptors intact) does not abolish the normal light/dark activity cycle in either species, nor prevent the entrainment of their activity cycles to phase shifts of the light/dark period. These results suggest, therefore, that crayfish brain photoreceptors are sufficient for the entrainment of locomotor activity rhythms to photic stimuli, and that they can act in the absence of the compound eyes and caudal photoreceptors. We also demonstrate that the intensity of PDH expression in the BPNs varies in phase with the locomotor activity rhythm of both crayfish species. Together, these findings suggest that the brain photoreceptor cells can function as extraretinal circadian photoreceptors and that the BPN represents part of an entrainment pathway synchronizing locomotor activity to environmental light/dark cycles, and implicating the neuropeptide PDH in these functions

  2. [The role of the glial cells in the maintenance of the ionic environment of the photoreceptors of the retina of the drone (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Tsacopoulos, M; Coles, J A

    1978-04-01

    A double-barrelled potassium sensitive microelectrode was used to record electrical potentials and K+ activities in the retina of the drone Apis Mellifera during stimulation with trains of flashes, 1 per sec, intense enough to produce receptor potentials of near maximal amplitude. During the stimulation photoreceptors lose about 25% of their intracellular potassium concentration. During stimulation the potassium activity in the extracellular space increased transitorily up to 20 mM and then fell to a plateau. By this time the potassium concentration increased by about 20% in the glial cells. These results suggest that the glial cells may participate in the regulation of K+ activity in the extracellular space. The increase of potassium activity in the glial cells may be a stimulus for activation of cellular metabolism. PMID:651211

  3. Protective effects of bilberry and lingonberry extracts against blue light-emitting diode light-induced retinal photoreceptor cell damage in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Blue light is a high-energy or short-wavelength visible light, which induces retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) and lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea) contain high amounts of polyphenols (anthocyanins, resveratrol, and proanthocyanidins) and thus confer health benefits. This study aimed to determine the protective effects and mechanism of action of bilberry extract (B-ext) and lingonberry extract (L-ext) and their active components against blue light-emitting diode (LED) light-induced retinal photoreceptor cell damage. Methods Cultured murine photoreceptor (661 W) cells were exposed to blue LED light following treatment with B-ext, L-ext, or their constituents (cyanidin, delphinidin, malvidin, trans-resveratrol, and procyanidin B2). 661 W cell viability was assessed using a tetrazolium salt (WST-8) assay and Hoechst 33342 nuclear staining, and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was determined using CM-H2DCFDA after blue LED light exposure. Activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), and LC3, an ubiquitin-like protein that is necessary for the formation of autophagosomes, were analyzed using Western blotting. Caspase-3/7 activation caused by blue LED light exposure in 661 W cells was determined using a caspase-3/7 assay kit. Results B-ext, L-ext, NAC, and their active components improved the viability of 661 W cells and inhibited the generation of intracellular ROS induced by blue LED light irradiation. Furthermore, B-ext and L-ext inhibited the activation of p38 MAPK and NF-κB induced by blue LED light exposure. Finally, B-ext, L-ext, and NAC inhibited caspase-3/7 activation and autophagy. Conclusions These findings suggest that B-ext and L-ext containing high amounts of polyphenols exert protective effects against blue LED light-induced retinal photoreceptor cell damage mainly through inhibition

  4. Photoreceptor phagocytosis is mediated by phosphoinositide signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mustafi, Debarshi; Kevany, Brian M.; Genoud, Christel; Bai, Xiaodong; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Circadian oscillations in peripheral tissues, such as the retinal compartment of the eye, are critical to anticipating changing metabolic demands. Circadian shedding of retinal photoreceptor cell discs with subsequent phagocytosis by the neighboring retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) is essential for removal of toxic metabolites and lifelong survival of these postmitotic neurons. Defects in photoreceptor phagocytosis can lead to severe retinal pathology, but the biochemical mechanisms remain poorly defined. By first documenting a 2.8-fold burst of photoreceptor phagocytosis events in the mouse eye in the morning compared with the afternoon by serial block face imaging, we established time points to assess transcriptional readouts by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). We identified 365 oscillating protein-coding transcripts that implicated the phosphoinositide lipid signaling network mediating the discrete steps of photoreceptor phagocytosis. Moreover, examination of overlapping cistromic sites by core clock transcription factors and promoter elements of these effector genes provided a functional basis for the circadian cycling of these transcripts. RNA-Seq also revealed oscillating expression of 16 long intergenic noncoding RNAs and key histone modifying enzymes critical for circadian gene expression. Our phenotypic and genotypic characterization reveals a complex global landscape of overlapping and temporally controlled networks driving the essential circadian process in the eye.—Mustafi, D., Kevany, B. M., Genoud, C., Bai, X., Palczewski, K. Photoreceptor phagocytosis is mediated by phosphoinositide signaling. PMID:23913857

  5. Organic photoreceptors: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnyk, Andrew R.; Pai, David M.

    1990-07-01

    When Chester Carison invented xerography, he employed sulfur and anthracene as photoconductors. Although the initial commercialization of his idea relied on inorganic photoconductors, the current trend is towards use of organic photoconductors because of their material variety, economy and flexibility. High speed copying and printing machines use belts coated with organic photoreceptors, while personal copiers and printers use aluminum drums dip-coated with organic photoreceptors. Multilayered, organic photoreceptors are now routinely mass produced by the millions with both visible sensitivity for copiers and infrared sensitivity for printers. This paper presents a brief overview of key photoreceptor properties and follow with a survey of electronic organic materials of current interest. The photodischarge characteristic is determined mainly by three factors: the photogeneration, the injection, and the transport of charge carriers. These functions can be accomplished by separate electronic material layers; photogeneration by organic pigments and charge transport by aromatic-amine electron-donor molecules. The photogeneration layers are usually fabricated by solvent coating a dispersion of a pigment in a polymeric binder while the charge transport layers are solvent coated to form a solid solution of the aromatic amine in a polymeric binder. Examples and characteristics of organic pigments and charge transport molecules of current interest are discussed.

  6. Dynamical Adaptation in Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Damon A.; Benichou, Raphael; Meister, Markus; Azeredo da Silveira, Rava

    2013-01-01

    Adaptation is at the heart of sensation and nowhere is it more salient than in early visual processing. Light adaptation in photoreceptors is doubly dynamical: it depends upon the temporal structure of the input and it affects the temporal structure of the response. We introduce a non-linear dynamical adaptation model of photoreceptors. It is simple enough that it can be solved exactly and simulated with ease; analytical and numerical approaches combined provide both intuition on the behavior of dynamical adaptation and quantitative results to be compared with data. Yet the model is rich enough to capture intricate phenomenology. First, we show that it reproduces the known phenomenology of light response and short-term adaptation. Second, we present new recordings and demonstrate that the model reproduces cone response with great precision. Third, we derive a number of predictions on the response of photoreceptors to sophisticated stimuli such as periodic inputs, various forms of flickering inputs, and natural inputs. In particular, we demonstrate that photoreceptors undergo rapid adaptation of response gain and time scale, over ∼ 300 ms—i. e., over the time scale of the response itself—and we confirm this prediction with data. For natural inputs, this fast adaptation can modulate the response gain more than tenfold and is hence physiologically relevant. PMID:24244119

  7. Transplantation of photoreceptors labeled with tritiated thymidine into RCS rats

    SciTech Connect

    Gouras, P.; Du, J.; Gelanze, M.; Kwun, R.; Kjeldbye, H.; Lopez, R. )

    1991-04-01

    Tritiated thymidine was administered to newborn rats to label photoreceptors, about 50% of which are still dividing. These photoreceptors were enzymatically dissociated and separated from the remainder of the retina after the infant rat matured. These labeled photoreceptors were then transplanted into a foreign host retina in the region of the outer nuclear layer. The hosts were ocular, albinotic, Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats, congenic to the normal donors and at least 4 months old, a time when virtually all the photoreceptors have degenerated from their retinas. The transplant site was examined at various times after transplantation by light microscope autoradiography. Labeled photoreceptor cell bodies were found in clusters in the outer nuclear layer region for as long as 3 months after transplantation surgery.

  8. Sexual dimorphism in the compound eye of Heliconius erato: a nymphalid butterfly with at least five spectral classes of photoreceptor.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Kyle J; Osorio, Daniel; Briscoe, Adriana D

    2016-08-01

    Most butterfly families expand the number of spectrally distinct photoreceptors in their compound eye by opsin gene duplications together with lateral filter pigments; however, most nymphalid genera have limited diversity, with only three or four spectral types of photoreceptor. Here, we examined the spatial pattern of opsin expression and photoreceptor spectral sensitivities in Heliconius erato, a nymphalid with duplicate ultraviolet opsin genes, UVRh1 and UVRh2 We found that the H. erato compound eye is sexually dimorphic. Females express the two UV opsin proteins in separate photoreceptors, but males do not express UVRh1. Intracellular recordings confirmed that females have three short wavelength-sensitive photoreceptors (λmax=356, ∼390 and 470 nm), while males have two (λmax=390 and ∼470 nm). We also found two long wavelength-sensitive photoreceptors (green, λmax∼555 nm, and red, λmax∼600 nm), which express the same LW opsin. The red cell's shifted sensitivity is probably due to perirhabdomal filtering pigments. Sexual dimorphism of the UV-absorbing rhodopsins may reflect the females' need to discriminate conspecifics from co-mimics. Red-green color vision may be used to detect differences in red coloration on Heliconius wings, or for host-plant identification. Among nymphalids so far investigated, only H. erato is known to possess five spectral classes of photoreceptor; sexual dimorphism of the eye via suppression of one class of opsin (here UVRh1 in males) has not - to our knowledge - been reported in any animal. PMID:27247318

  9. Simple photoreceptors in Limulus polyphemus.

    PubMed

    Millecchia, R; Bradbury, J; Mauro, A

    1966-12-01

    The "olfactory nerve," the endoparietal eye, and the rudimentary lateral eyes of Limulus (polyphemus) contain simple photoreceptor cells that duplicate many of the electrical responses of the retinular cells of the lateral eye; the responses are a receptor potential consisting of aninitial transient phase and a subsequent steady phase,low-amplitude fluctuations, and a small locally regenerative response to pulses of both light and current. Photic stimulation does not induce conducted action potentials, but does increase the membrane conductance. The receptor potentialrequires the presence of sodium ions in the external medium. Measurements of action and absorption spectra indicate a photopigment whose maximum absorption is of light with wavelength of 535 nanometers. The functional significance of these cells has not been ascertained. PMID:5921383

  10. Multiple rod–cone and cone–rod photoreceptor transmutations in snakes: Evidence from visual opsin gene expression

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simoe, Bruno F; Sampaio, Filipa L.; Loew, Ellis R.; Sanders, Kate L.; Fisher, Robert N.; Hart, Nathan S.; Hunt, David M.; Partridge, Julian C.; Gower, David J.

    2016-01-01

    In 1934, Gordon Walls forwarded his radical theory of retinal photoreceptor ‘transmutation’. This proposed that rods and cones used for scotopic and photopic vision, respectively, were not fixed but could evolve into each other via a series of morphologically distinguishable intermediates. Walls' prime evidence came from series of diurnal and nocturnal geckos and snakes that appeared to have pure-cone or pure-rod retinas (in forms that Walls believed evolved from ancestors with the reverse complement) or which possessed intermediate photoreceptor cells. Walls was limited in testing his theory because the precise identity of visual pigments present in photoreceptors was then unknown. Subsequent molecular research has hitherto neglected this topic but presents new opportunities. We identify three visual opsin genes, rh1, sws1 and lws, in retinal mRNA of an ecologically and taxonomically diverse sample of snakes central to Walls' theory. We conclude that photoreceptors with superficially rod- or cone-like morphology are not limited to containing scotopic or photopic opsins, respectively. Walls' theory is essentially correct, and more research is needed to identify the patterns, processes and functional implications of transmutation. Future research will help to clarify the fundamental properties and physiology of photoreceptors adapted to function in different light levels.

  11. Multiple rod-cone and cone-rod photoreceptor transmutations in snakes: evidence from visual opsin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Simões, Bruno F; Sampaio, Filipa L; Loew, Ellis R; Sanders, Kate L; Fisher, Robert N; Hart, Nathan S; Hunt, David M; Partridge, Julian C; Gower, David J

    2016-01-27

    In 1934, Gordon Walls forwarded his radical theory of retinal photoreceptor 'transmutation'. This proposed that rods and cones used for scotopic and photopic vision, respectively, were not fixed but could evolve into each other via a series of morphologically distinguishable intermediates. Walls' prime evidence came from series of diurnal and nocturnal geckos and snakes that appeared to have pure-cone or pure-rod retinas (in forms that Walls believed evolved from ancestors with the reverse complement) or which possessed intermediate photoreceptor cells. Walls was limited in testing his theory because the precise identity of visual pigments present in photoreceptors was then unknown. Subsequent molecular research has hitherto neglected this topic but presents new opportunities. We identify three visual opsin genes, rh1, sws1 and lws, in retinal mRNA of an ecologically and taxonomically diverse sample of snakes central to Walls' theory. We conclude that photoreceptors with superficially rod- or cone-like morphology are not limited to containing scotopic or photopic opsins, respectively. Walls' theory is essentially correct, and more research is needed to identify the patterns, processes and functional implications of transmutation. Future research will help to clarify the fundamental properties and physiology of photoreceptors adapted to function in different light levels. PMID:26817768

  12. Dynamic behavior of rod photoreceptor disks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunhe; Jiang, Yunhai; Koutalos, Yiannis

    2002-09-01

    Eukaryotic cells use membrane organelles, like the endoplasmic reticulum or the Golgi, to carry out different functions. Vertebrate rod photoreceptors use hundreds of membrane sacs (the disks) for the detection of light. We have used fluorescent tracers and single cell imaging to study the properties of rod photoreceptor disks. Labeling of intact rod photoreceptors with membrane markers and polar tracers revealed communication between intradiskal and extracellular space. Internalized tracers moved along the length of the rod outer segment, indicating communication between the disks as well. This communication involved the exchange of both membrane and aqueous phase and had a time constant in the order of minutes. The communication pathway uses approximately 2% of the available membrane disk area and does not allow the passage of molecules larger than 10 kDa. It was possible to load the intradiskal space with fluorescent Ca(2+) and pH dyes, which reported an intradiskal Ca(2+) concentration in the order of 1 microM and an acidic pH 6.5, both of them significantly different than intracellular and extracellular Ca(2+) concentrations and pH. The results suggest that the rod photoreceptor disks are not discrete, passive sacs but rather comprise an active cellular organelle. The communication between disks may be important for membrane remodeling as well as for providing access to the intradiskal space of the whole outer segment. PMID:12202366

  13. Improved cell metabolism prolongs photoreceptor survival upon retinal-pigmented epithelium loss in the sodium iodate induced model of geographic atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Zieger, Marina; Punzo, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is characterized by malfunction and loss of retinal-pigmented epithelium (RPE) cells. Because the RPE transfers nutrients from the choriocapillaris to photoreceptor (PR), PRs are affected as well. Geographic atrophy (GA) is an advanced form of AMD characterized by severe vision impairment due to RPE loss over large areas. Currently there is no treatment to delay the degeneration of nutrient deprived PRs once RPE cells die. Here we show that cell-autonomous activation of the key regulator of cell metabolism, the kinase mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), delays PR death in the sodium iodate induced model of RPE atrophy. Consistent with this finding loss of mTORC1 in cones accelerates cone death as cones fail to balance demand with supply. Interestingly, promoting rod survival does not promote cone survival in this model of RPE atrophy as both, rods and cones suffer from a sick and dying RPE. The findings suggest that activation of metabolic genes downstream of mTORC1 can serve as a strategy to prolong PR survival when RPE cells malfunction or die. PMID:26883199

  14. Optimizing Grid Patterns on Photovoltaic Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    CELCAL computer program helps in optimizing grid patterns for different photovoltaic cell geometries and metalization processes. Five different powerloss phenomena associated with front-surface metal grid pattern on photovoltaic cells.

  15. Pharmacological Modulation of Photoreceptor Outer Segment Degradation in a Human iPS Cell Model of Inherited Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ruchira; Kuai, David; Guziewicz, Karina E; Meyer, Jackelyn; Wilson, Molly; Lu, Jianfeng; Smith, Molly; Clark, Eric; Verhoeven, Amelia; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Gamm, David M

    2015-11-01

    Degradation of photoreceptor outer segments (POS) by retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is essential for vision, and studies have implicated altered POS processing in the pathogenesis of some retinal degenerative diseases. Consistent with this concept, a recently established hiPSC-RPE model of inherited macular degeneration, Best disease (BD), displayed reduced rates of POS breakdown. Herein we utilized this model to determine (i) if disturbances in protein degradation pathways are associated with delayed POS digestion and (ii) whether such defect(s) can be pharmacologically targeted. We found that BD hiPSC-RPE cultures possessed increased protein oxidation, decreased free-ubiquitin levels, and altered rates of exosome secretion, consistent with altered POS processing. Application of valproic acid (VPA) with or without rapamycin increased rates of POS degradation in our model, whereas application of bafilomycin-A1 decreased such rates. Importantly, the negative effect of bafilomycin-A1 could be fully reversed by VPA. The utility of hiPSC-RPE for VPA testing was further evident following examination of its efficacy and metabolism in a complementary canine disease model. Our findings suggest that disturbances in protein degradation pathways contribute to the POS processing defect observed in BD hiPSC-RPE, which can be manipulated pharmacologically. These results have therapeutic implications for BD and perhaps other maculopathies. PMID:26300224

  16. Inhibition of the alternative complement pathway preserves photoreceptors after retinal injury

    PubMed Central

    Sweigard, J. Harry; Matsumoto, Hidetaka; Smith, Kaylee E.; Kim, Leo A.; Paschalis, Eleftherios I.; Okonuki, Yoko; Castillejos, Alexandra; Kataoka, Keiko; Hasegawa, Eiichi; Yanai, Ryoji; Husain, Deeba; Lambris, John D.; Vavvas, Demetrios; Miller, Joan W.; Connor, Kip M.

    2015-01-01

    Degeneration of photoreceptors is a primary cause of vision loss worldwide, making the underlying mechanisms surrounding photoreceptor cell death critical to developing new treatment strategies. Retinal detachment, characterized by the separation of photoreceptors from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium, is a sight-threatening event that can happen in a number of retinal diseases. The detached photoreceptors undergo apoptosis and programmed necrosis. Given that photoreceptors are nondividing cells, their loss leads to irreversible visual impairment even after successful retinal reattachment surgery. To better understand the underlying disease mechanisms, we analyzed innate immune system regulators in the vitreous of human patients with retinal detachment and correlated the results with findings in a mouse model of retinal detachment. We identified the alternative complement pathway as promoting early photoreceptor cell death during retinal detachment. Photoreceptors down-regulate membrane-bound inhibitors of complement, allowing for selective targeting by the alternative complement pathway. When photoreceptors in the detached retina were removed from the primary source of oxygen and nutrients (choroidal vascular bed), the retina became hypoxic, leading to an up-regulation of complement factor B, a key mediator of the alternative pathway. Inhibition of the alternative complement pathway in knockout mice or through pharmacological means ameliorated photoreceptor cell death during retinal detachment. Our current study begins to outline the mechanism by which the alternative complement pathway facilitates photoreceptor cell death in the damaged retina. PMID:26203084

  17. Inhibition of the alternative complement pathway preserves photoreceptors after retinal injury.

    PubMed

    Sweigard, J Harry; Matsumoto, Hidetaka; Smith, Kaylee E; Kim, Leo A; Paschalis, Eleftherios I; Okonuki, Yoko; Castillejos, Alexandra; Kataoka, Keiko; Hasegawa, Eiichi; Yanai, Ryoji; Husain, Deeba; Lambris, John D; Vavvas, Demetrios; Miller, Joan W; Connor, Kip M

    2015-07-22

    Degeneration of photoreceptors is a primary cause of vision loss worldwide, making the underlying mechanisms surrounding photoreceptor cell death critical to developing new treatment strategies. Retinal detachment, characterized by the separation of photoreceptors from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium, is a sight-threatening event that can happen in a number of retinal diseases. The detached photoreceptors undergo apoptosis and programmed necrosis. Given that photoreceptors are nondividing cells, their loss leads to irreversible visual impairment even after successful retinal reattachment surgery. To better understand the underlying disease mechanisms, we analyzed innate immune system regulators in the vitreous of human patients with retinal detachment and correlated the results with findings in a mouse model of retinal detachment. We identified the alternative complement pathway as promoting early photoreceptor cell death during retinal detachment. Photoreceptors down-regulate membrane-bound inhibitors of complement, allowing for selective targeting by the alternative complement pathway. When photoreceptors in the detached retina were removed from the primary source of oxygen and nutrients (choroidal vascular bed), the retina became hypoxic, leading to an up-regulation of complement factor B, a key mediator of the alternative pathway. Inhibition of the alternative complement pathway in knockout mice or through pharmacological means ameliorated photoreceptor cell death during retinal detachment. Our current study begins to outline the mechanism by which the alternative complement pathway facilitates photoreceptor cell death in the damaged retina. PMID:26203084

  18. Evolutionary aspects of plant photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Li, Fay-Wei; Mathews, Sarah

    2016-03-01

    Plant photoreceptors link environmental light cues with physiological responses, determining how individual plants complete their life cycles. Structural and functional evolution of photoreceptors has co-occurred as plants diversified and faced the challenge of new light environments, during the transition of plants to land and as substantial plant canopies evolved. Large-scale comparative sequencing projects allow us for the first time to document photoreceptor evolution in understudied clades, revealing some surprises. Here we review recent progress in evolutionary studies of three photoreceptor families: phytochromes, phototropins and neochromes. PMID:26843269

  19. Evolution of clitellate phaosomes from rhabdomeric photoreceptor cells of polychaetes – a study in the leech Helobdella robusta (Annelida, Sedentaria, Clitellata)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In Annelida two types of photoreceptor cells (PRCs) are regarded as generally present, rhabdomeric and ciliary PRCs. In certain taxa, however, an additional type of PRC may occur, the so called phaosomal PRC. Whereas the former two types of PRCs are always organized as an epithelium with their sensory processes projecting into an extracellular cavity formed by the PRCs and (pigmented) supportive cells, phaosomes are seemingly intracellular vacuoles housing the sensory processes. Phaosomal PRCs are the only type of PRC found in one major annelid group, Clitellata. Several hypotheses have been put forward explaining the evolutionary origin of the clitellate phaosomes. To elucidate the evolution of clitellate PRC and eyes the leech Helobdella robusta, for which a sequenced genome is available, was chosen. Results TEM observations showed that extraocular and ocular PRCs are structurally identical. Bioinformatic analyses revealed predictions for four opsin genes, three of which could be amplified. All belong to the rhabdomeric opsin family and phylogenetic analyses showed them in a derived position within annelid opsins. Gene expression studies showed two of them expressed in the eye and in the extraocular PRCs. Polychaete eye-typic key enzymes for ommochromme and pterin shading pigments synthesis are not expressed in leech eyes. Conclusions By comparative gene-expression studies we herein provide strong evidence that the phaosomal PRCs typical of Clitellata are derived from the rhabdomeric PRCs characteristic for polychaete adult eyes. Thus, they represent a highly derived type of PRC that evolved in the stem lineage of Clitellata rather than another, primitive type of PRC in Metazoa. Evolution of these PRCs in Clitellata is related to a loss of the primary eyes and most of their photoreceptive elements except for the rhabdomeric PRCs. Most likely this happened while changing to an endobenthic mode of life. This hypothesis of PRC evolution is in accordance

  20. Roles of Glucose in Photoreceptor Survival*

    PubMed Central

    Chertov, Andrei O.; Holzhausen, Lars; Kuok, Iok Teng; Couron, Drew; Parker, Ed; Linton, Jonathan D.; Sadilek, Martin; Sweet, Ian R.; Hurley, James B.

    2011-01-01

    Vertebrate photoreceptor neurons have a high demand for metabolic energy, and their viability is very sensitive to genetic and environmental perturbations. We investigated the relationship between energy metabolism and cell death by evaluating the metabolic effects of glucose deprivation on mouse photoreceptors. Oxygen consumption, lactate production, ATP, NADH/NAD+, TCA cycle intermediates, morphological changes, autophagy, and viability were evaluated. We compared retinas incubated with glucose to retinas deprived of glucose or retinas treated with a mixture of mitochondrion-specific fuels. Rapid and slow phases of cell death were identified. The rapid phase is linked to reduced mitochondrial activity, and the slower phase reflects a need for substrates for cell maintenance and repair. PMID:21840997

  1. Effect of Purified Murine NGF on Isolated Photoreceptors of a Rodent Developing Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Rocco, Maria Luisa; Balzamino, Bijorn Omar; Petrocchi Passeri, Pamela; Micera, Alessandra; Aloe, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    A number of different studies have shown that neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF) support the survival of retinal ganglion neurons during a variety if insults. Recently, we have reported that that eye NGF administration can protect also photoreceptor degeneration in a mice and rat with inherited retinitis pigmentosa. However, the evidence that NGF acts directly on photoreceptors and that other retinal cells mediate the NGF effect could not be excluded. In the present study we have isolated retinal cells from rats with inherited retinitis pigmentosa (RP) during the post-natal stage of photoreceptor degenerative. In presence of NGF, these cells are characterized by enhanced expression of NGF-receptors and rhodopsin, the specific marker of photoreceptor and better cell survival, as well as neuritis outgrowth. Together these observations support the hypothesis that NGF that NGF acts directly on photoreceptors survival and prevents photoreceptor degeneration as previously suggested by in vivo studies. PMID:25897972

  2. Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF) delays photoreceptor degeneration in explants of rd/rd mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, P; Caffé, A R; Holmqvist, I; Söderpalm, A K; Singh, D P; Shinohara, T; van Veen, T

    2001-09-17

    Lens epithelium derived growth factor (LEDGF) has been shown to rescue embryonic chick photoreceptor cells from serum starvation and heat stress, light damaged photoreceptor cells in Lewis rats, and photoreceptor cells in RCS rats. The aim of our study is to study the rescue effect of LEDGF on photoreceptor cells in the rd/rd mouse using our long-term serum free organ culture. At the end of this culture period of 21-26 days LEDGF treated rd mouse retina showed an increased photoreceptor survival compared to the untreated controls. LEDGF has no effect on expression and localization of opsin and arrestin in the rod photoreceptor cells when RPE is present. The protective potency of LEDGF on the retinal photoreceptor cells is similar to that of BDNF. LEDGF is known to activate heat shock proteins (Hsps) and the elevated Hsps are also reported to suppress apoptosis. PMID:11588609

  3. Nr2e3-directed transcriptional regulation of genes involved in photoreceptor development and cell-type specific phototransduction.

    PubMed

    Haider, Neena B; Mollema, Nissa; Gaule, Meghan; Yuan, Yang; Sachs, Andrew J; Nystuen, Arne M; Naggert, Jürgen K; Nishina, Patsy M

    2009-09-01

    The retinal transcription factor Nr2e3 plays a key role in photoreceptor development and function. In this study we examine gene expression in the retina of Nr2e3(rd7/rd7) mutants with respect to wild-type control mice, to identify genes that are misregulated and hence potentially function in the Nr2e3 transcriptional network. Quantitative candidate gene real time PCR and subtractive hybridization approaches were used to identify transcripts that were misregulated in Nr2e3(rd7/rd7) mice. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays were then used to determine which of the misregulated transcripts were direct targets of NR2E3. We identified 24 potential targets of NR2E3. In the developing retina, NR2E3 targets transcription factors such as Ror1, Rorg, and the nuclear hormone receptors Nr1d1 and Nr2c1. In the mature retina NR2E3 targets several genes including the rod specific gene Gnb1 and cone specific genes blue opsin, and two of the cone transducin subunits, Gnat2 and Gnb3. In addition, we identified 5 novel transcripts that are targeted by NR2E3. While mislocalization of proteins between rods and cones was not observed, we did observe diminished concentration of GNB1 protein in adult Nr2e3(rd7/rd7) retinas. These studies identified novel transcriptional pathways that are potentially targeted by Nr2e3 in the retina and specifically demonstrate a novel role for NR2E3 in regulating genes involved in phototransduction. PMID:19379737

  4. Plant Flavoprotein Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Christie, John M.; Blackwood, Lisa; Petersen, Jan; Sullivan, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Plants depend on the surrounding light environment to direct their growth. Blue light (300–500 nm) in particular acts to promote a wide variety of photomorphogenic responses including seedling establishment, phototropism and circadian clock regulation. Several different classes of flavin-based photoreceptors have been identified that mediate the effects of blue light in the dicotyledonous genetic model Arabidopsis thaliana. These include the cryptochromes, the phototropins and members of the Zeitlupe family. In this review, we discuss recent advances, which contribute to our understanding of how these photosensory systems are activated by blue light and how they initiate signaling to regulate diverse aspects of plant development. PMID:25516569

  5. In Vivo Imaging of Human Cone Photoreceptor Inner Segments

    PubMed Central

    Scoles, Drew; Sulai, Yusufu N.; Langlo, Christopher S.; Fishman, Gerald A.; Curcio, Christine A.; Carroll, Joseph; Dubra, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. An often overlooked prerequisite to cone photoreceptor gene therapy development is residual photoreceptor structure that can be rescued. While advances in adaptive optics (AO) retinal imaging have recently enabled direct visualization of individual cone and rod photoreceptors in the living human retina, these techniques largely detect strongly directionally-backscattered (waveguided) light from normal intact photoreceptors. This represents a major limitation in using existing AO imaging to quantify structure of remnant cones in degenerating retina. Methods. Photoreceptor inner segment structure was assessed with a novel AO scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) differential phase technique, that we termed nonconfocal split-detector, in two healthy subjects and four subjects with achromatopsia. Ex vivo preparations of five healthy donor eyes were analyzed for comparison of inner segment diameter to that measured in vivo with split-detector AOSLO. Results. Nonconfocal split-detector AOSLO reveals the photoreceptor inner segment with or without the presence of a waveguiding outer segment. The diameter of inner segments measured in vivo is in good agreement with histology. A substantial number of foveal and parafoveal cone photoreceptors with apparently intact inner segments were identified in patients with the inherited disease achromatopsia. Conclusions. The application of nonconfocal split-detector to emerging human gene therapy trials will improve the potential of therapeutic success, by identifying patients with sufficient retained photoreceptor structure to benefit the most from intervention. Additionally, split-detector imaging may be useful for studies of other retinal degenerations such as AMD, retinitis pigmentosa, and choroideremia where the outer segment is lost before the remainder of the photoreceptor cell. PMID:24906859

  6. OFD1, as a Ciliary Protein, Exhibits Neuroprotective Function in Photoreceptor Degeneration Models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Chen, Xin; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Jieping; Li, Peng; Li, Zongyi; Xu, Jingying; Gao, Furong; Jin, Caixia; Tian, Haibin; Zhang, Jingfa; Li, Weiye; Lu, Lixia; Xu, Guo-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Ofd1 is a newly identified causative gene for Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a photoreceptor degenerative disease. This study aimed to examine Ofd1 localization in retina and further to investigate its function in photoreceptor degeneration models. Ofd1 localization in rat retina was examined using immunofluorescence. N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced rats and Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats were used as photoreceptor degeneration models. The expression pattern of Ofd1, other ciliary associated genes and Wnt signaling pathway genes were examined in rat models. Furthermore, pEGFP-Ofd1-CDS and pSUPER-Ofd1-shRNA were constructed to overexpress and knockdown the expression level in 661W and R28 cells. MNU was also used to induce cell death. Cilia formation was observed using immunocytochemistry (ICC). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected using the 2', 7'-Dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA) assay. Apoptosis genes expression was examined using qRT-PCR, Western blotting and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Ofd1 localized to outer segments of rat retina photoreceptors. Ofd1 and other ciliary proteins expression levels increased from the 1st and 4th postnatal weeks and decreased until the 6th week in the RCS rats, while their expression consistently decreased from the 1st and 7th day in the MNU rats. Moreover, Wnt signaling pathway proteins expression was significantly up-regulated in both rat models. Knockdown of Ofd1 expression resulted in a smaller population, shorter length of cell cilia, and lower cell viability. Ofd1 overexpression partially attenuated MNU toxic effects by reducing ROS levels and mitigating apoptosis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating Ofd1 localization and its function in rat retina and in retinal degeneration rat models. Ofd1 plays a role in controlling photoreceptor cilium length and number. Importantly, it demonstrates a neuroprotective function by protecting the photoreceptor from

  7. OFD1, as a Ciliary Protein, Exhibits Neuroprotective Function in Photoreceptor Degeneration Models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Zhang, Jieping; Li, Peng; Li, Zongyi; Xu, Jingying; Gao, Furong; Jin, Caixia; Tian, Haibin; Zhang, Jingfa; Li, Weiye; Lu, Lixia; Xu, Guo-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Ofd1 is a newly identified causative gene for Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a photoreceptor degenerative disease. This study aimed to examine Ofd1 localization in retina and further to investigate its function in photoreceptor degeneration models. Ofd1 localization in rat retina was examined using immunofluorescence. N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced rats and Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats were used as photoreceptor degeneration models. The expression pattern of Ofd1, other ciliary associated genes and Wnt signaling pathway genes were examined in rat models. Furthermore, pEGFP-Ofd1-CDS and pSUPER-Ofd1-shRNA were constructed to overexpress and knockdown the expression level in 661W and R28 cells. MNU was also used to induce cell death. Cilia formation was observed using immunocytochemistry (ICC). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected using the 2', 7'-Dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA) assay. Apoptosis genes expression was examined using qRT-PCR, Western blotting and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Ofd1 localized to outer segments of rat retina photoreceptors. Ofd1 and other ciliary proteins expression levels increased from the 1st and 4th postnatal weeks and decreased until the 6th week in the RCS rats, while their expression consistently decreased from the 1st and 7th day in the MNU rats. Moreover, Wnt signaling pathway proteins expression was significantly up-regulated in both rat models. Knockdown of Ofd1 expression resulted in a smaller population, shorter length of cell cilia, and lower cell viability. Ofd1 overexpression partially attenuated MNU toxic effects by reducing ROS levels and mitigating apoptosis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating Ofd1 localization and its function in rat retina and in retinal degeneration rat models. Ofd1 plays a role in controlling photoreceptor cilium length and number. Importantly, it demonstrates a neuroprotective function by protecting the photoreceptor from

  8. Morphological and physiological characteristics of dermal photoreceptors in Lymnaea stagnalis

    PubMed Central

    Takigami, Satoshi; Sunada, Hiroshi; Horikoshi, Tetsuro; Sakakibara, Manabu

    2014-01-01

    Dermal photoreceptors located in the mantle of Lymnaea stagnalis were histologically and physiologically characterized. Our previous study demonstrated that the shadow response from dermal photoreceptors induces the whole-body withdrawal response. Through the interneuron, RPeD11, we detected that the light-off response indirectly originated from a dermal photoreceptor. Previous observations, based on behavioral pharmacology, revealed that cyclic guanosine monophosphate acts as a second messenger in the dermal photoreceptor. Furthermore, gastropods possess dermal photoreceptors containing rhodopsin, as a photopigment, and another photo-sensitive protein, arrestin, responsible for terminating the light response. Thus, we chose three antibodies, anti-cGMP, anti-rhodopsin, and anti-β-arrestin, to identify the dermal photoreceptor molecules in Lymnaea mantle. Extracellular recording, using a suction electrode on the mantle, revealed a light off-response from the right parietal nerve. Overlapping structures, positive against each of the antibodies, were also observed. Numerous round, granular particles of 3–47 μm in diameter with one nucleus were distributed around pneumostome and/or inside the mantle. The cells surrounding the pneumostome area, located 10 μm beneath the surface, tended to have smaller cell soma ranging from 3 to 25 μm in diameter, while cells located in other areas were distributed uniformly inside the mantle, with a larger diameter ranging from 12 to 47 μm. The histological examination using back-filing Lucifer Yellow staining of the right parietal nerve with the three dermal photoreceptor antibodies confirmed that these overlapping-stained structures were dermal photoreceptors in Lymnaea. PMID:27493502

  9. Negative Regulation of the Novel norpAP24 Suppressor, diehard4, in the Endo-lysosomal Trafficking Underlies Photoreceptor Cell Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jongwoo; Song, Myungchul; Hong, Sujeong

    2013-01-01

    Rhodopsin has been used as a prototype system to investigate G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) internalization and endocytic sorting mechanisms. Failure of rhodopsin recycling upon light activation results in various degenerative retinal diseases. Accumulation of internalized rhodopsin in late endosomes and the impairment of its lysosomal degradation are associated with unregulated cell death that occurs in dystrophies. However, the molecular basis of rhodopsin accumulation remains elusive. We found that the novel norpAP24 suppressor, diehard4, is responsible for the inability of endo-lysosomal rhodopsin trafficking and retinal degeneration in Drosophila models of retinal dystrophies. We found that diehard4 encodes Osiris 21. Loss of its function suppresses retinal degeneration in norpAP24, rdgC306, and trp1, but not in rdgB2, suggesting a common cause of photoreceptor death. In addition, the loss of Osiris 21 function shifts the membrane balance between late endosomes and lysosomes as evidenced by smaller late endosomes and the proliferation of lysosomal compartments, thus facilitating the degradation of endocytosed rhodopsin. Our results demonstrate the existence of negative regulation in vesicular traffic between endosomes and lysosomes. We anticipate that the identification of additional components and an in-depth description of this specific molecular machinery will aid in therapeutic interventions of various retinal dystrophies and GPCR-related human diseases. PMID:23754968

  10. Negative regulation of the novel norpA(P24) suppressor, diehard4, in the endo-lysosomal trafficking underlies photoreceptor cell degeneration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongwoo; Song, Myungchul; Hong, Sujeong

    2013-06-01

    Rhodopsin has been used as a prototype system to investigate G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) internalization and endocytic sorting mechanisms. Failure of rhodopsin recycling upon light activation results in various degenerative retinal diseases. Accumulation of internalized rhodopsin in late endosomes and the impairment of its lysosomal degradation are associated with unregulated cell death that occurs in dystrophies. However, the molecular basis of rhodopsin accumulation remains elusive. We found that the novel norpA(P24) suppressor, diehard4, is responsible for the inability of endo-lysosomal rhodopsin trafficking and retinal degeneration in Drosophila models of retinal dystrophies. We found that diehard4 encodes Osiris 21. Loss of its function suppresses retinal degeneration in norpA(P24), rdgC(306), and trp(1), but not in rdgB(2), suggesting a common cause of photoreceptor death. In addition, the loss of Osiris 21 function shifts the membrane balance between late endosomes and lysosomes as evidenced by smaller late endosomes and the proliferation of lysosomal compartments, thus facilitating the degradation of endocytosed rhodopsin. Our results demonstrate the existence of negative regulation in vesicular traffic between endosomes and lysosomes. We anticipate that the identification of additional components and an in-depth description of this specific molecular machinery will aid in therapeutic interventions of various retinal dystrophies and GPCR-related human diseases. PMID:23754968

  11. Vibratome Sectioning Mouse Retina to Prepare Photoreceptor Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Clérin, Emmanuelle; Yang, Ying; Forster, Valérie; Fontaine, Valérie; Sahel, José-Alain; Léveillard, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    The retina is a part of the central nervous system that has organized architecture, with neurons in layers from the photoreceptors, both rods and cones in contact with the retinal pigmented epithelium in the most distant part on the retina considering the direction of light, and the ganglion cells in the most proximal distance. This architecture allows the isolation of the photoreceptor layer by vibratome sectioning. The dissected neural retina of a mouse aged 8 days is flat-embedded in 4% gelatin on top of a slice of 20% gelatin photoreceptor layer facing down. Using a vibratome and a double edged razor blade, the 100 µm thick inner retina is sectioned. This section contains the ganglion cells and the inner layer with notably the bipolar cells. An intermediary section of 15 µm is discarded before 200 µm of the outer retina containing the photoreceptors is recovered. The gelatin is removed by heating at 37 °C. Pieces of outer layer are incubated in 500 µl of Ringer's solution with 2 units of activated papain for 20 min at 37 °C. The reaction is stopped by adding 500 µl 10% fetal calf serum (FCS) in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM), then 25 units of DNAse I is added before centrifugation at RT, washed several times to remove serum and the cells are resuspended in 500 µl of DMEM and seeded at 1 x 105 cells/cm2. The cells are grown to 5 days in vitro and their viability scored using live/dead assay. The purity of the culture is first determined by microscopic observation during the experiment. The purity is then validated by seeding and fixing cells on a histological slide and analyzing using a rabbit polyclonal anti-SAG, a photoreceptor marker and mouse monoclonal anti-RHO, a rod photoreceptor specific marker. Alternatively, the photoreceptor layer (97% rods) can be used for gene or protein expression analysis and for transplantation. PMID:25548881

  12. Cone photoreceptor definition on adaptive optics retinal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Muthiah, Manickam Nick; Gias, Carlos; Chen, Fred Kuanfu; Zhong, Joe; McClelland, Zoe; Sallo, Ferenc B; Peto, Tunde; Coffey, Peter J; da Cruz, Lyndon

    2014-01-01

    Aims To quantitatively analyse cone photoreceptor matrices on images captured on an adaptive optics (AO) camera and assess their correlation to well-established parameters in the retinal histology literature. Methods High resolution retinal images were acquired from 10 healthy subjects, aged 20–35 years old, using an AO camera (rtx1, Imagine Eyes, France). Left eye images were captured at 5° of retinal eccentricity, temporal to the fovea for consistency. In three subjects, images were also acquired at 0, 2, 3, 5 and 7° retinal eccentricities. Cone photoreceptor density was calculated following manual and automated counting. Inter-photoreceptor distance was also calculated. Voronoi domain and power spectrum analyses were performed for all images. Results At 5° eccentricity, the cone density (cones/mm2 mean±SD) was 15.3±1.4×103 (automated) and 13.9±1.0×103 (manual) and the mean inter-photoreceptor distance was 8.6±0.4 μm. Cone density decreased and inter-photoreceptor distance increased with increasing retinal eccentricity from 2 to 7°. A regular hexagonal cone photoreceptor mosaic pattern was seen at 2, 3 and 5° of retinal eccentricity. Conclusions Imaging data acquired from the AO camera match cone density, intercone distance and show the known features of cone photoreceptor distribution in the pericentral retina as reported by histology, namely, decreasing density values from 2 to 7° of eccentricity and the hexagonal packing arrangement. This confirms that AO flood imaging provides reliable estimates of pericentral cone photoreceptor distribution in normal subjects. PMID:24729030

  13. Pattern recognition monitoring of PEM fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Meltser, M.A.

    1999-08-31

    The CO-concentration in the H{sub 2} feed stream to a PEM fuel cell stack is monitored by measuring current and voltage behavior patterns from an auxiliary cell attached to the end of the stack. The auxiliary cell is connected to the same oxygen and hydrogen feed manifolds that supply the stack, and discharges through a constant load. Pattern recognition software compares the current and voltage patterns from the auxiliary cell to current and voltage signature determined from a reference cell similar to the auxiliary cell and operated under controlled conditions over a wide range of CO-concentrations in the H{sub 2} fuel stream. 4 figs.

  14. Pattern recognition monitoring of PEM fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Meltser, Mark Alexander

    1999-01-01

    The CO-concentration in the H.sub.2 feed stream to a PEM fuel cell stack is monitored by measuring current and voltage behavior patterns from an auxiliary cell attached to the end of the stack. The auxiliary cell is connected to the same oxygen and hydrogen feed manifolds that supply the stack, and discharges through a constant load. Pattern recognition software compares the current and voltage patterns from the auxiliary cell to current and voltage signature determined from a reference cell similar to the auxiliary cell and operated under controlled conditions over a wide range of CO-concentrations in the H.sub.2 fuel stream.

  15. Photoreceptor Processing Speed and Input Resistance Changes during Light Adaptation Correlate with Spectral Class in the Bumblebee, Bombus impatiens

    PubMed Central

    Skorupski, Peter; Chittka, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Colour vision depends on comparison of signals from photoreceptors with different spectral sensitivities. However, response properties of photoreceptor cells may differ in ways other than spectral tuning. In insects, for example, broadband photoreceptors, with a major sensitivity peak in the green region of the spectrum (>500 nm), drive fast visual processes, which are largely blind to chromatic signals from more narrowly-tuned photoreceptors with peak sensitivities in the blue and UV regions of the spectrum. In addition, electrophysiological properties of the photoreceptor membrane may result in differences in response dynamics of photoreceptors of similar spectral class between species, and different spectral classes within a species. We used intracellular electrophysiological techniques to investigate response dynamics of the three spectral classes of photoreceptor underlying trichromatic colour vision in the bumblebee, Bombus impatiens, and we compare these with previously published data from a related species, Bombus terrestris. In both species, we found significantly faster responses in green, compared with blue- or UV-sensitive photoreceptors, although all 3 photoreceptor types are slower in B. impatiens than in B. terrestris. Integration times for light-adapted B. impatiens photoreceptors (estimated from impulse response half-width) were 11.3±1.6 ms for green photoreceptors compared with 18.6±4.4 ms and 15.6±4.4 for blue and UV, respectively. We also measured photoreceptor input resistance in dark- and light-adapted conditions. All photoreceptors showed a decrease in input resistance during light adaptation, but this decrease was considerably larger (declining to about 22% of the dark value) in green photoreceptors, compared to blue and UV (41% and 49%, respectively). Our results suggest that the conductances associated with light adaptation are largest in green photoreceptors, contributing to their greater temporal processing speed. We suggest that the

  16. Fly Photoreceptors Encode Phase Congruency

    PubMed Central

    Friederich, Uwe; Billings, Stephen A.; Hardie, Roger C.; Juusola, Mikko; Coca, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    More than five decades ago it was postulated that sensory neurons detect and selectively enhance behaviourally relevant features of natural signals. Although we now know that sensory neurons are tuned to efficiently encode natural stimuli, until now it was not clear what statistical features of the stimuli they encode and how. Here we reverse-engineer the neural code of Drosophila photoreceptors and show for the first time that photoreceptors exploit nonlinear dynamics to selectively enhance and encode phase-related features of temporal stimuli, such as local phase congruency, which are invariant to changes in illumination and contrast. We demonstrate that to mitigate for the inherent sensitivity to noise of the local phase congruency measure, the nonlinear coding mechanisms of the fly photoreceptors are tuned to suppress random phase signals, which explains why photoreceptor responses to naturalistic stimuli are significantly different from their responses to white noise stimuli. PMID:27336733

  17. Fly Photoreceptors Encode Phase Congruency.

    PubMed

    Friederich, Uwe; Billings, Stephen A; Hardie, Roger C; Juusola, Mikko; Coca, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    More than five decades ago it was postulated that sensory neurons detect and selectively enhance behaviourally relevant features of natural signals. Although we now know that sensory neurons are tuned to efficiently encode natural stimuli, until now it was not clear what statistical features of the stimuli they encode and how. Here we reverse-engineer the neural code of Drosophila photoreceptors and show for the first time that photoreceptors exploit nonlinear dynamics to selectively enhance and encode phase-related features of temporal stimuli, such as local phase congruency, which are invariant to changes in illumination and contrast. We demonstrate that to mitigate for the inherent sensitivity to noise of the local phase congruency measure, the nonlinear coding mechanisms of the fly photoreceptors are tuned to suppress random phase signals, which explains why photoreceptor responses to naturalistic stimuli are significantly different from their responses to white noise stimuli. PMID:27336733

  18. Minireview: The Role of Nuclear Receptors in Photoreceptor Differentiation and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Swaroop, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Rod and cone photoreceptors are specialized sensory cells that mediate vision. Transcriptional controls are critical for the development and long-term survival of photoreceptors; when these controls become ineffective, retinal dysfunction or degenerative disease may result. This review discusses the role of nuclear receptors, a class of ligand-regulated transcription factors, at key stages of photoreceptor life in the mammalian retina. Nuclear receptors with known ligands, such as retinoids or thyroid hormone, together with several orphan receptors without identified physiological ligands, complement other classes of transcription factors in directing the differentiation and functional maintenance of photoreceptors. The potential of nuclear receptors to respond to ligands introduces versatility into the control of photoreceptor development and function and may suggest new opportunities for treatments of photoreceptor disease. PMID:22556342

  19. LSD1-Mediated Demethylation of H3K4me2 Is Required for the Transition from Late Progenitor to Differentiated Mouse Rod Photoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Popova, Evgenya Y; Pinzon-Guzman, Carolina; Salzberg, Anna C; Zhang, Samuel Shao-Min; Barnstable, Colin J

    2016-09-01

    Epigenetic modifiers can work in concert with transcription factors to control the transition of cells from proliferating progenitors into quiescent terminally differentiated cells. This transition involves changes in histone methylation and one of the key regulators of this is the H3K4me2/1 histone demethylase LSD1. Here, we show that the highest expression of LSD1 occurs in postmitotic retinal cells during the peak period of rod photoreceptor differentiation. Pharmacological inhibition of LSD1 in retinal explants cultured from PN1 to PN8 had three major effects. It prevented the normal decrease in expression of genes associated with progenitor function, it blocked rod photoreceptor development, and it increased expression of genes associated with other retinal cell types. The maintained expression of progenitor genes was associated with a maintained level of H3K4me2 over the gene and its promoter. Among the genes whose expression was maintained was Hes1, a repressor known to block rod photoreceptor development. The inhibition of rod photoreceptor gene expression occurred in spite of the normal expression of transcription factors CRX and NRL, and the normal accumulation of H3K4me2 marks over the promoter and gene body. We suggest that LSD1 acts in concert with a series of nuclear receptors to modify chromatin structure and repress progenitor genes as well as to inhibit ectopic patterns of gene expression in the differentiating postmitotic retinal cells. PMID:26298666

  20. Dense Pattern Optical Multipass Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silver, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A multiple pass optical cell and method comprising providing a pair of opposed cylindrical mirrors having curved axes with substantially equal focal lengths, positioning an entrance hole for introducing light into the cell and an exit hole for extracting light from the cell, wherein the entrance hole and exit hole are coextensive or non-coextensive, introducing light into the cell through the entrance hole, and extracting light from the cell through the exit hole.

  1. Dense pattern optical multipass cell

    DOEpatents

    Silver, Joel A [Santa Fe, NM

    2009-01-13

    A multiple pass optical cell and method comprising providing a pair of opposed cylindrical mirrors having curved axes with substantially equal focal lengths, positioning an entrance hole for introducing light into the cell and an exit hole for extracting light from the cell, wherein the entrance hole and exit hole are coextensive or non-coextensive, introducing light into the cell through the entrance hole, and extracting light from the cell through the exit hole.

  2. Using Zinc Finger Nuclease Technology to Generate CRX‐Reporter Human Embryonic Stem Cells as a Tool to Identify and Study the Emergence of Photoreceptors Precursors During Pluripotent Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Joseph; Mellough, Carla B; Dorgau, Birthe; Przyborski, Stefan; Moreno‐Gimeno, Inmaculada

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to generate human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines harboring the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter at the endogenous loci of the Cone‐Rod Homeobox (CRX) gene, a key transcription factor in retinal development. Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) designed to cleave in the 3′ UTR of CRX were transfected into hESCs along with a donor construct containing homology to the target region, eGFP reporter, and a puromycin selection cassette. Following selection, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing analysis of antibiotic resistant clones indicated targeted integration of the reporter cassette at the 3′ of the CRX gene, generating a CRX‐GFP fusion. Further analysis of a clone exhibiting homozygote integration of the GFP reporter was conducted suggesting genomic stability was preserved and no other copies of the targeting cassette were inserted elsewhere within the genome. This clone was selected for differentiation towards the retinal lineage. Immunocytochemistry of sections obtained from embryoid bodies and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR of GFP positive and negative subpopulations purified by fluorescence activated cell sorting during the differentiation indicated a significant correlation between GFP and endogenous CRX expression. Furthermore, GFP expression was found in photoreceptor precursors emerging during hESC differentiation, but not in the retinal pigmented epithelium, retinal ganglion cells, or neurons of the developing inner nuclear layer. Together our data demonstrate the successful application of ZFN technology to generate CRX‐GFP labeled hESC lines, which can be used to study and isolate photoreceptor precursors during hESC differentiation. Stem Cells 2016;34:311–321 PMID:26608863

  3. Distinct lobes of Limulus ventral photoreceptors. II. Structure and ultrastructure

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The structure of Limulus ventral photoreceptors fixed in situ has been investigated using light and electron microscopy and computer-assisted reconstruction and planimetry. Photoreceptors occur singly and in clusters. All photoreceptors have two types of lobes. The rhabdomeral lobe (R lobe) appears to be specialized for light sensitivity, containing the rhabdomere, which completely covers its external surface and forms infoldings into the lobe. The structure of the external rhabdom differs from that within infoldings. The other main structures of the R lobe are the palisades along the rhabdom, multivesicular bodies, lamellar bodies, and mitochondria. The arhabdomeral lobe (A lobe) bears the axon and contains the nucleus, clusters of residual bodies, lamellar arrays of endoplasmic reticulum, masses of glycogen, lipid droplets, and Golgi complexes. The R lobe and A lobe are analogous to the outer and inner segments of vertebrae photoreceptors. In single photoreceptors A and R lobes are separated by an indentation filled with glial processes. Computer reconstructions of cell clusters reveal that each cell has both types of lobes and an axon. Most of the rhabdom is formed from abutting arrays of external rhabdom from the R lobes of different members of the cluster. Efferent fibers containing characteristic angular granules penetrate single cells and clusters in glial invaginations. The main, if not exclusive, target of the efferent fibers is the internal rhabdom. PMID:7175491

  4. Using Zinc Finger Nuclease Technology to Generate CRX-Reporter Human Embryonic Stem Cells as a Tool to Identify and Study the Emergence of Photoreceptors Precursors During Pluripotent Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Collin, Joseph; Mellough, Carla B; Dorgau, Birthe; Przyborski, Stefan; Moreno-Gimeno, Inmaculada; Lako, Majlinda

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to generate human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines harboring the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter at the endogenous loci of the Cone-Rod Homeobox (CRX) gene, a key transcription factor in retinal development. Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) designed to cleave in the 3' UTR of CRX were transfected into hESCs along with a donor construct containing homology to the target region, eGFP reporter, and a puromycin selection cassette. Following selection, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing analysis of antibiotic resistant clones indicated targeted integration of the reporter cassette at the 3' of the CRX gene, generating a CRX-GFP fusion. Further analysis of a clone exhibiting homozygote integration of the GFP reporter was conducted suggesting genomic stability was preserved and no other copies of the targeting cassette were inserted elsewhere within the genome. This clone was selected for differentiation towards the retinal lineage. Immunocytochemistry of sections obtained from embryoid bodies and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR of GFP positive and negative subpopulations purified by fluorescence activated cell sorting during the differentiation indicated a significant correlation between GFP and endogenous CRX expression. Furthermore, GFP expression was found in photoreceptor precursors emerging during hESC differentiation, but not in the retinal pigmented epithelium, retinal ganglion cells, or neurons of the developing inner nuclear layer. Together our data demonstrate the successful application of ZFN technology to generate CRX-GFP labeled hESC lines, which can be used to study and isolate photoreceptor precursors during hESC differentiation. PMID:26608863

  5. Photoreceptor IRBP prevents light induced injury.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhongcui; Zhang, Meng; Liu, Wei; Tian, Jie; Xu, Gezhi

    2016-01-01

    Interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP) is a classic inducer of experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU). Although IRBP causes neuronal loss in susceptible animals, resistant animals such as Sprague-Dawley (SPD) rats can benefit from the evoked protective autoimmune responses. The aim of the present study was to analyze the neuroprotective effects of IRBP against light-induced photoreceptor degeneration. We immunized 75 male SPD rats with IRBP and the rats were then exposed to blue light for 24 hours (IRBP group). Seventy five rats were included in the control group. We found that the number of apoptotic cells in the outer nuclear layer (ONL) peaked on 1 day after light exposure, and the ONL thickness decreased significantly on day 3. OX42-positive cells appeared in the ONL immediately after light exposure, and their number peaked on day 3, and changed from resting ramified cells to activated amoeboid cells. Compared with the control group (n=75), the IRBP group showed less apoptotic cells, a thicker ONL, and reduced expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha. These outcomes indicate the IRPB might protect retinal photoreceptors against light-induced injury. PMID:27100484

  6. Proteomic Analysis of the Ubiquitin Landscape in the Drosophila Embryonic Nervous System and the Adult Photoreceptor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Juanma; Martinez, Aitor; Lectez, Benoit; Lee, So Young; Franco, Maribel; Barrio, Rosa; Dittmar, Gunnar; Mayor, Ugo

    2015-01-01

    Background Ubiquitination is known to regulate physiological neuronal functions as well as to be involved in a number of neuronal diseases. Several ubiquitin proteomic approaches have been developed during the last decade but, as they have been mostly applied to non-neuronal cell culture, very little is yet known about neuronal ubiquitination pathways in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings Using an in vivo biotinylation strategy we have isolated and identified the ubiquitinated proteome in neurons both for the developing embryonic brain and for the adult eye of Drosophila melanogaster. Bioinformatic comparison of both datasets indicates a significant difference on the ubiquitin substrates, which logically correlates with the processes that are most active at each of the developmental stages. Detection within the isolated material of two ubiquitin E3 ligases, Parkin and Ube3a, indicates their ubiquitinating activity on the studied tissues. Further identification of the proteins that do accumulate upon interference with the proteasomal degradative pathway provides an indication of the proteins that are targeted for clearance in neurons. Last, we report the proof-of-principle validation of two lysine residues required for nSyb ubiquitination. Conclusions/Significance These data cast light on the differential and common ubiquitination pathways between the embryonic and adult neurons, and hence will contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms by which neuronal function is regulated. The in vivo biotinylation methodology described here complements other approaches for ubiquitome study and offers unique advantages, and is poised to provide further insight into disease mechanisms related to the ubiquitin proteasome system. PMID:26460970

  7. Caenorhabditis elegans vulval cell fate patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Félix, Marie-Anne

    2012-08-01

    The spatial patterning of three cell fates in a row of competent cells is exemplified by vulva development in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The intercellular signaling network that underlies fate specification is well understood, yet quantitative aspects remain to be elucidated. Quantitative models of the network allow us to test the effect of parameter variation on the cell fate pattern output. Among the parameter sets that allow us to reach the wild-type pattern, two general developmental patterning mechanisms of the three fates can be found: sequential inductions and morphogen-based induction, the former being more robust to parameter variation. Experimentally, the vulval cell fate pattern is robust to stochastic and environmental challenges, and minor variants can be detected. The exception is the fate of the anterior cell, P3.p, which is sensitive to stochastic variation and spontaneous mutation, and is also evolving the fastest. Other vulval precursor cell fates can be affected by mutation, yet little natural variation can be found, suggesting stabilizing selection. Despite this fate pattern conservation, different Caenorhabditis species respond differently to perturbations of the system. In the quantitative models, different parameter sets can reconstitute their response to perturbation, suggesting that network variation among Caenorhabditis species may be quantitative. Network rewiring likely occurred at longer evolutionary scales.

  8. Nonvisual photoreceptors of the deep brain, pineal organs and retina.

    PubMed

    Vigh, B; Manzano, M J; Zádori, A; Frank, C L; Lukáts, A; Röhlich, P; Szél, A; Dávid, C

    2002-04-01

    The role of the nonvisual photoreception is to synchronise periodic functions of living organisms to the environmental light periods in order to help survival of various species in different biotopes. In vertebrates, the so-called deep brain (septal and hypothalamic) photoreceptors, the pineal organs (pineal- and parapineal organs, frontal- and parietal eye) and the retina (of the "lateral" eye) are involved in the light-based entrain of endogenous circadian clocks present in various organs. In humans, photoperiodicity was studied in connection with sleep disturbances in shift work, seasonal depression, and in jet-lag of transmeridional travellers. In the present review, experimental and molecular aspects are discussed, focusing on the histological and histochemical basis of the function of nonvisual photoreceptors. We also offer a view about functional changes of these photoreceptors during pre- and postnatal development as well as about its possible evolution. Our scope in some points is different from the generally accepted views on the nonvisual photoreceptive systems. The deep brain photoreceptors are hypothalamic and septal nuclei of the periventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-contacting neuronal system. Already present in the lancelet and representing the most ancient type of vertebrate nerve cells ("protoneurons"), CSF-contacting neurons are sensory-type cells sitting in the wall of the brain ventricles that send a ciliated dendritic process into the CSF. Various opsins and other members of the phototransduction cascade have been demonstrated in telencephalic and hypothalamic groups of these neurons. In all species examined so far, deep brain photoreceptors play a role in the circadian and circannual regulation of periodic functions. Mainly called pineal "glands" in the last decades, the pineal organs actually represent a differentiated form of encephalic photoreceptors. Supposed to be intra- and extracranially outgrown groups of deep brain photoreceptors

  9. In-vivo imaging of photoreceptor structure and laser injury pathophysiology in the snake eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwick, Harry; Elliot, Rowe; Li, Guo; Akers, Andre; Edsall, Peter R.; Stuck, Bruce E.

    1999-06-01

    Confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (CSLO) combined with the high numerical aperture of the snake eye was used to evaluate laser injury at the photoreceptor and vascular retinal layers. An Argon laser source focused within a 35 micron retinal spot was used to produce a range of exposures from 152 to 1000 μjoules in the retinas of the Checkered Garter and Great Plains Rat snake. Anesthesia was induced with ketamine and xylazine. In vivo exposure sites measured post exposure showed unique photoreceptor damage characterized by surviving photoreceptors that were highly reflective and saturated, swollen and revealed more complex mode structure than normal photoreceptors when imaged under higher magnification. Evidence of oxidative stress was observed in photoreceptor cells peripheral to the lesion site as a late developing fluorescence (1-2 hour post exposure) following injection of Dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate, a marker of oxidative stress. At the anterior retina, acute exposure produced `sticky' blood cells, identified as leukocytes with Acridine orange. These findings indicate that laser retinal injury in large eyes, such as the human eye may involve pathophysiological cellular dynamics in both posterior and anterior retina and in normal retina adjacent to lesion sites. Photoreceptor movement outside the lesion site may relate to alterations in photoreceptor orientation and the efficiency of the photoreceptors quantal catch.

  10. Loss of Retinoschisin (RS1) Cell Surface Protein in Maturing Mouse Rod Photoreceptors Elevates the Luminance Threshold for Light-Driven Translocation of Transducin But Not Arrestin

    PubMed Central

    Ziccardi, Lucia; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Bush, Ronald A.

    2012-01-01

    Loss of retinoschisin (RS1) in Rs1 knock-out (Rs1–KO) retina produces a post-photoreceptor phenotype similar to X-linked retinoschisis in young males. However, Rs1 is expressed strongly in photoreceptors, and Rs1–KO mice have early reduction in the electroretinogram a-wave. We examined light-activated transducin and arrestin translocation in young Rs1–KO mice as a marker for functional abnormalities in maturing rod photoreceptors. We found a progressive reduction in luminance threshold for transducin translocation in wild-type (WT) retinas between postnatal days P18 and P60. At P21, the threshold in Rs1–KO retinas was 10-fold higher than WT, but it decreased to <2.5-fold higher by P60. Light-activated arrestin translocation and re-translocation of transducin in the dark were not affected. Rs1–KO rod outer segment (ROS) length was significantly shorter than WT at P21 but was comparable with WT at P60. These findings suggested a delay in the structural and functional maturation of Rs1–KO ROS. Consistent with this, transcription factors CRX and NRL, which are fundamental to maturation of rod protein expression, were reduced in ROS of Rs1–KO mice at P21 but not at P60. Expression of transducin was 15–30% lower in P21 Rs1–KO ROS and transducin GTPase hydrolysis was nearly twofold faster, reflecting a 1.7- to 2.5-fold increase in RGS9 (regulator of G-protein signaling) level. Transduction protein expression and activity levels were similar to WT at P60. Transducin translocation threshold elevation indicates photoreceptor functional abnormalities in young Rs1–KO mice. Rapid reduction in threshold coupled with age-related changes in transduction protein levels and transcription factor expression are consistent with delayed maturation of Rs1–KO photoreceptors. PMID:22993419

  11. Algal photoreceptors: in vivo functions and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Kianianmomeni, Arash; Hallmann, Armin

    2014-01-01

    Many algae, particularly microalgae, possess a sophisticated light-sensing system including photoreceptors and light-modulated signaling pathways to sense environmental information and secure the survival in a rapidly changing environment. Over the last couple of years, the multifaceted world of algal photobiology has enriched our understanding of the light absorption mechanisms and in vivo function of photoreceptors. Moreover, specific light-sensitive modules have already paved the way for the development of optogenetic tools to generate light switches for precise and spatial control of signaling pathways in individual cells and even in complex biological systems. PMID:24081482

  12. Rod Photoreceptors Express GPR55 in the Adult Vervet Monkey Retina

    PubMed Central

    Bouskila, Joseph; Javadi, Pasha; Casanova, Christian; Ptito, Maurice; Bouchard, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoids exert their actions mainly through two receptors, the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) and cannabinoid CB2 receptor (CB2R). In recent years, the G-protein coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) was suggested as a cannabinoid receptor based on its activation by anandamide and tetrahydrocannabinol. Yet, its formal classification is still a matter of debate. CB1R and CB2R expression patterns are well described for rodent and monkey retinas. In the monkey retina, CB1R has been localized in its neural (cone photoreceptor, horizontal, bipolar, amacrine and ganglion cells) and CB2R in glial components (Müller cells). The aim of this study was to determine the expression pattern of GPR55 in the monkey retina by using confocal microscopy. Our results show that GPR55 is strictly localized in the photoreceptor layer of the extrafoveal portion of the retina. Co-immunolabeling of GPR55 with rhodopsin, the photosensitive pigment in rods, revealed a clear overlap of expression throughout the rod structure with most prominent staining in the inner segments. Additionally, double-label of GPR55 with calbindin, a specific marker for cone photoreceptors in the primate retina, allowed us to exclude expression of GPR55 in cones. The labeling of GPR55 in rods was further assessed with a 3D visualization in the XZ and YZ planes thus confirming its exclusive expression in rods. These results provide data on the distribution of GPR55 in the monkey retina, different than CB1R and CB2R. The presence of GPR55 in rods suggests a function of this receptor in scotopic vision that needs to be demonstrated. PMID:24244730

  13. Progesterone receptor signalling in retinal photoreceptor neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Alice C Wyse; Roche, Sarah L; Byrne, Ashleigh M; Ruiz-Lopez, Ana M; Cotter, Thomas G

    2016-01-01

    'Norgestrel', a synthetic form of the female hormone progesterone has been identified as potential drug candidate for the treatment of the degenerative eye disease retinitis pigmentosa. However, to date, no work has looked at the compound's specific cellular target. Therefore, this study aimed to identify the receptor target of Norgestrel and begin to examine its potential mechanism of action in the retina. In this work, we identify and characterize the expression of progesterone receptors present in the C57 wild type and rd10 mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa. Classical progesterone receptors A and B (PR A/B), progesterone receptor membrane components 1 and 2 (PGRMC1, PGRMC2) and membrane progesterone receptors α, β and γ were found to be expressed. All receptors excluding PR A/B were also found in the 661W photoreceptor cell line. PGRMC1 is a key regulator of apoptosis and its expression is up-regulated in the degenerating rd10 mouse retina. Activated by Norgestrel through nuclear trafficking, siRNA knock down of PGRMC1 abrogated the protective properties of Norgestrel on damaged photoreceptors. Furthermore, specific inhibition of PGRMC1 by AG205 blocked Norgestrel-induced protection in stressed retinal explants. Therefore, we conclude that PGRMC1 is crucial to the neuroprotective effects of Norgestrel on stressed photoreceptors. The synthetic progestin 'Norgestrel' has been identified as a potential therapeutic for the treatment of Retinitis Pigmentosa, a degenerative eye disease. However, the mechanism behind this neuroprotection is currently unknown. In this work, we identify 'Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1' as the major progesterone receptor eliciting the protective effects of Norgestrel, both in vitro and ex vivo. This furthers our understanding of Norgestrel's molecular mechanism, which we hope will help bring Norgestrel one step closer to the clinic. PMID:26447367

  14. Internal dialysis of Limulus ventral photoreceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Stern, J H; Lisman, J E

    1982-01-01

    The internal dialysis technique has been applied to Limulus ventral photoreceptors. This method potentially allows quantitative control of the concentration of diffusible molecules within living cells. During dialysis, Limulus photoreceptors retained their ability to respond to light. Under conditions of dim illumination, responses were normal for close to an hour. In bright light, abnormalities developed more rapidly. The reversible effects of raising the dialysate Mg2+ concentration and the entrance of rhodamine-labeled albumin into cells shows that the dialysis method is useful for assaying the effects of small or large molecules on visual transduction. This method has been used to examine the effects of nucleotide triphosphates and cyclic nucleotides. The results show that nucleotide triphosphates (5-10 mM) are required to maintain a low rate of spontaneous quantum bumps. The importance of cyclic nucleotides in transduction is less clear; the light response was reduced by either cGMP or cAMP but only at very high concentrations (10 mM). Images PMID:6961434

  15. Transplantation of Photoreceptors Derived From Human Müller Glia Restore Rod Function in the P23H Rat

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Megan F.; Eastlake, Karen; Cottrill, Phillippa B.; Becker, Silke; Wiseman, Joseph; Khaw, Peng T.

    2014-01-01

    Müller glia possess stem cell characteristics that have been recognized to be responsible for the regeneration of injured retina in fish and amphibians. Although these cells are present in the adult human eye, they are not known to regenerate human retina in vivo. Human Müller glia with stem cell characteristics (hMSCs) can acquire phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of rod photoreceptors in vitro, suggesting that they may have potential for use in transplantation strategies to treat human photoreceptor degenerations. Much work has been undertaken in rodents using various sources of allogeneic stem cells to restore photoreceptor function, but the effect of human Müller glia-derived photoreceptors in the restoration of rod photoreceptor function has not been investigated. This study aimed to differentiate hMSCs into photoreceptor cells by stimulation with growth and differentiation factors in vitro to upregulate gene and protein expression of CRX, NR2E3, and rhodopsin and various phototransduction markers associated with rod photoreceptor development and function and to examine the effect of subretinal transplantation of these cells into the P23H rat, a model of primary photoreceptor degeneration. Following transplantation, hMSC-derived photoreceptor cells migrated and integrated into the outer nuclear layer of the degenerated retinas and led to significant improvement in rod photoreceptor function as shown by an increase in a-wave amplitude and slope using scotopic flash electroretinography. These observations suggest that hMSCs can be regarded as a cell source for development of cell-replacement therapies to treat human photoreceptor degenerations and may also offer potential for the development of autologous transplantation. PMID:24477073

  16. Auxiliary pattern for cell-based OPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahng, Andrew B.; Park, Chul-Hong

    2006-10-01

    The runtime of model-based optical proximity correction (OPC) tools has grown unacceptably with each successive technology generation, and has emerged as one of the major bottlenecks for turnaround time (TAT) of IC data preparation and manufacturing. The cell-based OPC approach improves runtime by performing OPC once per cell definition as opposed to once per cell instantiation in the layout. However, cell-based OPC does not comprehend inter-cell optical interactions that affect feature printability in a layout context. In this work, we propose auxiliary pattern-enabled cell-based OPC which can minimize the CD differences between cell-based OPC and model-based OPC. To enable effective insertion of auxiliary pattern (AP) in the design, we also propose a post-placement optimization of a standard cell block with respect to detailed placement. By dynamic programming-based placement perturbation, we achieve 100% AP applicability in designs with placement utilizations of < 70%. In an evaluation with a complete industrial flow, cell-based OPC with AP can match gate edge placement error (EPE) count of model-based OPC within 4%. This is an improvement of 90%, on average, over cell-based OPC without APs. The AP-based OPC approach can reduce OPC runtimes versus model-based OPC by up to 40X in our benchmark designs. We can also achieve reduction of GDSII file size and ORC runtimes due to hierarchy maintenance of cell-based OPC.

  17. Histamine Recycling Is Mediated by CarT, a Carcinine Transporter in Drosophila Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; An, Futing; Borycz, Jolanta A.; Borycz, Janusz; Meinertzhagen, Ian A.; Wang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is an important chemical messenger that regulates multiple physiological processes in both vertebrate and invertebrate animals. Even so, how glial cells and neurons recycle histamine remains to be elucidated. Drosophila photoreceptor neurons use histamine as a neurotransmitter, and the released histamine is recycled through neighboring glia, where it is conjugated to β-alanine to form carcinine. However, how carcinine is then returned to the photoreceptor remains unclear. In an mRNA-seq screen for photoreceptor cell-enriched transporters, we identified CG9317, an SLC22 transporter family protein, and named it CarT (Carcinine Transporter). S2 cells that express CarT are able to take up carcinine in vitro. In the compound eye, CarT is exclusively localized to photoreceptor terminals. Null mutations of cart alter the content of histamine and its metabolites. Moreover, null cart mutants are defective in photoreceptor synaptic transmission and lack phototaxis. These findings reveal that CarT is required for histamine recycling at histaminergic photoreceptors and provide evidence for a CarT-dependent neurotransmitter trafficking pathway between glial cells and photoreceptor terminals. PMID:26713872

  18. Protective function of pyridoxamine on retinal photoreceptor cells via activation of the p‑Erk1/2/Nrf2/Trx/ASK1 signalling pathway in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiang; Sun, Hong; Zhang, Chenghong; Li, Chen; Wang, Jinlei; Shen, Jie; Yu, Dong; Kong, Li

    2016-07-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the mechanisms that mediate the protective effects of pyridoxamine (PM) on light‑damaged retinal photoreceptor cells in diabetic mice. A high‑fat diet and streptozotocin were used to induce a mouse model of type II diabetes. During the experiment, mice were divided the mice into three types of group, as follows: Control groups (negative control and light‑damaged groups); experimental groups (diabetic and diabetic light‑damaged groups); and treatment groups (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg PM‑treated groups). Using hematoxylin‑eosin staining, the number of nuclear layer cells were counted. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were performed to measure the levels of thioredoxin (Trx), phospho‑extracellular signal‑regulated kinase 1/2 (p‑Erk1/2), nuclear factor erythroid 2‑related factor 2 (Nrf2) and apoptosis signal‑regulating kinase 1 (ASK1). The photoreceptor cell count in the outer nuclear layer of the light‑damaged, diabetic control and diabetic light‑damaged groups were significantly reduced compared with the negative control group (P<0.001). The cell counts in the PM‑treated groups were significantly increased compared with the diabetic group (P<0.001). Compared with the negative control group, the light‑damaged, diabetic and diabetic light‑damaged groups exhibited significantly decreased Trx, p‑Erk1/2 and Nrf2 expression levels (P<0.001), and significantly increased ASK1 expression levels (P<0.001). However, in the PM‑treated groups, Trx, p‑Erk1/2 and Nrf2 expression levels were significantly increased (P<0.001), and ASK1 expression was significantly decreased (P<0.001). The results of the present study demonstrate that PM protects retinal photoreceptor cells against light damage in diabetic mice, and that its mechanism may be associated with the upregulation of Trx, p‑Erk1/2 and Nrf2 expression, and the downregulation of ASK1 expression. PMID:27177199

  19. Advances in repairing the degenerate retina by rod photoreceptor transplantation☆

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Rachael A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite very different aetiologies, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and most inherited retinal disorders culminate in the same final common pathway, loss of the light-sensitive photoreceptors. There are few clinical treatments and none can reverse the loss of vision. Photoreceptor replacement by transplantation is proposed as a broad treatment strategy applicable to all degenerations. The past decade has seen a number of landmark achievements in this field, which together provide strong justification for continuing investigation into photoreceptor replacement strategies. These include proof of principle for restoring vision by rod-photoreceptor transplantation in mice with congenital stationary night blindness and advances in stem cell biology, which have led to the generation of complete optic structures in vitro from embryonic stem cells. The latter represents enormous potential for generating suitable and renewable donor cells with which to achieve the former. However, there are still challenges presented by the degenerating recipient retinal environment that must be addressed as we move to translating these technologies towards clinical application. PMID:24412415

  20. Cell patterning by laser-assisted bioprinting.

    PubMed

    Devillard, Raphaël; Pagès, Emeline; Correa, Manuela Medina; Kériquel, Virginie; Rémy, Murielle; Kalisky, Jérôme; Ali, Muhammad; Guillotin, Bertrand; Guillemot, Fabien

    2014-01-01

    The aim of tissue engineering is to produce functional three-dimensional (3D) tissue substitutes. Regarding native organ and tissue complexity, cell density and cell spatial 3D organization, which influence cell behavior and fate, are key parameters in tissue engineering. Laser-Assisted Bioprinting (LAB) allows one to print cells and liquid materials with a cell- or picoliter-level resolution. Thus, LAB seems to be an emerging and promising technology to fabricate tissue-like structures that have the physiological functionality of their native counterparts. This technology has additional advantages such as automation, reproducibility, and high throughput. It makes LAB compatible with the (industrial) fabrication of 3D constructs of physiologically relevant sizes. Here we present exhaustively the numerous steps that allow printing of viable cells with a well-preserved micrometer pattern. To facilitate the understanding of the whole cell patterning experiment using LAB, it is discussed in two parts: (1) preprocessing: laser set-up, bio-ink cartridge and bio-paper preparation, and pattern design; and (2) processing: bio-ink printing on the bio-paper. PMID:24439284

  1. Synthesis of docosahexaenoic acid from eicosapentaenoic acid in retina neurons protects photoreceptors from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Simón, María Victoria; Agnolazza, Daniela L; German, Olga Lorena; Garelli, Andrés; Politi, Luis E; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Anderson, Robert E; Rotstein, Nora P

    2016-03-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in activating photoreceptor death in several retinal degenerations. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the major polyunsaturated fatty acid in the retina, protects cultured retina photoreceptors from apoptosis induced by oxidative stress and promotes photoreceptor differentiation. Here, we investigated whether eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a metabolic precursor to DHA, had similar effects and whether retinal neurons could metabolize EPA to DHA. Adding EPA to rat retina neuronal cultures increased opsin expression and protected photoreceptors from apoptosis induced by the oxidants paraquat and hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ). Palmitic, oleic, and arachidonic acids had no protective effect, showing the specificity for DHA. We found that EPA supplementation significantly increased DHA percentage in retinal neurons, but not EPA percentage. Photoreceptors and glial cells expressed Δ6 desaturase (FADS2), which introduces the last double bond in DHA biosynthetic pathway. Pre-treatment of neuronal cultures with CP-24879 hydrochloride, a Δ5/Δ6 desaturase inhibitor, prevented EPA-induced increase in DHA percentage and completely blocked EPA protection and its effect on photoreceptor differentiation. These results suggest that EPA promoted photoreceptor differentiation and rescued photoreceptors from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis through its elongation and desaturation to DHA. Our data show, for the first time, that isolated retinal neurons can synthesize DHA in culture. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the major polyunsaturated fatty acid in retina photoreceptors, and its precursor, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) have multiple beneficial effects. Here, we show that retina neurons in vitro express the desaturase FADS2 and can synthesize DHA from EPA. Moreover, addition of EPA to these cultures protects photoreceptors from oxidative stress and promotes their differentiation through its metabolization to DHA. PMID:26662863

  2. Silencing of Tuberin Enhances Photoreceptor Survival and Function in a Preclinical Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Stephen H.; Chan, Lawrence; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Wu, Wen-Hsuan; Hsu, Chun-Wei; Yang, Jin; Tosi, Joaquin; Wert, Katherine J.; Davis, Richard J.; Mahajan, Vinit B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the functional consequences of silencing of tuberin, an inhibitor of the mTOR signaling pathway, in a preclinical model of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in order to test the hypothesis that insufficient induction of the protein kinase B (PKB)-regulated tuberin/mTOR self-survival pathway initiates apoptosis. Methods: In an unbiased genome-scale approach, kinase peptide substrate arrays were used to analyze self-survival pathways at the onset of photoreceptor degeneration. The mutant Pde6bH620Q/Pde6bH620Q at P14 and P18 photoreceptor outer segment (OS) lysates were labeled with P-ATP and hybridized to an array of 1,164 different synthetic peptide substrates. At this stage, OS of Pde6bH620Q/Pde6bH620Q rods are morphologically normal. In vitro kinase assays and immunohistochemistry were used to validate phosphorylation. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA) gene silencing was used to validate tuberin’s role in regulating survival. Results: At the onset of degeneration, 162 peptides were differentially phosphorylated. Protein kinases A, G, C (AGC kinases), and B exhibited increased activity in both peptide array and in vitro kinase assays. Immunohistochemical data confirmed altered phosphorylation patterns for phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1), ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6), and tuberin. Tuberin gene silencing rescued photoreceptors from degeneration. Conclusions: Phosphorylation of tuberin and RPS6 is due to the upregulated activity of PKB. PKB/tuberin cell growth/survival signaling is activated before the onset of degeneration. Substrates of the AGC kinases in the PKB/tuberin pathway are phosphorylated to promote cell survival. Knockdown of tuberin, the inhibitor of the mTOR pathway, increased photoreceptor survival and function in a preclinical model of RP. PMID:25646031

  3. The Giant Mottled Eel, Anguilla marmorata, Uses Blue-Shifted Rod Photoreceptors during Upstream Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng-Yu; Fu, Wen-Chun; Wang, I-Li

    2014-01-01

    Catadromous fishes migrate between ocean and freshwater during particular phases of their life cycle. The dramatic environmental changes shape their physiological features, e.g. visual sensitivity, olfactory ability, and salinity tolerance. Anguilla marmorata, a catadromous eel, migrates upstream on dark nights, following the lunar cycle. Such behavior may be correlated with ontogenetic changes in sensory systems. Therefore, this study was designed to identify changes in spectral sensitivity and opsin gene expression of A. marmorata during upstream migration. Microspectrophotometry analysis revealed that the tropical eel possesses a duplex retina with rod and cone photoreceptors. The λmax of rod cells are 493, 489, and 489 nm in glass, yellow, and wild eels, while those of cone cells are 508, and 517 nm in yellow, and wild eels, respectively. Unlike European and American eels, Asian eels exhibited a blue-shifted pattern of rod photoreceptors during upstream migration. Quantitative gene expression analyses of four cloned opsin genes (Rh1f, Rh1d, Rh2, and SWS2) revealed that Rh1f expression is dominant at all three stages, while Rh1d is expressed only in older yellow eel. Furthermore, sequence comparison and protein modeling studies implied that a blue shift in Rh1d opsin may be induced by two known (N83, S292) and four putative (S124, V189, V286, I290) tuning sites adjacent to the retinal binding sites. Finally, expression of blue-shifted Rh1d opsin resulted in a spectral shift in rod photoreceptors. Our observations indicate that the giant mottled eel is color-blind, and its blue-shifted scotopic vision may influence its upstream migration behavior and habitat choice. PMID:25101636

  4. Molecular evolutionary analysis of vertebrate transducins: a role for amino acid variation in photoreceptor deactivation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi G; Weadick, Cameron J; Santini, Francesco; Chang, Belinda S W

    2013-12-01

    Transducin is a heterotrimeric G protein that plays a critical role in phototransduction in the rod and cone photoreceptor cells of the vertebrate retina. Rods, highly sensitive cells that recover from photoactivation slowly, underlie dim-light vision, whereas cones are less sensitive, recover more quickly, and underlie bright-light vision. Transducin deactivation is a critical step in photoreceptor recovery and may underlie the functional distinction between rods and cones. Rods and cones possess distinct transducin α subunits, yet they share a common deactivation mechanism, the GTPase activating protein (GAP) complex. Here, we used codon models to examine patterns of sequence evolution in rod (GNAT1) and cone (GNAT2) α subunits. Our results indicate that purifying selection is the dominant force shaping GNAT1 and GNAT2 evolution, but that GNAT2 has additionally been subject to positive selection operating at multiple phylogenetic scales; phylogeny-wide analysis identified several sites in the GNAT2 helical domain as having substantially elevated dN/dS estimates, and branch-site analysis identified several nearby sites as targets of strong positive selection during early vertebrate history. Examination of aligned GNAT and GAP complex crystal structures revealed steric clashes between several positively selected sites and the deactivating GAP complex. This suggests that GNAT2 sequence variation could play an important role in adaptive evolution of the vertebrate visual system via effects on photoreceptor deactivation kinetics and provides an alternative perspective to previous work that focused instead on the effect of GAP complex concentration. Our findings thus further the understanding of the molecular biology, physiology, and evolution of vertebrate visual systems. PMID:24145862

  5. Light-regulated translocation of signaling proteins in Drosophila photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Frechter, Shahar; Minke, Baruch

    2007-01-01

    Illumination of Drosophila photoreceptor cells induces multi-facet responses, which include generation of the photoreceptor potential, screening pigment migration and translocation of signaling proteins which is the focus of recent extensive research. Translocation of three signaling molecules is covered in this review: (1) Light-dependent translocation of arrestin from the cytosol to the signaling membrane, the rhabdomere, determines the lifetime of activated rhodopsin. Arrestin translocates in PIP3 and NINAC myosin III dependent manner, and specific mutations which disrupt the interaction between arrestin and PIP3 or NINAC also impair the light-dependant translocation of arrestin and the termination of the response to light. (2) Activation of Drosophila visual G protein, DGq, causes a massive and reversible, translocation of the α subunit from the signaling membrane to the cytosol, accompanied by activity-dependent architectural changes. Analysis of the translocation and the recovery kinetics of DGqα in wild-type flies and specific visual mutants indicated that DGqα is necessary but not sufficient for the architectural changes. (3) The TRP-like (TRPL) but not TRP channels translocate in a light-dependent manner between the rhabdomere and the cell body. As a physiological consequence of this light-dependent modulation of the TRP/TRPL ratio, the photoreceptors of dark-adapted flies operate at a wider dynamic range, which allows the photoreceptors enriched with TRPL to function better in darkness and dim background illumination. Altogether, signal-dependent movement of signaling proteins plays a major role in the maintenance and function of photoreceptor cells. PMID:16458490

  6. The bHLH Transcription Factor NeuroD Governs Photoreceptor Genesis and Regeneration Through Delta-Notch Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Scott M.; Alvarez-Delfin, Karen; Saade, Carole J.; Thomas, Jennifer L.; Thummel, Ryan; Fadool, James M.; Hitchcock, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Photoreceptor genesis in the retina requires precise regulation of progenitor cell competence, cell cycle exit, and differentiation, although information around the mechanisms that govern these events currently is lacking. In zebrafish, the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor NeuroD governs photoreceptor genesis, but the signaling pathways through which NeuroD functions are unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify these pathways, and during photoreceptor genesis, Notch signaling was investigated as the putative mediator of NeuroD function. Methods In embryos, genetic mosaic analysis was used to determine if NeuroD functions is cell- or non–cell-autonomous. Morpholino-induced NeuroD knockdown, CRISPR/Cas9 mutation, and pharmacologic and transgenic approaches were used, followed by in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry, and quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), to identify mechanisms through which NeuroD functions. In adults, following photoreceptor ablation and NeuroD knockdown, similar methods as above were used to identify NeuroD function during photoreceptor regeneration. Results In embryos, NeuroD function is non–cell-autonomous, NeuroD knockdown increases Notch pathway gene expression, Notch inhibition rescues the NeuroD knockdown-induced deficiency in cell cycle exit but not photoreceptor maturation, and Notch activation and CRISPR/Cas9 mutation of neurod recapitulate NeuroD knockdown. In adults, NeuroD knockdown prevents cell cycle exit and photoreceptor regeneration and increases Notch pathway gene expression, and Notch inhibition rescues this phenotype. Conclusions These data demonstrate that during embryonic development, NeuroD governs photoreceptor genesis via non–cell-autonomous mechanisms and that, during photoreceptor development and regeneration, Notch signaling is a mechanistic link between NeuroD and cell cycle exit. In contrast, during embryonic development, NeuroD governs photoreceptor maturation via mechanisms

  7. Young Dentate Granule Cells Mediate Pattern Separation whereas Old Granule Cells Contribute to Pattern Completion

    PubMed Central

    Nakashiba, Toshiaki; Cushman, Jesse D.; Pelkey, Kenneth A.; Renaudineau, Sophie; Buhl, Derek L.; McHugh, Thomas J.; Barrera, Vanessa Rodriguez; Chittajallu, Ramesh; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; McBain, Chris J.; Fanselow, Michael S.; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2012-01-01

    Summary Adult-born granule cells (GCs), a minor population of cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, are highly active during the first few weeks following functional integration into the neuronal network (young GCs), distinguishing them from less active older adult-born GCs and the major population of dentate GCs generated developmentally (together, old GCs). We created a transgenic mouse in which output of old GCs was specifically inhibited while leaving a substantial portion of young GCs intact. These mice exhibited enhanced or normal pattern separation between similar contexts that was reduced following removal of young GCs by X-ray irradiation. Furthermore, mutant mice exhibited deficits in rapid pattern completion. Therefore, pattern separation of similar contexts requires adult-born young GCs while old GCs are unnecessary, whereas older GCs contribute to the rapid recall by pattern completion. Our data suggest that as adult-born GCs age, their function switches from pattern separation to rapid pattern completion. PMID:22365813

  8. Influence of blue light on photoreceptors in a live retinal explant system

    PubMed Central

    Roehlecke, Cora; Schumann, Ulrike; Ader, Marius; Knels, Lilla

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The present study was performed to investigate the early effects of blue light irradiation of photoreceptors in retinal explant cultures. Methods Murine retinal explant cultures were irradiated with visible blue light (405 nm) with an output power of 1 mW/cm2. Dihydroethidium was used to determine the production of reactive oxygen species. Morphological alterations of photoreceptor outer segments were determined by live imaging microscopy with mitochondrial dye JC-1. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy were used for ultrastructural evaluations. Cell death in the retina was assessed by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP) nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay method. Results Live retinal explants displayed an increase in reactive oxygen species production, as revealed by fluorescent dihydroethidium products in photoreceptor cells after 30 min of blue light exposure. After 3 h of exposure, blue light caused disorganization of the normally neatly stacked outer segments of living photoreceptors. Ultrastructural analysis revealed breaks in the cell membrane surrounding the outer segments, especially in the middle section. The outer segments appeared tortuous, and the lamellar structures had been disrupted. TUNEL-staining revealed that long-term blue light exposure induced photoreceptor cell death. Conclusions In vitro blue light irradiation of retinal explants is a suitable model system for investigating early ultrastructural changes, as well as damage that leads to cell death in photoreceptor cells. PMID:21527999

  9. Guiding the morphogenesis of dissociated newborn mouse retinal cells and hES cell-derived retinal cells by soft lithography-patterned microchannel PLGA scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    McUsic, Andrew C.; Lamba, Deepak A.; Reh, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived photoreceptors are a promising cell source for enhanced in vitro models of retinal degenerative diseases, but the more differentiated characteristics of retinal cells do not typically develop in dissociated cell cultures. Therefore, we have reconstructed organized retinal tissue by seeding dissociated cells into an array of aligned units that more faithfully mimics the retina. We solvent-processed poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) into a microchannel scaffold format to achieve this geometric constraint. We compared the effect of PLGA concentration on channel morphology and, along with other culture conditions, on the infiltration of dissociated newborn mouse retinal cells into the channels. Culturing scaffolds at the gas-liquid interface with low serum media increased infiltrated rod photoreceptor viability 18-fold over submerged, high serum cultures when evaluated after seven days. Rod photoreceptors and Müller glia aligned processes parallel to the microchannel walls. Otx2+ and Pax6+ subpopulations recapitulated lamination behavior. Further, we constructed scaffold/retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) co-cultures and observed rods extending rhodopsin-positive processes toward RPE cells, mimicking normal rod polarization and morphology. Finally, human embryonic stem cell-derived photoreceptors exhibited infiltration and morphological characteristics similar to mouse retinal cells inside the scaffolds. These findings constitute an important advance in generating tissue-level retinal models from dissociated cells for use as drug screening platforms and in regenerative medicine. PMID:22115999

  10. Carnosic acid slows photoreceptor degeneration in the Pde6brd10 mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kai; Tarchick, Matthew J.; Yu, Xiaoshan; Beight, Craig; Bu, Ping; Yu, Minzhong

    2016-01-01

    The photoreceptor cell death associated with the various genetic forms of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is currently untreatable and leads to partial or complete vision loss. Carnosic acid (CA) upregulates endogenous antioxidant enzymes and has proven neuroprotective in studies of neurodegenerative models affecting the brain. In this study, we examined the potential effect of CA on photoreceptor death in the Pde6brd10 mouse model of RP. Our data shows that CA provided morphological and functional preservation of photoreceptors. CA appears to exert its neuroprotective effects through inhibition of oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress. PMID:26961159

  11. Heteromeric MT1/MT2 Melatonin Receptors Modulate Photoreceptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Kenkichi; Benleulmi-Chaachoua, Abla; Journé, Anne-Sophie; Kamal, Maud; Guillaume, Jean-Luc; Dussaud, Sébastien; Gbahou, Florence; Yettou, Katia; Liu, Cuimei; Contreras-Alcantara, Susana; Jockers, Ralf; Tosini, Gianluca

    2013-01-01

    The formation of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) heteromers elicits signaling diversification and holds great promise for improved drug selectivity. Most studies have been conducted in heterologous expression systems; however, in vivo validation is missing from most cases thus questioning the physiological significance of GPCR heteromerization. Melatonin MT1 and MT2 receptors have been shown to exist as homo- and heteromers in vitro. We show here that the effect of melatonin on rod photoreceptor light sensitivity is mediated by melatonin MT1/MT2 receptor heteromers. This effect involves activation of the heteromer-specific PLC/PKC pathway and is abolished in MT1−/− and MT2−/− mice as well as in mice overexpressing a non-functional MT2 receptor mutant that competes with the formation of functional MT1/MT2 heteromers in photoreceptor cells. This study establishes the essential role of melatonin receptor heteromers in retinal function and supports the physiological importance of GPCR heteromerization. Finally, our work may have important therapeutic implications, as the heteromer complex may provide a unique pharmacological target to improve photoreceptor functioning and to extend the viability of photoreceptors during aging. PMID:24106342

  12. Cubozoan genome illuminates functional diversification of opsins and photoreceptor evolution.

    PubMed

    Liegertová, Michaela; Pergner, Jiří; Kozmiková, Iryna; Fabian, Peter; Pombinho, Antonio R; Strnad, Hynek; Pačes, Jan; Vlček, Čestmír; Bartůněk, Petr; Kozmik, Zbyněk

    2015-01-01

    Animals sense light primarily by an opsin-based photopigment present in a photoreceptor cell. Cnidaria are arguably the most basal phylum containing a well-developed visual system. The evolutionary history of opsins in the animal kingdom has not yet been resolved. Here, we study the evolution of animal opsins by genome-wide analysis of the cubozoan jellyfish Tripedalia cystophora, a cnidarian possessing complex lens-containing eyes and minor photoreceptors. A large number of opsin genes with distinct tissue- and stage-specific expression were identified. Our phylogenetic analysis unequivocally classifies cubozoan opsins as a sister group to c-opsins and documents lineage-specific expansion of the opsin gene repertoire in the cubozoan genome. Functional analyses provided evidence for the use of the Gs-cAMP signaling pathway in a small set of cubozoan opsins, indicating the possibility that the majority of other cubozoan opsins signal via distinct pathways. Additionally, these tests uncovered subtle differences among individual opsins, suggesting possible fine-tuning for specific photoreceptor tasks. Based on phylogenetic, expression and biochemical analysis we propose that rapid lineage- and species-specific duplications of the intron-less opsin genes and their subsequent functional diversification promoted evolution of a large repertoire of both visual and extraocular photoreceptors in cubozoans. PMID:26154478

  13. Optics of cone photoreceptors in the chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Wilby, David; Toomey, Matthew B; Olsson, Peter; Frederiksen, Rikard; Cornwall, M Carter; Oulton, Ruth; Kelber, Almut; Corbo, Joseph C; Roberts, Nicholas W

    2015-10-01

    Vision is the primary sensory modality of birds, and its importance is evident in the sophistication of their visual systems. Coloured oil droplets in the cone photoreceptors represent an adaptation in the avian retina, acting as long-pass colour filters. However, we currently lack understanding of how the optical properties and morphology of component structures (e.g. oil droplet, mitochondrial ellipsoid and outer segment) of the cone photoreceptor influence the transmission of light into the outer segment and the ultimate effect they have on receptor sensitivity. In this study, we use data from microspectrophotometry, digital holographic microscopy and electron microscopy to inform electromagnetic models of avian cone photoreceptors to quantitatively investigate the integrated optical function of the cell. We find that pigmented oil droplets primarily function as spectral filters, not light collection devices, although the mitochondrial ellipsoid improves optical coupling between the inner segment and oil droplet. In contrast, unpigmented droplets found in violet-sensitive cones double sensitivity at its peak relative to other cone types. Oil droplets and ellipsoids both narrow the angular sensitivity of single cone photoreceptors, but not as strongly as those in human cones. PMID:26423439

  14. Optics of cone photoreceptors in the chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus)

    PubMed Central

    Wilby, David; Toomey, Matthew B.; Olsson, Peter; Frederiksen, Rikard; Cornwall, M. Carter; Oulton, Ruth; Kelber, Almut; Corbo, Joseph C.; Roberts, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    Vision is the primary sensory modality of birds, and its importance is evident in the sophistication of their visual systems. Coloured oil droplets in the cone photoreceptors represent an adaptation in the avian retina, acting as long-pass colour filters. However, we currently lack understanding of how the optical properties and morphology of component structures (e.g. oil droplet, mitochondrial ellipsoid and outer segment) of the cone photoreceptor influence the transmission of light into the outer segment and the ultimate effect they have on receptor sensitivity. In this study, we use data from microspectrophotometry, digital holographic microscopy and electron microscopy to inform electromagnetic models of avian cone photoreceptors to quantitatively investigate the integrated optical function of the cell. We find that pigmented oil droplets primarily function as spectral filters, not light collection devices, although the mitochondrial ellipsoid improves optical coupling between the inner segment and oil droplet. In contrast, unpigmented droplets found in violet-sensitive cones double sensitivity at its peak relative to other cone types. Oil droplets and ellipsoids both narrow the angular sensitivity of single cone photoreceptors, but not as strongly as those in human cones. PMID:26423439

  15. Light Adaptation in Pecten Hyperpolarizing Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Maria del Pilar; Nasi, Enrico

    1997-01-01

    The ability of scallop hyperpolarizing photoreceptors to respond without attenuation to repetitive flashes, together with their low light sensitivity, lack of resolvable quantum bumps and fast photoresponse kinetics, had prompted the suggestion that these cells may be constitutively in a state akin to light adaptation. We here demonstrate that their photocurrent displays all manifestations of sensory adaptation: (a) The response amplitude to a test flash is decreased in a graded way by background or conditioning lights. This attenuation of the response develops with a time constant of 200–800 ms, inversely related to background intensity. (b) Adapting stimuli shift the stimulus-response curve and reduce the size of the saturating photocurrent. (c) The fall kinetics of the photoresponse are accelerated by light adaptation, and the roll-off of the modulation transfer function is displaced to higher frequencies. This light-induced desensitization exhibits a rapid recovery, on the order of a few seconds. Based on the notion that Ca mediates light adaptation in other cells, we examined the consequences of manipulating this ion. Removal of external Ca reversibly increased the photocurrent amplitude, without affecting light sensitivity, photoresponse kinetics, or susceptibility to background adaptation; the effect, therefore, concerns ion permeation, rather than the regulation of the visual response. Intracellular dialysis with 10 mM BAPTA did not reduce the peak-to-plateau decay of the photocurrent elicited by prolonged light steps, not the background-induced compression of the response amplitude range and the acceleration of its kinetics. Conversely, high levels of buffered free [Ca]i (10 μM) only marginally shifted the sensitivity curve (Δσ = 0.3 log) and spared all manifestations of light adaptation. These results indicate that hyperpolarizing invertebrate photoreceptors adapt to light, but the underlying mechanisms must utilize pathways that are largely

  16. Classical Photoreceptors Are Primarily Responsible for the Pupillary Light Reflex in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Varsha; Srivastava, Ipsit; Palchaudhuri, Shriya; Goel, Manvi; Sinha-Mahapatra, Sumit K.; Dhingra, Narender K.

    2016-01-01

    Pupillary light reflex (PLR) is an important clinical tool to assess the integrity of visual pathways. The available evidence suggests that melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells (mRGCs) mediate PLR—driven by the classical photoreceptors (rods and cones) at low irradiances and by melanopsin activation at high irradiances. However, genetic or pharmacological elimination of melanopsin does not completely abolish PLR at high irradiances, raising the possibility that classical photoreceptors may have a role even at high irradiances. Using an inducible mouse model of photoreceptor degeneration, we asked whether classical photoreceptors are responsible for PLR at all irradiances, and found that the PLR was severely attenuated at all irradiances. Using multiple approaches, we show that the residual PLR at high irradiances in this mouse was primarily from the remnant rods and cones, with a minor contribution from melanopsin activation. In contrast, in rd1 mouse where classical photoreceptor degeneration occurs during development, the PLR was absent at low irradiances but intact at high irradiances, as reported previously. Since mRGCs receive inputs from classical photoreceptors, we also asked whether developmental loss of classical photoreceptors as in rd1 mouse leads to compensatory takeover of the high-irradiance PLR by mRGCs. Specifically, we looked at a distinct subpopulation of mRGCs that express Brn3b transcription factor, which has been shown to mediate PLR. We found that rd1 mouse had a significantly higher proportion of Brn3b-expressing M1 type of mRGCs than in the inducible model. Interestingly, inducing classical photoreceptor degeneration during development also resulted in a higher proportion of Brn3b-expressing M1 cells and partially rescued PLR at high irradiances. These results suggest that classical photoreceptors are primarily responsible for PLR at all irradiances, while melanopsin activation makes a minor contribution at very high irradiances

  17. Photothermal nanoblade for patterned cell membrane cutting.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ting-Hsiang; Teslaa, Tara; Teitell, Michael A; Chiou, Pei-Yu

    2010-10-25

    We report a photothermal nanoblade that utilizes a metallic nanostructure to harvest short laser pulse energy and convert it into a highly localized and specifically shaped explosive vapor bubble. Rapid bubble expansion and collapse punctures a lightly-contacting cell membrane via high-speed fluidic flows and induced transient shear stress. The membrane cutting pattern is controlled by the metallic nanostructure configuration, laser pulse polarization, and energy. Highly controllable, sub-micron sized circular hole pairs to half moon-like, or cat-door shaped, membrane cuts were realized in glutaraldehyde treated HeLa cells. PMID:21164656

  18. Reprogramming of adult rod photoreceptors prevents retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Montana, Cynthia L.; Kolesnikov, Alexander V.; Shen, Susan Q.; Myers, Connie A.; Kefalov, Vladimir J.; Corbo, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    A prime goal of regenerative medicine is to direct cell fates in a therapeutically useful manner. Retinitis pigmentosa is one of the most common degenerative diseases of the eye and is associated with early rod photoreceptor death followed by secondary cone degeneration. We hypothesized that converting adult rods into cones, via knockdown of the rod photoreceptor determinant Nrl, could make the cells resistant to the effects of mutations in rod-specific genes, thereby preventing secondary cone loss. To test this idea, we engineered a tamoxifen-inducible allele of Nrl to acutely inactivate the gene in adult rods. This manipulation resulted in reprogramming of rods into cells with a variety of cone-like molecular, histologic, and functional properties. Moreover, reprogramming of adult rods achieved cellular and functional rescue of retinal degeneration in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa. These findings suggest that elimination of Nrl in adult rods may represent a unique therapy for retinal degeneration. PMID:23319618

  19. Identifying Functional Connections of the Inner Photoreceptors in Drosophila using Tango-Trace

    PubMed Central

    Jagadish, Smitha; Barnea, Gilad; Clandinin, Thomas R.; Axel, Richard

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In Drosophila, the four inner photoreceptor neurons exhibit overlapping but distinct spectral sensitivities and mediate behaviors that reflect spectral preference. We have developed a genetic strategy, Tango-Trace, that has permitted the identification of the connections of the four chromatic photoreceptors. Each of the four stochastically distributed chromatic photoreceptor subtypes make distinct connections in the medulla with four different TmY cells. Moreover, each class of TmY cells forms a retinotopic map in both the medulla and the lobula complex, generating four overlapping topographic maps that could carry different color information. Thus, the four inner photoreceptors transmit spectral information through distinct channels that may converge in both the medulla and lobula complex. These projections could provide an anatomic basis for color vision and may relay information about color to motion sensitive areas. Moreover, the Tango-Trace strategy we have employed may be applied more generally to identify neural circuits in the fly brain. PMID:25043419

  20. Identifying functional connections of the inner photoreceptors in Drosophila using Tango-Trace.

    PubMed

    Jagadish, Smitha; Barnea, Gilad; Clandinin, Thomas R; Axel, Richard

    2014-08-01

    In Drosophila, the four inner photoreceptor neurons exhibit overlapping but distinct spectral sensitivities and mediate behaviors that reflect spectral preference. We developed a genetic strategy, Tango-Trace, that has permitted the identification of the connections of the four chromatic photoreceptors. Each of the four stochastically distributed chromatic photoreceptor subtypes make distinct connections in the medulla with four different TmY cells. Moreover, each class of TmY cells forms a retinotopic map in both the medulla and the lobula complex, generating four overlapping topographic maps that could carry different color information. Thus, the four inner photoreceptors transmit spectral information through distinct channels that may converge in both the medulla and lobula complex. These projections could provide an anatomic basis for color vision and may relay information about color to motion sensitive areas. Moreover, the Tango-Trace strategy we used may be applied more generally to identify neural circuits in the fly brain. PMID:25043419

  1. Histochemical study of retinal photoreceptors development during pre- and postnatal period and their association with retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Vahid; Vojoudi, Elham; Fazel, Alireza; Ebrahimzadeh-bideskan, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this study was to evaluate distribution and changes of glycoconjugates of retinal photoreceptors during both pre- and postnatal development. Materials and Methods: Tissue sections from days 15 to 20 of Wistar rat embryos and 1 to 12 postnatal days of rat newborns including developing eye were prepared for lectinhistochemistry technique. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled lectins including Vicia villosa (VVA), peanut agglutinin (PNA), Maclura pomifera (MPA) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA-ІІ) were used. Alcian blue (pH 2.5) was used for counterstaining. Results: Interphotoreceptor matrix (IPM) plays a crucial role in photoreceptors differentiation and acts as a mediator in interactions between photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Specific cell surface glycoconjugates secreted from cone cells could help us to distinguish these cells from rod photoreceptors. Our results for the first time revealed the strong reaction of cone photoreceptors with the cone-specific lectin (PNA) at postnatal day 12 (P12). Postnatal day 12 can be determined as the final differentiation of cone photoreceptors. Conclusion: According to our findings, we suggest that the generation of the eye photoreceptors begins from pre- natal period and their final differentiations will continue to postnatal period. Glycoconjugates including (β-D-Gal [1-3]-D-GalNac) and (β-D-Gal) terminal sugars play a critical role in the pre- and postnatal development and differentiation of retinal photoreceptors. PMID:25429338

  2. Spatial Distribution of Intraflagellar Transport Proteins in Vertebrate Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Luby-Phelps, Katharine; Fogerty, Joseph; Baker, Sheila A.; Pazour, Gregory J.; Besharse, Joseph C.

    2008-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) of a ∼17S particle containing at least 16 distinct polypeptides is required for the assembly and maintenance of cilia and flagella. Although both genetic and biochemical evidence suggest a role for IFT in vertebrate photoreceptors, the spatial distribution of IFT proteins within photoreceptors remains poorly defined. We have evaluated the distribution of 4 IFT proteins using a combination of immunocytochemistry and rod-specific over-expression of GFP tagged IFT proteins. Endogenous IFT proteins are most highly concentrated within the inner segment, around the basal body, and within the outer segment IFT proteins are localized in discrete particles along the entire length of the axoneme. IFT52-GFP and IFT57-GFP mimicked this pattern in transgenic Xenopus. PMID:17931679

  3. Opsins in Limulus eyes: characterization of three visible light-sensitive opsins unique to and co-expressed in median eye photoreceptors and a peropsin/RGR that is expressed in all eyes.

    PubMed

    Battelle, Barbara-Anne; Kempler, Karen E; Saraf, Spencer R; Marten, Catherine E; Dugger, Donald R; Speiser, Daniel I; Oakley, Todd H

    2015-02-01

    The eyes of the horseshoe crab Limulus polyphemus have long been used for studies of basic mechanisms of vision, and the structure and physiology of Limulus photoreceptors have been examined in detail. Less is known about the opsins Limulus photoreceptors express. We previously characterized a UV opsin (LpUVOps1) that is expressed in all three types of Limulus eyes (lateral compound eyes, median ocelli and larval eyes) and three visible light-sensitive rhabdomeric opsins (LpOps1, -2 and -5) that are expressed in Limulus lateral compound and larval eyes. Physiological studies showed that visible light-sensitive photoreceptors are also present in median ocelli, but the visible light-sensitive opsins they express were unknown. In the current study we characterize three newly identified, visible light-sensitive rhabdomeric opsins (LpOps6, -7 and -8) that are expressed in median ocelli. We show that they are ocellar specific and that all three are co-expressed in photoreceptors distinct from those expressing LpUVOps1. Our current findings show that the pattern of opsin expression in Limulus eyes is much more complex than previously thought and extend our previous observations of opsin co-expression in visible light-sensitive Limulus photoreceptors. We also characterize a Limulus peropsin/RGR (LpPerOps1). We examine the phylogenetic relationship of LpPerOps1 with other peropsins and RGRs, demonstrate that LpPerOps1 transcripts are expressed in each of the three types of Limulus eyes and show that the encoded protein is expressed in membranes of cells closely associated with photoreceptors in each eye type. These finding suggest that peropsin was in the opsin repertoire of euchelicerates. PMID:25524988

  4. Opsins in Limulus eyes: characterization of three visible light-sensitive opsins unique to and co-expressed in median eye photoreceptors and a peropsin/RGR that is expressed in all eyes

    PubMed Central

    Battelle, Barbara-Anne; Kempler, Karen E.; Saraf, Spencer R.; Marten, Catherine E.; Dugger, Donald R.; Speiser, Daniel I.; Oakley, Todd H.

    2015-01-01

    The eyes of the horseshoe crab Limulus polyphemus have long been used for studies of basic mechanisms of vision, and the structure and physiology of Limulus photoreceptors have been examined in detail. Less is known about the opsins Limulus photoreceptors express. We previously characterized a UV opsin (LpUVOps1) that is expressed in all three types of Limulus eyes (lateral compound eyes, median ocelli and larval eyes) and three visible light-sensitive rhabdomeric opsins (LpOps1, -2 and -5) that are expressed in Limulus lateral compound and larval eyes. Physiological studies showed that visible light-sensitive photoreceptors are also present in median ocelli, but the visible light-sensitive opsins they express were unknown. In the current study we characterize three newly identified, visible light-sensitive rhabdomeric opsins (LpOps6, -7 and -8) that are expressed in median ocelli. We show that they are ocellar specific and that all three are co-expressed in photoreceptors distinct from those expressing LpUVOps1. Our current findings show that the pattern of opsin expression in Limulus eyes is much more complex than previously thought and extend our previous observations of opsin co-expression in visible light-sensitive Limulus photoreceptors. We also characterize a Limulus peropsin/RGR (LpPerOps1). We examine the phylogenetic relationship of LpPerOps1 with other peropsins and RGRs, demonstrate that LpPerOps1 transcripts are expressed in each of the three types of Limulus eyes and show that the encoded protein is expressed in membranes of cells closely associated with photoreceptors in each eye type. These finding suggest that peropsin was in the opsin repertoire of euchelicerates. PMID:25524988

  5. Calcium Stores in Vertebrate Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Križaj, David

    2012-01-01

    This review lays out the emerging evidence for the fundamental role of Ca2+ stores and store-operated channels in the Ca2+ homeostasis of rods and cones. Calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is a major contributor to steady-state and light-evoked photoreceptor Ca2+ homeostasis in the darkness whereas store-operated Ca2+ channels play a more significant role under sustained illumination conditions. The homeostatic response includes dynamic interactions between the plasma membrane, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), mitochondria and/or outer segment disk organelles which dynamically sequester, accumulate and release Ca2+. Coordinated activation of SERCA transporters, ryanodine receptors (RyR), inositol triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and TRPC channels amplifies cytosolic voltage-operated signals but also provides a memory trace of previous exposures to light. Store-operated channels, activated by the STIM1 sensor, prevent pathological decrease in [Ca2+]i mediated by excessive activation of PMCA transporters in saturating light. CICR and SOCE may also modulate the transmission of afferent and efferent signals in the outer retina. Thus, Ca2+ stores provide additional complexity, adaptability, tuneability and speed to photoreceptor signaling. PMID:22453974

  6. Distinct Contributions of Rod, Cone, and Melanopsin Photoreceptors to Encoding Irradiance

    PubMed Central

    Lall, Gurprit S.; Revell, Victoria L.; Momiji, Hiroshi; Al Enezi, Jazi; Altimus, Cara M.; Güler, Ali D.; Aguilar, Carlos; Cameron, Morven A.; Allender, Susan; Hankins, Mark W.; Lucas, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Photoreceptive, melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells (mRGCs) encode ambient light (irradiance) for the circadian clock, the pupillomotor system, and other influential behavioral/physiological responses. mRGCs are activated both by their intrinsic phototransduction cascade and by the rods and cones. However, the individual contribution of each photoreceptor class to irradiance responses remains unclear. We address this deficit using mice expressing human red cone opsin, in which rod-, cone-, and melanopsin-dependent responses can be identified by their distinct spectral sensitivity. Our data reveal an unexpectedly important role for rods. These photoreceptors define circadian responses at very dim “scotopic” light levels but also at irradiances at which pattern vision relies heavily on cones. By contrast, cone input to irradiance responses dissipates following light adaptation to the extent that these receptors make a very limited contribution to circadian and pupillary light responses under these conditions. Our data provide new insight into retinal circuitry upstream of mRGCs and optimal stimuli for eliciting irradiance responses. PMID:20471354

  7. The dynamic architecture of photoreceptor ribbon synapses: Cytoskeletal, extracellular matrix, and intramembrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    MERCER, AARON J.; THORESON, WALLACE B.

    2012-01-01

    Rod and cone photoreceptors possess ribbon synapses that assist in the transmission of graded light responses to second-order bipolar and horizontal cells of the vertebrate retina. Proper functioning of the synapse requires the juxtaposition of presynaptic release sites immediately adjacent to postsynaptic receptors. In this review, we focus on the synaptic, cytoskeletal, and extracellular matrix proteins that help to organize photoreceptor ribbon synapses in the outer plexiform layer. We examine the proteins that foster the clustering of release proteins, calcium channels, and synaptic vesicles in the presynaptic terminals of photoreceptors adjacent to their postsynaptic contacts. Although many proteins interact with one another in the presynaptic terminal and synaptic cleft, these protein–protein interactions do not create a static and immutable structure. Instead, photoreceptor ribbon synapses are remarkably dynamic, exhibiting structural changes on both rapid and slow time scales. PMID:22192503

  8. Photobiomodulation reduces photoreceptor death and regulates cytoprotection in early states of P23H retinal dystrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Diana K.; Gopalakrishnan, Sandeep; Schmitt, Heather; Abroe, Betsy; Stoehr, Michele; Dubis, Adam; Carroll, Joseph; Stone, Jonathan; Valter, Krisztina; Eells, Janis

    2013-03-01

    Irradiation by light in the far-red to near-infrared (NIR) region of the spectrum (photobiomodulation, PBM) has been demonstrated to attenuate the severity of neurodegenerative disease in experimental and clinical studies. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that 670 nm PBM would protect against the loss of retinal function and improve photoreceptor survival in a rodent model of retinitis pigmentosa, the P23H transgenic rat. P23H rat pups were treated once per day with a 670 nm LED array (180 sec treatments at 50 mW/cm2; fluence 9 joules/cm2) (Quantum Devices Inc., Barneveld WI) from postnatal day (p) 16-20 or from p10-20. Sham-treated rats were restrained, but not exposed to NIR light. The status of the retina was determined at p22 by assessment of mitochondrial function, oxidative stress and cell death. In a second series of studies, retinal status was assessed at p30 by measuring photoreceptor function by ERG and retinal morphology by Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT). 670 nm PBM increased retinal mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase activity and upregulated the retina's production of the key mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme, MnSOD. PBM also attenuated photoreceptor cell loss and improved photoreceptor function. PBM protects photoreceptors in the developing P23H retina, by augmenting mitochondrial function and stimulating antioxidant protective pathways. Photobiomodulation may have therapeutic potential, where mitochondrial damage is a step in the death of photoreceptors.

  9. Progress Toward Effective Treatments for Human Photoreceptor Degenerations

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Edwin M.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in several dozen genes have been shown to cause inherited photoreceptor degeneration in humans and it is likely that mutations in several dozen more will eventually be identified. Careful study of these genes has provided insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of human photoreceptor disease and has accelerated the development of a number of different classes of therapy including: nutritional supplementation, toxin avoidance, small- and large-molecule drugs, gene replacement, cell replacement, and even retinal prostheses. The retina is a very favorable system for the development of novel treatments for neurodegenerative disease because of its optical and physical accessibility as well as its highly ordered structure. With several forms of treatment for inherited retinal disease in or near clinical trial, one of the greatest remaining challenges is to educate clinicians in the appropriate use of genetic testing for identifying the individuals who will be most likely to benefit from each specific modality. PMID:19414246

  10. The locations of mitochondria in mammalian photoreceptors: relation to retinal vasculature.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jonathan; van Driel, Diana; Valter, Krisztina; Rees, Sandra; Provis, Jan

    2008-01-16

    Adult mammalian photoreceptors are elongated cells, and their mitochondria are sequestered to the ends of the cell, to the inner segments and (in some species) to axon terminals in the outer plexiform layer (OPL). We hypothesised that mitochondria migrate to these locations towards sources of oxygen, from the choroid and (in some species) from the deep capillaries of the retinal circulation. Six mammalian species were surveyed, using electron and light microscopy, including immunohistochemistry for the mitochondrial enzyme cytochrome oxidase (CO). In all 6 species, mitochondria were absent from photoreceptor somas and were numerous in inner segments. Mitochondria were prominent in axon terminals in 3 species (mouse, rat, human) with a retinal circulation and were absent from those terminals in 3 species (wallaby, rat, guinea pig) with avascular retinas. Further, in a human developmental series, it was evident that mitochondria migrate within rods and cones, towards and eventually past the outer limiting membrane (OLM), into the inner segment. In Müller and RPE cells also, mitochondria concentrated at the external surface of the cells. Neurones located in the inner layers of avascular retinas have mitochondria, but their expression of CO is low. Mitochondrial locations in photoreceptors, Müller and RPE cells are economically explained as the result of migration within the cell towards sources of oxygen. In photoreceptors, this migration results in a separation of mitochondria from the nuclear genome; this separation may be a factor in the vulnerability of photoreceptors to mutations, toxins and environmental stresses, which other retinal neurones survive. PMID:18048005

  11. Donepezil delays photoreceptor apoptosis induced by N-methyl-N-nitrosourea in mice

    PubMed Central

    WU, LONGYAN; XU, MAN; LIU, SHENGTAO; CHEN, GUO; ZHANG, FENGJUN; ZHAO, YAO; YI, JINGLIN

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited retinal degeneration diseases characterized by photoreceptor cell death that causes visual disturbances and eventual blindness. Intraperitoneal injection of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) causes photoreceptor loss, and is used to create an animal model for investigating the mechanisms that cause retinal degeneration diseases. Donepezil is an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor that has a protective effect on retinal ganglion cells in vitro and in vivo, and it is understood that donepezil increases the expression of a heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), which serves to protect neurons. Hsp70 functions as a chaperone molecule that protects cells from protein aggregation and assists in the refolding of denatured proteins. In the present study, the effects of donepezil on photoreceptor survival in mice was investigated. It was observed that donepezil upregulates the expression of Hsp70, to increase resistance to MNU-induced photoreceptor cell apoptosis by using its anti-apoptotic properties. In addition, the present study observed that Hsp70 promotes photoreceptor cell survival by upregulating the expression levels of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2). In conclusion, the results of the present study indicate that donepezil has the potential to be used as a treatment for retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:27284332

  12. Decreased Proteasomal Activity Causes Photoreceptor Degeneration in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Ryo; Noda, Kousuke; Tomaru, Utano; Kamoshita, Mamoru; Ozawa, Yoko; Notomi, Shoji; Hisatomi, Toshio; Noda, Mika; Kanda, Atsuhiro; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Kasahara, Masanori; Ishida, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To study the retinal degeneration caused by decreased proteasomal activity in β5t transgenic (β5t-Tg) mice, an animal model of senescence acceleration. Methods. β5t-Tg mice and age-matched littermate control (WT) mice were used. Proteasomal activities and protein level of poly-ubiquitinated protein in retinal extracts were quantified. Fundus images of β5t-Tg mice were taken and their features were assessed. For histologic evaluation, the thicknesses of inner nuclear layer (INL), outer nuclear layer (ONL), and photoreceptor outer segment (OS) were measured. For functional analysis, ERG was recorded under scotopic and photopic illumination conditions. Immunofluorescence (IF) staining and TUNEL were performed to investigate the mechanism of photoreceptor degeneration. Results. Chymotrypsin-like activity was partially suppressed in retinal tissues of β5t-Tg mice. Retinal degenerative changes with arterial attenuation were present in β5t-Tg, but not in WT mice. Inner nuclear layer thickness showed no significant change between β5t-Tg and WT mice at 1, 3, 6, and 9 months of age. By contrast, thicknesses of ONL and OS in β5t-Tg mice were significantly decreased at 3, 6, and 9 months compared with those in WT mice. Electroretinograms showed decrease of scotopic a-wave amplitude in β5t-Tg mice. The number of TUNEL-positive cells in ONL were significantly increased in β5t-Tg mice and colocalized with apoptosis-inducing factor, but not with cleaved caspase-3 and -9, indicating that the photoreceptor cell death was induced via a caspase-independent pathway. Conclusions. The current data showed that impaired proteasomal function causes photoreceptor degeneration. PMID:24994871

  13. Localization of the photocurrent of Limulus ventral photoreceptors using a vibrating probe.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, R; Fein, A

    1986-01-01

    We have used a vibrating probe to determine the profile of electrical current density around ventral photoreceptors of the horseshoe crab following flashes of light that uniformly illuminated the entire surface of the photoreceptor's cell body. The vibrating probe signal indicated that the density of inward current was greatest at the distal region of the cell, the region that is expected to contain the light-sensitive rhabdom. The density of inward current typically declined at the midpoint of the cell body and then reversed to an outward current flow in the proximal region of the cell body, close to the axon. The profile of local sensitivity of the photoreceptor to light closely matched the profile of inward current density, suggesting that the light-activated conductance is localized to the light-sensitive region of the cell. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:3730503

  14. Imaging Ca2+ dynamics in cone photoreceptor axon terminals of the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Manoj; Schubert, Timm; Baden, Tom; Wissinger, Bernd; Euler, Thomas; Paquet-Durand, Francois

    2015-01-01

    Retinal cone photoreceptors (cones) serve daylight vision and are the basis of color discrimination. They are subject to degeneration, often leading to blindness in many retinal diseases. Calcium (Ca(2+)), a key second messenger in photoreceptor signaling and metabolism, has been proposed to be indirectly linked with photoreceptor degeneration in various animal models. Systematically studying these aspects of cone physiology and pathophysiology has been hampered by the difficulties of electrically recording from these small cells, in particular in the mouse where the retina is dominated by rod photoreceptors. To circumvent this issue, we established a two-photon Ca(2+) imaging protocol using a transgenic mouse line that expresses the genetically encoded Ca(2+) biosensor TN-XL exclusively in cones and can be crossbred with mouse models for photoreceptor degeneration. The protocol described here involves preparing vertical sections ("slices") of retinas from mice and optical imaging of light stimulus-evoked changes in cone Ca(2+) level. The protocol also allows "in-slice measurement" of absolute Ca(2+) concentrations; as the recordings can be followed by calibration. This protocol enables studies into functional cone properties and is expected to contribute to the understanding of cone Ca(2+) signaling as well as the potential involvement of Ca(2+) in photoreceptor death and retinal degeneration. PMID:25993489

  15. Kinesin family 17 (osmotic avoidance abnormal-3) is dispensable for photoreceptor morphology and function.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Tam, Beatrice M; Ying, Guoxing; Wu, Sen; Hauswirth, William W; Frederick, Jeanne M; Moritz, Orson L; Baehr, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, homodimeric [kinesin family (KIF) 17, osmotic avoidance abnormal-3 (OSM-3)] and heterotrimeric (KIF3) kinesin-2 motors are required to establish sensory cilia by intraflagellar transport (IFT) where KIF3 and KIF17 cooperate to build the axoneme core and KIF17 builds the distal segments. However, the function of KIF17 in vertebrates is unresolved. We expressed full-length and motorless KIF17 constructs in mouse rod photoreceptors using adeno-associated virus in Xenopus laevis rod photoreceptors using a transgene and in ciliated IMCD3 cells. We found that tagged KIF17 localized along the rod outer segment axoneme when expressed in mouse and X. laevis photoreceptors, whereas KIF3A was restricted to the proximal axoneme. Motorless KIF3A and KIF17 mutants caused photoreceptor degeneration, likely through dominant negative effects on IFT. KIF17 mutant lacking the motor domain translocated to nuclei after exposure of a C-terminal nuclear localization signal. Germ-line deletion of Kif17 in mouse did not affect photoreceptor function. A rod-specific Kif3/Kif17 double knockout mouse demonstrated that KIF17 and KIF3 do not act synergistically and did not prevent rhodopsin trafficking to rod outer segments. In summary, the nematode model of KIF3/KIF17 cooperation apparently does not apply to mouse photoreceptors in which the photosensory cilium is built exclusively by KIF3. PMID:26229057

  16. Imaging Ca2+ Dynamics in Cone Photoreceptor Axon Terminals of the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Manoj; Schubert, Timm; Baden, Tom; Wissinger, Bernd; Euler, Thomas; Paquet-Durand, Francois

    2015-01-01

    Retinal cone photoreceptors (cones) serve daylight vision and are the basis of color discrimination. They are subject to degeneration, often leading to blindness in many retinal diseases. Calcium (Ca2+), a key second messenger in photoreceptor signaling and metabolism, has been proposed to be indirectly linked with photoreceptor degeneration in various animal models. Systematically studying these aspects of cone physiology and pathophysiology has been hampered by the difficulties of electrically recording from these small cells, in particular in the mouse where the retina is dominated by rod photoreceptors. To circumvent this issue, we established a two-photon Ca2+ imaging protocol using a transgenic mouse line that expresses the genetically encoded Ca2+ biosensor TN-XL exclusively in cones and can be crossbred with mouse models for photoreceptor degeneration. The protocol described here involves preparing vertical sections (“slices”) of retinas from mice and optical imaging of light stimulus-evoked changes in cone Ca2+ level. The protocol also allows “in-slice measurement” of absolute Ca2+ concentrations; as the recordings can be followed by calibration. This protocol enables studies into functional cone properties and is expected to contribute to the understanding of cone Ca2+ signaling as well as the potential involvement of Ca2+ in photoreceptor death and retinal degeneration. PMID:25993489

  17. Long-Term Survival of Photoreceptors Transplanted into the Adult Murine Neural Retina Requires Immune Modulation

    PubMed Central

    West, Emma L.; Pearson, Rachael A.; Barker, Susie E.; Luhmann, Ulrich F. O.; Maclaren, Robert E.; Barber, Amanda C.; Duran, Yanai; Smith, Alexander J.; Sowden, Jane C.; Ali, Robin R.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell therapy presents an opportunity to replace photoreceptors that are lost as a result of inherited and age-related degenerative disease. We have previously shown that murine postmitotic rod photoreceptor precursor cells, identified by expression of the rod-specific transcription factor Nrl, are able to migrate into and integrate within the adult murine neural retina. However, their long-term survival has yet to be determined. Here, we found that integrated Nrl.gfp+ve photoreceptors were present up to 12 months post-transplantation, albeit in significantly reduced numbers. Surviving cells had rod-like morphology, including inner/outer segments and spherule synapses. In a minority of eyes, we observed an early, marked reduction in integrated photoreceptors within 1 month post-transplantation, which correlated with increased numbers of amoeboid macrophages, indicating acute loss of transplanted cells due to an inflammatory response. In the majority of transplants, similar numbers of integrated cells were observed between 1 and 2 months post-transplantation. By 4 months, however, we observed a significant decrease in integrated cell survival. Macrophages and T cells were present around the transplantation site, indicating a chronic immune response. Immune suppression of recipients significantly increased transplanted photoreceptor survival, indicating that the loss observed in unsuppressed recipients resulted from T cell-mediated host immune responses. Thus, if immune responses are modulated, correctly integrated transplanted photoreceptors can survive for extended periods of time in hosts with partially mismatched H-2 haplotypes. These findings suggest that autologous donor cells are optimal for therapeutic approaches to repair the neural retina, though with immune suppression nonautologous donors may be effective. PMID:20857496

  18. Flash photolysis of caged compounds in Limulus ventral photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Rapid concentration jumps of Ins(1,4,5)P3 or ATP were made inside Limulus ventral photoreceptors by flash photolysis of the parent caged compounds. In intact ventral photoreceptors, the photolysis flash evokes a maximum amplitude light-activated current; therefore, a procedure was developed for uncoupling phototransduction by blocking two of the initial reactions in the cascade, rhodopsin excitation and G protein activation. Rhodopsin was inactivated by exposure to hydroxylamine and bright light. This procedure abolished the early receptor potential and reduced the quantum efficiency by 325 +/- 90- fold (mean +/- SD). G protein activation was blocked by injection of guanosine-5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP beta S). GDP beta S injection reduced the quantum efficiency by 1,881 +/- 1,153-fold (mean +/- SD). Together hydroxylamine exposure and GDP beta S injection reduced the quantum efficiency by 870,000 +/- 650,000-fold (mean +/- SD). After the combined treatment, photoreceptors produced quantum bumps to light that was approximately 10(6) times brighter than the intensity that produced quantum bumps before treatment. Experiments were performed with caged compounds injected into photoreceptors in which phototransduction was largely uncoupled. Photolysis of one compound, myo-inositol 1,4,5- triphosphate P4(5)-1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl ester (caged IP3), increased the voltage clamp current in response to the flashlamp by more than twofold without changing the latency of the response. The effect was not seen with photolysis of either adenosine-5'-triphosphate P3-1-(2- nitrophenyl)ethyl ester (caged ATP) or caged IP3 in cells preloaded with either heparin or (1,2-bis-(o-amino-phenoxy)ethane-N-N-N'-N' tetraacetic acid tetrapotassium salt (BAPTA). The results suggest that photoreleased IP3 releases calcium ions from intracellular stores and the resulting increase in [Ca2+]i enhances the amplification of the phototransduction cascade. PMID:1431805

  19. Adaptive potentiation in rod photoreceptors after light exposure.

    PubMed

    McKeown, Alex S; Kraft, Timothy W

    2014-06-01

    Photoreceptors adapt to changes in illumination by altering transduction kinetics and sensitivity, thereby extending their working range. We describe a previously unknown form of rod photoreceptor adaptation in wild-type (WT) mice that manifests as a potentiation of the light response after periods of conditioning light exposure. We characterize the stimulus conditions that evoke this graded hypersensitivity and examine the molecular mechanisms of adaptation underlying the phenomenon. After exposure to periods of saturating illumination, rods show a 10-35% increase in circulating dark current, an adaptive potentiation (AP) to light exposure. This potentiation grows as exposure to light is extended up to 3 min and decreases with longer exposures. Cells return to their initial dark-adapted sensitivity with a time constant of recovery of ∼7 s. Halving the extracellular Mg concentration prolongs the adaptation, increasing the time constant of recovery to 13.3 s, but does not affect the magnitude of potentiation. In rods lacking guanylate cyclase activating proteins 1 and 2 (GCAP(-/-)), AP is more than doubled compared with WT rods, and halving the extracellular Mg concentration does not affect the recovery time constant. Rods from a mouse expressing cyclic nucleotide-gated channels incapable of binding calmodulin also showed a marked increase in the amplitude of AP. Application of an insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) kinase inhibitor (Tyrphostin AG1024) blocked AP, whereas application of an insulin receptor kinase inhibitor (HNMPA(AM)3) failed to do so. A broad-acting tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor (orthovanadate) also blocked AP. Our findings identify a unique form of adaptation in photoreceptors, so that they show transient hypersensitivity to light, and are consistent with a model in which light history, acting via the IGF-1R, can increase the sensitivity of rod photoreceptors, whereas the photocurrent overshoot is regulated by Ca-calmodulin and Ca(2

  20. Adaptive potentiation in rod photoreceptors after light exposure

    PubMed Central

    McKeown, Alex S.

    2014-01-01

    Photoreceptors adapt to changes in illumination by altering transduction kinetics and sensitivity, thereby extending their working range. We describe a previously unknown form of rod photoreceptor adaptation in wild-type (WT) mice that manifests as a potentiation of the light response after periods of conditioning light exposure. We characterize the stimulus conditions that evoke this graded hypersensitivity and examine the molecular mechanisms of adaptation underlying the phenomenon. After exposure to periods of saturating illumination, rods show a 10–35% increase in circulating dark current, an adaptive potentiation (AP) to light exposure. This potentiation grows as exposure to light is extended up to 3 min and decreases with longer exposures. Cells return to their initial dark-adapted sensitivity with a time constant of recovery of ∼7 s. Halving the extracellular Mg concentration prolongs the adaptation, increasing the time constant of recovery to 13.3 s, but does not affect the magnitude of potentiation. In rods lacking guanylate cyclase activating proteins 1 and 2 (GCAP−/−), AP is more than doubled compared with WT rods, and halving the extracellular Mg concentration does not affect the recovery time constant. Rods from a mouse expressing cyclic nucleotide–gated channels incapable of binding calmodulin also showed a marked increase in the amplitude of AP. Application of an insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) kinase inhibitor (Tyrphostin AG1024) blocked AP, whereas application of an insulin receptor kinase inhibitor (HNMPA(AM)3) failed to do so. A broad-acting tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor (orthovanadate) also blocked AP. Our findings identify a unique form of adaptation in photoreceptors, so that they show transient hypersensitivity to light, and are consistent with a model in which light history, acting via the IGF-1R, can increase the sensitivity of rod photoreceptors, whereas the photocurrent overshoot is regulated by Ca-calmodulin and

  1. Exploring RPE as a source of photoreceptors: assessing cellular differentiation in vivo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To evaluate neuroD–induced RPE transdifferentiation into photoreceptor cells in the subretinal space, RPE cells were dissociated, cultured, and guided to transdifferentiate by infecting them with retrovirus RCAS–neuroD, or RCAS–GFP as a control. The cells were then harvested and microinjected into t...

  2. The temporal topography of the N-Methyl- N-nitrosourea induced photoreceptor degeneration in mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Ye; Chen, Tao; Fang, Wei; Peng, Guanghua; Wang, liqiang; Qin, Limin; Liu, Bei; Fei Huang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the progressive photoreceptors apoptosis. The N-Methyl- N-nitrosourea (MNU) is an alkylating toxicant which could induce photoreceptor apoptosis resembling that of the hereditary RP. However, the detailed process pattern of this degeneration remains poorly characterized. We systemically explored the topography of the photoreceptor degeneration in the MNU treated mouse, and related these spatial data with the time-dependent characteristics of retinal pathology. These temporal topographic data delineated sequential scenes of the progressive photoreceptor degeneration in the MNU treated retinas: focal photoreceptors showed different vulnerabilities to the MNU toxicity and displayed a distinctive spatial- and time-dependent progression. Moreover, the positional asymmetry between the retinal quadrants firstly provided instructive information about the unique toxicology properties of the MNU. Further mechanism study suggested that the up-regulation of Bax and Calpain-2, rather than the Caspase-3, should be responsible for the asymmetry in the MNU induced photoreceptor degeneration. Together with the comparative sensitivities to the neurotoxicity of MNU between two photoreceptor populations, these topographic data would facilitate the standardization of analytic parameters related to the MNU induced RP model, and enhance its application in the therapeutic explorations of human RP. PMID:26685797

  3. No evidence for a genetic blueprint: The case of the “complex” mammalian photoreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Kumaramanickavel, G; Denton, M J; Legge, M

    2015-01-01

    Despite the intensity of the search for genes causing inherited retinal degenerations over the past 3 decades, of the approximately 200 disease genes identified to date, all appear to be ordinary housekeeping genes specifying proteins playing basic structural and functional roles in the mature photoreceptor cells. No genes or genetic elements have been identified which can be construed as having a specific morphogenic role, directing the development of the cytoarchitecture of any particular retinal cell. The evidence suggests that the cytoarchitecture of the retinal photoreceptors, although enormously complex, arises from the self-organization of the cells constituents without any regulation or direction from an external genetic blueprint. PMID:26044481

  4. Unidirectional Photoreceptor-to-Müller Glia Coupling and Unique K+ Channel Expression in Caiman Retina

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Yomarie; Benedikt, Jan; Ulbricht, Elke; Karl, Anett; Dávila, José; Savvinov, Alexey; Kucheryavykh, Yuriy; Inyushin, Mikhail; Cubano, Luis A.; Pannicke, Thomas; Veh, Rüdiger W.; Francke, Mike; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Eaton, Misty J.; Reichenbach, Andreas; Skatchkov, Serguei N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Müller cells, the principal glial cells of the vertebrate retina, are fundamental for the maintenance and function of neuronal cells. In most vertebrates, including humans, Müller cells abundantly express Kir4.1 inwardly rectifying potassium channels responsible for hyperpolarized membrane potential and for various vital functions such as potassium buffering and glutamate clearance; inter-species differences in Kir4.1 expression were, however, observed. Localization and function of potassium channels in Müller cells from the retina of crocodiles remain, hitherto, unknown. Methods We studied retinae of the Spectacled caiman (Caiman crocodilus fuscus), endowed with both diurnal and nocturnal vision, by (i) immunohistochemistry, (ii) whole-cell voltage-clamp, and (iii) fluorescent dye tracing to investigate K+ channel distribution and glia-to-neuron communications. Results Immunohistochemistry revealed that caiman Müller cells, similarly to other vertebrates, express vimentin, GFAP, S100β, and glutamine synthetase. In contrast, Kir4.1 channel protein was not found in Müller cells but was localized in photoreceptor cells. Instead, 2P-domain TASK-1 channels were expressed in Müller cells. Electrophysiological properties of enzymatically dissociated Müller cells without photoreceptors and isolated Müller cells with adhering photoreceptors were significantly different. This suggests ion coupling between Müller cells and photoreceptors in the caiman retina. Sulforhodamine-B injected into cones permeated to adhering Müller cells thus revealing a uni-directional dye coupling. Conclusion Our data indicate that caiman Müller glial cells are unique among vertebrates studied so far by predominantly expressing TASK-1 rather than Kir4.1 K+ channels and by bi-directional ion and uni-directional dye coupling to photoreceptor cells. This coupling may play an important role in specific glia-neuron signaling pathways and in a new type of K+ buffering. PMID

  5. Cell-cell interactions during patterning of the Arabidopsis anther.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaoqi; Dickinson, Hugh G

    2010-04-01

    Key steps in the evolution of the angiosperm anther include the patterning of the concentrically organized microsporangium and the incorporation of four such microsporangia into a leaf-like structure. Mutant studies in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana are leading to an increasingly accurate picture of (i) the cell lineages culminating in the different cell types present in the microsporangium (the microsporocytes, the tapetum, and the middle and endothecial layers), and (ii) some of the genes responsible for specifying their fates. However, the processes that confer polarity on the developing anther and position the microsporangia within it remain unclear. Certainly, data from a range of experimental strategies suggest that hormones play a central role in establishing polarity and the patterning of the anther initial, and may be responsible for locating the microsporangia. But the fact that microsporangia were originally positioned externally suggests that their development is likely to be autonomous, perhaps with the reproductive cells generating signals controlling the growth and division of the investing anther epidermis. These possibilities are discussed in the context of the expression of genes which initiate and maintain male and female reproductive development, and in the perspective of our current views of anther evolution. PMID:20298223

  6. In the Limelight: Photoreceptors in Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Certain cyanobacteria look green if grown in red light and vice versa. This dramatic color change, called complementary chromatic adaptation (CCA), is caused by alterations of the major colored light-harvesting proteins. A major controller of CCA is the cyanobacteriochrome (CBCR) RcaE, a red-green reversible photoreceptor that triggers a complex signal transduction pathway. Now, a new study demonstrates that CCA is also modulated by DpxA, a CBCR that senses yellow and teal (greenish blue) light. DpxA acts to expand the range of wavelengths that can impact CCA, by fine-tuning the process. This dual control of CCA might positively impact the fitness of cells growing in the shade of competing algae or in a water column where light levels and spectral quality change gradually with depth. This discovery adds to the growing number of light-responsive phenomena controlled by multiple CBCRs. Furthermore, the diverse CBCRs which are exclusively found in cyanobacteria have significant biotechnological potential. PMID:27353763

  7. In the Limelight: Photoreceptors in Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Bhaya, Devaki

    2016-01-01

    Certain cyanobacteria look green if grown in red light and vice versa. This dramatic color change, called complementary chromatic adaptation (CCA), is caused by alterations of the major colored light-harvesting proteins. A major controller of CCA is the cyanobacteriochrome (CBCR) RcaE, a red-green reversible photoreceptor that triggers a complex signal transduction pathway. Now, a new study demonstrates that CCA is also modulated by DpxA, a CBCR that senses yellow and teal (greenish blue) light. DpxA acts to expand the range of wavelengths that can impact CCA, by fine-tuning the process. This dual control of CCA might positively impact the fitness of cells growing in the shade of competing algae or in a water column where light levels and spectral quality change gradually with depth. This discovery adds to the growing number of light-responsive phenomena controlled by multiple CBCRs. Furthermore, the diverse CBCRs which are exclusively found in cyanobacteria have significant biotechnological potential. PMID:27353763

  8. Using neurogenin to Reprogram Chick RPE to Produce Photoreceptor-like Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiumei; Ma, Wenxin; Zhuo, Yehong; Yan, Run-Tao

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. One potential therapy for vision loss from photoreceptor degeneration is cell replacement, but this approach presents a need for photoreceptor cells. This study explores whether the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) could be a convenient source of developing photoreceptors. Methods. The RPE of chick embryos was subjected to reprogramming by proneural genes neurogenin (ngn)1 and ngn3. The genes were introduced into the RPE through retrovirus RCAS-mediated transduction, with the virus microinjected into the eye or added to retinal pigment epithelial explant culture. The retinal pigment epithelia were then analyzed for photoreceptor traits. Results. In chick embryos infected with retrovirus RCAS-expressing ngn3 (RCAS-ngn3), the photoreceptor gene visinin (the equivalent of mammalian recoverin) was expressed in cells of the retinal pigment epithelial layer. When isolated and cultured as explants, retinal pigment epithelial tissues from embryos infected with RCAS-ngn3 or RCAS-ngn1 gave rise to layers of visinin-positive cells. These reprogrammed cells expressed genes of phototransduction and synapses, such as red opsin, the α-subunit of cone transducin, SNAP-25, and PSD-95. Reprogramming occurred with retinal pigment epithelial explants derived from virally infected embryos and with retinal pigment epithelial explants derived from normal embryos, with the recombinant viruses added at the onset of the explant culture. In addition, reprogramming took place in retinal pigment epithelial explants from both young and old embryos, from embryonic day (E)6 to E18, when the visual system becomes functional in the chick. Conclusions. The results support the prospect of exploring the RPE as a convenient source of developing photoreceptors for in situ cell replacement. PMID:19628733

  9. Arl13b Interacts With Vangl2 to Regulate Cilia and Photoreceptor Outer Segment Length in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ping; Dudinsky, Lynn; Fogerty, Joseph; Gaivin, Robert; Perkins, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Mutations in the gene ARL13B cause the classical form of Joubert syndrome, an autosomal recessive ciliopathy with variable degrees of retinal degeneration. As second-site modifier alleles can contribute to retinal pathology in ciliopathies, animal models provide a unique platform to test how genetic interactions modulate specific phenotypes. In this study, we analyzed the zebrafish arl13b mutant for retinal degeneration and for epistatic relationships with the planar cell polarity protein (PCP) component vangl2. Methods Photoreceptor and cilia structure was examined by light and electron microscopy. Immunohistochemistry was performed to examine ciliary markers. Genetic interactions were tested by pairwise crosses of heterozygous animals. Genetic mosaic animals were generated by blastula transplantation and analyzed by fluorescence microscopy. Results At 5 days after fertilization, photoreceptor outer segments were shorter in zebrafish arl13b−/− mutants compared to wild-type larvae, no overt signs of retinal degeneration were observed by light or electron microscopy. Starting at 14 days after fertilization (dpf) and continuing through 30 dpf, cells lacking Arl13b died following transplantation into wild-type host animals. Photoreceptors of arl13b−/−;vangl2−/− mutants were more compromised than the photoreceptors of single mutants. Finally, when grown within a wild-type retina, the vangl2−/− mutant cone photoreceptors displayed normal basal body positioning. Conclusions We show that arl13b−/− mutants have shortened cilia and photoreceptor outer segments and exhibit a slow, progressive photoreceptor degeneration that occurs over weeks. The data suggest that loss of Arl13b leads to slow photoreceptor degeneration, but can be exacerbated by the loss of vangl2. Importantly, the data show that Arl13b can genetically and physically interact with Vangl2 and this association is important for normal photoreceptor structure. The loss of vangl2

  10. Discrete Waves and Phototransduction in Voltage-damped Ventral Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Behbehani, Michael; Srebro, Richard

    1974-01-01

    Discrete waves in the voltage-clamped photoreceptor of Limulus are remarkably similar in all essential properties to those found in an unclamped cell. The latency distribution of discrete waves is not affected by considerable changes in the holding potential in a voltage-clamped cell. Both large and small waves occur in voltage-clamped and unclamped cells and in approximately the same proportion. Large and small waves also share the same latency distributions and spectral sensitivity. We suggest that small waves may result from the activation of damaged membrane areas. Large waves have an average amplitude of approximately 5 nA in voltage-clamped photoreceptors. It probably requires several square microns of cell membrane to support this much photo-current. Thus the amplification inherent in the discrete wave process may involve spatial spread of activation from unimolecular dimensions to several square microns of cell membrane surface. Neither local current flow, nor pre-packaging of any transmitter substance appears to be involved in the amplification process. The possible mechanisms of the amplification are evaluated with relationship to the properties of discrete waves. PMID:4846766

  11. LACK OF PROTEIN-TYROSINE SULFATION DISRUPTS PHOTORECEPTOR OUTER SEGMENT MORPHOGENESIS, RETINAL FUNCTION AND RETINAL ANATOMY

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, David M.; Murray, Anne R.; Kanan, Yogita; Arbogast, Kelsey L.; Hamilton, Robert A.; Fliesler, Steven J.; Burns, Marie E.; Moore, Kevin L.; Al-Ubaidi, Muayyad R.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the role(s) of protein-tyrosine sulfation in the retina, we examined retinal function and structure in mice lacking tyrosylprotein sulfotransferases (TPST) 1 and 2. Tpst double knockout (DKO; Tpst1−/−/Tpst2−/−) retinas had drastically reduced electroretinographic responses, although their photoreceptors exhibited normal responses in single cell recordings. These retinas appeared normal histologically; however, the rod photoreceptors had ultrastructurally abnormal outer segments, with membrane evulsions into the extracellular space, irregular disc membrane spacing, and expanded intradiscal space. Photoreceptor synaptic terminals were disorganized in Tpst DKO retinas, but established ultrastructurally normal synapses, as did bipolar and amacrine cells; however, the morphology and organization of neuronal processes in the inner retina were abnormal. These results indicate that protein-tyrosine sulfation is essential for proper outer segment morphogenesis and synaptic function, but is not critical for overall retinal structure or synapse formation, and may serve broader functions in neuronal development and maintenance. PMID:21039965

  12. The Retina of Ansorge's Cusimanse (Crossarchus ansorgei): Number, Topography and Convergence of Photoreceptors and Ganglion Cells in Relation to Ecology and Behavior.

    PubMed

    Coimbra, João Paulo; Kaswera-Kyamakya, Consolate; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Manger, Paul R; Collin, Shaun P

    2015-01-01

    The family Herpestidae (cusimanses and mongooses) is a monophyletic radiation of carnivores with remarkable variation in microhabitat occupation and diel activity, but virtually nothing is known about how they use vision in the context of their behavioral ecology. In this paper, we measured the number and topographic distribution of neurons (rods, cones and retinal ganglion cells) and estimated the spatial resolving power of the eye of the diurnal, forest-dwelling Ansorge's cusimanse (Crossarchus ansorgei). Using retinal wholemounts and stereology, we found that rods are more numerous (42,500,000; 92%) than cones (3,900,000; 8%). Rod densities form a concentric and dorsotemporally asymmetric plateau that matches the location and shape of a bright yellow tapetum lucidum located within the dorsal aspect of the eye. Maximum rod density (340,300 cells/mm(2)) occurs within an elongated plateau below the optic disc that corresponds to a transitional region between the tapetum lucidum and the pigmented choroid. Cone densities form a temporal area with a peak density of 44,500 cells/mm(2) embedded in a weak horizontal streak that matches the topographic distribution of retinal ganglion cells. Convergence ratios of cones to retinal ganglion cells vary from 50:1 in the far periphery to 3:1 in the temporal area. With a ganglion cell peak density of 13,400 cells/mm(2) and an eye size of 11 mm in axial length, we estimated upper limits of spatial resolution of 7.5-8 cycles/degree, which is comparable to other carnivores such as hyenas. In conclusion, we suggest that the topographic retinal traits described for Ansorge's cusimanse conform to a presumed carnivore retinal blueprint but also show variations that reflect its specific ecological needs. PMID:26288092

  13. Use of Hydrogen as a Novel Therapeutic Strategy Against Photoreceptor Degeneration in Retinitis Pigmentosa Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Ye; Geng, Lei; Wang, Liqiang; Xu, Weiwei; Qin, Limin; Peng, Guanghua; Huang, Yi Fei; Yang, Ji xue

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal dystrophies characterized by progressive photoreceptor apoptosis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been recognized as critical initiators of the photoreceptor apoptosis in RP. Photoreceptor survival in RP mutants will not only require the inhibition of effectors of apoptotic machinery, but also the elimination of the initiating upstream signals, such as ROS. These cytotoxic ROS should be neutralized by the antioxidant defense system, otherwise they would interact with the macromolecules essential for photoreceptor survival. Hydrogen is a promising gaseous agent that has come to the forefront of therapeutic research over the last few years. It has been verified that hydrogen is capable of neutralizing the cytotoxic ROS selectively, rectifying abnormities in the apoptotic cascades, and attenuating the related inflammatory response. Hydrogen is so mild that it does not disturb the metabolic oxidation-reduction reactions or disrupt the physiologic ROS involved in cell signaling. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that hydrogen might be an effective therapeutic agent to slow or prevent photoreceptor degeneration in RP retinas. It is a logical step to test hydrogen for therapeutic use in multiple RP animal models, and ultimately in human RP patients. PMID:26952558

  14. The carcinine transporter CarT is required in Drosophila photoreceptor neurons to sustain histamine recycling

    PubMed Central

    Stenesen, Drew; Moehlman, Andrew T; Krämer, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic transmission from Drosophila photoreceptors to lamina neurons requires recycling of histamine neurotransmitter. Synaptic histamine is cleared by uptake into glia and conversion into carcinine, which functions as transport metabolite. How carcinine is transported from glia to photoreceptor neurons remains unclear. In a targeted RNAi screen for genes involved in this pathway, we identified carT, which encodes a member of the SLC22A transporter family. CarT expression in photoreceptors is necessary and sufficient for fly vision and behavior. Carcinine accumulates in the lamina of carT flies. Wild-type levels are restored by photoreceptor-specific expression of CarT, and endogenous tagging suggests CarT localizes to synaptic endings. Heterologous expression of CarT in S2 cells is sufficient for carcinine uptake, demonstrating the ability of CarT to utilize carcinine as a transport substrate. Together, our results demonstrate that CarT transports the histamine metabolite carcinine into photoreceptor neurons, thus contributing an essential step to the histamine–carcinine cycle. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10972.001 PMID:26653853

  15. Cav1.4 L-Type Calcium Channels Contribute to Calpain Activation in Degenerating Photoreceptors of rd1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schön, Christian; Paquet-Durand, François; Michalakis, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited blinding disorder characterized by progressive degeneration and loss of photoreceptors. The exact mechanism of degeneration and cell death of photoreceptors is not known, but is thought to involve disturbed Ca2+—signaling. Ca2+ can enter the photoreceptor cell via outer segment cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels or synaptic Cav1.4 L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC). Previously, we have shown that genetic ablation of the Cngb1 gene encoding the B subunit of the rod CNG channel delays the fast progressing degeneration in the rd1 mutant mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa. In this study, we crossbred rd1 mice with the Cacna1f-deficient mouse lacking the Cav1.4 α1 subunit of the L-type VGCC. Longitudinal in vivo examinations of photoreceptor layer thickness by optical coherence tomography revealed a significant, but not sustained delay of retinal degeneration in Cacna1f x rd1 double mutant mice compared to rd1 mice. This was accompanied by a reduction of TUNEL positive cells in the early phase of rod degeneration. Remarkably, Cacna1f x rd1 double mutant mice displayed a strong decrease in the activation of the Ca2+-dependent protease calpain during photoreceptor loss. Our results show that genetic deletion of the synaptic Cav1.4 L-type VGCCs impairs calpain activation and leads to a short-term preservation of photoreceptors in the rd1 mouse. PMID:27270916

  16. Cav1.4 L-Type Calcium Channels Contribute to Calpain Activation in Degenerating Photoreceptors of rd1 Mice.

    PubMed

    Schön, Christian; Paquet-Durand, François; Michalakis, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited blinding disorder characterized by progressive degeneration and loss of photoreceptors. The exact mechanism of degeneration and cell death of photoreceptors is not known, but is thought to involve disturbed Ca2+-signaling. Ca2+ can enter the photoreceptor cell via outer segment cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels or synaptic Cav1.4 L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC). Previously, we have shown that genetic ablation of the Cngb1 gene encoding the B subunit of the rod CNG channel delays the fast progressing degeneration in the rd1 mutant mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa. In this study, we crossbred rd1 mice with the Cacna1f-deficient mouse lacking the Cav1.4 α1 subunit of the L-type VGCC. Longitudinal in vivo examinations of photoreceptor layer thickness by optical coherence tomography revealed a significant, but not sustained delay of retinal degeneration in Cacna1f x rd1 double mutant mice compared to rd1 mice. This was accompanied by a reduction of TUNEL positive cells in the early phase of rod degeneration. Remarkably, Cacna1f x rd1 double mutant mice displayed a strong decrease in the activation of the Ca2+-dependent protease calpain during photoreceptor loss. Our results show that genetic deletion of the synaptic Cav1.4 L-type VGCCs impairs calpain activation and leads to a short-term preservation of photoreceptors in the rd1 mouse. PMID:27270916

  17. 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate and adenylate cyclase in phototransduction by limulus ventral photoreceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J E; Kaupp, U B; Malbon, C C

    1984-01-01

    Biochemical and electrophysiological measurements were made on photoreceptor cells from Limulus ventral eyes to investigate the possible role of cyclic AMP and adenylate cyclase in the visual transduction mechanism. Cyclic AMP content in a photoreceptor-enriched fraction (the end organs) of Limulus ventral eyes was approximately 15 pmol/mg protein. The cyclic AMP content was increased by bathing eyes in 1-methyl-3-isobutyl xanthine or forskolin and was increased almost 100-fold when bathed in both. Illumination did not change cyclic AMP content significantly in any of these conditions. Discrete events that can be recorded electrophysiologically occur spontaneously in darkness. An increase in the frequency of discrete events is evoked by dim illumination. The discrete events are a sign of excitation of Limulus photoreceptor cells. Drug-induced changes in the rate of occurrence of discrete events recorded electrophysiologically in darkness were not correlated with changes in cyclic AMP content. Adenylate cyclase activity measured from a small number of pooled photoreceptor clusters was stimulated by fluoride and vanadate ions, hydrolysis-resistant analogues of GTP, cholera toxin and forskolin. The Limulus enzyme is similar pharmacologically to mammalian and avian adenylate cyclases. Activation of adenylate cyclase by drugs was not correlated with changes in the rate of occurrence of discrete events recorded electrophysiologically in darkness. A heat-treated Lubrol extract of membranes from Limulus ventral eyes reconstituted the adenylate cyclase activity of membranes from S49 mouse lymphoma cyc- mutant cells which lack a functional regulatory protein. These findings suggest that Limulus ventral eye photoreceptors contain a regulatory protein that mediates the activation of adenylate cyclase by guanine nucleotides, fluoride or cholera toxin. This regulatory protein is homologous with that found in mammalian and avian adenylate cyclases. Our findings suggest that

  18. G-quartet oligonucleotide mediated delivery of proteins into photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium via intravitreal injection.

    PubMed

    Leaderer, Derek; Cashman, Siobhan M; Kumar-Singh, Rajendra

    2016-04-01

    There is currently no available method to efficiently deliver proteins across the plasma membrane of photoreceptor or retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells in vivo. Thus, current clinical application of recombinant proteins in ophthalmology is limited to the use of proteins that perform their biological function extracellularly. The ability to traverse biological membranes would enable the mobilization of a significantly larger number of proteins with previously well characterized properties. Nucleolin is abundantly present on the surface of rapidly dividing cells including cancer cells. Surprisingly, nucleolin is also present on the surface of photoreceptor cell bodies. Here we investigated whether nucleolin can be utilized as a gateway for the delivery of proteins into retinal cells following intravitreal injection. AS1411 is a G-quartet aptamer capable of targeting nucleolin. Subsequent to intravitreal injection, fluorescently labeled AS1411 localized to various retinal cell types including the photoreceptors and RPE. AS1411 linked to streptavidin (a ∼50 kDa protein) via a biotin bridge enabled the uptake of Streptavidin into photoreceptors and RPE. AS1411-Streptavidin conjugate applied topically to the cornea allowed for uptake of the conjugate into the nucleus and cytoplasm of corneal endothelial cells. Clinical relevance of AS1411 as a delivery vehicle was strongly indicated by demonstration of the presence of cell surface nucleolin on the photoreceptors, inner neurons and ganglion cells of human retina. These data support exploration of AS1411 as a means of delivering therapeutic proteins to diseased retina. PMID:26923800

  19. Cell patterning on poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate)-patterned fluoropolymer substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wan-Joong; Jung, Chang-Hee; Hwang, In-Tae; Jung, Chan-Hee; Choi, Jae-Hak; Hong, Sung-Kwon

    2013-10-01

    The surface functionalization of bio-inert fluoropolymer films through ion beam-induced surface graft polymerization was investigated to control the cellular behavior. The surface of poly(tetrafluoroethylene-co-perfluoropropl vinyl ether) (PFA) films was selectively activated by 150 keV H+ ion implantation in the presence of a pattern mask and sodium 4-styrenesulfonate (SS) was then graft polymerized onto the implanted PFA films to form hydrophilic poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS)-patterned PFA films. The surface of the resulting PSS-patterned PFA films was investigated in terms of the degree of graft polymerization, chemical structure, chemical composition, wettability, and morphology. The analytical results revealed that PSS was selectively grafted onto the implanted regions of the PFA films. Furthermore, in vitro cell culture on the PSS-patterned PFA films exhibited a preferential adhesion and growth of cells onto the PSS-grafted regions, resulting in well-organized 100 μm cell patterns.

  20. Estimating photoreceptor excitations from spectral outputs of a personal light exposure measurement device.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dingcai; Barrionuevo, Pablo A

    2015-03-01

    The intrinsic circadian clock requires photoentrainment to synchronize the 24-hour solar day. Therefore, light stimulation is an important component of chronobiological research. Currently, the chronobiological research field overwhelmingly uses photopic illuminance that is based on the luminous efficiency function, V(λ), to quantify light levels. However, recent discovery of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs), which are activated by self-contained melanopsin photopigment and also by inputs from rods and cones, makes light specification using a one-dimensional unit inadequate. Since the current understanding of how different photoreceptor inputs contribute to the circadian system through ipRGCs is limited, it is recommended to specify light in terms of the excitations of five photoreceptors (S-, M-, L-cones, rods and ipRGCs; Lucas et al., 2014). In the current study, we assessed whether the spectral outputs from a commercially available spectral watch (i.e. Actiwatch Spectrum) could be used to estimate photoreceptor excitations. Based on the color sensor spectral sensitivity functions from a previously published work, as well as from our measurements, we computed spectral outputs in the long-wavelength range (R), middle-wavelength range (G), short-wavelength range (B) and broadband range (W) under 52 CIE illuminants (25 daylight illuminants, 27 fluorescent lights). We also computed the photoreceptor excitations for each illuminant using human photoreceptor spectral sensitivity functions. Linear regression analyses indicated that the Actiwatch spectral outputs could predict photoreceptor excitations reliably, under the assumption of linear responses of the Actiwatch color sensors. In addition, R, G, B outputs could classify illuminant types (fluorescent versus daylight illuminants) satisfactorily. However, the assessment of actual Actiwatch recording under several testing light sources showed that the spectral outputs were subject to

  1. AAV Vectors for FRET-Based Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions in Photoreceptor Outer Segments

    PubMed Central

    Becirovic, Elvir; Böhm, Sybille; Nguyen, Ong N. P.; Riedmayr, Lisa M.; Hammelmann, Verena; Schön, Christian; Butz, Elisabeth S.; Wahl-Schott, Christian; Biel, Martin; Michalakis, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful method for the detection and quantification of stationary and dynamic protein-protein interactions. Technical limitations have hampered systematic in vivo FRET experiments to study protein-protein interactions in their native environment. Here, we describe a rapid and robust protocol that combines adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated in vivo delivery of genetically encoded FRET partners with ex vivo FRET measurements. The method was established on acutely isolated outer segments of murine rod and cone photoreceptors and relies on the high co-transduction efficiency of retinal photoreceptors by co-delivered AAV vectors. The procedure can be used for the systematic analysis of protein-protein interactions of wild type or mutant outer segment proteins in their native environment. Conclusively, our protocol can help to characterize the physiological and pathophysiological relevance of photoreceptor specific proteins and, in principle, should also be transferable to other cell types. PMID:27516733

  2. The p110α Isoform of Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase is Essential for Cone Photoreceptor Survival

    PubMed Central

    Rajala, Raju V.S.; Ranjo-Bishop, Michelle; Wang, Yuhong; Rajala, Ammaji; Anderson, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are a family of lipid kinases that phosphorylates the 3'OH of the inositol ring of phosphoinositides (PIs). They are responsible for coordinating a diverse range of cellular functions. Class IA PI3K is a heterodimeric protein composed of a regulatory p85 and a catalytic p110 subunit. In this study, we conditionally deleted the p110α-subunit of PI3K in cone photoreceptor cells using the Cre-loxP system. Cone photoreceptors allow for color vision in bright light (daylight vision). Cone-specific deletion of p110α resulted in cone degeneration. Our studies suggest that PI3K signaling is essential for cone photoreceptor functions. PMID:25742742

  3. In Vitro Interaction of Tubulin with the Photoreceptor cGMP Phosphodiesterase γ-Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Uyen B.; Song, Jikui; Mavlyutov, Timur A.; Guo, Lian-Wang

    2010-01-01

    The α and β tubulins compose the microtubule cytoskeleton which is involved in many cellular processes such as vesicular transport. The photoreceptor cells in the retina are neurons specialized for phototransduction. Here we report a novel interaction between tubulin and the photoreceptor cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE6) gamma subunit (PDEγ). The specificity and molecular details of the PDEγ:tubulin interaction were analyzed through the experiments of pull down, microtubule co-sedimentation, and NMR spectroscopy. The tubulin-interacting site was identified to be in the PDEγ C-terminal I67-G85 region, and the interaction interface appeared to be distinct from those with the other PDEγ targets in phototransduction. We also observed that PDEγ interacted with tubulin in a GTP-dependent manner. Our findings offer implications for non-phototransduction role(s) of PDEγ in the photoreceptor neurons. PMID:20655363

  4. Mutations in PNPLA6 are linked to photoreceptor degeneration and various forms of childhood blindness

    PubMed Central

    Kmoch, S.; Majewski, J.; Ramamurthy, V.; Cao, S.; Fahiminiya, S.; Ren, H.; MacDonald, I.M.; Lopez, I.; Sun, V.; Keser, V.; Khan, A.; Stránecký, V.; Hartmannová, H.; Přistoupilová, A.; Hodaňová, K.; Piherová, L.; Kuchař, L.; Baxová, A.; Chen, R.; Barsottini, O.G.P.; Pyle, A.; Griffin, H.; Splitt, M.; Sallum, J.; Tolmie, J.L.; Sampson, J.R.; Chinnery, P.; Canada, Care4Rare; Banin, E.; Sharon, D.; Dutta, S.; Grebler, R.; Helfrich-Foerster, C.; Pedroso, J.L.; Kretzschmar, D.; Cayouette, M.; Koenekoop, R.K.

    2015-01-01

    Blindness due to retinal degeneration affects millions of people worldwide, but many disease-causing mutations remain unknown. PNPLA6 encodes the patatin-like phospholipase domain containing protein 6, also known as neuropathy target esterase (NTE), which is the target of toxic organophosphates that induce human paralysis due to severe axonopathy of large neurons. Mutations in PNPLA6 also cause human spastic paraplegia characterized by motor neuron degeneration. Here we identify PNPLA6 mutations in childhood blindness in seven families with retinal degeneration, including Leber congenital amaurosis and Oliver McFarlane syndrome. PNPLA6 localizes mostly at the inner segment plasma membrane in photo-receptors and mutations in Drosophila PNPLA6 lead to photoreceptor cell death. We also report that lysophosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidic acid levels are elevated in mutant Drosophila. These findings show a role for PNPLA6 in photoreceptor survival and identify phospholipid metabolism as a potential therapeutic target for some forms of blindness. PMID:25574898

  5. Rod photoreceptors drive circadian photoentrainment across a wide range of light intensities

    PubMed Central

    Altimus, C.M.; Güler, A.D.; Alam, N.M.; Arman, A.C.; Prusky, G.T.; Sampath, A.P.; Hattar, S

    2010-01-01

    In mammals, synchronization of the circadian pacemaker in the hypothalamus is achieved through direct input from the eyes conveyed by intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs). Circadian photoentrainment can be maintained by rod and cone photoreceptors, but their functional contributions and their retinal circuits that impinge on ipRGCs are not well understood. We demonstrate in genetic mouse models lacking functional rods, or where rods are the only functional photoreceptors, that rods are solely responsible for photoentrainment at scotopic light intensities. Surprisingly, rods were also capable of driving circadian photoentrainment at photopic intensities where they were incapable of supporting a visually–guided behavior. Using animals in which cone photoreceptors were ablated, we demonstrate that rods signal through cones at high light intensities, but not low light intensities. Thus two distinct retinal circuits drive ipRGC function to support circadian photoentrainment across a wide range of light intensities. PMID:20711184

  6. AAV Vectors for FRET-Based Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions in Photoreceptor Outer Segments.

    PubMed

    Becirovic, Elvir; Böhm, Sybille; Nguyen, Ong N P; Riedmayr, Lisa M; Hammelmann, Verena; Schön, Christian; Butz, Elisabeth S; Wahl-Schott, Christian; Biel, Martin; Michalakis, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful method for the detection and quantification of stationary and dynamic protein-protein interactions. Technical limitations have hampered systematic in vivo FRET experiments to study protein-protein interactions in their native environment. Here, we describe a rapid and robust protocol that combines adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated in vivo delivery of genetically encoded FRET partners with ex vivo FRET measurements. The method was established on acutely isolated outer segments of murine rod and cone photoreceptors and relies on the high co-transduction efficiency of retinal photoreceptors by co-delivered AAV vectors. The procedure can be used for the systematic analysis of protein-protein interactions of wild type or mutant outer segment proteins in their native environment. Conclusively, our protocol can help to characterize the physiological and pathophysiological relevance of photoreceptor specific proteins and, in principle, should also be transferable to other cell types. PMID:27516733

  7. Meckelin 3 is necessary for photoreceptor outer segment development in rat Meckel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Sarika; Hudson, Scott; Gattone, Vincent H; Miller, Caroline; Chernoff, Ellen A G; Belecky-Adams, Teri L

    2013-01-01

    Ciliopathies lead to multiorgan pathologies that include renal cysts, deafness, obesity and retinal degeneration. Retinal photoreceptors have connecting cilia joining the inner and outer segment that are responsible for transport of molecules to develop and maintain the outer segment process. The present study evaluated meckelin (MKS3) expression during outer segment genesis and determined the consequences of mutant meckelin on photoreceptor development and survival in Wistar polycystic kidney disease Wpk/Wpk rat using immunohistochemistry, analysis of cell death and electron microscopy. MKS3 was ubiquitously expressed throughout the retina at postnatal day 10 (P10) and P21. However, in the mature retina, MKS3 expression was restricted to photoreceptors and the retinal ganglion cell layer. At P10, both the wild type and homozygous Wpk mutant retina had all retinal cell types. In contrast, by P21, cells expressing rod- and cone-specific markers were fewer in number and expression of opsins appeared to be abnormally localized to the cell body. Cell death analyses were consistent with the disappearance of photoreceptor-specific markers and showed that the cells were undergoing caspase-dependent cell death. By electron microscopy, P10 photoreceptors showed rudimentary outer segments with an axoneme, but did not develop outer segment discs that were clearly present in the wild type counterpart. At p21 the mutant outer segments appeared much the same as the P10 mutant outer segments with only a short axoneme, while the wild-type controls had developed outer segments with many well-organized discs. We conclude that MKS3 is not important for formation of connecting cilium and rudimentary outer segments, but is critical for the maturation of outer segment processes. PMID:23516626

  8. Endothelial cell motility, coordination and pattern formation during vasculogenesis.

    PubMed

    Czirok, Andras

    2013-01-01

    How vascular networks assemble is a fundamental problem of developmental biology that also has medical importance. To explain the organizational principles behind vascular patterning, we must understand how can tissue level structures be controlled through cell behavior patterns like motility and adhesion that, in turn, are determined by biochemical signal transduction processes? We discuss the various ideas that have been proposed as mechanisms for vascular network assembly: cell motility guided by extracellular matrix alignment (contact guidance), chemotaxis guided by paracrine and autocrine morphogens, and multicellular sprouting guided by cell-cell contacts. All of these processes yield emergent patterns, thus endothelial cells can form an interconnected structure autonomously, without guidance from an external pre-pattern. PMID:23857825

  9. Cerebellar Zonal Patterning Relies on Purkinje Cell Neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    White, Joshua J.; Arancillo, Marife; Stay, Trace L.; George-Jones, Nicholas A.; Levy, Sabrina L.; Heck, Detlef H.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebellar circuits are patterned into an array of topographic parasagittal domains called zones. The proper connectivity of zones is critical for motor coordination and motor learning, and in several neurological diseases cerebellar circuits degenerate in zonal patterns. Despite recent advances in understanding zone function, we still have a limited understanding of how zones are formed. Here, we focused our attention on Purkinje cells to gain a better understanding of their specific role in establishing zonal circuits. We used conditional mouse genetics to test the hypothesis that Purkinje cell neurotransmission is essential for refining prefunctional developmental zones into sharp functional zones. Our results show that inhibitory synaptic transmission in Purkinje cells is necessary for the precise patterning of Purkinje cell zones and the topographic targeting of mossy fiber afferents. As expected, blocking Purkinje cell neurotransmission caused ataxia. Using in vivo electrophysiology, we demonstrate that loss of Purkinje cell communication altered the firing rate and pattern of their target cerebellar nuclear neurons. Analysis of Purkinje cell complex spike firing revealed that feedback in the cerebellar nuclei to inferior olive to Purkinje cell loop is obstructed. Loss of Purkinje neurotransmission also caused ectopic zonal expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, which is only expressed in adult Purkinje cells when calcium is dysregulated and if excitability is altered. Our results suggest that Purkinje cell inhibitory neurotransmission establishes the functional circuitry of the cerebellum by patterning the molecular zones, fine-tuning afferent circuitry, and shaping neuronal activity. PMID:24920627

  10. Direct patterning of mammalian cells in an ultrasonic heptagon stencil.

    PubMed

    Bernassau, A L; Gesellchen, F; Macpherson, P G A; Riehle, M; Cumming, D R S

    2012-06-01

    We describe the construction of a ultrasonic device suitable for micro patterning particles and cells for tissue engineering applications. The device is formed by seven transducers shaped into a heptagon cavity. By exciting two and three transducers simultaneously, lines or hexagonal shapes can be formed with beads and cells. Furthermore, phase control of the transducers allows shifting the standing waves and thus patterning at different positions on a surface in a controlled manner. The paper discusses direct patterning of mammalian cells by ultrasound "stencil". PMID:22327813

  11. Single cell pattern formation and transient cytoskeletal arrays

    PubMed Central

    Bement, William M.; von Dassow, George

    2015-01-01

    A major goal of developmental biology is to explain the emergence of pattern in cell layers, tissues and organs. Developmental biologists now accept that reaction diffusion-based mechanisms are broadly employed in developing organisms to direct pattern formation. Here we briefly consider these mechanisms and then apply some of the concepts derived from them to several processes that occur in single cells: wound repair, yeast budding, and cytokinesis. Two conclusions emerge from this analysis: first, there is considerable overlap at the level of general mechanisms between developmental and single cell pattern formation; second, dynamic structures based on the actin cytoskeleton may be far more ordered than is generally recognized. PMID:24529246

  12. Processing of polarized light by squid photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Saidel, W M; Lettvin, J Y; MacNichol, E F

    Behavioural tests have demonstrated that cephalopods can discriminate light polarized in different planes, and the receptors have been localized by electrophysiological studies of the eye. Discrimination of the plane of polarization is a consequence of both the structure of the microvilli in the outer segments of the photoreceptors and the orientation of the photosensitive chromophore on these membranes. However, between the depolarizing receptor response resulting from photoreception and the behaviour of the animal, nothing is known about neuronal processing of polarized light by cephalopods. Here we show that some squid photoreceptors discriminate the plane of polarization within the spike train, and that any particular plane is seen as a variable intensity. Given the well known orthogonal orientation of microvilli in outer segments of adjacent photoreceptors and the physiological preference for one of two mutually perpendicular planes of polarization by single photoreceptors, we conclude that cephalopod vision is based on two complementary views of the world, each determined by the transformation of polarization-sensitive receptors into complementary intensity scales. A visual system based on this transformation would lead to enhanced contrast underwater and visualization of object details obscured by confounding highlights. PMID:6877374

  13. Photoreceptors mapping from past history till date.

    PubMed

    Parihar, Parul; Singh, Rachana; Singh, Samiksha; Tripathi, Durgesh Kumar; Chauhan, Devendra Kumar; Singh, Vijay Pratap; Prasad, Sheo Mohan

    2016-09-01

    The critical source of information in plants is light, which is perceived by receptors present in plants and animals. Receptors present in plant and animal system regulate important processes, and knowing the chromophores and signalling domains for each receptor could pave a way to trace out links between these receptors. The signalling mechanism for each receptor will give insight knowledge. This review has focussed on the photoreceptors from past history till date, that have evolved in the plant as well as in the animal system (to lesser extent). We have also focussed our attention on finding the links between the receptors by showing the commonalities as well as the differences between them, and also tried to trace out the links with the help of chromophores and signalling domain. Several photoreceptors have been traced out, which share similarity in the chromophore as well as in the signalling domain, which indicate towards the evolution of photoreceptors from one another. For instance, cryptochrome has been found to evolve three times from CPD photolyase as well as evolution of different types of phytochrome is a result of duplication and divergence. In addition, similarity between the photoreceptors suggested towards evolution from one another. This review has also discussed possible mechanism for each receptor i.e. how they regulate developmental processes and involve what kinds of regulators and also gives an insight on signalling mechanisms by these receptors. This review could also be a new initiative in the study of UVR8 associated studies. PMID:27387671

  14. Surface Functionalization for Protein and Cell Patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colpo, Pascal; Ruiz, Ana; Ceriotti, Laura; Rossi, François

    The interaction of biological systems with synthetic material surfaces is an important issue for many biological applications such as implanted devices, tissue engineering, cell-based sensors and assays, and more generally biologic studies performed ex vivo. To ensure reliable outcomes, the main challenge resides in the ability to design and develop surfaces or artificial micro-environment that mimic 'natural environment' in interacting with biomolecules and cells without altering their function and phenotype. At this effect, microfabrication, surface chemistry and material science play a pivotal role in the design of advanced in-vitro systems for cell culture applications. In this chapter, we discuss and describe different techniques enabling the control of cell-surface interactions, including the description of some techniques for immobilization of ligands for controlling cell-surface interactions and some methodologies for the creation of well confined cell rich areas.

  15. Cluap1 is Essential for Ciliogenesis and Photoreceptor Maintenance in the Vertebrate Eye

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chanjae; Wallingford, John B.; Gross, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To identify the mutation and cell biological underpinnings of photoreceptor defects in zebrafish au5 mutants. Methods. Whole genome sequencing and SNP mapping were used to determine the genomic interval that harbors the au5 mutation. A candidate mutation was cloned and sequenced, and mRNA rescue used to validate that the affected gene was correctly identified. In situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, and confocal imaging were used to determine the effects on photoreceptor development and maintenance in mutant retinae, and to determine if ciliogenesis or cilia-dependent development was affected in mutant embryos. Expression of tagged proteins and high-speed in vivo confocal imaging was used to quantify intraflagellar transport (IFT) and IFT particle localization within multiciliated cells of the Xenopus epidermis. Results. The au5 mutants possess a nonsense mutation in cluap1, which encodes a component of the IFT machinery. Photoreceptor defects result from degeneration of photoreceptors, and defects in ciliogenesis precede degeneration. Cilia in the olfactory pit are absent, and left-right heart positioning is aberrant, consistent with a role for cluap1 during ciliogenesis and cilia-dependent development. High-speed in vivo imaging demonstrates that cluap1 undergoes IFT and that it moves along the cilium bidirectionally, with similar localization and kinetics as IFT20, an IFT-B complex component. Conclusions. We identified a novel mutation in cluap1 and determined that photoreceptor maintenance is dependent on cluap1. Imaging data support a model in which cluap1 is a component of the IFT-B complex, and cilia formation requires cluap1 function. These data may provide new insights into the mechanism of photoreceptor degeneration in retinal ciliopathies. PMID:24970261

  16. Hypoxia reduces the effect of photoreceptor bleaching.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yun-Bin; Liu, Jorn-Hon; Chang, Yin

    2012-07-01

    Hypoxia and light illumination can both decrease oxygen consumption in the photoreceptor layers. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the mutual effects of hypoxia and intense illumination to the photoreceptors are additive. The a-wave of flash electroretinogram (fERG) was recorded to indirectly measure the photoreceptors function under given conditions. Six normal healthy subjects, mean age 34.0 ± 3.8 years, all of whom had high-altitude (>3,000 m) mountain hiking experience, were recruited for the study. Flash a-wave electroretinography was examined under four conditions: (1) normal (D/N); (2) systemic hypoxia induced by inhaling a mixture of O(2) and N(2) gases, which caused oxyhemoglobin saturation (SaO(2)) ≈ 80% (D/H); (3) intense light illumination, which resulted in photoreceptor bleaching (B/N); and (4) a combination of conditions b and c (B/H). Thirty light stimuli, each with a 20-ms ON and 1,980-ms OFF cycle, were given and ERG performed to probe the photoreceptor function. The results showed that a-wave at the various conditions did not respond to all stimuli. The average a-wave amplitudes were 91.4 ± 46.5, 22.8 ± 42.5, 15.5 ± 28.9, and 35.2 ± 41.1 μV for D/N, D/H, B/N, and B/H, respectively. Nonparametric Friedman test for a-wave amplitude indicated that significant differences occurred in D/N-D/H, D/N-B/N, D/N-B/H, D/H-B/H, and B/N-B/H (all p values were <0.001, but D/H-B/N was 0.264). Thus, systemic hypoxia or strong illumination to the retina can cause an absence of the ERG a-wave or change its response, although individual differences were observed. In this study, systemic hypoxia appeared to reduce photoreceptor bleaching, an interesting finding in itself. The mechanisms underlying the disappearance of the ERG a-wave following hypoxia or intense illumination to the photoreceptors seem to differ. PMID:22544448

  17. Accumulation of non-outer segment proteins in the outer segment underlies photoreceptor degeneration in Bardet–Biedl syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Poppy; Allamargot, Chantal; Hudson, Joseph S.; Andersen, Emily K.; Bhattarai, Sajag; Drack, Arlene V.; Sheffield, Val C.; Seo, Seongjin

    2015-01-01

    Compartmentalization and polarized protein trafficking are essential for many cellular functions. The photoreceptor outer segment (OS) is a sensory compartment specialized for phototransduction, and it shares many features with primary cilia. As expected, mutations disrupting protein trafficking to cilia often disrupt protein trafficking to the OS and cause photoreceptor degeneration. Bardet–Biedl syndrome (BBS) is one of the ciliopathies associated with defective ciliary trafficking and photoreceptor degeneration. However, precise roles of BBS proteins in photoreceptor cells and the underlying mechanisms of photoreceptor degeneration in BBS are not well understood. Here, we show that accumulation of non-OS proteins in the OS underlies photoreceptor degeneration in BBS. Using a newly developed BBS mouse model [Leucine zipper transcription factor-like 1 (Lztfl1)/Bbs17 mutant], isolated OSs, and quantitative proteomics, we determined 138 proteins that are enriched more than threefold in BBS mutant OS. In contrast, only eight proteins showed a more than threefold reduction. We found striking accumulation of Stx3 and Stxbp1/Munc18-1 and loss of polarized localization of Prom1 within the Lztfl1 and Bbs1 mutant OS. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that large vesicles are formed in the BBS OS, disrupting the lamellar structure of the OS. Our findings suggest that accumulation (and consequent sequestration) of non-OS proteins in the OS is likely the primary cause of photoreceptor degeneration in BBS. Our data also suggest that a major function of BBS proteins in photoreceptors is to transport proteins from the OS to the cell body or to prevent entry of non-OS proteins into the OS. PMID:26216965

  18. Long-term preservation of cone photoreceptors and visual acuity in rd10 mutant mice exposed to continuous environmental enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Strettoi, Enrica

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In human patients and animal models of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a gradual loss of rod photoreceptors and decline in scotopic vision are the primary manifestations of the disease. Secondary death of cones and gradual, regressive remodeling of the inner retina follow and progress at different speeds according to the underlying genetic defect. In any case, the final outcome is near-blindness without a conclusive cure yet. We recently reported that environmental enrichment (EE), an experimental manipulation based on exposure to enhanced motor, sensory, and social stimulation, when started at birth, exerts clear beneficial effects on a mouse model of RP, by slowing vision loss. The purpose of this study was to investigate in the same mouse the long-term effects of chronic exposure to an EE and assess the outcome of this manipulation on cone survival, inner retinal preservation, and visual behavior. Methods Two groups of rd10 mutant mice were maintained in an EE or standard (ST) laboratory conditions up to 1 year of age. Then, retinal preservation was assessed with immunocytochemistry, confocal microscopy examination, cone counts, and electron microscopy of the photoreceptor layer, while visual acuity was tested behaviorally with a Prusky water maze. Results rd10 mice are a model of autosomal recessive RP with a typical rod-cone, center to the periphery pattern of photoreceptor degeneration. They carry a mutation of the rod-specific phosphodiesterase gene and undergo rod death that peaks at around P24, while cone electroretinogram (ERG) is extinct by P60. We previously showed that early exposure to an EE efficiently delays photoreceptor degeneration in these mutants, extending the time window of cone viability and cone-mediated vision well beyond the phase of maximum rod death. Here we find that a maintained EE can delay the degeneration of cones even in the long term. Confocal and electron microscopy examination of the retinas of the rd10 EE and ST mice at 1

  19. Directionality of individual cone photoreceptors in the parafoveal region.

    PubMed

    Morris, Hugh J; Blanco, Leonardo; Codona, Johanan L; Li, Simone L; Choi, Stacey S; Doble, Nathan

    2015-12-01

    The pointing direction of cone photoreceptors can be inferred from the Stiles-Crawford Effect of the First Kind (SCE-I) measurement. Healthy retinas have tightly packed cones with a SCE-I function peak either centered in the pupil or with a slight nasal bias. Various retinal pathologies can change the profile of the SCE-I function implying that the arrangement or the light capturing properties of the cone photoreceptors are affected. Measuring the SCE-I may reveal early signs of photoreceptor change before actual cell apoptosis occurs. In vivo retinal imaging with adaptive optics (AO) was used to measure the pointing direction of individual cones at eight retinal locations in four control human subjects. Retinal images were acquired by translating an aperture in the light delivery arm through 19 different locations across a subject's entrance pupil. Angular tuning properties of individual cones were calculated by fitting a Gaussian to the reflected intensity profile of each cone projected onto the pupil. Results were compared to those from an accepted psychophysical SCE-I measurement technique. The maximal difference in cone directionality of an ensemble of cones, ρ¯, between the major and minor axes of the Gaussian fit was 0.05 versus 0.29mm(-2) in one subject. All four subjects were found to have a mean nasal bias of 0.81mm with a standard deviation of ±0.30mm in the peak position at all retinal locations with mean ρ¯ value decreasing by 23% with increasing retinal eccentricity. Results show that cones in the parafoveal region converge towards the center of the pupillary aperture, confirming the anterior pointing alignment hypothesis. PMID:26494187

  20. Examination of VLC-PUFA–Deficient Photoreceptor Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Lea D.; Hopiavuori, Blake R.; Brush, Richard S.; Chan, Michael; Van Hook, Matthew J.; Thoreson, Wallace B.; Anderson, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Juvenile-onset autosomal dominant Stargardt-like macular dystrophy (STGD3) is caused by mutations in ELOVL4 (elongation of very long fatty acids-4), an elongase necessary for the biosynthesis of very long chain fatty acids (VLC-FAs ≥ C26). Photoreceptors are enriched with VLC polyunsaturated fatty acids (VLC-PUFAs), which are necessary for long-term survival of rod photoreceptors. The purpose of these studies was to determine the effect of deletion of VLC-PUFAs on rod synaptic function in retinas of mice conditionally depleted (KO) of Elovl4. Methods. Retina function was assessed in wild-type (WT) and KO by electroretinography. Outer plexiform structure was evaluated by immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Single-cell recordings measured rod ion channel operation and rod bipolar glutamate signaling. Sucrose gradient centrifugation was used to isolate synaptosomes from bovine retina. Proteins and lipids were analyzed by Western blotting and tandem mass spectroscopy, respectively. Results. Inner retinal responses (b-wave, oscillatory potentials, and scotopic threshold responses) of the ERG were decreased in the KO mice compared to controls. However the rod ion channel operation and bipolar glutamate responses were comparable between groups. Biochemical analysis revealed that conventional and ribbon synapses have VLC-PUFAs. Ultrastructural analysis showed that the outer plexiform layer was disorganized and the diameter of vesicles in rod terminals was smaller in the KO mice. Conclusions. Very long chain PUFAs affect rod function by contributing to synaptic vesicle size, which may alter the dynamics of synaptic transmission, ultimately resulting in a loss of neuronal connectivity and death of rod photoreceptors. PMID:24764063

  1. Photoreceptor types and distributions in the retinae of insectivores.

    PubMed

    Peichl, L; Künzle, H; Vogel, P

    2000-01-01

    The retinae of insectivores have been rarely studied, and their photoreceptor arrangements and expression patterns of visual pigments are largely unknown. We have determined the presence and distribution of cones in three species of shrews (common shrew Sorex araneus, greater white-toothed shrew Crocidura russula, dark forest shrew Crocidura poensis; Soricidae) and in the lesser hedgehog tenrec Echinops telfairi (Tenrecidae). Special cone types were identified and quantified in flattened whole retinae by antisera/antibodies recognizing the middle-to-long-wavelength-sensitive (M/L-)cone opsin and the short-wavelength-sensitive (S-)cone opsin, respectively. A combination of immunocytochemistry with conventional histology was used to assess rod densities and cone/rod ratios. In all four species the rods dominate at densities of about 230,000-260,000/mm2. M/L- and S-cones are present, comprising between 2% of the photoreceptors in the nocturnal Echinops telfairi and 13% in Sorex araneus that has equal diurnal and nocturnal activity phases. This suggests dichromatic color vision like in many other mammals. A striking feature in all four species are dramatically higher S-cone proportions in ventral than in dorsal retina (0.5% vs. 2.5-12% in Sorex, 5-15% vs. 30-45% in Crocidura poensis, 3-12% vs. 20-50% in Crocidura russula, 10-30% vs. 40-70% in Echinops). The functional and comparative aspects of these structural findings are discussed. PMID:11193110

  2. Scaffold-independent Patterning of Cells using Magnetic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Suvojit; Biswas, Moanaro; Elankumaran, Subbiah; Puri, Ishwar

    2013-03-01

    Spatial patterning of cells in vitro relies on direct contact of cells on to solid surfaces. Scaffold independent patterning of cells has never been achieved so far. Patterning of cells has wide applications including stem cell biology, tissue architecture and regenerative medicine besides fundamental biology. Magnetized cells in a suspension can be manipulated using an externally applied magnetic field enabling directed patterning. We magnetized mammalian cells by internalization of superparamagnetic nanoparticles coated with bovine serum albumin (BSA). A magnetic field is then used to arrange cells in a desired pattern on a substrate or in suspension. The control strategy is derived from the self-assembly of magnetic colloids in a liquid considering magnetostatic interactions. The range of achievable structural features promise novel experimental methods investigating the influence of tissue shape and size on cell population dynamics wherein Fickian diffusion of autocrine growth signals are known to play a significant role. By eliminating the need for a scaffold, intercellular adhesion mechanics and the effects of temporally regulated signals can be investigated. The findings can be applied to novel tissue engineering methods.

  3. Alterations to retinal architecture prior to photoreceptor loss in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Roche, Sarah L; Wyse-Jackson, Alice C; Byrne, Ashleigh M; Ruiz-Lopez, Ana M; Cotter, Thomas G

    2016-01-01

    Mouse models of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are essential tools in the pursuit to understand fully what cell types and processes underlie the degeneration observed in RP. Knowledge of these processes is required if we are to develop successful therapies to treat this currently incurable disease. We have used the rd10 mouse model of RP to study retinal morphology prior to photoreceptor loss, using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy on cryosections, since little is known about how the mutation affects the retina during this period. We report novel findings that the mutation in the rd10 mouse results in retinal abnormalities earlier than was previously thought. Defects in rod and cone outer segments, bipolar cells, amacrine cells and photoreceptor synapses were apparent in the retina during early stages of postnatal retinal development and prior to the loss of photoreceptors. Additionally, we observed a dramatic response of glial cells during this period. Microglia responded as early as postnatal day (P) 5; ?13 days before any photoreceptor loss is detected with Müller glia and astrocytes exhibiting changes from P10 and P15 respectively. Overall, these findings present pathological aspects to the postnatal development of the rd10 retina, contributing significantly to our understanding of disease onset and progression in the rd10 mouse and provide a valuable resource for the study of retinal dystrophies. PMID:27160072

  4. Facile cell patterning on an albumin-coated surface.

    PubMed

    Yamazoe, Hironori; Uemura, Toshimasa; Tanabe, Toshizumi

    2008-08-19

    Fabrication of micropatterned surfaces to organize and control cell adhesion and proliferation is an indispensable technique for cell-based technologies. Although several successful strategies for creating cellular micropatterns on substrates have been demonstrated, a complex multistep process and requirements for special and expensive equipment or materials limit their prevalence as a general experimental tool. To circumvent these problems, we describe here a novel facile fabrication method for a micropatterned surface for cell patterning by utilizing the UV-induced conversion of the cell adhesive property of albumin, which is the most abundant protein in blood plasma. An albumin-coated surface was prepared by cross-linking albumin with ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether and subsequent casting of the cross-linked albumin solution on the cell culture dish. While cells did not attach to the albumin surface prepared in this way, UV exposure renders the surface cell-adhesive. Thus, surface micropatterning was achieved simply by exposing the albumin-coated surface to UV light through a mask with the desired pattern. Mouse fibroblast L929 cells were inoculated on the patterned albumin substrates, and cells attached and spread in a highly selective manner according to the UV-irradiated pattern. Although detailed investigation of the molecular-level mechanism concerning the change in cell adhesiveness of the albumin-coated surface is required, the present results would give a novel facile method for the fabrication of cell micropatterned surfaces. PMID:18627191

  5. Ion channels activated by light in Limulus ventral photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    The light-activated conductance of Limulus ventral photoreceptors was studied using the patch-clamp technique. Channels (40 pS) were observed whose probability of opening was greatly increased by light. In some cells the latency of channel activation was nearly the same as that of the macroscopic response, while in other cells the channel latency was much greater. Like the macroscopic conductance, channel activity was reduced by light adaptation but enhanced by the intracellular injection of the calcium chelator EGTA. The latter observation indicates that channel activation was not a secondary result of the light-induced rise in intracellular calcium. A two-microelectrode voltage-clamp method was used to measure the voltage dependence of the light-activated macroscopic conductance. It was found that this conductance is constant over a wide voltage range more negative than zero, but it increases markedly at positive voltages. The single channel currents measured over this same voltage range show that the single channel conductance is independent of voltage, but that channel gating properties are dependent on voltage. Both the mean channel open time and the opening rate increase at positive voltages. These properties change in a manner consistent with the voltage dependence of the macroscopic conductance. The broad range of similarities between the macroscopic and single channel currents supports the conclusion that the 40-pS channel that we have observed is the principal channel underlying the response to light in these photoreceptors. PMID:2419481

  6. Focal damage to macaque photoreceptors produces persistent visual loss

    PubMed Central

    Strazzeri, Jennifer M.; Hunter, Jennifer J.; Masella, Benjamin D.; Yin, Lu; Fischer, William S.; DiLoreto, David A.; Libby, Richard T.; Williams, David R.; Merigan, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Insertion of light-gated channels into inner retina neurons restores neural light responses, light evoked potentials, visual optomotor responses and visually-guided maze behavior in mice blinded by retinal degeneration. This method of vision restoration bypasses damaged outer retina, providing stimulation directly to retinal ganglion cells in inner retina. The approach is similar to that of electronic visual protheses, but may offer some advantages, such as avoidance of complex surgery and direct targeting of many thousands of neurons. However, the promise of this technique for restoring human vision remains uncertain because rodent animal models, in which it has been largely developed, are not ideal for evaluating visual perception. On the other hand, psychophysical vision studies in macaque can be used to evaluate different approaches to vision restoration in humans. Furthermore, it has not been possible to test vision restoration in macaques, the optimal model for human-like vision, because there has been no macaque model of outer retina degeneration. In this study, we describe development of a macaque model of photoreceptor degeneration that can in future studies be used to test restoration of perception by visual prostheses. Our results show that perceptual deficits caused by focal light damage are restricted to locations at which photoreceptors are damaged, that optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be used to track such lesions, and that adaptive optics retinal imaging, which we recently used for in vivo recording of ganglion cell function, can be used in future studies to examine these lesions. PMID:24316158

  7. Focal damage to macaque photoreceptors produces persistent visual loss.

    PubMed

    Strazzeri, Jennifer M; Hunter, Jennifer J; Masella, Benjamin D; Yin, Lu; Fischer, William S; DiLoreto, David A; Libby, Richard T; Williams, David R; Merigan, William H

    2014-02-01

    Insertion of light-gated channels into inner retina neurons restores neural light responses, light evoked potentials, visual optomotor responses and visually-guided maze behavior in mice blinded by retinal degeneration. This method of vision restoration bypasses damaged outer retina, providing stimulation directly to retinal ganglion cells in inner retina. The approach is similar to that of electronic visual protheses, but may offer some advantages, such as avoidance of complex surgery and direct targeting of many thousands of neurons. However, the promise of this technique for restoring human vision remains uncertain because rodent animal models, in which it has been largely developed, are not ideal for evaluating visual perception. On the other hand, psychophysical vision studies in macaque can be used to evaluate different approaches to vision restoration in humans. Furthermore, it has not been possible to test vision restoration in macaques, the optimal model for human-like vision, because there has been no macaque model of outer retina degeneration. In this study, we describe development of a macaque model of photoreceptor degeneration that can in future studies be used to test restoration of perception by visual prostheses. Our results show that perceptual deficits caused by focal light damage are restricted to locations at which photoreceptors are damaged, that optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be used to track such lesions, and that adaptive optics retinal imaging, which we recently used for in vivo recording of ganglion cell function, can be used in future studies to examine these lesions. PMID:24316158

  8. Self-Organizing Actomyosin Patterns on the Cell Cortex at Epithelial Cell-Cell Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Thomas; Wu, Selwin K.; Michael, Magdalene; Yap, Alpha S.; Gomez, Guillermo A.; Neufeld, Zoltan

    2014-01-01

    The behavior of actomyosin critically determines morphologically distinct patterns of contractility found at the interface between adherent cells. One such pattern is found at the apical region (zonula adherens) of cell-cell junctions in epithelia, where clusters of the adhesion molecule E-cadherin concentrate in a static pattern. Meanwhile, E-cadherin clusters throughout lateral cell-cell contacts display dynamic movements in the plane of the junctions. To gain insight into the principles that determine the nature and organization of these dynamic structures, we analyze this behavior by modeling the 2D actomyosin cell cortex as an active fluid medium. The numerical simulations show that the stability of the actin filaments influences the spatial structure and dynamics of the system. We find that in addition to static Turing-type patterns, persistent dynamic behavior occurs in a wide range of parameters. In the 2D model, mechanical stress-dependent actin breakdown is shown to produce a continuously changing network of actin bridges, whereas with a constant breakdown rate, more isolated clusters of actomyosin tend to form. The model qualitatively reproduces the dynamic and stable patterns experimentally observed at the junctions between epithelial cells. PMID:25468344

  9. Self-organizing actomyosin patterns on the cell cortex at epithelial cell-cell junctions.

    PubMed

    Moore, Thomas; Wu, Selwin K; Michael, Magdalene; Yap, Alpha S; Gomez, Guillermo A; Neufeld, Zoltan

    2014-12-01

    The behavior of actomyosin critically determines morphologically distinct patterns of contractility found at the interface between adherent cells. One such pattern is found at the apical region (zonula adherens) of cell-cell junctions in epithelia, where clusters of the adhesion molecule E-cadherin concentrate in a static pattern. Meanwhile, E-cadherin clusters throughout lateral cell-cell contacts display dynamic movements in the plane of the junctions. To gain insight into the principles that determine the nature and organization of these dynamic structures, we analyze this behavior by modeling the 2D actomyosin cell cortex as an active fluid medium. The numerical simulations show that the stability of the actin filaments influences the spatial structure and dynamics of the system. We find that in addition to static Turing-type patterns, persistent dynamic behavior occurs in a wide range of parameters. In the 2D model, mechanical stress-dependent actin breakdown is shown to produce a continuously changing network of actin bridges, whereas with a constant breakdown rate, more isolated clusters of actomyosin tend to form. The model qualitatively reproduces the dynamic and stable patterns experimentally observed at the junctions between epithelial cells. PMID:25468344

  10. Changes in Parthenogenetic Imprinting Patterns during Reprogramming by Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyun Sik; Hong, Yean Ju; Choi, Hyun Woo; Song, Hyuk; Byun, Sung June; Uhm, Sang Jun; Seo, Han Geuk; Do, Jeong Tae

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated somatic cells can be reprogrammed into the pluripotent state by cell-cell fusion. In the pluripotent state, reprogrammed cells may then self-renew and differentiate into all three germ layers. Fusion-induced reprogramming also epigenetically modifies the somatic cell genome through DNA demethylation, X chromosome reactivation, and histone modification. In this study, we investigated whether fusion with embryonic stem cells (ESCs) also reprograms genomic imprinting patterns in somatic cells. In particular, we examined imprinting changes in parthenogenetic neural stem cells fused with biparental ESCs, as well as in biparental neural stem cells fused with parthenogenetic ESCs. The resulting hybrid cells expressed the pluripotency markers Oct4 and Nanog. In addition, methylation of several imprinted genes except Peg3 was comparable between hybrid cells and ESCs. This finding indicates that reprogramming by cell fusion does not necessarily reverse the status of all imprinted genes to the state of pluripotent fusion partner. PMID:27232503

  11. Coexpression of two visual pigments in a photoreceptor causes an abnormally broad spectral sensitivity in the eye of the butterfly Papilio xuthus.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Kentaro; Mizuno, Shin; Kinoshita, Michiyo; Stavenga, Doekele G

    2003-06-01

    The compound eye of the butterfly Papilio xuthus consists of three different types of ommatidia, each containing nine photoreceptor cells (R1-R9). We have found previously that the R5-R8 photoreceptors of type II ommatidia coexpress two different mRNAs, encoding opsins of green- and orange-red-absorbing visual pigments (Kitamoto et al., 1998). Do these cells contain two functionally distinct visual pigments? First, we identified the sensitivity spectrum of these photoreceptors by using combined intracellular recording and dye injection. We thus found that the R5-R8 of type II ommatidia have a characteristic sensitivity spectrum extending over an excessively broad spectral range, from the violet to the red region; the photoreceptors are therefore termed broadband photoreceptors. The spectral shape was interpreted with a computational model for type II ommatidia, containing a UV visual pigment in cells R1 and R2, two green visual pigments in cells R3 and R4, a far-UV-absorbing screening pigment (3-hydroxyretinol) in the distal part of the ommatidium, and a red-screening pigment that surrounds the rhabdom. The modeling suggests that both visual pigments in the R5-R8 photoreceptors participate in phototransduction. This work provides the first compelling evidence that multiple visual pigments participate in phototransduction in single invertebrate photoreceptors. PMID:12805293

  12. Melanopsin-Expressing Amphioxus Photoreceptors Transduce Light via a Phospholipase C Signaling Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Angueyra, Juan Manuel; Pulido, Camila; Malagón, Gerardo; Nasi, Enrico; Gomez, Maria del Pilar

    2012-01-01

    Melanopsin, the receptor molecule that underlies light sensitivity in mammalian ‘circadian’ receptors, is homologous to invertebrate rhodopsins and has been proposed to operate via a similar signaling pathway. Its downstream effectors, however, remain elusive. Melanopsin also expresses in two distinct light-sensitive cell types in the neural tube of amphioxus. This organism is the most basal extant chordate and can help outline the evolutionary history of different photoreceptor lineages and their transduction mechanisms; moreover, isolated amphioxus photoreceptors offer unique advantages, because they are unambiguously identifiable and amenable to single-cell physiological assays. In the present study whole-cell patch clamp recording, pharmacological manipulations, and immunodetection were utilized to investigate light transduction in amphioxus photoreceptors. A Gq was identified and selectively localized to the photosensitive microvillar membrane, while the pivotal role of phospholipase C was established pharmacologically. The photocurrent was profoundly depressed by IP3 receptor antagonists, highlighting the importance of IP3 receptors in light signaling. By contrast, surrogates of diacylglycerol (DAG), as well as poly-unsaturated fatty acids failed to activate a membrane conductance or to alter the light response. The results strengthen the notion that calcium released from the ER via IP3-sensitive channels may fulfill a key role in conveying - directly or indirectly - the melanopsin-initiated light signal to the photoconductance; moreover, they challenge the dogma that microvillar photoreceptors and phoshoinositide-based light transduction are a prerogative of invertebrate eyes. PMID:22235344

  13. Surface texturing and patterning in solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.

    1993-11-01

    Surface texture can perform a number of functions in modern solar cell design. The most obvious function is in control of reflection from surfaces on which sunlight is incident. However, texture can also be used to influence the fate of light that is refracted into the cell. Light steering by surface texture can ensure this refracted light is absorbed in regions of the cell which are most responsive. When used with rear reflectors, surface texture can help trap weakly absorbed light into the cell, increasing the effective path length or optical thickness of the cell by factors of 30--60. Two general types of texture are considered. One involves macroscopic features of controlled shape designed to control the direction of interacting light. The other is based on the use of irregular features of size comparable to wavelength of the light. These can be very effective in scattering light into a wide range of directions. Non-optical uses of texture are also briefly described. 62 refs., 22 figs.

  14. Myocardial Cell Pattern on Piezoelectric Nanofiber Mats for Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Wang, X.; Zhao, H.; Du, Y.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents in vitro contractile myocardial cell pattern on piezoelectric nanofiber mats with applications in energy harvesting. The cell-based energy harvester consists of myocardial cell sheet and a PDMS substrate with a PVDF nanofiber mat on. Experimentally, cultured on specifically distributed nanofiber mats, neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes are characterized with the related morphology and contraction. Previously, we have come up with the concept of energy harvesting from heart beating using piezoelectric material. A bio-hybrid energy harvester combined living cardiomyocytes, PDMS polymer substrate and piezoelectric PVDF film with the electrical output of peak current 87.5nA and peak voltage 92.3mV. However, the thickness of the cardiomyocyte cultured on a two-dimensional substrate is much less than that of the piezoelectric film. The Micro Contact Printing (μCP) method used in cell pattern on the PDMS thin film has tough requirement for the film surface. As such, in this paper we fabricated nanofiber-constructed PDMS thin film to realize cell pattern due to PVDF nanofibers with better piezoelectricity and microstructures of nanofiber mats guiding cell distribution. Living cardiomyocytes patterned on those distributed piezoelectric nanofibers with the result of the same distribution as the nanofiber pattern.

  15. Autonomous patterning of cells on microstructured fine particles.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Iwori; Kawanabe, Masato; Kaneko, Arata

    2015-05-01

    Regularly patterned cells can clarify cellular function and are required in some biochip applications. This study examines cell patterning along microstructures and the effect of microstructural geometry on selective cellular adhesion. Particles can be autonomously assembled on a soda-lime glass substrate that is chemically patterned by immersion in a suspension of fine particles. By adopting various sizes of fine particles, we can control the geometry of the microstructure. Cells adhere more readily to microstructured fine particles than to flat glass substrate. Silica particles hexagonally packed in 5-40 μm line and space microstructures provide an effective cell scaffold on the glass substrate. Cultured cells tend to attach and proliferate along the microstructured region while avoiding the flat region. The difference in cell adhesion is attributed to their geometries, as both of the silica particles and soda-lime glass are hydrophilic related with cell adhesiveness. After cell seeding, cells adhered to the flat region migrated toward the microstructured region. For most of the cells to assemble on the scaffold, the scaffolding microstructures must be spaced by at most 65 μm. PMID:25746259

  16. Changes in Intracellular Free Calcium Concentration during Illumination of Invertebrate Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. E.; Blinks, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Aequorin, which luminesces in the presence of calcium, was injected into photoreceptor cells of Limulus ventral eye. A bright light stimulus elicited a large increase in aequorin luminescence, the aequorin response, indicating a rise of intracellular calcium ion concentration, Cai. The aequorin response reached a maximum after the peak of the electrical response of the photoreceptor, decayed during a prolonged stimulus, and returned to an undetectable level in the dark. Reduction of Cao reduced the amplitude of the aequorin response by a factor no greater than 3. Raising Cao increased the amplitude of the aequorin response. The aequorin response became smaller when membrane voltage was clamped to successively more positive values. These results indicate that the stimulus-induced rise of Cai may be due in part to a light-induced influx of Ca and in part to release of Ca from an intracellular store. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that a rise in Cai is a step in the sequence of events underlying light-adaptation in Limulus ventral photoreceptors. Aequorin was also injected into photoreceptors of Balanus. The aequorin responses were similar to those recorded from Limulus cells in all but two ways: (a) A large sustained aequorin luminescence was measured during a prolonged stimulus, and (b) removal of extracellular calcium reduced the aequorin response to an undetectable level. PMID:4155426

  17. Retinophilin is a light-regulated phosphoprotein required to suppress photoreceptor dark noise in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Mecklenburg, Kirk L.; Takemori, Nobuaki; Komori, Naoka; Chu, Brian; Hardie, Roger C.; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; O’Tousa, Joseph. E.

    2010-01-01

    Photoreceptor cells achieve high sensitivity, reliably detecting single photons, while limiting the spontaneous activation events responsible for dark noise. We used proteomic, genetic, and electrophysiological approaches to characterize Retinophilin (RTP/CG10233) in Drosophila photoreceptors, and establish its involvement in dark noise suppression. RTP possesses MORN (Membrane Occupation and Recognition Nexus) motifs, a structure shared with mammalian junctophilins and other membrane-associated proteins found within excitable cells. We show the MORN repeats, and both the N- and C-terminal domains, are required for RTP localization in the microvillar light gathering organelle, the rhabdomere. RTP exists in multiple phosphorylated isoforms under dark conditions and is dephosphorylated by light exposure. An RTP deletion mutant exhibits a high rate of spontaneous membrane depolarization events in dark conditions but retains the normal kinetics of the light response. Photoreceptors lacking NINAC myosin III, a motor protein/kinase, also display a similar dark noise phenotype as the RTP deletion. We show that NINAC mutants are depleted for RTP. These results suggest the increase in dark noise in NINAC mutants is due to lack of RTP, and further, defines a novel role for NINAC in the rhabdomere. We propose that RTP is a light-regulated phosphoprotein that organizes rhabdomeric components to suppress random activation of the phototransduction cascade and thus increases the signaling fidelity of dark-adapted photoreceptors. PMID:20107052

  18. Efficient Immobilization and Patterning of Live Bacterial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suo, Zhiyong; Avci, Recep; Yang, Xinghong; Pascual, David W.

    2008-01-01

    A monolayer of live bacterial cells has been patterned onto substrates through the interaction between CFA/I fimbriae and the corresponding antibody. Patterns of live bacteria have been prepared with cellular resolution on silicon and gold substrates for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as a model with high specificity and efficiency. The immobilized cells are capable of dividing in growth medium to form a self-sustaining bacterial monolayer on the patterned areas. Interestingly, the immobilized cells can alter their orientation on the substrate, from lying-down to standing-up, as a response to the cell density increase during incubation. This method was successfully used to sort a targeted bacterial species from a mixed culture within 2 h. PMID:18321142

  19. The Classification of HEp-2 Cell Patterns Using Fractal Descriptor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rudan; Sun, Yuanyuan; Yang, Zhihao; Song, Bo; Hu, Xiaopeng

    2015-07-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) with HEp-2 cells is considered as a powerful, sensitive and comprehensive technique for analyzing antinuclear autoantibodies (ANAs). The automatic classification of the HEp-2 cell images from IIF has played an important role in diagnosis. Fractal dimension can be used on the analysis of image representing and also on the property quantification like texture complexity and spatial occupation. In this study, we apply the fractal theory in the application of HEp-2 cell staining pattern classification, utilizing fractal descriptor firstly in the HEp-2 cell pattern classification with the help of morphological descriptor and pixel difference descriptor. The method is applied to the data set of MIVIA and uses the support vector machine (SVM) classifier. Experimental results show that the fractal descriptor combining with morphological descriptor and pixel difference descriptor makes the precisions of six patterns more stable, all above 50%, achieving 67.17% overall accuracy at best with relatively simple feature vectors. PMID:26011888

  20. Spontaneous Regeneration of Human Photoreceptor Outer Segments

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Jonathan C.; Parker, Alicia B.; Botelho, James V.; Duncan, Jacque L.

    2015-01-01

    Photoreceptors are damaged in many common eye diseases, such as macular degeneration, retinal detachment, and retinitis pigmentosa. The development of methods to promote the repair or replacement of affected photoreceptors is a major goal of vision research. In this context, it would be useful to know whether photoreceptors are capable of undergoing some degree of spontaneous regeneration after injury. We report a subject who lost retinal function in a wide zone around the optic disc, giving rise to massive enlargement of the physiological blind spot. Imaging with an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) showed depletion of cone outer segments in the affected retina. A year later visual function had improved, with shrinkage of the enlarged blind spot. AOSLO imaging showed repopulation of cone outer segments, although their density remained below normal. There was a one-to-one match between sites of formerly missing outer segments and new outer segments that had appeared over the course of the year’s recovery. This correspondence provided direct morphological evidence that damaged cones are capable, under some circumstances, of generating new outer segments. PMID:26213154

  1. Differential alterations in the expression of neurotransmitter receptors in inner retina following loss of photoreceptors in rd1 mouse.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Prerna; Sinha-Mahapatra, Sumit K; Ghosh, Abhinaba; Srivastava, Ipsit; Dhingra, Narender K

    2015-01-01

    Loss of photoreceptors leads to significant remodeling in inner retina of rd1 mouse, a widely used model of retinal degeneration. Several morphological and physiological alterations occur in the second- and third-order retinal neurons. Synaptic activity in the excitatory bipolar cells and the predominantly inhibitory amacrine cells is enhanced. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) exhibit hyperactivity and aberrant spiking pattern, which adversely affects the quality of signals they can carry to the brain. To further understand the pathophysiology of retinal degeneration, and how it may lead to aberrant spiking in RGCs, we asked how loss of photoreceptors affects some of the neurotransmitter receptors in rd1 mouse. Using Western blotting, we measured the levels of several neurotransmitter receptors in adult rd1 mouse retina. We found significantly higher levels of AMPA, glycine and GABAa receptors, but lower levels of GABAc receptors in rd1 mouse than in wild-type. Since GABAa receptor is expressed in several retinal layers, we employed quantitative immunohistochemistry to measure GABAa receptor levels in specific retinal layers. We found that the levels of GABAa receptors in inner plexiform layer of wild-type and rd1 mice were similar, whereas those in outer plexiform layer and inner nuclear layer combined were higher in rd1 mouse. Specifically, we found that the number of GABAa-immunoreactive somas in the inner nuclear layer of rd1 mouse retina was significantly higher than in wild-type. These findings provide further insights into neurochemical remodeling in the inner retina of rd1 mouse, and how it might lead to oscillatory activity in RGCs. PMID:25835503

  2. Computational analysis of signaling patterns in single cells

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Denise M.; Purvis, Jeremy E.

    2014-01-01

    Signaling proteins are flexible in both form and function. They can bind to multiple molecular partners and integrate diverse types of cellular information. When imaged by time-lapse microscopy, many signaling proteins show complex patterns of activity or localization that vary from cell to cell. This heterogeneity is so prevalent that it has spurred the development of new computational strategies to analyze single-cell signaling patterns. A collective observation from these analyses is that cells appear less heterogeneous when their responses are normalized to, or synchronized with, other single-cell measurements. In many cases, these transformed signaling patterns show distinct dynamical trends that correspond with predictable phenotypic outcomes. When signaling mechanisms are unclear, computational models can suggest putative molecular interactions that are experimentally testable. Thus, computational analysis of single-cell signaling has not only provided new ways to quantify the responses of individual cells, but has helped resolve longstanding questions surrounding many well-studied human signaling proteins including NF-κB, p53, ERK1/2, and CDK2. A number of specific challenges lie ahead for single-cell analysis such as quantifying the contribution of non-cell autonomous signaling as well as the characterization of protein signaling dynamics in vivo. PMID:25263011

  3. Spatial Pattern of Cell Damage in Tissue from Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem L.; Huff, Janice L.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    A new Monte Carlo algorithm was developed that can model passage of heavy ions in a tissue, and their action on the cellular matrix for 2- or 3-dimensional cases. The build-up of secondaries such as projectile fragments, target fragments, other light fragments, and delta-rays was simulated. Cells were modeled as a cell culture monolayer in one example, where the data were taken directly from microscopy (2-d cell matrix). A simple model of tissue was given as abstract spheres with close approximation to real cell geometries (3-d cell matrix), as well as a realistic model of tissue was proposed based on microscopy images. Image segmentation was used to identify cells in an irradiated cell culture monolayer, or slices of tissue. The cells were then inserted into the model box pixel by pixel. In the case of cell monolayers (2-d), the image size may exceed the modeled box size. Such image was is moved with respect to the box in order to sample as many cells as possible. In the case of the simple tissue (3-d), the tissue box is modeled with periodic boundary conditions, which extrapolate the technique to macroscopic volumes of tissue. For real tissue, specific spatial patterns for cell apoptosis and necrosis are expected. The cell patterns were modeled based on action cross sections for apoptosis and necrosis estimated based on BNL data, and other experimental data.

  4. Rod photoreceptors protect from cone degeneration-induced retinal remodeling and restore visual responses in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Saade, Carole J.; Alvarez-Delfin, Karen; Fadool, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Humans are largely dependent upon cone-mediated vision. However, death or dysfunction of rods, the predominant photoreceptor subtype, results in secondary loss of cones, remodeling of retinal circuitry and blindness. The changes in circuitry may contribute to the vision deficit and undermine attempts at restoring sight. We exploit zebrafish larvae as a genetic model to specifically characterize changes associated with photoreceptor degenerations in a cone-dominated retina. Photoreceptors form synapses with two types of second order neurons, bipolar cells and horizontal cells. Using cell-specific reporter gene expression and immunolabeling for postsynaptic glutamate receptors, significant remodeling is observed following cone degeneration in the pde6cw59 larval retina but not rod degeneration in the Xops:mCFPq13 line. In adults, rods and cones are present in approximately equal numbers, and in pde6cw59 mutants glutamate receptor expression and synaptic structures in the outer plexiform layer are preserved, and visual responses are gained in these once-blind fish. We propose that the abundance of rods in the adult protects the retina from cone degeneration-induced remodeling. We test this hypothesis by genetically manipulating the number of rods in larvae. We show that an increased number and uniform distribution of rods in lor/tbx2bp22bbtl or six7 morpholino-injected larvae protect from pde6cw59-induced secondary changes. The observations that remodeling is a common consequence of photoreceptor death across species, and that in zebrafish a small number of surviving photoreceptors afford protection from degeneration-induced changes provides a model for systematic analysis of factors that slow or even prevent the secondary deteriorations associated with neural degenerative disease. PMID:23365220

  5. Adenosine triphosphate-induced photoreceptor death and retinal remodeling in rats

    PubMed Central

    Vessey, Kirstan A; Greferath, Ursula; Aplin, Felix P; Jobling, Andrew I; Phipps, Joanna A; Ho, Tracy; De Iongh, Robbert U; Fletcher, Erica L

    2014-01-01

    Many common causes of blindness involve the death of retinal photoreceptors, followed by progressive inner retinal cell remodeling. For an inducible model of retinal degeneration to be useful, it must recapitulate these changes. Intravitreal administration of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has recently been found to induce acute photoreceptor death. The aim of this study was to characterize the chronic effects of ATP on retinal integrity. Five-week-old, dark agouti rats were administered 50 mM ATP into the vitreous of one eye and saline into the other. Vision was assessed using the electroretinogram and optokinetic response and retinal morphology investigated via histology. ATP caused significant loss of visual function within 1 day and loss of 50% of the photoreceptors within 1 week. At 3 months, 80% of photoreceptor nuclei were lost, and total photoreceptor loss occurred by 6 months. The degeneration and remodeling were similar to those found in heritable retinal dystrophies and age-related macular degeneration and included inner retinal neuronal loss, migration, and formation of new synapses; Müller cell gliosis, migration, and scarring; blood vessel loss; and retinal pigment epithelium migration. In addition, extreme degeneration and remodeling events, such as neuronal and glial migration outside the neural retina and proliferative changes in glial cells, were observed. These extreme changes were also observed in the 2-year-old P23H rhodopsin transgenic rat model of retinitis pigmentosa. This ATP-induced model of retinal degeneration may provide a valuable tool for developing pharmaceutical therapies or for testing electronic implants aimed at restoring vision. J. Comp. Neurol. 522:2928–2950, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24639102

  6. Stable transgenesis in the marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii sheds new light on photoreceptor evolution

    PubMed Central

    Backfisch, Benjamin; Veedin Rajan, Vinoth Babu; Fischer, Ruth M.; Lohs, Claudia; Arboleda, Enrique; Tessmar-Raible, Kristin; Raible, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Research in eye evolution has mostly focused on eyes residing in the head. In contrast, noncephalic light sensors are far less understood and rather regarded as evolutionary innovations. We established stable transgenesis in the annelid Platynereis, a reference species for evolutionary and developmental comparisons. EGFP controlled by cis-regulatory elements of r-opsin, a characteristic marker for rhabdomeric photoreceptors, faithfully recapitulates known r-opsin expression in the adult eyes, and marks a pair of pigment-associated frontolateral eyelets in the brain. Unexpectedly, transgenic animals revealed an additional series of photoreceptors in the ventral nerve cord as well as photoreceptors that are located in each pair of the segmental dorsal appendages (notopodia) and project into the ventral nerve cord. Consistent with a photosensory function of these noncephalic cells, decapitated animals display a clear photoavoidance response. Molecular analysis of the receptors suggests that they differentiate independent of pax6, a gene involved in early eye development of many metazoans, and that the ventral cells may share origins with the Hesse organs in the amphioxus neural tube. Finally, expression analysis of opn4×-2 and opn4m-2, two zebrafish orthologs of Platynereis r-opsin, reveals that these genes share expression in the neuromasts, known mechanoreceptors of the lateral line peripheral nervous system. Together, this establishes that noncephalic photoreceptors are more widespread than assumed, and may even reflect more ancient aspects of sensory systems. Our study marks significant advance for the understanding of photoreceptor cell (PRC) evolution and development and for Platynereis as a functional lophotrochozoan model system. PMID:23284166

  7. The supply of metabolic substrate from glia to photoreceptors in the retina of the honeybee drone.

    PubMed

    Tsacopoulos, M; Coles, J A; Van de Werve, G

    1987-01-01

    1. The drone retina is composed essentially of only two types of cells: a population of identical photoreceptor cells occupying 38% of the volume is embedded in a syncytium of glia (called outer pigment cells). Nearly all the mitochondria are in the photoreceptors. 2. A retinal slice consumes 18 microliter O2 (ml tissue)-1 min-1 in the dark for up to 6 h, even without exogenous substrate; in 6 h this would require the equivalent of 127 mM glucose in the photoreceptors or 8.7 mg glycogen (ml tissue)-1. 3. Freshly dissected retinas contain about 45 mg glycogen (ml tissue)-1, but this appears, from electron micrographs and from the PAS reaction, to be exclusively in the glia. After superfusion with substrate-free Ringer solution for 30 min, slices of retina contained less than 20 microM glucose. It therefore appears that to sustain respiration, carbohydrate substrate must be transferred from the glia to the photoreceptors. 4. Even after 6 h superfusion with substrate-free Ringer solution O2 consumption (QO2) was not increased by exogenous glucose, pyruvate, trehalose or lactate, nor decreased by 2-deoxy-D-glucose. QO2 was increased 2-3 fold by either light stimulation or (for at least 20 min) by 50 microM dinitrophenol. 5. QO2 was only slightly reduced when Na-dependent glucose transport was inhibited either by reduction of extracellular [Na+], or the presence of phlorizin. 6. It is suggested that drone retinal function does not require the uptake of glucose by the photoreceptors, but that the glia do take up glucose. PMID:3503929

  8. NEURONATIN IS A STRESS-RESPONSIVE PROTEIN OF ROD PHOTORECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    SHINDE, VISHAL; PITALE, PRIYAMVADA M.; HOWSE, WAYNE; GORBATYUK, OLEG; GORBATYUK, MARINA

    2016-01-01

    Neuronatin (NNAT) is a small transmembrane proteolipid that is highly expressed in the embryonic developing brain and several other peripheral tissues. This study is the first to provide evidence that NNAT is detected in the adult retina of various adult rod-dominant mammals, including wild-type (WT) rodents, transgenic rodents expressing mutant S334ter, P23H, or T17M rhodopsin, non-human primates, humans, and cone-dominant tree shrews. Immunohistochemical and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analyses were applied to detect NNAT. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed that NNAT immunofluorescence is restricted to the outer segments (OSs) of photoreceptors without evidence of staining in other retinal cell types across all mammalian species. Moreover, in tree shrew retinas, we found NNAT to be co-localized with rhodopsin, indicating its predominant expression in rods. The rod-derived expression of NNAT was further confirmed by qRT-PCR in isolated rod photoreceptor cells. We also used these cells to mimic cellular stress in transgenic retinas by treating them with the endoplasmic reticulum stress inducer, tunicamycin. Thus, our data revealed accumulation of NNAT around the nucleus as compared to dispersed localization of NNAT within control cells. This distribution coincided with the partial intracellular mislocalization of NNAT to the outer nuclear layer observed in transgenic retinas. In addition, stressed retinas demonstrated an increase of NNAT mRNA and protein levels. Therefore, our study demonstrated that NNAT is a novel stress-responsive protein with a potential structural and/or functional role in adult mammalian retinas. PMID:27109921

  9. Neuronatin is a stress-responsive protein of rod photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Vishal; Pitale, Priyamvada M; Howse, Wayne; Gorbatyuk, Oleg; Gorbatyuk, Marina

    2016-07-22

    Neuronatin (NNAT) is a small transmembrane proteolipid that is highly expressed in the embryonic developing brain and several other peripheral tissues. This study is the first to provide evidence that NNAT is detected in the adult retina of various adult rod-dominant mammals, including wild-type (WT) rodents, transgenic rodents expressing mutant S334ter, P23H, or T17M rhodopsin, non-human primates, humans, and cone-dominant tree shrews. Immunohistochemical and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analyses were applied to detect NNAT. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed that NNAT immunofluorescence is restricted to the outer segments (OSs) of photoreceptors without evidence of staining in other retinal cell types across all mammalian species. Moreover, in tree shrew retinas, we found NNAT to be co-localized with rhodopsin, indicating its predominant expression in rods. The rod-derived expression of NNAT was further confirmed by qRT-PCR in isolated rod photoreceptor cells. We also used these cells to mimic cellular stress in transgenic retinas by treating them with the endoplasmic reticulum stress inducer, tunicamycin. Thus, our data revealed accumulation of NNAT around the nucleus as compared to dispersed localization of NNAT within control cells. This distribution coincided with the partial intracellular mislocalization of NNAT to the outer nuclear layer observed in transgenic retinas. In addition, stressed retinas demonstrated an increase of NNAT mRNA and protein levels. Therefore, our study demonstrated that NNAT is a novel stress-responsive protein with a potential structural and/or functional role in adult mammalian retinas. PMID:27109921

  10. Excessive Myosin Activity in Mbs Mutants Causes Photoreceptor Movement Out of the Drosophila Eye Disc Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Arnold; Treisman, Jessica E.

    2004-01-01

    Neuronal cells must extend a motile growth cone while maintaining the cell body in its original position. In migrating cells, myosin contraction provides the driving force that pulls the rear of the cell toward the leading edge. We have characterized the function of myosin light chain phosphatase, which down-regulates myosin activity, in Drosophila photoreceptor neurons. Mutations in the gene encoding the myosin binding subunit of this enzyme cause photoreceptors to drop out of the eye disc epithelium and move toward and through the optic stalk. We show that this phenotype is due to excessive phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain Spaghetti squash rather than another potential substrate, Moesin, and that it requires the nonmuscle myosin II heavy chain Zipper. Myosin binding subunit mutant cells continue to express apical epithelial markers and do not undergo ectopic apical constriction. In addition, mutant cells in the wing disc remain within the epithelium and differentiate abnormal wing hairs. We suggest that excessive myosin activity in photoreceptor neurons may pull the cell bodies toward the growth cones in a process resembling normal cell migration. PMID:15075368

  11. Generating patterns from fields of cells. Examples from Drosophila segmentation.

    PubMed

    Sanson, B

    2001-12-01

    In Drosophila, a cascade of maternal, gap, pair-rule and segment polarity genes subdivides the antero/posterior axis of the embryo into repeating segmental stripes. This review summarizes what happens next, i.e. how an intrasegmental pattern is generated and controls the differentiation of specific cell types in the epidermis. Within each segment, cells secreting the signalling molecules Wingless (the homologue of vertebrate Wnt-1) and Hedgehog are found in narrow stripes on both sides of the parasegmental boundary. The Wingless and Hedgehog organizing activities help to establish two more stripes per segment that localize ligands for the Epidermal Growth Factor and the Notch signalling pathways, respectively. These four signals then act at short range and in concert to control epidermal differentiation at the single cell level across the segment. This example from Drosophila provides a paradigm for how organizers generate precise patterns, and ultimately different cell types, in a naïve field of cells. PMID:11743020

  12. Plasma-Sprayed Titanium Patterns for Enhancing Early Cell Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yunqi; Xie, Youtao; Pan, Houhua; Zheng, Xuebin; Huang, Liping; Ji, Fang; Li, Kai

    2016-06-01

    Titanium coating has been widely used as a biocompatible metal in biomedical applications. However, the early cell responses and long-term fixation of titanium implants are not satisfied. To obviate these defects, in this paper, micro-post arrays with various widths (150-1000 μm) and intervals (100-300 μm) were fabricated on the titanium substrate by template-assisted plasma spraying technology. In vitro cell culture experiments showed that MC3T3-E1 cells exhibited significantly higher osteogenic differentiation as well as slightly improved adhesion and proliferation on the micro-patterned coatings compared with the traditional one. The cell number on the pattern with 1000 µm width reached 130% after 6 days of incubation, and the expressions of osteopontin (OPN) as well as osteocalcin (OC) were doubled. No obvious difference was found in cell adhesion on various size patterns. The present micro-patterned coatings proposed a new modification method for the traditional plasma spraying technology to enhance the early cell responses and convenience for the bone in-growth.

  13. Plasma-Sprayed Titanium Patterns for Enhancing Early Cell Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yunqi; Xie, Youtao; Pan, Houhua; Zheng, Xuebin; Huang, Liping; Ji, Fang; Li, Kai

    2016-05-01

    Titanium coating has been widely used as a biocompatible metal in biomedical applications. However, the early cell responses and long-term fixation of titanium implants are not satisfied. To obviate these defects, in this paper, micro-post arrays with various widths (150-1000 μm) and intervals (100-300 μm) were fabricated on the titanium substrate by template-assisted plasma spraying technology. In vitro cell culture experiments showed that MC3T3-E1 cells exhibited significantly higher osteogenic differentiation as well as slightly improved adhesion and proliferation on the micro-patterned coatings compared with the traditional one. The cell number on the pattern with 1000 µm width reached 130% after 6 days of incubation, and the expressions of osteopontin (OPN) as well as osteocalcin (OC) were doubled. No obvious difference was found in cell adhesion on various size patterns. The present micro-patterned coatings proposed a new modification method for the traditional plasma spraying technology to enhance the early cell responses and convenience for the bone in-growth.

  14. Patterned Thermoresponsive Microgel Coatings for Noninvasive Processing of Adherent Cells.

    PubMed

    Uhlig, Katja; Wegener, Thomas; He, Jian; Zeiser, Michael; Bookhold, Johannes; Dewald, Inna; Godino, Neus; Jaeger, Magnus; Hellweg, Thomas; Fery, Andreas; Duschl, Claus

    2016-03-14

    Cultivation of adherently growing cells in artificial environments is of utmost importance in medicine and biotechnology to accomplish in vitro drug screening or to investigate disease mechanisms. Precise cell manipulation, like localized control over adhesion, is required to expand cells, to establish cell models for novel therapies and to perform noninvasive cell experiments. To this end, we developed a method of gentle, local lift-off of mammalian cells using polymer surfaces, which are reversibly and repeatedly switchable between a cell-attractive and a cell-repellent state. This property was introduced through micropatterned thermoresponsive polymer coatings formed from colloidal microgels. Patterning was obtained through automated nanodispensing or microcontact printing, making use of unspecific electrostatic interactions between microgels and substrates. This process is much more robust against ambient conditions than covalent coupling, thus lending itself to up-scaling. As an example, wound healing assays were accomplished at 37 °C with highly increased precision in microfluidic environments. PMID:26879608

  15. Cell Patterning for Liver Tissue Engineering via Dielectrophoretic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yahya, Wan Nurlina Wan; Kadri, Nahrizul Adib; Ibrahim, Fatimah

    2014-01-01

    Liver transplantation is the most common treatment for patients with end-stage liver failure. However, liver transplantation is greatly limited by a shortage of donors. Liver tissue engineering may offer an alternative by providing an implantable engineered liver. Currently, diverse types of engineering approaches for in vitro liver cell culture are available, including scaffold-based methods, microfluidic platforms, and micropatterning techniques. Active cell patterning via dielectrophoretic (DEP) force showed some advantages over other methods, including high speed, ease of handling, high precision and being label-free. This article summarizes liver function and regenerative mechanisms for better understanding in developing engineered liver. We then review recent advances in liver tissue engineering techniques and focus on DEP-based cell patterning, including microelectrode design and patterning configuration. PMID:24991941

  16. Ire1 supports normal ER differentiation in developing Drosophila photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zuyuan; Chikka, Madhusudana Rao; Xia, Hongai; Ready, Donald F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) serves virtually all aspects of cell physiology and, by pathways that are incompletely understood, is dynamically remodeled to meet changing cell needs. Inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (Ire1), a conserved core protein of the unfolded protein response (UPR), participates in ER remodeling and is particularly required during the differentiation of cells devoted to intense secretory activity, so-called ‘professional’ secretory cells. Here, we characterize the role of Ire1 in ER differentiation in the developing Drosophila compound eye photoreceptors (R cells). As part of normal development, R cells take a turn as professional secretory cells with a massive secretory effort that builds the photosensitive membrane organelle, the rhabdomere. We find rough ER sheets proliferate as rhabdomere biogenesis culminates, and Ire1 is required for normal ER differentiation. Ire1 is active early in R cell development and is required in anticipation of peak biosynthesis. Without Ire1, the amount of rough ER sheets is strongly reduced and the extensive cortical ER network at the rhabdomere base, the subrhabdomere cisterna (SRC), fails. Instead, ER proliferates in persistent and ribosome-poor tubular tangles. A phase of Ire1 activity early in R cell development thus shapes dynamic ER. PMID:26787744

  17. The contribution of Shaker K+ channels to the information capacity of Drosophila photoreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niven, Jeremy E.; Vähäsöyrinki, Mikko; Kauranen, Mika; Hardie, Roger C.; Juusola, Mikko; Weckström, Matti

    2003-02-01

    An array of rapidly inactivating voltage-gated K+ channels is distributed throughout the nervous systems of vertebrates and invertebrates. Although these channels are thought to regulate the excitability of neurons by attenuating voltage signals, their specific functions are often poorly understood. We studied the role of the prototypical inactivating K+ conductance, Shaker, in Drosophila photoreceptors by recording intracellularly from wild-type and Shaker mutant photoreceptors. Here we show that loss of the Shaker K+ conductance produces a marked reduction in the signal-to-noise ratio of photoreceptors, generating a 50% decrease in the information capacity of these cells in fully light-adapted conditions. By combining experiments with modelling, we show that the inactivation of Shaker K+ channels amplifies voltage signals and enables photoreceptors to use their voltage range more effectively. Loss of the Shaker conductance attenuated the voltage signal and induced a compensatory decrease in impedance. Our results demonstrate the importance of the Shaker K+ conductance for neural coding precision and as a mechanism for selectively amplifying graded signals in neurons, and highlight the effect of compensatory mechanisms on neuronal information processing.

  18. Noninvasive imaging of the human rod photoreceptor mosaic using a confocal adaptive optics scanning ophthalmoscope

    PubMed Central

    Dubra, Alfredo; Sulai, Yusufu; Norris, Jennifer L.; Cooper, Robert F.; Dubis, Adam M.; Williams, David R.; Carroll, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The rod photoreceptors are implicated in a number of devastating retinal diseases. However, routine imaging of these cells has remained elusive, even with the advent of adaptive optics imaging. Here, we present the first in vivo images of the contiguous rod photoreceptor mosaic in nine healthy human subjects. The images were collected with three different confocal adaptive optics scanning ophthalmoscopes at two different institutions, using 680 and 775 nm superluminescent diodes for illumination. Estimates of photoreceptor density and rod:cone ratios in the 5°–15° retinal eccentricity range are consistent with histological findings, confirming our ability to resolve the rod mosaic by averaging multiple registered images, without the need for additional image processing. In one subject, we were able to identify the emergence of the first rods at approximately 190 μm from the foveal center, in agreement with previous histological studies. The rod and cone photoreceptor mosaics appear in focus at different retinal depths, with the rod mosaic best focus (i.e., brightest and sharpest) being at least 10 μm shallower than the cones at retinal eccentricities larger than 8°. This study represents an important step in bringing high-resolution imaging to bear on the study of rod disorders. PMID:21750765

  19. Arf-like Protein 3 (ARL3) Regulates Protein Trafficking and Ciliogenesis in Mouse Photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Hanke-Gogokhia, Christin; Wu, Zhijian; Gerstner, Cecilia D; Frederick, Jeanne M; Zhang, Houbin; Baehr, Wolfgang

    2016-03-25

    Arf-like protein 3 (ARL3) is a ubiquitous small GTPase expressed in ciliated cells of plants and animals. Germline deletion ofArl3in mice causes multiorgan ciliopathy reminiscent of Bardet-Biedl or Joubert syndromes. As photoreceptors are elegantly compartmentalized and have cilia, we probed the function of ARL3 (ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf)-like 3 protein) by generating rod photoreceptor-specific (prefix(rod)) and retina-specific (prefix(ret))Arl3deletions. In predegenerate(rod)Arl3(-/-)mice, lipidated phototransduction proteins showed trafficking deficiencies, consistent with the role of ARL3 as a cargo displacement factor for lipid-binding proteins. By contrast,(ret)Arl3(-/-)rods and cones expressing Cre recombinase during embryonic development formed neither connecting cilia nor outer segments and degenerated rapidly. Absence of cilia infers participation of ARL3 in ciliogenesis and axoneme formation. Ciliogenesis was rescued, and degeneration was reversed in part by subretinal injection of adeno-associated virus particles expressing ARL3-EGFP. The conditional knock-out phenotypes permitted identification of two ARL3 functions, both in the GTP-bound form as follows: one as a regulator of intraflagellar transport participating in photoreceptor ciliogenesis and the other as a cargo displacement factor transporting lipidated protein to the outer segment. Surprisingly, a farnesylated inositol polyphosphate phosphatase only trafficked from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi, thereby excluding it from a role in photoreceptor cilia physiology. PMID:26814127

  20. An extraretinally expressed insect cryptochrome with similarity to the blue light photoreceptors of mammals and plants.

    PubMed

    Egan, E S; Franklin, T M; Hilderbrand-Chae, M J; McNeil, G P; Roberts, M A; Schroeder, A J; Zhang, X; Jackson, F R

    1999-05-15

    Photic entrainment of insect circadian rhythms can occur through either extraretinal (brain) or retinal photoreceptors, which mediate sensitivity to blue light or longer wavelengths, respectively. Although visual transduction processes are well understood in the insect retina, almost nothing is known about the extraretinal blue light photoreceptor of insects. We now have identified and characterized a candidate blue light photoreceptor gene in Drosophila (DCry) that is homologous to the cryptochrome (Cry) genes of mammals and plants. The DCry gene is located in region 91F of the third chromosome, an interval that does not contain other genes required for circadian rhythmicity. The protein encoded by DCry is approximately 50% identical to the CRY1 and CRY2 proteins recently discovered in mammalian species. As expected for an extraretinal photoreceptor mediating circadian entrainment, DCry mRNA is expressed within the adult brain and can be detected within body tissues. Indeed, tissue in situ hybridization demonstrates prominent expression in cells of the lateral brain, which are close to or coincident with the Drosophila clock neurons. Interestingly, DCry mRNA abundance oscillates in a circadian manner in Drosophila head RNA extracts, and the temporal phasing of the rhythm is similar to that documented for the mouse Cry1 mRNA, which is expressed in clock tissues. Finally, we show that changes in DCry gene dosage are associated predictably with alterations of the blue light resetting response for the circadian rhythm of adult locomotor activity. PMID:10233998

  1. Stress Reaction in Outer Segments of Photoreceptors after Blue Light Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Ader, Marius; Brunssen, Coy; Bramke, Silvia; Morawietz, Henning; Funk, Richard H. W.

    2013-01-01

    The retina is prone to oxidative stress from many factors which are also involved in the pathogenesis of degenerative diseases. In this study, we used the application of blue light as a physiological stress factor. The aim of this study was to identify the major source of intracellular ROS that mediates blue light-induced detrimental effects on cells which may lead to cytotoxicity. We hypothesized that outer segments are the major source of blue light induced ROS generation. In photoreceptors, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase (Nox) enzymes and the recently found respiratory chain complexes may represent a major source for reactive oxygen species (ROS), beside mitochondria and chromophores. Therefore, we investigated this hypothesis and analysed the exact localization of the ROS source in photoreceptors in an organotypic culture system for mouse retinas. Whole eyeball cultures were irradiated with visible blue light (405 nm) with an output power of 1 mW/cm2. Blue light impingement lead to an increase of ROS production (detected by H2DCFDA in live retinal explants), which was particularly strong in the photoreceptor outer segments. Nox-2 and Nox-4 proteins are sources of ROS in blue light irradiated photoreceptors; the Nox inhibitor apocynin decreased ROS stimulated by blue light. Concomitantly, enzyme SOD-1, a member of the antioxidant defense system, indicator molecules of protein oxidation (CML) and lipid oxidation (MDA and 4-HNE) were also increased in the outer segments. Interestingly, outer segments showed a mitochondrial-like membrane potential which was demonstrated using two dyes (JC-1 and TMRE) normally exclusively associated with mitochondria. As in mitochondria, these dyes indicated a decrease of the membrane potential in hypoxic states or cell stress situations. The present study demonstrates that ROS generation and oxidative stress occurs directly in the outer segments of photoreceptors after blue light irradiation. PMID

  2. Generation of Viable Cell and Biomaterial Patterns by Laser Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringeisen, Bradley

    2001-03-01

    In order to fabricate and interface biological systems for next generation applications such as biosensors, protein recognition microarrays, and engineered tissues, it is imperative to have a method of accurately and rapidly depositing different active biomaterials in patterns or layered structures. Ideally, the biomaterial structures would also be compatible with many different substrates including technologically relevant platforms such as electronic circuits or various detection devices. We have developed a novel laser-based technique, termed matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation direct write (MAPLE DW), that is able to direct write patterns and three-dimensional structures of numerous biologically active species ranging from proteins and antibodies to living cells. Specifically, we have shown that MAPLE DW is capable of forming mesoscopic patterns of living prokaryotic cells (E. coli bacteria), living mammalian cells (Chinese hamster ovaries), active proteins (biotinylated bovine serum albumin, horse radish peroxidase), and antibodies specific to a variety of classes of cancer related proteins including intracellular and extracellular matrix proteins, signaling proteins, cell cycle proteins, growth factors, and growth factor receptors. In addition, patterns of viable cells and active biomolecules were deposited on different substrates including metals, semiconductors, nutrient agar, and functionalized glass slides. We will present an explanation of the laser-based transfer mechanism as well as results from our recent efforts to fabricate protein recognition microarrays and tissue-based microfluidic networks.

  3. MicroRNAs are essential for differentiation of the retinal pigmented epithelium and maturation of adjacent photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Ohana, Reut; Weiman-Kelman, Benjamin; Raviv, Shaul; Tamm, Ernst R; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Rinon, Ariel; Netanely, Dvir; Shamir, Ron; Solomon, Arie S; Ashery-Padan, Ruth

    2015-07-15

    Dysfunction of the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) results in degeneration of photoreceptors and vision loss and is correlated with common blinding disorders in humans. Although many protein-coding genes are known to be expressed in RPE and are important for its development and maintenance, virtually nothing is known about the in vivo roles of non-coding transcripts. The expression patterns of microRNAs (miRNAs) have been analyzed in a variety of ocular tissues, and a few were implicated to play role in RPE based on studies in cell lines. Here, through RPE-specific conditional mutagenesis of Dicer1 or Dgcr8 in mice, the importance of miRNAs for RPE differentiation was uncovered. miRNAs were found to be dispensable for maintaining RPE fate and survival, and yet they are essential for the acquisition of important RPE properties such as the expression of genes involved in the visual cycle pathway, pigmentation and cell adhesion. Importantly, miRNAs of the RPE are required for maturation of adjacent photoreceptors, specifically for the morphogenesis of the outer segments. The alterations in the miRNA and mRNA profiles in the Dicer1-deficient RPE point to a key role of miR-204 in regulation of the RPE differentiation program in vivo and uncover the importance of additional novel RPE miRNAs. This study reveals the combined regulatory activity of miRNAs that is required for RPE differentiation and for the development of the adjacent neuroretina. PMID:26062936

  4. R7 Photoreceptor Specification in the Developing Drosophila Eye: The Role of the Transcription Factor Deadpan

    PubMed Central

    Mavromatakis, Yannis Emmanuel; Tomlinson, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    As cells proceed along their developmental pathways they make a series of sequential cell fate decisions. Each of those decisions needs to be made in a robust manner so there is no ambiguity in the state of the cell as it proceeds to the next stage. Here we examine the decision made by the Drosophila R7 precursor cell to become a photoreceptor and ask how the robustness of that decision is achieved. The transcription factor Tramtrack (Ttk) inhibits photoreceptor assignment, and previous studies found that the RTK-induced degradation of Ttk was critically required for R7 specification. Here we find that the transcription factor Deadpan (Dpn) is also required; it is needed to silence ttk transcription, and only when Ttk protein degradation and transcriptional silencing occur together is the photoreceptor fate robustly achieved. Dpn expression needs to be tightly restricted to R7 precursors, and we describe the role played by Ttk in repressing dpn transcription. Thus, Dpn and Ttk act as mutually repressive transcription factors, with Dpn acting to ensure that Ttk is effectively removed from R7, and Ttk acting to prevent Dpn expression in other cells. Furthermore, we find that N activity is required to promote dpn transcription, and only in R7 precursors does the removal of Ttk coincide with high N activity, and only in this cell does Dpn expression result. PMID:27427987

  5. Mutations in lozenge and D-Pax2 invoke ectopic patterned cell death in the developing Drosophila eye using distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Siddall, Nicole A; Behan, Kristina Jackson; Crew, Jennifer R; Cheung, Tara L; Fair, Jason A; Batterham, Philip; Pollock, John Archie

    2003-04-01

    Mutations in the lozenge gene of Drosophila melanogaster elicit a pleiotropic set of adult phenotypes, including severe compound eye perturbations resulting from the defective recruitment of photoreceptors R1/6 and R7, cone and pigment cells. In this study, we show that excessive patterned apoptosis is evident at the same developmental stage in these lozenge mutants. In lozenge null mutants, apoptosis occurs prior to lozenge-dependent cell fate specification. A second gene, D-Pax2, genetically interacts with lozenge. Interestingly, D-Pax2 mutants also exhibit increased cell death, but slightly later in development than that in lozenge mutants. Although expression of the caspase inhibitor p35 eliminates death in both lozenge and D-Pax2 mutants, the lozenge mutant eye phenotypes persist because other normal Lozenge functions are still lacking. D-Pax2 eye phenotypes, in contrast, are dramatically altered in a p35 background, because cells that normally differentiate as cone and primary pigment cells are subsequently transformed into secondary pigment cells. This study leads us to propose that Lozenge, aside from its known role in gene regulation of cell-specific transcription factors, is required to contribute to the repression of cell death mechanisms, creating a permissive environment for the survival of undifferentiated cells in early eye development. Lack of lozenge expression increases the likelihood that an undifferentiated cell will initiate its default death program and die prematurely. The ectopic cell death evident in D-Pax2 mutants appears to arise from the cell fate transformation of cone cells into secondary pigment cells, either autonomously or as a result of defective signalling. PMID:12690448

  6. Microfabricated ratchet structures for concentrating and patterning motile bacterial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yub Kim, Sang; Lee, Eun Se; Lee, Ho Jae; Lee, Se Yeon; Kuk Lee, Sung; Kim, Taesung

    2010-09-01

    We present a novel microfabricated concentrator for Escherichia coli that can be a stand-alone and self-contained microfluidic device because it utilizes the motility of cells. First of all, we characterize the motility of E. coli cells and various ratcheting structures that can guide cells to move in a desired direction in straight and circular channels. Then, we combine these ratcheting microstructures with the intrinsic tendency of cells to swim on the right side in microchannels to enhance the concentration rates up to 180 fold until the concentrators are fully filled with cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cells can be positioned and concentrated with a constant spacing distance on a surface, allowing spatial patterning of motile cells. These results can be applied to biosorption or biosensor devices that are powered by motile cells because they can be highly concentrated without any external mechanical and electrical energy sources. Hence, we believe that the concentrator design holds considerable potential to be applied for concentrating and patterning other motile microbes and providing a versatile structure for motility study of bacterial cells.

  7. Dynamic membrane patterning, signal localization and polarity in living cells.

    PubMed

    Zamparo, M; Chianale, F; Tebaldi, C; Cosentino-Lagomarsino, M; Nicodemi, M; Gamba, A

    2015-02-01

    We review the molecular and physical aspects of the dynamic localization of signaling molecules on the plasma membranes of living cells. At the nanoscale, clusters of receptors and signaling proteins play an essential role in the processing of extracellular signals. At the microscale, "soft" and highly dynamic signaling domains control the interaction of individual cells with their environment. At the multicellular scale, individual polarity patterns control the forces that shape multicellular aggregates and tissues. PMID:25563791

  8. Divergent T-Cell Cytokine Patterns in Inflammatory Arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, A. K.; Seipelt, E.; Sieper, J.

    1994-08-01

    A major immunoregulatory mechanism in inflammatory infections and allergic diseases is the control of the balance of cytokines secreted by Th1/Th2 subsets of T helper (Th) cells. This might also be true in autoimmune diseases; a Th2 pattern that prevents an effective immune response in infections with intracellular bacteria may favor immunosuppression in autoimmune diseases. The pattern of cytokine expression was compared in the synovial tissue from patients with a typical autoimmune disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and with a disorder with similar synovial pathology but driven by persisting exogenous antigen, reactive arthritis. We screened 12 rheumatoid and 9 reactive arthritis synovial tissues by PCR and in situ hybridization for their expression of T-cell cytokines. The cytokine pattern differs significantly between the two diseases; rheumatoid arthritis samples express a Th1-like pattern whereas in reactive arthritis interferon γ expression is accompanied by that of interleukin 4. Studying the expression of cytokines by in situ hybridization confirmed the results found by PCR; they also show an extremely low frequency of cytokine-transcribing cells. In a double-staining experiment, it was demonstrated that interleukin 4 is made by CD4 cells. These experiments favor the possibility of therapeutic intervention in inflammatory rheumatic diseases by means of inhibitory cytokines.

  9. Modal content of living human cone photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhuolin; Kocaoglu, Omer P.; Turner, Timothy L.; Miller, Donald T.

    2015-01-01

    Decades of experimental and theoretical investigations have established that photoreceptors capture light based on the principles of optical waveguiding. Yet considerable uncertainty remains, even for the most basic prediction as to whether photoreceptors support more than a single waveguide mode. To test for modal behavior in human cone photoreceptors in the near infrared, we took advantage of adaptive-optics optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT, λc = 785 nm) to noninvasively image in three dimensions the reflectance profile of cones. Modal content of reflections generated at the cone inner segment and outer segment junction (IS/OS) and cone outer segment tip (COST) was examined over a range of cone diameters in 1,802 cones from 0.6° to 10° retinal eccentricity. Second moment analysis in conjunction with theoretical predictions indicate cone IS and OS have optical properties consistent of waveguides, which depend on segment diameter and refractive index. Cone IS was found to support a single mode near the fovea (≤3°) and multiple modes further away (>4°). In contrast, no evidence of multiple modes was found in the cone OSs. The IS/OS and COST reflections share a common optical aperture, are most circular near the fovea, show no orientation preference, and are temporally stable. We tested mode predictions of a conventional step-index fiber model and found that in order to fit our AO-OCT results required a lower estimate of the IS refractive index and introduction of an IS focusing/tapering effect. PMID:26417509

  10. Ordered Patterns of Cell Shape and Orientational Correlation during Spontaneous Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Iwaya, Suguru; Sano, Masaki

    2008-01-01

    Background In the absence of stimuli, most motile eukaryotic cells move by spontaneously coordinating cell deformation with cell movement in the absence of stimuli. Yet little is known about how cells change their own shape and how cells coordinate the deformation and movement. Here, we investigated the mechanism of spontaneous cell migration by using computational analyses. Methodology We observed spontaneously migrating Dictyostelium cells in both a vegetative state (round cell shape and slow motion) and starved one (elongated cell shape and fast motion). We then extracted regular patterns of morphological dynamics and the pattern-dependent systematic coordination with filamentous actin (F-actin) and cell movement by statistical dynamic analyses. Conclusions/Significance We found that Dictyostelium cells in both vegetative and starved states commonly organize their own shape into three ordered patterns, elongation, rotation, and oscillation, in the absence of external stimuli. Further, cells inactivated for PI3-kinase (PI3K) and/or PTEN did not show ordered patterns due to the lack of spatial control in pseudopodial formation in both the vegetative and starved states. We also found that spontaneous polarization was achieved in starved cells by asymmetric localization of PTEN and F-actin. This breaking of the symmetry of protein localization maintained the leading edge and considerably enhanced the persistence of directed migration, and overall random exploration was ensured by switching among the different ordered patterns. Our findings suggest that Dictyostelium cells spontaneously create the ordered patterns of cell shape mediated by PI3K/PTEN/F-actin and control the direction of cell movement by coordination with these patterns even in the absence of external stimuli. PMID:19011688

  11. Hydrogel microfluidics for the patterning of pluripotent stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosson, S.; Lutolf, M. P.

    2014-03-01

    Biomolecular signaling is of utmost importance in governing many biological processes such as the patterning of the developing embryo where biomolecules regulate key cell-fate decisions. In vivo, these factors are presented in a spatiotemporally tightly controlled fashion. Although state-of-the-art microfluidic technologies allow precise biomolecule delivery in time and space, long-term (stem) cell culture at the micro-scale is often far from ideal due to medium evaporation, limited space for cell growth or shear stress. To overcome these challenges, we here introduce a concept based on hydrogel microfluidics for decoupling conventional, macro-scale cell culture from precise biomolecule delivery through a gel layer. We demonstrate the spatiotemporally controlled neuronal commitment of mouse embryonic stem cells via delivery of retinoic acid gradients. This technique should be useful for testing the effect of dose and timing of biomolecules, singly or in combination, on stem cell fate.

  12. Calcium ion, an intracellular messenger of light adaptation, also participates in excitation of Limulus photoreceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Bolsover, S R; Brown, J E

    1985-01-01

    Photoreceptor cells of Limulus ventral eyes were bathed in artificial sea water (ASW) that contained 10 mM-EGTA and no added Ca2+ (EGTA-ASW). Test flashes elicited responses that increased to a maximum size within 10 min in EGTA-ASW but did not change further when dark-adapted cells were bathed for an additional 35 min in this solution. Light responses progressively declined from this maximum size if the cells were repetitively illuminated in EGTA-ASW. In this state of reduced responsiveness, response amplitudes were further reduced by intracellular ionophoretic injection of EGTA; response amplitudes were increased by intracellular ionophoretic injection of Ca2+. Both of these findings are opposite to what is normally observed for cells bathed in ASW. Also, after repetitive illumination in EGTA-ASW, both the slope of the response versus intensity relationship became steeper and light responses often had a delayed increase in amplitude. The light responses and the response versus intensity relation returned to normal when the bathing medium was changed back to ASW containing 10 mM-Ca2+. The light-induced rise in luminescence recorded from photoreceptors injected with the photoprotein aequorin (the 'aequorin response') declined by at most 50% after dark-adapted photoreceptors were bathed in EGTA-ASW for 45 min. However, the aequorin response progressively declined by 98% if cells were repetitively illuminated while bathed in EGTA-ASW. The total intracellular Ca content of whole end-organs was measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Total intracellular Ca content did not change significantly while photoreceptors were bathed in EGTA-ASW even after repetitive illumination. We suggest that cytosolic Ca2+ is required by one or more steps in the mechanisms that link rhodopsin isomerization to both (i) an increase in the conductance of the cell membrane to Na+ and (ii) a release of Ca2+ from a light-labile store. PMID:3928878

  13. Transcriptional Regulation of Rod Photoreceptor Homeostasis Revealed by In Vivo NRL Targetome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Hong; Kim, Douglas S.; Klocke, Bernward; Johnson, Kory R.; Cui, Kairong; Gotoh, Norimoto; Zang, Chongzhi; Gregorski, Janina; Gieser, Linn; Peng, Weiqun; Fann, Yang; Seifert, Martin; Zhao, Keji; Swaroop, Anand

    2012-01-01

    A stringent control of homeostasis is critical for functional maintenance and survival of neurons. In the mammalian retina, the basic motif leucine zipper transcription factor NRL determines rod versus cone photoreceptor cell fate and activates the expression of many rod-specific genes. Here, we report an integrated analysis of NRL-centered gene regulatory network by coupling chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP–Seq) data from Illumina and ABI platforms with global expression profiling and in vivo knockdown studies. We identified approximately 300 direct NRL target genes. Of these, 22 NRL targets are associated with human retinal dystrophies, whereas 95 mapped to regions of as yet uncloned retinal disease loci. In silico analysis of NRL ChIP–Seq peak sequences revealed an enrichment of distinct sets of transcription factor binding sites. Specifically, we discovered that genes involved in photoreceptor function include binding sites for both NRL and homeodomain protein CRX. Evaluation of 26 ChIP–Seq regions validated their enhancer functions in reporter assays. In vivo knockdown of 16 NRL target genes resulted in death or abnormal morphology of rod photoreceptors, suggesting their importance in maintaining retinal function. We also identified histone demethylase Kdm5b as a novel secondary node in NRL transcriptional hierarchy. Exon array analysis of flow-sorted photoreceptors in which Kdm5b was knocked down by shRNA indicated its role in regulating rod-expressed genes. Our studies identify candidate genes for retinal dystrophies, define cis-regulatory module(s) for photoreceptor-expressed genes and provide a framework for decoding transcriptional regulatory networks that dictate rod homeostasis. PMID:22511886

  14. Role of protein kinase C in light adaptation of molluscan microvillar photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Piccoli, Giuseppe; del Pilar Gomez, Maria; Nasi, Enrico

    2002-01-01

    The mechanisms by which Ca2+ regulates light adaptation in microvillar photoreceptors remain poorly understood. Protein kinase C (PKC) is a likely candidate, both because some sub-types are activated by Ca2+ and because of its association with the macromolecular ‘light-transduction complex’ in Drosophila. We investigated the possible role of PKC in the modulation of the light response in molluscan photoreceptors. Western blot analysis with isoform-specific antibodies revealed the presence of PKCα in retinal homogenates. Immunocytochemistry in isolated cell preparations confirmed PKCα localization in microvillar photoreceptors, preferentially confined to the light-sensing lobe. Light stimulation induced translocation of PKCα immunofluorescence to the photosensitive membrane, an effect that provides independent evidence for PKC activation by illumination; a similar outcome was observed after incubation with the phorbol ester PMA. Several chemically distinct activators of PKC, such as phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), (-)indolactam V and 1,2,-dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol (DOG) inhibited the light response of voltage-clamped microvillar photoreceptors, but were ineffective in ciliary photoreceptors, in which light does not activate the Gq/PLC cascade, nor elevates intracellular Ca2+. Pharmacological inhibition of PKC antagonized the desensitization produced by adapting lights and also caused a small, but consistent enhancement of basal sensitivity. These results strongly support the involvement of PKC activation in the light-dependent regulation of response sensitivity. However, unlike adapting background light or elevation of [Ca2+]i, PKC activators did not speed up the photoresponse, nor did PKC inhibitors antagonize the accelerating effects of background adaptation, suggesting that modulation of photoresponse time course may involve a separate Ca2+-dependent signal. PMID:12205183

  15. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1994-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not stain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type 1 hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type 2 hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  16. Hierarchical Patterning of Cells with a Microeraser and Electrospun Nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Jiang, Xueqin; Zhong, Huixiang; Dai, Wen; Zhou, Jianhua; Wu, Hongkai

    2016-03-01

    For tissue engineering applications, it is important to develop fabrication strategies for building models with controlled cell distributions in defined structures. Here, a simple, flexible approach (named the μ-eraser strategy) is developed to construct multicell micropatterns. This approach involves pressing a poly(dimethylsiloxane) stamp to erase cells growing on substrates, and seeding other types of cells. The pressing/seeding process can be conducted in any designed pattern at desired time point. In a proof of concept, multicell micropatterns of human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial A549 cells, murine fibroblast (FB) cells and murine osteoblast (OB) cells are achieved on Petri dishes and electrospun sheets. Besides forming multicell micropatterns, the cell orientation can be regulated by microstripes and alignment of nanofibers. On Petri dishes and random fiber sheets, FB and OB cells align along microstripes, while A549 cells do not. However, when growing on aligned fiber sheets, no matter whether solo-cultured or co-cultured, all cells in micropatterns orient along the fibers. Based on this technique, a platform is built up to investigate rates of cell migration and interinvasion under solo-culture and co-culture systems. It is believed that this μ-eraser strategy has promise for biological, pharmaceutical, and biomedical applications. PMID:26682534

  17. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1993-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylglucosamine (WGA), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not strain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type I hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type II hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  18. Passive signal propagation and membrane properties in median photoreceptors of the giant barnacle

    PubMed Central

    Hudspeth, A. J.; Poo, Mu Ming; Stuart, Ann E.

    1977-01-01

    1. The light-induced electrical responses of barnacle photoreceptors spread decrementally along the cells' axons. The decay of the depolarizing and hyperpolarizing components of the visual signal was studied by recording intracellularly from single receptor axons of the median ocellus of the giant barnacle. 2. The resistance of the photoreceptor neurone decreases markedly when the cell is depolarized with respect to its dark resting potential of -60 mV. This rectification results in differential attenuation of the depolarizing and hyperpolarizing components of the visual signal as they spread down the axon. Consequently, the visual signal entering the synaptic region is conspicuously distorted. 3. Bathing the photoreceptor axons in sodium-free or calcium-free saline or in isotonic sucrose does not significantly affect the spread of the visual signal to the terminals. Thus the signal is not amplified by an ionic mechanism along the axon. 4. Membrane characteristics of the photoreceptor for hyperpolarizing voltage changes were estimated from (a) the ratio of the amplitudes of the visual signals recorded simultaneously in the axon and in the soma, (b) the time constant, and (c) the input resistance of the cell. All three independent measurements are consistent with a length constant 1 to 2 times the total length of the cell (λ = 10-18 mm) and an unusually high membrane resistivity of about 300 kΩ cm2. This resistivity enables the receptor potential to spread passively to the terminal region. 5. Electron microscopic examination of receptor axons reveals an investment of glial lamellae, but demonstrates neither unusual structures which would lead to a high apparent membrane resistivity, nor junctions between cells which would seal off the extracellular space. Thus the observed high resistivity appears to be an intrinsic property of the receptor membrane. ImagesABCD PMID:592129

  19. Report on the National Eye Institute Audacious Goals Initiative: Photoreceptor Regeneration and Integration Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Gamm, David M.; Wong, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    The National Eye Institute (NEI) hosted a workshop on May 2, 2015, as part of the Audacious Goals Initiative (AGI) to foster a concerted effort to develop novel therapies for outer retinal diseases. The central goal of this initiative is to “demonstrate by 2025 the restoration of usable vision in humans through the regeneration of neurons and neural connections in the eye and visual system.” More specifically, the AGI identified two neural retinal cell classes—ganglion cells and photoreceptors—as challenging, high impact targets for these efforts. A prior workshop and subsequent white paper provided a foundation to begin addressing issues regarding optic nerve regeneration, whereas the major objective of the May 2015 workshop was to review progress toward photoreceptor replacement and identify research gaps and barriers that are limiting advancement of the field. The present report summarizes that discussion and input, which was gathered from a panel of distinguished basic science and clinical investigators with diverse technical expertise and experience with different model systems. Four broad discussion categories were put forth during the workshop, each addressing a critical area of need in the pursuit of functional photoreceptor regeneration: (1) cell sources for photoreceptor regeneration, (2) cell delivery and/or integration, (3) outcome assessment, and (4) preclinical models and target patient populations. For each category, multiple challenges and opportunities for research discovery and tool production were identified and vetted. The present report summarizes the dialogue that took place and seeks to encourage continued interactions within the vision science community on this topic. It also serves as a guide for funding to support the pursuit of cell and circuit repair in diseases leading to photoreceptor degeneration. PMID:26629398

  20. Patterns of periodic holes created by increased cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ting-Hsuan; Guo, Chunyan; Zhao, Xin; Yao, Yucheng; Boström, Kristina I.; Wong, Margaret N.; Tintut, Yin; Demer, Linda L.; Ho, Chih-Ming; Garfinkel, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The reaction and diffusion of morphogens is a mechanism widely used to explain many spatial patterns in physics, chemistry and developmental biology. However, because experimental control is limited in most biological systems, it is often unclear what mechanisms account for the biological patterns that arise. Here, we study a biological model of cultured vascular mesenchymal cells (VMCs), which normally self-organize into aggregates that form into labyrinthine configurations. We use an experimental control and a mathematical model that includes reacting and diffusing morphogens and a third variable reflecting local cell density. With direct measurements showing that cell motility was increased ninefold and threefold by inhibiting either Rho kinase or non-muscle myosin-II, respectively, our experimental results and mathematical modelling demonstrate that increased motility alters the multicellular pattern of the VMC cultures, from labyrinthine to a pattern of periodic holes. These results suggest implications for the tissue engineering of functional replacements for trabecular or spongy tissue such as endocardium and bone. PMID:22649581

  1. Haploinsufficiency of RanBP2 is neuroprotective against light-elicited and age-dependent degeneration of photoreceptor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyoung-in; Yi, Haiqing; Yeh, Andrew; Tserentsoodol, Nomingerel; Cuadrado, Lori; Searle, Kelly; Hao, Ying; Ferreira, Paulo A.

    2008-01-01

    Prolonged light exposure is a determinant factor in inducing neurodegeneration of photoreceptors by apoptosis. Yet, the molecular bases of the pathways and components triggering this cell death event are elusive. Here, we reveal a prominent age-dependent increase in the susceptibility of photoreceptor neurons to undergo apoptosis under light in a mouse model. This is accompanied by light-induced subcellular changes of photoreceptors, such as dilation of the disks at the tip of the outer segments, prominent vesiculation of nascent disks, and autophagy of mitochondria into large multilamellar bodies. Notably, haploinsufficiency of Ran-binding protein-2 (RanBP2) suppresses apoptosis and most facets of membrane dysgenesis observed with age upon light-elicited stress. RanBP2 haploinsufficiency promotes decreased levels of free fatty acids in the retina independent of light exposure and turns the mice refractory to weight gain on a high-fat diet, whereas light promotes an increase in hydrogen peroxide regardless of the genotype. These studies demonstrate the presence of age-dependent and RanBP2-mediated pathways modulating membrane biogenesis of the outer segments and light-elicited neurodegeneration of photoreceptors. Furthermore, the findings support a mechanism whereby the RanBP2-dependent production of free fatty acids, metabolites thereof or the modulation of a cofactor dependent on any of these, promote apoptosis of photoreceptors in concert with the light-stimulated production of reactive oxygen species. PMID:18949001

  2. Elementary and macroscopic light-induced currents and their Ca2+-dependence in the photoreceptors of Periplaneta americana

    PubMed Central

    Immonen, Esa-Ville; Krause, Stephan; Krause, Yani; Frolov, Roman; Vähäsöyrinki, Mikko T.; Weckström, Matti

    2014-01-01

    In a microvillar photoreceptor, absorption of an incident photon initiates a phototransduction reaction that generates a depolarizing light-induced current (LIC) in the microvillus. Although in-depth knowledge about these processes in photoreceptors of the fruitfly Drosophila is available, not much is known about their nature in other insect species. Here, we present description of some basic properties of both elementary and macroscopic LICs and their Ca2+-dependence in the photoreceptors of a dark-active species, the cockroach Periplaneta americana. Cockroach photoreceptors respond to single photon absorptions by generating quantum bumps with about 5-fold larger amplitudes than in Drosophila. At the macroscopic current level, cockroach photoreceptors responded to light with variable sensitivity and current waveform. This variability could be partially attributed to differences in whole-cell capacitance. Transient LICs, both elementary and macroscopic, showed only moderate dependence on extracellular Ca2+. However, with long light pulses, response inactivation was largely abolished and the overall size of LICs increased when extracellular Ca2+ was omitted. Finally, by determining relative ionic permeabilities from reversals of LICs, we demonstrate that when compared to Drosophila, cockroach light-gated channels are only moderately Ca2+-selective. PMID:24795648

  3. A Short N-terminal Domain of HDAC4 Preserves Photoreceptors and Restores Visual Function in Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xinzheng; Wang, Shao-Bin; Xu, Hongping; Ribic, Adema; Mohns, Ethan J.; Zhou, Yu; Zhu, Xianjun; Biederer, Thomas; Crair, Michael C.; Chen, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a leading cause of inherited blindness, with no effective treatment currently available. Mutations primarily in genes expressed in rod photoreceptors lead to early rod death, followed by a slower phase of cone photoreceptor death. Rd1 mice provide an invaluable animal model to evaluate therapies for the disease. We previously reported that overexpression of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) prolongs rod survival in rd1 mice. Here we report a key role of a short N-terminal domain of HDAC4 in photoreceptor protection. Expression of this domain suppresses multiple cell death pathways in photoreceptor degeneration, and preserves even more rd1 rods than the full length HDAC4 protein. Expression of a short N-terminal domain of HDAC4 in transgenic mice carrying the rd1 mutation also prolongs the survival of cone photoreceptors, and partially restores visual function. Our results may facilitate the design of a small protein therapy for some forms of retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:26272629

  4. Spectroscopic characterization of the Stentor photoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Walker, E B; Lee, T Y; Song, P S

    1979-09-20

    1. On the basis of chromatographic and spectroscopic (absorption, fluorescence and its polarization, fluorescence lifetime, circular dichroism) characterization of the Stentor photoreceptor (stentorin) for photophobic response, the photoreceptor chromophore released from mild acid hydrolysis has been identified as hypericin. 2. The native chromophore is apparently linked to a protein (65 K) containing Lys and several hydrophobic residues, which is soluble in acetone and n-pentane. The peptide-linked stentorin (I) chromophore exhibits circular dichroism in the visible region due to the induced optical activity provided by the peptide. 3. The sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of a 38% fraction of the sucrose density centrifugation has resolved stentorin II proteins having molecular weights of 13 000, 16 000, 65 000 and 130 000. These proteins, as well as the acetone-soluble peptide, have been spectroscopically characterized with particular emphasis on their primary photoreactivity as the photophobic receptor of Stentor coeruleus. 4. Irradiation of whole living Stentor in dilute buffer solutions induces a decrease in the pH of the medium. A strong dependence upon pH in the fluorescence spectra of both synthetic and native chromophores is also evident, showing a significant drop in the pKa of one or more hydroxyl groups in the excited state. A mechanism for the photophobic response, based on this lowering of the pKa as the primary photoprocess, has been discussed. PMID:39631

  5. Control of a four-color sensing photoreceptor by a two-color sensing photoreceptor reveals complex light regulation in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Bussell, Adam N; Kehoe, David M

    2013-07-30

    Photoreceptors are biologically important for sensing changes in the color and intensity of ambient light and, for photosynthetic organisms, processing this light information to optimize food production through photosynthesis. Cyanobacteria are an evolutionarily and ecologically important prokaryotic group of oxygenic photosynthesizers that contain cyanobacteriochrome (CBCR) photoreceptors, whose family members sense nearly the entire visible spectrum of light colors. Some cyanobacteria contain 12 to 15 different CBCRs, and many family members contain multiple light-sensing domains. However, the complex interactions that must be occurring within and between these photoreceptors remain unexplored. Here we describe the regulation and photobiology of a unique CBCR called IflA (influenced by far-red light), demonstrating that a second CBCR called RcaE strongly regulates IflA abundance and that IflA uses two distinct photosensory domains to respond to four different light colors: blue, green, red, and far-red. The absorption of red or far-red light by one domain affects the conformation of the other domain, and the rate of relaxation of one of these domains is influenced by the conformation of the other. Deletion of iflA results in delayed growth at low cell density, suggesting that IflA accelerates growth under this condition, apparently by sensing the ratio of red to far-red light in the environment. The types of complex photobiological interactions described here, both between unrelated CBCR family members and within photosensory domains of a single CBCR, may be advantageous for species using these photoreceptors in aquatic environments, where light color ratios are influenced by many biotic and abiotic factors. PMID:23858449

  6. Pattern formation in solutal convection: vermiculated rolls and isolated cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Julyan H. E.; Piro, Oreste; Villacampa, Ana I.

    2002-11-01

    Observations of the peculiar behaviour of a drink of liqueur topped with cream led us to perform experiments showing that the instability is a convection phenomenon that arises through destabilizing surface-tension forces. The convection is solutal: driven by gradients of concentration of a solute, rather than by heat gradients as in the more commonly studied thermal convection. The convective patterns, vermiculated rolls and isolated cells, are quite unlike the usual planforms. They are associated with an elastic surface film, and the Marangoni number is high, characteristic of solutal convection. We have conducted further experiments that reproduce these patterns in simpler working fluids.

  7. Unique system of photoreceptors in sea urchin tube feet

    PubMed Central

    Ullrich-Lüter, Esther M; Dupont, Sam; Arboleda, Enrique; Hausen, Harald; Arnone, Maria Ina

    2011-01-01

    Different sea urchin species show a vast variety of responses to variations in light intensity; however, despite this behavioral evidence for photosensitivity, light sensing in these animals has remained an enigma. Genome information of the recently sequenced purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) allowed us to address this question from a previously unexplored molecular perspective by localizing expression of the rhabdomeric opsin Sp-opsin4 and Sp-pax6, two genes essential for photoreceptor function and development, respectively. Using a specifically designed antibody against Sp-Opsin4 and in situ hybridization for both genes, we detected expression in two distinct groups of photoreceptor cells (PRCs) located in the animal's numerous tube feet. Specific reactivity of the Sp-Opsin4 antibody with sea star optic cushions, which regulate phototaxis, suggests a similar visual function in sea urchins. Ultrastructural characterization of the sea urchin PRCs revealed them to be of a microvillar receptor type. Our data suggest that echinoderms, in contrast to chordates, deploy a microvillar, r-opsin–expressing PRC type for vision, a feature that has been so far documented only in protostome animals. Surprisingly, sea urchin PRCs lack any associated screening pigment. Indeed, one of the tube foot PRC clusters may account for directional vision by being shaded through the opaque calcite skeleton. The PRC axons connect to the animal internal nervous system, suggesting an integrative function beyond local short circuits. Because juveniles display no phototaxis until skeleton completion, we suggest a model in which the entire sea urchin, deploying its skeleton as PRC screening device, functions as a huge compound eye. PMID:21536888

  8. Light-induced changes of sensitivity in Limulus ventral photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    The responses of Limulus ventral photoreceptors to brief test flashes and to longer adapting lights were measured under voltage clamp conditions. When the cell was dark adapted, there was a range of energy of the test flashes over which the peak amplitude of the responses (light-induced currents) was directly proportional to the flash energy. This was also true when test flashes were superposed on adapting stimuli but the proportionality constant (termed peak currently/photon) was reduced. The peak current/photon was attenuated more by brighter adapting stimuli than by less bright adapting stimuli. The peak current/photon is a measure of the sensitivity of the conductance- increase mechanism underlying the light response of the photo-receptor. The response elicited by an adapting stimulus had a large initial transient which declined to a smaller plateau. The peak current/photon decreased sharply during the declining phase of the transient and was relatively stable during the plateau. This indicates that the onset of light adaptation is delayed with respect to the onset of the response to the adapting stimulus. If the adaptational state just before the onset of each of a series of adapting stimuli was constant, the amplitude of the transient was a nearly linear function of intensity. When the total intensity was rapidly doubled (or halved) during a plateau response, the total current approximately doubled (or halved). We argue that the transition from transient to plateau, light-elicited changes of threshold, and the nonlinear function relating the plateau response to stimulus intensity all reflect changes of the responsiveness of the conductance-increase mechanism. PMID:1181378

  9. In vivo tracking of phosphoinositides in Drosophila photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Hardie, Roger C.; Liu, Che-Hsiung; Randall, Alexander S.; Sengupta, Sukanya

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In order to monitor phosphoinositide turnover during phospholipase C (PLC)-mediated Drosophila phototransduction, fluorescently tagged lipid probes were expressed in photoreceptors and imaged both in dissociated cells, and in eyes of intact living flies. Of six probes tested, TbR332H (a mutant of the Tubby protein pleckstrin homology domain) was judged the best reporter for phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2], and the P4M domain from Legionella SidM for phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P). Using accurately calibrated illumination, we found that only ∼50% of PtdIns(4,5)P2 and very little PtdIns4P were depleted by full daylight intensities in wild-type flies, but both were severely depleted by ∼100-fold dimmer intensities in mutants lacking Ca2+-permeable transient receptor potential (TRP) channels or protein kinase C (PKC). Resynthesis of PtdIns4P (t½ ∼12 s) was faster than PtdIns(4,5)P2 (t½ ∼40 s), but both were greatly slowed in mutants of DAG kinase (rdgA) or PtdIns transfer protein (rdgB). The results indicate that Ca2+- and PKC-dependent inhibition of PLC is required for enabling photoreceptors to maintain phosphoinositide levels despite high rates of hydrolysis by PLC, and suggest that phosphorylation of PtdIns4P to PtdIns(4,5)P2 is the rate-limiting step of the cycle. PMID:26483384

  10. Calcium diffusion coefficient in rod photoreceptor outer segments.

    PubMed Central

    Nakatani, Kei; Chen, Chunhe; Koutalos, Yiannis

    2002-01-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) modulates several of the enzymatic pathways that mediate phototransduction in the outer segments of vertebrate rod photoreceptors. Ca(2+) enters the rod outer segment through cationic channels kept open by cyclic GMP (cGMP) and is pumped out by a Na(+)/Ca(2+),K(+) exchanger. Light initiates a biochemical cascade, which leads to closure of the cGMP-gated channels, and a concomitant decline in the concentration of Ca(2+). This decline mediates the recovery from stimulation by light and underlies the adaptation of the cell to background light. The speed with which the decline in the Ca(2+) concentration propagates through the rod outer segment depends on the Ca(2+) diffusion coefficient. We have used the fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator fluo-3 and confocal microscopy to measure the profile of the Ca(2+) concentration after stimulation of the rod photoreceptor by light. From these measurements, we have obtained a value of 15 +/- 1 microm(2)s(-1) for the radial Ca(2+) diffusion coefficient. This value is consistent with the effect of a low-affinity, immobile buffer reported to be present in the rod outer segment (L.Lagnado, L. Cervetto, and P.A. McNaughton, 1992, J. Physiol. 455:111-142) and with a buffering capacity of approximately 20 for rods in darkness(S. Nikonov, N. Engheta, and E.N. Pugh, Jr., 1998, J. Gen. Physiol. 111:7-37). This value suggests that diffusion provides a significant delay for the radial propagation of the decline in the concentration of Ca(2+). Also, because of baffling by the disks, the longitudinal Ca(2+) diffusion coefficient will be in the order of 2 microm(2)s(-1), which is much smaller than the longitudinal cGMP diffusion coefficient (30-60 microm(2)s(-1); ). Therefore, the longitudinal decline of Ca(2+) lags behind the longitudinal spread of excitation by cGMP. PMID:11806915

  11. Spatially patterned matrix elasticity directs stem cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun; DelRio, Frank W.; Ma, Hao; Killaars, Anouk R.; Basta, Lena P.; Kyburz, Kyle A.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation for the functional role of matrix mechanics in regulating stem cell self-renewal and differentiation processes. However, it is largely unknown how subcellular, spatial mechanical variations in the local extracellular environment mediate intracellular signal transduction and direct cell fate. Here, the effect of spatial distribution, magnitude, and organization of subcellular matrix mechanical properties on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSCs) function was investigated. Exploiting a photodegradation reaction, a hydrogel cell culture substrate was fabricated with regions of spatially varied and distinct mechanical properties, which were subsequently mapped and quantified by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The variations in the underlying matrix mechanics were found to regulate cellular adhesion and transcriptional events. Highly spread, elongated morphologies and higher Yes-associated protein (YAP) activation were observed in hMSCs seeded on hydrogels with higher concentrations of stiff regions in a dose-dependent manner. However, when the spatial organization of the mechanically stiff regions was altered from a regular to randomized pattern, lower levels of YAP activation with smaller and more rounded cell morphologies were induced in hMSCs. We infer from these results that irregular, disorganized variations in matrix mechanics, compared with regular patterns, appear to disrupt actin organization, and lead to different cell fates; this was verified by observations of lower alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and higher expression of CD105, a stem cell marker, in hMSCs in random versus regular patterns of mechanical properties. Collectively, this material platform has allowed innovative experiments to elucidate a novel spatial mechanical dosing mechanism that correlates to both the magnitude and organization of spatial stiffness. PMID:27436901

  12. Spatially patterned matrix elasticity directs stem cell fate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; DelRio, Frank W; Ma, Hao; Killaars, Anouk R; Basta, Lena P; Kyburz, Kyle A; Anseth, Kristi S

    2016-08-01

    There is a growing appreciation for the functional role of matrix mechanics in regulating stem cell self-renewal and differentiation processes. However, it is largely unknown how subcellular, spatial mechanical variations in the local extracellular environment mediate intracellular signal transduction and direct cell fate. Here, the effect of spatial distribution, magnitude, and organization of subcellular matrix mechanical properties on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSCs) function was investigated. Exploiting a photodegradation reaction, a hydrogel cell culture substrate was fabricated with regions of spatially varied and distinct mechanical properties, which were subsequently mapped and quantified by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The variations in the underlying matrix mechanics were found to regulate cellular adhesion and transcriptional events. Highly spread, elongated morphologies and higher Yes-associated protein (YAP) activation were observed in hMSCs seeded on hydrogels with higher concentrations of stiff regions in a dose-dependent manner. However, when the spatial organization of the mechanically stiff regions was altered from a regular to randomized pattern, lower levels of YAP activation with smaller and more rounded cell morphologies were induced in hMSCs. We infer from these results that irregular, disorganized variations in matrix mechanics, compared with regular patterns, appear to disrupt actin organization, and lead to different cell fates; this was verified by observations of lower alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and higher expression of CD105, a stem cell marker, in hMSCs in random versus regular patterns of mechanical properties. Collectively, this material platform has allowed innovative experiments to elucidate a novel spatial mechanical dosing mechanism that correlates to both the magnitude and organization of spatial stiffness. PMID:27436901

  13. Directing cell migration and organization via nanocrater-patterned cell-repellent interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Hojeong; Koo, Sangmo; Reese, Willie Mae; Loskill, Peter; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Healy, Kevin E.

    2015-09-01

    Although adhesive interactions between cells and nanostructured interfaces have been studied extensively, there is a paucity of data on how nanostructured interfaces repel cells by directing cell migration and cell-colony organization. Here, by using multiphoton ablation lithography to pattern surfaces with nanoscale craters of various aspect ratios and pitches, we show that the surfaces altered the cells’ focal-adhesion size and distribution, thus affecting cell morphology, migration and ultimately localization. We also show that nanocrater pitch can disrupt the formation of mature focal adhesions to favour the migration of cells towards higher-pitched regions, which present increased planar area for the formation of stable focal adhesions. Moreover, by designing surfaces with variable pitch but constant nanocrater dimensions, we were able to create circular and striped cellular patterns. Our surface-patterning approach, which does not involve chemical treatments and can be applied to various materials, represents a simple method to control cell behaviour on surfaces.

  14. On a model of pattern regeneration based on cell memory.

    PubMed

    Bessonov, Nikolai; Levin, Michael; Morozova, Nadya; Reinberg, Natalia; Tosenberger, Alen; Volpert, Vitaly

    2015-01-01

    We present here a new model of the cellular dynamics that enable regeneration of complex biological morphologies. Biological cell structures are considered as an ensemble of mathematical points on the plane. Each cell produces a signal which propagates in space and is received by other cells. The total signal received by each cell forms a signal distribution defined on the cell structure. This distribution characterizes the geometry of the cell structure. If a part of this structure is removed, the remaining cells have two signals. They keep the value of the signal which they had before the amputation (memory), and they receive a new signal produced after the amputation. Regeneration of the cell structure is stimulated by the difference between the old and the new signals. It is stopped when the two signals coincide. The algorithm of regeneration contains certain rules which are essential for its functioning, being the first quantitative model of cellular memory that implements regeneration of complex patterns to a specific target morphology. Correct regeneration depends on the form and the size of the cell structure, as well as on some parameters of regeneration. PMID:25695252

  15. Toward Synthetic Spatial Patterns in Engineered Cell Populations with Chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Duran-Nebreda, Salva; Solé, Ricard V

    2016-07-15

    A major force shaping form and patterns in biology is based in the presence of amplification mechanisms able to generate ordered, large-scale spatial structures out of local interactions and random initial conditions. Turing patterns are one of the best known candidates for such ordering dynamics, and their existence has been proven in both chemical and physical systems. Their relevance in biology, although strongly supported by indirect evidence, is still under discussion. Extensive modeling approaches have stemmed from Turing's pioneering ideas, but further confirmation from experimental biology is required. An alternative possibility is to engineer cells so that self-organized patterns emerge from local communication. Here we propose a potential synthetic design based on the interaction between population density and a diffusing signal, including also directed motion in the form of chemotaxis. The feasibility of engineering such a system and its implications for developmental biology are also assessed. PMID:27009520

  16. Cone Photoreceptors Develop Normally in the Absence of Functional Rod Photoreceptors in a Transgenic Swine Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez de Castro, Juan P.; Scott, Patrick A.; Fransen, James W.; Demas, James; DeMarco, Paul J.; Kaplan, Henry J.; McCall, Maureen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Human and swine retinas have morphological and functional similarities. In the absence of primate models, the swine is an attractive model to study retinal function and disease, with its cone-rich visual streak, our ability to manipulate their genome, and the differences in susceptibility of rod and cone photoreceptors to disease. We characterized the normal development of cone function and its subsequent decline in a P23H rhodopsin transgenic (TgP23H) miniswine model of autosomal dominant RP. Methods. Semen from TgP23H miniswine 53-1 inseminated domestic swine and produced TgP23H and Wt hybrid littermates. Retinal function was evaluated using ERGs between postnatal days (P) 14 and 120. Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) responses were recorded to full-field stimuli at several intensities. Retinal morphology was assessed using light and electron microscopy. Results. Scotopic retinal function matures in Wt pigs up to P60, but never develops in TgP23H pigs. Wt and TgP23H photopic vision matures similarly up to P30 and diverges at P60 where TgP23H cone vision declines. There are fewer TgP23H RGCs with visually evoked responses at all ages and their response to light is compromised. Photoreceptor morphological changes mirror these functional changes. Conclusions. Lack of early scotopic function in TgP23H swine suggests it as a model of an aggressive form of RP. In this mammalian model of RP, normal cone function develops independent of rod function. Therefore, its retina represents a system in which therapies to rescue cones can be developed to prolong photopic visual function in RP patients. PMID:24618325

  17. Efficacy and selectivity of phosphodiesterase-targeted drugs to inhibit photoreceptor phosphodiesterase (PDE6) in retinal photoreceptors*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiujun; Feng, Qing; Cote, Rick H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors are important therapeutic agents, but their effects on photoreceptor PDE (PDE6) and photoreceptor cells are poorly understood. We characterized the potency and selectivity of various classes of PDE inhibitors on purified rod and cone PDE6 and on intact rod outer segments (ROS). Methods: The inhibition constant (KI) of isozyme-selective PDE inhibitors was determined for purified rod and cone PDE6. Perturbations of cGMP levels in isolated ROS suspensions by PDE inhibitors were quantitated by a cGMP enzyme-linked immunoassay. Results: Most PDE5-selective inhibitors are excellent PDE6 inhibitors. Vardenafil, a potent PDE5 inhibitor (KI = 0.2 nM), is the most potent PDE6 inhibitor tested (KI = 0.7 nM). Zaprinast is the only drug that inhibits PDE6 more potently than PDE5. PDE1-selective inhibitors were equally effective in inhibiting PDE6. In intact ROS, PDE inhibitors elevated cGMP levels but none fully inhibited PDE6. Their potency to elevate cGMP levels in ROS was much lower than their ability to inhibit the purified enzyme. Competition between PDE5/6-selective drugs and the inhibitory γ subunit for the active site of PDE6 is proposed to reduce the effectiveness of drugs at the enzyme active site. Conclusions: Several classes of PDE inhibitors equally well inhibit PDE6 as the PDE family to which they are targeted. In intact ROS, high PDE6 concentrations, binding of the γ subunit to the active site, and calcium feedback mechanisms attenuate the effectiveness of PDE inhibitors to inhibit PDE6 and disrupt the cGMP signaling pathway during visual transduction. PMID:16123402

  18. Tuning cell adhesion by direct nanostructuring silicon into cell repulsive/adhesive patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Premnath, Priyatha; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2015-09-10

    Developing platforms that allow tuning cell functionality through incorporating physical, chemical, or mechanical cues onto the material surfaces is one of the key challenges in research in the field of biomaterials. In this respect, various approaches have been proposed and numerous structures have been developed on a variety of materials. Most of these approaches, however, demand a multistep process or post-chemical treatment. Therefore, a simple approach would be desirable to develop bio-functionalized platforms for effectively modulating cell adhesion and consequently programming cell functionality without requiring any chemical or biological surface treatment. This study introduces a versatile yet simple laser approach to structure silicon (Si) chips into cytophobic/cytophilic patterns in order to modulate cell adhesion and proliferation. These patterns are fabricated on platforms through direct laser processing of Si substrates, which renders a desired computer-generated configuration into patterns. We investigate the morphology, chemistry, and wettability of the platform surfaces. Subsequently, we study the functionality of the fabricated platforms on modulating cervical cancer cells (HeLa) behaviour. The results from in vitro studies suggest that the nanostructures efficiently repel HeLa cells and drive them to migrate onto untreated sites. The study of the morphology of the cells reveals that cells evade the cytophobic area by bending and changing direction. Additionally, cell patterning, cell directionality, cell channelling, and cell trapping are achieved by developing different platforms with specific patterns. The flexibility and controllability of this approach to effectively structure Si substrates to cell-repulsive and cell-adhesive patterns offer perceptible outlook for developing bio-functionalized platforms for a variety of biomedical devices. Moreover, this approach could pave the way for developing anti-cancer platforms that selectively repel

  19. A model for photoreceptor-based magnetoreception in birds.

    PubMed Central

    Ritz, T; Adem, S; Schulten, K

    2000-01-01

    A large variety of animals has the ability to sense the geomagnetic field and utilize it as a source of directional (compass) information. It is not known by which biophysical mechanism this magnetoreception is achieved. We investigate the possibility that magnetoreception involves radical-pair processes that are governed by anisotropic hyperfine coupling between (unpaired) electron and nuclear spins. We will show theoretically that fields of geomagnetic field strength and weaker can produce significantly different reaction yields for different alignments of the radical pairs with the magnetic field. As a model for a magnetic sensory organ we propose a system of radical pairs being 1) orientationally ordered in a molecular substrate and 2) exhibiting changes in the reaction yields that affect the visual transduction pathway. We evaluate three-dimensional visual modulation patterns that can arise from the influence of the geomagnetic field on radical-pair systems. The variations of these patterns with orientation and field strength can furnish the magnetic compass ability of birds with the same characteristics as observed in behavioral experiments. We propose that the recently discovered photoreceptor cryptochrome is part of the magnetoreception system and suggest further studies to prove or disprove this hypothesis. PMID:10653784

  20. Distribution of cone photoreceptors in the mammalian retina.

    PubMed

    Szél, A; Röhlich, P; Caffé, A R; van Veen, T

    1996-12-15

    The retina of mammals contains various amounts of cone photoreceptors that are relatively evenly distributed and display a radially or horizontally oriented area of peak density. In most mammalian species two spectrally different classes of cone can be distinguished with various histochemical and physiological methods. These cone classes occur in a relatively constant ratio, middle-to-longwave sensitive cones being predominant over short-wave cones. Recent observations do not support the idea that each cone subpopulation is uniformly distributed across the retina. With appropriate type-specific markers, unexpected patterns of colour cone topography have been revealed in certain species. In the mouse and the rabbit, the "standard" uniform pattern was found to be confined exclusively to the dorsal retina. In a ventral zone of variable width all cones express short-wave pigment, a phenomenon whose biological significance is not known yet. Dorso-ventral asymmetries have been described in lower vertebrates, matching the spectral distribution of light reaching the retina from various sectors of the visual field. It is not clear, however, whether the retinal cone fields in mammals carry out a function similar to that of their counterparts in fish and amphibians. Since in a number of mammalian species short-wave cones are the first to differentiate, and the expression of the short-wave pigment seems to be the default pathway of cone differentiation, we suggest that the short-wave sensitive cone fields are rudimentary areas conserving an ancestral stage of the photopigment evolution. PMID:9016448

  1. Synthesis and patterning of tunable multiscale materials with engineered cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Allen Y.; Deng, Zhengtao; Billings, Amanda N.; Seker, Urartu O.S.; Lu, Michelle Y.; Citorik, Robert J.; Zakeri, Bijan; Lu, Timothy K.

    2014-01-01

    Many natural biological systems - such as biofilms, shells and skeletal tissues - are able to assemble multifunctional and environmentally responsive multiscale assemblies of living and non-living components. Here, by using inducible genetic circuits and cellular communication circuits to regulate Escherichia coli curli amyloid production, we show that E. coli cells can organize self-assembling amyloid fibrils across multiple length scales, producing amyloid-based materials that are either externally controllable or undergo autonomous patterning. We also interfaced curli fibrils with inorganic materials, such as gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and quantum dots (QDs), and used these capabilities to create an environmentally responsive biofilm-based electrical switch, produce gold nanowires and nanorods, co-localize AuNPs with CdTe/CdS QDs to modulate QD fluorescence lifetimes, and nucleate the formation of fluorescent ZnS QDs. This work lays a foundation for synthesizing, patterning, and controlling functional composite materials with engineered cells. PMID:24658114

  2. Synthesis and patterning of tunable multiscale materials with engineered cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Allen Y.; Deng, Zhengtao; Billings, Amanda N.; Seker, Urartu O. S.; Lu, Michelle Y.; Citorik, Robert J.; Zakeri, Bijan; Lu, Timothy K.

    2014-05-01

    Many natural biological systems—such as biofilms, shells and skeletal tissues—are able to assemble multifunctional and environmentally responsive multiscale assemblies of living and non-living components. Here, by using inducible genetic circuits and cellular communication circuits to regulate Escherichia coli curli amyloid production, we show that E. coli cells can organize self-assembling amyloid fibrils across multiple length scales, producing amyloid-based materials that are either externally controllable or undergo autonomous patterning. We also interfaced curli fibrils with inorganic materials, such as gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and quantum dots (QDs), and used these capabilities to create an environmentally responsive biofilm-based electrical switch, produce gold nanowires and nanorods, co-localize AuNPs with CdTe/CdS QDs to modulate QD fluorescence lifetimes, and nucleate the formation of fluorescent ZnS QDs. This work lays a foundation for synthesizing, patterning, and controlling functional composite materials with engineered cells.

  3. Estimating the Size of Onion Epidermal Cells from Diffraction Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groff, Jeffrey R.

    2012-10-01

    Bioscience and premedical profession students are a major demographic served by introductory physics courses at many colleges and universities. Exposing these students to biological applications of physical principles will help them to appreciate physics as a useful tool for their future professions. Here I describe an experiment suitable for introductory physics where principles of wave optics are applied to probe the size of onion epidermal cells. The epidermis tissue is composed of cells of relatively uniform size and shape (Fig. 1) so the tissue acts like a one-dimensional transmission diffraction grating. The diffraction patterns generated when a laser beam passes through the tissue (Fig. 2) are analyzed and an estimate of the average width of individual onion epidermal cells is calculated. The results are compared to direct measurements taken using a light microscope. The use of microscopes and plant-cell tissue slides creates opportunities for cross-discipline collaboration between physics and biology instructors.

  4. Conditional knockdown of DNA methyltransferase 1 reveals a key role of retinal pigment epithelium integrity in photoreceptor outer segment morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nasonkin, Igor O.; Merbs, Shannath L.; Lazo, Kevin; Oliver, Verity F.; Brooks, Matthew; Patel, Krushangi; Enke, Raymond A.; Nellissery, Jacob; Jamrich, Milan; Le, Yun Z.; Bharti, Kapil; Fariss, Robert N.; Rachel, Rivka A.; Zack, Donald J.; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique J.; Swaroop, Anand

    2013-01-01

    Dysfunction or death of photoreceptors is the primary cause of vision loss in retinal and macular degenerative diseases. As photoreceptors have an intimate relationship with the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) for exchange of macromolecules, removal of shed membrane discs and retinoid recycling, an improved understanding of the development of the photoreceptor-RPE complex will allow better design of gene- and cell-based therapies. To explore the epigenetic contribution to retinal development we generated conditional knockout alleles of DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1) in mice. Conditional Dnmt1 knockdown in early eye development mediated by Rx-Cre did not produce lamination or cell fate defects, except in cones; however, the photoreceptors completely lacked outer segments despite near normal expression of phototransduction and cilia genes. We also identified disruption of RPE morphology and polarization as early as E15.5. Defects in outer segment biogenesis were evident with Dnmt1 exon excision only in RPE, but not when excision was directed exclusively to photoreceptors. We detected a reduction in DNA methylation of LINE1 elements (a measure of global DNA methylation) in developing mutant RPE as compared with neural retina, and of Tuba3a, which exhibited dramatically increased expression in mutant retina. These results demonstrate a unique function of DNMT1-mediated DNA methylation in controlling RPE apicobasal polarity and neural retina differentiation. We also establish a model to study the epigenetic mechanisms and signaling pathways that guide the modulation of photoreceptor outer segment morphogenesis by RPE during retinal development and disease. PMID:23406904

  5. Conditional knockdown of DNA methyltransferase 1 reveals a key role of retinal pigment epithelium integrity in photoreceptor outer segment morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nasonkin, Igor O; Merbs, Shannath L; Lazo, Kevin; Oliver, Verity F; Brooks, Matthew; Patel, Krushangi; Enke, Raymond A; Nellissery, Jacob; Jamrich, Milan; Le, Yun Z; Bharti, Kapil; Fariss, Robert N; Rachel, Rivka A; Zack, Donald J; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique J; Swaroop, Anand

    2013-03-01

    Dysfunction or death of photoreceptors is the primary cause of vision loss in retinal and macular degenerative diseases. As photoreceptors have an intimate relationship with the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) for exchange of macromolecules, removal of shed membrane discs and retinoid recycling, an improved understanding of the development of the photoreceptor-RPE complex will allow better design of gene- and cell-based therapies. To explore the epigenetic contribution to retinal development we generated conditional knockout alleles of DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1) in mice. Conditional Dnmt1 knockdown in early eye development mediated by Rx-Cre did not produce lamination or cell fate defects, except in cones; however, the photoreceptors completely lacked outer segments despite near normal expression of phototransduction and cilia genes. We also identified disruption of RPE morphology and polarization as early as E15.5. Defects in outer segment biogenesis were evident with Dnmt1 exon excision only in RPE, but not when excision was directed exclusively to photoreceptors. We detected a reduction in DNA methylation of LINE1 elements (a measure of global DNA methylation) in developing mutant RPE as compared with neural retina, and of Tuba3a, which exhibited dramatically increased expression in mutant retina. These results demonstrate a unique function of DNMT1-mediated DNA methylation in controlling RPE apicobasal polarity and neural retina differentiation. We also establish a model to study the epigenetic mechanisms and signaling pathways that guide the modulation of photoreceptor outer segment morphogenesis by RPE during retinal development and disease. PMID:23406904

  6. Adaptation in the input-output relation of the synapse made by the barnacle's photoreceptor.

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, J H; Moore, J W; Stuart, A E

    1985-01-01

    A study was made of synaptic transmission between the four median photoreceptors of the giant barnacle (Balanus nubilus) and their post-synaptic cells (I-cells). Simultaneous intracellular recordings were made from the presynaptic terminal region of a photoreceptor and from the soma of an I-cell. The photoreceptor's membrane potential provided feed-back to bath electrodes that passed current into the receptors' axons, permitting the voltage to be controlled at the point of arborization of their presynaptic terminals. Simultaneous recordings from a second photoreceptor showed that its voltage tracked the first. Step depolarizations of the receptors from their dark resting potential (about -60 mV) caused hyperpolarizations of the I-cell that reached a peak, then decayed to a plateau value. The amplitude of the I-cell's response grew with presynaptic depolarizations, saturating at presynaptic values 10-20 mV depolarized from dark rest. Step hyperpolarizations of the receptors from dark rest evoked depolarizations of the I-cell consisting of an initial peak, which varied greatly in amplitude and wave form from preparation to preparation, followed by a plateau. The presence of this post-synaptic response indicates that transmitter is released continuously from the receptors at their dark resting potential. An input-output relation of the synapse was obtained by presenting step depolarizations from a holding potential of -80 mV, where steady-state transmitter release is shut off. The relation is sigmoidal; in the exponentially rising phase of the curve, a 5-11 mV presynaptic change produces a 10-fold change in post-synaptic response. When the presynaptic holding potential was set at values ranging from -80 to -40 mV, the relation between the I-cell's response and the absolute potential to which the receptor was stepped shifted along the presynaptic voltage axis. The slopes of the input-output relations were roughly parallel or increased as the photoreceptors were held

  7. Microtubule-associated protein tau in bovine retinal photoreceptor rod outer segments: comparison with brain tau.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Akio; Nishizawa, Yuji; Matsuura, Isao; Hayashi, Fumio; Usukura, Jiro; Bondarenko, Vladimir A

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have suggested a possible involvement of abnormal tau in some retinal degenerative diseases. The common view in these studies is that these retinal diseases share the mechanism of tau-mediated degenerative diseases in brain and that information about these brain diseases may be directly applied to explain these retinal diseases. Here we collectively examine this view by revealing three basic characteristics of tau in the rod outer segment (ROS) of bovine retinal photoreceptors, i.e., its isoforms, its phosphorylation mode and its interaction with microtubules, and by comparing them with those of brain tau. We find that ROS contains at least four isoforms: three are identical to those in brain and one is unique in ROS. All ROS isoforms, like brain isoforms, are modified with multiple phosphate molecules; however, ROS isoforms show their own specific phosphorylation pattern, and these phosphorylation patterns appear not to be identical to those of brain tau. Interestingly, some ROS isoforms, under the normal conditions, are phosphorylated at the sites identical to those in Alzheimer's patient isoforms. Surprisingly, a large portion of ROS isoforms tightly associates with a membranous component(s) other than microtubules, and this association is independent of their phosphorylation states. These observations strongly suggest that tau plays various roles in ROS and that some of these functions may not be comparable to those of brain tau. We believe that knowledge about tau in the entire retinal network and/or its individual cells are also essential for elucidation of tau-mediated retinal diseases, if any. PMID:23712071

  8. Effect of light intensity on flight control and temporal properties of photoreceptors in bumblebees.

    PubMed

    Reber, Therese; Vähäkainu, Antti; Baird, Emily; Weckström, Matti; Warrant, Eric; Dacke, Marie

    2015-05-01

    To control flight, insects rely on the pattern of visual motion generated on the retina as they move through the environment. When light levels fall, vision becomes less reliable and flight control thus becomes more challenging. Here, we investigated the effect of light intensity on flight control by filming the trajectories of free-flying bumblebees (Bombus terrestris, Linnaeus 1758) in an experimental tunnel at different light levels. As light levels fell, flight speed decreased and the flight trajectories became more tortuous but the bees were still remarkably good at centring their flight about the tunnel's midline. To investigate whether this robust flight performance can be explained by visual adaptations in the bumblebee retina, we also examined the response speed of the green-sensitive photoreceptors at the same light intensities. We found that the response speed of the photoreceptors significantly decreased as light levels fell. This indicates that bumblebees have both behavioural (reduction in flight speed) and retinal (reduction in response speed of the photoreceptors) adaptations to allow them to fly in dim light. However, the more tortuous flight paths recorded in dim light suggest that these adaptations do not support flight with the same precision during the twilight hours of the day. PMID:25750416

  9. Local adaptation in the ventral photoreceptors of Limulus

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    Local adaptation was demonstrated in the ventral photoreceptors of Lumulus using either flashes or continuous illumination. Spots of light locally desensitized the region of the photoreceptor on which they were focused. In dark-adapted photoreceptors where "quantum bumps" were clearly discernible, local adaptation of the quantum bumps was observed. Local adaptation could induce differences of threshold of 1 decade over distances of 50-80 mum. With continuous local illumination these gradients could be maintained from 2 s to 30 min. In addition, the decrease in time scale associated with light adaptation was also found to be localized to the region of illumination. PMID:1194890

  10. Electron probe microanalysis of calcium release and magnesium uptake by endoplasmic reticulum in bee photoreceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, O.; Walz, B. ); Somlyo, A.V.; Somlyo, A.P. )

    1991-02-01

    Honey bee photoreceptors contain large sacs of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that can be located unequivocally in freeze-dried cryosections. The elemental compositon of the ER was determined by electron probe x-ray microanalysis and was visualized in high-resolution x-ray maps. In the ER of dark-adapted photoreceptors, the Ca concentration was 47.5 {plus minus} 1.1 mmol/kg (dry weight). During a 3-sec nonsaturating light stimulus, {approximately}50% of the Ca content was released from the ER. Light stimulation also caused a highly significant increase in the Mg content of the ER; the ratio of Mg uptake to Ca released was {approximately}0.7. Our results show unambiguously that the ER is the source of Ca{sup 2+} release during cell stimulation and suggest the Mg{sup 2+} can nearly balance the charge movement of Ca{sup 2+}.

  11. Electron probe microanalysis of calcium release and magnesium uptake by endoplasmic reticulum in bee photoreceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, O; Walz, B; Somlyo, A V; Somlyo, A P

    1991-01-01

    Honey bee photoreceptors contain large sacs of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that can be located unequivocally in freeze-dried cryosections. The elemental composition of the ER was determined by electron probe x-ray microanalysis and was visualized in high-resolution x-ray maps. In the ER of dark-adapted photoreceptors, the Ca concentration was 47.5 +/- 1.1 mmol/kg (dry weight) (mean +/- SEM). During a 3-sec nonsaturating light stimulus, approximately 50% of the Ca content was released from the ER. Light stimulation also caused a highly significant increase in the Mg content of the ER; the ratio of Mg uptake to Ca released was approximately 0.7. Our results show unambiguously that the ER is the source of Ca2+ release during cell stimulation and suggest that Mg2+ can nearly balance the charge movement of Ca2+. Images PMID:1992466

  12. Visual transduction in human rod photoreceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, T W; Schneeweis, D M; Schnapf, J L

    1993-01-01

    1. Photocurrents were recorded with suction electrodes from rod photoreceptors of seven humans. 2. Brief flashes of light evoked transient outward currents of up to 20 pA. With increasing light intensity the peak response amplitude increased along an exponential saturation function. A half-saturating peak response was evoked by approximately sixty-five photoisomerizations. 3. Responses to brief dim flashes rose to a peak in about 200 ms. The waveform was roughly like the impulse response of a series of four to five low-pass filters. 4. The rising phases of the responses to flashes of increasing strength were found to fit with a biochemical model of phototransduction with an 'effective delay time' and 'characteristic time' of about 2 and 800 ms, respectively. 5. Spectral sensitivities were obtained over a wavelength range from 380 to 760 nm. The action spectrum, which peaked at 495 nm, followed the template described for photoreceptors in the macaque retina. Variation between rods in the position of the spectrum on the wavelength axis was small. 6. The scotopic luminosity function derived from human psychophysical experiments was found to agree well with the measured rod action spectrum after adjustments were made for lens absorption and photopigment self-screening in the intact eye. 7. Responses to steps of light rose monotonically to a maintained level, showing little or no relaxation. Nevertheless, the relationship between light intensity and steady-state response amplitude was shallower than that expected from simple response saturation. This is consistent with an adaptation mechanism acting on a rapid time scale. 8. Flash sensitivity fell with increasing intensities of background light according to Weber's law. Sensitivity was reduced twofold by lights evoking about 120 photoisomerizations per second. Background lights decreased the time to peak and the integration time of the flash response by up to 20%. PMID:8229828

  13. RPGR: Its role in photoreceptor physiology, human disease, and future therapies

    PubMed Central

    Megaw, Roly D.; Soares, Dinesh C.; Wright, Alan F.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian photoreceptors contain specialised connecting cilia that connect the inner (IS) to the outer segments (OS). Dysfunction of the connecting cilia due to mutations in ciliary proteins are a common cause of the inherited retinal dystrophy retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Mutations affecting the Retinitis Pigmentosa GTPase Regulator (RPGR) protein is one such cause, affecting 10–20% of all people with RP and the majority of those with X-linked RP. RPGR is located in photoreceptor connecting cilia. It interacts with a wide variety of ciliary proteins, but its exact function is unknown. Recently, there have been important advances both in our understanding of RPGR function and towards the development of a therapy. This review summarises the existing literature on human RPGR function and dysfunction, and suggests that RPGR plays a role in the function of the ciliary gate, which controls access of both membrane and soluble proteins to the photoreceptor outer segment. We discuss key models used to investigate and treat RPGR disease and suggest that gene augmentation therapy offers a realistic therapeutic approach, although important questions still remain to be answered, while cell replacement therapy based on retinal progenitor cells represents a more distant prospect. PMID:26093275

  14. Microglial phagocytosis and activation underlying photoreceptor degeneration is regulated by CX3CL1-CX3CR1 signaling in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Zabel, Matthew K; Zhao, Lian; Zhang, Yikui; Gonzalez, Shaimar R; Ma, Wenxin; Wang, Xu; Fariss, Robert N; Wong, Wai T

    2016-09-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a disease characterized by the progressive degeneration of mutation-bearing photoreceptors, is a significant cause of incurable blindness in the young worldwide. Recent studies have found that activated retinal microglia contribute to photoreceptor demise via phagocytosis and proinflammatory factor production, however mechanisms regulating these contributions are not well-defined. In this study, we investigate the role of CX3CR1, a microglia-specific receptor, in regulating microglia-mediated degeneration using the well-established rd10 mouse model of RP. We found that in CX3CR1-deficient (CX3CR1(GFP/GFP) ) rd10 mice microglial infiltration into the photoreceptor layer was significantly augmented and associated with accelerated photoreceptor apoptosis and atrophy compared with CX3CR1-sufficient (CX3CR1(GFP/+) ) rd10 littermates. CX3CR1-deficient microglia demonstrated increased phagocytosis as evidenced by (1) having increased numbers of phagosomes in vivo, (2) an increased rate of phagocytosis of fluorescent beads and photoreceptor cellular debris in vitro, and (3) increased photoreceptor phagocytosis dynamics on live cell imaging in retinal explants, indicating that CX3CR1 signaling in microglia regulates the phagocytic clearance of at-risk photoreceptors. We also found that CX3CR1 deficiency in retinal microglia was associated with increased expression of inflammatory cytokines and microglial activation markers. Significantly, increasing CX3CL1-CX3CR1 signaling in the rd10 retina via exogenous intravitreal delivery of recombinant CX3CL1 was effective in (1) decreasing microglial infiltration, phagocytosis and activation, and (2) improving structural and functional features of photoreceptor degeneration. These results indicate that CX3CL1-CX3CR1 signaling is a molecular mechanism capable of modulating microglial-mediated degeneration and represents a potential molecular target in therapeutic approaches to RP. GLIA 2016

  15. Laser-based patterning for transfected cell microarrays.

    PubMed

    Hook, Andrew L; Creasey, Rhiannon; Hayes, Jason P; Thissen, Helmut; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2009-12-01

    The spatial control over biomolecule- and cell-surface interactions is of great interest to a broad range of biomedical applications, including sensors, implantable devices and cell microarrays. Microarrays in particular require precise spatial control and the formation of patterns with microscale features. Here, we have developed an approach specifically designed for transfected cell microarray (TCM) applications that allows microscale spatial control over the location of both DNA and cells on highly doped p-type silicon substrates. This was achieved by surface modification, involving plasma polymerization of allylamine, grafting of poly(ethylene glycol) and subsequent excimer laser ablation. DNA could be delivered in a spatially defined manner using ink-jet printing. In addition, electroporation was investigated as an approach to transfect attached cells with adsorbed DNA and good transfection efficiencies of approximately 20% were observed. The ability of the microstructured surfaces to spatially direct both DNA adsorption and cell attachment was demonstrated in a functional TCM, making this system an exciting platform for chip-based functional genomics. PMID:20811112

  16. Repair of the degenerate retina by photoreceptor transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Amanda C.; Hippert, Claire; Duran, Yanai; West, Emma L.; Bainbridge, James W. B.; Warre-Cornish, Katherine; Luhmann, Ulrich F. O.; Lakowski, Jorn; Sowden, Jane C.; Ali, Robin R.; Pearson, Rachael A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite different aetiologies, age-related macular degeneration and most inherited retinal disorders culminate in the same final common pathway, the loss of photoreceptors. There are few treatments and none reverse the loss of vision. Photoreceptor replacement by transplantation is proposed as a broad treatment strategy applicable to all degenerations. Recently, we demonstrated restoration of vision following rod-photoreceptor transplantation into a mouse model of stationary night-blindness, raising the critical question of whether photoreceptor replacement is equally effective in different types and stages of degeneration. We present a comprehensive assessment of rod-photoreceptor transplantation across six murine models of inherited photoreceptor degeneration. Transplantation is feasible in all models examined but disease type has a major impact on outcome, as assessed both by the morphology and number of integrated rod-photoreceptors. Integration can increase (Prph2+/Δ307), decrease (Crb1rd8/rd8, Gnat1−/−, Rho−/−), or remain constant (PDE6βrd1/rd1, Prph2rd2/rd2) with disease progression, depending upon the gene defect, with no correlation with severity. Robust integration is possible even in late-stage disease. Glial scarring and outer limiting membrane integrity, features that change with degeneration, significantly affect transplanted photoreceptor integration. Combined breakdown of these barriers markedly increases integration in a model with an intact outer limiting membrane, strong gliotic response, and otherwise poor transplantation outcome (Rho−/−), leading to an eightfold increase in integration and restoration of visual function. Thus, it is possible to achieve robust integration across a broad range of inherited retinopathies. Moreover, transplantation outcome can be improved by administering appropriate, tailored manipulations of the recipient environment. PMID:23248312

  17. The thermal origin of spontaneous activity in the Limulus photoreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Srebro, Richard; Behbehani, Mahmood

    1972-01-01

    1. Discrete depolarizations of the photoreceptor cell membrane called discrete waves occur spontaneously and in response to illumination in the eye of the horseshoe crab, Limulus. Each light induced discrete wave is caused by the absorption of a single photon. 2. The frequencies of spontaneous and light induced discrete waves were studied at different temperatures from 0 to 25° C using a new method of counting them to avoid errors due to their temporal overlap. 3. The frequency of spontaneous discrete waves followed the Arrhenius relationship with activation energy equal to 48·6 kcal. 4. The frequency of the discrete waves caused by a fixed level of steady illumination was not significantly changed when the temperature of the cell was changed. 5. The relationship of the frequency of spontaneous discrete waves to temperature was compared to a prediction based on the relationship of the quantum relative spectral sensitivity of the Limulus eye to the temperature of the eye. The prediction was in good agreement with observation and suggests that spontaneous discrete waves result from thermally induced cis to trans isomerizations of visual pigment molecules. PMID:5071400

  18. Rab6 functions in polarized transport in Drosophila photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Takunori; Nakamura, Yuri; Satoh, Akiko K.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Selective membrane transport pathways are essential for cells in situ to construct and maintain a polarized structure comprising multiple plasma membrane domains, which is essential for their specific cellular functions. Genetic screening in Drosophila photoreceptors harboring multiple plasma membrane domains enables the identification of genes involved in polarized transport pathways. Our genome-wide high-throughput screening identified a Rab6-null mutant with a rare phenotype characterized by a loss of 2 apical transport pathways with an intact basolateral transport. Although the functions of Rab6 in the Golgi apparatus are well known, its function in polarized transport is unexpected. The mutant phenotype and localization of Rab6 strongly indicate that Rab6 regulates transport between the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and recycling endosomes (REs): basolateral cargos are segregated at the TGN before Rab6 functions, but cargos going to multiple apical domains are sorted at REs. Both the medial-Golgi resident protein Metallophosphoesterase (MPPE) and the TGN marker GalT::CFP exhibit diffused co-localized distributions in Rab6-deficient cells, suggesting they are trapped in the retrograde transport vesicles returning to trans-Golgi cisternae. Hence, we propose that Rab6 regulates the fusion of retrograde transport vesicles containing medial, trans-Golgi resident proteins to the Golgi cisternae, which causes Golgi maturation to REs. PMID:27116570

  19. High-speed autofocusing of a cell using diffraction pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oku, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Masatoshi; Theodorus; Hashimoto, Koichi

    2006-05-01

    This paper proposes a new autofocusing method for observing cells under a transmission illumination. The focusing method uses a quick and simple focus estimation technique termed “depth from diffraction,” which is based on a diffraction pattern in a defocused image of a biological specimen. Since this method can estimate the focal position of the specimen from only a single defocused image, it can easily realize high-speed autofocusing. To demonstrate the method, it was applied to continuous focus tracking of a swimming paramecium, in combination with two-dimensional position tracking. Three-dimensional tracking of the paramecium for 70 s was successfully demonstrated.

  20. Pyro-electrification of polymer membranes for cell patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rega, R.; Gennari, O.; Mecozzia, L.; Grilli, S.; Pagliarulo, V.; Ferraro, P.

    2016-05-01

    In the recent years, much attention has been devoted to the possibility of charging polymer-based materials, due to their potential in developing large-scale and inexpensive flexible thin-film technology. The availability of localized electrostatic fields is in of great interest for a huge amount of applications such as distribution of biomolecules and cells from the liquid phase. Here we report a voltage-free pyro-electrification (PE) process able to induce permanent dipoles into polymer layers; the lithium niobate (LN) crystal is the key component that plays the multi-purpose role of sustaining, heating and poling the polymer layer that is then peeled-off easily in order to have a free-standing charged membrane. The results show the fascinating application for the living cell patterning. It well known that cell behaviour is affected by chemical and topographical cues of substrate. In fact, polymers, such as polystyrene (PS) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), are naturally cytophobic and require specific functionalization treatments in order to promote cell adhesion. Through our proposal technique, it's possible to obtain spontaneous organization and a driven growth of SH-SY5Y cells that is solely dictated by the nature of the charge polymer surface, opening, in this way, the innovative chance to manipulate and transfer biological samples on a free-standing polymer layer [1].

  1. Visual ecology and potassium conductances of insect photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Frolov, Roman; Immonen, Esa-Ville; Weckström, Matti

    2016-04-01

    Voltage-activated potassium channels (Kv channels) in the microvillar photoreceptors of arthropods are responsible for repolarization and regulation of photoreceptor signaling bandwidth. On the basis of analyzing Kv channels in dipteran flies, it was suggested that diurnal, rapidly flying insects predominantly express sustained K(+) conductances, whereas crepuscular and nocturnally active animals exhibit strongly inactivating Kv conductances. The latter was suggested to function for minimizing cellular energy consumption. In this study we further explore the evolutionary adaptations of the photoreceptor channelome to visual ecology and behavior by comparing K(+) conductances in 15 phylogenetically diverse insects, using patch-clamp recordings from dissociated ommatidia. We show that rapid diurnal flyers such as the blowfly (Calliphora vicina) and the honeybee (Apis mellifera) express relatively large noninactivating Kv conductances, conforming to the earlier hypothesis in Diptera. Nocturnal and/or slow-moving species do not in general exhibit stronger Kv conductance inactivation in the physiological membrane voltage range, but the photoreceptors in species that are known to rely more on vision behaviorally had higher densities of sustained Kv conductances than photoreceptors of less visually guided species. No statistically significant trends related to visual performance could be identified for the rapidly inactivating Kv conductances. Counterintuitively, strong negative correlations were observed between photoreceptor capacitance and specific membrane conductance for both sustained and inactivating fractions of Kv conductance, suggesting insignificant evolutionary pressure to offset negative effects of high capacitance on membrane filtering with increased conductance. PMID:26864762

  2. Photoreceptor avascular privilege is shielded by soluble VEGF receptor-1

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ling; Uehara, Hironori; Zhang, Xiaohui; Das, Subrata K; Olsen, Thomas; Holt, Derick; Simonis, Jacquelyn M; Jackman, Kyle; Singh, Nirbhai; Miya, Tadashi R; Huang, Wei; Ahmed, Faisal; Bastos-Carvalho, Ana; Le, Yun Zheng; Mamalis, Christina; Chiodo, Vince A; Hauswirth, William W; Baffi, Judit; Lacal, Pedro M; Orecchia, Angela; Ferrara, Napoleone; Gao, Guangping; Young-hee, Kim; Fu, Yingbin; Owen, Leah; Albuquerque, Romulo; Baehr, Wolfgang; Thomas, Kirk; Li, Dean Y; Chalam, Kakarla V; Shibuya, Masabumi; Grisanti, Salvatore; Wilson, David J; Ambati, Jayakrishna; Ambati, Balamurali K

    2013-01-01

    Optimal phototransduction requires separation of the avascular photoreceptor layer from the adjacent vascularized inner retina and choroid. Breakdown of peri-photoreceptor vascular demarcation leads to retinal angiomatous proliferation or choroidal neovascularization, two variants of vascular invasion of the photoreceptor layer in age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of irreversible blindness in industrialized nations. Here we show that sFLT-1, an endogenous inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), is synthesized by photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), and is decreased in human AMD. Suppression of sFLT-1 by antibodies, adeno-associated virus-mediated RNA interference, or Cre/lox-mediated gene ablation either in the photoreceptor layer or RPE frees VEGF-A and abolishes photoreceptor avascularity. These findings help explain the vascular zoning of the retina, which is critical for vision, and advance two transgenic murine models of AMD with spontaneous vascular invasion early in life. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00324.001 PMID:23795287

  3. Light adaptation of invertebrate photoreceptors: influence of intracellular pH buffering capacity.

    PubMed Central

    Bolsover, S R; Brown, J E

    1982-01-01

    1. The possible role of pH changes in mediating light adaptation in Limulus ventral photoreceptor cells was studied by intracellular injection of zwitterionic pH buffers. The intracellular concentration of buffer was estimated by inclusion of a radioactive marker in the injection solution. 2. The light-induced increase of intracellular Ca2+ concentration was monitored by intracellular aequorin. The light-induced increase of Ca2+ concentration was not markedly altered by injection of pH buffer to an intracellular concentration of about 200 mM. 3. The progressive decrease in responsiveness during intracellular ionophoretic injection of Ca2+ was not markedly altered by injection of pH buffer to an intracellular concentration of about 200 mM. 4. Photoreceptors of both Limulus and Balanus were impaled with two micropipettes and voltage clamped. Membrane current induced by a prolonged steady illumination declined from an early transient to a plateau. This delayed decline of current indicates a light-induced reduction of sensitivity (i.e. light adaptation). The wave forms were similar before and after injection of pH buffer to an intracellular concentration of about 200 mM. 5. We conclude that it is unlikely that a light-induced change of cytosolic pH mediates light adaptation in Limulus (and Balanus) photoreceptors. PMID:7175745

  4. Liprin-alpha has LAR-independent functions in R7 photoreceptor axon targeting.

    PubMed

    Hofmeyer, Kerstin; Maurel-Zaffran, Corinne; Sink, Helen; Treisman, Jessica E

    2006-08-01

    In the Drosophila visual system, the color-sensing photoreceptors R7 and R8 project their axons to two distinct layers in the medulla. Loss of the receptor tyrosine phosphatase LAR from R7 photoreceptors causes their axons to terminate prematurely in the R8 layer. Here we identify a null mutation in the Liprin-alpha gene based on a similar R7 projection defect. Liprin-alpha physically interacts with the inactive D2 phosphatase domain of LAR, and this domain is also essential for R7 targeting. However, another LAR-dependent function, egg elongation, requires neither Liprin-alpha nor the LAR D2 domain. Although human and Caenorhabditis elegans Liprin-alpha proteins have been reported to control the localization of LAR, we find that LAR localizes to focal adhesions in Drosophila S2R+ cells and to photoreceptor growth cones in vivo independently of Liprin-alpha. In addition, Liprin-alpha overexpression or loss of function can affect R7 targeting in the complete absence of LAR. We conclude that Liprin-alpha does not simply act by regulating LAR localization but also has LAR-independent functions. PMID:16864797

  5. To unite or divide: mitochondrial dynamics in the murine outer retina that preceded age related photoreceptor loss

    PubMed Central

    Kam, Jaimie Hoh; Jeffery, Glen

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial function declines with age and is associated with age-related disorders and cell death. In the retina this is critical as photoreceptor energy demands are the greatest in the body and aged cell loss large (~30%). But mitochondria can fuse or divide to accommodate changing demands. We explore ageing mitochondrial dynamics in young (1 month) and old (12 months) mouse retina, investigating changes in mitochondrial fission (Fis1) and fusion (Opa1) proteins, cytochrome C oxidase (COX III), which reflects mitochondrial metabolic status, and heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60) that is a mitochondrial chaperon for protein folding. Western blots showed each protein declined with age. However, within this, immunostaining revealed increases of around 50% in Fis1 and Opa1 in photoreceptor inner segments (IS). Electron microscope analysis revealed mitochondrial fragmentation with age and marked changes in morphology in IS, consistent with elevated dynamics. COX III declined by approximately 30% in IS, but Hsp60 reductions were around 80% in the outer plexiform layer. Our results are consistent with declining mitochondrial metabolism. But also with increased photoreceptor mitochondrial dynamics that differ from other retinal regions, perhaps reflecting attempts to maintain function. These changes are the platform for age related photoreceptor loss initiated after 12 months. PMID:26393878

  6. Retinal photoreceptor imaging with high-speed line-field parallel spectral domain OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fechtig, Daniel J.; Ginner, Laurin; Kumar, Abhishek; Pircher, Michael; Schmoll, Tilman; Wurster, Lara M.; Drexler, Wolfgang; Leitgeb, Rainer A.

    2016-03-01

    We present retinal photoreceptor imaging with a line-field parallel spectral domain OCT modality, utilizing a commercially available 2D CMOS detector array operating at and imaging speed of 500 B-scans/s. Our results demonstrate for the first time in vivo structural and functional retinal assessment with a line-field OCT setup providing sufficient sensitivity, lateral and axial resolution and 3D acquisition rates in order to resolve individual photoreceptor cells. The phase stability of the system is manifested by the high phase-correlation across the lateral FOV on the level of individual photoreceptors. The setup comprises a Michelson interferometer illuminated by a broadband light source, where a line-focus is formed via a cylindrical lens and the back-propagated light from sample and reference arm is detected by a 2D array after passing a diffraction grating. The spot size of the line-focus on the retina is 5μm, which corresponds to a PSF of 50μm and an oversampling factor of 3.6 at the detector plane, respectively. A full 3D stack was recorded in only 0.8 s. We show representative enface images, tomograms and phase-difference maps of cone photoreceptors with a lateral FOV close to 2°. The high-speed capability and the phase stability due to parallel illumination and detection may potentially lead to novel structural and functional diagnostic tools on a cellular and microvascular imaging level. Furthermore, the presented system enables competitive imaging results as compared to respective point scanning modalities and facilitates utilizing software based digital aberration correction algorithms for achieving 3D isotropic resolution across the full FOV.

  7. Random Photon Absorption Model Elucidates How Early Gain Control in Fly Photoreceptors Arises from Quantal Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhuoyi; Zhou, Yu; Juusola, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    Many diurnal photoreceptors encode vast real-world light changes effectively, but how this performance originates from photon sampling is unclear. A 4-module biophysically-realistic fly photoreceptor model, in which information capture is limited by the number of its sampling units (microvilli) and their photon-hit recovery time (refractoriness), can accurately simulate real recordings and their information content. However, sublinear summation in quantum bump production (quantum-gain-nonlinearity) may also cause adaptation by reducing the bump/photon gain when multiple photons hit the same microvillus simultaneously. Here, we use a Random Photon Absorption Model (RandPAM), which is the 1st module of the 4-module fly photoreceptor model, to quantify the contribution of quantum-gain-nonlinearity in light adaptation. We show how quantum-gain-nonlinearity already results from photon sampling alone. In the extreme case, when two or more simultaneous photon-hits reduce to a single sublinear value, quantum-gain-nonlinearity is preset before the phototransduction reactions adapt the quantum bump waveform. However, the contribution of quantum-gain-nonlinearity in light adaptation depends upon the likelihood of multi-photon-hits, which is strictly determined by the number of microvilli and light intensity. Specifically, its contribution to light-adaptation is marginal (≤ 1%) in fly photoreceptors with many thousands of microvilli, because the probability of simultaneous multi-photon-hits on any one microvillus is low even during daylight conditions. However, in cells with fewer sampling units, the impact of quantum-gain-nonlinearity increases with brightening light. PMID:27445779

  8. Microbe Associated Molecular Pattern Signaling in Guard Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Wenxiu; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Stomata, formed by pairs of guard cells in the epidermis of terrestrial plants, regulate gas exchange, thus playing a critical role in plant growth and stress responses. As natural openings, stomata are exploited by microbes as an entry route. Recent studies reveal that plants close stomata upon guard cell perception of molecular signatures from microbes, microbe associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), to prevent microbe invasion. The perception of MAMPs induces signal transduction including recruitment of second messengers, such as Ca2+ and H2O2, phosphorylation events, and change of transporter activity, leading to stomatal movement. In the present review, we summarize recent findings in signaling underlying MAMP-induced stomatal movement by comparing with other signalings. PMID:27200056

  9. Microbe Associated Molecular Pattern Signaling in Guard Cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wenxiu; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Stomata, formed by pairs of guard cells in the epidermis of terrestrial plants, regulate gas exchange, thus playing a critical role in plant growth and stress responses. As natural openings, stomata are exploited by microbes as an entry route. Recent studies reveal that plants close stomata upon guard cell perception of molecular signatures from microbes, microbe associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), to prevent microbe invasion. The perception of MAMPs induces signal transduction including recruitment of second messengers, such as Ca(2+) and H2O2, phosphorylation events, and change of transporter activity, leading to stomatal movement. In the present review, we summarize recent findings in signaling underlying MAMP-induced stomatal movement by comparing with other signalings. PMID:27200056

  10. Bifurcation and Firing Patterns of the Pancreatic β-Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Shenquan; Liu, Xuanliang; Zeng, Yanjun

    Using a model of individual isolated pancreatic β-cells, we investigated bifurcation diagrams of interspike intervals (ISIs) and largest Lyapunov exponents (LLE), which clearly demonstrated a wide range of transitions between different firing patterns. The numerical simulation results revealed the effect of different time constants and ion channels on the neuronal discharge rhythm. Furthermore, an individual cell exhibited tonic spiking, square-wave bursting, and tapered bursting. Additionally, several bifurcation phenomena can be observed in this paper, such as period-doubling, period-adding, inverse period-doubling and inverse period-adding scenarios. In addition, we researched the mechanisms underlying two kinds of bursting (tapered and square-wave bursting) by use of fast-slow dynamics analysis. Finally, we analyzed the codimension-two bifurcation of the fast subsystem and studied cusp bifurcation, generalized Hopf (or Bautin) bifurcation and Bogdanov-Takens bifurcation.

  11. The structure and dynamics of patterns of Benard convection cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rivier, N. Imperial Coll. of Science and Technology, London . Blackett Lab. Lausanne Univ. . Inst. de Physique Experimentale)

    1990-08-01

    Benard-Marangoni convection, in containers with large aspect ratio, exhibits space-filling cellular structures, highly deformable, but crystallized. They contain dislocations and grain boundaries generated and moved by elementary topological transformations, and are subjected to a weak shear stress due to the earth's rotation. The cellular structure and its fluctuations are analyzed from a crystallographic viewpoint, by using two complementary approaches. One is a global analysis of cellular structures in cylindrical symmetry. Their structural stability and defect pattern are obtained as topological mode-locking of a continuous structural parameter. The other, a local, molecular dynamics of the cells, gives a realistic parametrization of the forces and the transformations by generalizing the Voronoi cell construction in one extra dimension. 23 refs., 8 figs.

  12. Three-dimensional patterning of multiple cell populations through orthogonal genetic control of cell motility

    PubMed Central

    MacKay, Joanna L.; Sood, Anshum

    2013-01-01

    The ability to independently assemble multiple cell types within a three-dimensional matrix would be a powerful enabling tool for modeling and engineering complex tissues. Here we introduce a strategy to dynamically pattern distinct subpopulations of cells through genetic regulation of cell motility. We first describe glioma cell lines that were genetically engineered to stably express constitutively active or dominant negative Rac1 GTPase mutants under the control of either a doxycycline-inducible or cumate-inducible promoter. We culture each population as multicellular spheroids and show that by adding or withdrawing the appropriate inducer at specific times, we can control the timing and extent of Rac1-dependent cell migration into three-dimensional collagen matrices. We then report results with mixed spheroids in which one subpopulation of cells expresses dominant negative Rac1 under a doxycycline-inducible promoter and the other expresses dominant negative Rac1 under a cumate-inducible promoter. Using this system, we demonstrate that doxycycline and cumate addition suppress Rac1-dependent motility in a subpopulation-specific and temporally-controlled manner. This allows us to orthogonally control the motility of each subpopulation and spatially assemble the cells into radially symmetric three-dimensional patterns through the synchronized addition and removal of doxycycline and cumate. This synthetic biology-inspired strategy offers a novel means of spatially organizing multiple cell populations in conventional matrix scaffolds and complements the emerging suite of technologies that seek to pattern cells by engineering extracellular matrix properties. PMID:24622945

  13. A systematic framework for evaluating standard cell middle-of-line (MOL) robustness for multiple patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaoqing; Cline, Brian; Yeric, Greg; Yu, Bei; Pan, David Z.

    2015-03-01

    Multiple patterning (triple and quadruple patterning) is being considered for use on the Middle-Of-Line (MOL) layers at the 10nm technology node and beyond.1 For robust standard cell design, designers need to improve the inter-cell compatibility for all combinations of cells and cell placements. Multiple patterning colorability checks break the locality of traditional rule checking and N-wise checks are strongly needed to verify the multiple patterning colorability for layout interaction across cell boundaries. In this work, a systematic framework is proposed to evaluate the library-level robustness over multiple patterning from two perpectives, including illegal cell combinations and full chip interactions. With efficient N-wise checks, the vertical and horizontal boundary checks are explored to predict illegal cell combinations. For full chip interactions, random benchmarks are generated by cell shifting and tested to evaluate the placement-level efforts needed to reduce the quadruple patterning to triple patterning for the MOL layer.

  14. Establishment of a cone photoreceptor transplantation platform based on a novel cone-GFP reporter mouse line

    PubMed Central

    Smiley, Sheila; Nickerson, Philip E.; Comanita, Lacrimioara; Daftarian, Narsis; El-Sehemy, Ahmed; Tsai, En Leh Samuel; Matan-Lithwick, Stuart; Yan, Keqin; Thurig, Sherry; Touahri, Yacine; Dixit, Rajiv; Aavani, Tooka; De Repentingy, Yves; Baker, Adam; Tsilfidis, Catherine; Biernaskie, Jeff; Sauvé, Yves; Schuurmans, Carol; Kothary, Rashmi; Mears, Alan J.; Wallace, Valerie A.

    2016-01-01

    We report successful retinal cone enrichment and transplantation using a novel cone-GFP reporter mouse line. Using the putative cone photoreceptor-enriched transcript Coiled-Coil Domain Containing 136 (Ccdc136) GFP-trapped allele, we monitored developmental reporter expression, facilitated the enrichment of cones, and evaluated transplanted GFP-labeled cones in wildtype and retinal degeneration mutant retinas. GFP reporter and endogenous Ccdc136 transcripts exhibit overlapping temporal and spatial expression patterns, both initiated in cone precursors of the embryonic retina and persisting to the adult stage in S and S/M opsin+ cones as well as rod bipolar cells. The trapped allele does not affect cone function or survival in the adult mutant retina. When comparing the integration of GFP+ embryonic cones and postnatal Nrl−/− ‘cods’ into retinas of adult wildtype and blind mice, both cell types integrated and exhibited a degree of morphological maturation that was dependent on donor age. These results demonstrate the amenability of the adult retina to cone transplantation using a novel transgenic resource that can advance therapeutic cone transplantation in models of age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26965927

  15. Establishment of a cone photoreceptor transplantation platform based on a novel cone-GFP reporter mouse line.

    PubMed

    Smiley, Sheila; Nickerson, Philip E; Comanita, Lacrimioara; Daftarian, Narsis; El-Sehemy, Ahmed; Tsai, En Leh Samuel; Matan-Lithwick, Stuart; Yan, Keqin; Thurig, Sherry; Touahri, Yacine; Dixit, Rajiv; Aavani, Tooka; De Repentingy, Yves; Baker, Adam; Tsilfidis, Catherine; Biernaskie, Jeff; Sauvé, Yves; Schuurmans, Carol; Kothary, Rashmi; Mears, Alan J; Wallace, Valerie A

    2016-01-01

    We report successful retinal cone enrichment and transplantation using a novel cone-GFP reporter mouse line. Using the putative cone photoreceptor-enriched transcript Coiled-Coil Domain Containing 136 (Ccdc136) GFP-trapped allele, we monitored developmental reporter expression, facilitated the enrichment of cones, and evaluated transplanted GFP-labeled cones in wildtype and retinal degeneration mutant retinas. GFP reporter and endogenous Ccdc136 transcripts exhibit overlapping temporal and spatial expression patterns, both initiated in cone precursors of the embryonic retina and persisting to the adult stage in S and S/M opsin(+) cones as well as rod bipolar cells. The trapped allele does not affect cone function or survival in the adult mutant retina. When comparing the integration of GFP(+) embryonic cones and postnatal Nrl(-/-) 'cods' into retinas of adult wildtype and blind mice, both cell type