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Sample records for photosynthesis gene expression

  1. The Coordination of Gene Expression within Photosynthesis Pathway for Acclimation of C4 Energy Crop Miscanthus lutarioriparius.

    PubMed

    Xing, Shilai; Kang, Lifang; Xu, Qin; Fan, Yangyang; Liu, Wei; Zhu, Caiyun; Song, Zhihong; Wang, Qian; Yan, Juan; Li, Jianqiang; Sang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    As a promising candidate for the second-generation C4 energy crop, Miscanthus lutarioriparius has well acclimated to the water-limited and high-light Loess Plateau in China by improving photosynthesis rate and water use efficiency (WUE) compared to its native habitat along Yangtze River. Photosynthetic genes were demonstrated as one major category of the candidate genes underlying the physiological superiority. To further study how photosynthetic genes interact to improve the acclimation potential of M. lutarioriparius, population expression patterns within photosynthesis pathway were explored between one mild environment and one harsh environment. We found that 108 transcripts in assembled transcriptome of M. lutarioriparius were highly similar to genes in three Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) photosynthesis pathways of sorghum and maize. Phylogenetic analyses using sorghum, maize, rice, and Arabidopsis genes of dark reaction identified 23 orthologs and 30 paralogs of M. lutarioriparius photosynthetic genes. These genes were also clustered into two kinds of expression pattern. 87% of transcripts in dark reaction were up-regulated and all 14 chloroplast-encoded transcripts in light reaction increased degradation in the harsh environment compared to the mild environment. Moreover, 80.8% of photosynthetic transcripts were coordinated at transcription level under the two environments. Interestingly, LHCI and PSI were significantly correlated with F-ATPase and C4 cycle. Overall, this study indicates the coordinated expression between cyclic electron transport (consisting of LHCI, PSI, and ATPase) and CO2-concentrating mechanism (C4 cycle) could account for photosynthesis plasticity on M. lutarioriparius acclimation potential. PMID:26904072

  2. The Coordination of Gene Expression within Photosynthesis Pathway for Acclimation of C4 Energy Crop Miscanthus lutarioriparius

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Shilai; Kang, Lifang; Xu, Qin; Fan, Yangyang; Liu, Wei; Zhu, Caiyun; Song, Zhihong; Wang, Qian; Yan, Juan; Li, Jianqiang; Sang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    As a promising candidate for the second-generation C4 energy crop, Miscanthus lutarioriparius has well acclimated to the water-limited and high-light Loess Plateau in China by improving photosynthesis rate and water use efficiency (WUE) compared to its native habitat along Yangtze River. Photosynthetic genes were demonstrated as one major category of the candidate genes underlying the physiological superiority. To further study how photosynthetic genes interact to improve the acclimation potential of M. lutarioriparius, population expression patterns within photosynthesis pathway were explored between one mild environment and one harsh environment. We found that 108 transcripts in assembled transcriptome of M. lutarioriparius were highly similar to genes in three Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) photosynthesis pathways of sorghum and maize. Phylogenetic analyses using sorghum, maize, rice, and Arabidopsis genes of dark reaction identified 23 orthologs and 30 paralogs of M. lutarioriparius photosynthetic genes. These genes were also clustered into two kinds of expression pattern. 87% of transcripts in dark reaction were up-regulated and all 14 chloroplast-encoded transcripts in light reaction increased degradation in the harsh environment compared to the mild environment. Moreover, 80.8% of photosynthetic transcripts were coordinated at transcription level under the two environments. Interestingly, LHCI and PSI were significantly correlated with F-ATPase and C4 cycle. Overall, this study indicates the coordinated expression between cyclic electron transport (consisting of LHCI, PSI, and ATPase) and CO2-concentrating mechanism (C4 cycle) could account for photosynthesis plasticity on M. lutarioriparius acclimation potential. PMID:26904072

  3. prrA, a putative response regulator involved in oxygen regulation of photosynthesis gene expression in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Eraso, J M; Kaplan, S

    1994-01-01

    A new locus, prrA, involved in the regulation of photosynthesis gene expression in response to oxygen, has been identified in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Inactivation of prrA results in the absence of photosynthetic spectral complexes. The prrA gene product has strong homology to response regulators associated with signal transduction in other prokaryotes. When prrA is present in multiple copies, cells produce light-harvesting complexes under aerobic growth conditions, suggesting that prrA affects photosynthesis gene expression positively in response to oxygen deprivation. Analysis of the expression of puc::lacZ fusions in wild-type and PrrA- cells revealed a substantial decrease in LacZ expression in the absence of prrA under all conditions of growth, especially when cells were grown anaerobically in the dark in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide. Northern (RNA) and slot blot hybridizations confirmed the beta-galactoside results for puc and revealed additional positive regulation of puf, puhA, and cycA by PrrA. The effect of truncated PrrA on photosynthesis gene expression in the presence of low oxygen levels can be explained by assuming that PrrA may be effective as a multimer. PrrA was found to act on the downstream regulatory sequences (J. K. Lee and S. Kaplan, J. Bacteriol. 174:1146-1157, 1992) of the puc operon regulatory region. Finally, two spontaneous prrA mutations that abolish prrA function by changing amino acids in the amino-terminal domain of the protein were isolated. Images PMID:8282708

  4. Promotion of photosynthesis in transgenic rice over-expressing of maize C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene by nitric oxide donors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pingbo; Li, Xia; Huo, Kai; Wei, Xiaodong; Dai, Chuanchao; Lv, Chuangen

    2014-03-15

    We determined the effects of exogenous nitric oxide on photosynthesis and gene expression in transgenic rice plants (PC) over-expressing the maize C4pepc gene, which encodes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). Seedlings were subjected to treatments with NO donors, an NO scavenger, phospholipase inhibitors, a Ca(2+) chelator, a Ca(2+) channel inhibitor, and a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhibitor, individually and in various combinations. The NO donors significantly increased the net photosynthetic rate (PN) of PC and wild-type (WT), especially that of PC. Treatment with an NO scavenger did inhibit the PN of rice plants. The treatments with phospholipase inhibitors and a Ca(2+) chelator decreased the PN of WT and PC, and photosynthesis was more strongly inhibited in WT than in PC. Further analyses showed that the NO donors increased endogenous levels of NO and PLD activity, but decreased endogenous levels of Ca(2+) both WT and PC. However, there was a greater increase in NO in WT and a greater increase in PLD activity and Ca(2+) level in PC. The NO donors also increased both PEPC activity and pepc gene expression in PC. PEPC activity can be increased by SNP alone. But the expression of its encoding gene in PC might be regulated by SNP, together with PA and Ca(2+). PMID:24594398

  5. Deep evolutionary comparison of gene expression identifies parallel recruitment of trans-factors in two independent origins of C4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Aubry, Sylvain; Kelly, Steven; Kümpers, Britta M C; Smith-Unna, Richard D; Hibberd, Julian M

    2014-06-01

    With at least 60 independent origins spanning monocotyledons and dicotyledons, the C4 photosynthetic pathway represents one of the most remarkable examples of convergent evolution. The recurrent evolution of this highly complex trait involving alterations to leaf anatomy, cell biology and biochemistry allows an increase in productivity by ∼ 50% in tropical and subtropical areas. The extent to which separate lineages of C4 plants use the same genetic networks to maintain C4 photosynthesis is unknown. We developed a new informatics framework to enable deep evolutionary comparison of gene expression in species lacking reference genomes. We exploited this to compare gene expression in species representing two independent C4 lineages (Cleome gynandra and Zea mays) whose last common ancestor diverged ∼ 140 million years ago. We define a cohort of 3,335 genes that represent conserved components of leaf and photosynthetic development in these species. Furthermore, we show that genes encoding proteins of the C4 cycle are recruited into networks defined by photosynthesis-related genes. Despite the wide evolutionary separation and independent origins of the C4 phenotype, we report that these species use homologous transcription factors to both induce C4 photosynthesis and to maintain the cell specific gene expression required for the pathway to operate. We define a core molecular signature associated with leaf and photosynthetic maturation that is likely shared by angiosperm species derived from the last common ancestor of the monocotyledons and dicotyledons. We show that deep evolutionary comparisons of gene expression can reveal novel insight into the molecular convergence of highly complex phenotypes and that parallel evolution of trans-factors underpins the repeated appearance of C4 photosynthesis. Thus, exploitation of extant natural variation associated with complex traits can be used to identify regulators. Moreover, the transcription factors that are shared by

  6. Deep Evolutionary Comparison of Gene Expression Identifies Parallel Recruitment of Trans-Factors in Two Independent Origins of C4 Photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kümpers, Britta M. C.; Smith-Unna, Richard D.; Hibberd, Julian M.

    2014-01-01

    With at least 60 independent origins spanning monocotyledons and dicotyledons, the C4 photosynthetic pathway represents one of the most remarkable examples of convergent evolution. The recurrent evolution of this highly complex trait involving alterations to leaf anatomy, cell biology and biochemistry allows an increase in productivity by ∼50% in tropical and subtropical areas. The extent to which separate lineages of C4 plants use the same genetic networks to maintain C4 photosynthesis is unknown. We developed a new informatics framework to enable deep evolutionary comparison of gene expression in species lacking reference genomes. We exploited this to compare gene expression in species representing two independent C4 lineages (Cleome gynandra and Zea mays) whose last common ancestor diverged ∼140 million years ago. We define a cohort of 3,335 genes that represent conserved components of leaf and photosynthetic development in these species. Furthermore, we show that genes encoding proteins of the C4 cycle are recruited into networks defined by photosynthesis-related genes. Despite the wide evolutionary separation and independent origins of the C4 phenotype, we report that these species use homologous transcription factors to both induce C4 photosynthesis and to maintain the cell specific gene expression required for the pathway to operate. We define a core molecular signature associated with leaf and photosynthetic maturation that is likely shared by angiosperm species derived from the last common ancestor of the monocotyledons and dicotyledons. We show that deep evolutionary comparisons of gene expression can reveal novel insight into the molecular convergence of highly complex phenotypes and that parallel evolution of trans-factors underpins the repeated appearance of C4 photosynthesis. Thus, exploitation of extant natural variation associated with complex traits can be used to identify regulators. Moreover, the transcription factors that are shared by

  7. The Effect of Silicon on Photosynthesis and Expression of Its Relevant Genes in Rice (Oryza sativa L.) under High-Zinc Stress

    PubMed Central

    Song, Alin; Li, Ping; Fan, Fenliang; Li, Zhaojun; Liang, Yongchao

    2014-01-01

    The main objectives of this study were to elucidate the roles of silicon (Si) in alleviating the effects of 2 mM zinc (high Zn) stress on photosynthesis and its related gene expression levels in leaves of rice (Oryza sativa L.) grown hydroponically with high-Zn stress. The results showed that photosynthetic parameters, including net photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, stomatal conductance, intercellular CO2 concentration, chlorophyll concentration and the chlorophyll fluorescence, were decreased in rice exposed to high-Zn treatment. The leaf chloroplast structure was disordered under high-Zn stress, including uneven swelling, disintegrated and missing thylakoid membranes, and decreased starch granule size and number, which, however, were all counteracted by the addition of 1.5 mM Si. Furthermore, the expression levels of Os08g02630 (PsbY), Os05g48630 (PsaH), Os07g37030 (PetC), Os03g57120 (PetH), Os09g26810 and Os04g38410 decreased in Si-deprived plants under high-Zn stress. Nevertheless, the addition of 1.5 mM Si increased the expression levels of these genes in plants under high-Zn stress at 72 h, and the expression levels were higher in Si-treated plants than in Si-deprived plants. Therefore, we conclude that Si alleviates the Zn-induced damage to photosynthesis in rice. The decline of photosynthesis in Zn-stressed rice was attributed to stomatal limitation, and Si activated and regulated some photosynthesis-related genes in response to high-Zn stress, consequently increasing photosynthesis. PMID:25426937

  8. The effect of Silicon on photosynthesis and expression of its relevant genes in rice (Oryza sativa L.) under high-zinc stress.

    PubMed

    Song, Alin; Li, Ping; Fan, Fenliang; Li, Zhaojun; Liang, Yongchao

    2014-01-01

    The main objectives of this study were to elucidate the roles of silicon (Si) in alleviating the effects of 2 mM zinc (high Zn) stress on photosynthesis and its related gene expression levels in leaves of rice (Oryza sativa L.) grown hydroponically with high-Zn stress. The results showed that photosynthetic parameters, including net photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, stomatal conductance, intercellular CO2 concentration, chlorophyll concentration and the chlorophyll fluorescence, were decreased in rice exposed to high-Zn treatment. The leaf chloroplast structure was disordered under high-Zn stress, including uneven swelling, disintegrated and missing thylakoid membranes, and decreased starch granule size and number, which, however, were all counteracted by the addition of 1.5 mM Si. Furthermore, the expression levels of Os08g02630 (PsbY), Os05g48630 (PsaH), Os07g37030 (PetC), Os03g57120 (PetH), Os09g26810 and Os04g38410 decreased in Si-deprived plants under high-Zn stress. Nevertheless, the addition of 1.5 mM Si increased the expression levels of these genes in plants under high-Zn stress at 72 h, and the expression levels were higher in Si-treated plants than in Si-deprived plants. Therefore, we conclude that Si alleviates the Zn-induced damage to photosynthesis in rice. The decline of photosynthesis in Zn-stressed rice was attributed to stomatal limitation, and Si activated and regulated some photosynthesis-related genes in response to high-Zn stress, consequently increasing photosynthesis. PMID:25426937

  9. Overexpression of OsSAP16 Regulates Photosynthesis and the Expression of a Broad Range of Stress Response Genes in Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Coe, Robert A.; Karki, Shanta; Wanchana, Samart; Thakur, Vivek; Henry, Amelia; Lin, Hsiang-Chun; Huang, Jianliang; Peng, Shaobing; Quick, William Paul

    2016-01-01

    This study set out to identify and characterize transcription factors regulating photosynthesis in rice. Screening populations of rice T-DNA activation lines led to the identification of a T-DNA mutant with an increase in intrinsic water use efficiency (iWUE) under well-watered conditions. Flanking sequence analysis showed that the T-DNA construct was located upstream of LOC_Os07g38240 (OsSAP16) encoding for a stress-associated protein (SAP). A second mutant identified with activation in the same gene exhibited the same phenotype; expression of OsSAP16 was shown to be enhanced in both lines. There were no differences in stomatal development or morphology in either of these mutants, although overexpression of OsSAP16 reduced stomatal conductance. This phenotype limited CO2 uptake and the rate of photosynthesis, which resulted in the accumulation of less biomass in the two mutants. Whole transcriptome analysis showed that overexpression of OsSAP16 led to global changes in gene expression consistent with the function of zinc-finger transcription factors. These results show that the gene is involved in modulating the response of rice to drought stress through regulation of the expression of a set of stress-associated genes. PMID:27303811

  10. Overexpression of OsSAP16 Regulates Photosynthesis and the Expression of a Broad Range of Stress Response Genes in Rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Coe, Robert A; Karki, Shanta; Wanchana, Samart; Thakur, Vivek; Henry, Amelia; Lin, Hsiang-Chun; Huang, Jianliang; Peng, Shaobing; Quick, William Paul

    2016-01-01

    This study set out to identify and characterize transcription factors regulating photosynthesis in rice. Screening populations of rice T-DNA activation lines led to the identification of a T-DNA mutant with an increase in intrinsic water use efficiency (iWUE) under well-watered conditions. Flanking sequence analysis showed that the T-DNA construct was located upstream of LOC_Os07g38240 (OsSAP16) encoding for a stress-associated protein (SAP). A second mutant identified with activation in the same gene exhibited the same phenotype; expression of OsSAP16 was shown to be enhanced in both lines. There were no differences in stomatal development or morphology in either of these mutants, although overexpression of OsSAP16 reduced stomatal conductance. This phenotype limited CO2 uptake and the rate of photosynthesis, which resulted in the accumulation of less biomass in the two mutants. Whole transcriptome analysis showed that overexpression of OsSAP16 led to global changes in gene expression consistent with the function of zinc-finger transcription factors. These results show that the gene is involved in modulating the response of rice to drought stress through regulation of the expression of a set of stress-associated genes. PMID:27303811

  11. Regulation of photosynthesis and stomatal and mesophyll conductance under water stress and recovery in olive trees: correlation with gene expression of carbonic anhydrase and aquaporins.

    PubMed

    Perez-Martin, Alfonso; Michelazzo, Chiara; Torres-Ruiz, Jose M; Flexas, Jaume; Fernández, José E; Sebastiani, Luca; Diaz-Espejo, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    The hypothesis that aquaporins and carbonic anhydrase (CA) are involved in the regulation of stomatal (g s) and mesophyll (g m) conductance to CO2 was tested in a short-term water-stress and recovery experiment in 5-year-old olive plants (Olea europaea) growing outdoors. The evolution of leaf gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, and plant water status, and a quantitative analysis of photosynthesis limitations, were followed during water stress and recovery. These variables were correlated with gene expression of the aquaporins OePIP1.1 and OePIP2.1, and stromal CA. At mild stress and at the beginning of the recovery period, stomatal limitations prevailed, while the decline in g m accounted for up to 60% of photosynthesis limitations under severe water stress. However, g m was restored to control values shortly after rewatering, facilitating the recovery of the photosynthetic rate. CA was downregulated during water stress and upregulated after recovery. The use of structural equation modelling allowed us to conclude that both OePIP1.1 and OePIP2.1 expression could explain most of the variations observed for g s and g m. CA expression also had a small but significant effect on g m in olive under water-stress conditions. PMID:24799563

  12. Regulation of photosynthesis and stomatal and mesophyll conductance under water stress and recovery in olive trees: correlation with gene expression of carbonic anhydrase and aquaporins

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Martin, Alfonso; Michelazzo, Chiara; Torres-Ruiz, Jose M.; Flexas, Jaume; Fernández, José E.; Sebastiani, Luca; Diaz-Espejo, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The hypothesis that aquaporins and carbonic anhydrase (CA) are involved in the regulation of stomatal (g s) and mesophyll (g m) conductance to CO2 was tested in a short-term water-stress and recovery experiment in 5-year-old olive plants (Olea europaea) growing outdoors. The evolution of leaf gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, and plant water status, and a quantitative analysis of photosynthesis limitations, were followed during water stress and recovery. These variables were correlated with gene expression of the aquaporins OePIP1.1 and OePIP2.1, and stromal CA. At mild stress and at the beginning of the recovery period, stomatal limitations prevailed, while the decline in g m accounted for up to 60% of photosynthesis limitations under severe water stress. However, g m was restored to control values shortly after rewatering, facilitating the recovery of the photosynthetic rate. CA was downregulated during water stress and upregulated after recovery. The use of structural equation modelling allowed us to conclude that both OePIP1.1 and OePIP2.1 expression could explain most of the variations observed for g s and g m. CA expression also had a small but significant effect on g m in olive under water-stress conditions. PMID:24799563

  13. Tomato response to legume cover crop and nitrogen: differing enhancement patterns of fruit yield, photosynthesis and gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomatoes responded to soil and residue from a hairy vetch cover crop differently on many levels than tomato response to inorganic nitrogen. Tomato fruit production, plant biomass parameters, and photosynthesis were higher in plants grown in vetch than bare soil. Tomato growth and photosynthesis metr...

  14. A Novel R2R3-MYB Transcription Factor BpMYB106 of Birch (Betula platyphylla) Confers Increased Photosynthesis and Growth Rate through Up-regulating Photosynthetic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chenguang; Li, Chenghao

    2016-01-01

    We isolated a R2R3-MYB transcription factor BpMYB106, which regulates photosynthesis in birch (Betula platyphylla Suk.). BpMYB106 mainly expresses in the leaf and shoot tip of birch, and its protein is localized in the nucleus. We further fused isolated a 1588 bp promoter of BpMYB106 and analyzed it by PLACE, which showed some cis-acting elements related to photosynthesis. BpMYB106 promoter β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter fusion studies gene, the result, showed the GUS reporter gene in transgenic birch with BpMYB106 promoter showed strong activities in shoot tip, cotyledon margins, and mature leaf trichomes. The overexpression of BpMYB106 in birch resulted in significantly increased trichome density, net photosynthetic rate, and growth rate as compared with the wild-type birch. RNA-Seq profiling revealed the upregulation of several photosynthesis-related genes in the photosynthesis and oxidative phosphorylation pathways in the leaves of transgenic plants. Yeast one-hybrid analysis, coupled with transient assay in tobacco, revealed that BpMYB106 binds a MYB binding site MYB2 in differentially expressed gene promoters. Thus, BpMYB106 may directly activate the expression of a range of photosynthesis related genes through interacting with the MYB2 element in their promoters. Our study demonstrating the overexpression of BpMYB106—a R2R3-MYB transcription factor—upregulates the genes of the photosynthesis and oxidative phosphorylation pathways to improve photosynthesis. PMID:27047502

  15. Parallel Recruitment of Multiple Genes into C4 Photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Boxall, Susanna F.; Gregory, Richard; Edwards, Erika J.; Hartwell, James; Osborne, Colin P.

    2013-01-01

    During the diversification of living organisms, novel adaptive traits usually evolve through the co-option of preexisting genes. However, most enzymes are encoded by gene families, whose members vary in their expression and catalytic properties. Each may therefore differ in its suitability for recruitment into a novel function. In this work, we test for the presence of such a gene recruitment bias using the example of C4 photosynthesis, a complex trait that evolved recurrently in flowering plants as a response to atmospheric CO2 depletion. We combined the analysis of complete nuclear genomes and high-throughput transcriptome data for three grass species that evolved the C4 trait independently. For five of the seven enzymes analyzed, the same gene lineage was recruited across the independent C4 origins, despite the existence of multiple copies. The analysis of a closely related C3 grass confirmed that C4 expression patterns were not present in the C3 ancestors but were acquired during the evolutionary transition to C4 photosynthesis. The significant bias in gene recruitment indicates that some genes are more suitable for a novel function, probably because the mutations they accumulated brought them closer to the characteristics required for the new function. PMID:24179135

  16. Antisense RNA Inhibition of RbcS Gene Expression Reduces Rubisco Level and Photosynthesis in the C4 Plant Flaveria bidentis.

    PubMed

    Furbank, R. T.; Chitty, J. A.; Von Caemmerer, S.; Jenkins, CLD.

    1996-07-01

    The C4 dicot Flaveria bidentis was genetically transformed with an antisense RNA construct targeted to the nuclear-encoded gene for the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco; RbcS). RbcS mRNA levels in leaves of transformants were reduced by as much as 80% compared to wild-type levels, and extractable enzyme activity was reduced by up to 85%. There was no significant effect of transformation with the gene construct on levels of other photosynthetic enzymes. Antisense transformants with reduced Rubisco activity exhibited a stunted phenotype. Rates of photosynthesis were reduced in air at high light and over a range of CO2 concentrations but were unaffected at low light. From these results we conclude that, as is the case in C3 plants, Rubisco activity is a major determinant of photosynthetic flux in C4 plants under high light intensities and air levels of CO2. PMID:12226324

  17. Identification and characterization of nuclear genes involved in photosynthesis in Populus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The gap between the real and potential photosynthetic rate under field conditions suggests that photosynthesis could potentially be improved. Nuclear genes provide possible targets for improving photosynthetic efficiency. Hence, genome-wide identification and characterization of the nuclear genes affecting photosynthetic traits in woody plants would provide key insights on genetic regulation of photosynthesis and identify candidate processes for improvement of photosynthesis. Results Using microarray and bulked segregant analysis strategies, we identified differentially expressed nuclear genes for photosynthesis traits in a segregating population of poplar. We identified 515 differentially expressed genes in this population (FC ≥ 2 or FC ≤ 0.5, P < 0.05), 163 up-regulated and 352 down-regulated. Real-time PCR expression analysis confirmed the microarray data. Singular Enrichment Analysis identified 48 significantly enriched GO terms for molecular functions (28), biological processes (18) and cell components (2). Furthermore, we selected six candidate genes for functional examination by a single-marker association approach, which demonstrated that 20 SNPs in five candidate genes significantly associated with photosynthetic traits, and the phenotypic variance explained by each SNP ranged from 2.3% to 12.6%. This revealed that regulation of photosynthesis by the nuclear genome mainly involves transport, metabolism and response to stimulus functions. Conclusions This study provides new genome-scale strategies for the discovery of potential candidate genes affecting photosynthesis in Populus, and for identification of the functions of genes involved in regulation of photosynthesis. This work also suggests that improving photosynthetic efficiency under field conditions will require the consideration of multiple factors, such as stress responses. PMID:24673936

  18. The Expression of TaRca2-α Gene Associated with Net Photosynthesis Rate, Biomass and Grain Yield in Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) under Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Iqbal; Bachir, Daoura Goudia; Chen, Liang; Hu, Yin-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Improvement in activation of Rubisco by Rubisco activase can potentially enhance CO2 assimilation and photosynthetic efficiency in plants. The three homoeologous copies of TaRca2-α were identified on chromosomes 4AL, 4BS and 4DS (TaRca2-α-4AL, TaRca2-α-4BS, and TaRca2-α-4DS) in bread wheat. Expression patterns of the three copies at heading (Z55), anthesis (Z67) and grain-filling (Z73) stages were investigated through qRT-PCR analyses in a panel of 59 bread wheat genotypes and their effects on net photosynthesis rate (Pn), biomass plant-1 (BMPP) and grain yield plant-1 (GYPP) were further explored. Different but similar expression patterns were observed for the three copies of TaRca2-α at the three growth stages with highest expression at grain-filling stage. TaRca2-α-4BS expressed higher at the three stages than TaRca2-α-4AL and TaRca2-α-4DS. The 59 genotypes could be clustered into three groups as high (7 genotypes), intermediate (41 genotypes) and low (11 genotypes) expression based on the expression of the three copies of TaRca2-α at three growth stages. Significant variations (P<0.01) were observed among the three groups of bread wheat genotypes for Pn, BMPP and GYPP. Generally, the genotypes with higher TaRca2-α expression also showed higher values for Pn, BMPP and GYPP. The expressions of the three copies of TaRca2-α at heading, anthesis and grain-filling stages were positively correlated with Pn, BMPP and GYPP (P<0.01) with stronger association for TaRca2-α-4BS at grain-filling stage. These results revealed that the expression of TaRca2-α contribute substantially to Pn, BMPP and GYPP, and suggested that manipulating TaRca-α expression may efficiently improve Pn, BMPP and GYPP in bread wheat and detecting TaRca-α expression levels with emphasis on TaRca2-α-4BS may be a positive strategy for selection in improving photosynthetic efficiency and grain yield of bread wheat. PMID:27548477

  19. The Expression of TaRca2-α Gene Associated with Net Photosynthesis Rate, Biomass and Grain Yield in Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) under Field Conditions.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Iqbal; Bachir, Daoura Goudia; Chen, Liang; Hu, Yin-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Improvement in activation of Rubisco by Rubisco activase can potentially enhance CO2 assimilation and photosynthetic efficiency in plants. The three homoeologous copies of TaRca2-α were identified on chromosomes 4AL, 4BS and 4DS (TaRca2-α-4AL, TaRca2-α-4BS, and TaRca2-α-4DS) in bread wheat. Expression patterns of the three copies at heading (Z55), anthesis (Z67) and grain-filling (Z73) stages were investigated through qRT-PCR analyses in a panel of 59 bread wheat genotypes and their effects on net photosynthesis rate (Pn), biomass plant-1 (BMPP) and grain yield plant-1 (GYPP) were further explored. Different but similar expression patterns were observed for the three copies of TaRca2-α at the three growth stages with highest expression at grain-filling stage. TaRca2-α-4BS expressed higher at the three stages than TaRca2-α-4AL and TaRca2-α-4DS. The 59 genotypes could be clustered into three groups as high (7 genotypes), intermediate (41 genotypes) and low (11 genotypes) expression based on the expression of the three copies of TaRca2-α at three growth stages. Significant variations (P<0.01) were observed among the three groups of bread wheat genotypes for Pn, BMPP and GYPP. Generally, the genotypes with higher TaRca2-α expression also showed higher values for Pn, BMPP and GYPP. The expressions of the three copies of TaRca2-α at heading, anthesis and grain-filling stages were positively correlated with Pn, BMPP and GYPP (P<0.01) with stronger association for TaRca2-α-4BS at grain-filling stage. These results revealed that the expression of TaRca2-α contribute substantially to Pn, BMPP and GYPP, and suggested that manipulating TaRca-α expression may efficiently improve Pn, BMPP and GYPP in bread wheat and detecting TaRca-α expression levels with emphasis on TaRca2-α-4BS may be a positive strategy for selection in improving photosynthetic efficiency and grain yield of bread wheat. PMID:27548477

  20. Effects of copper sulfate, hydrogen peroxide and N-phenyl-2-naphthylamine on oxidative stress and the expression of genes involved photosynthesis and microcystin disposition in Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Qian, Haifeng; Yu, Shuqiong; Sun, Zhengqi; Xie, Xiucai; Liu, Weiping; Fu, Zhengwei

    2010-09-01

    Algal blooms have been increasing in prevalence all over the world, destroying ecosystems and placing other organisms at risk. Chemical remediation is one of most important methods of controlling algal bloom formation. The effects of copper sulfate, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and N-phenyl-2-naphthylamine on photosynthesis-related and microcystin-related gene transcription and physiological changes of Microcystis aeruginosa were analyzed. The results suggest that transcription of psaB, psbD1 and rbcL was inhibited by the three algaecides, which blocked the electron transport chain, significantly enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and overwhelmed the antioxidant system. The increase in ROS destroyed pigment synthesis and membrane integrity, which inhibited or killed the algal cells. Furthermore, H(2)O(2) treatment down-regulated mcyD transcription, which indicated a decrease in the microcystin level in the cells. Our results demonstrate that H(2)O(2) has the greatest potential as an algaecide because it not only inhibits algae growth but may reduce microcystin synthesis. PMID:20566224

  1. PHOTOSYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect

    2002-06-21

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC)on PHOTOSYNTHESIS was held at Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  2. Redox signaling: globalization of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jeong-Il; Kaplan, Samuel

    2000-01-01

    Here we show that the extent of electron flow through the cbb3 oxidase of Rhodobacter sphaeroides is inversely related to the expression levels of those photosynthesis genes that are under control of the PrrBA two-component activation system: the greater the electron flow, the stronger the inhibitory signal generated by the cbb3 oxidase to repress photosynthesis gene expression. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we show that intramolecular electron transfer within the cbb3 oxidase is involved in signal generation and transduction and this signal does not directly involve the intervention of molecular oxygen. In addition to the cbb3 oxidase, the redox state of the quinone pool controls the transcription rate of the puc operon via the AppA–PpsR antirepressor–repressor system. Together, these interacting regulatory circuits are depicted in a model that permits us to understand the regulation by oxygen and light of photosynthesis gene expression in R.sphaeroides. PMID:10944106

  3. Zinc Affects Differently Growth, Photosynthesis, Antioxidant Enzyme Activities and Phytochelatin Synthase Expression of Four Marine Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Deroche, Thi Le Nhung; Caruso, Aurore; Le, Thi Trung; Bui, Trang Viet; Schoefs, Benoît; Tremblin, Gérard; Morant-Manceau, Annick

    2012-01-01

    Zinc-supplementation (20 μM) effects on growth, photosynthesis, antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, catalase), and the expression of phytochelatin synthase gene were investigated in four marine diatoms (Amphora acutiuscula, Nitzschia palea, Amphora coffeaeformis and Entomoneis paludosa). Zn-supplementation reduced the maximum cell density. A linear relationship was found between the evolution of gross photosynthesis and total chlorophyll content. The Zn treatment decreased the electron transport rate except in A. coffeaeformis and in E. paludosa at high irradiance. A linear relationship was found between the efficiency of light to evolve oxygen and the size of the light-harvesting antenna. The external carbonic anhydrase activity was stimulated in Zn-supplemented E. paludosa but was not correlated with an increase of photosynthesis. The total activity of the antioxidant enzymes did not display any clear increase except in ascorbate peroxidase activity in N. palea. The phytochelatin synthase gene was identified in the four diatoms, but its expression was only revealed in N. palea, without a clear difference between control and Zn-supplemented cells. Among the four species, A. paludosa was the most sensitive and A. coffeaeformis, the most tolerant. A. acutiuscula seemed to be under metal starvation, whereas, to survive, only N. palea developed several stress responses. PMID:22645501

  4. Independent and Parallel Evolution of New Genes by Gene Duplication in Two Origins of C4 Photosynthesis Provides New Insight into the Mechanism of Phloem Loading in C4 Species

    PubMed Central

    Emms, David M.; Covshoff, Sarah; Hibberd, Julian M.; Kelly, Steven

    2016-01-01

    C4 photosynthesis is considered one of the most remarkable examples of evolutionary convergence in eukaryotes. However, it is unknown whether the evolution of C4 photosynthesis required the evolution of new genes. Genome-wide gene-tree species-tree reconciliation of seven monocot species that span two origins of C4 photosynthesis revealed that there was significant parallelism in the duplication and retention of genes coincident with the evolution of C4 photosynthesis in these lineages. Specifically, 21 orthologous genes were duplicated and retained independently in parallel at both C4 origins. Analysis of this gene cohort revealed that the set of parallel duplicated and retained genes is enriched for genes that are preferentially expressed in bundle sheath cells, the cell type in which photosynthesis was activated during C4 evolution. Furthermore, functional analysis of the cohort of parallel duplicated genes identified SWEET-13 as a potential key transporter in the evolution of C4 photosynthesis in grasses, and provides new insight into the mechanism of phloem loading in these C4 species. Key words: C4 photosynthesis, gene duplication, gene families, parallel evolution. PMID:27016024

  5. Coordination of plastid and nuclear gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, John C; Sullivan, James A; Wang, Jun-Hui; Jerome, Cheryl A; MacLean, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    The coordinated expression of genes distributed between the nuclear and plastid genomes is essential for the assembly of functional chloroplasts. Although the nucleus has a pre-eminent role in controlling chloroplast biogenesis, there is considerable evidence that the expression of nuclear genes encoding photosynthesis-related proteins is regulated by signals from plastids. Perturbation of several plastid-located processes, by inhibitors or in mutants, leads to decreased transcription of a set of nuclear photosynthesis-related genes. Characterization of arabidopsis gun (genomes uncoupled) mutants, which express nuclear genes in the presence of norflurazon or lincomycin, has provided evidence for two separate signalling pathways, one involving tetrapyrrole biosynthesis intermediates and the other requiring plastid protein synthesis. In addition, perturbation of photosynthetic electron transfer produces at least two different redox signals, as part of the acclimation to altered light conditions. The recognition of multiple plastid signals requires a reconsideration of the mechanisms of regulation of transcription of nuclear genes encoding photosynthesis-related proteins. PMID:12594922

  6. Systems analysis of cis-regulatory motifs in C4 photosynthesis genes using maize and rice leaf transcriptomic data during a process of de-etiolation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiajia; Bräutigam, Andrea; Weber, Andreas P. M.; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Identification of potential cis-regulatory motifs controlling the development of C4 photosynthesis is a major focus of current research. In this study, we used time-series RNA-seq data collected from etiolated maize and rice leaf tissues sampled during a de-etiolation process to systematically characterize the expression patterns of C4-related genes and to further identify potential cis elements in five different genomic regions (i.e. promoter, 5′UTR, 3′UTR, intron, and coding sequence) of C4 orthologous genes. The results demonstrate that although most of the C4 genes show similar expression patterns, a number of them, including chloroplast dicarboxylate transporter 1, aspartate aminotransferase, and triose phosphate transporter, show shifted expression patterns compared with their C3 counterparts. A number of conserved short DNA motifs between maize C4 genes and their rice orthologous genes were identified not only in the promoter, 5′UTR, 3′UTR, and coding sequences, but also in the introns of core C4 genes. We also identified cis-regulatory motifs that exist in maize C4 genes and also in genes showing similar expression patterns as maize C4 genes but that do not exist in rice C3 orthologs, suggesting a possible recruitment of pre-existing cis-elements from genes unrelated to C4 photosynthesis into C4 photosynthesis genes during C4 evolution. PMID:27436282

  7. Transcriptional Control of Photosynthesis Genes: The Evolutionarily Conserved Regulatory Mechanism in Plastid Genome Function

    PubMed Central

    Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Ibrahim, Iskander M.; Jeličić, Branka; Tomašić, Ana; Fulgosi, Hrvoje; Allen, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Chloroplast sensor kinase (CSK) is a bacterial-type sensor histidine kinase found in chloroplasts—photosynthetic plastids—in eukaryotic plants and algae. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we demonstrate recognition and interactions between: CSK, plastid transcription kinase (PTK), and a bacterial-type RNA polymerase sigma factor-1 (SIG-1). CSK interacts with itself, with SIG-1, and with PTK. PTK also interacts directly with SIG-1. PTK has previously been shown to catalyze phosphorylation of plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (PEP), suppressing plastid transcription nonspecifically. Phospho-PTK is inactive as a PEP kinase. Here, we propose that phospho-CSK acts as a PTK kinase, releasing PTK repression of chloroplast transcription, while CSK also acts as a SIG-1 kinase, blocking transcription specifically at the gene promoter of chloroplast photosystem I. Oxidation of the photosynthetic electron carrier plastoquinone triggers phosphorylation of CSK, inducing chloroplast photosystem II while suppressing photosystem I. CSK places photosystem gene transcription under the control of photosynthetic electron transport. This redox signaling pathway has its origin in cyanobacteria, photosynthetic prokaryotes from which chloroplasts evolved. The persistence of this mechanism in cytoplasmic organelles of photosynthetic eukaryotes is in precise agreement with the CoRR hypothesis for the function of organellar genomes: the plastid genome and its primary gene products are Co-located for Redox Regulation. Genes are retained in plastids primarily in order for their expression to be subject to this rapid and robust redox regulatory transcriptional control mechanism, whereas plastid genes also encode genetic system components, such as some ribosomal proteins and RNAs, that exist in order to support this primary, redox regulatory control of photosynthesis genes. Plastid genome function permits adaptation of the photosynthetic apparatus to changing environmental conditions of light

  8. GENE EXPRESSION NETWORKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    "Gene expression network" is the term used to describe the interplay, simple or complex, between two or more gene products in performing a specific cellular function. Although the delineation of such networks is complicated by the existence of multiple and subtle types of intera...

  9. Metabolic Network Constrains Gene Regulation of C4 Photosynthesis: The Case of Maize

    PubMed Central

    Robaina-Estévez, Semidán; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Engineering C3 plants to increase their efficiency of carbon fixation as well as of nitrogen and water use simultaneously may be facilitated by understanding the mechanisms that underpin the C4 syndrome. Existing experimental studies have indicated that the emergence of the C4 syndrome requires co-ordination between several levels of cellular organization, from gene regulation to metabolism, across two co-operating cell systems—mesophyll and bundle sheath cells. Yet, determining the extent to which the structure of the C4 plant metabolic network may constrain gene expression remains unclear, although it will provide an important consideration in engineering C4 photosynthesis in C3 plants. Here, we utilize flux coupling analysis with the second-generation maize metabolic models to investigate the correspondence between metabolic network structure and transcriptomic phenotypes along the maize leaf gradient. The examined scenarios with publically available data from independent experiments indicate that the transcriptomic programs of the two cell types are co-ordinated, quantitatively and qualitatively, due to the presence of coupled metabolic reactions in specific metabolic pathways. Taken together, our study demonstrates that precise quantitative coupling will have to be achieved in order to ensure a successfully engineered transition from C3 to C4 crops. PMID:26903529

  10. Metabolic Network Constrains Gene Regulation of C4 Photosynthesis: The Case of Maize.

    PubMed

    Robaina-Estévez, Semidán; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2016-05-01

    Engineering C3 plants to increase their efficiency of carbon fixation as well as of nitrogen and water use simultaneously may be facilitated by understanding the mechanisms that underpin the C4 syndrome. Existing experimental studies have indicated that the emergence of the C4 syndrome requires co-ordination between several levels of cellular organization, from gene regulation to metabolism, across two co-operating cell systems-mesophyll and bundle sheath cells. Yet, determining the extent to which the structure of the C4 plant metabolic network may constrain gene expression remains unclear, although it will provide an important consideration in engineering C4 photosynthesis in C3 plants. Here, we utilize flux coupling analysis with the second-generation maize metabolic models to investigate the correspondence between metabolic network structure and transcriptomic phenotypes along the maize leaf gradient. The examined scenarios with publically available data from independent experiments indicate that the transcriptomic programs of the two cell types are co-ordinated, quantitatively and qualitatively, due to the presence of coupled metabolic reactions in specific metabolic pathways. Taken together, our study demonstrates that precise quantitative coupling will have to be achieved in order to ensure a successfully engineered transition from C3 to C4 crops. PMID:26903529

  11. Gene expression technology

    SciTech Connect

    Goeddel, D.V. )

    1990-01-01

    The articles in this volume were assemble to enable the reader to design effective strategies for the expression of cloned genes and cDNAs. More than a compilation of papers describing the multitude of techniques now available for expressing cloned genes, this volume provides a manual that should prove useful for solving the majority of expression problems one likely to encounter. The four major expression systems commonly available to most investigators are stressed: Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, yeast, and mammalian cells. Each of these system has its advantages and disadvantages, details of which are found in Chapter 1 and the strategic overviews for the four major sections of the volume. The papers in each of these sections provide many suggestions on how to proceed if initial expression levels are not sufficient.

  12. Gene expression networks.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Reuben; Portier, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of microarrays and next-generation biotechnologies, the use of gene expression data has become ubiquitous in biological research. One potential drawback of these data is that they are very rich in features or genes though cost considerations allow for the use of only relatively small sample sizes. A useful way of getting at biologically meaningful interpretations of the environmental or toxicological condition of interest would be to make inferences at the level of a priori defined biochemical pathways or networks of interacting genes or proteins that are known to perform certain biological functions. This chapter describes approaches taken in the literature to make such inferences at the biochemical pathway level. In addition this chapter describes approaches to create hypotheses on genes playing important roles in response to a treatment, using organism level gene coexpression or protein-protein interaction networks. Also, approaches to reverse engineer gene networks or methods that seek to identify novel interactions between genes are described. Given the relatively small sample numbers typically available, these reverse engineering approaches are generally useful in inferring interactions only among a relatively small or an order 10 number of genes. Finally, given the vast amounts of publicly available gene expression data from different sources, this chapter summarizes the important sources of these data and characteristics of these sources or databases. In line with the overall aims of this book of providing practical knowledge to a researcher interested in analyzing gene expression data from a network perspective, the chapter provides convenient publicly accessible tools for performing analyses described, and in addition describe three motivating examples taken from the published literature that illustrate some of the relevant analyses. PMID:23086841

  13. Pleiotropic effect of sigE over-expression on cell morphology, photosynthesis and hydrogen production in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Osanai, Takashi; Kuwahara, Ayuko; Iijima, Hiroko; Toyooka, Kiminori; Sato, Mayuko; Tanaka, Kan; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Saito, Kazuki; Hirai, Masami Yokota

    2013-11-01

    Over-expression of sigE, a gene encoding an RNA polymerase sigma factor in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, is known to activate sugar catabolism and bioplastic production. In this study, we investigated the effects of sigE over-expression on cell morphology, photosynthesis and hydrogen production in this cyanobacterium. Transmission electron and scanning probe microscopic analyses revealed that sigE over-expression increased the cell size, possibly as a result of aberrant cell division. Over-expression of sigE reduced respiration and photosynthesis activities via changes in gene expression and chlorophyll fluorescence. Hydrogen production under micro-oxic conditions is enhanced in sigE over-expressing cells. Despite these pleiotropic phenotypes, the sigE over-expressing strain showed normal cell viability under both nitrogen-replete and nitrogen-depleted conditions. These results provide insights into the inter-relationship among metabolism, cell morphology, photosynthesis and hydrogen production in this unicellular cyanobacterium. PMID:23941239

  14. Biotic Stress Globally Down-Regulates Photosynthesis Genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Upon herbivore and pathogen attacks, plants switch from processes supporting growth and reproduction to defense by inducing a set of defense genes and down-regulating most of the nuclear encoded photosynthetic genes. To determine if this transcriptional response is universal we used transcriptome da...

  15. Phaeodactylum tricornutum photosynthesis and Thalassiosira pseudonana bio-silica formation genes nucleotide fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Todd; Marchese, P.; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Cheung, E.; Subramaniam, R.; Sullivan, R.; Schneider, P.; Flamholz, A.; Huerta, M.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2008-08-01

    Diatom bioactivity has been reported to be responsible for about 20% of carbon fixation globally and together with other photosynthetic organisms, the bioactivity can be monitored via satellite ocean imaging. The bioinformatics embedded in the nucleotide fluctuations of photosynthesis and bio-silicate genes in diatoms were studied. The recently reported phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase PEPC1 and PEPC2 C4-like photosynthesis genes in Phaeodactylum tricornutum were found to have similar fractal dimensions of about 2.01. In comparison, the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii PEPC1 and PEPC2 genes have fractal dimensions of about 2.05. The PEPC CpG dinucleotide content is 8% in P. tricornutum and 10% in C. reinhardtii. Further comparison of the cell wall protein gene showed that the VSP1 gene sequence in C. reinhardtii has a fractal dimension of 2.03 and the bio-silica formation silaffin gene in Thalassiosira pseudonana has a fractal dimension of 2.01. The phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase PPC1 and PPC2 in T. pseudonana were found to have fractal dimensions and CpG dinucleotide content similar to that of P. tricornutum. The fractal dimension of the dnaB replication helicase gene is about 1.98 for both diatoms as well as for the alga Heterosigma akashiwo. In comparison, the E. coli dnaB gene has a fractal dimension of about 2.03. Given that high fractal dimension and CpG dinucleotide content sequences have been associated with the presence of selective pressures, the relatively low fractal dimension gene sequences of the two unique properties of Earth-bound diatoms (photosynthesis and bio-silica cell wall) suggests the potential for the development of high fractal dimension sequences for adaptation in harsh environments.

  16. Expression profiling and functional analysis reveals that TOR is a key player in regulating photosynthesis and phytohormone signaling pathways in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Pan; Xiong, Fangjie; Que, Yumei; Wang, Kai; Yu, Lihua; Li, Zhengguo; Ren, Maozhi

    2015-01-01

    Target of rapamycin (TOR) acts as a master regulator to control cell growth by integrating nutrient, energy, and growth factors in all eukaryotic species. TOR plays an evolutionarily conserved role in regulating the transcription of genes associated with anabolic and catabolic processes in Arabidopsis, but little is known about the functions of TOR in photosynthesis and phytohormone signaling, which are unique features of plants. In this study, AZD8055 (AZD) was screened as the strongest active-site TOR inhibitor (asTORi) in Arabidopsis compared with TORIN1 and KU63794 (KU). Gene expression profiles were evaluated using RNA-seq after treating Arabidopsis seedlings with AZD. More than three-fold differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in AZD-treated plants relative to rapamycin-treated plants in previous studies. Most of the DEGs and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways involved in cell wall elongation, ribosome biogenesis, and cell autophagy were common to both AZD- and rapamycin-treated samples, but AZD displayed much broader and more efficient inhibition of TOR compared with rapamycin. Importantly, the suppression of TOR by AZD resulted in remodeling of the expression profile of the genes associated with photosynthesis and various phytohormones, indicating that TOR plays a crucial role in modulating photosynthesis and phytohormone signaling in Arabidopsis. These newly identified DEGs expand the understanding of TOR signaling in plants. This study elucidates the novel functions of TOR in photosynthesis and phytohormone signaling and provides a platform to study the downstream targets of TOR in Arabidopsis. PMID:26442001

  17. Over-expression of cytosolic glutamine synthetase increases photosynthesis and growth at low nitrogen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, S I; Allen, D J; Ortiz-Lopez, A; Hernández, G

    2001-05-01

    Nitrogen, which is a major limiting nutrient for plant growth, is assimilated as ammonium by the concerted action of glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT). GS catalyses the critical incorporation of inorganic ammonium into the amino acid glutamine. Two types of GS isozymes, located in the cytosol (GS1) and in the chloroplast (GS2) have been identified in plants. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) transformants, over-expressing GS1 driven by the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter were analysed. GS in leaves of GS-5 and GS-8 plants was up-regulated, at the level of RNA and proteins. These transgenic plants had six times higher leaf GS activity than controls. Under optimum nitrogen fertilization conditions there was no effect of GS over-expression on photosynthesis or growth. However, under nitrogen starvation the GS transgenics had c. 70% higher shoot and c. 100% greater root dry weight as well as 50% more leaf area than low nitrogen controls. This was achieved by the maintenance of photosynthesis at rates indistinguishable from plants under high nitrogen, while photosynthesis in control plants was inhibited by 40-50% by nitrogen deprivation. It was demonstrated that manipulation of GS activity has the potential to maintain crop photosynthetic productivity while reducing nitrogen fertilization and the concomitant pollution. PMID:11432923

  18. Arabidopsis gene co-expression network and its functional modules

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Linyong; Van Hemert, John L; Dash, Sudhansu; Dickerson, Julie A

    2009-01-01

    Background Biological networks characterize the interactions of biomolecules at a systems-level. One important property of biological networks is the modular structure, in which nodes are densely connected with each other, but between which there are only sparse connections. In this report, we attempted to find the relationship between the network topology and formation of modular structure by comparing gene co-expression networks with random networks. The organization of gene functional modules was also investigated. Results We constructed a genome-wide Arabidopsis gene co-expression network (AGCN) by using 1094 microarrays. We then analyzed the topological properties of AGCN and partitioned the network into modules by using an efficient graph clustering algorithm. In the AGCN, 382 hub genes formed a clique, and they were densely connected only to a small subset of the network. At the module level, the network clustering results provide a systems-level understanding of the gene modules that coordinate multiple biological processes to carry out specific biological functions. For instance, the photosynthesis module in AGCN involves a very large number (> 1000) of genes which participate in various biological processes including photosynthesis, electron transport, pigment metabolism, chloroplast organization and biogenesis, cofactor metabolism, protein biosynthesis, and vitamin metabolism. The cell cycle module orchestrated the coordinated expression of hundreds of genes involved in cell cycle, DNA metabolism, and cytoskeleton organization and biogenesis. We also compared the AGCN constructed in this study with a graphical Gaussian model (GGM) based Arabidopsis gene network. The photosynthesis, protein biosynthesis, and cell cycle modules identified from the GGM network had much smaller module sizes compared with the modules found in the AGCN, respectively. Conclusion This study reveals new insight into the topological properties of biological networks. The

  19. Suppression of Tla1 gene expression for improved solar conversion efficiency and photosynthetic productivity in plants and algae

    DOEpatents

    Melis, Anastasios; Mitra, Mautusi

    2010-06-29

    The invention provides method and compositions to minimize the chlorophyll antenna size of photosynthesis by decreasing TLA1 gene expression, thereby improving solar conversion efficiencies and photosynthetic productivity in plants, e.g., green microalgae, under bright sunlight conditions.

  20. Gene Express Inc.

    PubMed

    Saccomanno, Colette F

    2006-07-01

    Gene Express, Inc. is a technology-licensing company and provider of Standardized Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (StaRT-PCR) services. Designed by and for clinical researchers involved in pharmaceutical, biomarker and molecular diagnostic product development, StaRT-PCR is a unique quantitative and standardized multigene expression measurement platform. StaRT-PCR meets all of the performance characteristics defined by the US FDA as required to support regulatory submissions [101,102] , and by the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act of 1988 (CLIA) as necessary to support diagnostic testing [1] . A standardized mixture of internal standards (SMIS), manufactured in bulk, provides integrated quality control wherein each native template target gene is measured relative to a competitive template internal standard. Bulk production enables the compilation of a comprehensive standardized database from across multiple experiments, across collaborating laboratories and across the entire clinical development lifecycle of a given compound or diagnostic product. For the first time, all these data are able to be directly compared. Access to such a database can dramatically shorten the time from investigational new drug (IND) to new drug application (NDA), or save time and money by hastening a substantiated 'no-go' decision. High-throughput StaRT-PCR is conducted at the company's automated Standardized Expression Measurement (SEM) Center. Currently optimized for detection on a microcapillary electrophoretic platform, StaRT-PCR products also may be analyzed on microarray, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), or matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) platforms. SEM Center services deliver standardized genomic data--data that will accelerate the application of pharmacogenomic technology to new drug and diagnostic test development and facilitate personalized medicine. PMID:16886903

  1. Effect of nonylphenol on response of physiology and photosynthesis-related gene transcription of Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Qian, Haifeng; Pan, Xiangjie; Shi, Shutian; Yu, Shuqiong; Jiang, Haiyan; Lin, Zhifan; Fu, Zhengwei

    2011-11-01

    Nonylphenol (NP) is regarded as a kind of persistent organic pollutant which exists ubiquitously in the environment. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of NP on Chlorella vulgaris physiological indices and gene transcription. The results showed that NP stress inhibited algal growth in short-term bioassay. NP also decreased chlorophyll content, including chl a, chl b, and total chlorophyll. NP caused oxidant hurt by overproducing reactive oxygen species (ROS), which might destroy the overall membrane system to cause malondialdehyde content increase. NP inhibited photosynthesis-related gene transcription in C. vulgaris after 24 to 48 h exposure. The lowest transcript levels of psaB, psbA, and rbcL in C. vulgaris decreased to only 18.5%, 7%, and 4% of the control, respectively. Taken together, our results demonstrate that NP is toxic to fresh algae growth by affecting the photosynthesis-related genes transcription and overproducing ROS to disrupt cell structure in a short period. PMID:21207133

  2. Identification of Photosynthesis-Associated C4 Candidate Genes through Comparative Leaf Gradient Transcriptome in Multiple Lineages of C3 and C4 Species

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zehong; Weissmann, Sarit; Wang, Minghui; Du, Baijuan; Huang, Lei; Wang, Lin; Tu, Xiaoyu; Zhong, Silin; Myers, Christopher; Brutnell, Thomas P.; Sun, Qi; Li, Pinghua

    2015-01-01

    Leaves of C4 crops usually have higher radiation, water and nitrogen use efficiencies compared to the C3 species. Engineering C4 traits into C3 crops has been proposed as one of the most promising ways to repeal the biomass yield ceiling. To better understand the function of C4 photosynthesis, and to identify candidate genes that are associated with the C4 pathways, a comparative transcription network analysis was conducted on leaf developmental gradients of three C4 species including maize, green foxtail and sorghum and one C3 species, rice. By combining the methods of gene co-expression and differentially co-expression networks, we identified a total of 128 C4 specific genes. Besides the classic C4 shuttle genes, a new set of genes associated with light reaction, starch and sucrose metabolism, metabolites transportation, as well as transcription regulation, were identified as involved in C4 photosynthesis. These findings will provide important insights into the differential gene regulation between C3 and C4 species, and a good genetic resource for establishing C4 pathways in C3 crops. PMID:26465154

  3. Evolution of gene expression after gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-05-01

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat-maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that γ-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a γ-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. PMID:25912045

  4. Evolution of Gene Expression after Gene Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat–maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that γ-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a γ-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. PMID:25912045

  5. Serial analysis of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Velculescu, V E; Zhang, L; Vogelstein, B; Kinzler, K W

    1995-10-20

    The characteristics of an organism are determined by the genes expressed within it. A method was developed, called serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), that allows the quantitative and simultaneous analysis of a large number of transcripts. To demonstrate this strategy, short diagnostic sequence tags were isolated from pancreas, concatenated, and cloned. Manual sequencing of 1000 tags revealed a gene expression pattern characteristic of pancreatic function. New pancreatic transcripts corresponding to novel tags were identified. SAGE should provide a broadly applicable means for the quantitative cataloging and comparison of expressed genes in a variety of normal, developmental, and disease states. PMID:7570003

  6. Identification of C4 photosynthesis metabolism and regulatory-associated genes in Eleocharis vivipara by SSH.

    PubMed

    Chen, Taiyu; Ye, Rongjian; Fan, Xiaolei; Li, Xianghua; Lin, Yongjun

    2011-09-01

    This is the first effort to investigate the candidate genes involved in kranz developmental regulation and C(4) metabolic fluxes in Eleocharis vivipara, which is a leafless freshwater amphibious plant and possesses a distinct culms anatomy structure and photosynthetic pattern in contrasting environments. A terrestrial specific SSH library was constructed to investigate the genes involved in kranz anatomy developmental regulation and C(4) metabolic fluxes. A total of 73 ESTs and 56 unigenes in 384 clones were identified by array hybridization and sequencing. In total, 50 unigenes had homologous genes in the databases of rice and Arabidopsis. The real-time quantitative PCR results showed that most of the genes were accumulated in terrestrial culms and ABA-induced culms. The C(4) marker genes were stably accumulated during the culms development process in terrestrial culms. With respect to C(3) culms, C(4) photosynthesis metabolism consumed much more transporters and translocators related to ion metabolism, organic acids and carbohydrate metabolism, phosphate metabolism, amino acids metabolism, and lipids metabolism. Additionally, ten regulatory genes including five transcription factors, four receptor-like proteins, and one BURP protein were identified. These regulatory genes, which co-accumulated with the culms developmental stages, may play important roles in culms structure developmental regulation, bundle sheath chloroplast maturation, and environmental response. These results shed new light on the C(4) metabolic fluxes, environmental response, and anatomy structure developmental regulation in E. vivipara. PMID:21739352

  7. TaSCL14, a novel wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) GRAS gene, regulates plant growth, photosynthesis, tolerance to photooxidative stress, and senescence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kunmei; Li, Hongwei; Chen, Yaofeng; Zheng, Qi; Li, Bin; Li, Zhensheng

    2015-01-20

    Rates of photosynthesis, tolerance to photooxidative stress, and senescence are all important physiological factors that affect plant development and thus agricultural productivity. GRAS proteins play essential roles in plant growth and development as well as in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. So far few GRAS genes in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) have been characterized. A previous transcriptome analysis indicated that the expression of a GRAS gene (TaSCL14) was induced by high-light stress in Xiaoyan 54 (XY54), a common wheat cultivar with strong tolerance to high-light stress. In this study, TaSCL14 gene was isolated from XY54 and mapped on chromosome 4A. TaSCL14 was expressed in various wheat organs, with high levels in stems and roots. Our results confirmed that TaSCL14 expression was indeed responsive to high-light stress. Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV)-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of TaSCL14 in wheat was performed to help characterize its potential functions. Silencing of TaSCL14 resulted in inhibited plant growth, decreased photosynthetic capacity, and reduced tolerance to photooxidative stress. In addition, silencing of TaSCL14 in wheat promoted leaf senescence induced by darkness. These results suggest that TaSCL14 may act as a multifunctional regulator involved in plant growth, photosynthesis, tolerance to photooxidative stress, and senescence. PMID:25619599

  8. Aberrant Gene Expression in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ence; Ji, Guoli; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L.; Cai, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression as an intermediate molecular phenotype has been a focus of research interest. In particular, studies of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) have offered promise for understanding gene regulation through the discovery of genetic variants that explain variation in gene expression levels. Existing eQTL methods are designed for assessing the effects of common variants, but not rare variants. Here, we address the problem by establishing a novel analytical framework for evaluating the effects of rare or private variants on gene expression. Our method starts from the identification of outlier individuals that show markedly different gene expression from the majority of a population, and then reveals the contributions of private SNPs to the aberrant gene expression in these outliers. Using population-scale mRNA sequencing data, we identify outlier individuals using a multivariate approach. We find that outlier individuals are more readily detected with respect to gene sets that include genes involved in cellular regulation and signal transduction, and less likely to be detected with respect to the gene sets with genes involved in metabolic pathways and other fundamental molecular functions. Analysis of polymorphic data suggests that private SNPs of outlier individuals are enriched in the enhancer and promoter regions of corresponding aberrantly-expressed genes, suggesting a specific regulatory role of private SNPs, while the commonly-occurring regulatory genetic variants (i.e., eQTL SNPs) show little evidence of involvement. Additional data suggest that non-genetic factors may also underlie aberrant gene expression. Taken together, our findings advance a novel viewpoint relevant to situations wherein common eQTLs fail to predict gene expression when heritable, rare inter-individual variation exists. The analytical framework we describe, taking into consideration the reality of differential phenotypic robustness, may be valuable for investigating

  9. Method of controlling gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Peters, Norman K.; Frost, John W.; Long, Sharon R.

    1991-12-03

    A method of controlling expression of a DNA segment under the control of a nod gene promoter which comprises administering to a host containing a nod gene promoter an amount sufficient to control expression of the DNA segment of a compound of the formula: ##STR1## in which each R is independently H or OH, is described.

  10. Gene Expression in Oligodendroglial Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Elisabeth J.; Haylock, Brian; Husband, David; du Plessis, Daniel; Sibson, D. Ross; Warnke, Peter C.; Walker, Carol

    2010-01-01

    Background: Oligodendroglial tumors with 1p/19q loss are more likely to be chemosensitive and have longer survival than those with intact 1p/19q, but not all respond to chemotherapy, warranting investigation of the biological basis of chemosensitivity. Methods: Gene expression profiling was performed using amplified antisense RNA from 28 oligodendroglial tumors treated with chemotherapy (26 serial stereotactic biopsy, 2 resection). Expression of differentially expressed genes was validated by real-time PCR. Results: Unsupervised hierarchical clustering showed clustering of multiple samples from the same case in 14/17 cases and identified subgroups associated with tumor grade and 1p/19q status. 176 genes were differentially expressed, 164 being associated with 1p/19q loss (86% not on 1p or 19q). 94 genes differed between responders and non-responders to chemotherapy; 12 were not associated with 1p/19q loss. Significant differential expression was confirmed in 11/13 selected genes. Novel genes associated with response to therapy included SSBP2, GFRA1, FAP and RASD1. IQGAP1, INA, TGIF1, NR2F2 and MYCBP were differentially expressed in oligodendroglial tumors with 1p/19q loss. Conclusion: Gene expression profiling using serial stereotactic biopsies indicated greater homogeneity within tumors than between tumors. Genes associated with 1p/19q status or response were identified warranting further elucidation of their role in oligodendroglial tumors. PMID:20966545

  11. Chromosome assignment of four photosynthesis-related genes and their variability in wheat species.

    PubMed

    Ogihara, Y; Shimizu, H; Hasegawa, K; Tsujimoto, H; Sasakuma, T

    1994-06-01

    Copy numbers of four photosynthesis-related genes, PhyA, Ppc, RbcS and Lhcb1 (*)1, in wheat genomes were estimated by slot-blot analysis, and these genes were assigned to the chromosome arms of common wheat by Southern hybridization of DNA from an aneuploid series of the cultivar Chinese Spring. The copy number of PhyA was estimated to be one locus per haploid genome, and this gene was assigned to chromosomes 4AL, 4BS and 4DS. The Ppc gene showed a low copy number of small multigenes, and was located on the short arm of homoeologous group 3 chromosomes and the long arm of chromosomes of homoeologous group 7. RbcS consisted of a multigene family, with approximately 100 copies in the common wheat genome, and was located on the short arm of group 2 chromosomes and the long arm of group 5 chromosomes. Lhcb1 (*)1 also consisted of a multigene family with about 50 copies in common wheat. Only a limited number of restriction fragments (approximately 15%) were used to determine the locations of members of this family on the long arm of group 1 chromosomes owing to the multiplicity of DNA bands. The variability of hybridized bands with the four genes was less in polyploids, but was more in the case of multigene families. RFLP analysis of polyploid wheats and their presumed ancestors was carried out with probes of the oat PhyA gene, the maize Ppc gene, the wheat RbcS gene and the wheat Lhcb1 (*)1 gene. The RFLP patterns of common wheat most closely resembled those of T. Dicoccum (Emmer wheat), T. urartu (A genome), Ae. speltoides (S genome) and Ae. squarrosa (D genome). Diversification of genes in the wheat complex appear to have occurred mainly at the diploid level. Based on RFLP patterns, B and S genomes were clustered into two major groups. The fragment numbers per genome were reduced in proportion to the increase of ploidy level for all four genes, suggesting that some mechanism(s) might operate to restrict, and so keep to a minimum, the gene numbers in the polyploid

  12. Rootstock effects on gene expression patterns in apple tree scions.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Philip J; Rytter, Jo; Detwiler, Elizabeth A; Travis, James W; McNellis, Timothy W

    2003-11-01

    Like many fruit trees, apple trees (Malus pumila) do not reproduce true-to-type from seed. Desirable cultivars are clonally propagated by grafting onto rootstocks that can alter the characteristics of the scion. For example, the M.7 EMLA rootstock is semi-dwarfing and reduces the susceptibility of the scion to Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight disease. In contrast, the M.9 T337 rootstock is dwarfing and does not alter fire blight susceptibility of the scion. This study represents a comprehensive comparison of gene expression patterns in scions of the 'Gala' apple cultivar grafted to either M.7 EMLA or M.9 T337. Expression was determined by cDNA-AFLP coupled with silver staining of the gels. Scions grafted to the M.9 T337 rootstock showed higher expression of a number of photosynthesis-related, transcription/translation-related, and cell division-related genes, while scions grafted to the M.7 EMLA rootstock showed increased stress-related gene expression. The observed differences in gene expression showed a remarkable correlation with physiological differences between the two graft combinations. The roles that the differentially expressed genes might play in tree stature, stress tolerance, photosynthetic activity, fire blight resistance, and other differences conferred by the two rootstocks are discussed. PMID:15010615

  13. Nuclear Neighborhoods and Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Rui; Bodnar, Megan S.; Spector, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The eukaryotic nucleus is a highly compartmentalized and dynamic environment. Chromosome territories are arranged non-randomly within the nucleus and numerous studies have indicated that a gene’s position in the nucleus can impact its transcriptional activity. Here, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of the influence of specific nuclear neighborhoods on gene expression or repression. Nuclear neighborhoods associated with transcriptional repression include the inner nuclear membrane/nuclear lamina and peri-nucleolar chromatin, whereas neighborhoods surrounding the nuclear pore complex, PML nuclear bodies, and nuclear speckles seem to be transcriptionally permissive. While nuclear position appears to play an important role in gene expression, it is likely to be only one piece of a flexible puzzle that incorporates numerous parameters. We are still at a very early, yet exciting stage in our journey toward deciphering the mechanism(s) that govern the permissiveness of gene expression/repression within different nuclear neighborhoods. PMID:19339170

  14. Differential Gene Expression in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Jakobs, Tatjana C.

    2014-01-01

    In glaucoma, regardless of its etiology, retinal ganglion cells degenerate and eventually die. Although age and elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) are the main risk factors, there are still many mysteries in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. The advent of genome-wide microarray expression screening together with the availability of animal models of the disease has allowed analysis of differential gene expression in all parts of the eye in glaucoma. This review will outline the findings of recent genome-wide expression studies and discuss their commonalities and differences. A common finding was the differential regulation of genes involved in inflammation and immunity, including the complement system and the cytokines transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). Other genes of interest have roles in the extracellular matrix, cell–matrix interactions and adhesion, the cell cycle, and the endothelin system. PMID:24985133

  15. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  16. Redox regulation of photosynthetic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Queval, Guillaume; Foyer, Christine H.

    2012-01-01

    Redox chemistry and redox regulation are central to the operation of photosynthesis and respiration. However, the roles of different oxidants and antioxidants in the regulation of photosynthetic or respiratory gene expression remain poorly understood. Leaf transcriptome profiles of a range of Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes that are deficient in either hydrogen peroxide processing enzymes or in low molecular weight antioxidant were therefore compared to determine how different antioxidant systems that process hydrogen peroxide influence transcripts encoding proteins targeted to the chloroplasts or mitochondria. Less than 10 per cent overlap was observed in the transcriptome patterns of leaves that are deficient in either photorespiratory (catalase (cat)2) or chloroplastic (thylakoid ascorbate peroxidase (tapx)) hydrogen peroxide processing. Transcripts encoding photosystem II (PSII) repair cycle components were lower in glutathione-deficient leaves, as were the thylakoid NAD(P)H (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate)) dehydrogenases (NDH) mRNAs. Some thylakoid NDH mRNAs were also less abundant in tAPX-deficient and ascorbate-deficient leaves. Transcripts encoding the external and internal respiratory NDHs were increased by low glutathione and low ascorbate. Regulation of transcripts encoding specific components of the photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains by hydrogen peroxide, ascorbate and glutathione may serve to balance non-cyclic and cyclic electron flow pathways in relation to oxidant production and reductant availability. PMID:23148274

  17. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Hurst, Laurence D.

    2015-01-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene’s expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (<100 kb) but extends much further. Sex-specific expression change is also genomically clustered. As genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking. PMID:25743543

  18. Gene expression during memory formation.

    PubMed

    Igaz, Lionel Muller; Bekinschtein, Pedro; Vianna, Monica M R; Izquierdo, Ivan; Medina, Jorge H

    2004-01-01

    For several decades, neuroscientists have provided many clues that point out the involvement of de novo gene expression during the formation of long-lasting forms of memory. However, information regarding the transcriptional response networks involved in memory formation has been scarce and fragmented. With the advent of genome-based technologies, combined with more classical approaches (i.e., pharmacology and biochemistry), it is now feasible to address those relevant questions--which gene products are modulated, and when that processes are necessary for the proper storage of memories--with unprecedented resolution and scale. Using one-trial inhibitory (passive) avoidance training of rats, one of the most studied tasks so far, we found two time windows of sensitivity to transcriptional and translational inhibitors infused into the hippocampus: around the time of training and 3-6 h after training. Remarkably, these periods perfectly overlap with the involvement of hippocampal cAMP/PKA (protein kinase A) signaling pathways in memory consolidation. Given the complexity of transcriptional responses in the brain, particularly those related to processing of behavioral information, it was clearly necessary to address this issue with a multi-variable, parallel-oriented approach. We used cDNA arrays to screen for candidate inhibitory avoidance learning-related genes and analyze the dynamic pattern of gene expression that emerges during memory consolidation. These include genes involved in intracellular kinase networks, synaptic function, DNA-binding and chromatin modification, transcriptional activation and repression, translation, membrane receptors, and oncogenes, among others. Our findings suggest that differential and orchestrated hippocampal gene expression is necessary in both early and late periods of long-term memory consolidation. Additionally, this kind of studies may lead to the identification and characterization of genes that are relevant for the pathogenesis

  19. Analysis of global gene expression profiles to identify differentially expressed genes critical for embryo development in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Peng, Lifang; Wu, Ya; Shen, Yanyue; Wu, Xiaoming; Wang, Jianbo

    2014-11-01

    Embryo development represents a crucial developmental period in the life cycle of flowering plants. To gain insights into the genetic programs that control embryo development in Brassica rapa L., RNA sequencing technology was used to perform transcriptome profiling analysis of B. rapa developing embryos. The results generated 42,906,229 sequence reads aligned with 32,941 genes. In total, 27,760, 28,871, 28,384, and 25,653 genes were identified from embryos at globular, heart, early cotyledon, and mature developmental stages, respectively, and analysis between stages revealed a subset of stage-specific genes. We next investigated 9,884 differentially expressed genes with more than fivefold changes in expression and false discovery rate ≤ 0.001 from three adjacent-stage comparisons; 1,514, 3,831, and 6,633 genes were detected between globular and heart stage embryo libraries, heart stage and early cotyledon stage, and early cotyledon and mature stage, respectively. Large numbers of genes related to cellular process, metabolism process, response to stimulus, and biological process were expressed during the early and middle stages of embryo development. Fatty acid biosynthesis, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, and photosynthesis-related genes were expressed predominantly in embryos at the middle stage. Genes for lipid metabolism and storage proteins were highly expressed in the middle and late stages of embryo development. We also identified 911 transcription factor genes that show differential expression across embryo developmental stages. These results increase our understanding of the complex molecular and cellular events during embryo development in B. rapa and provide a foundation for future studies on other oilseed crops. PMID:25214014

  20. Regulation of Rubisco gene expression in C4 plants.

    PubMed

    Berry, James O; Mure, Christopher M; Yerramsetty, Pradeep

    2016-06-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate-carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) incorporates inorganic carbon into an organic form, making this chloroplastic enzyme one of the most essential factors for all life on earth. Despite its central role in photosynthesis, research into regulation of the chloroplast rbcL and nuclear RbcS genes that encode this enzyme has lagged behind other plant gene systems. A major characteristic of kranz-type C4 plants is the accumulation of Rubisco only within chloroplasts of internalized bundle sheath cells that surround the leaf vascular centers. In plants that utilize the less common single cell C4 system, Rubisco accumulates only within one type of dimorphic chloroplasts localized to a specific region of leaf chlorenchyma cells. Understanding regulatory processes that restrict Rubisco gene expression to only one cell type or chloroplast type is a major focus of C4 research. Regulatory steps may include transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and post-translational processes. PMID:27026038

  1. Gene expression profile of pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Galicia, J C; Henson, B R; Parker, J S; Khan, A A

    2016-06-01

    The cost, prevalence and pain associated with endodontic disease necessitate an understanding of the fundamental molecular aspects of its pathogenesis. This study was aimed to identify the genetic contributors to pulpal pain and inflammation. Inflamed pulps were collected from patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (n=20). Normal pulps from teeth extracted for various reasons served as controls (n=20). Pain level was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneTitan Multichannel Instrument. The difference in gene expression levels were determined by the significance analysis of microarray program using a false discovery rate (q-value) of 5%. Genes involved in immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and signaling, integrin cell surface interactions, and others were expressed at relatively higher levels in the pulpitis group. Moreover, several genes known to modulate pain and inflammation showed differential expression in asymptomatic and mild pain patients (⩾30 mm on VAS) compared with those with moderate to severe pain. This exploratory study provides a molecular basis for the clinical diagnosis of pulpitis. With an enhanced understanding of pulpal inflammation, future studies on treatment and management of pulpitis and on pain associated with it can have a biological reference to bridge treatment strategies with pulpal biology. PMID:27052691

  2. Systems Biophysics of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Jose M.G.; Saiz, Leonor

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is a process central to any form of life. It involves multiple temporal and functional scales that extend from specific protein-DNA interactions to the coordinated regulation of multiple genes in response to intracellular and extracellular changes. This diversity in scales poses fundamental challenges to the use of traditional approaches to fully understand even the simplest gene expression systems. Recent advances in computational systems biophysics have provided promising avenues to reliably integrate the molecular detail of biophysical process into the system behavior. Here, we review recent advances in the description of gene regulation as a system of biophysical processes that extend from specific protein-DNA interactions to the combinatorial assembly of nucleoprotein complexes. There is now basic mechanistic understanding on how promoters controlled by multiple, local and distal, DNA binding sites for transcription factors can actively control transcriptional noise, cell-to-cell variability, and other properties of gene regulation, including precision and flexibility of the transcriptional responses. PMID:23790365

  3. Control of Renin Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Sean T.; Jones, Craig A.; Gross, Kenneth W.; Pan, Li

    2015-01-01

    Renin, as part of the renin-angiotensin system, plays a critical role in the regulation of blood pressure, electrolyte homeostasis, mammalian renal development and progression of fibrotic/hypertrophic diseases. Renin gene transcription is subject to complex developmental and tissue-specific regulation. Initial studies using the mouse As4.1 cell line, which has many characteristics of the renin-expressing juxtaglomerular cells of the kidney, have identified a proximal promoter region (−197 to −50 bp) and an enhancer (−2866 to −2625 bp) upstream of the Ren-1c gene, which are critical for renin gene expression. The proximal promoter region contains several transcription factor-binding sites including a binding site for the products of the developmental control genes Hox. The enhancer consists of at least 11 transcription factor-binding sites and is responsive to various signal transduction pathways including cAMP, retinoic acid, endothelin-1, and cytokines, all of which are known to alter renin mRNA levels. Furthermore, in vivo models have validated several of these key components found within the proximal promoter region and the enhancer as well as other key sites necessary for renin gene transcription. PMID:22576577

  4. Light-dependent expression of flg22-induced defense genes in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Satoshi; Aoyama, Mayu; Nakai, Kana; Shimotani, Koji; Yamasaki, Kanako; Sato, Masa H.; Tojo, Daisuke; Suwastika, I. Nengah; Nomura, Hironari; Shiina, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplasts have been reported to generate retrograde immune signals that activate defense gene expression in the nucleus. However, the roles of light and photosynthesis in plant immunity remain largely elusive. In this study, we evaluated the effects of light on the expression of defense genes induced by flg22, a peptide derived from bacterial flagellins which acts as a potent elicitor in plants. Whole-transcriptome analysis of flg22-treated Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings under light and dark conditions for 30 min revealed that a number of (30%) genes strongly induced by flg22 (>4.0) require light for their rapid expression, whereas flg22-repressed genes include a significant number of genes that are down-regulated by light. Furthermore, light is responsible for the flg22-induced accumulation of salicylic acid (SA), indicating that light is indispensable for basal defense responses in plants. To elucidate the role of photosynthesis in defense, we further examined flg22-induced defense gene expression in the presence of specific inhibitors of photosynthetic electron transport: 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) and 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-benzoquinone (DBMIB). Light-dependent expression of defense genes was largely suppressed by DBMIB, but only partially suppressed by DCMU. These findings suggest that photosynthetic electron flow plays a role in controlling the light-dependent expression of flg22-inducible defense genes. PMID:25346742

  5. Identification of differentially expressed genes in flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) under saline-alkaline stress by digital gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ying; Huang, Wengong; Chen, Hongyu; Wu, Guangwen; Yuan, Hongmei; Song, Xixia; Kang, Qinghua; Zhao, Dongsheng; Jiang, Weidong; Liu, Yan; Wu, Jianzhong; Cheng, Lili; Yao, Yubo; Guan, Fengzhi

    2014-10-01

    The salinization and alkalization of soil are widespread environmental problems, and alkaline salt stress is more destructive than neutral salt stress. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of plant tolerance to saline-alkaline stress has become a major challenge. However, little attention has been paid to the mechanism of plant alkaline salt tolerance. In this study, gene expression profiling of flax was analyzed under alkaline-salt stress (AS2), neutral salt stress (NSS) and alkaline stress (AS) by digital gene expression. Three-week-old flax seedlings were placed in 25 mM Na2CO3 (pH11.6) (AS2), 50mM NaCl (NSS) and NaOH (pH11.6) (AS) for 18 h. There were 7736, 1566 and 454 differentially expressed genes in AS2, NSS and AS compared to CK, respectively. The GO category gene enrichment analysis revealed that photosynthesis was particularly affected in AS2, carbohydrate metabolism was particularly affected in NSS, and the response to biotic stimulus was particularly affected in AS. We also analyzed the expression pattern of five categories of genes including transcription factors, signaling transduction proteins, phytohormones, reactive oxygen species proteins and transporters under these three stresses. Some key regulatory gene families involved in abiotic stress, such as WRKY, MAPKKK, ABA, PrxR and ion channels, were differentially expressed. Compared with NSS and AS, AS2 triggered more differentially expressed genes and special pathways, indicating that the mechanism of AS2 was more complex than NSS and AS. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first transcriptome analysis of flax in response to saline-alkaline stress. These data indicate that common and diverse features of saline-alkaline stress provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of plant saline-alkaline tolerance and offer a number of candidate genes as potential markers of tolerance to saline-alkaline stress. PMID:25058012

  6. Gene expression throughout a vertebrate's embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Describing the patterns of gene expression during embryonic development has broadened our understanding of the processes and patterns that define morphogenesis. Yet gene expression patterns have not been described throughout vertebrate embryogenesis. This study presents statistical analyses of gene expression during all 40 developmental stages in the teleost Fundulus heteroclitus using four biological replicates per stage. Results Patterns of gene expression for 7,000 genes appear to be important as they recapitulate developmental timing. Among the 45% of genes with significant expression differences between pairs of temporally adjacent stages, significant differences in gene expression vary from as few as five to more than 660. Five adjacent stages have disproportionately more significant changes in gene expression (> 200 genes) relative to other stages: four to eight and eight to sixteen cell stages, onset of circulation, pre and post-hatch, and during complete yolk absorption. The fewest differences among adjacent stages occur during gastrulation. Yet, at stage 16, (pre-mid-gastrulation) the largest number of genes has peak expression. This stage has an over representation of genes in oxidative respiration and protein expression (ribosomes, translational genes and proteases). Unexpectedly, among all ribosomal genes, both strong positive and negative correlations occur. Similar correlated patterns of expression occur among all significant genes. Conclusions These data provide statistical support for the temporal dynamics of developmental gene expression during all stages of vertebrate development. PMID:21356103

  7. Large-scale mRNA expression profiling in the common ice plant, Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, performing C3 photosynthesis and Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM).

    PubMed

    Cushman, John C; Tillett, Richard L; Wood, Joshua A; Branco, Joshua M; Schlauch, Karen A

    2008-01-01

    The common ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L.) has emerged as a useful model for molecular genetic studies of Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) because CAM can be induced in this species by water deficit or salinity stress. Non-redundant sequence information from expressed sequence tag data was used to fabricate a custom oligonucleotide microarray to compare large-scale mRNA expression patterns in M. crystallinum plants conducting C(3) photosynthesis versus CAM. Samples were collected every 4 h over a 24 h time period at the start of the subjective second day from plants grown under constant light and temperature conditions in order to capture variation in mRNA expression due to salinity stress and circadian clock control. Of 8455 genes, a total of 2343 genes (approximately 28%) showed a significant change as judged by analysis of variance (ANOVA) in steady-state mRNA abundance at one or more time points over the 24 h period. Of these, 858 (10%) and 599 (7%) exhibited a greater than two-fold ratio (TFR) increase or decrease in mRNA abundance, respectively. Functional categorization of these TFR genes revealed that many genes encoding products that function in CAM-related C(4) acid carboxylation/decarboxylation, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, polysaccharide, polyol, and starch biosynthesis/degradation, protein degradation, transcriptional activation, signalling, stress response, and transport facilitation, and novel, unclassified proteins exhibited stress-induced increases in mRNA abundance. In contrast, salt stress resulted in a significant decrease in transcript abundance for genes encoding photosynthetic functions, protein synthesis, and cellular biogenesis functions. Many genes with CAM-related functions exhibited phase shifts in their putative circadian expression patterns following CAM induction. This report establishes an extensive catalogue of gene expression patterns for future investigations aimed at understanding the complex, transcriptional

  8. Gene Expression Studies in Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xlao-Guang; Mathur, Geetika; James, Anthony A.

    2009-01-01

    Research on gene expression in mosquitoes is motivated by both basic and applied interests. Studies of genes involved in hematophagy, reproduction, olfaction, and immune responses reveal an exquisite confluence of biological adaptations that result in these highly-successful life forms. The requirement of female mosquitoes for a bloodmeal for propagation has been exploited by a wide diversity of viral, protozoan and metazoan pathogens as part of their life cycles. Identifying genes involved in host-seeking, blood feeding and digestion, reproduction, insecticide resistance and susceptibility/refractoriness to pathogen development is expected to provide the bases for the development of novel methods to control mosquito-borne diseases. Advances in mosquito transgenesis technologies, the availability of whole genome sequence information, mass sequencing and analyses of transcriptomes and RNAi techniques will assist development of these tools as well as deepen the understanding of the underlying genetic components for biological phenomena characteristic of these insect species. PMID:19161831

  9. The Gene Expression Omnibus database

    PubMed Central

    Clough, Emily; Barrett, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database is an international public repository that archives and freely distributes high-throughput gene expression and other functional genomics data sets. Created in 2000 as a worldwide resource for gene expression studies, GEO has evolved with rapidly changing technologies and now accepts high-throughput data for many other data applications, including those that examine genome methylation, chromatin structure, and genome–protein interactions. GEO supports community-derived reporting standards that specify provision of several critical study elements including raw data, processed data, and descriptive metadata. The database not only provides access to data for tens of thousands of studies, but also offers various Web-based tools and strategies that enable users to locate data relevant to their specific interests, as well as to visualize and analyze the data. This chapter includes detailed descriptions of methods to query and download GEO data and use the analysis and visualization tools. The GEO homepage is at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/. PMID:27008011

  10. The Gene Expression Omnibus Database.

    PubMed

    Clough, Emily; Barrett, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database is an international public repository that archives and freely distributes high-throughput gene expression and other functional genomics data sets. Created in 2000 as a worldwide resource for gene expression studies, GEO has evolved with rapidly changing technologies and now accepts high-throughput data for many other data applications, including those that examine genome methylation, chromatin structure, and genome-protein interactions. GEO supports community-derived reporting standards that specify provision of several critical study elements including raw data, processed data, and descriptive metadata. The database not only provides access to data for tens of thousands of studies, but also offers various Web-based tools and strategies that enable users to locate data relevant to their specific interests, as well as to visualize and analyze the data. This chapter includes detailed descriptions of methods to query and download GEO data and use the analysis and visualization tools. The GEO homepage is at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/. PMID:27008011

  11. Expression of the Arabidopsis Sigma Factor SIG5 Is Photoreceptor and Photosynthesis Controlled

    PubMed Central

    Mellenthin, Marina; Ellersiek, Ulrike; Börger, Anna; Baier, Margarete

    2014-01-01

    Two collections of Arabidopsis GAL4 enhancer trap lines were screened for light-intensity dependent reporter gene activation. Line N9313 was isolated for its strong light-intensity regulation. The T-DNA element trapped distant enhancers of the SIG5 promoter, which drives expression of a sigma factor involved in regulation of chloroplast genes for photosystem II core proteins. The T-DNA insertion 715 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site splits the promoter in a distal and proximal part. Both parts are sensitive to blue and red light and depend on photosynthetic electron transport activity between photosystem II and the plastoquinone pool. The mainblue-light sensitivity is localized within a 196-bp sequence (–887 to –691 bp) in the proximal promoter region It is preferentially CRY1 and PHYB controlled. Type-I and type-II phytochromes mediate red-light sensitivity via various promoter elements spread over the proximal and distal upstream region. This work characterizes SIG5 as an anterograde control factor of chloroplast gene expression, which is controlled by chloroplast signals in a retrograde manner. PMID:27135509

  12. Classification of genes based on gene expression analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelova, M.; Myers, C.; Faith, J.

    2008-05-01

    Systems biology and bioinformatics are now major fields for productive research. DNA microarrays and other array technologies and genome sequencing have advanced to the point that it is now possible to monitor gene expression on a genomic scale. Gene expression analysis is discussed and some important clustering techniques are considered. The patterns identified in the data suggest similarities in the gene behavior, which provides useful information for the gene functionalities. We discuss measures for investigating the homogeneity of gene expression data in order to optimize the clustering process. We contribute to the knowledge of functional roles and regulation of E. coli genes by proposing a classification of these genes based on consistently correlated genes in expression data and similarities of gene expression patterns. A new visualization tool for targeted projection pursuit and dimensionality reduction of gene expression data is demonstrated.

  13. Classification of genes based on gene expression analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Angelova, M. Myers, C. Faith, J.

    2008-05-15

    Systems biology and bioinformatics are now major fields for productive research. DNA microarrays and other array technologies and genome sequencing have advanced to the point that it is now possible to monitor gene expression on a genomic scale. Gene expression analysis is discussed and some important clustering techniques are considered. The patterns identified in the data suggest similarities in the gene behavior, which provides useful information for the gene functionalities. We discuss measures for investigating the homogeneity of gene expression data in order to optimize the clustering process. We contribute to the knowledge of functional roles and regulation of E. coli genes by proposing a classification of these genes based on consistently correlated genes in expression data and similarities of gene expression patterns. A new visualization tool for targeted projection pursuit and dimensionality reduction of gene expression data is demonstrated.

  14. Identification of four soybean reference genes for gene expression normalization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene expression analysis requires the use of reference genes stably expressed independently of specific tissues or environmental conditions. Housekeeping genes (e.g., actin, tubulin, ribosomal, polyubiquitin and elongation factor 1-alpha) are commonly used as reference genes with the assumption tha...

  15. Mitochondrial RNA granules: Compartmentalizing mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jourdain, Alexis A; Boehm, Erik; Maundrell, Kinsey; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2016-03-14

    In mitochondria, DNA replication, gene expression, and RNA degradation machineries coexist within a common nondelimited space, raising the question of how functional compartmentalization of gene expression is achieved. Here, we discuss the recently characterized "mitochondrial RNA granules," mitochondrial subdomains with an emerging role in the regulation of gene expression. PMID:26953349

  16. Changes in the physiology and gene expression of Microcystis aeruginosa under EGCG stress.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yaping; Wang, Jin; Yu, Yang; Shi, Limei; Kong, Fanxiang

    2014-12-01

    EGCG (Epigallocatechin-3-gallate) has an allelopathic inhibitory effect on Microcystis aeruginosa. Cellular structure, physiological and biochemical reactions and gene expression were examined to explore the mechanism of inhibition. As was shown in electron microscopy, the structure of the cell wall, cell membrane and thylakoid was disrupted by EGCG. EGCG also reduced the efficiency of photosynthesis and the electron transfer rate in M. aeruginosa cells, as was determined with a flow cytometer. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis demonstrated that gene expression of the core proteins of the photosynthesis centers PSI and PSII and ATP synthase were reduced, while the expression of the phycobilisome degradation protein A gene (nbl A) was elevated. The expression of the universal stress protein gene increased, which would enhance the adaptive capacity of Microcystis cells to polyphenols and oxidative stress. Furthermore, EGCG elevated the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in M. aeruginosa cells, and thus caused oxidative cellular damage. When treated with EGCG at low concentrations (10 and 40 mg L(-)(1)), the cells were able to activate defense systems to degrade the excess ROS. But at a concentration of 70 mg L(-)(1), oxidative stress exceeded tolerance limits, and the cells were severely damaged. We concluded that damage to photosynthesis and oxidative stress were the primary mechanisms for the allelopathic effect of EGCG on M. aeruginosa. PMID:25016428

  17. Environmental control of plant nuclear gene expression by chloroplast redox signals.

    PubMed

    Pfalz, Jeannette; Liebers, Monique; Hirth, Matthias; Grübler, Björn; Holtzegel, Ute; Schröter, Yvonne; Dietzel, Lars; Pfannschmidt, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Plant photosynthesis takes place in specialized cell organelles, the chloroplasts, which perform all essential steps of this process. The proteins involved in photosynthesis are encoded by genes located on the plastid and nuclear genomes. Proper function and regulation of light harvesting and energy fixation thus requires a tight coordination of the gene expression machineries in the two genetic compartments. This is achieved by a bi-directional exchange of information between nucleus and plastids. Signals emerging from plastids report the functional and developmental state of the organelle to the nucleus and initiate distinct nuclear gene expression profiles, which trigger responses that support or improve plastid functions. Recent research indicated that this signaling is absolutely essential for plant growth and development. Reduction/oxidation (redox) signals from photosynthesis are key players in this information network since they do report functional disturbances in photosynthesis, the primary energy source of plants. Such disturbances are caused by environmental fluctuations for instance in illumination, temperature, or water availability. These environmental changes affect the linear electron flow of photosynthesis and result in changes of the redox state of the components involved [e.g., the plastoquinone (PQ) pool] or coupled to it (e.g., the thioredoxin pool). Thus, the changes in redox state directly reflect the environmental impact and serve as immediate plastidial signals to the nucleus. The triggered responses range from counterbalancing reactions within the physiological range up to severe stress responses including cell death. This review focuses on physiological redox signals from photosynthetic electron transport (PET), their relation to the environment, potential transduction pathways to the nucleus and their impact on nuclear gene expression. PMID:23181068

  18. Environmental control of plant nuclear gene expression by chloroplast redox signals

    PubMed Central

    Pfalz, Jeannette; Liebers, Monique; Hirth, Matthias; Grübler, Björn; Holtzegel, Ute; Schröter, Yvonne; Dietzel, Lars; Pfannschmidt, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Plant photosynthesis takes place in specialized cell organelles, the chloroplasts, which perform all essential steps of this process. The proteins involved in photosynthesis are encoded by genes located on the plastid and nuclear genomes. Proper function and regulation of light harvesting and energy fixation thus requires a tight coordination of the gene expression machineries in the two genetic compartments. This is achieved by a bi-directional exchange of information between nucleus and plastids. Signals emerging from plastids report the functional and developmental state of the organelle to the nucleus and initiate distinct nuclear gene expression profiles, which trigger responses that support or improve plastid functions. Recent research indicated that this signaling is absolutely essential for plant growth and development. Reduction/oxidation (redox) signals from photosynthesis are key players in this information network since they do report functional disturbances in photosynthesis, the primary energy source of plants. Such disturbances are caused by environmental fluctuations for instance in illumination, temperature, or water availability. These environmental changes affect the linear electron flow of photosynthesis and result in changes of the redox state of the components involved [e.g., the plastoquinone (PQ) pool] or coupled to it (e.g., the thioredoxin pool). Thus, the changes in redox state directly reflect the environmental impact and serve as immediate plastidial signals to the nucleus. The triggered responses range from counterbalancing reactions within the physiological range up to severe stress responses including cell death. This review focuses on physiological redox signals from photosynthetic electron transport (PET), their relation to the environment, potential transduction pathways to the nucleus and their impact on nuclear gene expression. PMID:23181068

  19. Does inbreeding affect gene expression in birds?

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, Bengt; Naurin, Sara; Hasselquist, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Inbreeding increases homozygosity, exposes genome-wide recessive deleterious alleles and often reduces fitness. The physiological and reproductive consequences of inbreeding may be manifested already during gene regulation, but the degree to which inbreeding influences gene expression is unknown in most organisms, including in birds. To evaluate the pattern of inbreeding-affected gene expression over the genome and in relation to sex, we performed a transcriptome-wide gene expression (10 695 genes) study of brain tissue of 10-day-old inbred and outbred, male and female zebra finches. We found significantly lower gene expression in females compared with males at Z-linked genes, confirming that dosage compensation is incomplete in female birds. However, inbreeding did not affect gene expression at autosomal or sex-linked genes, neither in males nor in females. Analyses of single genes again found a clear sex-biased expression at Z-linked genes, whereas only a single gene was significantly affected by inbreeding. The weak effect of inbreeding on gene expression in zebra finches contrasts to the situation, for example, in Drosophila where inbreeding has been found to influence gene expression more generally and at stress-related genes in particular. PMID:25232028

  20. Seasonal Effects on Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Goldinger, Anita; Shakhbazov, Konstantin; Henders, Anjali K.; McRae, Allan F.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Powell, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    Many health conditions, ranging from psychiatric disorders to cardiovascular disease, display notable seasonal variation in severity and onset. In order to understand the molecular processes underlying this phenomenon, we have examined seasonal variation in the transcriptome of 606 healthy individuals. We show that 74 transcripts associated with a 12-month seasonal cycle were enriched for processes involved in DNA repair and binding. An additional 94 transcripts demonstrated significant seasonal variability that was largely influenced by blood cell count levels. These transcripts were enriched for immune function, protein production, and specific cellular markers for lymphocytes. Accordingly, cell counts for erythrocytes, platelets, neutrophils, monocytes, and CD19 cells demonstrated significant association with a 12-month seasonal cycle. These results demonstrate that seasonal variation is an important environmental regulator of gene expression and blood cell composition. Notable changes in leukocyte counts and genes involved in immune function indicate that immune cell physiology varies throughout the year in healthy individuals. PMID:26023781

  1. MRI of Transgene Expression: Correlation to Therapeutic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Högemanny, Dagmar; Saeki, Yoshinaga; Tyminski, Edyta; Terada, Kinya; Weissleder, Ralph; Chiocca, E Antonio; Basilion, James P

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide highresolution 3D maps of structural and functional information, yet its use of mapping in vivo gene expression has only recently been explored. A potential application for this technology is to noninvasively image transgene expression. The current study explores the latter using a nonregulatable internalizing engineered transferrin receptor (ETR) whose expression can be probed for with a superparamagnetic Tf-CLIO probe. Using an HSV-based amplicon vector system for transgene delivery, we demonstrate that: 1) ETR is a sensitive MR marker gene; 2) several transgenes can be efficiently expressed from a single amplicon; 3) expression of each transgene results in functional gene product; and 4) ETR gene expression correlates with expression of therapeutic genes when the latter are contained within the same amplicon. These data, taken together, suggest that MRI of ETR expression can serve as a surrogate for measuring therapeutic transgene expression. PMID:12407446

  2. C3-C4 intermediacy in grasses: organelle enrichment and distribution, glycine decarboxylase expression, and the rise of C2 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Khoshravesh, Roxana; Stinson, Corey R; Stata, Matt; Busch, Florian A; Sage, Rowan F; Ludwig, Martha; Sage, Tammy L

    2016-05-01

    Photorespiratory glycine shuttling and decarboxylation in bundle sheath (BS) cells exhibited by C2 species is proposed to be the evolutionary bridge to C4 photosynthesis in eudicots. To evaluate this in grasses, we compare anatomy, cellular localization of glycine decarboxylase (GDC), and photosynthetic physiology of a suspected C2 grass, Homolepis aturensis, with these traits in known C2 grasses, Neurachne minor and Steinchisma hians, and C3 S laxum that is sister to S hians We also use publicly available genome and RNA-sequencing data to examine the evolution of GDC subunits and enhance our understanding of the evolution of BS-specific GDC expression in C2 and C4 grasses. Our results confirm the identity of H aturensis as a C2 species; GDC is confined predominantly to the organelle-enriched BS cells in H aturensis and S hians and to mestome sheath cells of N minor Phylogenetic analyses and data obtained from immunodetection of the P-subunit of GDC are consistent with the hypothesis that the BS dominant levels of GDC in C2 and C4 species are due to changes in expression of a single GLDP gene in M and BS cells. All BS mitochondria and peroxisomes and most chloroplasts in H aturensis and S hians are situated centripetally in a pattern identical to C2 eudicots. In S laxum, which has C3-like gas exchange patterns, mitochondria and peroxisomes are positioned centripetally as they are in S hians This subcellular phenotype, also present in eudicots, is posited to initiate a facilitation cascade leading to C2 and C4 photosynthesis. PMID:27073202

  3. C3–C4 intermediacy in grasses: organelle enrichment and distribution, glycine decarboxylase expression, and the rise of C2 photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Khoshravesh, Roxana; Stinson, Corey R.; Stata, Matt; Busch, Florian A.; Sage, Rowan F.; Ludwig, Martha; Sage, Tammy L.

    2016-01-01

    Photorespiratory glycine shuttling and decarboxylation in bundle sheath (BS) cells exhibited by C2 species is proposed to be the evolutionary bridge to C4 photosynthesis in eudicots. To evaluate this in grasses, we compare anatomy, cellular localization of glycine decarboxylase (GDC), and photosynthetic physiology of a suspected C2 grass, Homolepis aturensis, with these traits in known C2 grasses, Neurachne minor and Steinchisma hians, and C3 S. laxum that is sister to S. hians. We also use publicly available genome and RNA-sequencing data to examine the evolution of GDC subunits and enhance our understanding of the evolution of BS-specific GDC expression in C2 and C4 grasses. Our results confirm the identity of H. aturensis as a C2 species; GDC is confined predominantly to the organelle-enriched BS cells in H. aturensis and S. hians and to mestome sheath cells of N. minor. Phylogenetic analyses and data obtained from immunodetection of the P-subunit of GDC are consistent with the hypothesis that the BS dominant levels of GDC in C2 and C4 species are due to changes in expression of a single GLDP gene in M and BS cells. All BS mitochondria and peroxisomes and most chloroplasts in H. aturensis and S. hians are situated centripetally in a pattern identical to C2 eudicots. In S. laxum, which has C3-like gas exchange patterns, mitochondria and peroxisomes are positioned centripetally as they are in S. hians. This subcellular phenotype, also present in eudicots, is posited to initiate a facilitation cascade leading to C2 and C4 photosynthesis. PMID:27073202

  4. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chory, Joanne

    2006-01-16

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  5. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chory, Joanne

    2004-12-31

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  6. Gene Expression: Sizing it all up

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic architecture appears to be a largely unexplored component of gene expression. Although surely not the end of the story, we are learning that when it comes to gene expression, size is important. We have been surprised to find that certain patterns of expression, tissue-specific versus constit...

  7. Association genetics and transcriptome analysis reveal a gibberellin-responsive pathway involved in regulating photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jianbo; Tian, Jiaxing; Du, Qingzhang; Chen, Jinhui; Li, Ying; Yang, Xiaohui; Li, Bailian; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-05-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) regulate a wide range of important processes in plant growth and development, including photosynthesis. However, the mechanism by which GAs regulate photosynthesis remains to be understood. Here, we used multi-gene association to investigate the effect of genes in the GA-responsive pathway, as constructed by RNA sequencing, on photosynthesis, growth, and wood property traits, in a population of 435 Populus tomentosa By analyzing changes in the transcriptome following GA treatment, we identified many key photosynthetic genes, in agreement with the observed increase in measurements of photosynthesis. Regulatory motif enrichment analysis revealed that 37 differentially expressed genes related to photosynthesis shared two essential GA-related cis-regulatory elements, the GA response element and the pyrimidine box. Thus, we constructed a GA-responsive pathway consisting of 47 genes involved in regulating photosynthesis, including GID1, RGA, GID2, MYBGa, and 37 photosynthetic differentially expressed genes. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based association analysis showed that 142 SNPs, representing 40 candidate genes in this pathway, were significantly associated with photosynthesis, growth, and wood property traits. Epistasis analysis uncovered interactions between 310 SNP-SNP pairs from 37 genes in this pathway, revealing possible genetic interactions. Moreover, a structural gene-gene matrix based on a time-course of transcript abundances provided a better understanding of the multi-gene pathway affecting photosynthesis. The results imply a functional role for these genes in mediating photosynthesis, growth, and wood properties, demonstrating the potential of combining transcriptome-based regulatory pathway construction and genetic association approaches to detect the complex genetic networks underlying quantitative traits. PMID:27091876

  8. Control of RANKL Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    Osteoclasts are highly specialized cells capable of degrading mineralized tissue and form at different regions of bone to meet different physiological needs, such as mobilization of calcium, modeling of bone structure, and remodeling of bone matrix. Osteoclast production is elevated in a number of pathological conditions, many of which lead to loss of bone mass. Whether normal or pathological, osteoclastogenesis strictly depends upon support from accessory cells which supply cytokines required for osteoclast differentiation. Only one of these cytokines, receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL), is absolutely essential for osteoclast formation throughout life and is thus expressed by all cell types that support osteoclast differentiation. The central role of RANKL in bone resorption is highlighted by the fact that it is the basis for a new therapy to inhibit bone loss. This review will discuss mechanisms that control RANKL gene expression in different osteoclast-support cells and how the study of such mechanisms may lead to a better understanding of the cellular interactions that drive normal and pathological bone resorption. PMID:19716455

  9. Multiple abiotic stimuli are integrated in the regulation of rice gene expression under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Plessis, Anne; Hafemeister, Christoph; Wilkins, Olivia; Gonzaga, Zennia Jean; Meyer, Rachel Sarah; Pires, Inês; Müller, Christian; Septiningsih, Endang M; Bonneau, Richard; Purugganan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Plants rely on transcriptional dynamics to respond to multiple climatic fluctuations and contexts in nature. We analyzed the genome-wide gene expression patterns of rice (Oryza sativa) growing in rainfed and irrigated fields during two distinct tropical seasons and determined simple linear models that relate transcriptomic variation to climatic fluctuations. These models combine multiple environmental parameters to account for patterns of expression in the field of co-expressed gene clusters. We examined the similarities of our environmental models between tropical and temperate field conditions, using previously published data. We found that field type and macroclimate had broad impacts on transcriptional responses to environmental fluctuations, especially for genes involved in photosynthesis and development. Nevertheless, variation in solar radiation and temperature at the timescale of hours had reproducible effects across environmental contexts. These results provide a basis for broad-based predictive modeling of plant gene expression in the field. PMID:26609814

  10. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2008-06-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  11. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2012-05-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  12. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  13. Global Analysis of Photosynthesis Transcriptional Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Saheed; Noguera, Daniel R.; Donohue, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a crucial biological process that depends on the interplay of many components. This work analyzed the gene targets for 4 transcription factors: FnrL, PrrA, CrpK and MppG (RSP_2888), which are known or predicted to control photosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) identified 52 operons under direct control of FnrL, illustrating its regulatory role in photosynthesis, iron homeostasis, nitrogen metabolism and regulation of sRNA synthesis. Using global gene expression analysis combined with ChIP-seq, we mapped the regulons of PrrA, CrpK and MppG. PrrA regulates ∼34 operons encoding mainly photosynthesis and electron transport functions, while CrpK, a previously uncharacterized Crp-family protein, regulates genes involved in photosynthesis and maintenance of iron homeostasis. Furthermore, CrpK and FnrL share similar DNA binding determinants, possibly explaining our observation of the ability of CrpK to partially compensate for the growth defects of a ΔFnrL mutant. We show that the Rrf2 family protein, MppG, plays an important role in photopigment biosynthesis, as part of an incoherent feed-forward loop with PrrA. Our results reveal a previously unrealized, high degree of combinatorial regulation of photosynthetic genes and significant cross-talk between their transcriptional regulators, while illustrating previously unidentified links between photosynthesis and the maintenance of iron homeostasis. PMID:25503406

  14. Global analysis of photosynthesis transcriptional regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Imam, Saheed; Noguera, Daniel R; Donohue, Timothy J

    2014-12-01

    Photosynthesis is a crucial biological process that depends on the interplay of many components. This work analyzed the gene targets for 4 transcription factors: FnrL, PrrA, CrpK and MppG (RSP_2888), which are known or predicted to control photosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) identified 52 operons under direct control of FnrL, illustrating its regulatory role in photosynthesis, iron homeostasis, nitrogen metabolism and regulation of sRNA synthesis. Using global gene expression analysis combined with ChIP-seq, we mapped the regulons of PrrA, CrpK and MppG. PrrA regulates ∼34 operons encoding mainly photosynthesis and electron transport functions, while CrpK, a previously uncharacterized Crp-family protein, regulates genes involved in photosynthesis and maintenance of iron homeostasis. Furthermore, CrpK and FnrL share similar DNA binding determinants, possibly explaining our observation of the ability of CrpK to partially compensate for the growth defects of a ΔFnrL mutant. We show that the Rrf2 family protein, MppG, plays an important role in photopigment biosynthesis, as part of an incoherent feed-forward loop with PrrA. Our results reveal a previously unrealized, high degree of combinatorial regulation of photosynthetic genes and significant cross-talk between their transcriptional regulators, while illustrating previously unidentified links between photosynthesis and the maintenance of iron homeostasis. PMID:25503406

  15. Gene expression in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Jansen, R; Penninx, B W J H; Madar, V; Xia, K; Milaneschi, Y; Hottenga, J J; Hammerschlag, A R; Beekman, A; van der Wee, N; Smit, J H; Brooks, A I; Tischfield, J; Posthuma, D; Schoevers, R; van Grootheest, G; Willemsen, G; de Geus, E J; Boomsma, D I; Wright, F A; Zou, F; Sun, W; Sullivan, P F

    2016-03-01

    The search for genetic variants underlying major depressive disorder (MDD) has not yet provided firm leads to its underlying molecular biology. A complementary approach is to study gene expression in relation to MDD. We measured gene expression in peripheral blood from 1848 subjects from The Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. Subjects were divided into current MDD (N=882), remitted MDD (N=635) and control (N=331) groups. MDD status and gene expression were measured again 2 years later in 414 subjects. The strongest gene expression differences were between the current MDD and control groups (129 genes at false-discovery rate, FDR<0.1). Gene expression differences across MDD status were largely unrelated to antidepressant use, inflammatory status and blood cell counts. Genes associated with MDD were enriched for interleukin-6 (IL-6)-signaling and natural killer (NK) cell pathways. We identified 13 gene expression clusters with specific clusters enriched for genes involved in NK cell activation (downregulated in current MDD, FDR=5.8 × 10(-5)) and IL-6 pathways (upregulated in current MDD, FDR=3.2 × 10(-3)). Longitudinal analyses largely confirmed results observed in the cross-sectional data. Comparisons of gene expression results to the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC) MDD genome-wide association study results revealed overlap with DVL3. In conclusion, multiple gene expression associations with MDD were identified and suggest a measurable impact of current MDD state on gene expression. Identified genes and gene clusters are enriched with immune pathways previously associated with the etiology of MDD, in line with the immune suppression and immune activation hypothesis of MDD. PMID:26008736

  16. Analysis of Gene Expression Patterns Using Biclustering.

    PubMed

    Roy, Swarup; Bhattacharyya, Dhruba K; Kalita, Jugal K

    2016-01-01

    Mining microarray data to unearth interesting expression profile patterns for discovery of in silico biological knowledge is an emerging area of research in computational biology. A group of functionally related genes may have similar expression patterns under a set of conditions or at some time points. Biclustering is an important data mining tool that has been successfully used to analyze gene expression data for biologically significant cluster discovery. The purpose of this chapter is to introduce interesting patterns that may be observed in expression data and discuss the role of biclustering techniques in detecting interesting functional gene groups with similar expression patterns. PMID:26350227

  17. Xenbase: gene expression and improved integration.

    PubMed

    Bowes, Jeff B; Snyder, Kevin A; Segerdell, Erik; Jarabek, Chris J; Azam, Kenan; Zorn, Aaron M; Vize, Peter D

    2010-01-01

    Xenbase (www.xenbase.org), the model organism database for Xenopus laevis and X. (Silurana) tropicalis, is the principal centralized resource of genomic, development data and community information for Xenopus research. Recent improvements include the addition of the literature and interaction tabs to gene catalog pages. New content has been added including a section on gene expression patterns that incorporates image data from the literature, large scale screens and community submissions. Gene expression data are integrated into the gene catalog via an expression tab and is also searchable by multiple criteria using an expression search interface. The gene catalog has grown to contain over 15,000 genes. Collaboration with the European Xenopus Research Center (EXRC) has resulted in a stock center section with data on frog lines supplied by the EXRC. Numerous improvements have also been made to search and navigation. Xenbase is also the source of the Xenopus Anatomical Ontology and the clearinghouse for Xenopus gene nomenclature. PMID:19884130

  18. Abiotic Stresses: Insight into Gene Regulation and Protein Expression in Photosynthetic Pathways of Plants.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Mohammad-Zaman; Moumeni, Ali; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2015-01-01

    Global warming and climate change intensified the occurrence and severity of abiotic stresses that seriously affect the growth and development of plants,especially, plant photosynthesis. The direct impact of abiotic stress on the activity of photosynthesis is disruption of all photosynthesis components such as photosystem I and II, electron transport, carbon fixation, ATP generating system and stomatal conductance. The photosynthetic system of plants reacts to the stress differently, according to the plant type, photosynthetic systems (C₃ or C₄), type of the stress, time and duration of the occurrence and several other factors. The plant responds to the stresses by a coordinate chloroplast and nuclear gene expression. Chloroplast, thylakoid membrane, and nucleus are the main targets of regulated proteins and metabolites associated with photosynthetic pathways. Rapid responses of plant cell metabolism and adaptation to photosynthetic machinery are key factors for survival of plants in a fluctuating environment. This review gives a comprehensive view of photosynthesis-related alterations at the gene and protein levels for plant adaptation or reaction in response to abiotic stress. PMID:26343644

  19. Abiotic Stresses: Insight into Gene Regulation and Protein Expression in Photosynthetic Pathways of Plants

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Mohammad-Zaman; Moumeni, Ali; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2015-01-01

    Global warming and climate change intensified the occurrence and severity of abiotic stresses that seriously affect the growth and development of plants, especially, plant photosynthesis. The direct impact of abiotic stress on the activity of photosynthesis is disruption of all photosynthesis components such as photosystem I and II, electron transport, carbon fixation, ATP generating system and stomatal conductance. The photosynthetic system of plants reacts to the stress differently, according to the plant type, photosynthetic systems (C3 or C4), type of the stress, time and duration of the occurrence and several other factors. The plant responds to the stresses by a coordinate chloroplast and nuclear gene expression. Chloroplast, thylakoid membrane, and nucleus are the main targets of regulated proteins and metabolites associated with photosynthetic pathways. Rapid responses of plant cell metabolism and adaptation to photosynthetic machinery are key factors for survival of plants in a fluctuating environment. This review gives a comprehensive view of photosynthesis-related alterations at the gene and protein levels for plant adaptation or reaction in response to abiotic stress. PMID:26343644

  20. Comparative Transcriptome Atlases Reveal Altered Gene Expression Modules between Two Cleomaceae C3 and C4 Plant Species[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Külahoglu, Canan; Denton, Alisandra K.; Sommer, Manuel; Maß, Janina; Schliesky, Simon; Wrobel, Thomas J.; Berckmans, Barbara; Gongora-Castillo, Elsa; Buell, C. Robin; Simon, Rüdiger; De Veylder, Lieven; Bräutigam, Andrea; Weber, Andreas P.M.

    2014-01-01

    C4 photosynthesis outperforms the ancestral C3 state in a wide range of natural and agro-ecosystems by affording higher water-use and nitrogen-use efficiencies. It therefore represents a prime target for engineering novel, high-yielding crops by introducing the trait into C3 backgrounds. However, the genetic architecture of C4 photosynthesis remains largely unknown. To define the divergence in gene expression modules between C3 and C4 photosynthesis during leaf ontogeny, we generated comprehensive transcriptome atlases of two Cleomaceae species, Gynandropsis gynandra (C4) and Tarenaya hassleriana (C3), by RNA sequencing. Overall, the gene expression profiles appear remarkably similar between the C3 and C4 species. We found that known C4 genes were recruited to photosynthesis from different expression domains in C3, including typical housekeeping gene expression patterns in various tissues as well as individual heterotrophic tissues. Furthermore, we identified a structure-related module recruited from the C3 root. Comparison of gene expression patterns with anatomy during leaf ontogeny provided insight into genetic features of Kranz anatomy. Altered expression of developmental factors and cell cycle genes is associated with a higher degree of endoreduplication in enlarged C4 bundle sheath cells. A delay in mesophyll differentiation apparent both in the leaf anatomy and the transcriptome allows for extended vein formation in the C4 leaf. PMID:25122153

  1. HOXB homeobox gene expression in cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    López, R; Garrido, E; Piña, P; Hidalgo, A; Lazos, M; Ochoa, R; Salcedo, M

    2006-01-01

    The homeobox (HOX) genes are a family of transcription factors that bind to specific DNA sequences in target genes regulating gene expression. Thirty-nine HOX genes have been mapped in four conserved clusters: A, B, C, and D; they act as master genes regulating the identity of body segments along the anteroposterior axis of the embryo. The role played by HOX genes in adult cell differentiation is unclear to date, but growing evidence suggests that they may play an important role in the development of cancer. To study the role played by HOX genes in cervical cancer, in the present work, we analyzed the expression of HOXB genes and the localization of their transcripts in human cervical tissues. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis and nonradioactive RNA in situ hybridization were used to detect HOXB expression in 11 normal cervical tissues and 17 cervical carcinomas. It was determined that HOXB1, B3, B5, B6, B7, B8, and B9 genes are expressed in normal adult cervical epithelium and squamous cervical carcinomas. Interestingly, HOXB2, HOXB4, and HOXB13 gene expression was found only in tumor tissues. Our findings suggest that the new expression of HOXB2, HOXB4, and B13 genes is involved in cervical cancer. PMID:16445654

  2. Gene Expression Profiling of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Jacob, Harrys K.C.; Jakharia, Aniruddha; Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Kashyap, Manoj Kumar; Goel, Renu; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Dwivedi, Sutopa; Pathare, Swapnali; Dikshit, Jyoti Bajpai; Maharudraiah, Jagadeesha; Singh, Sujay; Sameer Kumar, Ghantasala S; Vijayakumar, M.; Veerendra Kumar, Kariyanakatte Veeraiah; Premalatha, Chennagiri Shrinivasamurthy; Tata, Pramila; Hariharan, Ramesh; Roa, Juan Carlos; Prasad, T.S.K; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Kumar, Rekha Vijay; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide, both in men and women. A genomewide gene expression analysis was carried out to identify differentially expressed genes in gastric adenocarcinoma tissues as compared to adjacent normal tissues. We used Agilent’s whole human genome oligonucleotide microarray platform representing ~41,000 genes to carry out gene expression analysis. Two-color microarray analysis was employed to directly compare the expression of genes between tumor and normal tissues. Through this approach, we identified several previously known candidate genes along with a number of novel candidate genes in gastric cancer. Testican-1 (SPOCK1) was one of the novel molecules that was 10-fold upregulated in tumors. Using tissue microarrays, we validated the expression of testican-1 by immunohistochemical staining. It was overexpressed in 56% (160/282) of the cases tested. Pathway analysis led to the identification of several networks in which SPOCK1 was among the topmost networks of interacting genes. By gene enrichment analysis, we identified several genes involved in cell adhesion and cell proliferation to be significantly upregulated while those corresponding to metabolic pathways were significantly downregulated. The differentially expressed genes identified in this study are candidate biomarkers for gastric adenoacarcinoma. PMID:27030788

  3. Gene expression profiling in developing human hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Mei, Pinchao; Lou, Rong; Zhang, Michael Q; Wu, Guanyun; Qiang, Boqin; Zhang, Zhengguo; Shen, Yan

    2002-10-15

    The gene expression profile of developing human hippocampus is of particular interest and importance to neurobiologists devoted to development of the human brain and related diseases. To gain further molecular insight into the developmental and functional characteristics, we analyzed the expression profile of active genes in developing human hippocampus. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were selected by sequencing randomly selected clones from an original 3'-directed cDNA library of 150-day human fetal hippocampus, and a digital expression profile of 946 known genes that could be divided into 16 categories was generated. We also used for comparison 14 other expression profiles of related human neural cells/tissues, including human adult hippocampus. To yield more confidence regarding differential expression, a method was applied to attach normalized expression data to genes with a low false-positive rate (<0.05). Finally, hierarchical cluster analysis was used to exhibit related gene expression patterns. Our results are in accordance with anatomical and physiological observations made during the developmental process of the human hippocampus. Furthermore, some novel findings appeared to be unique to our results. The abundant expression of genes for cell surface components and disease-related genes drew our attention. Twenty-four genes are significantly different from adult, and 13 genes might be developing hippocampus-specific candidate genes, including wnt2b and some Alzheimer's disease-related genes. Our results could provide useful information on the ontogeny, development, and function of cells in the human hippocampus at the molecular level and underscore the utility of large-scale, parallel gene expression analyses in the study of complex biological phenomena. PMID:12271469

  4. Widespread ectopic expression of olfactory receptor genes

    PubMed Central

    Feldmesser, Ester; Olender, Tsviya; Khen, Miriam; Yanai, Itai; Ophir, Ron; Lancet, Doron

    2006-01-01

    Background Olfactory receptors (ORs) are the largest gene family in the human genome. Although they are expected to be expressed specifically in olfactory tissues, some ectopic expression has been reported, with special emphasis on sperm and testis. The present study systematically explores the expression patterns of OR genes in a large number of tissues and assesses the potential functional implication of such ectopic expression. Results We analyzed the expression of hundreds of human and mouse OR transcripts, via EST and microarray data, in several dozens of human and mouse tissues. Different tissues had specific, relatively small OR gene subsets which had particularly high expression levels. In testis, average expression was not particularly high, and very few highly expressed genes were found, none corresponding to ORs previously implicated in sperm chemotaxis. Higher expression levels were more common for genes with a non-OR genomic neighbor. Importantly, no correlation in expression levels was detected for human-mouse orthologous pairs. Also, no significant difference in expression levels was seen between intact and pseudogenized ORs, except for the pseudogenes of subfamily 7E which has undergone a human-specific expansion. Conclusion The OR superfamily as a whole, show widespread, locus-dependent and heterogeneous expression, in agreement with a neutral or near neutral evolutionary model for transcription control. These results cannot reject the possibility that small OR subsets might play functional roles in different tissues, however considerable care should be exerted when offering a functional interpretation for ectopic OR expression based only on transcription information. PMID:16716209

  5. The nature of floral signals in Arabidopsis. I. Photosynthesis and a far-red photoresponse independently regulate flowering by increasing expression of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT)

    PubMed Central

    King, Rod W.; Hisamatsu, Tamotsu; Goldschmidt, Eliezer E.; Blundell, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    Arabidopsis flowers in long day (LD) in response to signals transported from the photoinduced leaf to the shoot apex. These LD signals may include protein of the gene FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) while in short day (SD) with its slower flowering, signalling may involve sucrose and gibberellin. Here, it is shown that after 5 weeks growth in SD, a single LD up-regulated leaf blade expression of FT and CONSTANS (CO) within 4–8 h, and flowers were visible within 2–3 weeks. Plants kept in SDs were still vegetative 7 weeks later. This LD response was blocked in ft-1 and a co mutant. Exposure to different LD light intensities and spectral qualities showed that two LD photoresponses are important for up-regulation of FT and for flowering. Phytochrome is effective at a low intensity from far-red (FR)-rich incandescent lamps. Independently, photosynthesis is active in an LD at a high intensity from red (R)-rich fluorescent lamps. The photosynthetic role of a single high light LD is demonstrated here by the blocking of the flowering and FT increase on removal of atmospheric CO2 or by decreasing the LD light intensity by 10-fold. These conditions also reduced leaf blade sucrose content and photosynthetic gene expression. An SD light integral matching that in a single LD was not effective for flowering, although there was reasonable FT-independent flowering after 12 SD at high light. While a single photosynthetic LD strongly amplified FT expression, the ability to respond to the LD required an additional but unidentified photoresponse. The implications of these findings for studies with mutants and for flowering in natural conditions are discussed. PMID:18836142

  6. Gene Expression Patterns in Ovarian Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Schaner, Marci E.; Ross, Douglas T.; Ciaravino, Giuseppe; Sørlie, Therese; Troyanskaya, Olga; Diehn, Maximilian; Wang, Yan C.; Duran, George E.; Sikic, Thomas L.; Caldeira, Sandra; Skomedal, Hanne; Tu, I-Ping; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Johnson, Steven W.; O'Dwyer, Peter J.; Fero, Michael J.; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Hastie, Trevor; Tibshirani, Robert; van de Rijn, Matt; Teng, Nelson N.; Longacre, Teri A.; Botstein, David; Brown, Patrick O.; Sikic, Branimir I.

    2003-01-01

    We used DNA microarrays to characterize the global gene expression patterns in surface epithelial cancers of the ovary. We identified groups of genes that distinguished the clear cell subtype from other ovarian carcinomas, grade I and II from grade III serous papillary carcinomas, and ovarian from breast carcinomas. Six clear cell carcinomas were distinguished from 36 other ovarian carcinomas (predominantly serous papillary) based on their gene expression patterns. The differences may yield insights into the worse prognosis and therapeutic resistance associated with clear cell carcinomas. A comparison of the gene expression patterns in the ovarian cancers to published data of gene expression in breast cancers revealed a large number of differentially expressed genes. We identified a group of 62 genes that correctly classified all 125 breast and ovarian cancer specimens. Among the best discriminators more highly expressed in the ovarian carcinomas were PAX8 (paired box gene 8), mesothelin, and ephrin-B1 (EFNB1). Although estrogen receptor was expressed in both the ovarian and breast cancers, genes that are coregulated with the estrogen receptor in breast cancers, including GATA-3, LIV-1, and X-box binding protein 1, did not show a similar pattern of coexpression in the ovarian cancers. PMID:12960427

  7. Gene Expression Studies in Lygus lineolaris

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genes are expressed in insect cells, as in all living organisms, by transcription of DNA into RNA followed by translation of RNA into proteins. The intricate patterns of differential gene expression in time and space directly influence the development and function of every aspect of the organism. Wh...

  8. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments resulted in the differential expression of hundreds of genes. A 5 day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β -Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on two fronts. First, expression patterns visualized with the Adh/GUS transgene were used to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response, and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. (Paul et al., Plant Physiol. 2001, 126:613). Second, genome-wide patterns of native gene expression were evaluated utilizing the Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChip? array of 8,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes identified with the arrays was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - TaqmanTM). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays of hybridized with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to the control arrays revealed hundreds of genes that were differentially expressed in response to spaceflight, yet most genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were unaffected. These results will be discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment, and with regard to potential future flight opportunities.

  9. Controlling expression of genes in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with a vitamin-repressible riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Ramundo, Silvia; Rochaix, Jean-David

    2015-01-01

    Chloroplast genomes of land plants and algae contain generally between 100 and 150 genes. These genes are involved in plastid gene expression and photosynthesis and in various other tasks. The function of some chloroplast genes is still unknown and some of them appear to be essential for growth and survival. Repressible and reversible expression systems are highly desirable for functional and biochemical characterization of these genes. We have developed a genetic tool that allows one to regulate the expression of any coding sequence in the chloroplast genome of the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Our system is based on vitamin-regulated expression of the nucleus-encoded chloroplast Nac2 protein, which is specifically required for the expression of any plastid gene fused to the psbD 5'UTR. With this approach, expression of the Nac2 gene in the nucleus and, in turn, that of the chosen chloroplast gene artificially driven by the psbD 5'UTR, is controlled by the MetE promoter and Thi4 riboswitch, which can be inactivated in a reversible way by supplying vitamin B12 and thiamine to the growth medium, respectively. This system opens interesting possibilities for studying the assembly and turnover of chloroplast multiprotein complexes such as the photosystems, the ribosome, and the RNA polymerase. It also provides a way to overcome the toxicity often associated with the expression of proteins of biotechnological interest in the chloroplast. PMID:25605390

  10. Gene expression profile analysis in astaxanthin-induced Haematococcus pluvialis using a cDNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Eom, Hyunsuk; Lee, Choul-Gyun; Jin, EonSeon

    2006-05-01

    The unicellular green alga Haematococcus pluvialis (Volvocales) is known for the ketocarotenoid astaxanthin (3, 3'-dihydroxy-beta, beta-carotene-4, 4'-dione) accumulation, which is induced under unfavorable culture conditions. In this work, we used cDNA microarray analysis to screen differentially expressed genes in H. pluvialis under astaxanthin-inductive culture conditions, such as combination of cell exposure to high irradiance and nutrient deprivation. Among the 965 genes in the cDNA array, there are 144 genes exhibiting differential expression (twofold changes) under these conditions. A significant decrease in the expression of photosynthesis-related genes was shown in astaxanthin-accumulating cells (red cells). Defense- or stress-related genes and signal transduction genes were also induced in the red cells. A comparison of microarray and real-time PCR analysis showed good correlation between the differentially expressed genes by the two methods. Our results indicate that the cDNA microarray approach, as employed in this work, can be relied upon and used to monitor gene expression profiles in H. pluvialis. In addition, the genes that were differentially expressed during astaxanthin induction are suitable candidates for further study and can be used as tools for dissecting the molecular mechanism of this unique pigment accumulation process in the green alga H. pluvialis. PMID:16320067

  11. Regulatory hotspots are associated with plant gene expression under varying soil phosphorus supply in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Hammond, John P; Mayes, Sean; Bowen, Helen C; Graham, Neil S; Hayden, Rory M; Love, Christopher G; Spracklen, William P; Wang, Jun; Welham, Sue J; White, Philip J; King, Graham J; Broadley, Martin R

    2011-07-01

    Gene expression is a quantitative trait that can be mapped genetically in structured populations to identify expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL). Genes and regulatory networks underlying complex traits can subsequently be inferred. Using a recently released genome sequence, we have defined cis- and trans-eQTL and their environmental response to low phosphorus (P) availability within a complex plant genome and found hotspots of trans-eQTL within the genome. Interval mapping, using P supply as a covariate, revealed 18,876 eQTL. trans-eQTL hotspots occurred on chromosomes A06 and A01 within Brassica rapa; these were enriched with P metabolism-related Gene Ontology terms (A06) as well as chloroplast- and photosynthesis-related terms (A01). We have also attributed heritability components to measures of gene expression across environments, allowing the identification of novel gene expression markers and gene expression changes associated with low P availability. Informative gene expression markers were used to map eQTL and P use efficiency-related QTL. Genes responsive to P supply had large environmental and heritable variance components. Regulatory loci and genes associated with P use efficiency identified through eQTL analysis are potential targets for further characterization and may have potential for crop improvement. PMID:21527424

  12. Gearbox gene expression and growth rate.

    PubMed

    Aldea, M; Garrido, T; Tormo, A

    1993-07-01

    Regulation of gene expression in prokaryotic cells usually takes place at the level of transcription initiation. Different forms of RNA polymerase recognizing specific promoters are engaged in the control of many prokaryotic regulons. This also seems to be the case for some Escherichia coli genes that are induced at low growth rates and by nutrient starvation. Their gene products are synthesized at levels inversely proportional to growth rate, and this mode of regulation has been termed gearbox gene expression. This kind of growth-rate modulation is exerted by specific transcriptional initiation signals, the gearbox promoters, and some of them depend on a putative new σ factor (RpoS). Gearbox promoters drive expression of morphogenetic and cell division genes at constant levels per cell and cycle to meet the demands of cell division and septum formation. A mechanism is proposed that could sense the growth rate of the cell to alter gene expression by the action of specific σ factors. PMID:24420108

  13. Quality Measures for Gene Expression Biclusters

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, Beatriz; Girldez, Ral; Aguilar-Ruiz, Jess S.

    2015-01-01

    An noticeable number of biclustering approaches have been proposed proposed for the study of gene expression data, especially for discovering functionally related gene sets under different subsets of experimental conditions. In this context, recognizing groups of co-expressed or co-regulated genes, that is, genes which follow a similar expression pattern, is one of the main objectives. Due to the problem complexity, heuristic searches are usually used instead of exhaustive algorithms. Furthermore, most of biclustering approaches use a measure or cost function that determines the quality of biclusters. Having a suitable quality metric for bicluster is a critical aspect, not only for guiding the search, but also for establishing a comparison criteria among the results obtained by different biclustering techniques. In this paper, we analyse a large number of existing approaches to quality measures for gene expression biclusters, as well as we present a comparative study of them based on their capability to recognize different expression patterns in biclusters. PMID:25763839

  14. Quality measures for gene expression biclusters.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Beatriz; Girldez, Ral; Aguilar-Ruiz, Jess S

    2015-01-01

    An noticeable number of biclustering approaches have been proposed proposed for the study of gene expression data, especially for discovering functionally related gene sets under different subsets of experimental conditions. In this context, recognizing groups of co-expressed or co-regulated genes, that is, genes which follow a similar expression pattern, is one of the main objectives. Due to the problem complexity, heuristic searches are usually used instead of exhaustive algorithms. Furthermore, most of biclustering approaches use a measure or cost function that determines the quality of biclusters. Having a suitable quality metric for bicluster is a critical aspect, not only for guiding the search, but also for establishing a comparison criteria among the results obtained by different biclustering techniques. In this paper, we analyse a large number of existing approaches to quality measures for gene expression biclusters, as well as we present a comparative study of them based on their capability to recognize different expression patterns in biclusters. PMID:25763839

  15. Aplysia californica neurons express microinjected neuropeptide genes.

    PubMed Central

    DesGroseillers, L; Cowan, D; Miles, M; Sweet, A; Scheller, R H

    1987-01-01

    Neuropeptide genes are expressed in specific subsets of large polyploid neurons in Aplysia californica. We have defined the transcription initiation sites of three of these neuropeptide genes (the R14, L11, and ELH genes) and determined the nucleotide sequence of the promoter regions. The genes contain the usual eucaryotic promoter signals as well as other structures of potential regulatory importance, including inverted and direct repeats. The L11 and ELH genes, which are otherwise unrelated, have homology in the promoter regions, while the R14 promoter was distinct. When cloned plasmids were microinjected into Aplysia neurons in organ culture, transitions between supercoiled, relaxed circular, and linear DNAs occurred along with ligation into high-molecular-weight species. About 20% of the microinjected neurons expressed the genes. The promoter region of the R14 gene functioned in expression of the microinjected DNA in all cells studied. When both additional 5' and 3' sequences were included, the gene was specifically expressed only in R14, suggesting that the specificity of expression is generated by a multicomponent repression system. Finally, the R14 peptide could be expressed in L11, demonstrating that it is possible to alter the transmitter phenotype of these neurons by introduction of cloned genes. Images PMID:3670293

  16. Methodological Limitations in Determining Astrocytic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Liang; Guo, Chuang; Wang, Tao; Li, Baoman; Gu, Li; Wang, Zhanyou

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, astrocytic mRNA and protein expression are studied by in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemically. This led to the concept that astrocytes lack aralar, a component of the malate-aspartate-shuttle. At least similar aralar mRNA and protein expression in astrocytes and neurons isolated by fluorescence-assisted cell sorting (FACS) reversed this opinion. Demonstration of expression of other astrocytic genes may also be erroneous. Literature data based on morphological methods were therefore compared with mRNA expression in cells obtained by recently developed methods for determination of cell-specific gene expression. All Na,K-ATPase-α subunits were demonstrated by immunohistochemistry (IHC), but there are problems with the cotransporter NKCC1. Glutamate and GABA transporter gene expression was well determined immunohistochemically. The same applies to expression of many genes of glucose metabolism, whereas a single study based on findings in bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic animals showed very low astrocytic expression of hexokinase. Gene expression of the equilibrative nucleoside transporters ENT1 and ENT2 was recognized by ISH, but ENT3 was not. The same applies to the concentrative transporters CNT2 and CNT3. All were clearly expressed in FACS-isolated cells, followed by biochemical analysis. ENT3 was enriched in astrocytes. Expression of many nucleoside transporter genes were shown by microarray analysis, whereas other important genes were not. Results in cultured astrocytes resembled those obtained by FACS. These findings call for reappraisal of cellular nucleoside transporter expression. FACS cell yield is small. Further development of cell separation methods to render methods more easily available and less animal and cost consuming and parallel studies of astrocytic mRNA and protein expression by ISH/IHC and other methods are necessary, but new methods also need to be thoroughly checked. PMID:24324456

  17. Gene Expression Noise, Fitness Landscapes, and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlebois, Daniel

    The stochastic (or noisy) process of gene expression can have fitness consequences for living organisms. For example, gene expression noise facilitates the development of drug resistance by increasing the time scale at which beneficial phenotypic states can be maintained. The present work investigates the relationship between gene expression noise and the fitness landscape. By incorporating the costs and benefits of gene expression, we track how the fluctuation magnitude and timescale of expression noise evolve in simulations of cell populations under stress. We find that properties of expression noise evolve to maximize fitness on the fitness landscape, and that low levels of expression noise emerge when the fitness benefits of gene expression exceed the fitness costs (and that high levels of noise emerge when the costs of expression exceed the benefits). The findings from our theoretical/computational work offer new hypotheses on the development of drug resistance, some of which are now being investigated in evolution experiments in our laboratory using well-characterized synthetic gene regulatory networks in budding yeast. Nserc Postdoctoral Fellowship (Grant No. PDF-453977-2014).

  18. A comparative gene expression database for invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background As whole genome and transcriptome sequencing gets cheaper and faster, a great number of 'exotic' animal models are emerging, rapidly adding valuable data to the ever-expanding Evo-Devo field. All these new organisms serve as a fantastic resource for the research community, but the sheer amount of data, some published, some not, makes detailed comparison of gene expression patterns very difficult to summarize - a problem sometimes even noticeable within a single lab. The need to merge existing data with new information in an organized manner that is publicly available to the research community is now more necessary than ever. Description In order to offer a homogenous way of storing and handling gene expression patterns from a variety of organisms, we have developed the first web-based comparative gene expression database for invertebrates that allows species-specific as well as cross-species gene expression comparisons. The database can be queried by gene name, developmental stage and/or expression domains. Conclusions This database provides a unique tool for the Evo-Devo research community that allows the retrieval, analysis and comparison of gene expression patterns within or among species. In addition, this database enables a quick identification of putative syn-expression groups that can be used to initiate, among other things, gene regulatory network (GRN) projects. PMID:21861937

  19. Differential placental gene expression in severe preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Sitras, V; Paulssen, R H; Grønaas, H; Leirvik, J; Hanssen, T A; Vårtun, A; Acharya, G

    2009-05-01

    We investigated the global placental gene expression profile in severe preeclampsia. Twenty-one women were randomly selected from 50 participants with uncomplicated pregnancies to match 21 patients with severe preeclampsia. A 30K Human Genome Survey Microarray v.2.0 (Applied Biosystems) was used to evaluate the gene expression profile. After RNA isolation, five preeclamptic placentas were excluded due to poor RNA quality. The series composed of 37 hybridizations in a one-channel detection system of chemiluminescence emitted by the microarrays. An empirical Bayes analysis was applied to find differentially expressed genes. In preeclamptic placentas 213 genes were significantly (fold-change>or=2 and pexpressed genes were associated with Alzheimer disease, angiogenesis, Notch-, TGFbeta- and VEGF-signalling pathways. Sixteen genes best discriminated preeclamptic from normal placentas. Comparison between early- (<34 weeks) and late-onset preeclampsia showed 168 differentially expressed genes with oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelin signalling pathways mainly involved in early-onset disease. Validation of the microarray results was performed by RT-PCR, quantitative urine hCG measurement and placental histopathologic examination. In summary, placental gene expression is altered in preeclampsia and we provide a comprehensive list of the differentially expressed genes. Placental gene expression is different between early- and late-onset preeclampsia, suggesting differences in pathophysiology. PMID:19249095

  20. Nucleosome repositioning underlies dynamic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Nocetti, Nicolas; Whitehouse, Iestyn

    2016-03-15

    Nucleosome repositioning at gene promoters is a fundamental aspect of the regulation of gene expression. However, the extent to which nucleosome repositioning is used within eukaryotic genomes is poorly understood. Here we report a comprehensive analysis of nucleosome positions as budding yeast transit through an ultradian cycle in which expression of >50% of all genes is highly synchronized. We present evidence of extensive nucleosome repositioning at thousands of gene promoters as genes are activated and repressed. During activation, nucleosomes are relocated to allow sites of general transcription factor binding and transcription initiation to become accessible. The extent of nucleosome shifting is closely related to the dynamic range of gene transcription and generally related to DNA sequence properties and use of the coactivators TFIID or SAGA. However, dynamic gene expression is not limited to SAGA-regulated promoters and is an inherent feature of most genes. While nucleosome repositioning occurs pervasively, we found that a class of genes required for growth experience acute nucleosome shifting as cells enter the cell cycle. Significantly, our data identify that the ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzyme Snf2 plays a fundamental role in nucleosome repositioning and the expression of growth genes. We also reveal that nucleosome organization changes extensively in concert with phases of the cell cycle, with large, regularly spaced nucleosome arrays being established in mitosis. Collectively, our data and analysis provide a framework for understanding nucleosome dynamics in relation to fundamental DNA-dependent transactions. PMID:26966245

  1. Gene expression profiling of flag leaves at the booting stage in the japonica hybrid rice Huayou14 and its parental lines by microarray.

    PubMed

    Huangwei, Chu; Fuan, Niu; Can, Cheng; Jihua, Zhou; Xinqi, Wang; Xiaojin, Luo; Qin, Yuan; Liming, Cao

    2015-09-01

    Gene expression profiling using microarray has contributed significantly to heterosis studies. Using the Affymetrix rice genome array, we investigated gene expression profiles in the flag leaves of the japonica hybrid rice Huayou14 and its parental cultivars Shen9A and Fan14 at the booting stage. A total of 2057 genes differentially expressed (fold change ≥2 or ≤0.5) between Huayou14 and its parents were identified. Functional classification of the differentially expressed genes by Gene Ontology (GO) analysis indicated the differentially expressed genes were significantly enriched in photosynthesis-related cellular component categories (e.g. photosystem Ⅰ, chloroplast membrane and chloroplast envelope), and biological process categories (e.g. chlorophyll catabolic, chlorophyll biosynthetic and carotenoid biosynthetic processes). These results suggest that the changes in the photosynthetic ability of the japonica hybrid rice Huayou14 may be related to heterosis. Metabolic pathway analysis indicated that differentially expressed genes were significantly enriched in photosynthesis-antenna proteins and starch and sucrose metabolic pathways, instead of photosynthesis and carbon fixation pathways as reported previously. These results suggest that different genes or metabolic pathways might contribute to the heterosis of different hybrid combinations. PMID:26399533

  2. Transcriptional regulation of secretin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Nishitani, J; Rindi, G; Lopez, M J; Upchurch, B H; Leiter, A B

    1995-01-01

    Expression of the gene encoding the hormone secretin is restricted to a specific enteroendocrine cell type and to beta-cells in developing pancreatic islets. To characterize regulatory elements in the secretin gene responsible for its expression in secretin-producing cells, we used a series of reporter genes for transient expression assays in transfection studies carried out in secretin-producing islet cell lines. Analysis of the transcriptional activity of deletion mutants identified a positive cis regulatory domain between 174 and 53 base pairs upstream from the transcriptional initiation site which was required for secretin gene expression in secretin-producing HIT insulinoma cells. Within this enhancer were sequences resembling two binding sites for the transcription factor Sp1, as well as a consensus sequence for binding to helix-loop-helix proteins. Analysis of these three elements by site-directed mutagenesis suggests that each is important for full transcriptional activity. The role of proximal enhancer sequences in directing secretin gene expression to appropriate tissues is further supported by studies in transgenic mice revealing that 1.6 kilobases of the secretin gene 5' flanking sequence were sufficient to direct the expression of either human growth hormone or simian virus 40 large T-antigen reporter genes to all major secretin-producing tissues. PMID:8774991

  3. Secondary metabolite gene expression and interplay of bacterial functions in a tropical freshwater cyanobacterial bloom

    PubMed Central

    Penn, Kevin; Wang, Jia; Fernando, Samodha C; Thompson, Janelle R

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (cyanoHABs) appear to be increasing in frequency on a global scale. The Cyanobacteria in blooms can produce toxic secondary metabolites that make freshwater dangerous for drinking and recreation. To characterize microbial activities in a cyanoHAB, transcripts from a eutrophic freshwater reservoir in Singapore were sequenced for six samples collected over one day-night period. Transcripts from the Cyanobacterium Microcystis dominated all samples and were accompanied by at least 533 genera primarily from the Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria. Within the Microcystis population, abundant transcripts were from genes for buoyancy, photosynthesis and synthesis of the toxin microviridin, suggesting that these are necessary for competitive dominance in the Reservoir. During the day, Microcystis transcripts were enriched in photosynthesis and energy metabolism while at night enriched pathways included DNA replication and repair and toxin biosynthesis. Microcystis was the dominant source of transcripts from polyketide and non-ribosomal peptide synthase (PKS and NRPS, respectively) gene clusters. Unexpectedly, expression of all PKS/NRPS gene clusters, including for the toxins microcystin and aeruginosin, occurred throughout the day-night cycle. The most highly expressed PKS/NRPS gene cluster from Microcystis is not associated with any known product. The four most abundant phyla in the reservoir were enriched in different functions, including photosynthesis (Cyanobacteria), breakdown of complex organic molecules (Proteobacteria), glycan metabolism (Bacteroidetes) and breakdown of plant carbohydrates, such as cellobiose (Actinobacteria). These results provide the first estimate of secondary metabolite gene expression, functional partitioning and functional interplay in a freshwater cyanoHAB. PMID:24646695

  4. Secondary metabolite gene expression and interplay of bacterial functions in a tropical freshwater cyanobacterial bloom.

    PubMed

    Penn, Kevin; Wang, Jia; Fernando, Samodha C; Thompson, Janelle R

    2014-09-01

    Cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (cyanoHABs) appear to be increasing in frequency on a global scale. The Cyanobacteria in blooms can produce toxic secondary metabolites that make freshwater dangerous for drinking and recreation. To characterize microbial activities in a cyanoHAB, transcripts from a eutrophic freshwater reservoir in Singapore were sequenced for six samples collected over one day-night period. Transcripts from the Cyanobacterium Microcystis dominated all samples and were accompanied by at least 533 genera primarily from the Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria. Within the Microcystis population, abundant transcripts were from genes for buoyancy, photosynthesis and synthesis of the toxin microviridin, suggesting that these are necessary for competitive dominance in the Reservoir. During the day, Microcystis transcripts were enriched in photosynthesis and energy metabolism while at night enriched pathways included DNA replication and repair and toxin biosynthesis. Microcystis was the dominant source of transcripts from polyketide and non-ribosomal peptide synthase (PKS and NRPS, respectively) gene clusters. Unexpectedly, expression of all PKS/NRPS gene clusters, including for the toxins microcystin and aeruginosin, occurred throughout the day-night cycle. The most highly expressed PKS/NRPS gene cluster from Microcystis is not associated with any known product. The four most abundant phyla in the reservoir were enriched in different functions, including photosynthesis (Cyanobacteria), breakdown of complex organic molecules (Proteobacteria), glycan metabolism (Bacteroidetes) and breakdown of plant carbohydrates, such as cellobiose (Actinobacteria). These results provide the first estimate of secondary metabolite gene expression, functional partitioning and functional interplay in a freshwater cyanoHAB. PMID:24646695

  5. Sexual differences of imprinted genes' expression levels.

    PubMed

    Faisal, Mohammad; Kim, Hana; Kim, Joomyeong

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, genomic imprinting has evolved as a dosage-controlling mechanism for a subset of genes that play critical roles in their unusual reproduction scheme involving viviparity and placentation. As such, many imprinted genes are highly expressed in sex-specific reproductive organs. In the current study, we sought to test whether imprinted genes are differentially expressed between the two sexes. According to the results, the expression levels of the following genes differ between the two sexes of mice: Peg3, Zim1, Igf2, H19 and Zac1. The expression levels of these imprinted genes are usually greater in males than in females. This bias is most obvious in the developing brains of 14.5-dpc embryos, but also detected in the brains of postnatal-stage mice. However, this sexual bias is not obvious in 10.5-dpc embryos, a developmental stage before the sexual differentiation. Thus, the sexual bias observed in the imprinted genes is most likely attributable by gonadal hormones rather than by sex chromosome complement. Overall, the results indicate that several imprinted genes are sexually different in terms of their expression levels, and further suggest that the transcriptional regulation of these imprinted genes may be influenced by unknown mechanisms associated with sexual differentiation. PMID:24125951

  6. High expression hampers horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Park, Chungoo; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2012-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), the movement of genetic material from one species to another, is a common phenomenon in prokaryotic evolution. Although the rate of HGT is known to vary among genes, our understanding of the cause of this variation, currently summarized by two rules, is far from complete. The first rule states that informational genes, which are involved in DNA replication, transcription, and translation, have lower transferabilities than operational genes. The second rule asserts that protein interactivity negatively impacts gene transferability. Here, we hypothesize that high expression hampers HGT, because the fitness cost of an HGT to the recipient, arising from the 1) energy expenditure in transcription and translation, 2) cytotoxic protein misfolding, 3) reduction in cellular translational efficiency, 4) detrimental protein misinteraction, and 5) disturbance of the optimal protein concentration or cell physiology, increases with the expression level of the transferred gene. To test this hypothesis, we examined laboratory and natural HGTs to Escherichia coli. We observed lower transferabilities of more highly expressed genes, even after controlling the confounding factors from the two established rules and the genic GC content. Furthermore, expression level predicts gene transferability better than all other factors examined. We also confirmed the significant negative impact of gene expression on the rate of HGTs to 127 of 133 genomes of eubacteria and archaebacteria. Together, these findings establish the gene expression level as a major determinant of horizontal gene transferability. They also suggest that most successful HGTs are initially slightly deleterious, fixed because of their negligibly low costs rather than high benefits to the recipient. PMID:22436996

  7. Gene expression in periodontal tissues following treatment

    PubMed Central

    Beikler, Thomas; Peters, Ulrike; Prior, Karola; Eisenacher, Martin; Flemmig, Thomas F

    2008-01-01

    Background In periodontitis, treatment aimed at controlling the periodontal biofilm infection results in a resolution of the clinical and histological signs of inflammation. Although the cell types found in periodontal tissues following treatment have been well described, information on gene expression is limited to few candidate genes. Therefore, the aim of the study was to determine the expression profiles of immune and inflammatory genes in periodontal tissues from sites with severe chronic periodontitis following periodontal therapy in order to identify genes involved in tissue homeostasis. Gingival biopsies from 12 patients with severe chronic periodontitis were taken six to eight weeks following non-surgical periodontal therapy, and from 11 healthy controls. As internal standard, RNA of an immortalized human keratinocyte line (HaCaT) was used. Total RNA was subjected to gene expression profiling using a commercially available microarray system focusing on inflammation-related genes. Post-hoc confirmation of selected genes was done by Realtime-PCR. Results Out of the 136 genes analyzed, the 5% most strongly expressed genes compared to healthy controls were Interleukin-12A (IL-12A), Versican (CSPG-2), Matrixmetalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), Down syndrome critical region protein-1 (DSCR-1), Macrophage inflammatory protein-2β (Cxcl-3), Inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1 (BIRC-1), Cluster of differentiation antigen 38 (CD38), Regulator of G-protein signalling-1 (RGS-1), and Finkel-Biskis-Jinkins murine osteosarcoma virus oncogene (C-FOS); the 5% least strongly expressed genes were Receptor-interacting Serine/Threonine Kinase-2 (RIP-2), Complement component 3 (C3), Prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase-2 (COX-2), Interleukin-8 (IL-8), Endothelin-1 (EDN-1), Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-2 (PAI-2), Matrix-metalloproteinase-14 (MMP-14), and Interferon regulating factor-7 (IRF-7). Conclusion Gene expression profiles found in periodontal tissues following therapy

  8. Gene expression homeostasis and chromosome architecture

    PubMed Central

    Seshasayee, Aswin Sai Narain

    2014-01-01

    In rapidly growing populations of bacterial cells, including those of the model organism Escherichia coli, genes essential for growth - such as those involved in protein synthesis - are expressed at high levels; this is in contrast to many horizontally-acquired genes, which are maintained at low transcriptional levels.1 This balance in gene expression states between 2 distinct classes of genes is established by a galaxy of transcriptional regulators, including the so-called nucleoid associated proteins (NAP) that contribute to shaping the chromosome.2 Besides these active players in gene regulation, it is not too far-fetched to anticipate that genome organization in terms of how genes are arranged on the chromosome,3 which is the result of long-drawn transactions among genome rearrangement processes and selection, and the manner in which it is structured inside the cell, plays a role in establishing this balance. A recent study from our group has contributed to the literature investigating the interplay between global transcriptional regulators and genome organization in establishing gene expression homeostasis.4 In particular, we address a triangle of functional interactions among genome organization, gene expression homeostasis and horizontal gene transfer. PMID:25997086

  9. Candidate reference genes for gene expression studies in water lily.

    PubMed

    Luo, Huolin; Chen, Sumei; Wan, Hongjian; Chen, Fadi; Gu, Chunsun; Liu, Zhaolei

    2010-09-01

    The selection of an appropriate reference gene(s) is a prerequisite for the proper interpretation of quantitative Real-Time polymerase chain reaction data. We report the evaluation of eight candidate reference genes across various tissues and treatments in the water lily by the two software packages geNorm and NormFinder. Across all samples, clathrin adaptor complexes medium subunit (AP47) and actin 11 (ACT11) emerged as the most suitable reference genes. Across different tissues, ACT11 and elongation factor 1-alpha (EF1alpha) exhibited a stable expression pattern. ACT11 and AP47 also stably expressed in roots subjected to various treatments, but in the leaves of the same plants the most stably expressed genes were ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 16 (UBC16) and ACT11. PMID:20452325

  10. Dynamic modeling of gene expression data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holter, N. S.; Maritan, A.; Cieplak, M.; Fedoroff, N. V.; Banavar, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    We describe the time evolution of gene expression levels by using a time translational matrix to predict future expression levels of genes based on their expression levels at some initial time. We deduce the time translational matrix for previously published DNA microarray gene expression data sets by modeling them within a linear framework by using the characteristic modes obtained by singular value decomposition. The resulting time translation matrix provides a measure of the relationships among the modes and governs their time evolution. We show that a truncated matrix linking just a few modes is a good approximation of the full time translation matrix. This finding suggests that the number of essential connections among the genes is small.

  11. Dynamic modeling of gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    Holter, Neal S.; Maritan, Amos; Cieplak, Marek; Fedoroff, Nina V.; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    2001-01-01

    We describe the time evolution of gene expression levels by using a time translational matrix to predict future expression levels of genes based on their expression levels at some initial time. We deduce the time translational matrix for previously published DNA microarray gene expression data sets by modeling them within a linear framework by using the characteristic modes obtained by singular value decomposition. The resulting time translation matrix provides a measure of the relationships among the modes and governs their time evolution. We show that a truncated matrix linking just a few modes is a good approximation of the full time translation matrix. This finding suggests that the number of essential connections among the genes is small. PMID:11172013

  12. Nucleosomal promoter variation generates gene expression noise

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Christopher R.; Boeger, Hinrich

    2014-01-01

    Gene product molecule numbers fluctuate over time and between cells, confounding deterministic expectations. The molecular origins of this noise of gene expression remain unknown. Recent EM analysis of single PHO5 gene molecules of yeast indicated that promoter molecules stochastically assume alternative nucleosome configurations at steady state, including the fully nucleosomal and nucleosome-free configuration. Given that distinct configurations are unequally conducive to transcription, the nucleosomal variation of promoter molecules may constitute a source of gene expression noise. This notion, however, implies an untested conjecture, namely that the nucleosomal variation arises de novo or intrinsically (i.e., that it cannot be explained as the result of the promoter’s deterministic response to variation in its molecular surroundings). Here, we show—by microscopically analyzing the nucleosome configurations of two juxtaposed physically linked PHO5 promoter copies—that the configurational variation, indeed, is intrinsically stochastic and thus, a cause of gene expression noise rather than its effect. PMID:25468975

  13. Selenite transiently represses transcription of photosynthesis-related genes in potato leaves.

    PubMed

    Poggi, Valeria; Del Vescovo, Valerio; Di Sanza, Claudio; Negri, Rodolfo; Hochkoeppler, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    A striking response of potato leaves to aspersion with selenite was observed at the transcriptional level by means of cDNA microarrays analysis. This response is characterized by a general transient repression of genes coding for components of photosynthetic systems and of other light-regulated genes. In particular, maximal repression was observed 8 h after selenite aspersion, while 24 h after the treatment a complete recovery of normal transcriptional levels was detected. Another general feature of the transcriptional response to selenite is represented by the transcriptional induction of genes related to amino acid metabolism, and to stress defense; interestingly, two genes coding for glutathione S-transferases were found early-induced upon selenite treatment. PMID:17846914

  14. Amino acid regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Fafournoux, P; Bruhat, A; Jousse, C

    2000-01-01

    The impact of nutrients on gene expression in mammals has become an important area of research. Nevertheless, the current understanding of the amino acid-dependent control of gene expression is limited. Because amino acids have multiple and important functions, their homoeostasis has to be finely maintained. However, amino-acidaemia can be affected by certain nutritional conditions or various forms of stress. It follows that mammals have to adjust several of their physiological functions involved in the adaptation to amino acid availability by regulating the expression of numerous genes. The aim of the present review is to examine the role of amino acids in regulating mammalian gene expression and protein turnover. It has been reported that some genes involved in the control of growth or amino acid metabolism are regulated by amino acid availability. For instance, limitation of several amino acids greatly increases the expression of the genes encoding insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1, CHOP (C/EBP homologous protein, where C/EBP is CCAAT/enhancer binding protein) and asparagine synthetase. Elevated mRNA levels result from both an increase in the rate of transcription and an increase in mRNA stability. Several observations suggest that the amino acid regulation of gene expression observed in mammalian cells and the general control process described in yeast share common features. Moreover, amino acid response elements have been characterized in the promoters of the CHOP and asparagine synthetase genes. Taken together, the results discussed in the present review demonstrate that amino acids, by themselves, can, in concert with hormones, play an important role in the control of gene expression. PMID:10998343

  15. Efficient ectopic gene expression targeting chick mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Oberg, Kerby C; Pira, Charmaine U; Revelli, Jean-Pierre; Ratz, Beate; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo; Eichele, Gregor

    2002-07-01

    The chick model has been instrumental in illuminating genes that regulate early vertebrate development and pattern formation. Targeted ectopic gene expression is critical to dissect further the complicated gene interactions that are involved. In an effort to develop a consistent method to ectopically introduce and focally express genes in chick mesoderm, we evaluated and optimized several gene delivery methods, including implantation of 293 cells laden with viral vectors, direct adenoviral injection, and electroporation (EP). We targeted the mesoderm of chick wing buds between stages 19 and 21 (Hamburger and Hamilton stages) and used beta-galactosidase and green fluorescent protein (GFP) to document gene transfer. Expression constructs using the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter, the beta-actin promoter, and vectors with an internal ribosomal entry sequence linked to GFP (IRES-GFP) were also compared. After gene transfer, we monitored expression for up to 3 days. The functionality of ectopic expression was demonstrated with constructs containing the coding sequences for Shh, a secreted signaling protein, or Hoxb-8, a transcription factor, both of which can induce digit duplication when ectopically expressed in anterior limb mesoderm. We identified several factors that enhance mesodermal gene transfer. First, the use of a vector with the beta-actin promoter coupled to the 69% fragment of the bovine papilloma virus yielded superior mesodermal expression both by markers and functional results when compared with several CMV-driven vectors. Second, we found the use of mineral oil to be an important adjuvant for EP and direct viral injection to localize and contain vector within the mesoderm at the injection site. Lastly, although ectopic expression could be achieved with all three methods, we favored EP confined to the mesoderm with insulated microelectrodes (confined microelectroporation- CMEP), because vector construction is rapid, the method is efficient, and results

  16. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis. PMID:26393928

  17. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis. PMID:26393928

  18. A Novel, Photosynthesis-Associated Thioredoxin-Like Gene: Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, Jackie, L

    2005-09-13

    Many aspects of the biosynthesis and physiological regulation of the photosynthetic apparatus of plants, algae and cyanobacteria remain to be understood, and are likely to involve yet-unidentified proteins that carry out oxidation/reduction (redox) reactions. TxlA from Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 and its homologues from other cyanobacteria and plants, including Sll1980 from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803, are likely to be among these proteins. In fact, the homologue of TxlA in the plant Arabidopsis thaliana, HCF164, may be required for synthesis of the cytochrome b6f complex that transfers electrons between the two photosynthetic reaction centers. TxlAs share an N-terminal hydrophobic domain, a central thioredoxin-like domain, and a unique C-terminal hydrophilic domain. Plant and algal TxlAs are nuclear-encoded and have an additional N-terminal domain that targets them to the chloroplast. We have found that the common N-terminal domain of TxlA anchors it to a membrane, probably the thylakoid (photosynthetic) membrane (where HCF164 is also localized, with its thioredoxin-like domain in the thylakoid lumen). We have also found that the thioredoxin-like domain is likely to assume the conformation typical of thioredoxins and possesses thioredoxin-like redox activity in vitro, and that the C-terminal domain is important to the structure and function of the thioredoxin-like domain both in vivo and in vitro. These data show that TxlAs have the cellular location and enzymatic activity expected of a protein involved in the biosynthesis of redox components or redox regulation of the photosynthetic apparatus. We were unable to inactivate the thioredoxin-like domain of TxlA in either PCC 7942 or PCC 6803, under either photosynthetic or heterotrophic growth conditions. We also found that expression of antisense txlA mRNA from an IPTG-regulated promoter in PCC 7942 was lethal, most likely because it effectively inactivated txlA by ''RNA silencing

  19. Homeobox genes expressed during echinoderm arm regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ben Khadra, Yousra; Said, Khaled; Thorndyke, Michael; Martinez, Pedro

    2014-04-01

    Regeneration in echinoderms has proved to be more amenable to study in the laboratory than the more classical vertebrate models, since the smaller genome size and the absence of multiple orthologs for different genes in echinoderms simplify the analysis of gene function during regeneration. In order to understand the role of homeobox-containing genes during arm regeneration in echinoderms, we isolated the complement of genes belonging to the Hox class that are expressed during this process in two major echinoderm groups: asteroids (Echinaster sepositus and Asterias rubens) and ophiuroids (Amphiura filiformis), both of which show an extraordinary capacity for regeneration. By exploiting the sequence conservation of the homeobox, putative orthologs of several Hox genes belonging to the anterior, medial, and posterior groups were isolated. We also report the isolation of a few Hox-like genes expressed in the same systems. PMID:24309817

  20. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose of review. This review focuses on the effect(s) of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on gene transcription as determined from data generated using cDNA microarrays. Introduced within the past decade, this methodology allows detection of the expression of thousands of genes simultaneo...

  1. Reading Genomes and Controlling Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libchaber, Albert

    2000-03-01

    Molecular recognition of DNA sequences is achieved by DNA hybridization of complementary sequences. We present various scenarios for optimization, leading to microarrays and global measurement. Gene expression can be controlled using gene constructs immobilized on a template with micron scale temperature heaters. We will discuss and present results on protein microarrays.

  2. Gene expression in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Milner, R J; Sutcliffe, J G

    1983-08-25

    191 randomly selected cDNA clones prepared from rat brain cytoplasmic poly (A)+ RNA were screened by Northern blot hybridization to rat brain, liver and kidney RNA to determine the tissue distribution, abundance and size of the corresponding brain mRNA. 18% hybridized to mRNAs each present equally in the three tissues, 26% to mRNAs differentially expressed in the tissues, and 30% to mRNAs present only in the brain. An additional 26% of the clones failed to detect mRNA in the three tissues at an abundance level of about 0.01%, but did contain rat cDNA as demonstrated by Southern blotting; this class probably represents rare mRNAs expressed in only some brain cells. Therefore, most mRNA expressed in brain is either specific to brain or otherwise displays regulation. Rarer mRNA species tend to be larger than the more abundant species, and tend to be brain specific; the rarest, specific mRNAs average 5000 nucleotides in length. Ten percent of the clones hybridize to multiple mRNAs, some of which are expressed from small multigenic families. From these data we estimate that there are probably at most 30,000 distinct mRNA species expressed in the rat brain, the majority of which are uniquely expressed in the brain. PMID:6193485

  3. Control of gene expression in trypanosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Vanhamme, L; Pays, E

    1995-01-01

    Trypanosomes are protozoan agents of major parasitic diseases such as Chagas' disease in South America and sleeping sickness of humans and nagana disease of cattle in Africa. They are transmitted to mammalian hosts by specific insect vectors. Their life cycle consists of a succession of differentiation and growth phases requiring regulated gene expression to adapt to the changing extracellular environment. Typical of such stage-specific expression is that of the major surface antigens of Trypanosoma brucei, procyclin in the procyclic (insect) form and the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) in the bloodstream (mammalian) form. In trypanosomes, the regulation of gene expression is effected mainly at posttranscriptional levels, since primary transcription of most of the genes occurs in long polycistronic units and is constitutive. The transcripts are processed by transsplicing and polyadenylation under the influence of intergenic polypyrimidine tracts. These events show some developmental regulation. Untranslated sequences of the mRNAs seem to play a prominent role in the stage-specific control of individual gene expression, through a modulation of mRNA abundance. The VSG and procyclin transcription units exhibit particular features that are probably related to the need for a high level of expression. The promoters and RNA polymerase driving the expression of these units resemble those of the ribosomal genes. Their mutually exclusive expression is ensured by controls operating at several levels, including RNA elongation. Antigenic variation in the bloodstream is achieved through DNA rearrangements or alternative activation of the telomeric VSG gene expression sites. Recent discoveries, such as the existence of a novel nucleotide in telomeric DNA and the generation of point mutations in VSG genes, have shed new light on the mechanisms and consequences of antigenic variation. PMID:7603410

  4. Application of multidisciplinary analysis to gene expression.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuefel; Kang, Huining; Fields, Chris; Cowie, Jim R.; Davidson, George S.; Haaland, David Michael; Sibirtsev, Valeriy; Mosquera-Caro, Monica P.; Xu, Yuexian; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Helman, Paul; Andries, Erik; Ar, Kerem; Potter, Jeffrey; Willman, Cheryl L.; Murphy, Maurice H.

    2004-01-01

    Molecular analysis of cancer, at the genomic level, could lead to individualized patient diagnostics and treatments. The developments to follow will signal a significant paradigm shift in the clinical management of human cancer. Despite our initial hopes, however, it seems that simple analysis of microarray data cannot elucidate clinically significant gene functions and mechanisms. Extracting biological information from microarray data requires a complicated path involving multidisciplinary teams of biomedical researchers, computer scientists, mathematicians, statisticians, and computational linguists. The integration of the diverse outputs of each team is the limiting factor in the progress to discover candidate genes and pathways associated with the molecular biology of cancer. Specifically, one must deal with sets of significant genes identified by each method and extract whatever useful information may be found by comparing these different gene lists. Here we present our experience with such comparisons, and share methods developed in the analysis of an infant leukemia cohort studied on Affymetrix HG-U95A arrays. In particular, spatial gene clustering, hyper-dimensional projections, and computational linguistics were used to compare different gene lists. In spatial gene clustering, different gene lists are grouped together and visualized on a three-dimensional expression map, where genes with similar expressions are co-located. In another approach, projections from gene expression space onto a sphere clarify how groups of genes can jointly have more predictive power than groups of individually selected genes. Finally, online literature is automatically rearranged to present information about genes common to multiple groups, or to contrast the differences between the lists. The combination of these methods has improved our understanding of infant leukemia. While the complicated reality of the biology dashed our initial, optimistic hopes for simple answers from

  5. Phytochrome-regulated Gene Expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identification of all genes involved in the phytochrome (phy)-mediated responses of plants to their light environment is an important goal in providing an overall understanding of light-regulated growth and development. This article highlights and integrates the central findings of two recent compre...

  6. Expression profiles of sugarcane under drought conditions: Variation in gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Júlio César Farias; Terto, Jackeline; Silva, José Vieira; Almeida, Cícero

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Drought is a major factor in decreased sugarcane productivity because of the resulting morphophysiological effects that it causes. Gene expression studies that have examined the influence of water stress in sugarcane have yielded divergent results, indicating the absence of a fixed pattern of changes in gene expression. In this work, we investigated the expression profiles of 12 genes in the leaves of a drought-tolerant genotype (RB72910) of sugarcane and compared the results with those of other studies. The genotype was subjected to 80–100% water availability (control condition) and 0–20% water availability (simulated drought). To analyze the physiological status, the SPAD index, Fv/Fm ratio, net photosynthesis (A), stomatal conductance (g s) and stomatal transpiration (E) were measured. Total RNA was extracted from leaves and the expression of SAMDC, ZmPIP2-1 protein, ZmTIP4-2 protein, WIP protein, LTP protein, histone H3, DNAj, ferredoxin I, β-tubulin, photosystem I, gene 1 and gene 2 was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Important differences in the expression profiles of these genes were observed when compared with other genotypes, suggesting that complex defense mechanisms are activated in response to water stress. However, there was no recognizable pattern for the changes in expression of the different proteins associated with tolerance to drought stress. PMID:26537606

  7. Regulation of immunoglobulin gene rearrangement and expression.

    PubMed

    Taussig, M J; Sims, M J; Krawinkel, U

    1989-05-01

    The molecular genetic events leading to Ig expression and their control formed the topic of a recent EMBO workshop. This report by Michael Taussig, Martin Sims and Ulrich Krawinkel discusses contributions dealing with genes expressed in early pre-B cells, the mechanism of rearrangement, aberrant rearrangements seen in B cells of SCID mice, the feedback control of rearrangement as studied in transgenic mice, the control of Ig expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, and class switching. PMID:2787158

  8. Heterelogous Expression of Plant Genes

    PubMed Central

    Yesilirmak, Filiz; Sayers, Zehra

    2009-01-01

    Heterologous expression allows the production of plant proteins in an organism which is simpler than the natural source. This technology is widely used for large-scale purification of plant proteins from microorganisms for biochemical and biophysical analyses. Additionally expression in well-defined model organisms provides insights into the functions of proteins in complex pathways. The present review gives an overview of recombinant plant protein production methods using bacteria, yeast, insect cells, and Xenopus laevis oocytes and discusses the advantages of each system for functional studies and protein characterization. PMID:19672459

  9. Introduction to the Gene Expression Analysis.

    PubMed

    Segundo-Val, Ignacio San; Sanz-Lozano, Catalina S

    2016-01-01

    In 1941, Beadle and Tatum published experiments that would explain the basis of the central dogma of molecular biology, whereby the DNA through an intermediate molecule, called RNA, results proteins that perform the functions in cells. Currently, biomedical research attempts to explain the mechanisms by which develops a particular disease, for this reason, gene expression studies have proven to be a great resource. Strictly, the term "gene expression" comprises from the gene activation until the mature protein is located in its corresponding compartment to perform its function and contribute to the expression of the phenotype of cell.The expression studies are directed to detect and quantify messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of a specific gene. The development of the RNA-based gene expression studies began with the Northern Blot by Alwine et al. in 1977. In 1969, Gall and Pardue and John et al. independently developed the in situ hybridization, but this technique was not employed to detect mRNA until 1986 by Coghlan. Today, many of the techniques for quantification of RNA are deprecated because other new techniques provide more information. Currently the most widely used techniques are qPCR, expression microarrays, and RNAseq for the transcriptome analysis. In this chapter, these techniques will be reviewed. PMID:27300529

  10. Improving Photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Evans, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthesis is the basis of plant growth, and improving photosynthesis can contribute toward greater food security in the coming decades as world population increases. Multiple targets have been identified that could be manipulated to increase crop photosynthesis. The most important target is Rubisco because it catalyses both carboxylation and oxygenation reactions and the majority of responses of photosynthesis to light, CO2, and temperature are reflected in its kinetic properties. Oxygenase activity can be reduced either by concentrating CO2 around Rubisco or by modifying the kinetic properties of Rubisco. The C4 photosynthetic pathway is a CO2-concentrating mechanism that generally enables C4 plants to achieve greater efficiency in their use of light, nitrogen, and water than C3 plants. To capitalize on these advantages, attempts have been made to engineer the C4 pathway into C3 rice (Oryza sativa). A simpler approach is to transfer bicarbonate transporters from cyanobacteria into chloroplasts and prevent CO2 leakage. Recent technological breakthroughs now allow higher plant Rubisco to be engineered and assembled successfully in planta. Novel amino acid sequences can be introduced that have been impossible to reach via normal evolution, potentially enlarging the range of kinetic properties and breaking free from the constraints associated with covariation that have been observed between certain kinetic parameters. Capturing the promise of improved photosynthesis in greater yield potential will require continued efforts to improve carbon allocation within the plant as well as to maintain grain quality and resistance to disease and lodging. PMID:23812345

  11. Improving photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Evans, John R

    2013-08-01

    Photosynthesis is the basis of plant growth, and improving photosynthesis can contribute toward greater food security in the coming decades as world population increases. Multiple targets have been identified that could be manipulated to increase crop photosynthesis. The most important target is Rubisco because it catalyses both carboxylation and oxygenation reactions and the majority of responses of photosynthesis to light, CO₂, and temperature are reflected in its kinetic properties. Oxygenase activity can be reduced either by concentrating CO₂ around Rubisco or by modifying the kinetic properties of Rubisco. The C₄ photosynthetic pathway is a CO₂-concentrating mechanism that generally enables C₄ plants to achieve greater efficiency in their use of light, nitrogen, and water than C₃ plants. To capitalize on these advantages, attempts have been made to engineer the C₄ pathway into C₃ rice (Oryza sativa). A simpler approach is to transfer bicarbonate transporters from cyanobacteria into chloroplasts and prevent CO₂ leakage. Recent technological breakthroughs now allow higher plant Rubisco to be engineered and assembled successfully in planta. Novel amino acid sequences can be introduced that have been impossible to reach via normal evolution, potentially enlarging the range of kinetic properties and breaking free from the constraints associated with covariation that have been observed between certain kinetic parameters. Capturing the promise of improved photosynthesis in greater yield potential will require continued efforts to improve carbon allocation within the plant as well as to maintain grain quality and resistance to disease and lodging. PMID:23812345

  12. Tracking Difference in Gene Expression in a Time-Course Experiment Using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Pui Shan; Tanaka, Michihiro; Sunaga, Yoshihiko; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Taniguchi, Takeaki; Yoshino, Tomoko; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Fujibuchi, Wataru; Aburatani, Sachiyo

    2014-01-01

    Fistulifera sp. strain JPCC DA0580 is a newly sequenced pennate diatom that is capable of simultaneously growing and accumulating lipids. This is a unique trait, not found in other related microalgae so far. It is able to accumulate between 40 to 60% of its cell weight in lipids, making it a strong candidate for the production of biofuel. To investigate this characteristic, we used RNA-Seq data gathered at four different times while Fistulifera sp. strain JPCC DA0580 was grown in oil accumulating and non-oil accumulating conditions. We then adapted gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) to investigate the relationship between the difference in gene expression of 7,822 genes and metabolic functions in our data. We utilized information in the KEGG pathway database to create the gene sets and changed GSEA to use re-sampling so that data from the different time points could be included in the analysis. Our GSEA method identified photosynthesis, lipid synthesis and amino acid synthesis related pathways as processes that play a significant role in oil production and growth in Fistulifera sp. strain JPCC DA0580. In addition to GSEA, we visualized the results by creating a network of compounds and reactions, and plotted the expression data on top of the network. This made existing graph algorithms available to us which we then used to calculate a path that metabolizes glucose into triacylglycerol (TAG) in the smallest number of steps. By visualizing the data this way, we observed a separate up-regulation of genes at different times instead of a concerted response. We also identified two metabolic paths that used less reactions than the one shown in KEGG and showed that the reactions were up-regulated during the experiment. The combination of analysis and visualization methods successfully analyzed time-course data, identified important metabolic pathways and provided new hypotheses for further research. PMID:25268590

  13. Noise minimization in eukaryotic gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, Hunter B.; Hirsh, Aaron E.; Giaever, Guri; Kumm, Jochen; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-01-15

    All organisms have elaborate mechanisms to control rates of protein production. However, protein production is also subject to stochastic fluctuations, or noise. Several recent studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli have investigated the relationship between transcription and translation rates and stochastic fluctuations in protein levels, or more generally, how such randomness is a function of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. However, the fundamental question of whether stochasticity in protein expression is generally biologically relevant has not been addressed, and it remains unknown whether random noise in the protein production rate of most genes significantly affects the fitness of any organism. We propose that organisms should be particularly sensitive to variation in the protein levels of two classes of genes: genes whose deletion is lethal to the organism and genes that encode subunits of multiprotein complexes. Using an experimentally verified model of stochastic gene expression in S. cerevisiae, we estimate the noise in protein production for nearly every yeast gene, and confirm our prediction that the production of essential and complex-forming proteins involves lower levels of noise than does the production of most other genes. Our results support the hypothesis that noise in gene expression is a biologically important variable, is generally detrimental to organismal fitness, and is subject to natural selection.

  14. Physiological performance, secondary metabolite and expression profiling of genes associated with drought tolerance in Withania somnifera.

    PubMed

    Sanchita; Singh, Ruchi; Mishra, Anand; Dhawan, Sunita S; Shirke, Pramod A; Gupta, Madan M; Sharma, Ashok

    2015-11-01

    Physiological, biochemical, and gene expression responses under drought stress were studied in Withania somnifera. Photosynthesis rate, stomatal conductance, transpiration rate, relative water content, chlorophyll content, and quantum yield of photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII) decreased in response to drought stress. Comparative expression of genes involved in osmoregulation, detoxification, signal transduction, metabolism, and transcription factor was analyzed through quantitative RT-PCR. The genes encoding 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CS), glutathione S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD), serine threonine-protein kinase (STK), serine threonine protein phosphatase (PSP), aldehyde dehydrogenase (AD), leucoanthocyanidin dioxygenase/anthocyanin synthase (LD/AS), HSP, MYB, and WRKY have shown upregulation in response to drought stress condition in leaf tissues. Enhanced detoxification and osmoregulation along with increased withanolides production were also observed under drought stress. The results of this study will be helpful in developing stress-tolerant and high secondary metabolite yielding genotypes. PMID:25691002

  15. Aminoglycoside uptake increased by tet gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Merlin, T L; Davis, G E; Anderson, W L; Moyzis, R K; Griffith, J K

    1989-01-01

    The expression of extrachromosomal tet genes not only confers tetracycline resistance but also increases the susceptibilities of gram-negative bacteria to commonly used aminoglycoside antibiotics. We investigated the possibility that tet expression increases aminoglycoside susceptibility by increasing bacterial uptake of aminoglycoside. Studies of [3H]gentamicin uptake in paired sets of Escherichia coli HB101 and Salmonella typhimurium LT2 expressing and not expressing tet showed that tet expression accelerates energy-dependent [3H]gentamicin uptake. Increased [3H]gentamicin uptake was accompanied by decreased bacterial protein synthesis and bacterial growth. Increased aminoglycoside uptake occurred whether tet expression was constitutive or induced, whether the tet gene was class B or C, and whether the tet gene was plasmid borne or integrated into the bacterial chromosome. tet expression produced no measurable change in membrane potential, suggesting that tet expression increases aminoglycoside uptake either by increasing the availability of specific carriers or by lowering the minimum membrane potential that is necessary for uptake. PMID:2684011

  16. Inferring differentiation pathways from gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Ivan G.; Roepcke, Stefan; Hafemeister, Christoph; Schliep, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: The regulation of proliferation and differentiation of embryonic and adult stem cells into mature cells is central to developmental biology. Gene expression measured in distinguishable developmental stages helps to elucidate underlying molecular processes. In previous work we showed that functional gene modules, which act distinctly in the course of development, can be represented by a mixture of trees. In general, the similarities in the gene expression programs of cell populations reflect the similarities in the differentiation path. Results: We propose a novel model for gene expression profiles and an unsupervised learning method to estimate developmental similarity and infer differentiation pathways. We assess the performance of our model on simulated data and compare it with favorable results to related methods. We also infer differentiation pathways and predict functional modules in gene expression data of lymphoid development. Conclusions: We demonstrate for the first time how, in principal, the incorporation of structural knowledge about the dependence structure helps to reveal differentiation pathways and potentially relevant functional gene modules from microarray datasets. Our method applies in any area of developmental biology where it is possible to obtain cells of distinguishable differentiation stages. Availability: The implementation of our method (GPL license), data and additional results are available at http://algorithmics.molgen.mpg.de/Supplements/InfDif/ Contact: filho@molgen.mpg.de, schliep@molgen.mpg.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data is available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:18586709

  17. Gene expression following acute morphine administration.

    PubMed

    Loguinov, A V; Anderson, L M; Crosby, G J; Yukhananov, R Y

    2001-08-28

    The long-term response to neurotropic drugs depends on drug-induced neuroplasticity and underlying changes in gene expression. However, alterations in neuronal gene expression can be observed even following single injection. To investigate the extent of these changes, gene expression in the medial striatum and lumbar part of the spinal cord was monitored by cDNA microarray following single injection of morphine. Using robust and resistant linear regression (MM-estimator) with simultaneous prediction confidence intervals, we detected differentially expressed genes. By combining the results with cluster analysis, we have found that a single morphine injection alters expression of two major groups of genes, for proteins involved in mitochondrial respiration and for cytoskeleton-related proteins. RNAs for these proteins were mostly downregulated both in the medial striatum and in lumbar part of the spinal cord. These transitory changes were prevented by coadministration of the opioid antagonist naloxone. Data indicate that microarray analysis by itself is useful in describing the effect of well-known substances on the nervous system and provides sufficient information to propose a potentially novel pathway mediating its activity. PMID:11526201

  18. Human AZU-1 gene, variants thereof and expressed gene products

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Bissell, Mina

    2004-06-22

    A human AZU-1 gene, mutants, variants and fragments thereof. Protein products encoded by the AZU-1 gene and homologs encoded by the variants of AZU-1 gene acting as tumor suppressors or markers of malignancy progression and tumorigenicity reversion. Identification, isolation and characterization of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes localized to a tumor suppressive locus at chromosome 10q26, highly expressed in nonmalignant and premalignant cells derived from a human breast tumor progression model. A recombinant full length protein sequences encoded by the AZU-1 gene and nucleotide sequences of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes and variant and fragments thereof. Monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies specific to AZU-1, AZU-2 encoded protein and to AZU-1, or AZU-2 encoded protein homologs.

  19. Transcriptome-wide Changes in Coral Gene Expression at Noon and Midnight Under Field Conditions.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Jones, Lupita J; Palumbi, Stephen R

    2015-06-01

    Reef-building corals experience high daily variation in their environment, food availability, and physiological activities such as calcification and photosynthesis by endosymbionts. On Ofu Island, American Samoa, we investigated day-night differences in gene expression under field conditions of changing pH, temperature, light, and oxygen. Using RNASeq techniques, we compared two replicate transcriptomes from a single coral colony of Acropora hyacinthus over six noons and five midnights. We identified 344 contigs with significant expression differences across 16,800 contigs in the transcriptome, most with small fold-changes. However, there were 21 contigs with fold-changes ranging from 10 to 141. The largest changes were in a set of transcription factors strongly associated with day-night gene regulation in other animals, including cryptochromes, thyrotroph embryonic factor, and D site-binding protein. We also found large daytime increases in a set of genes involved in glucose transport and glycogen storage. We found small expression differences in genes associated with aerobic ATP production and hypoxia response, along with slightly higher expression of most calcification genes at noon. Although >40-fold-changes in expression occur in important transcription factors, downstream gene regulation seems very stable in corals from day to night compared to other animals studied. PMID:26124449

  20. Alternative-splicing-mediated gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qianliang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a fundamental process during gene expression and has been found to be ubiquitous in eukaryotes. However, how AS impacts gene expression levels both quantitatively and qualitatively remains to be fully explored. Here, we analyze two common models of gene expression, each incorporating a simple splice mechanism that a pre-mRNA is spliced into two mature mRNA isoforms in a probabilistic manner. In the constitutive expression case, we show that the steady-state molecular numbers of two mature mRNA isoforms follow mutually independent Poisson distributions. In the bursting expression case, we demonstrate that the tail decay of the steady-state distribution for both mature mRNA isoforms that in general are not mutually independent can be characterized by the product of mean burst size and splicing probability. In both cases, we find that AS can efficiently modulate both the variability (measured by variance) and the noise level of the total mature mRNA, and in particular, the latter is always lower than the noise level of the pre-mRNA, implying that AS always reduces the noise. These results altogether reveal that AS is a mechanism of efficiently controlling the gene expression noise.

  1. Differentially expressed genes of Chenopodium amaranticolor in response to cymbidium mosaic virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su Min; Baek, Eseul; Ryu, Ki Hyun; Choi, Sun Hee

    2016-09-01

    Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV)-induced expressed sequence tag (EST) clones from Chenopodium amaranticolor were identified. CymMV was mechanically inoculated onto C. amaranticolor, and local lesion symptoms were observed. Inoculated leaves were collected on serial days post inoculation (dpi) to identify activated or suppressed genes. mRNA isolation and suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) were then performed to identify differentially expressed genes related to the local lesion response. Fifty-three ESTs, including genes related to defense and stress responses (e.g., lipoxygenase, jasmonate-induced protein, and heat shock protein), were generated. In addition, a large proportion of the ESTs were found to be involved in photosynthesis, as determined by their functional categories. Expression levels of several EST genes were observed using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and the evaluated genes showed varying levels of expression during the experimental period. In this study, differentially expressed sequences via SSH were identified from CymMV-infected C. amaranticolor, and profiling and annotation were carried out to determine the expression pattern of CymMV and its interaction with C. amaranticolor. PMID:27364083

  2. Analysis of gene expression patterns and levels in maize hybrids and their parents.

    PubMed

    Nie, H S; Li, S P; Shan, X H; Wu, Y; Su, S Z; Liu, H K; Han, J Y; Yuan, Y P

    2015-01-01

    Heterosis has greatly contributed to conventional plant breeding and is widely used to increase crop plant productivity. However, although some studies have explored the mechanisms of heterosis at the genomic and transcriptome level, these mechanisms still remain unclear. The growth and development of maize seedlings and immature embryos have an important impact on subsequent production. This study investigated differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between parents and reciprocal hybrids in the seedling leaves, roots, and immature embryo 15 days after pollination using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP)-based transcript profiling (cDNA-AFLP). We isolated 180, 170, and 108 genes from the leaves, roots, and immature embryos, respectively, that were differentially expressed between hybrids and parents. Sequencing and functional analysis revealed that 107 transcript-derived fragments in the roots and leaves and 90 in the immature embryos were involved in known functions, whereas many DEGs had roles in plant growth and development, photosynthesis, signal transduction, and seed germination. Quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis of relative expression levels between reciprocal hybrids and both parental genotypes of selected genes produced results that were consistent with cDNA-AFLP. We validated the expression patterns of 15 selected genes related to heterosis formation and revealed that most showed non-additive expression in one or both hybrids, including dominant, underdominant, and overdominant expression. This indicates that gene-regulatory interactions among parental alleles play an important role in heterosis during the early developmental stages of maize. PMID:26634505

  3. Gene expression analysis of flax seed development

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Flax, Linum usitatissimum L., is an important crop whose seed oil and stem fiber have multiple industrial applications. Flax seeds are also well-known for their nutritional attributes, viz., omega-3 fatty acids in the oil and lignans and mucilage from the seed coat. In spite of the importance of this crop, there are few molecular resources that can be utilized toward improving seed traits. Here, we describe flax embryo and seed development and generation of comprehensive genomic resources for the flax seed. Results We describe a large-scale generation and analysis of expressed sequences in various tissues. Collectively, the 13 libraries we have used provide a broad representation of genes active in developing embryos (globular, heart, torpedo, cotyledon and mature stages) seed coats (globular and torpedo stages) and endosperm (pooled globular to torpedo stages) and genes expressed in flowers, etiolated seedlings, leaves, and stem tissue. A total of 261,272 expressed sequence tags (EST) (GenBank accessions LIBEST_026995 to LIBEST_027011) were generated. These EST libraries included transcription factor genes that are typically expressed at low levels, indicating that the depth is adequate for in silico expression analysis. Assembly of the ESTs resulted in 30,640 unigenes and 82% of these could be identified on the basis of homology to known and hypothetical genes from other plants. When compared with fully sequenced plant genomes, the flax unigenes resembled poplar and castor bean more than grape, sorghum, rice or Arabidopsis. Nearly one-fifth of these (5,152) had no homologs in sequences reported for any organism, suggesting that this category represents genes that are likely unique to flax. Digital analyses revealed gene expression dynamics for the biosynthesis of a number of important seed constituents during seed development. Conclusions We have developed a foundational database of expressed sequences and collection of plasmid clones that comprise

  4. Photosynthesis, water use, and root viability under water stress as affected by expression of SAG12-ipt controlling cytokinin synthesis in Agrostis stolonifera

    PubMed Central

    Merewitz, Emily B.; Gianfagna, Thomas; Huang, Bingru

    2011-01-01

    Water stress reduces endogenous cytokinin (CK) content and may inhibit CK production. Maintenance of endogenous CK levels by genetic transformation with ipt in leaves and roots undergoing senescence may promote stress tolerance. This study was designed to determine the physiological effects of ipt expression on immature and mature leaves and in roots for plants exposed to different levels of water stress for creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera). Plants containing the ipt gene, encoding the enzyme adenine isopentenyl phosphotransferase for CK synthesis ligated to a senescence-activated promoter (SAG12), and wild-type ‘Penncross’ (WT) were grown hydroponically in a growth chamber and exposed to water stress by weekly additions of polyethylene glycol 8000 to reduce the growing solution osmotic potential from –0.05 to –0.3, –0.5, –0.7, –1.0, and –1.4 MPa. Immature and mature leaves and roots of SAG12-ipt creeping bentgrass were evaluated for ipt expression, CK content, leaf relative water content (RWC), chlorophyll content (Chl), photochemical efficiency (FvFm), osmotic adjustment (OA), photosynthesis rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (gs), transpiration (E), water use efficiency (WUE), carbon isotope discrimination (Δ), and root viability. Expression of ipt was detected in all plant parts and a higher CK content, primarily in the form of isopentyladenine (iPa), was found in SAG12-ipt plants but not in the WT plants under water stress. Immature leaves exhibited higher iPa and OA at all treatment levels. Mature leaves of SAG12-ipt plants maintained higher OA, Pn, Chl, WUE, and Δ, whereas gs and E were relatively unaffected compared to the WT. Roots of SAG12-ipt plants had higher levels of iPa and greater root viability than the WT. The results demonstrate that expression of ipt enhanced the tolerance of creeping bentgrass to water stress, which could be attributed to the positive effects on osmotic adjustment, efficient water use, and maintaining

  5. Gene expression profiles in irradiated cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minafra, L.; Bravatà, V.; Russo, G.; Ripamonti, M.; Gilardi, M. C.

    2013-07-01

    Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying cellular response to radiation may provide new avenues to develop innovative predictive tests of radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues and to improve individual therapy. Nowadays very few studies describe molecular changes induced by hadrontherapy treatments, therefore this field has to be explored and clarified. High-throughput methodologies, such as DNA microarray, allow us to analyse mRNA expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in order to discover new genes and pathways as targets of response to hadrontherapy. Our aim is to elucidate the molecular networks involved in the sensitivity/resistance of cancer cell lines subjected to hadrontherapy treatments with a genomewide approach by using cDNA microarray technology to identify gene expression profiles and candidate genes responsible of differential cellular responses.

  6. Gene expression profiles in irradiated cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Minafra, L.; Bravatà, V.; Russo, G.; Ripamonti, M.; Gilardi, M. C.

    2013-07-26

    Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying cellular response to radiation may provide new avenues to develop innovative predictive tests of radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues and to improve individual therapy. Nowadays very few studies describe molecular changes induced by hadrontherapy treatments, therefore this field has to be explored and clarified. High-throughput methodologies, such as DNA microarray, allow us to analyse mRNA expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in order to discover new genes and pathways as targets of response to hadrontherapy. Our aim is to elucidate the molecular networks involved in the sensitivity/resistance of cancer cell lines subjected to hadrontherapy treatments with a genomewide approach by using cDNA microarray technology to identify gene expression profiles and candidate genes responsible of differential cellular responses.

  7. Coordinated regulation of photosynthesis in rice increases yield and tolerance to environmental stress

    PubMed Central

    Ambavaram, Madana M. R.; Basu, Supratim; Krishnan, Arjun; Ramegowda, Venkategowda; Batlang, Utlwang; Rahman, Lutfor; Baisakh, Niranjan; Pereira, Andy

    2014-01-01

    Plants capture solar energy and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) through photosynthesis, which is the primary component of crop yield, and needs to be increased considerably to meet the growing global demand for food. Environmental stresses, which are increasing with climate change, adversely affect photosynthetic carbon metabolism (PCM) and limit yield of cereals such as rice (Oryza sativa) that feeds half the world. To study the regulation of photosynthesis, we developed a rice gene regulatory network and identified a transcription factor HYR (HIGHER YIELD RICE) associated with PCM, which on expression in rice enhances photosynthesis under multiple environmental conditions, determining a morpho-physiological programme leading to higher grain yield under normal, drought and high-temperature stress conditions. We show HYR is a master regulator, directly activating photosynthesis genes, cascades of transcription factors and other downstream genes involved in PCM and yield stability under drought and high-temperature environmental stress conditions. PMID:25358745

  8. Method for assembling and expressing multiple genes in the nucleus of microalgae.

    PubMed

    Noor-Mohammadi, Samaneh; Pourmir, Azadeh; Johannes, Tyler W

    2014-03-01

    The green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, is a model organism used in the study of photosynthesis and biotechnological research. Despite its importance, a complete set of genetic tools has yet to be developed. Here, we report the development of a new method for constructing a multi-gene pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and integrating the assembled pathway into the nuclear genome of C. reinhardtii. To demonstrate the use of this method, we assembled and functionally expressed up to three reporter proteins (Ble, AphVIII, and GFP) simultaneously in the nucleus of C. reinhardtii. This new molecular tool should aid efforts to engineer microalgae for biofuel and biopharmaceutical production. PMID:24129955

  9. Comparative differential gene expression analysis of nucleus-encoded proteins for Rafflesia cantleyi against Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Siuk-Mun; Lee, Xin-Wei; Wan, Kiew-Lian; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2015-09-01

    Regulation of functional nucleus-encoded proteins targeting the plastidial functions was comparatively studied for a plant parasite, Rafflesia cantleyi versus a photosynthetic plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. This study involved two species of different feeding modes and different developmental stages. A total of 30 nucleus-encoded proteins were found to be differentially-regulated during two stages in the parasite; whereas 17 nucleus-encoded proteins were differentially-expressed during two developmental stages in Arabidopsis thaliana. One notable finding observed for the two plants was the identification of genes involved in the regulation of photosynthesis-related processes where these processes, as expected, seem to be present only in the autotroph.

  10. Dramatic Photosynthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlsson, Britta

    2003-01-01

    Presents a creative way to teach photosynthesis. Revolves around the growth of a lily planted and stored in the classroom. Combines the concepts of particle theory, transformation, and changes of phase and mass in a holistic approach. The six-step teaching sequence is founded on the notions of challenge, variation, and drama. (Author/NB)

  11. Reintroducing Photosynthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vila, F.; Sanz, A.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on conceptual difficulties related to photosynthesis and respiratory metabolism of a Plant Physiology course for undergraduate students that could hinder their better learning of metabolic processes. A survey of results obtained in this area during the last 10 academic years was performed, as well as a specific test, aimed to…

  12. Facilitated diffusion buffers noise in gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Schoech, Armin P.; Zabet, Nicolae Radu

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors perform facilitated diffusion (3D diffusion in the cytosol and 1D diffusion on the DNA) when binding to their target sites to regulate gene expression. Here, we investigated the influence of this binding mechanism on the noise in gene expression. Our results showed that, for biologically relevant parameters, the binding process can be represented by a two-state Markov model and that the accelerated target finding due to facilitated diffusion leads to a reduction in both the mRNA and the protein noise. PMID:25314467

  13. Clustering of High Throughput Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Pirim, Harun; Ekşioğlu, Burak; Perkins, Andy; Yüceer, Çetin

    2012-01-01

    High throughput biological data need to be processed, analyzed, and interpreted to address problems in life sciences. Bioinformatics, computational biology, and systems biology deal with biological problems using computational methods. Clustering is one of the methods used to gain insight into biological processes, particularly at the genomics level. Clearly, clustering can be used in many areas of biological data analysis. However, this paper presents a review of the current clustering algorithms designed especially for analyzing gene expression data. It is also intended to introduce one of the main problems in bioinformatics - clustering gene expression data - to the operations research community. PMID:23144527

  14. Visualizing Gene Expression In Situ

    SciTech Connect

    Burlage, R.S.

    1998-11-02

    Visualizing bacterial cells and describing their responses to the environment are difficult tasks. Their small size is the chief reason for the difficulty, which means that we must often use many millions of cells in a sample in order to determine what the average response of the bacteria is. However, an average response can sometimes mask important events in bacterial physiology, which means that our understanding of these organisms will suffer. We have used a variety of instruments to visualize bacterial cells, all of which tell us something different about the sample. We use a fluorescence activated cell sorter to sort cells based on the fluorescence provided by bioreporter genes, and these can be used to select for particular genetic mutations. Cells can be visualized by epifluorescent microscopy, and sensitive photodetectors can be added that allow us to find a single bacterial cell that is fluorescent or bioluminescent. We have also used standard photomultipliers to examine cell aggregates as field bioreporter microorganisms. Examples of each of these instruments show how our understanding of bacterial physiology has changed with the technology.

  15. Co-expression analysis reveals a group of genes potentially involved in regulation of plant response to iron-deficiency.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Wang, Lei; Yang, Zhi Min

    2015-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential element for plant growth and development. Iron deficiency results in abnormal metabolisms from respiration to photosynthesis. Exploration of Fe-deficient responsive genes and their networks is critically important to understand molecular mechanisms leading to the plant adaptation to soil Fe-limitation. Co-expression genes are a cluster of genes that have a similar expression pattern to execute relatively biological functions at a stage of development or under a certain environmental condition. They may share a common regulatory mechanism. In this study, we investigated Fe-starved-related co-expression genes from Arabidopsis. From the biological process GO annotation of TAIR (The Arabidopsis Information Resource), 180 iron-deficient responsive genes were detected. Using ATTED-II database, we generated six gene co-expression networks. Among these, two modules of PYE and IRT1 were successfully constructed. There are 30 co-expression genes that are incorporated in the two modules (12 in PYE-module and 18 in IRT1-module). Sixteen of the co-expression genes were well characterized. The remaining genes (14) are poorly or not functionally identified with iron stress. Validation of the 14 genes using real-time PCR showed differential expression under iron-deficiency. Most of the co-expression genes (23/30) could be validated in pye and fit mutant plants with iron-deficiency. We further identified iron-responsive cis-elements upstream of the co-expression genes and found that 22 out of 30 genes contain the iron-responsive motif IDE1. Furthermore, some auxin and ethylene-responsive elements were detected in the promoters of the co-expression genes. These results suggest that some of the genes can be also involved in iron stress response through the phytohormone-responsive pathways. PMID:25300251

  16. Sequence and gene expression evolution of paralogous genes in willows.

    PubMed

    Harikrishnan, Srilakshmy L; Pucholt, Pascal; Berlin, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Whole genome duplications (WGD) have had strong impacts on species diversification by triggering evolutionary novelties, however, relatively little is known about the balance between gene loss and forces involved in the retention of duplicated genes originating from a WGD. We analyzed putative Salicoid duplicates in willows, originating from the Salicoid WGD, which took place more than 45 Mya. Contigs were constructed by de novo assembly of RNA-seq data derived from leaves and roots from two genotypes. Among the 48,508 contigs, 3,778 pairs were, based on fourfold synonymous third-codon transversion rates and syntenic positions, predicted to be Salicoid duplicates. Both copies were in most cases expressed in both tissues and 74% were significantly differentially expressed. Mean Ka/Ks was 0.23, suggesting that the Salicoid duplicates are evolving by purifying selection. Gene Ontology enrichment analyses showed that functions related to DNA- and nucleic acid binding were over-represented among the non-differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates, while functions related to biosynthesis and metabolism were over-represented among the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates. We propose that the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates are regulatory neo- and/or subfunctionalized, while the non-differentially expressed are dose sensitive, hence, functionally conserved. Multiple evolutionary processes, thus drive the retention of Salicoid duplicates in willows. PMID:26689951

  17. Sequence and gene expression evolution of paralogous genes in willows

    PubMed Central

    Harikrishnan, Srilakshmy L.; Pucholt, Pascal; Berlin, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Whole genome duplications (WGD) have had strong impacts on species diversification by triggering evolutionary novelties, however, relatively little is known about the balance between gene loss and forces involved in the retention of duplicated genes originating from a WGD. We analyzed putative Salicoid duplicates in willows, originating from the Salicoid WGD, which took place more than 45 Mya. Contigs were constructed by de novo assembly of RNA-seq data derived from leaves and roots from two genotypes. Among the 48,508 contigs, 3,778 pairs were, based on fourfold synonymous third-codon transversion rates and syntenic positions, predicted to be Salicoid duplicates. Both copies were in most cases expressed in both tissues and 74% were significantly differentially expressed. Mean Ka/Ks was 0.23, suggesting that the Salicoid duplicates are evolving by purifying selection. Gene Ontology enrichment analyses showed that functions related to DNA- and nucleic acid binding were over-represented among the non-differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates, while functions related to biosynthesis and metabolism were over-represented among the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates. We propose that the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates are regulatory neo- and/or subfunctionalized, while the non-differentially expressed are dose sensitive, hence, functionally conserved. Multiple evolutionary processes, thus drive the retention of Salicoid duplicates in willows. PMID:26689951

  18. Transgenic control of perforin gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenheld, M.G.; Podack, E.R.; Levy, R.B.

    1995-03-01

    Perforin is a pore-forming effector molecule of CTL and NK cells. To characterize perforin gene expression and its transcriptional control mechanisms in vivo, expression of a cell surface tag, i.e., human CD4, was driven by 5.1 kb of the murin perforin 5{prime} flanking and promoter region in transgenic mice. Six out of seven transgenic lines expressed the perforin-tag hybrid gene at low to intermediate levels, depending on the integration site. Transgene expression occurred in all cells that physiologically are able to express perforin. At the whole organ level, significant amounts of transgenic mRNA and endogenous perforin mRNA were co-expressed in the lymphoid organs, as well as in the lung, the ileum, the oviduct/uterus, and the bone marrow. At the single cell level, the perforin tag was present on NK cells and on CD8{sup +}, as well as on CD4{sup +} cells. Also targeted were Thy-1.2{sup +} {gamma}{delta} T cells, but not Thy-1.2{sup -} {gamma}{delta} T cells, B cells, nor monocytes. During thymic T cell development, transgene expression occurred in double negative (CD4{sup -}CD8{sup -}) thymocytes and was detected at all subsequent stages, but exceeded the expression levels of the endogenous gene in the thymus. In conclusion, the analyzed perforin 5{prime} flanking and promoter region contains important cis-acting sequences that restrict perforin expression to T cells and NK cells, and therefore provides a unique tool for manipulating T cell and/or Nk cell-mediated immune responses in transgenic mice. On the other hand, the normal control of perforin gene expression involves at least one additional negative control mechanism that was not mediated by the transgenic promoter and upstream region. This control restricts perforin gene expression in thymically developing T cells and in most resting peripheral T cells, but can be released upon T cell activation. 43 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Gene expression profiling analysis of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    YIN, JI-GANG; LIU, XIAN-YING; WANG, BIN; WANG, DAN-YANG; WEI, MAN; FANG, HUA; XIANG, MEI

    2016-01-01

    As a gynecological oncology, ovarian cancer has high incidence and mortality. To study the mechanisms of ovarian cancer, the present study analyzed the GSE37582 microarray. GSE37582 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus and included data from 74 ovarian cancer cases and 47 healthy controls. The differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) were screened using linear models for microarray data package in R and were further screened for functional annotation. Next, Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analysis of the DEGs was conducted. The interaction associations of the proteins encoded by the DEGs were searched using the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes, and the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was visualized by Cytoscape. Moreover, module analysis of the PPI network was performed using the BioNet analysis tool in R. A total of 284 DEGs were screened, consisting of 145 upregulated genes and 139 downregulated genes. In particular, downregulated FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS) was an oncogene, while downregulated cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A) was a tumor suppressor gene and upregulated cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44) was classed as an ‘other’ gene. The enriched functions included collagen catabolic process, stress-activated mitogen-activated protein kinases cascade and insulin receptor signaling pathway. Meanwhile, FOS (degree, 15), CD44 (degree, 9), B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL2; degree, 7), CDKN1A (degree, 7) and matrix metallopeptidase 3 (MMP3; degree, 6) had higher connectivity degrees in the PPI network for the DEGs. These genes may be involved in ovarian cancer by interacting with other genes in the module of the PPI network (e.g., BCL2-FOS, BCL2-CDKN1A, FOS-CDKN1A, FOS-CD44, MMP3-MMP7 and MMP7-CD44). Overall, BCL2, FOS, CDKN1A, CD44, MMP3 and MMP7 may be correlated with ovarian cancer. PMID:27347159

  20. Conditional Gene Expression in Mycobacterium abscessus

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Mélanie; Singh, Anil Kumar; Gaillard, Jean-Louis; Nassif, Xavier; Herrmann, Jean-Louis

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is an emerging human pathogen responsible for lung infections, skin and soft-tissue infections and disseminated infections in immunocompromised patients. It may exist either as a smooth (S) or rough (R) morphotype, the latter being associated with increased pathogenicity in various models. Genetic tools for homologous recombination and conditional gene expression are desperately needed to allow the study of M. abscessus virulence. However, descriptions of knock-out (KO) mutants in M. abscessus are rare, with only one KO mutant from an S strain described so far. Moreover, of the three major tools developed for homologous recombination in mycobacteria, only the one based on expression of phage recombinases is working. Several conditional gene expression tools have recently been engineered for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis, but none have been tested yet in M. abscessus. Based on previous experience with genetic tools allowing homologous recombination and their failure in M. abscessus, we evaluated the potential interest of a conditional gene expression approach using a system derived from the two repressors system, TetR/PipOFF. After several steps necessary to adapt TetR/PipOFF for M. abscessus, we have shown the efficiency of this system for conditional expression of an essential mycobacterial gene, fadD32. Inhibition of fadD32 was demonstrated for both the S and R isotypes, with marginally better efficiency for the R isotype. Conditional gene expression using the dedicated TetR/PipOFF system vectors developed here is effective in S and R M. abscessus, and may constitute an interesting approach for future genetic studies in this pathogen. PMID:22195042

  1. Extensive Differences in Gene Expression Between Symbiotic and Aposymbiotic Cnidarians

    PubMed Central

    Lehnert, Erik M.; Mouchka, Morgan E.; Burriesci, Matthew S.; Gallo, Natalya D.; Schwarz, Jodi A.; Pringle, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Coral reefs provide habitats for a disproportionate number of marine species relative to the small area of the oceans that they occupy. The mutualism between the cnidarian animal hosts and their intracellular dinoflagellate symbionts provides the nutritional foundation for coral growth and formation of reef structures, because algal photosynthesis can provide >90% of the total energy of the host. Disruption of this symbiosis (“coral bleaching”) is occurring on a large scale due primarily to anthropogenic factors and poses a major threat to the future of coral reefs. Despite the importance of this symbiosis, the cellular mechanisms involved in its establishment, maintenance, and breakdown remain largely unknown. We report our continued development of genomic tools to study these mechanisms in Aiptasia, a small sea anemone with great promise as a model system for studies of cnidarian–dinoflagellate symbiosis. Specifically, we have generated de novo assemblies of the transcriptomes of both a clonal line of symbiotic anemones and their endogenous dinoflagellate symbionts. We then compared transcript abundances in animals with and without dinoflagellates. This analysis identified >900 differentially expressed genes and allowed us to generate testable hypotheses about the cellular functions affected by symbiosis establishment. The differentially regulated transcripts include >60 encoding proteins that may play roles in transporting various nutrients between the symbiotic partners; many more encoding proteins functioning in several metabolic pathways, providing clues regarding how the transported nutrients may be used by the partners; and several encoding proteins that may be involved in host recognition and tolerance of the dinoflagellate. PMID:24368779

  2. Annotation of gene function in citrus using gene expression information and co-expression networks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The genus Citrus encompasses major cultivated plants such as sweet orange, mandarin, lemon and grapefruit, among the world’s most economically important fruit crops. With increasing volumes of transcriptomics data available for these species, Gene Co-expression Network (GCN) analysis is a viable option for predicting gene function at a genome-wide scale. GCN analysis is based on a “guilt-by-association” principle whereby genes encoding proteins involved in similar and/or related biological processes may exhibit similar expression patterns across diverse sets of experimental conditions. While bioinformatics resources such as GCN analysis are widely available for efficient gene function prediction in model plant species including Arabidopsis, soybean and rice, in citrus these tools are not yet developed. Results We have constructed a comprehensive GCN for citrus inferred from 297 publicly available Affymetrix Genechip Citrus Genome microarray datasets, providing gene co-expression relationships at a genome-wide scale (33,000 transcripts). The comprehensive citrus GCN consists of a global GCN (condition-independent) and four condition-dependent GCNs that survey the sweet orange species only, all citrus fruit tissues, all citrus leaf tissues, or stress-exposed plants. All of these GCNs are clustered using genome-wide, gene-centric (guide) and graph clustering algorithms for flexibility of gene function prediction. For each putative cluster, gene ontology (GO) enrichment and gene expression specificity analyses were performed to enhance gene function, expression and regulation pattern prediction. The guide-gene approach was used to infer novel roles of genes involved in disease susceptibility and vitamin C metabolism, and graph-clustering approaches were used to investigate isoprenoid/phenylpropanoid metabolism in citrus peel, and citric acid catabolism via the GABA shunt in citrus fruit. Conclusions Integration of citrus gene co-expression networks

  3. Role of a COP1 interactive protein in mediating light-regulated gene expression in arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Y Y; Matsui, M; Ang, L H; Deng, X W

    1998-01-01

    Arabidopsis seedlings display distinct patterns of gene expression and morphogenesis according to the ambient light condition. An Arabidopsis nuclear protein, CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1), acts to repress photomorphogenesis in the absence of light. The Arabidopsis CIP7 protein was identified by its capability to interact with COP1. CIP7 is a novel nuclear protein that contains transcriptional activation activity without a recognizable DNA binding motif. CIP7 requires light for its high level of expression, and COP1 seems to play a role in repressing its expression in darkness. Decreasing CIP7 expression by introducing antisense CIP7 RNA resulted in defects in light-dependent anthocyanin and chlorophyll accumulation. Antisense plants also displayed reduced expression of light-inducible genes for anthocyanin biosynthesis and photosynthesis. However, no defect was observed in light-dependent inhibition of hypocotyl elongation. Taken together, our data indicate that CIP7 acts as a positive regulator of light-regulated genes and is a potential direct downstream target of COP1 for mediating light control of gene expression. PMID:9668129

  4. Analysis of gene expression and histone modification between C4 and non-C4 homologous genes of PPDK and PCK in maize.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiu-Mei; Li, Yuan; Chao, Qing; Shen, Jie; Gong, Xiu-Jie; Zhao, Biligen-Gaowa; Wang, Bai-Chen

    2016-07-01

    More efficient photosynthesis has allowed C4 plants to adapt to more diverse ecosystems (such as hot and arid conditions) than C3 plants. To better understand C4 photosynthesis, we investigated the expression patterns of C4 genes (C4PPDK and PCK1) and their non-C4 homologous genes (CyPPDK1, CyPPDK2, and PCK2) in the different organs of maize (Zea mays). Both C4 genes and non-C4 genes showed organ-dependent expression patterns. The mRNA levels of C4 genes were more abundant in leaf organ than in seeds at 25 days after pollination (DAP), while non-C4 genes were mainly expressed in developing seeds. Further, acetylation of histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9ac) positively correlates with mRNA levels of C4 genes (C4PPDK and PCK1) in roots, stems, leaves, and seeds at 25 DAP, acetylation of histone H4 lysine 5 (H4K5ac) in the promoter regions of both C4 (C4PPDK and PCK1) and non-C4 genes (CyPPDK1, CyPPDK2, and PCK2) correlated well with their transcripts abundance in stems. In photosynthetic organs (stems and leaves), dimethylation of histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9me2) negatively correlated with mRNA levels of both C4 and non-C4 genes. Taken together, our data suggest that histone modification was involved in the transcription regulation of both C4 genes and non-C4 genes, which might provide a clue of the functional evolution of C4 genes. PMID:27161567

  5. Comparative genomic analysis of transgenic poplar dwarf mutant reveals numerous differentially expressed genes involved in energy flow.

    PubMed

    Chen, Su; Bai, Shuang; Liu, Guifeng; Li, Huiyu; Jiang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    In our previous research, the Tamarix androssowii LEA gene (Tamarix androssowii late embryogenesis abundant protein Mrna, GenBank ID: DQ663481) was transferred into Populus simonii × Populus nigra. Among the eleven transgenic lines, one exhibited a dwarf phenotype compared to the wild type and other transgenic lines, named dwf1. To uncover the mechanisms underlying this phenotype, digital gene expression libraries were produced from dwf1, wild-type, and other normal transgenic lines, XL-5 and XL-6. Gene expression profile analysis indicated that dwf1 had a unique gene expression pattern in comparison to the other two transgenic lines. Finally, a total of 1246 dwf1-unique differentially expressed genes were identified. These genes were further subjected to gene ontology and pathway analysis. Results indicated that photosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism related genes were significantly affected. In addition, many transcription factors genes were also differentially expressed in dwf1. These various differentially expressed genes may be critical for dwarf mutant formation; thus, the findings presented here might provide insight for our understanding of the mechanisms of tree growth and development. PMID:25192286

  6. Integrating heterogeneous gene expression data for gene regulatory network modelling.

    PubMed

    Sîrbu, Alina; Ruskin, Heather J; Crane, Martin

    2012-06-01

    Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) are complex biological systems that have a large impact on protein levels, so that discovering network interactions is a major objective of systems biology. Quantitative GRN models have been inferred, to date, from time series measurements of gene expression, but at small scale, and with limited application to real data. Time series experiments are typically short (number of time points of the order of ten), whereas regulatory networks can be very large (containing hundreds of genes). This creates an under-determination problem, which negatively influences the results of any inferential algorithm. Presented here is an integrative approach to model inference, which has not been previously discussed to the authors' knowledge. Multiple heterogeneous expression time series are used to infer the same model, and results are shown to be more robust to noise and parameter perturbation. Additionally, a wavelet analysis shows that these models display limited noise over-fitting within the individual datasets. PMID:21948152

  7. Gene expression analysis of the embryonic subplate.

    PubMed

    Oeschger, Franziska M; Wang, Wei-Zhi; Lee, Sheena; García-Moreno, Fernando; Goffinet, André M; Arbonés, Maria L; Rakic, Sonja; Molnár, Zoltán

    2012-06-01

    The subplate layer of the cerebral cortex is comprised of a heterogeneous population of cells and contains some of the earliest-generated neurons. In the embryonic brain, subplate cells contribute to the guidance and areal targeting of thalamocortical axons. At later developmental stages, they are predominantly involved in the maturation and plasticity of the cortical circuitry and the establishment of functional modules. We aimed to further characterize the embryonic murine subplate population by establishing a gene expression profile at embryonic day (E) 15.5 using laser capture microdissection and microarrays. The microarray identified over 300 transcripts with higher expression in the subplate compared with the cortical plate at this stage. Using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, in situ hybridization (ISH), and immunohistochemistry (IHC), we have confirmed specific expression in the E15.5 subplate for 13 selected genes, which have not been previously associated with this compartment (Abca8a, Cdh10, Cdh18, Csmd3, Gabra5, Kcnt2, Ogfrl1, Pls3, Rcan2, Sv2b, Slc8a2, Unc5c, and Zdhhc2). In the reeler mutant, the expression of the majority of these genes (9 of 13) was shifted in accordance with the altered position of subplate. These genes belong to several functional groups and likely contribute to synapse formation and axonal growth and guidance in subplate cells. PMID:21862448

  8. Multiple Stochastic Point Processes in Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, Rajamanickam

    2008-04-01

    We generalize the idea of multiple-stochasticity in chemical reaction systems to gene expression. Using Chemical Langevin Equation approach we investigate how this multiple-stochasticity can influence the overall molecular number fluctuations. We show that the main sources of this multiple-stochasticity in gene expression could be the randomness in transcription and translation initiation times which in turn originates from the underlying bio-macromolecular recognition processes such as the site-specific DNA-protein interactions and therefore can be internally regulated by the supra-molecular structural factors such as the condensation/super-coiling of DNA. Our theory predicts that (1) in case of gene expression system, the variances ( φ) introduced by the randomness in transcription and translation initiation-times approximately scales with the degree of condensation ( s) of DNA or mRNA as φ ∝ s -6. From the theoretical analysis of the Fano factor as well as coefficient of variation associated with the protein number fluctuations we predict that (2) unlike the singly-stochastic case where the Fano factor has been shown to be a monotonous function of translation rate, in case of multiple-stochastic gene expression the Fano factor is a turn over function with a definite minimum. This in turn suggests that the multiple-stochastic processes can also be well tuned to behave like a singly-stochastic point processes by adjusting the rate parameters.

  9. Population-level control of gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevozhay, Dmitry; Adams, Rhys; van Itallie, Elizabeth; Bennett, Matthew; Balazsi, Gabor

    2011-03-01

    Gene expression is the process that translates genetic information into proteins, that determine the way cells live, function and even die. It was demonstrated that cells with identical genomes exposed to the same environment can differ in their protein composition and therefore phenotypes. Protein levels can vary between cells due to the stochastic nature of intracellular biochemical events, indicating that the genotype-phenotype connection is not deterministic at the cellular level. We asked whether genomes could encode isogenic cell populations more reliably than single cells. To address this question, we built two gene circuits to control three cell population-level characteristics: gene expression mean, coefficient of variation and non-genetic memory of previous expression states. Indeed, we found that these population-level characteristics were more predictable than the gene expression of single cells in a well-controlled environment. This research was supported by the NIH Director's New Innovator Award 1DP2 OD006481-01 and Welch Foundation Grant C-1729.

  10. Current Gene Expression Studies in Esophageal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Jiang, Yao-Guang

    2009-01-01

    Esophageal carcinoma is one of the deadliest cancers with highly aggressive potency, ranking as the sixth most common cancer among males and ninth most common cancer among females globally. Due to metastasis and invasion of surrounding tissues in early stage, the 5-year overall survival rate (14%) of esophageal cancer remains poor, even in comparison with the dismal survival rates (4%) from the 1970s. Numerous genes and proteins with abnormal expression and function involve in the pathogenesis of esophageal cancer, but the concrete process remains unclear. Microarray technique has been applied to investigating esophageal cancer. Many gene expression studies have been undertaken to look at the specific patterns of gene transcript levels in esophageal cancer. Human tissues and cell lines were used in these geneprofiling studies and a very valuable and interesting set of data has resulted from various microarray experiments. These expression studies have provided increased understanding of the complex pathological mechanisms involved in esophageal cancer. The eventual goal of microarray is to discover new markers for therapy and to customize therapy based on an individual tumor genetic composition. This review summarized the current state of gene expression profile studies in esophageal cancer. PMID:20514215

  11. Gene expression analysis of the embryonic subplate

    PubMed Central

    Oeschger, Franziska M.; Wang, Wei-Zhi; Lee, Sheena; García-Moreno, Fernando; Goffinet, André M.; Arbones, Mariona; Rakic, Sonia; Molnár, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    The subplate layer of the cerebral cortex is comprised of a heterogeneous population of cells and contains some of the earliest-generated neurons. In the embryonic brain, subplate cells contribute to the guidance and areal targeting of thalamocortical axons. At later stages, they are involved in the maturation and plasticity of the cortical circuitry and the establishment of functional modules. We aimed to further characterize the embryonic murine subplate population by establishing a gene expression profile at embryonic day 15.5 using laser capture microdissection and microarrays. The microarray identified over 300 transcripts with higher expression in the subplate compared to the cortical plate at this stage. Using quantitative RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, we have confirmed specific expression in the E15.5 subplate for 13 selected genes which have not been previously associated with this compartment (Abca8a, Cdh10, Cdh18, Csmd3, Gabra5, Kcnt2, Ogfrl1, Pls3, Rcan2, Sv2b, Slc8a2, Unc5c and Zdhhc2). In the reeler mutant, the expression of the majority of these genes (9 out of 13) was shifted in accordance with the altered position of subplate. These genes belong to several functional groups and likely contribute to the maturation and electrophysiological properties of subplate cells and to axonal growth and guidance. PMID:21862448

  12. Trigger finger, tendinosis, and intratendinous gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lundin, A-C; Aspenberg, P; Eliasson, P

    2014-04-01

    The pathogenesis of trigger finger has generally been ascribed to primary changes in the first annular ligament. In contrast, we recently found histological changes in the tendons, similar to the findings in Achilles tendinosis or tendinopathy. We therefore hypothesized that trigger finger tendons would show differences in gene expression in comparison to normal tendons in a pattern similar to what is published for Achilles tendinosis. We performed quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction on biopsies from finger flexor tendons, 13 trigger fingers and 13 apparently healthy control tendons, to assess the expression of 10 genes which have been described to be differently expressed in tendinosis (collagen type 1a1, collagen 3a1, MMP-2, MMP-3, ADAMTS-5, TIMP-3, aggrecan, biglycan, decorin, and versican). In trigger finger tendons, collagen types 1a1 and 3a1, aggrecan and biglycan were all up-regulated, and MMP-3and TIMP-3 were down-regulated. These changes were statistically significant and have been previously described for Achilles tendinosis. The remaining four genes were not significantly altered. The changes in gene expression support the hypothesis that trigger finger is a form of tendinosis. Because trigger finger is a common condition, often treated surgically, it could provide opportunities for clinical research on tendinosis. PMID:22882155

  13. The low noise limit in gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Dar, Roy D.; Weinberger, Leor S.; Cox, Chris D.; Simpson, Michael L.; Razooky, Brandon S.

    2015-10-21

    Protein noise measurements are increasingly used to elucidate biophysical parameters. Unfortunately noise analyses are often at odds with directly measured parameters. Here we show that these inconsistencies arise from two problematic analytical choices: (i) the assumption that protein translation rate is invariant for different proteins of different abundances, which has inadvertently led to (ii) the assumption that a large constitutive extrinsic noise sets the low noise limit in gene expression. While growing evidence suggests that transcriptional bursting may set the low noise limit, variability in translational bursting has been largely ignored. We show that genome-wide systematic variation in translational efficiency can-and in the case of E. coli does-control the low noise limit in gene expression. Therefore constitutive extrinsic noise is small and only plays a role in the absence of a systematic variation in translational efficiency. Lastly, these results show the existence of two distinct expression noise patterns: (1) a global noise floor uniformly imposed on all genes by expression bursting; and (2) high noise distributed to only a select group of genes.

  14. The low noise limit in gene expression

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dar, Roy D.; Weinberger, Leor S.; Cox, Chris D.; Simpson, Michael L.; Razooky, Brandon S.

    2015-10-21

    Protein noise measurements are increasingly used to elucidate biophysical parameters. Unfortunately noise analyses are often at odds with directly measured parameters. Here we show that these inconsistencies arise from two problematic analytical choices: (i) the assumption that protein translation rate is invariant for different proteins of different abundances, which has inadvertently led to (ii) the assumption that a large constitutive extrinsic noise sets the low noise limit in gene expression. While growing evidence suggests that transcriptional bursting may set the low noise limit, variability in translational bursting has been largely ignored. We show that genome-wide systematic variation in translational efficiencymore » can-and in the case of E. coli does-control the low noise limit in gene expression. Therefore constitutive extrinsic noise is small and only plays a role in the absence of a systematic variation in translational efficiency. Lastly, these results show the existence of two distinct expression noise patterns: (1) a global noise floor uniformly imposed on all genes by expression bursting; and (2) high noise distributed to only a select group of genes.« less

  15. The Low Noise Limit in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Roy D.; Razooky, Brandon S.; Weinberger, Leor S.; Cox, Chris D.; Simpson, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Protein noise measurements are increasingly used to elucidate biophysical parameters. Unfortunately noise analyses are often at odds with directly measured parameters. Here we show that these inconsistencies arise from two problematic analytical choices: (i) the assumption that protein translation rate is invariant for different proteins of different abundances, which has inadvertently led to (ii) the assumption that a large constitutive extrinsic noise sets the low noise limit in gene expression. While growing evidence suggests that transcriptional bursting may set the low noise limit, variability in translational bursting has been largely ignored. We show that genome-wide systematic variation in translational efficiency can–and in the case of E. coli does–control the low noise limit in gene expression. Therefore constitutive extrinsic noise is small and only plays a role in the absence of a systematic variation in translational efficiency. These results show the existence of two distinct expression noise patterns: (1) a global noise floor uniformly imposed on all genes by expression bursting; and (2) high noise distributed to only a select group of genes. PMID:26488303

  16. Digital gene expression signatures for maize development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome-wide expression signatures detect specific perturbations in developmental programs and contribute to functional resolution of key regulatory networks. In maize (Zea mays) inflorescences, mutations in the RAMOSA (RA) genes affect determinacy of axillary meristems and thus alter branching patt...

  17. Long Serial Analysis of Gene Expression for Gene Discovery and Transcriptome Profiling in the Widespread Marine Coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi†

    PubMed Central

    Dyhrman, Sonya T.; Haley, Sheean T.; Birkeland, Shanda R.; Wurch, Louie L.; Cipriano, Michael J.; McArthur, Andrew G.

    2006-01-01

    The abundant and widespread coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi plays an important role in mediating CO2 exchange between the ocean and the atmosphere through its impact on marine photosynthesis and calcification. Here, we use long serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) to identify E. huxleyi genes responsive to nitrogen (N) or phosphorus (P) starvation. Long SAGE is an elegant approach for examining quantitative and comprehensive gene expression patterns without a priori knowledge of gene sequences via the detection of 21-bp nucleotide sequence tags. E. huxleyi appears to have a robust transcriptional-level response to macronutrient deficiency, with 42 tags uniquely present or up-regulated twofold or greater in the N-starved library and 128 tags uniquely present or up-regulated twofold or greater in the P-starved library. The expression patterns of several tags were validated with reverse transcriptase PCR. Roughly 48% of these differentially expressed tags could be mapped to publicly available genomic or expressed sequence tag (EST) sequence data. For example, in the P-starved library a number of the tags mapped to genes with a role in P scavenging, including a putative phosphate-repressible permease and a putative polyphosphate synthetase. In short, the long SAGE analyses have (i) identified many new differentially regulated gene sequences, (ii) assigned regulation data to EST sequences with no database homology and unknown function, and (iii) highlighted previously uncharacterized aspects of E. huxleyi N and P physiology. To this end, our long SAGE libraries provide a new public resource for gene discovery and transcriptional analysis in this biogeochemically important marine organism. PMID:16391051

  18. Expression of mouse metallothionein genes in tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, I.B.; Yeargan, R.; Wagner, G.J.; Hunt, A.G. )

    1990-05-01

    We have expressed a mouse metallothionein (NT) gene in tobacco under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter and a pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit (rbcS) gene promoter. Seedlings in which MT gene expression is driven by the 35S promoter are resistant to toxic levels of cadmium. Mature plants carrying the 35S-MT gene accumulate less Cd in their leaves when exposed to low levels of Cd in laboratory growth conditions. Plants with the rbcS-MT construction express this gene in a light-regulated and tissue-specific manner, as expected. Moreover, the MT levels in leaves in these plants are about 20% of those seen in 35S-MT plants. These plants are currently being tested for Cd resistance. In addition, a small field evaluation of 35S-MT lines for Cd levels is being evaluated. These experiments will address the possibility of using MTs to alter Cd levels in crop species.

  19. Gene expression variation and expression quantitative trait mapping of human chromosome 21 genes.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Samuel; Lyle, Robert; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Attar, Homa; Subrahmanyan, Lakshman; Gehrig, Corinne; Parand, Leila; Gagnebin, Maryline; Rougemont, Jacques; Jongeneel, C Victor; Antonarakis, Stylianos E

    2005-12-01

    Inter-individual differences in gene expression are likely to account for an important fraction of phenotypic differences, including susceptibility to common disorders. Recent studies have shown extensive variation in gene expression levels in humans and other organisms, and that a fraction of this variation is under genetic control. We investigated the patterns of gene expression variation in a 25 Mb region of human chromosome 21, which has been associated with many Down syndrome (DS) phenotypes. Taqman real-time PCR was used to measure expression variation of 41 genes in lymphoblastoid cells of 40 unrelated individuals. For 25 genes found to be differentially expressed, additional analysis was performed in 10 CEPH families to determine heritabilities and map loci harboring regulatory variation. Seventy-six percent of the differentially expressed genes had significant heritabilities, and genomewide linkage analysis led to the identification of significant eQTLs for nine genes. Most eQTLs were in trans, with the best result (P=7.46 x 10(-8)) obtained for TMEM1 on chromosome 12q24.33. A cis-eQTL identified for CCT8 was validated by performing an association study in 60 individuals from the HapMap project. SNP rs965951 located within CCT8 was found to be significantly associated with its expression levels (P=2.5 x 10(-5)) confirming cis-regulatory variation. The results of our study provide a representative view of expression variation of chromosome 21 genes, identify loci involved in their regulation and suggest that genes, for which expression differences are significantly larger than 1.5-fold in control samples, are unlikely to be involved in DS-phenotypes present in all affected individuals. PMID:16251198

  20. Gene expression during normal and FSHD myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a dominant disease linked to contraction of an array of tandem 3.3-kb repeats (D4Z4) at 4q35. Within each repeat unit is a gene, DUX4, that can encode a protein containing two homeodomains. A DUX4 transcript derived from the last repeat unit in a contracted array is associated with pathogenesis but it is unclear how. Methods Using exon-based microarrays, the expression profiles of myogenic precursor cells were determined. Both undifferentiated myoblasts and myoblasts differentiated to myotubes derived from FSHD patients and controls were studied after immunocytochemical verification of the quality of the cultures. To further our understanding of FSHD and normal myogenesis, the expression profiles obtained were compared to those of 19 non-muscle cell types analyzed by identical methods. Results Many of the ~17,000 examined genes were differentially expressed (> 2-fold, p < 0.01) in control myoblasts or myotubes vs. non-muscle cells (2185 and 3006, respectively) or in FSHD vs. control myoblasts or myotubes (295 and 797, respectively). Surprisingly, despite the morphologically normal differentiation of FSHD myoblasts to myotubes, most of the disease-related dysregulation was seen as dampening of normal myogenesis-specific expression changes, including in genes for muscle structure, mitochondrial function, stress responses, and signal transduction. Other classes of genes, including those encoding extracellular matrix or pro-inflammatory proteins, were upregulated in FSHD myogenic cells independent of an inverse myogenesis association. Importantly, the disease-linked DUX4 RNA isoform was detected by RT-PCR in FSHD myoblast and myotube preparations only at extremely low levels. Unique insights into myogenesis-specific gene expression were also obtained. For example, all four Argonaute genes involved in RNA-silencing were significantly upregulated during normal (but not FSHD) myogenesis relative to non

  1. Differential expression of myrosinase gene families.

    PubMed Central

    Lenman, M; Falk, A; Rödin, J; Höglund, A S; Ek, B; Rask, L

    1993-01-01

    In mature seeds of Brassica napus three major and three minor myrosinase isoenzymes were identified earlier. These myrosinases are known to be encoded by at least two different families of myrosinase genes, denoted MA and MB. In the work described in this paper the presence of different myrosinase isoenzymes in embryos, seedlings, and vegetative mature tissues of B. napus was studied and related to the expression of myrosinase MA and MB genes in the same tissues to facilitate future functional studies of these enzymes. In developing seeds, myrosinases of 75, 73, 70, 68, 66, and 65 kD were present. During seedling development there was a turnover of the myrosinase pool such that in 5-d-old seedlings the 75-, 70-, 66-, and 65-kD myrosinases were present, with the 70- and 75-kD myrosinases predominating. In 21-d-old seedlings the same myrosinases were present, but the 66- and 65-kD myrosinase species were most abundant. At flowering the mature organs of the plant contained only a 72-kD myrosinase. MA genes were expressed only in developing seeds, whereas MB genes were most highly expressed in seeds, seedling cotyledons, young leaves, and to a lesser extent other organs of the mature plant. During embryogenesis of B. napus, myrosinase MA and MB gene transcripts started to accumulate approximately 20 d after pollination and reached their highest level approximately 15 d later. MB transcripts accumulated to about 3 times the amount of MA transcripts. In situ hybridization analysis of B. napus embryos showed that MA transcripts were present predominatly in myrosin cells in the axis, whereas MB genes were expressed in myrosin cells of the entire embryo. The embryo axiz contained 75-, 70-, and 65-kD myrosinases, whereas the cotyledons contained mainly 70- and 65-kD myrosinases. Amino acid sequencing revealed the 75-kD myrosinase to be encoded by the MA gene family. The high degree of cell and tissue specificity of the expression of myrosinase genes suggests that studies of

  2. Fluid Mechanics, Arterial Disease, and Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tarbell, John M.; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Dunn, Jessilyn; Jo, Hanjoong

    2014-01-01

    This review places modern research developments in vascular mechanobiology in the context of hemodynamic phenomena in the cardiovascular system and the discrete localization of vascular disease. The modern origins of this field are traced, beginning in the 1960s when associations between flow characteristics, particularly blood flow–induced wall shear stress, and the localization of atherosclerotic plaques were uncovered, and continuing to fluid shear stress effects on the vascular lining endothelial) cells (ECs), including their effects on EC morphology, biochemical production, and gene expression. The earliest single-gene studies and genome-wide analyses are considered. The final section moves from the ECs lining the vessel wall to the smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts within the wall that are fluid me chanically activated by interstitial flow that imposes shear stresses on their surfaces comparable with those of flowing blood on EC surfaces. Interstitial flow stimulates biochemical production and gene expression, much like blood flow on ECs. PMID:25360054

  3. Methods to improve cardiac gene therapy expression.

    PubMed

    Scimia, Maria Cecilia; Sydnes, Kate E; Zuppo, Daniel A; Koch, Walter J

    2014-11-01

    Gene therapy strategies are becoming a valuable approach for the treatment of heart failure. Some trials are ongoing and others are being organized. Vascular access in clinical experimentation is still the chosen modality of delivery, but many other approaches are in research and development. A successful gene therapy strategy involves not only the choice of the right vector and gene, but also the correct delivery strategy that allows for transduction of the highest percentage of cardiomyocytes, limited spilling of virus into other organs and the possibility to correlate the amount of injected virus to the rate of the expression within the cardiac tissue. The authors will first concentrate on clarifying what the barriers are that the virus has to overcome in order to reach the nuclei of the target organs and methodologies that have been tested to improve the range of expression. PMID:25340284

  4. Fluid Mechanics, Arterial Disease, and Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarbell, John M.; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Dunn, Jessilyn; Jo, Hanjoong

    2014-01-01

    This review places modern research developments in vascular mechanobiology in the context of hemodynamic phenomena in the cardiovascular system and the discrete localization of vascular disease. The modern origins of this field are traced, beginning in the 1960s when associations between flow characteristics, particularly blood flow-induced wall shear stress, and the localization of atherosclerotic plaques were uncovered, and continuing to fluid shear stress effects on the vascular lining endothelial cells (ECs), including their effects on EC morphology, biochemical production, and gene expression. The earliest single-gene studies and genome-wide analyses are considered. The final section moves from the ECs lining the vessel wall to the smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts within the wall that are fluid mechanically activated by interstitial flow that imposes shear stresses on their surfaces comparable with those of flowing blood on EC surfaces. Interstitial flow stimulates biochemical production and gene expression, much like blood flow on ECs.

  5. Control mechanisms of plastid gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Gruissem, W.; Tonkyn, J.C.

    1993-12-31

    Plastid DNAs of higher plants contain approximately 150 genes that encode RNAs and proteins for genetic and photosynthetic functions of the organelle. Results published in the last few years illustrate that the spatial and temporal expression of these plastid genes is regulated, in part, at the transcriptional level, but that developmentally controlled changes in mRNA stability, translational activity, and protein phosphorylation also have an important role in the control of plastid functions. This comprehensive review summarizes and discusses the mechanisms by which regulation of gene expression is exerted at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. It provides an overview of our current knowledge, but also emphasizes areas that are controversial and in which information on regulatory mechanisms is still incomplete. 455 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Light has a specific role in modulating Arabidopsis gene expression at low temperature

    PubMed Central

    Soitamo, Arto J; Piippo, Mirva; Allahverdiyeva, Yagut; Battchikova, Natalia; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2008-01-01

    Background Light and temperature are the key abiotic modulators of plant gene expression. In the present work the effect of light under low temperature treatment was analyzed by using microarrays. Specific attention was paid to the up and down regulated genes by using promoter analysis. This approach revealed putative regulatory networks of transcription factors behind the induction or repression of the genes. Results Induction of a few oxidative stress related genes occurred only under the Cold/Light treatment including genes encoding iron superoxide dismutase (FeSOD) and glutathione-dependent hydrogen peroxide peroxidases (GPX). The ascorbate dependent water-water cycle genes showed no response to Cold/Light or Cold/Dark treatments. Cold/Light specifically induced genes encoding protective molecules like phenylpropanoids and photosynthesis-related carotenoids also involved in the biosynthesis of hormone abscisic acid (ABA) crucial for cold acclimation. The enhanced/repressed transcript levels were not always reflected on the respective protein levels as demonstrated by dehydrin proteins. Conclusion Cold/Light up regulated twice as many genes as the Cold/Dark treatment and only the combination of light and low temperature enhanced the expression of several genes earlier described as cold-responsive genes. Cold/Light-induced genes included both cold-responsive transcription factors and several novel ones containing zinc-finger, MYB, NAC and AP2 domains. These are likely to function in concert in enhancing gene expression. Similar response elements were found in the promoter regions of both the transcription factors and their target genes implying a possible parallel regulation or amplification of the environmental signals according to the metabolic/redox state in the cells. PMID:18230142

  7. From gene expressions to genetic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek

    2009-03-01

    A method based on the principle of entropy maximization is used to identify the gene interaction network with the highest probability of giving rise to experimentally observed transcript profiles [1]. In its simplest form, the method yields the pairwise gene interaction network, but it can also be extended to deduce higher order correlations. Analysis of microarray data from genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae chemostat cultures exhibiting energy metabollic oscillations identifies a gene interaction network that reflects the intracellular communication pathways. These pathways adjust cellular metabolic activity and cell division to the limiting nutrient conditions that trigger metabolic oscillations. The success of the present approach in extracting meaningful genetic connections suggests that the maximum entropy principle is a useful concept for understanding living systems, as it is for other complex, nonequilibrium systems. The time-dependent behavior of the genetic network is found to involve only a few fundamental modes [2,3]. [4pt] REFERENCES:[0pt] [1] T. R. Lezon, J. R. Banavar, M. Cieplak, A. Maritan, and N. Fedoroff, Using the principle of entropy maximization to infer genetic interaction networks from gene expression patterns, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. (USA) 103, 19033-19038 (2006) [0pt] [2] N. S. Holter, M. Mitra, A. Maritan, M. Cieplak, J. R. Banavar, and N. V. Fedoroff, Fundamental patterns underlying gene expression profiles: simplicity from complexity, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97, 8409-8414 (2000) [0pt] [3] N. S. Holter, A. Maritan, M. Cieplak, N. V. Fedoroff, and J. R. Banavar, Dynamic modeling of gene expression data, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 98, 1693-1698 (2001)

  8. Regulation of methane genes and genome expression

    SciTech Connect

    John N. Reeve

    2009-09-09

    At the start of this project, it was known that methanogens were Archaeabacteria (now Archaea) and were therefore predicted to have gene expression and regulatory systems different from Bacteria, but few of the molecular biology details were established. The goals were then to establish the structures and organizations of genes in methanogens, and to develop the genetic technologies needed to investigate and dissect methanogen gene expression and regulation in vivo. By cloning and sequencing, we established the gene and operon structures of all of the “methane” genes that encode the enzymes that catalyze methane biosynthesis from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. This work identified unique sequences in the methane gene that we designated mcrA, that encodes the largest subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, that could be used to identify methanogen DNA and establish methanogen phylogenetic relationships. McrA sequences are now the accepted standard and used extensively as hybridization probes to identify and quantify methanogens in environmental research. With the methane genes in hand, we used northern blot and then later whole-genome microarray hybridization analyses to establish how growth phase and substrate availability regulated methane gene expression in Methanobacterium thermautotrophicus ΔH (now Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus). Isoenzymes or pairs of functionally equivalent enzymes catalyze several steps in the hydrogen-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. We established that hydrogen availability determine which of these pairs of methane genes is expressed and therefore which of the alternative enzymes is employed to catalyze methane biosynthesis under different environmental conditions. As were unable to establish a reliable genetic system for M. thermautotrophicus, we developed in vitro transcription as an alternative system to investigate methanogen gene expression and regulation. This led to the discovery that an archaeal protein

  9. Topological features in cancer gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, S; Krishnamoorthy, B

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method for exploring cancer gene expression data based on tools from algebraic topology. Our method selects a small relevant subset from tens of thousands of genes while simultaneously identifying nontrivial higher order topological features, i.e., holes, in the data. We first circumvent the problem of high dimensionality by dualizing the data, i.e., by studying genes as points in the sample space. Then we select a small subset of the genes as landmarks to construct topological structures that capture persistent, i.e., topologically significant, features of the data set in its first homology group. Furthermore, we demonstrate that many members of these loops have been implicated for cancer biogenesis in scientific literature. We illustrate our method on five different data sets belonging to brain, breast, leukemia, and ovarian cancers. PMID:25592573

  10. Determining Physical Mechanisms of Gene Expression Regulation from Single Cell Gene Expression Data.

    PubMed

    Ezer, Daphne; Moignard, Victoria; Göttgens, Berthold; Adryan, Boris

    2016-08-01

    Many genes are expressed in bursts, which can contribute to cell-to-cell heterogeneity. It is now possible to measure this heterogeneity with high throughput single cell gene expression assays (single cell qPCR and RNA-seq). These experimental approaches generate gene expression distributions which can be used to estimate the kinetic parameters of gene expression bursting, namely the rate that genes turn on, the rate that genes turn off, and the rate of transcription. We construct a complete pipeline for the analysis of single cell qPCR data that uses the mathematics behind bursty expression to develop more accurate and robust algorithms for analyzing the origin of heterogeneity in experimental samples, specifically an algorithm for clustering cells by their bursting behavior (Simulated Annealing for Bursty Expression Clustering, SABEC) and a statistical tool for comparing the kinetic parameters of bursty expression across populations of cells (Estimation of Parameter changes in Kinetics, EPiK). We applied these methods to hematopoiesis, including a new single cell dataset in which transcription factors (TFs) involved in the earliest branchpoint of blood differentiation were individually up- and down-regulated. We could identify two unique sub-populations within a seemingly homogenous group of hematopoietic stem cells. In addition, we could predict regulatory mechanisms controlling the expression levels of eighteen key hematopoietic transcription factors throughout differentiation. Detailed information about gene regulatory mechanisms can therefore be obtained simply from high throughput single cell gene expression data, which should be widely applicable given the rapid expansion of single cell genomics. PMID:27551778

  11. Determining Physical Mechanisms of Gene Expression Regulation from Single Cell Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Moignard, Victoria; Göttgens, Berthold; Adryan, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Many genes are expressed in bursts, which can contribute to cell-to-cell heterogeneity. It is now possible to measure this heterogeneity with high throughput single cell gene expression assays (single cell qPCR and RNA-seq). These experimental approaches generate gene expression distributions which can be used to estimate the kinetic parameters of gene expression bursting, namely the rate that genes turn on, the rate that genes turn off, and the rate of transcription. We construct a complete pipeline for the analysis of single cell qPCR data that uses the mathematics behind bursty expression to develop more accurate and robust algorithms for analyzing the origin of heterogeneity in experimental samples, specifically an algorithm for clustering cells by their bursting behavior (Simulated Annealing for Bursty Expression Clustering, SABEC) and a statistical tool for comparing the kinetic parameters of bursty expression across populations of cells (Estimation of Parameter changes in Kinetics, EPiK). We applied these methods to hematopoiesis, including a new single cell dataset in which transcription factors (TFs) involved in the earliest branchpoint of blood differentiation were individually up- and down-regulated. We could identify two unique sub-populations within a seemingly homogenous group of hematopoietic stem cells. In addition, we could predict regulatory mechanisms controlling the expression levels of eighteen key hematopoietic transcription factors throughout differentiation. Detailed information about gene regulatory mechanisms can therefore be obtained simply from high throughput single cell gene expression data, which should be widely applicable given the rapid expansion of single cell genomics. PMID:27551778

  12. [Modifications of gene expression by tumor promoters].

    PubMed

    Zhang, C; Zhao, Q; Guo, S; Zhao, M; Cheng, S

    1995-02-01

    The modifications of gene expression by tumor promoters were analyzed in vitro and in vivo. The results of slot blot hybridizations showed that tumor promoter TPA induced c-fos and c-myc expressions in mouse fibroblast cell line BALB/3T3 and rat liver, decreased the levels of Rb RNA in BALB/3T3 cell line and of alpha 1-I3 RNA in rat liver. It was also demonstrated that tumor promoter phenobarbital influenced c-fos and c-myc expressions and decreased alpha 1I3 mRNA level in rat liver during a long term experiment. Phenobarbital was found to have no effect on c-fos and c-myc expressions in rat liver during a short experiment. Tumor promoters induced the expressions of c-fos and c-myc which were positively-related to cancer formation and inhibited the expressions of Rb and alpha 1-I3 which were negatively-related to cancer formation. This implied that tumor promotion played an important role in cancer development and tumor promoters exerted their effects selectively according to the attributes of different genes. PMID:7540119

  13. Coevolution of gene expression among interacting proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, Hunter B.; Hirsh, Aaron E.; Wall, Dennis P.; Eisen,Michael B.

    2004-03-01

    Physically interacting proteins or parts of proteins are expected to evolve in a coordinated manner that preserves proper interactions. Such coevolution at the amino acid-sequence level is well documented and has been used to predict interacting proteins, domains, and amino acids. Interacting proteins are also often precisely coexpressed with one another, presumably to maintain proper stoichiometry among interacting components. Here, we show that the expression levels of physically interacting proteins coevolve. We estimate average expression levels of genes from four closely related fungi of the genus Saccharomyces using the codon adaptation index and show that expression levels of interacting proteins exhibit coordinated changes in these different species. We find that this coevolution of expression is a more powerful predictor of physical interaction than is coevolution of amino acid sequence. These results demonstrate previously uncharacterized coevolution of gene expression, adding a different dimension to the study of the coevolution of interacting proteins and underscoring the importance of maintaining coexpression of interacting proteins over evolutionary time. Our results also suggest that expression coevolution can be used for computational prediction of protein protein interactions.

  14. Gene expression regulation in roots under drought.

    PubMed

    Janiak, Agnieszka; Kwaśniewski, Mirosław; Szarejko, Iwona

    2016-02-01

    Stress signalling and regulatory networks controlling expression of target genes are the basis of plant response to drought. Roots are the first organs exposed to water deficiency in the soil and are the place of drought sensing. Signalling cascades transfer chemical signals toward the shoot and initiate molecular responses that lead to the biochemical and morphological changes that allow plants to be protected against water loss and to tolerate stress conditions. Here, we present an overview of signalling network and gene expression regulation pathways that are actively induced in roots under drought stress. In particular, the role of several transcription factor (TF) families, including DREB, AP2/ERF, NAC, bZIP, MYC, CAMTA, Alfin-like and Q-type ZFP, in the regulation of root response to drought are highlighted. The information provided includes available data on mutual interactions between these TFs together with their regulation by plant hormones and other signalling molecules. The most significant downstream target genes and molecular processes that are controlled by the regulatory factors are given. These data are also coupled with information about the influence of the described regulatory networks on root traits and root development which may translate to enhanced drought tolerance. This is the first literature survey demonstrating the gene expression regulatory machinery that is induced by drought stress, presented from the perspective of roots. PMID:26663562

  15. Salt induced gene expression in Prosopis farcta

    SciTech Connect

    Heimer, I.M.; Golan, A.; Lips, H.

    1987-04-01

    The authors hypothesize that in facultative halophytes, the genes which impart salt tolerance are expressed when the plants are exposed to salt. As a first step towards possible identification of these genes, they examined salt induced changes of gene expression in the facultative halophyte Prosopis farcta at the protein level, by SDS-PAGE. Exposure to salt of aseptically grown, two-week old seedlings, was carried out in one of two ways: (1) a one step transfer of seedlings from medium without salt to that with the indicated concentrations followed by 5 hr or 24 hr incubation periods. During the last 2 hrs of each incubation period the seedlings were pulse-labelled with /sup 35/S Sulfate or L-Methionine; (2) a gradual increase of the salt concentration at 50 mM increments at 2-4 day intervals. Two days after reaching the desired salt concentration, the seedlings were pulse-labelled for 2 hrs with /sup 35/S sulfate or L-methionine. Protein from roots were extracted and analyzed. Polypeptides were visualized by staining with coomassie blue or by fluorography. Qualitative as well as quantitative changes of gene expression as induced by salt could be observed. Their significance regarding salt tolerance will be discussed.

  16. Expression of bacterial genes in plant cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fraley, R T; Rogers, S G; Horsch, R B; Sanders, P R; Flick, J S; Adams, S P; Bittner, M L; Brand, L A; Fink, C L; Fry, J S; Galluppi, G R; Goldberg, S B; Hoffmann, N L; Woo, S C

    1983-01-01

    Chimeric bacterial genes conferring resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics have been inserted into the Agrobacterium tumefaciens tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid and introduced into plant cells by in vitro transformation techniques. The chimeric genes contain the nopaline synthase 5' and 3' regulatory regions joined to the genes for neomycin phosphotransferase type I or type II. The chimeric genes were cloned into an intermediate vector, pMON120, and inserted into pTiB6S3 by recombination and then introduced into petunia and tobacco cells by cocultivating A. tumefaciens cells with protoplast-derived cells. Southern hybridization was used to confirm the presence of the chimeric genes in the transformed plant tissues. Expression of the chimeric genes was determined by the ability of the transformed cells to proliferate on medium containing normally inhibitory levels of kanamycin (50 micrograms/ml) or other aminoglycoside antibiotics. Plant cells transformed by wild-type pTiB6S3 or derivatives carrying the bacterial neomycin phosphotransferase genes with their own promoters failed to grow under these conditions. The significance of these results for plant genetic engineering is discussed. Images PMID:6308651

  17. Gene expression profiling in sinonasal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Sinonasal adenocarcinomas are uncommon tumors which develop in the ethmoid sinus after exposure to wood dust. Although the etiology of these tumors is well defined, very little is known about their molecular basis and no diagnostic tool exists for their early detection in high-risk workers. Methods To identify genes involved in this disease, we performed gene expression profiling using cancer-dedicated microarrays, on nine matched samples of sinonasal adenocarcinomas and non-tumor sinusal tissue. Microarray results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry on two additional sets of tumors. Results Among the genes with significant differential expression we selected LGALS4, ACS5, CLU, SRI and CCT5 for further exploration. The overexpression of LGALS4, ACS5, SRI, CCT5 and the downregulation of CLU were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. Immunohistochemistry was performed for LGALS4 (Galectin 4), ACS5 (Acyl-CoA synthetase) and CLU (Clusterin) proteins: LGALS4 was highly up-regulated, particularly in the most differentiated tumors, while CLU was lost in all tumors. The expression of ACS5, was more heterogeneous and no correlation was observed with the tumor type. Conclusion Within our microarray study in sinonasal adenocarcinoma we identified two proteins, LGALS4 and CLU, that were significantly differentially expressed in tumors compared to normal tissue. A further evaluation on a new set of tissues, including precancerous stages and low grade tumors, is necessary to evaluate the possibility of using them as diagnostic markers. PMID:19903339

  18. Consensus gene regulatory networks: combining multiple microarray gene expression datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeling, Emma; Tucker, Allan

    2007-09-01

    In this paper we present a method for modelling gene regulatory networks by forming a consensus Bayesian network model from multiple microarray gene expression datasets. Our method is based on combining Bayesian network graph topologies and does not require any special pre-processing of the datasets, such as re-normalisation. We evaluate our method on a synthetic regulatory network and part of the yeast heat-shock response regulatory network using publicly available yeast microarray datasets. Results are promising; the consensus networks formed provide a broader view of the potential underlying network, obtaining an increased true positive rate over networks constructed from a single data source.

  19. Gene expression profiling analysis of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, H.; Ma, J.; Wu, J.; Chen, L.; Sun, F.; Qu, C.; Zheng, D.; Xu, S.

    2016-01-01

    The present study screened potential genes related to lung adenocarcinoma, with the aim of further understanding disease pathogenesis. The GSE2514 dataset including 20 lung adenocarcinoma and 19 adjacent normal tissue samples from 10 patients with lung adenocarcinoma aged 45-73 years was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the two groups were screened using the t-test. Potential gene functions were predicted using functional and pathway enrichment analysis, and protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks obtained from the STRING database were constructed with Cytoscape. Module analysis of PPI networks was performed through MCODE in Cytoscape. In total, 535 upregulated and 465 downregulated DEGs were identified. These included ATP5D, UQCRC2, UQCR11 and genes encoding nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), which are mainly associated with mitochondrial ATP synthesis coupled electron transport, and which were enriched in the oxidative phosphorylation pathway. Other DEGs were associated with DNA replication (PRIM1, MCM3, and RNASEH2A), cell surface receptor-linked signal transduction and the enzyme-linked receptor protein signaling pathway (MAPK1, STAT3, RAF1, and JAK1), and regulation of the cytoskeleton and phosphatidylinositol signaling system (PIP5K1B, PIP5K1C, and PIP4K2B). Our findings suggest that DEGs encoding subunits of NADH, PRIM1, MCM3, MAPK1, STAT3, RAF1, and JAK1 might be associated with the development of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26840709

  20. Overexpression of the Maize psbA Gene Enhances Drought Tolerance Through Regulating Antioxidant System, Photosynthetic Capability, and Stress Defense Gene Expression in Tobacco.

    PubMed

    Huo, Yongjin; Wang, Meiping; Wei, Yangyang; Xia, Zongliang

    2015-01-01

    The psbA (encoding D1 protein) plays an important role in protecting photosystem II (PSII) from oxidative damage in higher plants. In our previous study, the role of the psbA from maize (Zea mays. L) in response to SO2 stress was characterized. To date, information about the involvement of the psbA gene in drought response is scarce. Here we found that overexpression (OE) of ZmpsbA showed increased D1 protein abundance and enhanced drought stress tolerance in tobacco. The drought-tolerant phenotypes of the OE lines were accompanied by increases of key antioxidant enzymes SOD, CAT, and POD activities, but decreases of hydrogen peroxide, malondialdehyde, and ion leakage. Further investigation showed that the OE plants had much less reductions than the wild-type in the net photosynthesis rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (Gs), and the maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm) during drought stress; indicating that OE of ZmpsbA may alleviate photosynthesis inhibition during drought. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that there was significantly increased expression of NtLEA5, NtERD10C, NtAREB, and NtCDPK2 in ZmpsbA-OE lines. Together, our results indicate that ZmpsbA improves drought tolerance in tobacco possibly by alleviating photosynthesis reduction, reducing reactive oxygen species accumulation and membrane damage, and modulating stress defense gene expression. ZmpsbA could be exploited for engineering drought-tolerant plants in molecular breeding of crops. PMID:26793207

  1. Changes in gene expression of Prymnesium parvum induced by nitrogen and phosphorus limitation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenfeng; Koid, Amy E.; Terrado, Ramon; Campbell, Victoria; Caron, David A.; Heidelberg, Karla B.

    2015-01-01

    Prymnesium parvum is a globally distributed prymnesiophyte alga commonly found in brackish water marine ecosystems and lakes. It possesses a suite of toxins with ichthyotoxic, cytotoxic and hemolytic effects which, along with its mixotrophic nutritional capabilities, allows it to form massive Ecosystem Disruptive Algal Blooms (EDABs). While blooms of high abundance coincide with high levels of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), reports of field and laboratory studies have noted that P. parvum toxicity appears to be augmented at high N:P ratios or P-limiting conditions. Here we present the results of a comparative analysis of P. parvum RNA-Seq transcriptomes under nutrient replete conditions, and N or P deficiency to understand how this organism responds at the transcriptional level to varying nutrient conditions. In nutrient limited conditions we found diverse transcriptional responses for genes involved in nutrient uptake, protein synthesis and degradation, photosynthesis, and toxin production. As anticipated, when either N or P was limiting, transcription levels of genes encoding transporters for the respective nutrient were higher than those under replete condition. Ribosomal and lysosomal protein genes were expressed at higher levels under either nutrient-limited condition compared to the replete condition. Photosynthesis genes and polyketide synthase genes were more highly expressed under P-limitation but not under N-limitation. These results highlight the ability of P. parvum to mount a coordinated and varied cellular and physiological response to nutrient limitation. Results also provide potential marker genes for further evaluating the physiological response and toxin production of P. parvum populations during bloom formation or to changing environmental conditions. PMID:26157435

  2. Changes in gene expression of Prymnesium parvum induced by nitrogen and phosphorus limitation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenfeng; Koid, Amy E; Terrado, Ramon; Campbell, Victoria; Caron, David A; Heidelberg, Karla B

    2015-01-01

    Prymnesium parvum is a globally distributed prymnesiophyte alga commonly found in brackish water marine ecosystems and lakes. It possesses a suite of toxins with ichthyotoxic, cytotoxic and hemolytic effects which, along with its mixotrophic nutritional capabilities, allows it to form massive Ecosystem Disruptive Algal Blooms (EDABs). While blooms of high abundance coincide with high levels of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), reports of field and laboratory studies have noted that P. parvum toxicity appears to be augmented at high N:P ratios or P-limiting conditions. Here we present the results of a comparative analysis of P. parvum RNA-Seq transcriptomes under nutrient replete conditions, and N or P deficiency to understand how this organism responds at the transcriptional level to varying nutrient conditions. In nutrient limited conditions we found diverse transcriptional responses for genes involved in nutrient uptake, protein synthesis and degradation, photosynthesis, and toxin production. As anticipated, when either N or P was limiting, transcription levels of genes encoding transporters for the respective nutrient were higher than those under replete condition. Ribosomal and lysosomal protein genes were expressed at higher levels under either nutrient-limited condition compared to the replete condition. Photosynthesis genes and polyketide synthase genes were more highly expressed under P-limitation but not under N-limitation. These results highlight the ability of P. parvum to mount a coordinated and varied cellular and physiological response to nutrient limitation. Results also provide potential marker genes for further evaluating the physiological response and toxin production of P. parvum populations during bloom formation or to changing environmental conditions. PMID:26157435

  3. Comparative Digital Gene Expression Analysis of the Arabidopsis Response to Volatiles Emitted by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Hai-Ting; Zhao, Xia; Shang, Qian-Han; Wang, Yun; Guo, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Yu-Bao; Xie, Zhong-Kui; Wang, Ruo-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Some plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) regulated plant growth and elicited plant basal immunity by volatiles. The response mechanism to the Bacillus amyloliquefaciens volatiles in plant has not been well studied. We conducted global gene expression profiling in Arabidopsis after treatment with Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 volatiles by Illumina Digital Gene Expression (DGE) profiling of different growth stages (seedling and mature) and tissues (leaves and roots). Compared with the control, 1,507 and 820 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in leaves and roots at the seedling stage, respectively, while 1,512 and 367 DEGs were identified in leaves and roots at the mature stage. Seventeen genes with different regulatory patterns were validated using quantitative RT-PCR. Numerous DEGs were enriched for plant hormones, cell wall modifications, and protection against stress situations, which suggests that volatiles have effects on plant growth and immunity. Moreover, analyzes of transcriptome difference in tissues and growth stage using DGE profiling showed that the plant response might be tissue-specific and/or growth stage-specific. Thus, genes encoding flavonoid biosynthesis were downregulated in leaves and upregulated in roots, thereby indicating tissue-specific responses to volatiles. Genes related to photosynthesis were downregulated at the seedling stage and upregulated at the mature stage, respectively, thereby suggesting growth period-specific responses. In addition, the emission of bacterial volatiles significantly induced killing of cells of other organism pathway with up-regulated genes in leaves and the other three pathways (defense response to nematode, cell morphogenesis involved in differentiation and trichoblast differentiation) with up-regulated genes were significantly enriched in roots. Interestingly, some important alterations in the expression of growth-related genes, metabolic pathways, defense response to biotic

  4. Comparative Digital Gene Expression Analysis of the Arabidopsis Response to Volatiles Emitted by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens.

    PubMed

    Hao, Hai-Ting; Zhao, Xia; Shang, Qian-Han; Wang, Yun; Guo, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Yu-Bao; Xie, Zhong-Kui; Wang, Ruo-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Some plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) regulated plant growth and elicited plant basal immunity by volatiles. The response mechanism to the Bacillus amyloliquefaciens volatiles in plant has not been well studied. We conducted global gene expression profiling in Arabidopsis after treatment with Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 volatiles by Illumina Digital Gene Expression (DGE) profiling of different growth stages (seedling and mature) and tissues (leaves and roots). Compared with the control, 1,507 and 820 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in leaves and roots at the seedling stage, respectively, while 1,512 and 367 DEGs were identified in leaves and roots at the mature stage. Seventeen genes with different regulatory patterns were validated using quantitative RT-PCR. Numerous DEGs were enriched for plant hormones, cell wall modifications, and protection against stress situations, which suggests that volatiles have effects on plant growth and immunity. Moreover, analyzes of transcriptome difference in tissues and growth stage using DGE profiling showed that the plant response might be tissue-specific and/or growth stage-specific. Thus, genes encoding flavonoid biosynthesis were downregulated in leaves and upregulated in roots, thereby indicating tissue-specific responses to volatiles. Genes related to photosynthesis were downregulated at the seedling stage and upregulated at the mature stage, respectively, thereby suggesting growth period-specific responses. In addition, the emission of bacterial volatiles significantly induced killing of cells of other organism pathway with up-regulated genes in leaves and the other three pathways (defense response to nematode, cell morphogenesis involved in differentiation and trichoblast differentiation) with up-regulated genes were significantly enriched in roots. Interestingly, some important alterations in the expression of growth-related genes, metabolic pathways, defense response to biotic

  5. Gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa swarming motility

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of three types of motilities: swimming, twitching and swarming. The latter is characterized by a fast and coordinated group movement over a semi-solid surface resulting from intercellular interactions and morphological differentiation. A striking feature of swarming motility is the complex fractal-like patterns displayed by migrating bacteria while they move away from their inoculation point. This type of group behaviour is still poorly understood and its characterization provides important information on bacterial structured communities such as biofilms. Using GeneChip® Affymetrix microarrays, we obtained the transcriptomic profiles of both bacterial populations located at the tip of migrating tendrils and swarm center of swarming colonies and compared these profiles to that of a bacterial control population grown on the same media but solidified to not allow swarming motility. Results Microarray raw data were corrected for background noise with the RMA algorithm and quantile normalized. Differentially expressed genes between the three conditions were selected using a threshold of 1.5 log2-fold, which gave a total of 378 selected genes (6.3% of the predicted open reading frames of strain PA14). Major shifts in gene expression patterns are observed in each growth conditions, highlighting the presence of distinct bacterial subpopulations within a swarming colony (tendril tips vs. swarm center). Unexpectedly, microarrays expression data reveal that a minority of genes are up-regulated in tendril tip populations. Among them, we found energy metabolism, ribosomal protein and transport of small molecules related genes. On the other hand, many well-known virulence factors genes were globally repressed in tendril tip cells. Swarm center cells are distinct and appear to be under oxidative and copper stress responses. Conclusions Results reported in this study show that, as opposed to swarm center cells, tendril

  6. Heritability and expression of C sub 4 photosynthesis in hybrids between C sub 3 -C sub 4 and C sub 4 Flaveria

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    In general, leaves of C{sub 4} plants are considered to be more efficient at fixing atmospheric CO{sub 2} than those of C{sub 3} plants. Such efficiency in carbon assimilation is attributed to unique C{sub 4} features in anatomy, physiology and biochemistry of leaves. In these studies I investigated whether these C{sub 4} characteristics can be inherited and expressed in C{sub 3}-C{sub 4} species through artificial hybridization with C{sub 4} species in genus Flaveria. The expression of C{sub 4} photosynthesis in the parent C{sub 4} parent F. brownii is influenced by the light intensity during growth. Characterization of these F{sub 1} hybrids demonstrates that several C{sub 4} traits are heritable. The expression of Kranz leaf anatomy, and the activities and/or quantities of key C{sub 4} enzymes in the F{sub 1} hybrids are intermediate between levels in the parents. Enzyme localization studies with isolated leaf mesophyll and bundle sheath protoplasts indicated that these hybrids lack a complete compartmentation of major photosynthetic enzymes, but they do exhibit a differential distribution of these enzymes between the two cell types. Furthermore, {sup 14}CO{sub 2} labeling experiments showed that they all possess a high degree of functional C{sub 4} photosynthesis, which may in part contribute to the reduced photorespiration observed in the F{sub 1} hybrids.

  7. A novel circadianly expressed Drosophila melanogaster gene dependent on the period gene for its rhythmic expression.

    PubMed Central

    Van Gelder, R N; Krasnow, M A

    1996-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster period (per) gene is required for expression of endogenous circadian rhythms of locomotion and eclosion. per mRNA is expressed with a circadian rhythm that is dependent on Per protein; this feedback loop has been proposed to be essential to the central circadian pacemaker. This model would suggest the Per protein also controls the circadian expression of other genetic loci to generate circadian behavior and physiology. In this paper we describe Dreg-5, a gene whose mRNA is expressed in fly heads with a circadian rhythm nearly identical to that of the per gene. Dreg-5 mRNA continues to cycle in phase with that of per mRNA in conditions of total darkness and also when the daily feeding time is altered. Like per mRNA, Dreg-5 mRNA is not expressed rhythmically in per null mutant flies. Dreg-5 encodes a novel 298 residue protein and Dreg-5 protein isoforms also oscillate in abundance with a circadian rhythm. The phase of Dreg-5 protein oscillation, however, is different from that of Per protein expression, suggesting that Dreg-5 and per have common translational but different post-translational control mechanisms. These results demonstrate that the per gene is capable of modulating the rhythmic expression of other genes; this activity may form the basis of the output of circadian rhythmicity in Drosophila. Images PMID:8612586

  8. Identifying Driver Genes in Cancer by Triangulating Gene Expression, Gene Location, and Survival Data

    PubMed Central

    Rouam, Sigrid; Miller, Lance D; Karuturi, R Krishna Murthy

    2014-01-01

    Driver genes are directly responsible for oncogenesis and identifying them is essential in order to fully understand the mechanisms of cancer. However, it is difficult to delineate them from the larger pool of genes that are deregulated in cancer (ie, passenger genes). In order to address this problem, we developed an approach called TRIAngulating Gene Expression (TRIAGE through clinico-genomic intersects). Here, we present a refinement of this approach incorporating a new scoring methodology to identify putative driver genes that are deregulated in cancer. TRIAGE triangulates – or integrates – three levels of information: gene expression, gene location, and patient survival. First, TRIAGE identifies regions of deregulated expression (ie, expression footprints) by deriving a newly established measure called the Local Singular Value Decomposition (LSVD) score for each locus. Driver genes are then distinguished from passenger genes using dual survival analyses. Incorporating measurements of gene expression and weighting them according to the LSVD weight of each tumor, these analyses are performed using the genes located in significant expression footprints. Here, we first use simulated data to characterize the newly established LSVD score. We then present the results of our application of this refined version of TRIAGE to gene expression data from five cancer types. This refined version of TRIAGE not only allowed us to identify known prominent driver genes, such as MMP1, IL8, and COL1A2, but it also led us to identify several novel ones. These results illustrate that TRIAGE complements existing tools, allows for the identification of genes that drive cancer and could perhaps elucidate potential future targets of novel anticancer therapeutics. PMID:25949096

  9. Molecular imaging of in vivo gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Harney, Allison S.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Advances in imaging technologies have taken a prominent role in experimental and translational research and provide essential information on how changes in gene expression are related to downstream developmental and disease states. Discussion Magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents and optical probes developed to enhance signal intensity in the presence of a specific enzyme, genetic marker, second messenger or metabolite can prove a facile method of advancing the understanding of molecular events in disease progression. Conclusion The ability to detect changes in gene expression at the early stages of disease will lead to a greater understanding of disease progression, the use of early therapeutic intervention to increase patient survival, and tailored therapies to the detected genetic alterations in individual patients. PMID:21426178

  10. DNA supercoiling and bacterial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Dorman, Charles J

    2006-01-01

    DNA in bacterial cells is maintained in a negatively supercoiled state. This contributes to the organization of the bacterial nucleoid and also influences the global gene expression pattern in the cell through modulatory effects on transcription. Supercoiling arises as a result of changes to the linking number of the relaxed double-stranded DNA molecule and is set and reset by the action of DNA topoisomerases. This process is subject to a multitude of influences that are usually summarized as environmental stress. Responsiveness of linking number change to stress offers the promise of a mechanism for the wholesale adjustment of the transcription programme of the cell as the bacterium experiences different environments. Recent data from DNA microarray experiments support this proposition. The emerging picture is one of DNA supercoiling acting at or near the apex of a regulatory hierarchy where it collaborates with nucleoid-associated proteins and transcription factors to determine the gene expression profile of the cell. PMID:17338437

  11. Structure, expression and functions of MTA genes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Wang, Rui-An

    2016-05-15

    Metastatic associated proteins (MTA) are integrators of upstream regulatory signals with the ability to act as master coregulators for modifying gene transcriptional activity. The MTA family includes three genes and multiple alternatively spliced variants. The MTA proteins neither have their own enzymatic activity nor have been shown to directly interact with DNA. However, MTA proteins interact with a variety of chromatin remodeling factors and complexes with enzymatic activities for modulating the plasticity of nucleosomes, leading to the repression or derepression of target genes or other extra-nuclear and nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD)-complex independent activities. The functions of MTA family members are driven by the steady state levels and subcellular localization of MTA proteins, the dynamic nature of modifying signals and enzymes, the structural features and post-translational modification of protein domains, interactions with binding proteins, and the nature of the engaged and resulting features of nucleosomes in the proximity of target genes. In general, MTA1 and MTA2 are the most upregulated genes in human cancer and correlate well with aggressive phenotypes, therapeutic resistance, poor prognosis and ultimately, unfavorable survival of cancer patients. Here we will discuss the structure, expression and functions of the MTA family of genes in the context of cancer cells. PMID:26869315

  12. Global Gene Expression in Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Beenken, Karen E.; Dunman, Paul M.; McAleese, Fionnuala; Macapagal, Daphne; Murphy, Ellen; Projan, Steven J.; Blevins, Jon S.; Smeltzer, Mark S.

    2004-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that mutation of the staphylococcal accessory regulator (sarA) in a clinical isolate of Staphylococcus aureus (UAMS-1) results in an impaired capacity to form a biofilm in vitro (K. E. Beenken, J. S. Blevins, and M. S. Smeltzer, Infect. Immun. 71:4206-4211, 2003). In this report, we used a murine model of catheter-based biofilm formation to demonstrate that a UAMS-1 sarA mutant also has a reduced capacity to form a biofilm in vivo. Surprisingly, mutation of the UAMS-1 ica locus had little impact on biofilm formation in vitro or in vivo. In an effort to identify additional loci that might be relevant to biofilm formation and/or the adaptive response required for persistence of S. aureus within a biofilm, we isolated total cellular RNA from UAMS-1 harvested from a biofilm grown in a flow cell and compared the transcriptional profile of this RNA to RNA isolated from both exponential- and stationary-phase planktonic cultures. Comparisons were done using a custom-made Affymetrix GeneChip representing the genomic complement of six strains of S. aureus (COL, N315, Mu50, NCTC 8325, EMRSA-16 [strain 252], and MSSA-476). The results confirm that the sessile lifestyle associated with persistence within a biofilm is distinct by comparison to the lifestyles of both the exponential and postexponential phases of planktonic culture. Indeed, we identified 48 genes in which expression was induced at least twofold in biofilms over expression under both planktonic conditions. Similarly, we identified 84 genes in which expression was repressed by a factor of at least 2 compared to expression under both planktonic conditions. A primary theme that emerged from the analysis of these genes is that persistence within a biofilm requires an adaptive response that limits the deleterious effects of the reduced pH associated with anaerobic growth conditions. PMID:15231800

  13. Imaging gene expression in single living cells

    PubMed Central

    Shav-Tal, Yaron; Singer, Robert H.; Darzacq, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Technical advances in the field of live-cell imaging have introduced the cell biologist to a new, dynamic, subcellular world. The static world of molecules in fixed cells has now been extended to the time dimension. This allows the visualization and quantification of gene expression and intracellular trafficking events of the studied molecules and the associated enzymatic processes in individual cells, in real time. PMID:15459666

  14. Gene Expression Changes during the Gummosis Development of Peach Shoots in Response to Lasiodiplodia theobromae Infection Using RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Wang, Yuting; Li, Zhi; Zhang, He; Ye, Junli; Li, Guohuai

    2016-01-01

    Lasiodiplodia theobromae is a causal agent of peach (Prunus persica L.) tree gummosis, a serious disease affecting peach cultivation and production. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the pathogenesis remains unclear. RNA-Seq was performed to investigate gene expression in peach shoots inoculated or mock-inoculated with L. theobromae. A total of 20772 genes were detected in eight samples; 4231, 3750, 3453, and 3612 differentially expressed genes were identified at 12, 24, 48, and 60 h after inoculation, respectively. Furthermore, 920 differentially co-expressed genes (515 upregulated and 405 downregulated) were found, respectively. Gene ontology annotation revealed that phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and metabolism, uridine diphosphate-glucosyltransferase activity, and photosynthesis were the most differentially regulated processes during gummosis development. Significant differences were also found in the expression of genes involved in glycometabolism and in ethylene and jasmonic acid biosynthesis and signaling. These data illustrate the dynamic changes in gene expression in the inoculated peach shoots at the transcriptome level. Overall, gene expression in defense response and glycometabolism might result in the gummosis of peach trees induced by L. theobromae. PMID:27242544

  15. Infection of Apple by Apple Stem Grooving Virus Leads to Extensive Alterations in Gene Expression Patterns but No Disease Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Lu; Chen, Hui; Wang, Shaojie; Fan, Zaifeng; Guo, Liyun; Zhou, Tao

    2014-01-01

    To understand the molecular basis of viral diseases, transcriptome profiling has been widely used to correlate host gene expression change patterns with disease symptoms during viral infection in many plant hosts. We used infection of apple by Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV), which produces no disease symptoms, to assess the significance of host gene expression changes in disease development. We specifically asked the question of whether such asymptomatic infection is attributed to limited changes in host gene expression. Using RNA-seq, we identified a total of 184 up-regulated and 136 down-regulated genes in apple shoot cultures permanently infected by ASGV in comparison with virus-free shoot cultures. As in most plant hosts showing disease symptoms during viral infection, these differentially expressed genes encode known or putative proteins involved in cell cycle, cell wall biogenesis, response to biotic and abiotic stress, development and fruit ripening, phytohormone function, metabolism, signal transduction, transcription regulation, translation, transport, and photosynthesis. Thus, global host gene expression changes do not necessarily lead to virus disease symptoms. Our data suggest that the general approaches to correlate host gene expression changes under viral infection conditions to specific disease symptom, based on the interpretation of transcription profiling data and altered individual gene functions, may have limitations depending on particular experimental systems. PMID:24736405

  16. Gene Expression Changes during the Gummosis Development of Peach Shoots in Response to Lasiodiplodia theobromae Infection Using RNA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lei; Wang, Yuting; Li, Zhi; Zhang, He; Ye, Junli; Li, Guohuai

    2016-01-01

    Lasiodiplodia theobromae is a causal agent of peach (Prunus persica L.) tree gummosis, a serious disease affecting peach cultivation and production. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the pathogenesis remains unclear. RNA-Seq was performed to investigate gene expression in peach shoots inoculated or mock-inoculated with L. theobromae. A total of 20772 genes were detected in eight samples; 4231, 3750, 3453, and 3612 differentially expressed genes were identified at 12, 24, 48, and 60 h after inoculation, respectively. Furthermore, 920 differentially co-expressed genes (515 upregulated and 405 downregulated) were found, respectively. Gene ontology annotation revealed that phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and metabolism, uridine diphosphate-glucosyltransferase activity, and photosynthesis were the most differentially regulated processes during gummosis development. Significant differences were also found in the expression of genes involved in glycometabolism and in ethylene and jasmonic acid biosynthesis and signaling. These data illustrate the dynamic changes in gene expression in the inoculated peach shoots at the transcriptome level. Overall, gene expression in defense response and glycometabolism might result in the gummosis of peach trees induced by L. theobromae. PMID:27242544

  17. Infection of apple by apple stem grooving virus leads to extensive alterations in gene expression patterns but no disease symptoms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shanyi; Ye, Ting; Hao, Lu; Chen, Hui; Wang, Shaojie; Fan, Zaifeng; Guo, Liyun; Zhou, Tao

    2014-01-01

    To understand the molecular basis of viral diseases, transcriptome profiling has been widely used to correlate host gene expression change patterns with disease symptoms during viral infection in many plant hosts. We used infection of apple by Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV), which produces no disease symptoms, to assess the significance of host gene expression changes in disease development. We specifically asked the question of whether such asymptomatic infection is attributed to limited changes in host gene expression. Using RNA-seq, we identified a total of 184 up-regulated and 136 down-regulated genes in apple shoot cultures permanently infected by ASGV in comparison with virus-free shoot cultures. As in most plant hosts showing disease symptoms during viral infection, these differentially expressed genes encode known or putative proteins involved in cell cycle, cell wall biogenesis, response to biotic and abiotic stress, development and fruit ripening, phytohormone function, metabolism, signal transduction, transcription regulation, translation, transport, and photosynthesis. Thus, global host gene expression changes do not necessarily lead to virus disease symptoms. Our data suggest that the general approaches to correlate host gene expression changes under viral infection conditions to specific disease symptom, based on the interpretation of transcription profiling data and altered individual gene functions, may have limitations depending on particular experimental systems. PMID:24736405

  18. Most photorespiratory genes are preferentially expressed in the bundle sheath cells of the C4 grass Sorghum bicolor

    PubMed Central

    Döring, Florian; Streubel, Monika; Bräutigam, Andrea; Gowik, Udo

    2016-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of C4 plants is the division of labor between two different photosynthetic cell types, the mesophyll and the bundle sheath cells. C4 plants are of polyphyletic origin and, during the evolution of C4 photosynthesis, the expression of thousands of genes was altered and many genes acquired a cell type-specific or preferential expression pattern. Several lines of evidence, including computational modeling and physiological and phylogenetic analyses, indicate that alterations in the expression of a key photorespiration-related gene, encoding the glycine decarboxylase P subunit, was an early and important step during C4 evolution. Restricting the expression of this gene to the bundle sheath led to the establishment of a photorespiratory CO2 pump. We were interested in whether the expression of genes related to photorespiration remains bundle sheath specific in a fully optimized C4 species. Therefore we analyzed the expression of photorespiratory and C4 cycle genes using RNA in situ hybridization and transcriptome analysis of isolated mesophyll and bundle sheath cells in the C4 grass Sorghum bicolor. It turns out that the C4 metabolism of Sorghum is based solely on the NADP-dependent malic enzyme pathway. The majority of photorespiratory gene expression, with some important exceptions, is restricted to the bundle sheath. PMID:26976818

  19. Most photorespiratory genes are preferentially expressed in the bundle sheath cells of the C4 grass Sorghum bicolor.

    PubMed

    Döring, Florian; Streubel, Monika; Bräutigam, Andrea; Gowik, Udo

    2016-05-01

    One of the hallmarks of C4 plants is the division of labor between two different photosynthetic cell types, the mesophyll and the bundle sheath cells. C4 plants are of polyphyletic origin and, during the evolution of C4 photosynthesis, the expression of thousands of genes was altered and many genes acquired a cell type-specific or preferential expression pattern. Several lines of evidence, including computational modeling and physiological and phylogenetic analyses, indicate that alterations in the expression of a key photorespiration-related gene, encoding the glycine decarboxylase P subunit, was an early and important step during C4 evolution. Restricting the expression of this gene to the bundle sheath led to the establishment of a photorespiratory CO2 pump. We were interested in whether the expression of genes related to photorespiration remains bundle sheath specific in a fully optimized C4 species. Therefore we analyzed the expression of photorespiratory and C4 cycle genes using RNA in situ hybridization and transcriptome analysis of isolated mesophyll and bundle sheath cells in the C4 grass Sorghum bicolor It turns out that the C4 metabolism of Sorghum is based solely on the NADP-dependent malic enzyme pathway. The majority of photorespiratory gene expression, with some important exceptions, is restricted to the bundle sheath. PMID:26976818

  20. The systemic control of circadian gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gerber, A; Saini, C; Curie, T; Emmenegger, Y; Rando, G; Gosselin, P; Gotic, I; Gos, P; Franken, P; Schibler, U

    2015-09-01

    The mammalian circadian timing system consists of a central pacemaker in the brain's suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and subsidiary oscillators in nearly all body cells. The SCN clock, which is adjusted to geophysical time by the photoperiod, synchronizes peripheral clocks through a wide variety of systemic cues. The latter include signals depending on feeding cycles, glucocorticoid hormones, rhythmic blood-borne signals eliciting daily changes in actin dynamics and serum response factor (SRF) activity, and sensors of body temperature rhythms, such as heat shock transcription factors and the cold-inducible RNA-binding protein CIRP. To study these systemic signalling pathways, we designed and engineered a novel, highly photosensitive apparatus, dubbed RT-Biolumicorder. This device enables us to record circadian luciferase reporter gene expression in the liver and other organs of freely moving mice over months in real time. Owing to the multitude of systemic signalling pathway involved in the phase resetting of peripheral clocks the disruption of any particular one has only minor effects on the steady state phase of circadian gene expression in organs such as the liver. Nonetheless, the implication of specific pathways in the synchronization of clock gene expression can readily be assessed by monitoring the phase-shifting kinetics using the RT-Biolumicorder. PMID:26332965

  1. Nuclear structure, gene expression and development.

    PubMed

    Brown, K

    1999-01-01

    This article considers the extent to which features of nuclear structure are involved in the regulation of genome function. The recent renaissance in imaging technology has inspired a new determination to assign specific functions to nuclear domains or structures, many of which have been described as "factories" to express the idea that they coordinate nuclear processes in an efficient way. Visual data have been combined with genetic and biochemical information to support the idea that nuclear organization has functional significance. Particular DNA sequences or chromatin structures may nucleate domains that are permissive or restrictive of transcription, to which active or inactive loci could be recruited. Associations within the nucleus, as well as many nuclear structures, are transient and change dynamically during cell cycle progression and development. Despite this complexity, elucidation of the possible structural basis of epigenetic phenomena, such as the inheritance of a "cellular memory" of gene expression status, is an important goal for cell biology. Topics for discussion include the regulatory effect of chromatin structure on gene expression, putative "nuclear addresses" for genes and proteins, the functional significance of nuclear bodies, and the role of the nuclear matrix in nuclear compartmentalization. PMID:10651237

  2. Carbon Nanomaterials Alter Global Gene Expression Profiles.

    PubMed

    Woodman, Sara; Short, John C W; McDermott, Hyoeun; Linan, Alexander; Bartlett, Katelyn; Gadila, Shiva Kumar Goud; Schmelzle, Katie; Wanekaya, Adam; Kim, Kyoungtae

    2016-05-01

    Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs), which include carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their derivatives, have diverse technological and biomedical applications. The potential toxicity of CNMs to cells and tissues has become an important emerging question in nanotechnology. To assess the toxicity of CNTs and fullerenol C60(OH)24, we in the present work used the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one of the simplest eukaryotic organisms that share fundamental aspects of eukaryotic cell biology. We found that treatment with CNMs, regardless of their physical shape, negatively affected the growth rates, end-point cell densities and doubling times of CNM-exposed yeast cells when compared to unexposed cells. To investigate potential mechanisms behind the CNMs-induced growth defects, we performed RNA-Seq dependent transcriptional analysis and constructed global gene expression profiles of fullerenol C60(OH)24- and CNT-treated cells. When compared to non-treated control cells, CNM-treated cells displayed differential expression of genes whose functions are implicated in membrane transporters and stress response, although differentially expressed genes were not consistent between CNT- and fullerenol C60(OH)24-treated groups, leading to our conclusion that CNMs could serve as environmental toxic factors to eukaryotic cells. PMID:27483901

  3. Transition Metals in Control of Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Halloran, Thomas V.

    1993-08-01

    Metalloproteins play structural and catalytic roles in gene expression. The metalloregulatory proteins are a subclass that exerts metal-responsive control of genes involved in respiration, metabolism, and metal-specific homeostasis or stress-response systems, such as iron uptake and storage, copper efflux, and mercury detoxification. Two allosteric mechanisms for control of gene expression were first discovered in metalloregulatory systems: an iron-responsive translational control mechanism for ferritin production and a mercury-responsive DNA-distortion mechanism for transcriptional control of detoxification genes. These otherwise unrelated mechanisms give rise to a rapid physiological response when metal ion concentrations exceed a dangerous threshold. Molecular recognition in these allosteric metal ion receptors is achieved through atypical coordination geometries, cluster formation, or complexes with prosthetic groups, such as sulfide and heme. Thus, many of the inorganic assemblies that otherwise buttress the structure of biopolymers or catalyze substrate transformation in active sites of enzymes have also been adapted to serve sensor functions in the metalloregulatory proteins. Mechanistic studies of these metal-sensor protein interactions are providing new insights into fundamental aspects of inorganic chemistry, molecular biology, and cellular physiology.

  4. Gene expression profiling of inflammatory bladder disorders.

    PubMed

    Saban, Marcia R; Nguyen, Ngoc-Bich; Hurst, Robert E; Saban, Ricardo

    2003-03-01

    Inflammation underlies all major bladder pathologies including malignancy and represents a defense reaction to injury caused by physical damage, chemical substances, micro-organisms or other agents. During acute inflammation, activation of specific molecular pathways leads to an increased expression of selected genes whose products attack the insult, but ultimately should protect the tissue from the noxious stimulus. However, once the stimulus ceases, gene-expression should return to basal levels to avoid tissue damage, fibrosis, loss of function, and chronic inflammation. If this down-regulation does not occur, tissue fibrosis occurs as a serious complication of chronic inflammation. Although sensory nerve and most cells products are known to be key parts of the inflammatory puzzle, other key molecules are constantly being described that have a role in bladder inflammation. Therefore, as the database describing the repertoire of inflammatory mediators implicated in bladder inflammation increases, the central mechanisms by which injury can induce inflammation, cell damage, and repair often becomes less rather than more clear. To make sense of the vast knowledge of the genes involved in the inflammatory response may require analysis of the patterns of change and the elucidation of gene networks far more than definition of additional members of inflammatory cascades. This review discuss the appropriate use of microarray technology, which promises to solve both of these problems as well as identifying key molecules and mechanisms involved in the transition between acute and chronic inflammation. PMID:12647997

  5. Transcriptional analysis of human survivin gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Li, F; Altieri, D C

    1999-01-01

    The preservation of tissue and organ homoeostasis depends on the regulated expression of genes controlling apoptosis (programmed cell death). In this study, we have investigated the basal transcriptional requirements of the survivin gene, an IAP (inhibitor of apoptosis) prominently up-regulated in cancer. Analysis of the 5' flanking region of the human survivin gene revealed the presence of a TATA-less promoter containing a canonical CpG island of approximately 250 nt, three cell cycle dependent elements, one cell cycle homology region and numerous Sp1 sites. PCR-based analysis of human genomic DNA, digested with methylation-sensitive and -insensitive restriction enzymes, indicated that the CpG island was unmethylated in both normal and neoplastic tissues. Primer extension and S1 nuclease mapping of the human survivin gene identified two main transcription start sites at position -72 and within -57/-61 from the initiating ATG. Transfection of cervical carcinoma HeLa cells with truncated or nested survivin promoter-luciferase constructs revealed the presence of both enhancer and repressor sequences and identified a minimal promoter region within the proximal -230 nt of the human survivin gene. Unbiased mutagenesis analysis of the human survivin promoter revealed that targeting the Sp1 sequences at position -171 and -151 abolished basal transcriptional activity by approximately 63-82%. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assay with DNA oligonucleotides confirmed formation of a DNA-protein complex between the survivin Sp1 sequences and HeLa cell extracts in a reaction abolished by mutagenesis of the survivin Sp1 sites. These findings identify the basal transcriptional requirements of survivin gene expression. PMID:10567210

  6. Screening of differentially expressed genes in pathological scar tissues using expression microarray.

    PubMed

    Huang, L P; Mao, Z; Zhang, L; Liu, X X; Huang, C; Jia, Z S

    2015-01-01

    Pathological scar tissues and normal skin tissues were differentiated by screening for differentially expressed genes in pathologic scar tissues via gene expression microarray. The differentially expressed gene data was analyzed by gene ontology and pathway analyses. There were 5001 up- or down-regulated genes in 2-fold differentially expressed genes, 956 up- or down-regulated genes in 5-fold differentially expressed genes, and 114 up- or down-regulated genes in 20-fold differentially expressed genes. Therefore, significant differences were observed in the gene expression in pathological scar tissues and normal foreskin tissues. The development of pathological scar tissues has been correlated to changes in multiple genes and pathways, which are believed to form a dynamic network connection. PMID:26400303

  7. Differential Gene Expression between Leaf and Rhizome in Atractylodes lancea: A Comparative Transcriptome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qianqian; Huang, Xiao; Deng, Juan; Liu, Hegang; Liu, Yanwen; Yu, Kun; Huang, Bisheng

    2016-01-01

    The rhizome of Atractylodes lancea is extensively used in the practice of Traditional Chinese Medicine because of its broad pharmacological activities. This study was designed to characterize the transcriptome profiling of the rhizome and leaf of Atractylodes lancea in an attempt to uncover the molecular mechanisms regulating rhizome formation and growth. Over 270 million clean reads were assembled into 92,366 unigenes, 58% of which are homologous with sequences in public protein databases (NR, Swiss-Prot, GO, and KEGG). Analysis of expression levels showed that genes involved in photosynthesis, stress response, and translation were the most abundant transcripts in the leaf, while transcripts involved in stress response, transcription regulation, translation, and metabolism were dominant in the rhizome. Tissue-specific gene analysis identified distinct gene families active in the leaf and rhizome. Differential gene expression analysis revealed a clear difference in gene expression pattern, identifying 1518 up-regulated genes and 3464 down-regulated genes in the rhizome compared with the leaf, including a series of genes related to signal transduction, primary and secondary metabolism. Transcription factor (TF) analysis identified 42 TF families, with 67 and 60 TFs up-regulated in the rhizome and leaf, respectively. A total of 104 unigenes were identified as candidates for regulating rhizome formation and development. These data offer an overview of the gene expression pattern of the rhizome and leaf and provide essential information for future studies on the molecular mechanisms of controlling rhizome formation and growth. The extensive transcriptome data generated in this study will be a valuable resource for further functional genomics studies of A. lancea. PMID:27066021

  8. Reduced expression of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus ORF34, an essential gene, enhances heterologous gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, Tamer Z.; Zhang, Fengrui; Thiem, Suzanne M.

    2013-01-20

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ORF34 is part of a transcriptional unit that includes ORF32, encoding a viral fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and ORF33. We identified ORF34 as a candidate for deletion to improve protein expression in the baculovirus expression system based on enhanced reporter gene expression in an RNAi screen of virus genes. However, ORF34 was shown to be an essential gene. To explore ORF34 function, deletion (KO34) and rescue bacmids were constructed and characterized. Infection did not spread from primary KO34 transfected cells and supernatants from KO34 transfected cells could not infect fresh Sf21 cells whereas the supernatant from the rescue bacmids transfection could recover the infection. In addition, budded viruses were not observed in KO34 transfected cells by electron microscopy, nor were viral proteins detected from the transfection supernatants by western blots. These demonstrate that ORF34 is an essential gene with a possible role in infectious virus production.

  9. Heme Synthesis by Plastid Ferrochelatase I Regulates Nuclear Gene Expression in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Woodson, Jesse D.; Perez-Ruiz, Juan M.; Chory, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Summary Chloroplast signals regulate hundreds of nuclear genes during development and in response to stress, but little is known of the signals or signal transduction mechanisms of plastid-to-nucleus (retrograde) signaling [1, 2]. In Arabidopsis thaliana, genetic studies using norflurazon (NF), an inhibitor of carotenoid biosynthesis, have identified five GUN (genomes uncoupled) genes, implicating the tetrapyrrole pathway as a source of a retrograde signal. Loss of function of any of these GUN genes leads to increased expression of photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes (PhANGs) when chloroplast development has been blocked by NF [3, 4]. Here we present a new Arabidopsis gain-of-function mutant, gun6-1D, with a similar phenotype. The gun6-1Dmutant overexpresses the conserved plastid ferrochelatase 1 (FC1, heme synthase). Genetic and biochemical experiments demonstrate that increased flux through the heme branch of the plastid tetrapyrrole biosynthetic pathway increases PhANG expression. The second conserved plant ferrochelatase, FC2, colocalizes with FC1, but FC2 activity is unable to increase PhANG expression in undeveloped plastids. These data suggest a model in which heme, specifically produced by FC1, may be used as a retrograde signal to coordinate PhANG expression with chloroplast development. PMID:21565502

  10. Multiple abiotic stimuli are integrated in the regulation of rice gene expression under field conditions

    PubMed Central

    Plessis, Anne; Hafemeister, Christoph; Wilkins, Olivia; Gonzaga, Zennia Jean; Meyer, Rachel Sarah; Pires, Inês; Müller, Christian; Septiningsih, Endang M; Bonneau, Richard; Purugganan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Plants rely on transcriptional dynamics to respond to multiple climatic fluctuations and contexts in nature. We analyzed the genome-wide gene expression patterns of rice (Oryza sativa) growing in rainfed and irrigated fields during two distinct tropical seasons and determined simple linear models that relate transcriptomic variation to climatic fluctuations. These models combine multiple environmental parameters to account for patterns of expression in the field of co-expressed gene clusters. We examined the similarities of our environmental models between tropical and temperate field conditions, using previously published data. We found that field type and macroclimate had broad impacts on transcriptional responses to environmental fluctuations, especially for genes involved in photosynthesis and development. Nevertheless, variation in solar radiation and temperature at the timescale of hours had reproducible effects across environmental contexts. These results provide a basis for broad-based predictive modeling of plant gene expression in the field. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08411.001 PMID:26609814