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Sample records for photosynthetic membrane expression

  1. Oxygen dynamics in photosynthetic membranes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savikhin, Sergei; Kihara, Shigeharu

    2008-03-01

    Production of oxygen by oxygenic photosynthetic organisms is expected to raise oxygen concentration within their photosynthetic membranes above normal aerobic values. These raised levels of oxygen may affect function of many proteins within photosynthetic cells. However, experiments on proteins in vitro are usually performed in aerobic (or anaerobic) conditions since the oxygen content of a membrane is not known. Using theory of diffusion and measured oxygen production rates we estimated the excess levels of oxygen in functioning photosynthetic cells. We show that for an individual photosynthetic cell suspended in water oxygen level is essentially the same as that for a non-photosynthetic sell. These data suggest that oxygen protection mechanisms may have evolved after the development of oxygenic photosynthesis in primitive bacteria and was driven by the overall rise of oxygen concentration in the atmosphere. Substantially higher levels of oxygen are estimated to occur in closely packed colonies of photosynthetic bacteria and in green leafs.

  2. Electrostatics of photosynthetic reaction centers in membranes.

    PubMed

    Pennisi, Cristian P; Greenbaum, Elias; Yoshida, Ken

    2006-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers are integral membrane complexes. They have potential application as molecular photovoltaic structures and have been used in diverse technological applications. A three-dimensional electrostatic model of the photosystem I reaction center (PSI) embedded in a lipid membrane is presented. The potential is obtained by solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation with the finite element method (FEM). Simulations showing the potential distribution in a vesicle containing PSI reaction centers under different conditions are presented. The results of the simulations are compared with previous findings and a possible application of PSI to provide light activation of voltage-gated ion channels is discussed. PMID:17946611

  3. A Model for Prediction of Heat Stability of Photosynthetic Membranes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A previous study has revealed a positive correlation between heat-induced damage to photosynthetic membranes (thylakoid membranes) and chlorophyll loss. In this study, we exploited this correlation and developed a model for prediction of thermal damage to thylakoids. Prediction is based on estimat...

  4. Functional Implications of Photosystem II Crystal Formation in Photosynthetic Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Tietz, Stefanie; Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Enlow, Heather M.; Yarbrough, Robert; Wood, Magnus; Semchonok, Dmitry A.; Lowry, Troy; Li, Zhirong; Jahns, Peter; Boekema, Egbert J.; Lenhert, Steven; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Kirchhoff, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    The structural organization of proteins in biological membranes can affect their function. Photosynthetic thylakoid membranes in chloroplasts have the remarkable ability to change their supramolecular organization between disordered and semicrystalline states. Although the change to the semicrystalline state is known to be triggered by abiotic factors, the functional significance of this protein organization has not yet been understood. Taking advantage of an Arabidopsis thaliana fatty acid desaturase mutant (fad5) that constitutively forms semicrystalline arrays, we systematically test the functional implications of protein crystals in photosynthetic membranes. Here, we show that the change into an ordered state facilitates molecular diffusion of photosynthetic components in crowded thylakoid membranes. The increased mobility of small lipophilic molecules like plastoquinone and xanthophylls has implications for diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotective energy-dependent quenching. The mobility of the large photosystem II supercomplexes, however, is impaired, leading to retarded repair of damaged proteins. Our results demonstrate that supramolecular changes into more ordered states have differing impacts on photosynthesis that favor either diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotection or protein repair processes, thus fine-tuning the photosynthetic energy conversion. PMID:25897076

  5. Functional Implications of Photosystem II Crystal Formation in Photosynthetic Membranes.

    PubMed

    Tietz, Stefanie; Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Enlow, Heather M; Yarbrough, Robert; Wood, Magnus; Semchonok, Dmitry A; Lowry, Troy; Li, Zhirong; Jahns, Peter; Boekema, Egbert J; Lenhert, Steven; Niyogi, Krishna K; Kirchhoff, Helmut

    2015-05-29

    The structural organization of proteins in biological membranes can affect their function. Photosynthetic thylakoid membranes in chloroplasts have the remarkable ability to change their supramolecular organization between disordered and semicrystalline states. Although the change to the semicrystalline state is known to be triggered by abiotic factors, the functional significance of this protein organization has not yet been understood. Taking advantage of an Arabidopsis thaliana fatty acid desaturase mutant (fad5) that constitutively forms semicrystalline arrays, we systematically test the functional implications of protein crystals in photosynthetic membranes. Here, we show that the change into an ordered state facilitates molecular diffusion of photosynthetic components in crowded thylakoid membranes. The increased mobility of small lipophilic molecules like plastoquinone and xanthophylls has implications for diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotective energy-dependent quenching. The mobility of the large photosystem II supercomplexes, however, is impaired, leading to retarded repair of damaged proteins. Our results demonstrate that supramolecular changes into more ordered states have differing impacts on photosynthesis that favor either diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotection or protein repair processes, thus fine-tuning the photosynthetic energy conversion. PMID:25897076

  6. A method for estimation of permittivity in photosynthetic membranes and the effect of permittivity on the photosynthetic quantum yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, A. Yu.

    2013-02-01

    A new method for estimation of the internal permittivity of photosynthetic membranes is based on joint analysis of the optical data with high spectral resolution and precise X-ray data. The permittivity of the bacteriochlorophyll-containing membranes of purple bacteria ranges from 1.62 to 1.75. The relatively low permittivity of photosynthetic organisms provides a significant increase in the efficiency of energy migration from multiple antenna chlorophylls to reaction centers and photosynthetic efficiency in general.

  7. Redox regulation of photosynthetic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Queval, Guillaume; Foyer, Christine H.

    2012-01-01

    Redox chemistry and redox regulation are central to the operation of photosynthesis and respiration. However, the roles of different oxidants and antioxidants in the regulation of photosynthetic or respiratory gene expression remain poorly understood. Leaf transcriptome profiles of a range of Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes that are deficient in either hydrogen peroxide processing enzymes or in low molecular weight antioxidant were therefore compared to determine how different antioxidant systems that process hydrogen peroxide influence transcripts encoding proteins targeted to the chloroplasts or mitochondria. Less than 10 per cent overlap was observed in the transcriptome patterns of leaves that are deficient in either photorespiratory (catalase (cat)2) or chloroplastic (thylakoid ascorbate peroxidase (tapx)) hydrogen peroxide processing. Transcripts encoding photosystem II (PSII) repair cycle components were lower in glutathione-deficient leaves, as were the thylakoid NAD(P)H (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate)) dehydrogenases (NDH) mRNAs. Some thylakoid NDH mRNAs were also less abundant in tAPX-deficient and ascorbate-deficient leaves. Transcripts encoding the external and internal respiratory NDHs were increased by low glutathione and low ascorbate. Regulation of transcripts encoding specific components of the photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains by hydrogen peroxide, ascorbate and glutathione may serve to balance non-cyclic and cyclic electron flow pathways in relation to oxidant production and reductant availability. PMID:23148274

  8. [Multiparticle computer simulation of protein interactions in the photosynthetic membrane].

    PubMed

    Riznichenko, G Iu; Kovalenko, I B; Abaturova, A M; D'iakonova, A N; Kniazeva, O S; Ustinin, D M; Khrushchev, S S; Rubin, A B

    2011-01-01

    The basic principles of the design of direct multiparticle models and the results of multiparticle computer simulation of electron transfer by mobile protein carriers in the photosynthetic membrane of a chloroplast thylakoid are presented. The reactions of complex formation of the protein plastocyanin with the protein cytochrome f and the pigment-protein complex of photosystem I, as well as of the protein ferredoxin with the protein FNR and photosystem 1 are considered. The role of diffusion and electrostatic interactions is discussed, and the effect of the shape of the reaction volume and ionic strength on the rate of electron transport are discussed. PMID:22117434

  9. Elementary Energy Transfer Pathways in Allochromatium vinosum Photosynthetic Membranes.

    PubMed

    Lüer, Larry; Carey, Anne-Marie; Henry, Sarah; Maiuri, Margherita; Hacking, Kirsty; Polli, Dario; Cerullo, Giulio; Cogdell, Richard J

    2015-11-01

    Allochromatium vinosum (formerly Chromatium vinosum) purple bacteria are known to adapt their light-harvesting strategy during growth according to environmental factors such as temperature and average light intensity. Under low light illumination or low ambient temperature conditions, most of the LH2 complexes in the photosynthetic membranes form a B820 exciton with reduced spectral overlap with LH1. To elucidate the reason for this light and temperature adaptation of the LH2 electronic structure, we performed broadband femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy as a function of excitation wavelength in A. vinosum membranes. A target analysis of the acquired data yielded individual rate constants for all relevant elementary energy transfer (ET) processes. We found that the ET dynamics in high-light-grown membranes was well described by a homogeneous model, with forward and backward rate constants independent of the pump wavelength. Thus, the overall B800→B850→B890→ Reaction Center ET cascade is well described by simple triexponential kinetics. In the low-light-grown membranes, we found that the elementary backward transfer rate constant from B890 to B820 was strongly reduced compared with the corresponding constant from B890 to B850 in high-light-grown samples. The ET dynamics of low-light-grown membranes was strongly dependent on the pump wavelength, clearly showing that the excitation memory is not lost throughout the exciton lifetime. The observed pump energy dependence of the forward and backward ET rate constants suggests exciton diffusion via B850→ B850 transfer steps, making the overall ET dynamics nonexponential. Our results show that disorder plays a crucial role in our understanding of low-light adaptation in A. vinosum. PMID:26536265

  10. Effect of Chlamydomonas plastid terminal oxidase 1 expressed in tobacco on photosynthetic electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Feilke, Kathleen; Streb, Peter; Cornic, Gabriel; Perreau, François; Kruk, Jerzy; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2016-01-01

    The plastid terminal oxidase PTOX is a plastohydroquinone:oxygen oxidoreductase that is important for carotenoid biosynthesis and plastid development. Its role in photosynthesis is controversially discussed. Under a number of abiotic stress conditions, the protein level of PTOX increases. PTOX is thought to act as a safety valve under high light protecting the photosynthetic apparatus against photodamage. However, transformants with high PTOX level were reported to suffer from photoinhibition. To analyze the effect of PTOX on the photosynthetic electron transport, tobacco expressing PTOX-1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Cr-PTOX1) was studied by chlorophyll fluorescence, thermoluminescence, P700 absorption kinetics and CO2 assimilation. Cr-PTOX1 was shown to compete very efficiently with the photosynthetic electron transport for PQH2 . High pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis confirmed that the PQ pool was highly oxidized in the transformant. Immunoblots showed that, in the wild-type, PTOX was associated with the thylakoid membrane only at a relatively alkaline pH value while it was detached from the membrane at neutral pH. We present a model proposing that PTOX associates with the membrane and oxidizes PQH2 only when the oxidation of PQH2 by the cytochrome b6 f complex is limiting forward electron transport due to a high proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane. PMID:26663146

  11. VIPP1 Has a Disordered C-Terminal Tail Necessary for Protecting Photosynthetic Membranes against Stress1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lingang; Kondo, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Integrity of biomembranes is vital to living organisms. In bacteria, PspA is considered to act as repairing damaged membrane by forming large supercomplexes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Vulnerable to oxidative stress, photosynthetic organisms also contain a PspA ortholog called VIPP1, which has an additional C-terminal tail (Vc). In this study, Vc was shown to coincide with an intrinsically disordered region, and the role of VIPP1 in membrane protection against stress was investigated. We visualized VIPP1 by fusing it to GFP (VIPP1-GFP that fully complemented lethal vipp1 mutations), and investigated its behavior in vivo with live imaging. The intrinsically disordered nature of Vc enabled VIPP1 to form what appeared to be functional particles along envelopes, whereas the deletion of Vc caused excessive association of the VIPP1 particles, preventing their active movement for membrane protection. Expression of VIPP1 lacking Vc complemented vipp1 mutation, but exhibited sensitivity to heat shock stress. Conversely, transgenic plants over-expressing VIPP1 showed enhanced tolerance against heat shock, suggesting that Vc negatively regulates VIPP1 particle association and acts in maintaining membrane integrity. Our data thus indicate that VIPP1 is involved in the maintenance of photosynthetic membranes. During evolution, chloroplasts have acquired enhanced tolerance against membrane stress by incorporating a disordered C-terminal tail into VIPP1. PMID:27208228

  12. Abiotic Stresses: Insight into Gene Regulation and Protein Expression in Photosynthetic Pathways of Plants.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Mohammad-Zaman; Moumeni, Ali; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2015-01-01

    Global warming and climate change intensified the occurrence and severity of abiotic stresses that seriously affect the growth and development of plants,especially, plant photosynthesis. The direct impact of abiotic stress on the activity of photosynthesis is disruption of all photosynthesis components such as photosystem I and II, electron transport, carbon fixation, ATP generating system and stomatal conductance. The photosynthetic system of plants reacts to the stress differently, according to the plant type, photosynthetic systems (C₃ or C₄), type of the stress, time and duration of the occurrence and several other factors. The plant responds to the stresses by a coordinate chloroplast and nuclear gene expression. Chloroplast, thylakoid membrane, and nucleus are the main targets of regulated proteins and metabolites associated with photosynthetic pathways. Rapid responses of plant cell metabolism and adaptation to photosynthetic machinery are key factors for survival of plants in a fluctuating environment. This review gives a comprehensive view of photosynthesis-related alterations at the gene and protein levels for plant adaptation or reaction in response to abiotic stress. PMID:26343644

  13. Abiotic Stresses: Insight into Gene Regulation and Protein Expression in Photosynthetic Pathways of Plants

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Mohammad-Zaman; Moumeni, Ali; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2015-01-01

    Global warming and climate change intensified the occurrence and severity of abiotic stresses that seriously affect the growth and development of plants, especially, plant photosynthesis. The direct impact of abiotic stress on the activity of photosynthesis is disruption of all photosynthesis components such as photosystem I and II, electron transport, carbon fixation, ATP generating system and stomatal conductance. The photosynthetic system of plants reacts to the stress differently, according to the plant type, photosynthetic systems (C3 or C4), type of the stress, time and duration of the occurrence and several other factors. The plant responds to the stresses by a coordinate chloroplast and nuclear gene expression. Chloroplast, thylakoid membrane, and nucleus are the main targets of regulated proteins and metabolites associated with photosynthetic pathways. Rapid responses of plant cell metabolism and adaptation to photosynthetic machinery are key factors for survival of plants in a fluctuating environment. This review gives a comprehensive view of photosynthesis-related alterations at the gene and protein levels for plant adaptation or reaction in response to abiotic stress. PMID:26343644

  14. Proteomic characterization of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 photosynthetic membrane: Identification of New Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xiaohua; Roh, Jung Hyeob; Callister, Stephen J.; Tavano, Christine; Donohue, Timothy; Lipton, Mary S.; Kaplan, Samuel

    2007-10-01

    The intracytoplasmic membrane (ICM) system develops, upon induction, as a structure dedicated to the major events of bacterial photosynthesis, including harvesting light energy, primary charge separation, and electron transport. In this study, multi-chromatographic methods coupled with fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer, combined with subcellular fractionation, was applied to an investigation of the supramolecular composition of the native photosynthetic membrane of Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1. A complete proteomic profile of the intracytoplasmic membranes was obtained and the results showed that the intracytoplasmic membranes are mainly composed of four photosynthetic membrane protein complexes, including light harvesting complexes I and II, the reaction center and cytochrome bc1, as well as two new membrane protein components, an unknown protein (RSP1760) and a possible alkane hydroxylase. Proteins necessary for various cellular functions, such as ATP synthesis, respiratory components, ABC transporters, protein translocation, and other proteins with unknown functions were also identified in association with the intracytoplasmic membranes. This study opens a new perspective on the characterization and understanding of the photosynthetic supramolecular complexes of R. sphaeroides, and their internal interactions as well as interactions with other proteins inside or outside the intracytoplasmic membranes.

  15. Photosynthetic bacteria production from food processing wastewater in sequencing batch and membrane photo-bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Chitapornpan, S; Chiemchaisri, C; Chiemchaisri, W; Honda, R; Yamamoto, K

    2012-01-01

    Application of photosynthetic process could be highly efficient and surpass anaerobic treatment in releasing less greenhouse gas and odor while the biomass produced can be utilized. The combination of photosynthetic process with membrane separation is possibly effective for water reclamation and biomass production. In this study, cultivation of mixed culture photosynthetic bacteria from food processing wastewater was investigated in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) and a membrane bioreactor (MBR) supplied with infrared light. Both photo-bioreactors were operated at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 10 days. Higher MLSS concentration achieved in the MBR through complete retention of biomass resulted in a slightly improved performance. When the system was operated with MLSS controlled by occasional sludge withdrawal, total biomass production of MBR and SBR photo-bioreactor was almost equal. However, 64.5% of total biomass production was washed out with the effluent in SBR system. Consequently, the higher biomass could be recovered for utilization in MBR. PMID:22258682

  16. Visualizing the dynamic structure of the plant photosynthetic membrane.

    PubMed

    Ruban, Alexander V; Johnson, Matthew P

    2015-01-01

    The chloroplast thylakoid membrane is the site for the initial steps of photosynthesis that convert solar energy into chemical energy, ultimately powering almost all life on earth. The heterogeneous distribution of protein complexes within the membrane gives rise to an intricate three-dimensional structure that is nonetheless extremely dynamic on a timescale of seconds to minutes. These dynamics form the basis for the regulation of photosynthesis, and therefore the adaptability of plants to different environments. High-resolution microscopy has in recent years begun to provide new insights into the structural dynamics underlying a number of regulatory processes such as membrane stacking, photosystem II repair, photoprotective energy dissipation, state transitions and alternative electron transfer. Here we provide an overview of the essentials of thylakoid membrane structure in plants, and consider how recent advances, using a range of microscopies, have substantially increased our knowledge of the thylakoid dynamic structure. We discuss both the successes and limitations of the currently available techniques and highlight newly emerging microscopic methods that promise to move the field beyond the current 'static' view of membrane organization based on frozen snapshots to a 'live' view of functional membranes imaged under native aqueous conditions at ambient temperature and responding dynamically to external stimuli. PMID:27251532

  17. [Membrane-based photochemical systems as models for photosynthetic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, J.K.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this research are to improve our conceptual view of the ways in which membranes and interfaces can be used to control chemical reactivity. We have focused on understanding three elementary processes that are central to developing membrane-based integrated chemical systems for water photolysis or related photoconversion/photostorage processes. Specifically, we have sought to identify: the influence of interfaces upon charge separation/recombination reactions, pathways for transmembrane charge separation across hydrocarbon bilayer membranes, and mechanisms of water oxidation catalyzed by transition metal coordination complexes. Historically, the chemical dynamics of each of these processes has been poorly understood, with numerous unresolved issues and conflicting viewpoints appearing in the literature. As described in this report our recent research has led to considerable clarification of the underlying reaction mechanisms.

  18. Methods and constructs for expression of foreign proteins in photosynthetic organisms

    DOEpatents

    Laible, Philip D.; Hanson, Deborah K.

    2002-01-01

    A method for expressing and purifying foreign proteins in photosynthetic organisms comprising the simultaneous expression of both the heterologous protein and a means for compartmentalizing or sequestering of the protein.

  19. Simple Colorimetric Determination of the Manganese Content in Photosynthetic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Semin, B. K.; Seibert, M.

    2009-01-01

    The functional Mn content of intact photosystem II membrane fragments was measured as 4.06 {+-} 0.13 Mn/reaction center when determined using a simple, sensitive colorimetric assay that will also work with thylakoids and core complexes. This procedure requires minimal sample material, does not need expensive assay equipment, requires four simple steps, and only takes 20-30 min to perform. These include (a) removal of the adventitious Mn ions by CaCl{sub 2} treatment of the membranes, (b) extraction of the Mn from the O{sub 2}-evolving complex with hydrochloric acid, (c) purification of the extract by centrifugation followed by filtration of the supernatant through an Acrodisc syringe filter (0.2 {micro}m nylon membrane), and (d) colorimetric determination of Mn in the extract using the reaction of the chromogenic agent, 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine, with previously oxidized Mn(II) cations carried out at high pH. The colorimetric assay itself has been used previously by Serrat (Mikrochim Acta 129:77-80, 1998) for assaying Mn concentrations in sea water and drinking water.

  20. Entropy and biological systems: Experimentally-investigated entropy-driven stacking of plant photosynthetic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Husen; Liggins, John R.; Chow, Wah Soon

    2014-02-01

    According to the Second Law of Thermodynamics, an overall increase of entropy contributes to the driving force for any physicochemical process, but entropy has seldom been investigated in biological systems. Here, for the first time, we apply Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) to investigate the Mg2+-induced spontaneous stacking of photosynthetic membranes isolated from spinach leaves. After subtracting a large endothermic interaction of MgCl2 with membranes, unrelated to stacking, we demonstrate that the enthalpy change (heat change at constant pressure) is zero or marginally positive or negative. This first direct experimental evidence strongly suggests that an entropy increase significantly drives membrane stacking in this ordered biological structure. Possible mechanisms for the entropy increase include: (i) the attraction between discrete oppositely-charged areas, releasing counterions; (ii) the release of loosely-bound water molecules from the inter-membrane gap; (iii) the increased orientational freedom of previously-aligned water dipoles; and (iv) the lateral rearrangement of membrane components.

  1. Kinetics of structural reorganizations in multilamellar photosynthetic membranes monitored by small-angle neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Gergely; Kovács, László; Ünnep, Renáta; Zsiros, Ottó; Almásy, László; Rosta, László; Timmins, Peter; Peters, Judith; Posselt, Dorthe; Garab, Győző

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate the power of time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering experiments for the investigation of the structure and structural reorganizations of multilamellar photosynthetic membranes. In addition to briefly summarizing our results on thylakoid membranes isolated from higher plants and in unicellular organisms, we discuss the advantages and technical and methodological limitations of time-resolved SANS. We present a detailed and more systematical investigation of the kinetics of light-induced structural reorganizations in isolated spinach thylakoid membranes, which show how changes in the repeat distance and in the long-range order of the multilamellar membranes can be followed with a time resolution of seconds. We also present data from comparative measurements performed on thylakoid membranes isolated from tobacco. PMID:23839900

  2. Conservation of distantly related membrane proteins: photosynthetic reaction centers share a common structural core.

    PubMed

    Sadekar, Sumedha; Raymond, Jason; Blankenship, Robert E

    2006-11-01

    Photosynthesis was established on Earth more than 3 billion years ago. All available evidences suggest that the earliest photosynthetic organisms were anoxygenic and that oxygen-evolving photosynthesis is a more recent development. The reaction center complexes that form the heart of the energy storage process are integral membrane pigment proteins that span the membrane in vectorial fashion to carry out electron transfer. The origin and extent of distribution of these proteins has been perplexing from a phylogenetic point of view mostly because of extreme sequence divergence. A series of integral membrane proteins of known structure and varying degrees of sequence identity have been compared using combinatorial extension-Monte Carlo methods. The proteins include photosynthetic reaction centers from proteobacteria and cyanobacterial photosystems I and II, as well as cytochrome oxidase, bacteriorhodopsin, and cytochrome b. The reaction center complexes show a remarkable conservation of the core structure of 5 transmembrane helices, strongly implying common ancestry, even though the residual sequence identity is less than 10%, whereas the other proteins have structures that are unrelated. A relationship of sequence with structure was derived from the reaction center structures; with characteristic decay length of 1.6 A. Phylogenetic trees derived from the structural alignments give insights into the earliest photosynthetic reaction center, strongly suggesting that it was a homodimeric complex that did not evolve oxygen. PMID:16887904

  3. Energy transfer and clustering of photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes in reconstituted lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewa, Takehisa; Sumino, Ayumi; Watanabe, Natsuko; Noji, Tomoyasu; Nango, Mamoru

    2013-06-01

    In purple photosynthetic bacteria, light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) and light harvesting/reaction centre core complex (LH1-RC) play the key roles of capturing and transferring light energy and subsequent charge separation. These photosynthetic apparatuses form a supramolecular assembly; however, how the assembly influences the efficiency of energy conversion is not yet clear. We addressed this issue by evaluating the energy transfer in reconstituted photosynthetic protein complexes LH2 and LH1-RC and studying the structures and the membrane environment of the LH2/LH1-RC assemblies, which had been embedded into various lipid bilayers. Thus, LH2 and LH1-RC from Rhodopseudomonas palustris 2.1.6 were reconstituted in phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylcholine (PC), and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)/PG/cardiolipin (CL). Efficient energy transfer from LH2 to LH1-RC was observed in the PC and PE/PG/CL membranes. Atomic force microscopy revealed that LH2 and LH1-RC were heterogeneously distributed to form clusters in the PC and PE/PG/CL membranes. The results indicated that the phospholipid species influenced the cluster formation of LH2 and LH1-RC as well as the energy transfer efficiency.

  4. Photoproduction of hydrogen by membranes of green photosynthetic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, J D; Olson, J M

    1980-01-01

    Photoproduction of H/sub 2/ from ascorbate by unit-membrane vesicles from Chlorobium limicola f. thiosulfatophilum was achieved with a system containing gramicidin D, tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine, methyl viologen, dithioerythritol, Clostridium hydrogenase, and an oxygen-scavenging mixture of glucose, glucose oxidase, ethanol, and catalase. Maximum quantum yield was less than one percent. Half maximum rate of H/sub 2/ production occurred at a white-light intensity of approximately 0.15 cm/sup -2/. The reaction was inhibited completely by 0.3% sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate, 1% Triton X-100, or preheating the vesicles at 100/sup 0/C for 5 minutes. Low concentrations (0.01 and 0.05%) of Triton X-100 about doubled the reaction rate.

  5. Data supporting the absence of FNR dynamic photosynthetic membrane recruitment in trol mutants

    PubMed Central

    Vojta, Lea; Fulgosi, Hrvoje

    2016-01-01

    In photosynthesis, the flavoenzyme ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase (FNR) catalyses the final electron transfer from ferredoxin to NADP+, which is considered as the main pathway of high-energy electron partitioning in chloroplasts (DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-313X.2009.03999.x[1], DOI: 10.1038/srep10085[2]). Different detergents and pH treatments of photosynthetic membranes isolated from the Arabidopsis wild-type (WT) and the loss-of-function mutants of the thylakoid rhodanase-like protein TROL (trol), pre-acclimated to either dark, growth-light, or high-light conditions, were used to probe the strength of FNR-membrane associations. Detergents β-DM (decyl-β-D-maltopyranoside) or β-DDM (n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside) were used to test the stability of FNR binding to the thylakoid membranes, and to assess different membrane domains containing FNR. Further, the extraction conditions mimicked pH status of chloroplast stroma during changing light regimes. Plants without TROL are incapable of the dynamic FNR recruitment to the photosynthetic membranes. PMID:26977444

  6. Data supporting the absence of FNR dynamic photosynthetic membrane recruitment in trol mutants.

    PubMed

    Vojta, Lea; Fulgosi, Hrvoje

    2016-06-01

    In photosynthesis, the flavoenzyme ferredoxin:NADP(+) oxidoreductase (FNR) catalyses the final electron transfer from ferredoxin to NADP(+), which is considered as the main pathway of high-energy electron partitioning in chloroplasts (DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-313X.2009.03999.x[1], DOI: 10.1038/srep10085[2]). Different detergents and pH treatments of photosynthetic membranes isolated from the Arabidopsis wild-type (WT) and the loss-of-function mutants of the thylakoid rhodanase-like protein TROL (trol), pre-acclimated to either dark, growth-light, or high-light conditions, were used to probe the strength of FNR-membrane associations. Detergents β-DM (decyl-β-D-maltopyranoside) or β-DDM (n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside) were used to test the stability of FNR binding to the thylakoid membranes, and to assess different membrane domains containing FNR. Further, the extraction conditions mimicked pH status of chloroplast stroma during changing light regimes. Plants without TROL are incapable of the dynamic FNR recruitment to the photosynthetic membranes. PMID:26977444

  7. Interface for Light-Driven Electron Transfer by Photosynthetic Complexes Across Block Copolymer Membranes.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Liangju; Olson, Tien L; Lin, Su; Flores, Marco; Jiang, Yunjiang; Zheng, Wan; Williams, JoAnn C; Allen, James P; Liang, Hongjun

    2014-03-01

    Incorporation of membrane proteins into nanodevices to mediate recognition and transport in a collective and scalable fashion remains a challenging problem. We demonstrate how nanoscale photovoltaics could be designed using robust synthetic nanomembranes with incorporated photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs). Specifically, RCs from Rhodobacter sphaeroides are reconstituted spontaneously into rationally designed polybutadiene membranes to form hierarchically organized proteopolymer membrane arrays via a charge-interaction-directed reconstitution mechanism. Once incorporated, the RCs are fully active for prolonged periods based upon a variety of spectroscopic measurements, underscoring preservation of their 3D pigment configuration critical for light-driven charge transfer. This result provides a strategy to construct solar conversion devices using structurally versatile proteopolymer membranes with integrated RC functions to harvest broad regions of the solar spectrum. PMID:26274068

  8. Requirement of phosphatidylglycerol for photosynthetic function in thylakoid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Norihiro; Hagio, Miki; Wada, Hajime; Tsuzuki, Mikio

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the role of phosphatidylglycerol (PG) in photosynthesis, we constructed a mutant defective in the CDP-diacylglycerol synthase gene from a cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. The mutant, designated as SNC1, required PG supplementation for growth. Growth was repressed in PG-free medium concomitantly with the decrease in cellular content of PG. These results indicate that PG is essential, and that SNC1 is defective in PG synthesis. Decrease in PG content was accompanied by a reduction in the cellular content of chlorophyll, but with little effect on the contents of phycobilisome pigments, which showed that levels of chlorophyll–protein complexes decreased without alteration of those of phycobilisomes. Regardless of the decrease in the PG content, CO2-dependent photosynthesis by SNC1 was similar to that by the wild type on a chlorophyll basis, but consequently became lower on a cell basis. Simultaneously, the ratio of oxygen evolution of photosystem II (PSII) measured with p-benzoquinone to that of CO2-dependent photosynthesis, which ranged between 1.3 and 1.7 in the wild type. However, it was decreased in SNC1 from 1.3 to 0.4 during the early growth phase where chlorophyll content and CO2-dependent photosynthesis were little affected, and then finally to 0.1, suggesting that PSII first lost its ability to reduce p-benzoquinone and then decreased in its level and actual activity. These results indicate that PG contributes to the accumulation of chlorophyll–protein complexes in thylakoid membranes, and also to normal functioning of PSII. PMID:10984546

  9. Quorum sensing influences growth and photosynthetic membrane production in high-cell-density cultivations of Rhodospirillum rubrum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The facultative anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum exhibits versatile metabolic activity allowing the adaptation to rapidly changing growth conditions in its natural habitat, the microaerobic and anoxic zones of stagnant waters. The microaerobic growth mode is of special interest as it allows the high-level expression of photosynthetic membranes when grown on succinate and fructose in the dark, which could significantly simplify the industrial production of compounds associated with PM formation. However, recently we showed that PM synthesis is no longer inducible when R. rubrum cultures are grown to high cell densities under aerobic conditions. In addition a reduction of the growth rate and the continued accumulation of precursor molecules for bacteriochlorophyll synthesis were observed under high cell densities conditions. Results In the present work, we demonstrate that the cell density-dependent effects are reversible if the culture supernatant is replaced by fresh medium. We identified six N-acylhomoserine lactones and show that four of them are produced in varying amounts according to the growth phase and the applied growth conditions. Further, we demonstrate that N-acylhomoserine lactones and tetrapyrrole compounds released into the growth medium affect the growth rate and PM expression in high cell density cultures. Conclusions In summary, we provide evidence that R. rubrum possesses a Lux-type quorum sensing system which influences the biosynthesis of PM and the growth rate and is thus likely to be involved in the phenotypes of high cell density cultures and the rapid adaptation to changing environmental conditions. PMID:23927486

  10. Effect of constitutive expression of bacterial phytoene desaturase CRTI on photosynthetic electron transport in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Galzerano, Denise; Feilke, Kathleen; Schaub, Patrick; Beyer, Peter; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2014-03-01

    The constitutive expression of the bacterial carotene desaturase (CRTI) in Arabidopsis thaliana leads to increased susceptibility of leaves to light-induced damage. Changes in the photosynthetic electron transport chain rather than alterations of the carotenoid composition in the antenna were responsible for the increased photoinhibition. A much higher level of superoxide/hydrogen peroxide was generated in the light in thylakoid membranes from the CRTI expressing lines than in wild-type while the level of singlet oxygen generation remained unchanged. The increase in reactive oxygen species was related to the activity of plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX) since their generation was inhibited by the PTOX-inhibitor octyl gallate, and since the protein level of PTOX was increased in the CRTI-expressing lines. Furthermore, cyclic electron flow was suppressed in these lines. We propose that PTOX competes efficiently with cyclic electron flow for plastoquinol in the CRTI-expressing lines and that it plays a crucial role in the control of the reduction state of the plastoquinone pool. PMID:24378845

  11. Differential stability of photosynthetic membranes and fatty acid composition at elevated temperature in Symbiodinium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Almeyda, E.; Thomé, P. E.; El Hafidi, M.; Iglesias-Prieto, R.

    2011-03-01

    Coral reefs are threatened by increasing surface seawater temperatures resulting from climate change. Reef-building corals symbiotic with dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium experience dramatic reductions in algal densities when exposed to temperatures above the long-term local summer average, leading to a phenomenon called coral bleaching. Although the temperature-dependent loss in photosynthetic function of the algal symbionts has been widely recognized as one of the early events leading to coral bleaching, there is considerable debate regarding the actual damage site. We have tested the relative thermal stability and composition of membranes in Symbiodinium exposed to high temperature. Our results show that melting curves of photosynthetic membranes from different symbiotic dinoflagellates substantiate a species-specific sensitivity to high temperature, while variations in fatty acid composition under high temperature rather suggest a complex process in which various modifications in lipid composition may be involved. Our results do not support the role of unsaturation of fatty acids of the thylakoid membrane as being mechanistically involved in bleaching nor as being a dependable tool for the diagnosis of thermal susceptibility of symbiotic reef corals.

  12. Gene expression responses in photosynthetic tissues to herbicides and pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When plants are attacked by pathogens, the photosynthetic tissue is often dramatically affected. The chloroplasts within this tissue can participate in defense by being a source of many plant secondary metabolites that serve as defense signaling compounds, antioxidants, and phytoalexins. The chlorop...

  13. Spatial and temporal electroselection patterns in electric field stimulation of polarized luminescence from photosynthetic membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Rosemberg, Yosef; Rozen, Philip; Malkin, Shmuel; Korenstein, Rafi

    1992-01-01

    Electroselection processes of charge recombination are manifested in the study of electric field induced polarized emission from photosynthetic membrane vesicles. The study explores the coupled spatial-temporal characteristics of electric field induced charge recombination by examining the dependence of the integrated polarized emission and the time dependent polarization on electric field strength. The experimental results were fitted to theoretical models by computer simulations employing empirical parameters. Simulation of the dependence of the integrated polarized components of emission on electric field strength, suggests field-dependent increased ratio between radiative and nonradiative rates of charge recombination. The observation that the initial polarization values are independent of electric field strength supports the assumption that electric field induced emission originates from the pole area and then spreads away from it towards the equator. The propagation rate of this electric field induced charge recombination from the pole area towards the equator is reflected by the decay of polarization which increases upon raising the electric field strength. Simulation of the polarization's decay, based on a calculated angle of 26.3 ± 0.4° between the transition moment of emission and the plane of the membrane, establishes coupled temporal spatial patterns of electroselection in intramembrane electron transfer invoked by exposing preilluminated photosynthetic vesicles to a homogeneous electric field. PMID:19431835

  14. Electric field-induced lateral mobility of photosystem I in the photosynthetic membrane

    PubMed Central

    Brumfeld, Vlad; Miller, Israel R.; Korenstein, Rafi

    1989-01-01

    Electrophoretic movement of photosystem I (PS I) along the photosynthetic membrane of hypotonically swollen thylakoid vesicles was studied by analyzing the electric field-stimulated delayed luminescence (electrophotoluminescence) emitted from PS I. The electrophoretic mobility was inferred from the differences in electrophotoluminescence (EPL) of the photosynthetic vesicles in presence and absence of trains of low amplitude (<80 V/cm) prepulses of 1 ms duration at 4 ms spacing. The average apparent electric mobility, determined from the time course of EPL increase on one hemisphere or its decrease on the other one, as function of prepulse length and intensity was of the order of 3 · 10-5 cm2V-1s-1. The assymetric distribution of the PS I reached a steady state when the diffusional, electrostatic, and elastic forces balanced the electrophoretic driving force. A lateral diffusion coefficient of ∼5 · 10-9 cm2s-1 was found for the PS I complex from the diffusional relaxation after cessation of the electric field pulse train. Experimental conditions such as concentration, temperature, and viscosity of the aqueous solution were not critical for the effect. Between 23 and 150 electron charges per moving particle were estimated from the measured electrophoretic mobility. PMID:19431746

  15. Characterization of a photosynthetic microbial solar cell with a membrane electrode assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Hee; Bai, Seoung Jai

    2014-07-01

    We studied the photosynthetic microbial solar cell (PMSC), which is one of the sources of renewable energy. In order to increase the power output of the PMSC, we fabricated a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) by either spin coating or hot pressing with a Pt catalytic layer, whose thickness was changed depending on the fabrication method. The PMSC with MEA fabricated by hot pressing with a thick Pt layer showed higher power output than that fabricated by spin coating with a thin Pt layer. The effectiveness of the fabrication method and the correlation between the Pt thickness and the maximum power output of the PMSC were explained by using the triphase boundary theory and were verified experimentally using energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) line scans across the MEA cross sections.

  16. Effects of grafting on key photosynthetic enzymes and gene expression in the citrus cultivar Huangguogan.

    PubMed

    Liao, L; Cao, S Y; Rong, Y; Wang, Z H

    2016-01-01

    Grafting influences scion photosynthetic capacity and fruit quality. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), which strongly affects photosynthetic rate, and Rubisco activase (RCA), which regulates Rubisco activity, are two key photosynthetic enzymes. However, little information is available regarding the effect of grafting on the concentration and expression of Rubisco and RCA in the citrus cultivar Huangguogan. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of grafting Huangguogan plants onto trifoliate orange, tangerine, and orange on: 1) the concentration of Rubisco and RCA; 2) the mRNA levels of rbcL, rbcS, and rca; and 3) fruit quality. Overall, the results showed that when Huangguogan plants budded on tangerine and orange, they had better fruit quality, while on trifoliate orange they had higher Rubisco concentration. Tangerine and orange are probably the most suitable rootstocks for Huangguogan plants given the environmental conditions of Sichuan Province, China. PMID:26985941

  17. Membrane protein expression in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    King, Martin S; Boes, Christoph; Kunji, Edmund R S

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis has many properties that are ideal for the overproduction of membrane proteins in a functional form. Growth of lactococci is rapid, proceeds to high cell densities, and does not require aeration, which facilitates large-scale fermentation. The available promoter systems are strong and tightly regulated, allowing expression of toxic gene products in a controlled manner. Expressed membrane proteins are targeted exclusively to the cytoplasmic membrane, allowing the use of ionophores, ligands, and inhibitors to study activity of the membrane protein in whole cells. Constructed plasmids are stable and expression levels are highly reproducible. The relatively small genome size of the organism causes little redundancy, which facilitates complementation studies and allows for easier purification. The produced membrane proteins are often stable, as the organism has limited proteolytic capability, and they are readily solubilized from the membrane with mild detergents. Lactococci are multiple amino acid auxotrophs, allowing the incorporation of labels, such as selenomethionine. Among the few disadvantages are the low transformation frequency, AT-rich codon usage, and resistance to lysis by mechanical means, but these problems can be overcome fairly easily. We will describe in detail the protocols used to express membrane proteins in L. lactis, from cloning of the target gene to the isolation of membrane vesicles for the determination of expression levels. PMID:25857778

  18. Orientation of chlorophylls within chloroplasts as shown by optical and electrochromic properties of the photosynthetic membrane.

    PubMed

    Paillotin, G; Breton, J

    1977-04-01

    The effects on the optical properties of photosynthetic membranes caused by several types of chlorophyll differing in resonance frequency and in spatial disposition are theoretically analyzed. Using a method of moments and the linear dichroism spectrum of the lamellae, we evaluated the mean angle (phi) between the transition moment of each chlorophyll and the normal to the lamellae. We have confirmed that at about 695 nm the transition moment is in the plane of the lamellae, and outside it for chlorophyll b (phi approximately 48.6 degrees). By integrating over frequency the absorption variations affected by ionophores, we show that they may be ascribed to a Stark effect, and we analyze the dependence of this effect on the orientation of the chlorophylls. From this dependence and the degree of polarization of the Stark effect, we calculate the spatial fluctuations of the angle phi. The calculation shows that a definite value of phi corresponds to each resonance frequency of chlorophyl a found in vivo. This proves that the chlorophylls a are not oriented partly random. For chlorophylls b, on the other hand, phi may fluctuate by some 10 degrees about its mean value. The structural consequences of these results are discussed. PMID:851575

  19. Suppression of Tla1 gene expression for improved solar conversion efficiency and photosynthetic productivity in plants and algae

    DOEpatents

    Melis, Anastasios; Mitra, Mautusi

    2010-06-29

    The invention provides method and compositions to minimize the chlorophyll antenna size of photosynthesis by decreasing TLA1 gene expression, thereby improving solar conversion efficiencies and photosynthetic productivity in plants, e.g., green microalgae, under bright sunlight conditions.

  20. Heterologous expression of Arabidopsis phytochrome B in transgenic potato influences photosynthetic performance and tuber development

    SciTech Connect

    Thiele, A.; Herold, M.; Lenk, I.; Gatz, C. . Albrecht von Haller Inst. fuer Pflanzenwissenschaften); Quail, P.H. )

    1999-05-01

    Transgenic potato (Solanum tuberosum) plants expressing Arabidopsis phytochrome B were characterized morphologically and physiologically under white light in a greenhouse to explore their potential for improved photosynthesis and higher tuber yields. As expected, overexpression of functional phytochrome B caused pleiotropic effects such as semidwarfism, decreased apical dominance, a higher number of smaller but thicker leaves, and increased pigmentation. Because of increased numbers of chloroplasts in elongated palisade cells, photosynthesis per leaf area and in each individual plant increased. In addition, photosynthesis was less sensitive to photoinactivation under prolonged light stress. The beginning of senescence was not delayed, but deceleration of chlorophyll degradation extended the lifetime of photosynthetically active plants. Both the higher photosynthetic performance and the longer lifespan of the transgenic plants allowed greater biomass production, resulting in extended underground organs with increased tuber yields.

  1. THE STATE OF MANGANESE IN THE PHOTOSYNTHETIC APPARATUS. II. X-RAY ABSORPTION EDGE STUDIES ON MANGANESE IN PHOTOSYNTHETIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, J. A.; Goodin, D. B.; Wydrzynski, T.; Robertson, A. S.; Klein, M. P.

    1980-11-01

    X-ray absorption spectra at the Manganese K-edge are presented for spinach chloroplasts, and chloroplasts which have been Tris-treated and hence unable to evolve oxygen. A significant change in the electronic environment of manganese is observed and is attributed to the release of manganese from the thylakoid membranes with a concomitant change in oxidation state. A correlation of the K-edge energy, defined as the energy at the first inflection point, with coordination charge has been established for a number of manganese compounds of known structure and oxidation state. Comparison of the manganese K-edge energies of the chloroplast samples with the reference compounds places the average oxidation state of the chloroplasts between +2 and +3. Using the edge spectra for Tris-treated membranes which were osmotically shocked to remove the released manganese, difference edge spectra were synthesized to approximate the active pool of manganese. Coordination charge predictions for this fraction are consistent with an average resting oxidation state higher than +2. The shape at the edge is also indicative of heterogeneity of the manganese site, of low symmetry, or both.

  2. Organic carbon recovery and photosynthetic bacteria population in an anaerobic membrane photo-bioreactor treating food processing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Chitapornpan, S; Chiemchaisri, C; Chiemchaisri, W; Honda, R; Yamamoto, K

    2013-08-01

    Purple non-sulfur bacteria (PNSB) were cultivated by food industry wastewater in the anaerobic membrane photo-bioreactor. Organic removal and biomass production and characteristics were accomplished via an explicit examination of the long term performance of the photo-bioreactor fed with real wastewater. With the support of infra-red light transmitting filter, PNSB could survive and maintain in the system even under the continual fluctuations of influent wastewater characteristics. The average BOD and COD removal efficiencies were found at the moderate range of 51% and 58%, respectively. Observed photosynthetic biomass yield was 0.6g dried solid/g BOD with crude protein content of 0.41 g/g dried solid. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoretic analysis (DGGE) and 16S rDNA sequencing revealed the presence of Rhodopseudomonas palustris and significant changes in the photosynthetic bacterial community within the system. PMID:23489563

  3. Unique role for translation initiation factor 3 in the light color regulation of photosynthetic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gutu, Andrian; Nesbit, April D; Alverson, Andrew J; Palmer, Jeffrey D; Kehoe, David M

    2013-10-01

    Light-harvesting antennae are critical for collecting energy from sunlight and providing it to photosynthetic reaction centers. Their abundance and composition are tightly regulated to maintain efficient photosynthesis in changing light conditions. Many cyanobacteria alter their light-harvesting antennae in response to changes in ambient light-color conditions through the process of chromatic acclimation. The control of green light induction (Cgi) pathway is a light-color-sensing system that controls the expression of photosynthetic genes during chromatic acclimation, and while some evidence suggests that it operates via transcription attenuation, the components of this pathway have not been identified. We provide evidence that translation initiation factor 3 (IF3), an essential component of the prokaryotic translation initiation machinery that binds the 30S subunit and blocks premature association with the 50S subunit, is part of the control of green light induction pathway. Light regulation of gene expression has not been previously described for any translation initiation factor. Surprisingly, deletion of the IF3-encoding gene infCa was not lethal in the filamentous cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon, and its genome was found to contain a second, redundant, highly divergent infC gene which, when deleted, had no effect on photosynthetic gene expression. Either gene could complement an Escherichia coli infC mutant and thus both encode bona fide IF3s. Analysis of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genome databases established that multiple infC genes are present in the genomes of diverse groups of bacteria and land plants, most of which do not undergo chromatic acclimation. This suggests that IF3 may have repeatedly evolved important roles in the regulation of gene expression in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. PMID:24048028

  4. Analysis of picosecond laser induced fluorescence phenomena in photosynthetic membranes utilizing a master equation approach.

    PubMed Central

    Paillotin, G; Swenberg, C E; Breton, J; Geacintov, N E

    1979-01-01

    A Pauli master equation is formulated and solved to describe the fluorescence quantum yield, phi, and the fluorescence temporal decay curves. F(t), obtained in picosecond laser excitation experiments of photosynthetic systems. It is assumed that the lowering of phi with increasing pulse intensity is due to bimolecular singlet exciton annihilation processes which compete with the monomolecular exciton decay processes; Poisson statistics are taken into account. Calculated curves of phi as a function of the number of photon hits per domain are compared with experimental data, and it is concluded that these domains contain at least two to four connected photosynthetic units (depending on the temperature), where each photosynthetic unit is assumed to contain approximately 300 pigment molecules. It is shown that under conditions of high excitation intensities, the fluorescence decays approximately according to the (time)1/2 law. PMID:262402

  5. Analysis of picosecond laser induced fluorescence phenomena in photosynthetic membranes utilizing a master equation approach.

    PubMed

    Paillotin, G; Swenberg, C E; Breton, J; Geacintov, N E

    1979-03-01

    A Pauli master equation is formulated and solved to describe the fluorescence quantum yield, phi, and the fluorescence temporal decay curves. F(t), obtained in picosecond laser excitation experiments of photosynthetic systems. It is assumed that the lowering of phi with increasing pulse intensity is due to bimolecular singlet exciton annihilation processes which compete with the monomolecular exciton decay processes; Poisson statistics are taken into account. Calculated curves of phi as a function of the number of photon hits per domain are compared with experimental data, and it is concluded that these domains contain at least two to four connected photosynthetic units (depending on the temperature), where each photosynthetic unit is assumed to contain approximately 300 pigment molecules. It is shown that under conditions of high excitation intensities, the fluorescence decays approximately according to the (time)1/2 law. PMID:262402

  6. Distribution and self-organization of photosynthetic pigments in micelles: implication for the assembly of light-harvesting complexes and reaction centers in the photosynthetic membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Scherz, A; Rosenbach-Belkin, V; Fisher, J R

    1990-01-01

    The addition of bacteriochlorophylls and bacteriopheophytins to formamide/water, 3:1 (vol/vol), (or water) containing small spherical micelles of Triton X-100 leads to the reorganization of the detergent into micelles that consist of 5000-40,000 amphiphilic molecules. The pigment distribution within the micelles was determined by modified Poisson statistics taking into consideration the various sizes of micelles. Pigment dimerization occurred in micelles with more than a single occupant and was driven by a free-energy change of -4.5 kcal/mol (1 cal = 4.184 J) for bacteriochlorophyll a in formamide/water, -7.6 kcal/mol for bacteriopheophytin a in formamide/water, and -6.6 kcal/mol for bacteriopheophytin a in water. These values correspond to the room temperature equilibrium constants 2.2 x 10(3) M-1, 3.9 x 10(5) M-1, and 7.5 x 10(4) M-1, respectively. The incorporation of bacteriochlorophylls with attached small formamide polymers and the subsequent dimerization of these pigments in the lipid phase provide a model for studying the synergetic organization of polypeptides and bacteriochlorophyll clusters in the photosynthetic membrane. PMID:11607092

  7. Molecular cloning of a maize gene involved in photosynthetic membrane organization that is regulated by Robertson's Mutator.

    PubMed Central

    Martienssen, R A; Barkan, A; Freeling, M; Taylor, W C

    1989-01-01

    The maize photosynthetic mutant hcf106 has a distinctive and unusual thylakoid membrane organization, and fails to accumulate three of the five thylakoid membrane protein complexes. This mutant arose in a Robertson's Mutator background, and shows somatic instability typical of a transposon-induced allele. In addition, hcf106 is suppressed when Mu1 elements are inactive and modified in their terminal inverted repeats. Thus plants homozygous for the mutant allele adopt a mutant phenotype only when Mu1 elements are active and unmodified. DNA from the mutant allele has been cloned by 'transposon-tagging' using the transposon Mu1, and the identity of the clone confirmed by observing somatic excision of the transposon in a revertant sector. A 1.2 kb transcript homologous to the cloned DNA is found in wild-type and suppressed seedlings, but is not found in mutant seedlings, suggesting that suppression is mediated at the level of transcript accumulation. Images PMID:2548850

  8. Successful expression of heterologous egfp gene in the mitochondria of a photosynthetic eukaryote Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhangli; Zhao, Zhonglin; Wu, Zhihua; Fan, Zhun; Chen, Jun; Wu, Jinxia; Li, Jiancheng

    2011-09-01

    The efficient expression of exogenous gene in mitochondria of photosynthetic organism has been an insurmountable problem. In this study, the pBsLPNCG was constructed by inserting the egfp gene into a site between TERMINVREP-Left repeats and the cob gene in a fragment of mitochondrial DNA of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CC-124 and introduced into the mitochondria of respiratory deficient dum-1 mutation of C. reinhardtii CC-2654. Sequencing and DNA Southern analyses revealed that egfp gene had been integrated into the mitochondrial genome of transgenic algae as expected and no other copy of egfp existed in their nucleic genome. Both the fluorescence detection and Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of eGFP protein in the transgenic algae; it indicated that the egfp gene was successfully expressed in the mitochondria of C. reinhardtii. PMID:21664493

  9. C4 Photosynthetic Gene Expression in Light- and Dark-Grown Amaranth Cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Wang, J. L.; Long, J. J.; Hotchkiss, T.; Berry, J. O.

    1993-08-01

    The patterns of expression for genes encoding several C4 photosynthetic enzymes were examined in light-grown and dark-grown (etiolated) cotyledons of amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus), a dicotyledonous C4 plant. The large subunit and small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPCase), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase), and pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPdK) were all present in the cotyledons by d 2 after planting when the seedlings first emerged from the seed coat. Kranz anatomy was apparent in light-grown cotyledons throughout development, and the overall patterns of C4 gene expression were similar to those recently described for developing amaranth leaves (J.L. Wang, D.F. Klessig, J.O. Berry [1992] Plant Cell 4: 173-184). RuBPCase mRNA and proteins were present in both bundle sheath and mesophyll cells in a C3-like pattern during early development and became progressively more localized to bundle sheath cells in the C4-type pattern as the cotyledons expanded over 2 to 7 d. PEPCase and PPdK polypeptides were localized to mesophyll cells throughout development, even though PEPCase transcripts were detected in both bundle sheath and mesophyll cells. Kranz anatomy also developed in cotyledons grown in complete darkness. In 7-d-old dark-grown cotyledons, RuBPCase, PPdK, and PEPCase were all localized to the appropriate cell types, although at somewhat lower levels than in light-grown cotyledons. These findings demonstrate that the leaves and postembryonic cotyledons of amaranth undergo common developmental programs of C4 gene expression during maturation. Furthermore, light is not required for the cell-type-specific expression of genes encoding RuBPCase and other photosynthetic enzymes in this dicotyledonous C4 plant. PMID:12231890

  10. [Effects of exogenous salicylic acid on membrane lipid peroxidation and photosynthetic characteristics of Cucumis sativus seedlings under drought stress].

    PubMed

    Hao, Jing-Hong; Yi, Yang; Shang, Qing-Mao; Dong, Chun-Juan; Zhang, Zhi-Gang

    2012-03-01

    To approach the related mechanisms of exogenous salicylic acid (SA) in improving plant drought-resistance, this paper studied the effects of applying exogenous SA to the rhizosphere on the plant growth, membrane lipid peroxidation, proline accumulation, water use efficiency, net photosynthetic rate (Pn), and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters of cucumber (Cucumis sativus) seedlings under drought stresses (60% and 50% of saturated water capacity). Applying SA relieved the inhibitory effects of drought stress on plant growth, Pn, and water use efficiency, decreased membrane lipid peroxidation, and promoted proline accumulation. Meanwhile, the SA decreased the decrements of the maximum photochemical efficiency of PS II, actual photochemical efficiency of PS II, potential activity of PS II, effective photochemical efficiency of PS II, and photochemical quenching coefficient under drought stress significantly, and limited the increase of non-photochemical quenching coefficient. All the results suggested that applying exogenous SA could alleviate the oxidation damage of cell membrane resulted from the drought-caused membrane lipid peroxidation, improve the Pn by increasing PS II activity to benefit water utilization, enhance the regulation capability of osmosis to decrease water loss and increase water use efficiency, and thereby, improve the plant drought-resistance. PMID:22720616

  11. Atomic Detail Visualization of Photosynthetic Membranes with GPU-Accelerated Ray Tracing

    PubMed Central

    Vandivort, Kirby L.; Barragan, Angela; Singharoy, Abhishek; Teo, Ivan; Ribeiro, João V.; Isralewitz, Barry; Liu, Bo; Goh, Boon Chong; Phillips, James C.; MacGregor-Chatwin, Craig; Johnson, Matthew P.; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Hunter, C. Neil

    2016-01-01

    The cellular process responsible for providing energy for most life on Earth, namely photosynthetic light-harvesting, requires the cooperation of hundreds of proteins across an organelle, involving length and time scales spanning several orders of magnitude over quantum and classical regimes. Simulation and visualization of this fundamental energy conversion process pose many unique methodological and computational challenges. We present, in two accompanying movies, light-harvesting in the photosynthetic apparatus found in purple bacteria, the so-called chromatophore. The movies are the culmination of three decades of modeling efforts, featuring the collaboration of theoretical, experimental, and computational scientists. We describe the techniques that were used to build, simulate, analyze, and visualize the structures shown in the movies, and we highlight cases where scientific needs spurred the development of new parallel algorithms that efficiently harness GPU accelerators and petascale computers. PMID:27274603

  12. Localization of Membrane Proteins in the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 (Radial Asymmetry in the Photosynthetic Complexes).

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, D. M.; Troyan, T. A.; Sherman, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    Localization of membrane proteins in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 was determined by transmission electron microscopy utilizing immunocytochemistry with cells prepared by freeze-substitution. This preparation procedure maintained cellular morphology and permitted detection of cellular antigens with high sensitivity and low background. Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 is a unicellular cyanobacterium with thylakoids organized in concentric layers toward the periphery of the cell. Cytochrome oxidase was localized almost entirely in the cytoplasmic membrane, whereas a carotenoprotein (P35) was shown to be a cell wall component. The major photosystem II (PSII) proteins (D1, D2 CP43, and CP47) were localized throughout the thylakoids. Proteins of the Cyt b6/f complex were found to have a similar distribution. Thylakoid luminal proteins, such as the Mn-stabilizing protein, were located primarily in the thylakoid, but a small, reproducible fraction was found in the outer compartment. The photosystem I (PSI) reaction center proteins and the ATP synthase proteins were found associated mostly with the outermost thylakoid and with the cytoplasmic membrane. These results indicated that the photosynthetic apparatus is not evenly distributed throughout the thylakoids. Rather, there is a radial asymmetry such that much of the PSI and the ATPase synthase is located in the outermost thylakoid. The relationship of this structure to the photosynthetic mechanism is discussed. It is suggested that the photosystems are separated because of kinetic differences between PSII and PSI, as hypothesized by H.-W. Trissl and C. Wilhelm (Trends Biochem Sci [1993] 18:415-419). PMID:12232325

  13. The electron conduction of photosynthetic protein complexes embedded in a membrane.

    PubMed

    Stamouli, A; Frenken, J W M; Oosterkamp, T H; Cogdell, R J; Aartsma, T J

    2004-02-27

    The conductivity of two photosynthetic protein-pigment complexes, a light harvesting 2 complex and a reaction center, was measured with an atomic force microscope capable of performing electrical measurements. Current-voltage measurements were performed on complexes embedded in their natural environment. Embedding the complexes in lipid bilayers made it possible to discuss the different conduction behaviors of the two complexes in light of their atomic structure. PMID:14988007

  14. Electric field-induced lateral mobility of photosystem I in the photosynthetic membrane: A study by electrophotoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Brumfeld, V; Miller, I R; Korenstein, R

    1989-09-01

    Electrophoretic movement of photosystem I (PS I) along the photosynthetic membrane of hypotonically swollen thylakoid vesicles was studied by analyzing the electric field-stimulated delayed luminescence (electrophotoluminescence) emitted from PS I. The electrophoretic mobility was inferred from the differences in electrophotoluminescence (EPL) of the photosynthetic vesicles in presence and absence of trains of low amplitude (<80 V/cm) prepulses of 1 ms duration at 4 ms spacing. The average apparent electric mobility, determined from the time course of EPL increase on one hemisphere or its decrease on the other one, as function of prepulse length and intensity was of the order of 3 . 10(-5) cm(2)V(-1)s(-1). The assymetric distribution of the PS I reached a steady state when the diffusional, electrostatic, and elastic forces balanced the electrophoretic driving force. A lateral diffusion coefficient of approximately 5 . 10(-9) cm(2)s(-1) was found for the PS I complex from the diffusional relaxation after cessation of the electric field pulse train. Experimental conditions such as concentration, temperature, and viscosity of the aqueous solution were not critical for the effect. Between 23 and 150 electron charges per moving particle were estimated from the measured electrophoretic mobility. PMID:19431746

  15. Kinetic development and evaluation of membrane sequencing batch reactor (MSBR) with mixed cultures photosynthetic bacteria for dairy wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Kaewsuk, Jutamas; Thorasampan, Worachat; Thanuttamavong, Monthon; Seo, Gyu Tae

    2010-05-01

    This experimental study was conducted to evaluate a membrane sequencing batch reactor (MSBR) with mixed culture photosynthetic bacteria for dairy wastewater treatment. The study was undertaken in two steps: laboratory and pilot scale experiments. In the first step, kinetics analysis of the MSBR was carried out in a laboratory scale experiment with influent COD concentration of 2500 mg/L. The pilot scale experiment was conducted to investigate the performance of the MSBR and checked the suitability of the kinetics for an engineering design. The kinetic coefficients K(s), k, k(d), Y and mu(m) were found to be 174-mg-COD/L, 7.42/d, 0.1383/d, 0.2281/d and 1.69/d, respectively. There were some deviations of COD removal efficiency between the design value and the actual value. From the kinetics estimation, COD effluent from the design was 27 mg/L while the average actual COD effluent from the experiment was 149 mg/L. Due to the different light source condition, the factors relating to light energy (i.e. L(f) and IR(%)) must be incorporated into engineering design and performance prediction with these kinetic coefficients of the photosynthetic MSBR. PMID:20149520

  16. Studying the Supramolecular Organization of Photosynthetic Membranes within Freeze-fractured Leaf Tissues by Cryo-scanning Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Charuvi, Dana; Nevo, Reinat; Kaplan-Ashiri, Ifat; Shimoni, Eyal; Reich, Ziv

    2016-01-01

    Cryo-scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of freeze-fractured samples allows investigation of biological structures at near native conditions. Here, we describe a technique for studying the supramolecular organization of photosynthetic (thylakoid) membranes within leaf samples. This is achieved by high-pressure freezing of leaf tissues, freeze-fracturing, double-layer coating and finally cryo-SEM imaging. Use of the double-layer coating method allows acquiring high magnification (>100,000X) images with minimal beam damage to the frozen-hydrated samples as well as minimal charging effects. Using the described procedures we investigated the alterations in supramolecular distribution of photosystem and light-harvesting antenna protein complexes that take place during dehydration of the resurrection plant Craterostigma pumilum, in situ. PMID:27403565

  17. Ionic liquids effects on the permeability of photosynthetic membranes probed by the electrochromic shift of endogenous carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Malferrari, Marco; Malferrari, Danilo; Francia, Francesco; Galletti, Paola; Tagliavini, Emilio; Venturoli, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are promising materials exploited as solvents and media in many innovative applications, some already used at the industrial scale. The chemical structure and physicochemical properties of ILs can differ significantly according to the specific applications for which they have been synthesized. As a consequence, their interaction with biological entities and toxicity can vary substantially. To select highly effective and minimally harmful ILs, these properties need to be investigated. Here we use the so called chromatophores--protein-phospholipid membrane vesicles obtained from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides--to assess the effects of imidazolinium and pyrrolidinium ILs, with chloride or dicyanamide as counter anions, on the ionic permeability of a native biological membrane. The extent and modalities by which these ILs affect the ionic conductivity can be studied in chromatophores by analyzing the electrochromic response of endogenous carotenoids, acting as an intramembrane voltmeter at the molecular level. We show that chromatophores represent an in vitro experimental model suitable to probe permeability changes induced in cell membranes by ILs differing in chemical nature, degree of oxygenation of the cationic moiety and counter anion. PMID:26343161

  18. Photosynthetic membrane-less microbial fuel cells to enhance microalgal biomass concentration.

    PubMed

    Uggetti, Enrica; Puigagut, Jaume

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess the net increase in microalgal biomass concentration induced by photosynthetic microbial fuel cells (PMFC). The experiment was conducted on six lab-scale PMFC constituted by an anodic chamber simulating an anaerobic digester connected to a cathodic chamber consisting of a mixed algae consortia culture. Three PMFC were operated at closed circuit (PMFC(+)) whereas three PMFC were left unconnected as control (PMFC(-)). PMFC(+) produced a higher amount of carbon dioxide as a product of the organic matter oxidation that resulted in 1.5-3 times higher biomass concentration at the cathode compartment when compared to PMFC(-). PMID:27455126

  19. Identification of an Atypical Membrane Protein Involved in the Formation of Protein Disulfide Bonds in Oxygenic Photosynthetic Organisms*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Abhay K.; Bhattacharyya-Pakrasi, Maitrayee; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis in cyanobacteria nearly three billion years ago provided abundant reducing power and facilitated the elaboration of numerous oxygen-dependent reactions in our biosphere. Cyanobacteria contain an internal thylakoid membrane system, the site of photosynthesis, and a typical Gram-negative envelope membrane system. Like other organisms, the extracytoplasmic space in cyanobacteria houses numerous cysteine-containing proteins. However, the existence of a biochemical system for disulfide bond formation in cyanobacteria remains to be determined. Extracytoplasmic disulfide bond formation in non-photosynthetic organisms is catalyzed by coordinated interaction between two proteins, a disulfide carrier and a disulfide generator. Here we describe a novel gene, SyndsbAB, required for disulfide bond formation in the extracytoplasmic space of cyanobacteria. The SynDsbAB orthologs are present in most cyanobacteria and chloroplasts of higher plants with fully sequenced genomes. The SynDsbAB protein contains two distinct catalytic domains that display significant similarity to proteins involved in disulfide bond formation in Escherichia coli and eukaryotes. Importantly, SyndsbAB complements E. coli strains defective in disulfide bond formation. In addition, the activity of E. coli alkaline phosphatase localized to the periplasm of Synechocystis 6803 is dependent on the function of SynDsbAB. Deletion of SyndsbAB in Synechocystis 6803 causes significant growth impairment under photoautotrophic conditions and results in hyper-sensitivity to dithiothreitol, a reductant, whereas diamide, an oxidant had no effect on the growth of the mutant strains. We conclude that SynDsbAB is a critical protein for disulfide bond formation in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms and required for their optimal photoautotrophic growth. PMID:18413314

  20. Suppression of Photosynthetic Gene Expression in Roots Is Required for Sustained Root Growth under Phosphate Deficiency1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jun; Yu, Haopeng; Tian, Caihuan; Zhou, Wenkun; Li, Chuanyou; Jiao, Yuling; Liu, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Plants cope with inorganic phosphate (Pi) deficiencies in their environment by adjusting their developmental programs and metabolic activities. For Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the developmental responses include the inhibition of primary root growth and the enhanced formation of lateral roots and root hairs. Pi deficiency also inhibits photosynthesis by suppressing the expression of photosynthetic genes. Early studies showed that photosynthetic gene expression was also suppressed in Pi-deficient roots, a nonphotosynthetic organ; however, the biological relevance of this phenomenon remains unknown. In this work, we characterized an Arabidopsis mutant, hypersensitive to Pi starvation7 (hps7), that is hypersensitive to Pi deficiency; the hypersensitivity includes an increased inhibition of root growth. HPS7 encodes a tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase. Accumulation of HPS7 proteins in root tips is enhanced by Pi deficiency. Comparative RNA sequencing analyses indicated that the expression of many photosynthetic genes is activated in roots of hps7. Under Pi deficiency, the expression of photosynthetic genes in hps7 is further increased, which leads to enhanced accumulation of chlorophyll, starch, and sucrose. Pi-deficient hps7 roots also produce a high level of reactive oxygen species. Previous research showed that the overexpression of GOLDEN-like (GLK) transcription factors in transgenic Arabidopsis activates photosynthesis in roots. The GLK overexpressing (GLK OX) lines also exhibit increased inhibition of root growth under Pi deficiency. The increased inhibition of root growth in hps7 and GLK OX lines by Pi deficiency was completely reversed by growing the plants in the dark. Based on these results, we propose that suppression of photosynthetic gene expression is required for sustained root growth under Pi deficiency. PMID:24868033

  1. Kinetic model of primary energy transfer and trapping in photosynthetic membranes

    PubMed Central

    Pullerits, Tõnu; Freiberg, Arvi

    1992-01-01

    The picosecond time-domain incoherent singlet excitation transfer and trapping kinetics in core antenna of photosynthetic bacteria are studied in case of low excitation intensities by numerical integration of the appropriate master equation in a wide temperature range of 4-300 K. The essential features of our two-dimensional-lattice model are as follows: Förster excitation transfer theory, spectral heterogeneity of both the light-harvesting antenna and the reaction center, treatment of temperature effects through temperature dependence of spectral bands, inclusion of inner structure of the trap, and transition dipole moment orientation. The fluorescence kinetics is analyzed in terms of distributions of various kinetic components, and the influence of different inhomogeneities (orientational, spectral) is studied. A reasonably good agreement between theoretical and experimental fluorescence decay kinetics for purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum is achieved at high temperatures by assuming relatively large antenna spectral inhomogeneity: 20 nm at the whole bandwidth of 40 nm. The mean residence time in the antenna lattice site (it is assumed to be the aggregate of four bacteriochlorophyll a molecules bound to proteins) is estimated to be ∼12 ps. At 4 K only qualitative agreement between model and experiment is gained. The failure of quantitative fitting is perhaps due to the lack of knowledge about the real structure of antenna or local heating and cooling effects not taken into account. PMID:19431849

  2. Optimal fold symmetry of LH2 rings on a photosynthetic membrane

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, Liam; Chen, Hang; Chuang, Chern; Silbey, Robert J.; Cao, Jianshu

    2013-01-01

    An intriguing observation of photosynthetic light-harvesting systems is the N-fold symmetry of light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of purple bacteria. We calculate the optimal rotational configuration of N-fold rings on a hexagonal lattice and establish two related mechanisms for the promotion of maximum excitation energy transfer (EET). (i) For certain fold numbers, there exist optimal basis cells with rotational symmetry, extendable to the entire lattice for the global optimization of the EET network. (ii) The type of basis cell can reduce or remove the frustration of EET rates across the photosynthetic network. We find that the existence of a basis cell and its type are directly related to the number of matching points S between the fold symmetry and the hexagonal lattice. The two complementary mechanisms provide selection criteria for the fold number and identify groups of consecutive numbers. Remarkably, one such group consists of the naturally occurring 8-, 9-, and 10-fold rings. By considering the inter-ring distance and EET rate, we demonstrate that this group can achieve minimal rotational sensitivity in addition to an optimal packing density, achieving robust and efficient EET. This corroborates our findings i and ii and, through their direct relation to S, suggests the design principle of matching the internal symmetry with the lattice order. PMID:23650366

  3. Evolutionary origins, molecular cloning and expression of carotenoid hydroxylases in eukaryotic photosynthetic algae

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Xanthophylls, oxygenated derivatives of carotenes, play critical roles in photosynthetic apparatus of cyanobacteria, algae, and higher plants. Although the xanthophylls biosynthetic pathway of algae is largely unknown, it is of particular interest because they have a very complicated evolutionary history. Carotenoid hydroxylase (CHY) is an important protein that plays essential roles in xanthophylls biosynthesis. With the availability of 18 sequenced algal genomes, we performed a comprehensive comparative analysis of chy genes and explored their distribution, structure, evolution, origins, and expression. Results Overall 60 putative chy genes were identified and classified into two major subfamilies (bch and cyp97) according to their domain structures. Genes in the bch subfamily were found in 10 green algae and 1 red alga, but absent in other algae. In the phylogenetic tree, bch genes of green algae and higher plants share a common ancestor and are of non-cyanobacterial origin, whereas that of red algae is of cyanobacteria. The homologs of cyp97a/c genes were widespread only in green algae, while cyp97b paralogs were seen in most of algae. Phylogenetic analysis on cyp97 genes supported the hypothesis that cyp97b is an ancient gene originated before the formation of extant algal groups. The cyp97a gene is more closely related to cyp97c in evolution than to cyp97b. The two cyp97 genes were isolated from the green alga Haematococcus pluvialis, and transcriptional expression profiles of chy genes were observed under high light stress of different wavelength. Conclusions Green algae received a β-xanthophylls biosynthetic pathway from host organisms. Although red algae inherited the pathway from cyanobacteria during primary endosymbiosis, it remains unclear in Chromalveolates. The α-xanthophylls biosynthetic pathway is a common feature in green algae and higher plants. The origination of cyp97a/c is most likely due to gene duplication before divergence of

  4. Photosynthetic Gene Expression in Meristems and during Initial Leaf Development in a C4 Dicotyledonous Plant.

    PubMed

    Ramsperger, V. C.; Summers, R. G.; Berry, J. O.

    1996-08-01

    Immunolocalization and fluorescent in situ hybridization were used with confocal microscopy to examine patterns of photosynthetic gene expression during initial stages of leaf development in the C4 dicot Amaranthus hypochondriacus. mRNAs encoding the large and small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase were present in the apical dome and in all cells of the leaf primordia. In contrast, these polypeptides were detected only in cells of the ground meristem, with no accumulation detected in the apical dome or in other leaf primordia cells. The ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase transcripts showed very little cell-type specificity as leaf structures began to differentiate, whereas their polypeptides accumulated primarily in bundle-sheath precursor cells. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase mRNAs were abundant in meristems and leaf primordia, although their corresponding polypeptides did not accumulate in leaves until the leaf vascular system began to differentiate. These polypeptides were mostly restricted to premesophyll cells from their earliest detection, whereas their transcripts remained present in nearly all leaf cells. These findings indicate that individual C4 genes are independently regulated as they become initially localized to their appropriate cell types. Furthermore, posttranscriptional regulation plays a major role in determining early patterns of C4 gene expression. PMID:12226343

  5. An Evaluation of Sensor Performance for Harmful Compounds by Using Photo-Induced Electron Transfer from Photosynthetic Membranes to Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kasuno, Megumi; Kimura, Hiroki; Yasutomo, Hisataka; Torimura, Masaki; Murakami, Daisuke; Tsukatani, Yusuke; Hanada, Satoshi; Matsushita, Takayuki; Tao, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Rapid, simple, and low-cost screening procedures are necessary for the detection of harmful compounds in the effluent that flows out of point sources such as industrial outfall. The present study investigated the effects on a novel sensor of harmful compounds such as KCN, phenol, and herbicides such as 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), 2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,3,5-triazine (atrazine), and 2-N-tert-butyl-4-N-ethyl-6-methylsulfanyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine (terbutryn). The sensor employed an electrode system that incorporated the photocurrent of intra-cytoplasmic membranes (so-called chromatophores) prepared from photosynthetic bacteria and linked using carbon paste electrodes. The amperometric curve (photocurrent-time curve) of photo-induced electron transfer from chromatophores of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides to the electrode via an exogenous electron acceptor was composed of two characteristic phases: an abrupt increase in current immediately after illumination (I₀), and constant current over time (Ic). Compared with other redox compounds, 2,5-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone (DCBQ) was the most useful exogenous electron acceptor in this system. Photo-reduction of DCBQ exhibited Michaelis-Menten-like kinetics, and reduction rates were dependent on the amount of DCBQ and the photon flux intensity. The Ic decreased in the presence of KCN at concentrations over 0.05 μM (=μmol·dm(-3)). The I₀ decreased following the addition of phenol at concentrations over 20 μM. The Ic was affected by terbutryn at concentrations over 10 μM. In contrast, DCMU and atrazine had no effect on either I₀ or Ic. The utility of this electrode system for the detection of harmful compounds is discussed. PMID:27023553

  6. An Evaluation of Sensor Performance for Harmful Compounds by Using Photo-Induced Electron Transfer from Photosynthetic Membranes to Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Kasuno, Megumi; Kimura, Hiroki; Yasutomo, Hisataka; Torimura, Masaki; Murakami, Daisuke; Tsukatani, Yusuke; Hanada, Satoshi; Matsushita, Takayuki; Tao, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Rapid, simple, and low-cost screening procedures are necessary for the detection of harmful compounds in the effluent that flows out of point sources such as industrial outfall. The present study investigated the effects on a novel sensor of harmful compounds such as KCN, phenol, and herbicides such as 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), 2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,3,5-triazine (atrazine), and 2-N-tert-butyl-4-N-ethyl-6-methylsulfanyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine (terbutryn). The sensor employed an electrode system that incorporated the photocurrent of intra-cytoplasmic membranes (so-called chromatophores) prepared from photosynthetic bacteria and linked using carbon paste electrodes. The amperometric curve (photocurrent-time curve) of photo-induced electron transfer from chromatophores of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides to the electrode via an exogenous electron acceptor was composed of two characteristic phases: an abrupt increase in current immediately after illumination (I0), and constant current over time (Ic). Compared with other redox compounds, 2,5-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone (DCBQ) was the most useful exogenous electron acceptor in this system. Photo-reduction of DCBQ exhibited Michaelis-Menten-like kinetics, and reduction rates were dependent on the amount of DCBQ and the photon flux intensity. The Ic decreased in the presence of KCN at concentrations over 0.05 μM (=μmol·dm−3). The I0 decreased following the addition of phenol at concentrations over 20 μM. The Ic was affected by terbutryn at concentrations over 10 μM. In contrast, DCMU and atrazine had no effect on either I0 or Ic. The utility of this electrode system for the detection of harmful compounds is discussed. PMID:27023553

  7. Photosynthetic Membranes of Synechocystis or Plants Convert Sunlight to Photocurrent through Different Pathways due to Different Architectures

    PubMed Central

    Pinhassi, Roy I.; Larom, Shirley; Linkov, Artyom; Boulouis, Alix; Schöttler, Mark-Aurel; Bock, Ralph; Rothschild, Avner; Adir, Noam; Schuster, Gadi

    2015-01-01

    Thylakoid membranes contain the redox active complexes catalyzing the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis in cyanobacteria, algae and plants. Crude thylakoid membranes or purified photosystems from different organisms have previously been utilized for generation of electrical power and/or fuels. Here we investigate the electron transferability from thylakoid preparations from plants or the cyanobacterium Synechocystis. We show that upon illumination, crude Synechocystis thylakoids can reduce cytochrome c. In addition, this crude preparation can transfer electrons to a graphite electrode, producing an unmediated photocurrent of 15 μA/cm2. Photocurrent could be obtained in the presence of the PSII inhibitor DCMU, indicating that the source of electrons is QA, the primary Photosystem II acceptor. In contrast, thylakoids purified from plants could not reduce cyt c, nor produced a photocurrent in the photocell in the presence of DCMU. The production of significant photocurrent (100 μA/cm2) from plant thylakoids required the addition of the soluble electron mediator DCBQ. Furthermore, we demonstrate that use of crude thylakoids from the D1-K238E mutant in Synechocystis resulted in improved electron transferability, increasing the direct photocurrent to 35 μA/cm2. Applying the analogous mutation to tobacco plants did not achieve an equivalent effect. While electron abstraction from crude thylakoids of cyanobacteria or plants is feasible, we conclude that the site of the abstraction of the electrons from the thylakoids, the architecture of the thylakoid preparations influence the site of the electron abstraction, as well as the transfer pathway to the electrode. This dictates the use of different strategies for production of sustainable electrical current from photosynthetic thylakoid membranes of cyanobacteria or higher plants. PMID:25915422

  8. Photosynthetic Membranes of Synechocystis or Plants Convert Sunlight to Photocurrent through Different Pathways due to Different Architectures.

    PubMed

    Pinhassi, Roy I; Kallmann, Dan; Saper, Gadiel; Larom, Shirley; Linkov, Artyom; Boulouis, Alix; Schöttler, Mark-Aurel; Bock, Ralph; Rothschild, Avner; Adir, Noam; Schuster, Gadi

    2015-01-01

    Thylakoid membranes contain the redox active complexes catalyzing the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis in cyanobacteria, algae and plants. Crude thylakoid membranes or purified photosystems from different organisms have previously been utilized for generation of electrical power and/or fuels. Here we investigate the electron transferability from thylakoid preparations from plants or the cyanobacterium Synechocystis. We show that upon illumination, crude Synechocystis thylakoids can reduce cytochrome c. In addition, this crude preparation can transfer electrons to a graphite electrode, producing an unmediated photocurrent of 15 μA/cm2. Photocurrent could be obtained in the presence of the PSII inhibitor DCMU, indicating that the source of electrons is QA, the primary Photosystem II acceptor. In contrast, thylakoids purified from plants could not reduce cyt c, nor produced a photocurrent in the photocell in the presence of DCMU. The production of significant photocurrent (100 μA/cm2) from plant thylakoids required the addition of the soluble electron mediator DCBQ. Furthermore, we demonstrate that use of crude thylakoids from the D1-K238E mutant in Synechocystis resulted in improved electron transferability, increasing the direct photocurrent to 35 μA/cm2. Applying the analogous mutation to tobacco plants did not achieve an equivalent effect. While electron abstraction from crude thylakoids of cyanobacteria or plants is feasible, we conclude that the site of the abstraction of the electrons from the thylakoids, the architecture of the thylakoid preparations influence the site of the electron abstraction, as well as the transfer pathway to the electrode. This dictates the use of different strategies for production of sustainable electrical current from photosynthetic thylakoid membranes of cyanobacteria or higher plants. PMID:25915422

  9. Membrane Sequestration of PII Proteins and Nitrogenase Regulation in the Photosynthetic Bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus▿

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Drepper, Thomas; Masepohl, Bernd; Hallenbeck, Patrick C.

    2007-01-01

    Both Rhodobacter capsulatus PII homologs GlnB and GlnK were found to be necessary for the proper regulation of nitrogenase activity and modification in response to an ammonium shock. As previously reported for several other bacteria, ammonium addition triggered the AmtB-dependent association of GlnK with the R. capsulatus membrane. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis indicates that the modification/demodification of one PII homolog is aberrant in the absence of the other. In a glnK mutant, more GlnB was found to be membrane associated under these conditions. In a glnB mutant, GlnK fails to be significantly sequestered by AmtB, even though it appears to be fully deuridylylated. Additionally, the ammonium-induced enhanced sequestration by AmtB of the unmodifiable GlnK variant GlnK-Y51F follows the wild-type GlnK pattern with a high level in the cytoplasm without the addition of ammonium and an increased level in the membrane fraction after ammonium treatment. These results suggest that factors other than PII modification are driving its association with AmtB in the membrane in R. capsulatus. PMID:17586647

  10. Integration of energy and electron transfer processes in the photosynthetic membrane of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Cartron, Michaël L.; Olsen, John D.; Sener, Melih; Jackson, Philip J.; Brindley, Amanda A.; Qian, Pu; Dickman, Mark J.; Leggett, Graham J.; Schulten, Klaus; Hunter, C. Neil

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthesis converts absorbed solar energy to a protonmotive force, which drives ATP synthesis. The membrane network of chlorophyll–protein complexes responsible for light absorption, photochemistry and quinol (QH2) production has been mapped in the purple phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter (Rba.) sphaeroides using atomic force microscopy (AFM), but the membrane location of the cytochrome bc1 (cytbc1) complexes that oxidise QH2 to quinone (Q) to generate a protonmotive force is unknown. We labelled cytbc1 complexes with gold nanobeads, each attached by a Histidine10 (His10)-tag to the C-terminus of cytc1. Electron microscopy (EM) of negatively stained chromatophore vesicles showed that the majority of the cytbc1 complexes occur as dimers in the membrane. The cytbc1 complexes appeared to be adjacent to reaction centre light-harvesting 1-PufX (RC-LH1-PufX) complexes, consistent with AFM topographs of a gold-labelled membrane. His-tagged cytbc1 complexes were retrieved from chromatophores partially solubilised by detergent; RC-LH1-PufX complexes tended to co-purify with cytbc1, whereas LH2 complexes became detached, consistent with clusters of cytbc1 complexes close to RC-LH1-PufX arrays, but not with a fixed, stoichiometric cytbc1-RC-LH1-PufX supercomplex. This information was combined with a quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of the RC, cytbc1, ATP synthase, cytaa3 and cytcbb3 membrane protein complexes, to construct an atomic-level model of a chromatophore vesicle comprising 67 LH2 complexes, 11 LH1-RC-PufX dimers & 2 RC-LH1-PufX monomers, 4 cytbc1 dimers and 2 ATP synthases. Simulation of the interconnected energy, electron and proton transfer processes showed a half-maximal ATP turnover rate for a light intensity equivalent to only 1% of bright sunlight. Thus, the photosystem architecture of the chromatophore is optimised for growth at low light intensities. PMID:24530865

  11. Analysis of the Expression and Activity of Nitric Oxide Synthase from Marine Photosynthetic Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Foresi, Noelia; Correa-Aragunde, Natalia; Santolini, Jerome; Lamattina, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) functions as a signaling molecule in many biological processes in species belonging to all kingdoms of life. In animal cells, NO is synthesized primarily by NO synthase (NOS), an enzyme that catalyze the NADPH-dependent oxidation of L-arginine to NO and L-citrulline. Three NOS isoforms have been identified, the constitutive neuronal NOS (nNOS) and endothelial NOS (eNOS) and one inducible (iNOS). Plant NO synthesis is complex and is a matter of ongoing investigation and debate. Despite evidence of an Arg-dependent pathway for NO synthesis in plants, no plant NOS homologs to animal forms have been identified to date. In plants, there is also evidence for a nitrate-dependent mechanism of NO synthesis, catalyzed by cytosolic nitrate reductase. The existence of a NOS enzyme in the plant kingdom, from the tiny single-celled green alga Ostreococcus tauri was reported in 2010. O. tauri shares a common ancestor with higher plants and is considered to be part of an early diverging class within the green plant lineage.In this chapter we describe detailed protocols to study the expression and characterization of the enzymatic activity of NOS from O. tauri. The most used methods for the characterization of a canonical NOS are the analysis of spectral properties of the oxyferrous complex in the heme domain, the oxyhemoglobin (oxyHb) and citrulline assays and the NADPH oxidation for in vitro analysis of its activity or the use of fluorescent probes and Griess assay for in vivo NO determination. We further discuss the advantages and drawbacks of each method. Finally, we remark factors associated to the measurement of NOS activity in photosynthetic organisms that can generate misunderstandings in the interpretation of results. PMID:27094418

  12. Expression strategies for structural studies of eukaryotic membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Joseph A; Shahsavar, Azadeh; Paulsen, Peter Aasted; Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Nissen, Poul

    2016-06-01

    Integral membrane proteins in eukaryotes are central to various cellular processes and key targets in structural biology, biotechnology and drug development. However, the number of available structures for eukaryotic membrane protein belies their physiological importance. Recently, the number of available eukaryotic membrane protein structures has been steadily increasing due to the development of novel strategies in construct design, expression and structure determination. Here, we examine the major expression systems exploited for eukaryotic membrane proteins. Additionally we strive to tabulate and describe the recent expression strategies in eukaryotic membrane protein structural biology. We find that a majority of targets have been expressed in advanced host systems and modified from their wild-type form with distinct focus on conformation and thermostabilisation. However, strategies for native protein purification should also be considered where possible, particularly in light of the recent advances in single particle cryo electron microscopy. PMID:27362979

  13. Synchrotron Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering Investigation on Integral Membrane Protein Light-Harvesting Complex LH2 from Photosynthetic Bacterium Rhodopseudomonas Acidophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Lu-Chao; Weng, Yu-Xiang; Hong, Xin-Guo; Xian, Ding-Chang; Kobayashi, Katsumi

    2006-07-01

    Structures of membrane protein in solution are different from that in crystal phase. We present the primary results of small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) resolved topological structures of a light harvesting antenna membrane protein complex LH2 from photosynthetic bacteria Rhodopseudomonas acidophila in detergent solution for the first time. Our results show that the elliptical shape of the LH2 complex in solution clearly deviates from its circular structure in crystal phase determined by x-ray diffraction. This result provides an insight into the structure and function interplay in LH2.

  14. The design and synthesis of artificial photosynthetic antennas, reaction centres and membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, T A; Moore, A L; Gust, D

    2002-01-01

    Artificial antenna systems and reaction centres synthesized in our laboratory are used to illustrate that structural and thermodynamic factors controlling energy and electron transfer in these constructs can be modified to optimize performance. Artificial reaction centres have been incorporated into liposomal membranes where they convert light energy to vectorial redox potential. This redox potential drives a Mitchellian, quinone-based, proton-transporting redox loop that generates a Deltamu H(+) of ca. 4.4 kcal mol(-1) comprising DeltapH ca. 2.1 and Deltapsi ca. 70 mV. In liposomes containing CF(0)F(1)-ATP synthase, this system drives ATP synthesis against an ATP chemical potential similar to that observed in natural systems. PMID:12437888

  15. cor Gene Expression in Barley Mutants Affected in Chloroplast Development and Photosynthetic Electron Transport1

    PubMed Central

    Dal Bosco, Cristina; Busconi, Marco; Govoni, Chiara; Baldi, Paolo; Stanca, A. Michele; Crosatti, Cristina; Bassi, Roberto; Cattivelli, Luigi

    2003-01-01

    The expression of several barley (Hordeum vulgare) cold-regulated (cor) genes during cold acclimation was blocked in the albino mutant an, implying a chloroplast control on mRNAs accumulation. By using albino and xantha mutants ordered according to the step in chloroplast biogenesis affected, we show that the cold-dependent accumulation of cor14b, tmc-ap3, and blt14 mRNAs depends on plastid developmental stage. Plants acquire the ability to fully express cor genes only after the development of primary thylakoid membranes in their chloroplasts. To investigate the chloroplast-dependent mechanism involved in cor gene expression, the activity of a 643-bp cor14b promoter fragment was assayed in wild-type and albino mutant an leaf explants using transient β-glucuronidase reporter expression assay. Deletion analysis identified a 27-bp region between nucleotides −274 and −247 with respect to the transcription start point, encompassing a boundary of some element that contributes to the cold-induced expression of cor14b. However, cor14b promoter was equally active in green and in albino an leaves, suggesting that chloroplast controls cor14b expression by posttranscriptional mechanisms. Barley mutants lacking either photosystem I or II reaction center complexes were then used to evaluate the effects of redox state of electron transport chain components on COR14b accumulation. In the mutants analyzed, the amount of COR14b protein, but not the steady-state level of the corresponding mRNA, was dependent on the redox state of the electron transport chain. Treatments of the vir-zb63 mutant with electron transport chain inhibitors showed that oxidized plastoquinone promotes COR14b accumulation, thus suggesting a molecular relationship between plastoquinone/plastoquinol pool and COR14b. PMID:12586903

  16. Effect of partial or complete elimination of light-harvesting complexes on the surface electric properties and the functions of cyanobacterial photosynthetic membranes.

    PubMed

    Dobrikova, Anelia G; Domonkos, Ildikó; Sözer, Özge; Laczkó-Dobos, Hajnalka; Kis, Mihály; Párducz, Árpád; Gombos, Zoltán; Apostolova, Emilia L

    2013-02-01

    Influence of the modification of the cyanobacterial light-harvesting complex [i.e. phycobilisomes (PBS)] on the surface electric properties and the functions of photosynthetic membranes was investigated. We used four PBS mutant strains of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 as follows: PAL (PBS-less), CK (phycocyanin-less), BE (PSII-PBS-less) and PSI-less/apcE(-) (PSI-less with detached PBS). Modifications of the PBS content lead to changes in the cell morphology and surface electric properties of the thylakoid membranes as well as in their functions, such as photosynthetic oxygen-evolving activity, P700 kinetics and energy transfer between the pigment-protein complexes. Data reveal that the complete elimination of PBS in the PAL mutant causes a slight decrease in the electric dipole moments of the thylakoid membranes, whereas significant perturbations of the surface charges were registered in the membranes without assembled PBS-PSII macrocomplex (BE mutant) or PSI complex (PSI-less mutant). These observations correlate with the detected alterations in the membrane structural organization. Using a polarographic oxygen rate electrode, we showed that the ratio of the fast to the slow oxygen-evolving PSII centers depends on the partial or complete elimination of light-harvesting complexes, as the slow operating PSII centers dominate in the PBS-less mutant and in the mutant with detached PBS. PMID:22582961

  17. Tracking energy transfer between light harvesting complex 2 and 1 in photosynthetic membranes grown under high and low illumination

    PubMed Central

    Lüer, Larry; Moulisová, Vladimíra; Henry, Sarah; Polli, Dario; Brotosudarmo, Tatas H. P.; Hoseinkhani, Sajjad; Brida, Daniele; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Cerullo, Giulio; Cogdell, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Energy transfer (ET) between B850 and B875 molecules in light harvesting complexes LH2 and LH1/RC (reaction center) complexes has been investigated in membranes of Rhodopseudomonas palustris grown under high- and low-light conditions. In these bacteria, illumination intensity during growth strongly affects the type of LH2 complexes synthesized, their optical spectra, and their amount of energetic disorder. We used a specially built femtosecond spectrometer, combining tunable narrowband pump with broadband white-light probe pulses, together with an analytical method based on derivative spectroscopy for disentangling the congested transient absorption spectra of LH1 and LH2 complexes. This procedure allows real-time tracking of the forward (LH2 → LH1) and backward (LH2←LH1) ET processes and unambiguous determination of the corresponding rate constants. In low-light grown samples, we measured lower ET rates in both directions with respect to high-light ones, which is explained by reduced spectral overlap between B850 and B875 due to partial redistribution of oscillator strength into a higher energetic exciton transition. We find that the low-light adaptation in R. palustris leads to a reduced elementary backward ET rate, in accordance with the low probability of two simultaneous excitations reaching the same LH1/RC complex under weak illumination. Our study suggests that backward ET is not just an inevitable consequence of vectorial ET with small energetic offsets, but is in fact actively managed by photosynthetic bacteria. PMID:22307601

  18. Tracking energy transfer between light harvesting complex 2 and 1 in photosynthetic membranes grown under high and low illumination.

    PubMed

    Lüer, Larry; Moulisová, Vladimíra; Henry, Sarah; Polli, Dario; Brotosudarmo, Tatas H P; Hoseinkhani, Sajjad; Brida, Daniele; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Cerullo, Giulio; Cogdell, Richard J

    2012-01-31

    Energy transfer (ET) between B850 and B875 molecules in light harvesting complexes LH2 and LH1/RC (reaction center) complexes has been investigated in membranes of Rhodopseudomonas palustris grown under high- and low-light conditions. In these bacteria, illumination intensity during growth strongly affects the type of LH2 complexes synthesized, their optical spectra, and their amount of energetic disorder. We used a specially built femtosecond spectrometer, combining tunable narrowband pump with broadband white-light probe pulses, together with an analytical method based on derivative spectroscopy for disentangling the congested transient absorption spectra of LH1 and LH2 complexes. This procedure allows real-time tracking of the forward (LH2 → LH1) and backward (LH2←LH1) ET processes and unambiguous determination of the corresponding rate constants. In low-light grown samples, we measured lower ET rates in both directions with respect to high-light ones, which is explained by reduced spectral overlap between B850 and B875 due to partial redistribution of oscillator strength into a higher energetic exciton transition. We find that the low-light adaptation in R. palustris leads to a reduced elementary backward ET rate, in accordance with the low probability of two simultaneous excitations reaching the same LH1/RC complex under weak illumination. Our study suggests that backward ET is not just an inevitable consequence of vectorial ET with small energetic offsets, but is in fact actively managed by photosynthetic bacteria. PMID:22307601

  19. High-Throughput Baculovirus Expression System for Membrane Protein Production.

    PubMed

    Kalathur, Ravi C; Panganiban, Marinela; Bruni, Renato

    2016-01-01

    The ease of use, robustness, cost-effectiveness, and posttranslational machinery make baculovirus expression system a popular choice for production of eukaryotic membrane proteins. This system can be readily adapted for high-throughput operations. This chapter outlines the techniques and procedures for cloning, transfection, small-scale production, and purification of membrane protein samples in a high-throughput manner. PMID:27485337

  20. Phylogeny of Galactolipid Synthase Homologs Together with their Enzymatic Analyses Revealed a Possible Origin and Divergence Time for Photosynthetic Membrane Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yuzawa, Yuichi; Nishihara, Hidenori; Haraguchi, Tsuyoshi; Masuda, Shinji; Shimojima, Mie; Shimoyama, Atsushi; Yuasa, Hideya; Okada, Norihiro; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    The photosynthetic membranes of cyanobacteria and chloroplasts of higher plants have remarkably similar lipid compositions. In particular, thylakoid membranes of both cyanobacteria and chloroplasts are composed of galactolipids, of which monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) is the most abundant, although MGDG biosynthetic pathways are different in these organisms. Comprehensive phylogenetic analysis revealed that MGDG synthase (MGD) homologs of filamentous anoxygenic phototrophs Chloroflexi have a close relationship with MGDs of Viridiplantae (green algae and land plants). Furthermore, analyses for the sugar specificity and anomeric configuration of the sugar head groups revealed that one of the MGD homologs exhibited a true MGDG synthetic activity. We therefore presumed that higher plant MGDs are derived from this ancestral type of MGD genes, and genes involved in membrane biogenesis and photosystems have been already functionally associated at least at the time of Chloroflexi divergence. As MGD gene duplication is an important event during plastid evolution, we also estimated the divergence time of type A and B MGDs. Our analysis indicated that these genes diverged ∼323 million years ago, when Spermatophyta (seed plants) were appearing. Galactolipid synthesis is required to produce photosynthetic membranes; based on MGD gene sequences and activities, we have proposed a novel evolutionary model that has increased our understanding of photosynthesis evolution. PMID:22210603

  1. Incorporation of Photosynthetic Reaction Centers in the Membrane of Human Cells: Toward a New Tool for Optical Control of Cell Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Pennisi, Cristian P.; Jensen, Poul Erik; Zachar, Vladimir; Greenbaum, Elias; Yoshida, Ken

    2009-01-01

    The Photosystem I (PSI) reaction center is a photosynthetic membrane complex in which light-induced charge separation is accompanied by the generation of an electric potential. It has been recently proposed as a means to confer light sensitivity to cells possessing voltage-activated ion channels, but the feasibility of heterologous incorporation has not been demonstrated. In this work, methods of delivery and detection of PSI in the membrane of human cells are presented. Purified fractions of PSI were reconstituted in proteoliposomes that were used as vehicles for the membrane incorporation. A fluorescent impermeable dye was entrapped in the vesicles to qualitatively analyze the nature of the vesicle cell interaction. After incorporation, the localization and orientation of the complexes in the membrane was studied using immuno-fluorescence microscopy. The results showed complexes oriented as in native membranes, which were randomly distributed in clusters over the entire surface of the cell. Additionally, analysis of cell viability showed that the incorporation process does not damage the cell membrane. Taken together, the results of this work suggest that the mammalian cellular membrane is a reasonable environment for the incorporation of PSI complexes, which opens the possibility of using these molecular photovoltaic structures for optical control of cell activity.

  2. Clade-Specific Quantitative Analysis of Photosynthetic Gene Expression in Prochlorococcus

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Pinos, María-Carmen; Casado, Marta; Caballero, Gemma; Zinser, Erik R.; Dachs, Jordi; Piña, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Newly designed primers targeting rbcL (CO2 fixation), psbA (photosystem II) and rnpB (reference) genes were used in qRT-PCR assays to assess the photosynthetic capability of natural communities of Prochlorococcus, the most abundant photosynthetic organism on Earth and a major contributor to primary production in oligotrophic oceans. After optimizing sample collection methodology, we analyzed a total of 62 stations from the Malaspina 2010 circumnavigation (including Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans) at three different depths. Sequence and quantitative analyses of the corresponding amplicons showed the presence of high-light (HL) and low-light (LL) Prochlorococcus clades in essentially all 182 samples, with a largely uniform stratification of LL and HL sequences. Synechococcus cross-amplifications were detected by the taxon-specific melting temperatures of the amplicons. Laboratory exposure of Prochlorococcus MED4 (HL) and MIT9313 (LL) strains to organic pollutants (PAHs and organochlorine compounds) showed a decrease of rbcL transcript abundances, and of the rbcL to psbA ratios for both strains. We propose this technique as a convenient assay to evaluate effects of environmental stressors, including pollution, on the oceanic Prochlorococcus photosynthetic function. PMID:26244890

  3. Clade-Specific Quantitative Analysis of Photosynthetic Gene Expression in Prochlorococcus.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pinos, María-Carmen; Casado, Marta; Caballero, Gemma; Zinser, Erik R; Dachs, Jordi; Piña, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Newly designed primers targeting rbcL (CO2 fixation), psbA (photosystem II) and rnpB (reference) genes were used in qRT-PCR assays to assess the photosynthetic capability of natural communities of Prochlorococcus, the most abundant photosynthetic organism on Earth and a major contributor to primary production in oligotrophic oceans. After optimizing sample collection methodology, we analyzed a total of 62 stations from the Malaspina 2010 circumnavigation (including Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans) at three different depths. Sequence and quantitative analyses of the corresponding amplicons showed the presence of high-light (HL) and low-light (LL) Prochlorococcus clades in essentially all 182 samples, with a largely uniform stratification of LL and HL sequences. Synechococcus cross-amplifications were detected by the taxon-specific melting temperatures of the amplicons. Laboratory exposure of Prochlorococcus MED4 (HL) and MIT9313 (LL) strains to organic pollutants (PAHs and organochlorine compounds) showed a decrease of rbcL transcript abundances, and of the rbcL to psbA ratios for both strains. We propose this technique as a convenient assay to evaluate effects of environmental stressors, including pollution, on the oceanic Prochlorococcus photosynthetic function. PMID:26244890

  4. Short-term UV-B radiation affects photosynthetic performance and antioxidant gene expression in highbush blueberry leaves.

    PubMed

    Inostroza-Blancheteau, Claudio; Acevedo, Patricio; Loyola, Rodrigo; Arce-Johnson, Patricio; Alberdi, Miren; Reyes-Díaz, Marjorie

    2016-10-01

    The impact of increased artificial UV-B radiation on photosynthetic performance, antioxidant and SOD activities and molecular antioxidant metabolism responses in leaves of two highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L. cv. Brigitta and Bluegold) genotypes was studied. Plants were grown in a solid substrate and exposed to 0, 0.07, 0.12 and 0.19 W m(-2) of biologically-effective UV-B irradiance for 0-72 h. Our findings show that net photosynthesis (Pn) decreased significantly in Bluegold, accompanied by a reduction in the effective quantum yield (ФPSII) and electron transport rate (ETR), especially at the highest UV-B irradiation. On the other hand, Brigitta showed a better photosynthetic performance, as well as a clear increment in the antioxidant activity response that could be associated with increased superoxide dismutase activity (SOD) in the early hours of induced UV-B stress in all treatments. At the molecular level, the expression of the three antioxidant genes evaluated in both genotypes had a similar tendency. However, ascorbate peroxidase (APX) expression was significantly increased (6-fold) in Bluegold compared to Brigitta. Thus, the reduction of Pn concomitant with a lower photochemical performance and a reduced response of antioxidant metabolism suggest that the Bluegold genotype is more sensitive to UV-B radiation, while Brigitta appears to tolerate better moderate UV-B irradiance in a short-term experiment. PMID:27343876

  5. Translation Levels Control Multi-Spanning Membrane Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Cecilia; Bostrom, Jenny; Fuh, Germaine; Lee, Chingwei V.; Huang, Arthur; Vandlen, Richard L.; Yansura, Daniel G.

    2012-01-01

    Attempts to express eukaryotic multi-spanning membrane proteins at high-levels have been generally unsuccessful. In order to investigate the cause of this limitation and gain insight into the rate limiting processes involved, we have analyzed the effect of translation levels on the expression of several human membrane proteins in Escherichia coli (E. coli). These results demonstrate that excessive translation initiation rates of membrane proteins cause a block in protein synthesis and ultimately prevent the high-level accumulation of these proteins. Moderate translation rates allow coupling of peptide synthesis and membrane targeting, resulting in a significant increase in protein expression and accumulation over time. The current study evaluates four membrane proteins, CD20 (4-transmembrane (TM) helixes), the G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs, 7-TMs) RA1c and EG-VEGFR1, and Patched 1 (12-TMs), and demonstrates the critical role of translation initiation rates in the targeting, insertion and folding of integral membrane proteins in the E. coli membrane. PMID:22563408

  6. Giant vesicles functionally expressing membrane receptors for an insect pheromone.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Satoshi; Tabuchi, Masashi; Toyota, Taro; Sakurai, Takeshi; Hosoi, Tomohiro; Nomoto, Tomonori; Nakatani, Kei; Fujinami, Masanori; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2014-03-18

    To date, biochemical approaches to membrane receptors have been limited to the following methods: knockout or overexpression of membrane receptors by gene introduction and genome engineering or extraction of membrane receptor-surfactant complexes from innate cells and their introduction into model biomembranes. Here, we describe the development of a third method involving gene expression using cell-free in situ protein synthesis inside model biomembrane capsules. We verified this method by synthesizing olfactory receptors from the silkmoth Bombyx mori inside giant vesicles and found that they were excited in the presence of their ligand the Bombyx mori sex pheromone. PMID:24509495

  7. Effects of exogenous spermidine on photosynthetic capacity and expression of Calvin cycle genes in salt-stressed cucumber seedlings.

    PubMed

    Shu, Sheng; Chen, Lifang; Lu, Wei; Sun, Jin; Guo, Shirong; Yuan, Yinhui; Li, Jun

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the effects of exogenous spermidine (Spd) on growth, photosynthesis and expression of the Calvin cycle-related genes in cucumber seedlings (Cucumis sativus L.) exposed to NaCl stress. Salt stress reduced net photosynthetic rates (PN), actual photochemical efficiency of PSII (ΦPSII) and inhibited plant growth. Application of exogenous Spd to salinized nutrient solution alleviated salinity-induced the inhibition of plant growth, together with an increase in PN and ΦPSII. Salinity markedly reduced the maximum carboxylase activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Vcmax), the maximal velocity of RuBP regeneration (Jmax), triose-phosphate utilization capacity (TPU) and carboxylation efficiency (CE). Spd alleviated the negative effects on CO2 assimilation induced by salt stress. Moreover, Spd significantly increased the activities and contents of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and fructose-1,6-biphosphate aldolase (ALD; aldolase) in the salt-stressed cucumber leaves. On the other hand, salinity up-regulated the transcriptional levels of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RCA), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and phosphoribrokinase (PRK) and down-regulated the transcriptional levels of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit (RbcL), ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase small subunit (RbcS), ALD, triose-3-phosphate isomerase (TPI), fructose-1,6-bisphosphate phosphatase (FBPase) and 3-phosphoglyceric acid kinase (PGK). However, Spd application to salt-stressed plant roots counteracted salinity-induced mRNA expression changes in most of the above-mentioned genes. These results suggest that Spd could improve photosynthetic capacity through regulating gene expression and activity of key enzymes for CO2 fixation, thus confers tolerance to salinity on cucumber plants. PMID:25069716

  8. Expression of natural antimicrobials by human placenta and fetal membranes.

    PubMed

    King, A E; Paltoo, A; Kelly, R W; Sallenave, J-M; Bocking, A D; Challis, J R G

    2007-01-01

    Preterm birth associated with infection is a major clinical problem. We hypothesized that this condition is associated with altered expression of natural antimicrobial molecules (beta-defensins (HBD), elafin). Therefore, we examined expression of these molecules and their regulation by proinflammatory cytokines in placentae and fetal membranes from term pregnancy. HBD1-3 and elafin were localized by immunohistochemistry in fetal membranes and placenta. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to examine mRNA expression in primary trophoblast cells treated with inflammatory molecules. HBD1-3 and elafin were immunolocalized to placental and chorion trophoblast layers of fetal membranes and placenta. Immunoreactivity was also observed in amnion epithelium and decidua. No differences were noted between samples from women who were not in labour compared to those in active labour. In in vitro cultures of primary trophoblast cells, HBD2 and elafin mRNA expression was upregulated by the proinflammatory cytokine, IL-1beta. These results suggest that the chorion and placental trophoblast layers may be key barriers to the progression of infection in the pregnant uterus. Natural antimicrobial expression may be altered in response to inflammatory mediator expression associated with the onset of labour and/or uterine infection, providing increased protection when the uterus may be particularly susceptible to infection. PMID:16513165

  9. Membrane channel gene expression in human costal and articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Asmar, A.; Barrett-Jolley, R.; Werner, A.; Kelly, R.; Stacey, M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chondrocytes are the uniquely resident cells found in all types of cartilage and key to their function is the ability to respond to mechanical loads with changes of metabolic activity. This mechanotransduction property is, in part, mediated through the activity of a range of expressed transmembrane channels; ion channels, gap junction proteins, and porins. Appropriate expression of ion channels has been shown essential for production of extracellular matrix and differential expression of transmembrane channels is correlated to musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoarthritis and Albers-Schönberg. In this study we analyzed the consistency of gene expression between channelomes of chondrocytes from human articular and costal (teenage and fetal origin) cartilages. Notably, we found 14 ion channel genes commonly expressed between articular and both types of costal cartilage chondrocytes. There were several other ion channel genes expressed only in articular (6 genes) or costal chondrocytes (5 genes). Significant differences in expression of BEST1 and KCNJ2 (Kir2.1) were observed between fetal and teenage costal cartilage. Interestingly, the large Ca2+ activated potassium channel (BKα, or KCNMA1) was very highly expressed in all chondrocytes examined. Expression of the gap junction genes for Panx1, GJA1 (Cx43) and GJC1 (Cx45) was also observed in chondrocytes from all cartilage samples. Together, this data highlights similarities between chondrocyte membrane channel gene expressions in cells derived from different anatomical sites, and may imply that common electrophysiological signaling pathways underlie cellular control. The high expression of a range of mechanically and metabolically sensitive membrane channels suggest that chondrocyte mechanotransduction may be more complex than previously thought. PMID:27116676

  10. Expressing and purifying membrane transport proteins in high yield.

    PubMed

    Hale, Calvin C; Hill, Chananada K; Price, Elmer M; Bossuyt, Julie

    2002-01-01

    Structural analysis of native or recombinant membrane transport proteins has been hampered by the lack of effective methodologies to purify sufficient quantities of active protein. We addressed this problem by expressing a polyhistidine tagged construct of the cardiac sodium-calcium exchanger (NCX1) in Trichoplusia ni larvae (caterpillars) from which membrane vesicles were prepared. Larvae vesicles containing recombinant NCX1-his protein supported NCX1 transport activity that was mechanistically not different from activity in native cardiac sarcolemmal vesicles although the specific activity was reduced. SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis demonstrated the presence of both the 120 and 70 kDa forms of the NCX1 protein. Larvae vesicle proteins were solubilized in sodium cholate detergent and fractionated on a chelated Ni(2+) affinity chromatography column. After extensive washing, eluted fractions were mixed with soybean phospholipids and reconstituted. The resulting proteoliposomes contained NCX1 activity suggesting the protein retained native conformation. SDS-PAGE revealed two major bands at 120 and 70 kDa. Purification of large amounts of active NCX1 via this methodology should facilitate biophysical analysis of the protein. The larva expression system has broad-based application for membrane proteins where expression and purification of quantities required for physical analyses is problematic. PMID:11741710

  11. Expression of Eukaryotic Membrane Proteins in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Lucie; Kugler, Valérie; Wagner, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    A key point when it comes to heterologous expression of eukaryotic membrane proteins (EMPs) is the choice of the best-suited expression platform. The yeast Pichia pastoris has proven to be a very versatile system showing promising results in a growing number of cases. Indeed, its particular methylotrophic characteristics combined to the very simple handling of a eukaryotic microorganism that possesses the majority of mammalian-like machineries make it a very competitive expression system for various complex proteins, in amounts compatible with functional and structural studies. This chapter describes a set of robust methodologies routinely used for the successful expression of a variety of EMPs, going from yeast transformation with the recombinant plasmid to the analysis of the quality and quantity of the proteins produced. PMID:27485335

  12. Expression of major photosynthetic and salt-resistance genes in invasive reed lineages grown under elevated CO2 and temperature

    PubMed Central

    Eller, Franziska; Lambertini, Carla; Nielsen, Mette W; Radutoiu, Simona; Brix, Hans

    2014-01-01

    It is important to investigate the molecular causes of the variation in ecologically important traits to fully understand phenotypic responses to climate change. In the Mississippi River Delta, two distinct, sympatric invasive lineages of common reed (Phragmites australis) are known to differ in several ecophysiological characteristics and are expected to become more salt resistant due to increasing atmospheric CO2 and temperature. We investigated whether different patterns of gene expression can explain their ecophysiological differences and increased vigor under future climatic conditions. We compared the transcript abundance of photosynthetic genes of the Calvin cycle (Rubisco small subunit, RbcS; Phosphoglycerate kinase, PGK; Phosphoribulokinase, PRK), genes related with salt transport (Na+/H+ antiporter, PhaNHA) and oxidative stress response genes (Manganese Superoxide dismutase, MnSOD; Glutathione peroxidase, GPX), and the total aboveground biomass production between two genotypes representing the two lineages. The two genotypes (Delta-type, Mediterranean lineage, and EU-type, Eurasian lineage) were grown under an ambient and a future climate scenario with simultaneously elevated CO2 and temperature, and under two different soil salinities (0‰ or 20‰). We found neither differences in the aboveground biomass production nor the transcript abundances of the two genotypes, but soil salinity significantly affected all the investigated parameters, often interacting with the climatic conditions. At 20‰ salinity, most genes were higher expressed in the future than in the ambient climatic conditions. Higher transcription of the genes suggests higher abundance of the protein they code for, and consequently increased photosynthate production, improved stress responses, and salt exclusion. Therefore, the higher expression of these genes most likely contributed to the significantly ameliorated salinity impact on the aboveground biomass production of both P

  13. Tracing of backward energy transfer from LH1 to LH2 in photosynthetic membranes grown under high and low irradiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüer, L.; Moulisová, V.; Henry, S.; Polli, D.; Brotosudarmo, T. H. P.; Hoseinkhani, S.; Brida, D.; Lanzani, G.; Cerullo, G.; Cogdell, R. J.

    2013-03-01

    By introducing derivative transient absorption spectroscopy, we obtain rate constants for backward and forward energy transfer between LH1 and LH2 complexes in purple bacterial membranes. We find that backward energy transfer is strongly reduced in membranes grown under low irradiation conditions, compared to high light grown ones. We conclude that backward energy transfer is managed actively by the bacteria to avoid LH1 exciton deactivation under high irradiation conditions. The analytical method is generally applicable to excitonically coupled systems.

  14. Transcriptional Control of Expression of Genes for Photosynthetic Reaction Center and Light-Harvesting Proteins in the Purple Bacterium Rhodovulum sulfidophilum

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Shinji; Nagashima, Kenji V. P.; Shimada, Keizo; Matsuura, Katsumi

    2000-01-01

    The purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodovulum sulfidophilum synthesizes photosynthetic apparatus even under highly aerated conditions in the dark. To understand the oxygen-independent expression of photosynthetic genes, the expression of the puf operon coding for the light-harvesting 1 and reaction center proteins was analyzed. Northern blot hybridization analysis showed that puf mRNA synthesis was not significantly repressed by oxygen in this bacterium. High-resolution 5′ mapping of the puf mRNA transcriptional initiation sites and DNA sequence analysis of the puf upstream regulatory region indicated that there are three possible promoters for the puf operon expression, two of which have a high degree of sequence similarity with those of Rhodobacter capsulatus, which shows a high level of oxygen repression of photosystem synthesis. Deletion analysis showed that the third promoter is oxygen independent, but the activity of this promoter was not enough to explain the aerobic level of mRNA. The posttranscriptional puf mRNA degradation is not significantly influenced by oxygen in R. sulfidophilum. From these results, we conclude that puf operon expression in R. sulfidophilum is weakly repressed by oxygen, perhaps as a result of the following: (i) there are three promoters for puf operon transcription, at least one of which is oxygen independent; (ii) readthrough transcripts which may not be affected by oxygen may be significant in maintaining the puf mRNA levels; and (iii) the puf mRNA is fairly stable even under aerobic conditions. PMID:10781546

  15. Heterologous Expression of Membrane Proteins: Choosing the Appropriate Host

    PubMed Central

    Pochon, Nathalie; Dementin, Sébastien; Hivin, Patrick; Boutigny, Sylvain; Rioux, Jean-Baptiste; Salvi, Daniel; Seigneurin-Berny, Daphné; Richaud, Pierre; Joyard, Jacques; Pignol, David; Sabaty, Monique; Desnos, Thierry; Pebay-Peyroula, Eva; Darrouzet, Elisabeth; Vernet, Thierry; Rolland, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    Background Membrane proteins are the targets of 50% of drugs, although they only represent 1% of total cellular proteins. The first major bottleneck on the route to their functional and structural characterisation is their overexpression; and simply choosing the right system can involve many months of trial and error. This work is intended as a guide to where to start when faced with heterologous expression of a membrane protein. Methodology/Principal Findings The expression of 20 membrane proteins, both peripheral and integral, in three prokaryotic (E. coli, L. lactis, R. sphaeroides) and three eukaryotic (A. thaliana, N. benthamiana, Sf9 insect cells) hosts was tested. The proteins tested were of various origins (bacteria, plants and mammals), functions (transporters, receptors, enzymes) and topologies (between 0 and 13 transmembrane segments). The Gateway system was used to clone all 20 genes into appropriate vectors for the hosts to be tested. Culture conditions were optimised for each host, and specific strategies were tested, such as the use of Mistic fusions in E. coli. 17 of the 20 proteins were produced at adequate yields for functional and, in some cases, structural studies. We have formulated general recommendations to assist with choosing an appropriate system based on our observations of protein behaviour in the different hosts. Conclusions/Significance Most of the methods presented here can be quite easily implemented in other laboratories. The results highlight certain factors that should be considered when selecting an expression host. The decision aide provided should help both newcomers and old-hands to select the best system for their favourite membrane protein. PMID:22216205

  16. Applications of nylon membrane arrays to gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Cox, J M

    2001-04-01

    Gene expression analyses by hybridization of probes derived from mRNA to cDNA targets arrayed on a nylon membranes have been performed with increasing frequency and success over the last decade. While the initial costs of generating arrays are moderately high, they are now available commercially as complete packages which include the membranes and associated image analysis software for acquisition and processing of the data. Arrays can be used to generate information concerning the expression of mRNA from cells treated with various agents or from different tissues, e.g. comparing diseased with normal controls. To date, many groups, including immunologists, have used this technology to examine gene expression within their area of biological interest. The main characteristic of these systems is the large amount of data generated, since the expression of many thousands of genes are measured in parallel. The main practical issues are sensitivity of detection, reproducibility, comparability with other systems (e.g. Northern blots) and processing of data. Some of the significant applications of nylon array technology to date are reviewed in this chapter, and with these issues in mind, we include a discussion of our own experiences in this area. PMID:11251218

  17. Membrane-bound c-type cytochromes in Heliobacillus mobilis. In vivo study of the hemes involved in electron donation to the photosynthetic reaction center

    SciTech Connect

    Nitschke, W.; Kramer, D.M.; Liebl, U.

    1995-09-19

    The amount of heme per photosynthetic reaction center (RC) was examined in whole cells of Heliobacillus mobilis, and a stoichiometry of 5-6 hemes c and 1-3 hemes b per RC was found. Virtually the full complement of heme was seen to be functionally connected to the pool of electron donors to the photosynthetic RC. The kinetic parameters of electron transfer between reduced c-type hemes and the photooxidized primary donor P{sub 798}{sup +} were studied in whole cells and membrane fragments. The invivo half-times of electron donation (50% with t{sub 1/2}=110{mu}s, 50% with t{sub 1/2}=600 {mu}s) were seen to slow down to half-times in the range of several and several tens of milliseconds following disruption of cells. A severe conformational lateration or a change in the identity of the donating heme is discussed. Redox titrations of the flash-induced absorption changes performed on whole cells in the presence of mediators yielded the following redox midpoint potentials: P{sub 798}, E{sub m}=+240mV; heme c{sub 553}, E{sub m} = +190, +170, and +90 mV for the heme components oxidized after the first, second, and third flash, respectively. The results demonstrate that the pool of c{sub 553} hemes donating electrons to the RC is heterogeneous and that it consists of either several distinguishable cytochromes or multiheme cytochromes or both. The number of hemes reduced and the kinetics of heme rereduction after flash-induced oxidation were found to depend strongly on the degree of anaerobicity in the interior compartment for the cell. A model rationalizing the obtained results in terms of a set of differing redox components is proposed. 42 refs., 7 figs.

  18. [Membrane-based photochemical systems as models for photosynthetic cells]. Progress report, February 15, 1990--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, J.K.

    1992-12-31

    The objectives of this research are to improve our conceptual view of the ways in which membranes and interfaces can be used to control chemical reactivity. We have focused on understanding three elementary processes that are central to developing membrane-based integrated chemical systems for water photolysis or related photoconversion/photostorage processes. Specifically, we have sought to identify: the influence of interfaces upon charge separation/recombination reactions, pathways for transmembrane charge separation across hydrocarbon bilayer membranes, and mechanisms of water oxidation catalyzed by transition metal coordination complexes. Historically, the chemical dynamics of each of these processes has been poorly understood, with numerous unresolved issues and conflicting viewpoints appearing in the literature. As described in this report our recent research has led to considerable clarification of the underlying reaction mechanisms.

  19. Expression and purification of the membrane enzyme selenoprotein K.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Srinivasan, Prabhavathi; Pham, Diane N; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2012-11-01

    Selenoprotein K (SelK) is a membrane protein residing in the endoplasmic reticulum. The function of SelK is mostly unknown; however, it has been shown to participate in anti-oxidant defense, calcium regulation and in the endoplasmic reticulum associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathway. In order to study the function of SelK and the role of selenocysteine in catalysis, we have tested heterologous expression of human SelK in E. coli. Consequently, we have developed an over-expression strategy that exploits the maltose binding protein as a fusion partner to stabilize and solubilize SelK. The fusion partner can be cleaved from SelK in the presence of a variety of detergents compatible with structural characterization and the protein purified to homogeneity. SelK acquires a helical secondary structure in detergent micelles, even though it was predicted to be an intrinsically disordered protein due to its high percentage of polar residues. The same strategy was successfully applied to preparation of SelK binding partner - selenoprotein S (SelS). Hence, this heterologous expression and purification strategy can be applied to other members of the membrane enzyme family to which SelK belongs. PMID:22963794

  20. Expression and purification of integral membrane metallopeptidase HtpX.

    PubMed

    Arolas, Joan L; García-Castellanos, Raquel; Goulas, Theodoros; Akiyama, Yoshinori; Gomis-Rüth, F Xavier

    2014-07-01

    Little is known about the catalytic mechanism of integral membrane (IM) peptidases. HtpX is an IM metallopeptidase that plays a central role in protein quality control by preventing the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the membrane. Here we report the recombinant overexpression and purification of a catalytically ablated form of HtpX from Escherichia coli. Several E. coli strains, expression vectors, detergents, and purification strategies were tested to achieve maximum yields of pure and well-folded protein. HtpX was successfully overexpressed in E. coli BL21(DE3) cells using a pET-derived vector attaching a C-terminal His8-tag, extracted from the membranes using octyl-β-d-glucoside, and purified to homogeneity in the presence of this detergent in three consecutive steps: cobalt-affinity, anion-exchange, and size-exclusion chromatography. The production of HtpX in milligram amounts paves the way for structural studies, which will be essential to understand the catalytic mechanism of this IM peptidase and related family members. PMID:24769134

  1. Effects of paraquat on photosynthetic pigments, antioxidant enzymes, and gene expression in Chlorella pyrenoidosa under mixotrophic compared with autotrophic conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiguo; Liu, Min; Zhang, Peiliang; Yu, Fugen; Lu, Shan; Li, Pengfu; Zhou, Junying

    2014-11-01

    Only limited information is available on herbicide toxicity to algae under mixotrophic conditions. In the present study, we studied the effects of the herbicide paraquat on growth, photosynthetic pigments, antioxidant enzymes, and gene expression in Chlorella pyrenoidosa under mixotrophic compared with autotrophic conditions. The mean measured exposure concentrations of paraquat under mixotrophic and autotrophic conditions were in the range of 0.3-3.4 and 0.6-3.6 μM, respectively. Exposure to paraquat for 72 h under both autotrophic and mixotrophic conditions induced decreased growth and chlorophyll (Chl) content, increased superoxide dismutase and peroxidase activities, and decreased transcript abundances of three photosynthesis-related genes (light-independent protochlorophyllide reductase subunit, photosystem II protein D1, and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit [rbcL]). Compared with autotrophic conditions, the inhibition percentage of growth rate under mixotrophic conditions was lower at 0.8 μM paraquat, whereas it was greater at 1.8 and 3.4 μM paraquat. With exposure to 0.8-3.4 μM paraquat, the inhibition rates of Chl a and b content under mixotrophic conditions (43.1-52.4% and 54.6-59.7%, respectively) were greater compared with autotrophic conditions, whereas the inhibition rate of rbcL gene transcription under mixotrophic conditions (35.7-44.0%) was lower. These data showed that similar to autotrophic conditions, paraquat affected the activities of antioxidant enzymes and decreased Chl synthesis and transcription of photosynthesis-related genes in C. pyrenoidosa under mixotrophic conditions, but a differential susceptibility to paraquat toxicity occurred between autotrophically versus mixotrophically grown cells. PMID:25038722

  2. Bioengineering of photosynthetic membranes. Requirement of magnesium for the conversion of chlorophyllide a to chlorophyll a during the greening of etiochloroplasts in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Daniell, H.; Rebeiz, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    The massive conversion of delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) to protochlorophyllide (Pchlide) and the massive conversion of chlorophyllide a (Chlide a) to chlorophyll a (Chl a) are two essential conditions for the ALA-dependent assembly of photosynthetic membranes in vitro. In this work, the authors describe the development of a cell-free system capable of the forementioned biosynthetic activities at rates higher than in vivo, for the first 2 h of dark-incubation. The cell-free system consisted of 1) etiochloroplasts prepared from kinetin and gibberellic-acid-pretreated cucumber cotyledons, and 2) cofactors and additives described elsewhere and which are needed for the massive conversion of ALA to Pchlide, 3) high concentrations of ATP, MgCl/sub 2/, and an isoprenol alcohol such as phytol, were required for the massive conversion of Chlide a to Chl a. An absolute and novel requirement of Mg/sup 2 +/ for the conversion of Chlide a to Chl a was also demonstrated. In addition to the role of phytol as a substrate for the conversion of Chlide a to Chl a, the data suggested that this alcohol may also be involved in the regulation of the reactions between ALA and Pchlide. It is proposed that during greening, the conversion of Chlide a to Chl a may follow different biosynthetic rates, having different substrate and cofactor requirements, depending on the stage of plastid development.

  3. An integrated study of photochemical function and expression of a key photochemical gene (psbA) in photosynthetic communities of Lake Bonney (McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica).

    PubMed

    Kong, Weidong; Li, Wei; Romancova, Ingrid; Prášil, Ondřej; Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M

    2014-08-01

    Lake Bonney is one of several permanently ice-covered lakes in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, which maintain the only year-round biological activity on the Antarctic continent. Vertically stratified populations of autotrophic microorganisms occupying the water columns are adapted to numerous extreme conditions, including very low light, hypersalinity, ultra-oligotrophy and low temperatures. In this study, we integrated molecular biology, microscopy, flow cytometry, and functional photochemical analyses of the photosynthetic communities residing in the east and west basins of dry valley Lake Bonney. Diversity and abundance of the psbA gene encoding a major protein of the photosystem II reaction center were monitored during the seasonal transition between Antarctic summer (24-h daylight) to winter (24-h darkness). Vertical trends through the photic zone in psbA abundance (DNA and mRNA) closely matched that of primary production in both lobes. Seasonal trends in psbA transcripts differed between the two lobes, with psbA expression in the west basin exhibiting a transient rise in early Fall. Last, using spectroscopic and flow cytometric analyses, we provide the first evidence that the Lake Bonney photosynthetic community is dominated by picophytoplankton that possess photosynthetic apparatus adapted to extreme shade. PMID:24499459

  4. Pyramiding expression of maize genes encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) synergistically improve the photosynthetic characteristics of transgenic wheat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, HuiFang; Xu, WeiGang; Wang, HuiWei; Hu, Lin; Li, Yan; Qi, XueLi; Zhang, Lei; Li, ChunXin; Hua, Xia

    2014-09-01

    Using particle bombardment transformation, we introduced maize pepc cDNA encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and ppdk cDNA encoding pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) into the C3 crop wheat to generate transgenic wheat lines carrying cDNA of pepc (PC lines), ppdk (PK lines) or both (PKC lines). The integration, transcription, and expression of the foreign genes were confirmed by Southern blot, Real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (Q-RT-PCR), and Western blot analysis. Q-RT-PCR results indicated that the average relative expression levels of pepc and ppdk in the PKC lines reached 10 and 4.6, respectively, compared to their expressions in untransformed plants (set to 1). The enzyme activities of PEPC and PPDK in the PKC lines were 4.3- and 2.1-fold higher, respectively, than in the untransformed control. The maximum daily net photosynthetic rates of the PKC, PC, and PK lines were enhanced by 26.4, 13.3, and 4.5%, respectively, whereas the diurnal accumulations of photosynthesis were 21.3, 13.9, and 6.9%, respectively, higher than in the control. The Fv/Fm of the transgenic plants decreased less than in the control under high temperature and high light conditions (2 weeks after anthesis), suggesting that the transgenic wheat transports more absorbed light energy into a photochemical reaction. The exogenous maize C4-specific pepc gene was more effective than ppdk at improving the photosynthetic performance and yield characteristics of transgenic wheat, while the two genes showed a synergistic effect when they were transformed into the same genetic background, because the PKC lines exhibited improved photosynthetic and physiological traits. PMID:24595619

  5. Expression of the minor isoform pea ferredoxin in tobacco alters photosynthetic electron partitioning and enhances cyclic electron flow.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Nicolás E; Ceccoli, Romina D; Vía, María V Dalla; Voss, Ingo; Segretin, María E; Bravo-Almonacid, Fernando F; Melzer, Michael; Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza; Scheibe, Renate; Hanke, Guy T

    2013-02-01

    Ferredoxins (Fds) are ferrosulfoproteins that function as low-potential electron carriers in plants. The Fd family is composed of several isoforms that share high sequence homology but differ in functional characteristics. In leaves, at least two isoforms conduct linear and cyclic photosynthetic electron transport around photosystem I, and mounting evidence suggests the existence of at least partial division of duties between these isoforms. To evaluate the contribution of different kinds of Fds to the control of electron fluxes along the photosynthetic electron transport chain, we overexpressed a minor pea (Pisum sativum) Fd isoform (PsFd1) in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. The transplastomic OeFd1 plants exhibited variegated leaves and retarded growth and developmental rates. Photosynthetic studies of these plants indicated a reduction in carbon dioxide assimilation rates, photosystem II photochemistry, and linear electron flow. However, the plants showed an increase in nonphotochemical quenching, better control of excitation pressure at photosystem II, and no evidence of photoinhibition, implying a better dynamic regulation to remove excess energy from the photosynthetic electron transport chain. Finally, analysis of P700 redox status during illumination confirmed that the minor pea Fd isoform promotes enhanced cyclic flow around photosystem I. The two novel features of this work are: (1) that Fd levels achieved in transplastomic plants promote an alternative electron partitioning even under greenhouse light growth conditions, a situation that is exacerbated at higher light intensity measurements; and (2) that an alternative, minor Fd isoform has been overexpressed in plants, giving new evidence of labor division among Fd isoforms. PMID:23370717

  6. Expression Screening of Integral Membrane Proteins by Fusion to Fluorescent Reporters.

    PubMed

    Bird, Louise E; Nettleship, Joanne E; Järvinen, Valtteri; Rada, Heather; Verma, Anil; Owens, Raymond J

    2016-01-01

    The production of recombinant integral membrane proteins for structural and functional studies remains technically challenging due to their relatively low levels of expression. To address this problem, screening strategies have been developed to identify the optimal membrane sequence and expression host for protein production. A common approach is to genetically fuse the membrane protein to a fluorescent reporter, typically Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) enabling expression levels, localization and detergent solubilisation to be assessed. Initially developed for screening the heterologous expression of bacterial membrane proteins in Escherichia coli, the method has been extended to eukaryotic hosts, including insect and mammalian cells. Overall, GFP-based expression screening has made a major impact on the number of membrane protein structures that have been determined in the last few years. PMID:27553231

  7. Selecting Optimum Eukaryotic Integral Membrane Proteins for Structure Determination by Rapid Expression and Solubilization Screening

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Hays, Franklin A.; Roe-Zurz, Zygy; Vuong, Linda; Kelly, Libusha; Ho, Chi-Min; Robbins, Renée M.; Pieper, Ursula; O’Connell, Joseph D.; Miercke, Larry J. W.; Giacomini, Kathleen M.; Sali, Andrej; Stroud, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    A medium throughput approach is used to rapidly identify membrane proteins from a eukaryotic organism that are most amenable to expression in amounts and quality adequate to support structure determination. The goal was to expand knowledge of new membrane protein structures based on proteome-wide coverage. In the first phase membrane proteins from the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were selected for homologous expression in S. cerevisiae, a system that can be adapted to expression of membrane proteins from other eukaryotes. We performed medium-scale expression and solubilization tests on 351 rationally selected membrane proteins from the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These targets are inclusive of all annotated and unannotated membrane protein families within the organism’s membrane proteome. 272 targets were expressed and of these 234 solubilized in the detergent n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside. Furthermore, we report the identity of a subset of targets that were purified to homogeneity to facilitate structure determinations. The extensibility of this approach is demonstrated with the expression of ten human integral membrane proteins from the solute carrier superfamily (SLC). This discovery-oriented pipeline provides an efficient way to select proteins from particular membrane protein classes, families, or organisms that may be more suited to structure analysis than others. PMID:19061901

  8. Snorkel: an epitope tagging system for measuring the surface expression of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michael; Stafford, Lewis J; Onisk, Dale; Joaquim, Tony; Tobb, Alhagie; Goldman, Larissa; Fancy, David; Stave, James; Chambers, Ross

    2013-01-01

    Tags are widely used to monitor a protein's expression level, interactions, protein trafficking, and localization. Membrane proteins are often tagged in their extracellular domains to allow discrimination between protein in the plasma membrane from that in internal pools. Multipass membrane proteins offer special challenges for inserting a tag since the extracellular regions are often composed of small loops and thus inserting an epitope tag risks perturbing the structure, function, or location of the membrane protein. We have developed a novel tagging system called snorkel where a transmembrane domain followed by a tag is appended to the cytoplasmic C-terminus of the membrane protein. In this way the tag is displayed extracellularly, but structurally separate from the membrane protein. We have tested the snorkel tag system on a diverse panel of membrane proteins including GPCRs and ion channels and demonstrated that it reliably allows for monitoring of the surface expression. PMID:24023844

  9. Analysis of Porphyra Membrane Transporters Demonstrates Gene Transfer among Photosynthetic Eukaryotes and Numerous Sodium-Coupled Transport Systems1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Cheong Xin; Zäuner, Simone; Wheeler, Glen; Grossman, Arthur R.; Prochnik, Simon E.; Blouin, Nicolas A.; Zhuang, Yunyun; Benning, Christoph; Berg, Gry Mine; Yarish, Charles; Eriksen, Renée L.; Klein, Anita S.; Lin, Senjie; Levine, Ira; Brawley, Susan H.; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2012-01-01

    Membrane transporters play a central role in many cellular processes that rely on the movement of ions and organic molecules between the environment and the cell, and between cellular compartments. Transporters have been well characterized in plants and green algae, but little is known about transporters or their evolutionary histories in the red algae. Here we examined 482 expressed sequence tag contigs that encode putative membrane transporters in the economically important red seaweed Porphyra (Bangiophyceae, Rhodophyta). These contigs are part of a comprehensive transcriptome dataset from Porphyra umbilicalis and Porphyra purpurea. Using phylogenomics, we identified 30 trees that support the expected monophyly of red and green algae/plants (i.e. the Plantae hypothesis) and 19 expressed sequence tag contigs that show evidence of endosymbiotic/horizontal gene transfer involving stramenopiles. The majority (77%) of analyzed contigs encode transporters with unresolved phylogenies, demonstrating the difficulty in resolving the evolutionary history of genes. We observed molecular features of many sodium-coupled transport systems in marine algae, and the potential for coregulation of Porphyra transporter genes that are associated with fatty acid biosynthesis and intracellular lipid trafficking. Although both the tissue-specific and subcellular locations of the encoded proteins require further investigation, our study provides red algal gene candidates associated with transport functions and novel insights into the biology and evolution of these transporters. PMID:22337920

  10. [Effects of exogenous GSH on photosynthetic characteristics and expression of key enzyme genes of CO2 assimilation in leaves of tomato seedlings under NaCl stress].

    PubMed

    2014-09-01

    By spraying tomato leaves with reduced glutathione (GSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and glutathione synthesis inhibitor (BSO), respectively, the effects of glutathion-mediated redox state on leaf photosynthesis in tomato under NaCl stress were investigated. The results showed that the application of exogenous GSH significantly induced an increase in reducing power level, in- creased the net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (g(s)), transpiration rate (Tr), as well as the maximum quantum yield of PS II (Fv/Fm), actual photochemical efficiency of PS II (ΦPS II), photochemical quenching coefficient (q(P)) and non-photochemical quenching coefficient (NPQ), and enhanced the Rubisco activity and expression levels of RbcL, RbcS and RCA genes in leaves of tomato seedlings under NaCl stress. These results suggested that GSH alleviated salt-induced oxidative stress by protecting PS II from damage caused by excess energy, and improving the photochemical efficiency of PS II and dark reaction activity of photosynthesis. Although spraying GSSG decreased the level of reducing power and further aggravated the damage and photoinhibition of the leaf photosynthetic apparatus, Pn was not affected in combined stressed (NaCl and GSSG) plants, which might be due to the up-regulation of expression levels of RbcL and RbcS genes. The application of BSO had no significant effects on redox state, CO2 conductivity capacity and PS II photochemical efficiency in tomato leaves under NaCl stress. However, compared to salt singly stressed plants, BSO application increased Pn, likely due to the up-regulation of Rubisco initial activity and RCA and RbcS expression levels. PMID:25757316

  11. Photosynthetic characteristics of an amphibious plant, Eleocharis vivipara: Expression of C4 and C3 modes in contrasting environments

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Osamu; Samejima, Muneaki; Muto, Shoshi; Miyachi, Shigetoh

    1988-01-01

    Eleocharis vivipara Link, a freshwater amphibious leafless plant belonging to the Cyperaceae can grow in both terrestrial and submersed aquatic conditions. Two forms of E. vivipara obtained from these contrasting environments were examined for the characteristics associated with C4 and C3 photosynthesis. In the terrestrial form (δ 13C values = -13.5 to -15.4‰, where ‰ is parts per thousand), the culms, which are photosynthetic organs, possess a Kranz-type anatomy typical of C4 plants, and well-developed bundle-sheath cells contain numerous large chloroplasts. In the submersed form (δ 13C value = -25.9‰), the culms possess anatomical features characteristic of submersed aquatic plants, and the reduced bundle-sheath cells contain only a few small chloroplasts. 14C pulse-12C chase experiments showed that the terrestrial form and the submersed form fix carbon by way of the C4 pathway, with aspartate (40%) and malate (35%) as the main primary products, and by way of the C3 pathway, with 3-phosphoglyceric acid (53%) and sugar phosphates (14%) as the main primary products, respectively. The terrestrial form showed photosynthetic enzyme activities typical of the NAD-malic enzyme-C4 subtype, whereas the submersed form showed decreased activities of key C4 enzymes and an increased ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (EC 4.1.1.39) activity. These data suggest that this species can differentiate into the C4 mode under terrestrial conditions and into the C3 mode under submersed conditions. Images PMID:16593980

  12. Cell-free expression and in meso crystallisation of an integral membrane kinase for structure determination.

    PubMed

    Boland, Coilín; Li, Dianfan; Shah, Syed Tasadaque Ali; Haberstock, Stefan; Dötsch, Volker; Bernhard, Frank; Caffrey, Martin

    2014-12-01

    Membrane proteins are key elements in cell physiology and drug targeting, but getting a high-resolution structure by crystallographic means is still enormously challenging. Novel strategies are in big demand to facilitate the structure determination process that will ultimately hasten the day when sequence information alone can provide a three-dimensional model. Cell-free or in vitro expression enables rapid access to large quantities of high-quality membrane proteins suitable for an array of applications. Despite its impressive efficiency, to date only two membrane proteins produced by the in vitro approach have yielded crystal structures. Here, we have analysed synergies of cell-free expression and crystallisation in lipid mesophases for generating an X-ray structure of the integral membrane enzyme diacylglycerol kinase to 2.28-Å resolution. The quality of cellular and cell-free-expressed kinase samples has been evaluated systematically by comparing (1) spectroscopic properties, (2) purity and oligomer formation, (3) lipid content and (4) functionality. DgkA is the first membrane enzyme crystallised based on cell-free expression. The study provides a basic standard for the crystallisation of cell-free-expressed membrane proteins and the methods detailed here should prove generally useful and contribute to accelerating the pace at which membrane protein structures are solved. PMID:25012698

  13. Cell-free Expression and In Meso Crystallisation of an Integral Membrane Kinase for Structure Determination

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Syed Tasadaque Ali; Haberstock, Stefan; Dötsch, Volker; Bernhard, Frank; Caffrey, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins are key elements in cell physiology and drug targeting, but getting a high-resolution structure by crystallographic means is still enormously challenging. Novel strategies are in big demand to facilitate the structure determination process that will ultimately hasten the day when sequence information alone can provide a 3-dimensional model. Cell-free or in vitro expression enables rapid access to large quantities of high quality membrane proteins suitable for an array of applications. Despite its impressive efficiency, to date only two membrane proteins produced by the in vitro approach have yielded crystal structures. Here, we have analysed synergies of cell-free expression and crystallisation in lipidic mesophases for generating an X-ray structure of the integral membrane enzyme diacylglycerol kinase to 2.28 Å resolution. The quality of cellular and cell-free expressed kinase samples have been evaluated systematically by comparing i) spectroscopic properties, ii) purity and oligomer formation, iii) lipid content and iv) functionality. DgkA is the first membrane enzyme crystallised based on cell-free expression. The study provides a basic standard for the crystallisation of cell-free expressed membrane proteins and the methods detailed here should prove generally useful and contribute to accelerating the pace at which membrane protein structures are solved. PMID:25012698

  14. A Link between Integral Membrane Protein Expression and Simulated Integration Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Stephen S; Niesen, Michiel J M; Müller, Axel; Tiemann, Katrin; Saladi, Shyam M; Galimidi, Rachel P; Zhang, Bin; Clemons, William M; Miller, Thomas F

    2016-08-23

    Integral membrane proteins (IMPs) control the flow of information and nutrients across cell membranes, yet IMP mechanistic studies are hindered by difficulties in expression. We investigate this issue by addressing the connection between IMP sequence and observed expression levels. For homologs of the IMP TatC, observed expression levels vary widely and are affected by small changes in protein sequence. The effect of sequence changes on experimentally observed expression levels strongly correlates with the simulated integration efficiency obtained from coarse-grained modeling, which is directly confirmed using an in vivo assay. Furthermore, mutations that improve the simulated integration efficiency likewise increase the experimentally observed expression levels. Demonstration of these trends in both Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium smegmatis suggests that the results are general to other expression systems. This work suggests that IMP integration is a determinant for successful expression, raising the possibility of controlling IMP expression via rational design. PMID:27524616

  15. A Link Between Integral Membrane Protein Expression and Simulated Integration Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Axel; Tiemann, Katrin; Saladi, Shyam M.; Galimidi, Rachel P.; Zhang, Bin; Clemons, William M.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins (IMP) control the flow of information and nutrients across cell membranes, yet IMP mechanistic studies are hindered by difficulties in expression. We investigate this issue by addressing the connection between IMP sequence and observed expression levels. For homologs of the IMP TatC, observed expression levels widely vary and are affected by small changes in protein sequence. The effect of sequence changes on experimentally observed expression levels strongly correlates with the simulated integration efficiency obtained from coarse-grained modeling, which is directly confirmed using an in vivo assay. Furthermore, mutations that improve the simulated integration efficiency likewise increase the experimentally observed expression levels. Demonstration of these trends in both Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium smegmatis suggests that the results are general to other expression systems. This work suggests that IMP integration is a determinant for successful expression, raising the possibility of controlling IMP expression via rational design. PMID:27524616

  16. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) Gene Expression and Photosynthetic Activity in Nutrient-enriched Mesocosm Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyman, M.; Davies, J. T.; Weston, K.; Crawford, D. W.; Purdie, D. A.

    1998-02-01

    The temporal variability in carbon dioxide fixation rates and the relative abundance ofrbcLSmRNA (encoding the large subunit of the Calvin cycle enzyme, RubisCO) was determined for nutrient-stimulated populations of marine phytoplankton enclosed in diatom-dominated and coccolithophorid-dominated mesocosms. Both mesocosms were characterized by successive bloom events that were preceded by marked increases in the level of RubisCO gene expression. In general, maxima inrbcLmRNA abundance showed the strongest temporal covariation with peaks in the value of the photosynthetic parameter PBmax, the chlorophyll-specific maximum rate of CO2fixation. Somewhat looser temporal co-variations were observed between peaks in transcript levels and maxima in chlorophyll concentrations or phytoplankton biomass. The specific contribution of the haptophyteEmiliania huxleyito the overall level of gene expression in the diatom-dominated enclosure was investigated using an homologousrbcLgene probe. The results were compared to data obtained at lower hybridization stringency using a generalrbcLprobe originating from the oceanic cyanobacteriumSynechococcusWH8103. The comparative data suggest that, whereas diatoms made a substantial contribution to the mRNA signal during the initial part of the experiment, the contribution ofE. huxleyito the overall level of gene expression increased as the experiment progressed.

  17. Expression patterns of genes encoding plasma membrane aquaporins during fruit development in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Shi, Jin; Wang, Jinfang; Li, Ren; Li, Dianbo; Xu, Fengfeng; Sun, Qianqian; Zhao, Bin; Mao, Ai-Jun; Guo, Yang-Dong

    2015-11-01

    Aquaporins are membrane channels precisely regulating water movement through cell membranes in most living organisms. Despite the advances in the physiology of fruit development, their participation during fruit development in cucumber still barely understood. In this paper, the expressions of 12 genes encoding plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) were analyzed during cucumber fruit development in our work. Based on the homology search with known PIPs from rice, Arabidopsis and strawberry, 12 cucumber PIP genes subfamily members were identified. Cellular localization assays indicated that CsPIPs were localized in the plasma membrane. The qRT-PCR analysis of CsPIPs showed that 12 CsPIPs were differentially expressed during fruit development. These results suggest that 12 genes encoding plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (CsPIPs) play very important roles in cucumber life cycle and the data generated will be helpful in understanding their precise roles during fruit development in cucumber. PMID:26351149

  18. Response of plasma membrane H+-ATPase in rice (Oryza sativa) seedlings to simulated acid rain.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chanjuan; Ge, Yuqing; Su, Lei; Bu, Jinjin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the adaptation of plants to acid rain is important to find feasible approaches to alleviate such damage to plants. We studied effects of acid rain on plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and transcription, intracellular H(+), membrane permeability, photosynthetic efficiency, and relative growth rate during stress and recovery periods. Simulated acid rain at pH 5.5 did not affect plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity, intracellular H(+), membrane permeability, photosynthetic efficiency, and relative growth rate. Plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and transcription in leaves treated with acid rain at pH 3.5 was increased to maintain ion homeostasis by transporting excessive H(+) out of cells. Then intracellular H(+) was close to the control after a 5-day recovery, alleviating damage on membrane and sustaining photosynthetic efficiency and growth. Simulated acid rain at pH 2.5 inhibited plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity by decreasing the expression of H(+)-ATPase at transcription level, resulting in membrane damage and abnormal intracellular H(+), and reduction in photosynthetic efficiency and relative growth rate. After a 5-day recovery, all parameters in leaves treated with pH 2.5 acid rain show alleviated damage, implying that the increased plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity and its high expression were involved in repairing process in acid rain-stressed plants. Our study suggests that plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase can play a role in adaptation to acid rain for rice seedlings. PMID:25087500

  19. High-throughput Cloning and Expression of Integral Membrane Proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bruni, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Recently, several structural genomics centers have been established and a remarkable number of three-dimensional structures of soluble proteins have been solved. For membrane proteins, the number of structures solved has been significantly trailing those for their soluble counterparts, not least because over-expression and purification of membrane proteins is a much more arduous process. By using high throughput technologies, a large number of membrane protein targets can be screened simultaneously and a greater number of expression and purification conditions can be employed, leading to a higher probability of successfully determining the structure of membrane proteins. This unit describes the cloning, expression and screening of membrane proteins using high throughput methodologies developed in our laboratory. Basic Protocol 1 deals with the cloning of inserts into expression vectors by ligation-independent cloning. Basic Protocol 2 describes the expression and purification of the target proteins on a miniscale. Lastly, for the targets that express at the miniscale, basic protocols 3 and 4 outline the methods employed for the expression and purification of targets at the midi-scale, as well as a procedure for detergent screening and identification of detergent(s) in which the target protein is stable. PMID:24510647

  20. Heat-shock protein expression on the membrane of T cells undergoing apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Poccia, F; Piselli, P; Vendetti, S; Bach, S; Amendola, A; Placido, R; Colizzi, V

    1996-01-01

    Heat-shock proteins (hsp) represent a highly conserved family of proteins, normally localized in the cytoplasm and nucleus, whose expression is induced in situations involving cell stress. This paper reports the unusual translocation of hsp to the cell membrane of T cells undergoing apoptosis. We observed that glucocorticosteroid-induced thymocyte death is associated to the surface expression of hsp 60 and hsp 70 in a discrete fraction of apoptotic cells. hsp surface expression is closely related to a thymic subset of immature CD3low/- T cells. The expression of surface hsp 60 appears early after treatment with dexamethasone (3 hr) whereas the membrane expression of hsp 70 follows different kinetics and peaks later. Morphological analysis of the hsp+ apoptotic cells suggest that this subset represents late-stage apoptotic cells at their minimal volume before fragmentation into apoptotic bodies. Membrane expression of hsp is also associated with apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from AIDS patients cultured in vitro. Altogether, we show that a discrete fraction of cells undergoing apoptosis expresses membrane hsp 60 and hsp 70, supporting the hypothesis that apoptosis causes a radical alteration in the expression of cell surface molecules. Surface hsp expressed during apoptosis may constitute a novel immune-context able to generate packages of self- and exogenous antigens, originating from degradation of altered cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:8707351

  1. Screening for lipid requirements of membrane proteins by combining cell-free expression with nanodiscs.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Erik; Dötsch, Volker; Bernhard, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Cell-free (CF) protein expression has emerged as one of the most efficient production platforms for membrane proteins. Central bottlenecks prevalent in conventional cell-based expression systems such as mistargeting, inclusion body formation, degradation as well as product toxicity can be addressed by taking advantage of the reduced complexity of CF expression systems. However, the open accessibility of CF reactions offers the possibility to design customized artificial expression environments by supplying synthetic hydrophobic compounds such as micelles or membranes of defined composition. The open nature of CF systems therefore generally allows systematic screening approaches for the identification of efficient cotranslational solubilization environments of membrane proteins. Synergies exist in particular with the recently developed nanodisc (ND) technology enabling the synthesis of stable and highly soluble particles containing membrane discs of defined composition. Specific types of lipids frequently modulate folding, stability, and activity of integrated membrane proteins. One recently reported example are phospho-MurNAc-pentapeptide (MraY) translocases that catalyze a crucial step in bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis making them interesting as future drug targets. Production of functionally active MraY homologues from most human pathogens in conventional cellular production systems was so far not successful due to their obviously strict lipid dependency for functionally folding. We demonstrate that the combination of CF expression with ND technologies is an efficient strategy for the production of folded MraY translocases, and we present a general protocol for the rapid screening of lipid specificities of membrane proteins. PMID:25857790

  2. Green fluorescent protein-based expression screening of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bird, Louise E; Rada, Heather; Verma, Anil; Gasper, Raphael; Birch, James; Jennions, Matthew; Lӧwe, Jan; Moraes, Isabel; Owens, Raymond J

    2015-01-01

    The production of recombinant membrane proteins for structural and functional studies remains technically challenging due to low levels of expression and the inherent instability of many membrane proteins once solubilized in detergents. A protocol is described that combines ligation independent cloning of membrane proteins as GFP fusions with expression in Escherichia coli detected by GFP fluorescence. This enables the construction and expression screening of multiple membrane protein/variants to identify candidates suitable for further investment of time and effort. The GFP reporter is used in a primary screen of expression by visualizing GFP fluorescence following SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Membrane proteins that show both a high expression level with minimum degradation as indicated by the absence of free GFP, are selected for a secondary screen. These constructs are scaled and a total membrane fraction prepared and solubilized in four different detergents. Following ultracentrifugation to remove detergent-insoluble material, lysates are analyzed by fluorescence detection size exclusion chromatography (FSEC). Monitoring the size exclusion profile by GFP fluorescence provides information about the mono-dispersity and integrity of the membrane proteins in different detergents. Protein: detergent combinations that elute with a symmetrical peak with little or no free GFP and minimum aggregation are candidates for subsequent purification. Using the above methodology, the heterologous expression in E. coli of SED (shape, elongation, division, and sporulation) proteins from 47 different species of bacteria was analyzed. These proteins typically have ten transmembrane domains and are essential for cell division. The results show that the production of the SEDs orthologues in E. coli was highly variable with respect to the expression levels and integrity of the GFP fusion proteins. The experiment identified a subset for further investigation. PMID

  3. Selective Methyl Labeling of Eukaryotic Membrane Proteins Using Cell-Free Expression

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Structural characterization of membrane proteins and other large proteins with NMR relies increasingly on perdeuteration combined with incorporation of specifically protonated amino acid moieties, such as methyl groups of isoleucines, valines, or leucines. The resulting proton dilution reduces dipolar broadening producing sharper resonance lines, ameliorates spectral crowding, and enables measuring of crucial distances between and to methyl groups. While incorporation of specific methyl labeling is now well established for bacterial expression using suitable precursors, corresponding methods are still lacking for cell-free expression, which is often the only choice for producing labeled eukaryotic membrane proteins in mg quantities. Here we show that we can express methyl-labeled human integral membrane proteins cost-effectively by cell-free expression based of crude hydrolyzed ILV-labeled OmpX inclusion bodies. These are obtained in Escherichia coli with very high quantity and represent an optimal intermediate to channel ILV precursors into the eukaryotic proteins. PMID:24937763

  4. Advanced method for high-throughput expression of mutated eukaryotic membrane proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Keisuke; Sugawara, Taishi; Shiroishi, Mitsunori; Tokuda, Natsuko; Kurokawa, Azusa; Misaka, Takumi; Makyio, Hisayoshi; Yurugi-Kobayashi, Takami; Shimamura, Tatsuro; Nomura, Norimichi; Murata, Takeshi; Abe, Keiko; Iwata, So

    2008-07-11

    Crystallization of eukaryotic membrane proteins is a challenging, iterative process. The protein of interest is often modified in an attempt to improve crystallization and diffraction results. To accelerate this process, we took advantage of a GFP-fusion yeast expression system that uses PCR to direct homologous recombination and gene cloning. We explored the possibility of employing more than one PCR fragment to introduce various mutations in a single step, and found that when up to five PCR fragments were co-transformed into yeast, the recombination frequency was maintained as the number of fragments was increased. All transformants expressed the model membrane protein, while the resulting plasmid from each clone contained the designed mutations only. Thus, we have demonstrated a technique allowing the expression of mutant membrane proteins within 5 days, combining a GFP-fusion expression system and yeast homologous recombination.

  5. Selective methyl labeling of eukaryotic membrane proteins using cell-free expression.

    PubMed

    Linser, Rasmus; Gelev, Vladimir; Hagn, Franz; Arthanari, Haribabu; Hyberts, Sven G; Wagner, Gerhard

    2014-08-13

    Structural characterization of membrane proteins and other large proteins with NMR relies increasingly on perdeuteration combined with incorporation of specifically protonated amino acid moieties, such as methyl groups of isoleucines, valines, or leucines. The resulting proton dilution reduces dipolar broadening producing sharper resonance lines, ameliorates spectral crowding, and enables measuring of crucial distances between and to methyl groups. While incorporation of specific methyl labeling is now well established for bacterial expression using suitable precursors, corresponding methods are still lacking for cell-free expression, which is often the only choice for producing labeled eukaryotic membrane proteins in mg quantities. Here we show that we can express methyl-labeled human integral membrane proteins cost-effectively by cell-free expression based of crude hydrolyzed ILV-labeled OmpX inclusion bodies. These are obtained in Escherichia coli with very high quantity and represent an optimal intermediate to channel ILV precursors into the eukaryotic proteins. PMID:24937763

  6. An Approach to Heterologous Expression of Membrane Proteins. The Case of Bacteriorhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Round, Ekaterina; Shevchenko, Vitaly; Gushchin, Ivan; Polovinkin, Vitaly; Borshchevskiy, Valentin; Gordeliy, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    Heterologous overexpression of functional membrane proteins is a major bottleneck of structural biology. Bacteriorhodopsin from Halobium salinarum (bR) is a striking example of the difficulties in membrane protein overexpression. We suggest a general approach with a finite number of steps which allows one to localize the underlying problem of poor expression of a membrane protein using bR as an example. Our approach is based on constructing chimeric proteins comprising parts of a protein of interest and complementary parts of a homologous protein demonstrating advantageous expression. This complementary protein approach allowed us to increase bR expression by two orders of magnitude through the introduction of two silent mutations into bR coding DNA. For the first time the high quality crystals of bR expressed in E. Coli were obtained using the produced protein. The crystals obtained with in meso nanovolume crystallization diffracted to 1.67 Å. PMID:26046789

  7. Bemisia tabaci-infested tomato plants show a phase-specific pattern of photosynthetic gene expression indicative of disrupted electron flow leading to photo-oxidation and plant death

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Hernández, María Gloria

    2009-01-01

    A suppression-subtractive-hybridization (SSH) strategy led to the identification of several genes whose expression was differentially modified in response to different larval phases present during the infestation process of tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum) by virus-free whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Bt). The findings regarding photosynthetic gene expression were in accordance to previous studies reporting altered patterns of expression as a result of insect herbivory. However, the examination, in this study, of four stages of larval Bt development permitted the detection of phase-dependent changes in gene expression which appeared to target specific photosynthetic complexes. Thus, an upregulation of photosystem II genes in the latter two phases of Bt development contrasted with a general repression of genes belonging to the three other photosynthetic complexes, in addition to a number of genes coding for proteins associated with the oxygen evolving complex and the Calvin cycle. We propose that the contrasting pattern of expression led to an over-excitation of PSII and consequent oxidative damage, as suggested by the concomitant upregulation of oxidative stress genes, and could have contributed to the wide-spread necrosis observed in Bt-infested tomato plants at late stages of the plant-insect interaction. PMID:19826216

  8. Expression of functional neurotransmitter receptors in Xenopus oocytes after injection of human brain membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miledi, Ricardo; Eusebi, Fabrizio; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Palma, Eleonora; Trettel, Flavia

    2002-10-01

    The Xenopus oocyte is a very powerful tool for studies of the structure and function of membrane proteins, e.g., messenger RNA extracted from the brain and injected into oocytes leads to the synthesis and membrane incorporation of many types of functional receptors and ion channels, and membrane vesicles from Torpedo electroplaques injected into oocytes fuse with the oocyte membrane and cause the appearance of functional Torpedo acetylcholine receptors and Cl channels. This approach was developed further to transplant already assembled neurotransmitter receptors from human brain cells to the plasma membrane of Xenopus oocytes. Membranes isolated from the temporal neocortex of a patient, operated for intractable epilepsy, were injected into oocytes and, within a few hours, the oocyte membrane acquired functional neurotransmitter receptors to -aminobutyric acid, -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid, kainate, and glycine. These receptors were also expressed in the plasma membrane of oocytes injected with mRNA extracted from the temporal neocortex of the same patient. All of this makes the Xenopus oocyte a more useful model than it already is for studies of the structure and function of many human membrane proteins and opens the way to novel pathophysiological investigations of some human brain disorders.

  9. A Guide to Transient Expression of Membrane Proteins in HEK-293 Cells for Functional Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Amanda; Wong, Aloysius; Esau, Luke; Lemtiri-Chlieh, Fouad; Gehring, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293) cells are commonly used as host for the heterologous expression of membrane proteins not least because they have a high transfection efficiency and faithfully translate and process proteins. In addition, their cell size, morphology and division rate, and low expression of native channels are traits that are particularly attractive for current-voltage measurements. Nevertheless, the heterologous expression of complex membrane proteins such as receptors and ion channels for biological characterization and in particular for single-cell applications such as electrophysiology remains a challenge. Expression of functional proteins depends largely on careful step-by-step optimization that includes the design of expression vectors with suitable identification tags, as well as the selection of transfection methods and detection parameters appropriate for the application. Here, we use the heterologous expression of a plant potassium channel, the Arabidopsis thaliana guard cell outward-rectifying K+ channel, AtGORK (At5G37500) in HEK-293 cells as an example, to evaluate commonly used transfection reagents and fluorescent detection methods, and provide a detailed methodology for optimized transient transfection and expression of membrane proteins for in vivo studies in general and for single-cell applications in particular. This optimized protocol will facilitate the physiological and cellular characterization of complex membrane proteins. PMID:27486406

  10. Time-dependent changes in antioxidative enzyme expression and photosynthetic activity of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells under acute exposure to cadmium and anthracene.

    PubMed

    Aksmann, Anna; Pokora, Wojciech; Baścik-Remisiewicz, Agnieszka; Dettlaff-Pokora, Agnieszka; Wielgomas, Bartosz; Dziadziuszko, Małgorzata; Tukaj, Zbigniew

    2014-12-01

    Heavy metals (HM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are present in the freshwater environment at concentrations that can be hazardous to the biota. Among HMs and PAHs, cadmium (Cd) and anthracene (ANT) are the most prevalent and toxic ones. The response of Chlamydomonas cells to Cd and ANT at concentrations that markedly reduced the growth of algal population was investigated in this study. At such concentrations, both cadmium and anthracene were recognized as oxidative stress inducers, since high concentration of H2O2 in treated cultures was observed. Therefore, as a part of the "molecular phase" of the cell response to this stress, we examined the time-dependent expression of genes encoding the main antioxidative enzymes: superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX), as well as the activity of these enzymes in cells, with special attention paid to chloroplastic and mitochondrial isoforms of SOD. To characterize the cell response at the "physiological level", we examined the photosynthetic activity of stressed cells via analysis of chlorophyll a fluorescence in vivo. In contrast to standard ecotoxicity studies in which the growth end-points are usually determined, herein we present time-dependent changes in algal cell response to Cd- and ANT-induced stress. The most significant effect(s) of the toxicants on photosynthetic activity was observed in the 6th hour, when strong depression of PI parameter value, an over 50 percent reduction of the active reaction center fraction (RC0) and a 3-fold increase in non-photochemical energy dissipation (DI0/RC) were noted. At the same time, the increase (up to 2.5-fold) in mRNA transcript of SOD and CAT genes, followed by the enhancement in the enzyme activity was observed. The high expression of the Msd 3 gene in treated Chlamydomonas cells probably complements the partial loss of chloroplast Fe-SOD and APX activity, while catalase and Mn-SOD 5 seem to be the major enzymes responsible for

  11. Membrane-targeted HrpNEa can modulate apple defense gene expression.

    PubMed

    Vergne, E; de Bernonville, T Dugé; Dupuis, F; Sourice, S; Cournol, R; Berthelot, P; Barny, M A; Brisset, M N; Chevreau, E

    2014-02-01

    Fire blight caused by Erwinia amylovora is the major bacterial disease of tribe Maleae, including apple. Among the proteins secreted by this bacterium, HrpNEa, also called harpin, is known to induce hypersensitive response in nonhost plants and to form amyloid oligomers leading to pore opening in the plasma membrane and alteration of membrane homeostasis. To better understand the physiological effects of HrpNEa in the host plant, we produced transgenic apple plants expressing HrpNEa with or without a secretion signal peptide (SP). HrpNEa expressed with a SP was found to be associated within the membrane fraction, in accordance with amyloidogenic properties and the presence of transmembrane domains revealed by in silico analysis. Expression analysis of 28 apple defense-related genes revealed gene modulations in the transgenic line expressing membrane-targeted HrpNEa. While apple transgenic trees displaying a high constitutive expression level of SP-HrpNEa showed a slight reduction of infection frequency after E. amylovora inoculation, there was no decrease in the disease severity. Thus HrpNEa seems to act as an elicitor of host defenses, when localized in the host membrane. PMID:24156770

  12. Combining in Vitro Folding with Cell Free Protein Synthesis for Membrane Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Focke, Paul J; Hein, Christopher; Hoffmann, Beate; Matulef, Kimberly; Bernhard, Frank; Dötsch, Volker; Valiyaveetil, Francis I

    2016-08-01

    Cell free protein synthesis (CFPS) has emerged as a promising methodology for protein expression. While polypeptide production is very reliable and efficient using CFPS, the correct cotranslational folding of membrane proteins during CFPS is still a challenge. In this contribution, we describe a two-step protocol in which the integral membrane protein is initially expressed by CFPS as a precipitate followed by an in vitro folding procedure using lipid vesicles for converting the protein precipitate to the correctly folded protein. We demonstrate the feasibility of using this approach for the K(+) channels KcsA and MVP and the amino acid transporter LeuT. We determine the crystal structure of the KcsA channel obtained by CFPS and in vitro folding to show the structural similarity to the cellular expressed KcsA channel and to establish the feasibility of using this two-step approach for membrane protein production for structural studies. Our studies show that the correct folding of these membrane proteins with complex topologies can take place in vitro without the involvement of the cellular machinery for membrane protein biogenesis. This indicates that the folding instructions for these complex membrane proteins are contained entirely within the protein sequence. PMID:27384110

  13. Expression and localization of predicted inclusion membrane proteins in Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Weber, Mary M; Bauler, Laura D; Lam, Jennifer; Hackstadt, Ted

    2015-12-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular pathogen that replicates in a membrane-bound vacuole termed the inclusion. Early in the infection cycle, the pathogen extensively modifies the inclusion membrane through incorporation of numerous type III secreted effector proteins, called inclusion membrane proteins (Incs). These proteins are characterized by a bilobed hydrophobic domain of 40 amino acids. The presence of this domain has been used to predict up to 59 putative Incs for C. trachomatis; however, localization to the inclusion membrane with specific antibodies has been demonstrated for only about half of them. Here, we employed recently developed genetic tools to verify the localization of predicted Incs that had not been previously localized to the inclusion membrane. Expression of epitope-tagged putative Incs identified 10 that were previously unverified as inclusion membrane localized and thus authentic Incs. One novel Inc and 3 previously described Incs were localized to inclusion membrane microdomains, as evidenced by colocalization with phosphorylated Src (p-Src). Several predicted Incs did not localize to the inclusion membrane but instead remained associated with the bacteria. Using Yersinia as a surrogate host, we demonstrated that many of these are not secreted via type III secretion, further suggesting they may not be true Incs. Collectively, our results highlight the utility of genetic tools for demonstrating secretion from chlamydia. Further mechanistic studies aimed at elucidating effector function will advance our understanding of how the pathogen maintains its unique intracellular niche and mediates interactions with the host. PMID:26416906

  14. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha is expressed by glomerular visceral epithelial cells in human membranous nephropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Neale, T. J.; Rüger, B. M.; Macaulay, H.; Dunbar, P. R.; Hasan, Q.; Bourke, A.; Murray-McIntosh, R. P.; Kitching, A. R.

    1995-01-01

    The role of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) was examined in biopsy-proven glomerulonephritis by immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, immunogold electron microscopy, immunoassay in serum and urine, and urinary immunoblot. Striking glomerular capillary wall and visceral glomerular epithelial cell TNF-alpha protein staining was observed in all cases of membranous nephropathy and membranous lupus nephropathy. Staining was less frequently observed in crescentic glomerulonephritis and in isolated cases of other histological subtypes of glomerulonephritis, usually in association with glomerular macrophages. By immunogold electron microscopy TNF-alpha was localized in membranous nephropathy within the visceral glomerular epithelial cells, and also in the glomerular basement membrane, especially in relation to immune deposits. In situ hybridization localized TNF-alpha mRNA exclusively to glomerular epithelial cells in all biopsies with membranous morphology but not in other histological subtypes. Concentrations of TNF-alpha were significantly increased compared with normal controls in the urine of patients with membranous nephropathy and with crescentic glomerulonephritis. The expression of TNF-alpha by glomerular epithelial cells exclusively and universally in biopsies showing a membranous morphology strongly suggests this cytokine has a role in the pathogenesis of membranous nephropathy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:7778683

  15. Expression and purification of membrane protein diacylglycerol acyltransferase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diacylglycerol acyltransferases (DGATs) catalyze the last and rate-limiting step of triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis in eukaryotic organisms. Plants and animals deficient in DGATs accumulate less TAG. Over-expression of DGATs increases TAG in seeds and other tissues. DGAT knockout mice are resista...

  16. The Photosynthetic Apparatus and Its Regulation in the Aerobic Gammaproteobacterium Congregibacter litoralis gen. nov., sp. nov

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Stefan; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Fuchs, Bernhard M.; Tindall, Brian J.

    2009-01-01

    Background There is accumulating evidence that in some marine environments aerobic bacteriochlorophyll a-producing bacteria represent a significant part of the microbial population. The interaction of photosynthesis and carbon metabolism in these interesting bacteria is still largely unknown and requires further investigation in order to estimate their contribution to the marine carbon cycle. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we analyzed the structure, composition and regulation of the photosynthetic apparatus in the obligately aerobic marine gammaproteobacterium KT71T. Photoheterotrophically grown cells were characterized by a poorly developed lamellar intracytoplasmic membrane system, a type 1 light-harvesting antenna complex and a photosynthetic reaction center associated with a tetraheme cytochrome c. The only photosynthetic pigments produced were bacteriochlorophyll a and spirilloxanthin. Under semiaerobic conditions KT71T cells expressing a photosynthetic apparatus showed a light-dependent increase of growth yield in the range of 1.3–2.5 fold. The expression level of the photosynthetic apparatus depended largely on the utilized substrate, the intermediary carbon metabolism and oxygen tension. In addition, pigment synthesis was strongly influenced by light, with blue light exerting the most significant effect, implicating that proteins containing a BLUF domain may be involved in regulation of the photosynthetic apparatus. Several phenotypic traits in KT71T could be identified that correlated with the assumed redox state of growing cells and thus could be used to monitor the cellular redox state under various incubation conditions. Conclusions/Significance In a hypothetical model that explains the regulation of the photosynthetic apparatus in strain KT71T we propose that the expression of photosynthesis genes depends on the cellular redox state and is maximal under conditions that allow a balanced membrane redox state. So far, bacteria capable of an

  17. In-Situ Observation of Membrane Protein Folding during Cell-Free Expression

    PubMed Central

    Fitter, Jörg; Büldt, Georg; Heberle, Joachim; Schlesinger, Ramona; Ataka, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Proper insertion, folding and assembly of functional proteins in biological membranes are key processes to warrant activity of a living cell. Here, we present a novel approach to trace folding and insertion of a nascent membrane protein leaving the ribosome and penetrating the bilayer. Surface Enhanced IR Absorption Spectroscopy selectively monitored insertion and folding of membrane proteins during cell-free expression in a label-free and non-invasive manner. Protein synthesis was performed in an optical cell containing a prism covered with a thin gold film with nanodiscs on top, providing an artificial lipid bilayer for folding. In a pilot experiment, the folding pathway of bacteriorhodopsin via various secondary and tertiary structures was visualized. Thus, a methodology is established with which the folding reaction of other more complex membrane proteins can be observed during protein biosynthesis (in situ and in operando) at molecular resolution. PMID:26978519

  18. Tissue specificity of a baculovirus expressed, basement membrane-degrading protease in larvae of Heliothis virescens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ScathL is a cathepsin L-like cysteine protease from flesh fly Sarcophaga peregrina, which digests components of the basement membrane during insect metamorphosis. A recombinant baculovirus (AcMLF9.ScathL) expressing ScathL kills larvae of the tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens, significantly faste...

  19. Small-Scale Screening to Large-Scale Over-Expression of Human Membrane Proteins for Structural Studies.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Sarika; Saha, Sukanya; Thamminana, Sobrahani; Stroud, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    Membrane protein structural studies are frequently hampered by poor expression. The low natural abundance of these proteins implies a need for utilizing different heterologous expression systems. E. coli and yeast are commonly used expression systems due to rapid cell growth at high cell density, economical production, and ease of manipulation. Here we report a simplified, systematically developed robust strategy from small-scale screening to large-scale over-expression of human integral membrane proteins in the mammalian expression system for structural studies. This methodology streamlines small-scale screening of several different constructs utilizing fluorescence size-exclusion chromatography (FSEC) towards optimization of buffer, additives, and detergents for achieving stability and homogeneity. This is followed by the generation of stable clonal cell lines expressing desired constructs, and lastly large-scale expression for crystallization. These techniques are designed to rapidly advance the structural studies of eukaryotic integral membrane proteins including that of human membrane proteins. PMID:27485338

  20. Expression of SPARC during development of the chicken chorioallantoic membrane: evidence for regulated proteolysis in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Iruela-Arispe, M L; Lane, T F; Redmond, D; Reilly, M; Bolender, R P; Kavanagh, T J; Sage, E H

    1995-01-01

    SPARC is a secreted glycoprotein that has been shown to disrupt focal adhesions and to regulate the proliferation of endothelial cells in vitro. Moreover, peptides resulting from the proteolysis of SPARC exhibit angiogenic activity. Here we describe the temporal synthesis, turnover, and angiogenic potential of SPARC in the chicken chorioallantoic membrane. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy revealed specific expression of SPARC protein in endothelial cells, and significantly higher levels of SPARC were observed in smaller newly formed blood vessels in comparison to larger, developmentally older vessels. SPARC mRNA was detected at the earliest stages of chorioallantoic membrane morphogenesis and reached maximal levels at day 13 of embryonic development. Interestingly, steady-state levels of SPARC mRNA did not correlate directly with protein accumulation; moreover, the protein appeared to undergo limited degradation during days 10-15. Incubation of [125I]-SPARC with chorioallantoic membranes of different developmental ages confirmed that extracellular proteolysis occurred during days 9-15, but not at later stages (e.g., days 17-21). Comparison of peptides produced by incubation with chorioallantoic membranes with those generated by plasmin showed an identical pattern of proteolysis. Plasmin activity was present throughout development, and in situ zymography identified sites of plasminogen activator activity that corresponded to areas exhibiting high levels of SPARC expression. Synthetic peptides from a plasmin-sensitive region of SPARC, between amino acids 113-130, stimulated angiogenesis in the chorioallantoic membrane in a dose-dependent manner; in contrast, intact SPARC was inactive in similar assays. We have shown that SPARC is expressed in endothelial cells of newly formed blood vessels in a manner that is both temporally and spatially restricted. Between days 9 and 15 of chorioallantoic membrane development, the protein undergoes proteolytic cleavage that

  1. Cloning of immunodominant membrane protein genes of phytoplasmas and their in planta expression.

    PubMed

    Kakizawa, Shigeyuki; Oshima, Kenro; Ishii, Yoshiko; Hoshi, Ayaka; Maejima, Kensaku; Jung, Hee-Young; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Namba, Shigetou

    2009-04-01

    Phytoplasmas are plant pathogenic bacteria that cause devastating yield losses in diverse crops worldwide. Although the understanding of the pathogen biology is important in agriculture, the inability to culture phytoplasmas has hindered their full characterization. Previous studies demonstrated that immunodominant membrane proteins could be classified into three types, immunodominant membrane protein (Imp), immunodominant membrane protein A (IdpA), and antigenic membrane protein (Amp), and they are nonhomologous to each other. Here, cloning and sequencing of imp-containing genomic fragments were performed for several groups of phytoplasma including the aster yellows and rice yellow dwarf groups, for which an imp sequence has not previously been reported. Sequence comparison analysis revealed that Imps are highly variable among phytoplasmas, and clear positive selection was observed in several Imps, suggesting that Imp has important roles in host-phytoplasma interactions. As onion yellows (OY) phytoplasma was known to have Amp as the immunodominant membrane protein, the protein accumulation level of Imp in planta was measured compared with that of Amp. The resulting accumulation of Imp was calculated as approximately one-tenth that of Amp, being consistent with the immunodominant property of Amp in OY. It is suggested that an ancestral type of immunodominant membrane protein could be Imp, and subsequently the expression level of Amp or IdpA is increased in several phytoplasma groups. PMID:19222574

  2. Photosynthetic reaction center complexes from heliobacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trost, J. T.; Vermaas, W. F. J.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers are pigment-protein complexes that are responsible for the transduction of light energy into chemical energy. Considerable evidence indicates that photosynthetic organisms were present very early in the evolution of life on Earth. The goal of this project is to understand the early evolutionary development of photosynthesis by examining the properties of reaction centers isolated from certain contemporary organisms that appear to contain the simplest photosynthetic reaction centers. The major focus is on the family of newly discovered strictly anaerobic photosynthetic organisms that are grouped with the gram-positive phylum of bacteria. The properties of these reactions centers suggest that they may be the descendants of an ancestor that also gave rise to Photosystem 1 found in oxygen-evolving photosynthetic organisms. Photoactive reaction center-core antenna complexes were isolated from the photosynthetic bacteria, Heliobacillus mobilis and Heliobacterium gestii, by extraction of membranes with Deriphat 160C followed by differential centrifugation and sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Other aspects of this investigation are briefly discussed.

  3. Feasibility of a photosynthetic artificial lung.

    PubMed

    Basu-Dutt, S; Fandino, M R; Salley, S O; Thompson, I M; Whittlesey, G C; Klein, M D

    1997-01-01

    The success of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for the treatment of acute respiratory failure has led to consideration of the development of a more portable, and perhaps even implantable, artificial lung. The authors suggest a bioregenerative life support system that includes a photo-synthetic organism that can remove CO2 and produce O2 in the presence of an energy source. To build a model of such a photosynthetic artificial lung, the photosynthetic capability of a high temperature strain of the algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa was maximized at a cell density of 25 million cells/ml to serve as the O2 producer and CO2 remover. The "patient" in this model was comprised of 1 L of medium or 350 ml of blood, interfaced with the photosynthetic system across a gas transfer membrane. The experiments demonstrated the ability of the plant cells to supply O2 and remove CO2 from the "patient" with a maximum rate of 0.55 mmoles/L/hr under the most favorable measured operating conditions. The projected rate of 1.0 mmoles/L/hr required for physiologic applications is not totally ab absurd idea, with a slightly modified set-up. Modifications may be in the form of regulating the photosynthetic pathway or genetically engineering a hybrid strain with enhanced O2 producing and suppressed photoinhibition capacity. PMID:9242940

  4. 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP)-induced alteration in leaf photosynthetic rate, chlorophyll fluorescence, respiration and membrane damage in rice (Oryza sativa L.) under high night temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High night temperature (HNT) can induce ethylene-triggered reactive oxygen species production, which can cause premature leaf senescence and membrane damage, thereby affecting production, consumption and transfer of photosynthates, and yield. The 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) can competitively bind w...

  5. Two unrelated putative membrane-bound progestin receptors, progesterone membrane receptor component 1 (PGMRC1) and membrane progestin receptor (mPR) beta, are expressed in the rainbow trout oocyte and exhibit similar ovarian expression patterns

    PubMed Central

    Mourot, Brigitte; Nguyen, Thaovi; Fostier, Alexis; Bobe, Julien

    2006-01-01

    Background In lower vertebrates, steroid-induced oocyte maturation is considered to involve membrane-bound progestin receptors. Two totally distinct classes of putative membrane-bound progestin receptors have been reported in vertebrates. A first class of receptors, now termed progesterone membrane receptor component (PGMRC; subtypes 1 and 2) has been studied since 1996 but never studied in a fish species nor in the oocyte of any animal species. A second class of receptors, termed membrane progestin receptors (mPR; subtypes alpha, beta and gamma), was recently described in vertebrates and implicated in the progestin-initiated induction of oocyte maturation in fish. Methods In the present study, we report the characterization of the full coding sequence of rainbow trout PGMRC1 and mPR beta cDNAs, their tissue distribution, their ovarian expression profiles during oogenesis, their hormonal regulation in the full grown ovary and the in situ localization of PGMRC1 mRNA in the ovary. Results Our results clearly show, for the first time in any animal species, that rainbow trout PGMRC1 mRNA is present in the oocyte and has a strong expression in ovarian tissue. In addition, we show that both mPR beta and PGMRC1, two members of distinct membrane-bound progestin receptor classes, exhibit highly similar ovarian expression profiles during the reproductive cycle with maximum levels during vitellogenesis and a down-expression during late vitellogenesis. In addition, the mRNA abundance of both genes is not increased after in vitro hormonal stimulation of full grown follicles by maturation inducing hormones. Conclusion Together, our findings suggest that PGMRC1 is a new possible participant in the progestin-induced oocyte maturation in fish. However, its participation in the process of oocyte maturation, which remains to be confirmed, would occur at post-transcriptional levels. PMID:16457725

  6. Role of membrane depolarization and extracellular calcium in increased complement receptor expression during neutrophil (PMN) activation

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, M.; Wetzler, E.; Birx, D.L.

    1986-03-05

    During PMN activation the surface expression of receptors (R) for C3b and C3bi increases rapidly. This is necessary for optimal cell adhesion, migration, and phagocytosis. Following stimulation with fMLP or LTB-4, the increased expression of C3bR depends only on the Ca/sup + +/ released from intracellular stores and is not inhibited by 5mM EDTA, while the increase in C3biR also requires extracellular Ca/sup + +/. CR expression also increases when the PMN are depolarized with 140 mM K/sup +/, but with this stimulus, EDTA inhibits C3bR by 67% and C3biR 100%, suggesting that intracellular Ca/sup + +/ stores may not be released. Pertussis toxin caused dose-dependent inhibition of both CR responses to fMLP and also inhibited the increases in both CR induced by K/sup +/. Membrane depolarization (monitored by di-O-C5 fluorescence) due to fMLP was similarly inhibited by toxin but the depolarization due to K/sup +/ was not. The dose of phorbol myristate acetate that maximally increased CR expression, 0.1 ng/ml, did not depolarize the membrane. These results suggest that membrane depolarization is neither necessary nor sufficient for increased CR expression. A Ca/sup + +/ and GTP binding protein-dependent enzyme such as phospholipase C is necessary to the amplify initial signals generated either by release of Ca/sup + +/ stores or by opening voltage dependent Ca/sup + +/ channels following membrane depolarization.

  7. Tat Peptide-Mediated Soluble Expression of the Membrane Protein LSECtin-CRD in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Guofu; Wang, Changzhen; Wu, Yonghong; Cong, Jianbo; Cheng, Li; Wang, Mingqun; Zhao, Pengkai; Tang, Li; Zhang, Chenggang; Wu, Ke

    2013-01-01

    The human liver and lymph node sinusoidal endothelial cell C-type lectin (hLSECtin), a type II integral membrane protein, containing a Ca2+-dependent carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD), has a well-established biological activity, yet its three-dimensional structure is unknown due to low expression yields and aggregation into inclusion bodies. Previous study has demonstrated that the HIV-1 virus-encoded Tat peptide (‘YGRKKRRQRRR’) can increase the yields and the solubility of heterologous proteins. However, whether the Tat peptide could promote the high-yield and soluble expression of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli is not known. Therefore, the prokaryotic expression vector pET28b-Tat-hLSECtin-CRD (using pET28b and pET28b-hLSECtin-CRD as controls) was constructed, and transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3) cells and induced with isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactoside (IPTG) followed with identifying by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Subsequently, the bacterial subcellular structure, in which overexpressed the heterologous proteins Tat-hLSECtin-CRD and Tat-free hLSECtin-CRD, was analyzed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) respectively, and the mannose-binding activity of Tat-hLSECtin-CRD was also determined. Expectedly, the solubility of Tat-LSECtin-CRD significantly increased compared to Tat-free LSECtin-CRD (**p < 0.01) with prolonged time, and the Tat-LSECtin-CRD had a significant mannose-binding activity. The subcellular structure analysis indicated that the bacterial cells overexpressed Tat-hLSECtin-CRD exhibited denser region compared with controls, while dot denser region aggregated in the two ends of bacterial cells overexpressed Tat-free hLSECtin-CRD. This study provided a novel method for improving the soluble expression of membrane proteins in prokaryotic systems by fusion with the Tat peptide, which may be potentially expanded to the expression of other membrane proteins. PMID:24358298

  8. Gene cloning and prokaryotic expression of recombinant outer membrane protein from Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ye; Wang, Xiuli; Guo, Sheping; Qiu, Xuemei

    2011-06-01

    Gram-negative Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a common pathogen in humans and marine animals. The outer membrane protein of bacteria plays an important role in the infection and pathogenicity to the host. Thus, the outer membrane proteins are an ideal target for vaccines. We amplified a complete outer membrane protein gene (ompW) from V. parahaemolyticus ATCC 17802. We then cloned and expressed the gene into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells. The gene coded for a protein that was 42.78 kDa. We purified the protein using Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and Anti-His antibody Western blotting, respectively. Our results provide a basis for future application of the OmpW protein as a vaccine candidate against infection by V. parahaemolyticus. In addition, the purified OmpW protein can be used for further functional and structural studies.

  9. Tangled evolutionary processes with commonality and diversity in plastidial glycolipid synthesis in photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Hori, Koichi; Nobusawa, Takashi; Watanabe, Tei; Madoka, Yuka; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Shibata, Daisuke; Shimojima, Mie; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-01

    In photosynthetic organisms, the photosynthetic membrane constitutes a scaffold for light-harvesting complexes and photosynthetic reaction centers. Three kinds of glycolipids, namely monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, digalactosyldiacylglycerol, and sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol, constitute approximately 80-90% of photosynthetic membrane lipids and are well conserved from tiny cyanobacteria to the leaves of huge trees. These glycolipids perform a wide variety of functions beyond biological membrane formation. In particular, the capability of adaptation to harsh environments through regulation of membrane glycolipid composition is essential for healthy growth and development of photosynthetic organisms. The genome analysis and functional genetics of the model seed plant Arabidopsis thaliana have yielded many new findings concerning the biosynthesis, regulation, and functions of glycolipids. Nevertheless, it remains to be clarified how the complex biosynthetic pathways and well-organized functions of glycolipids evolved in early and primitive photosynthetic organisms, such as cyanobacteria, to yield modern photosynthetic organisms like land plants. Recently, genome data for many photosynthetic organisms have been made available as the fruit of the rapid development of sequencing technology. We also have reported the draft genome sequence of the charophyte alga Klebsormidium flaccidum, which is an intermediate organism between green algae and land plants. Here, we performed a comprehensive phylogenic analysis of glycolipid biosynthesis genes in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms including K. flaccidum. Based on the results together with membrane lipid analysis of this alga, we discuss the evolution of glycolipid synthesis in photosynthetic organisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Lipid Biology edited by Kent D. Chapman and Ivo Feussner. PMID:27108062

  10. Photosynthetic water splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.

    1981-01-01

    The photosynthetic unit of hydrogen evolution, the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production, and hydrogenic photosynthesis are discussed in the section on previous work. Recent results are given on simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen, kinetic studies, microscopic marine algae-seaweeds, and oxygen profiles.

  11. Process for photosynthetically splitting water

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.

    1982-01-28

    In one form of the invention, hydrogen is produced by providing a reactor containing a body of water. The water contains photolytic material, i.e., photoactive material containing a hydrogen-catalyst. The interior of the reactor is isolated from atmosphere and includes a volume for receiving gases evolved from the body of water. The photolytic material is exposed to light to effect photosynthetic splitting of the water into gaseous hydrogen and oxygen. The gas-receiving volume is continuously evacuated by pumping to promote evolution of gaseous hydrogen and oxygen into that volume and to withdraw them therefrom. In another form of the invention, separation of the hydrogen and oxygen is effected by selectively diffusing the hydrogen through a heated semipermeable membrane in a separation zone while maintaining across the zone a magnetic field gradient biasing the oxygen away from the membrane. In a third form of the invention, the withdrawn gas is contacted with a membrane blocking flow of water vapor to the region for effecting recovery of the hydrogen. In a fourth embodiment, the invention comprises a process for selectively recovering hydrogen from a gas mixture comprising hydrogen and oxygen. The process is conducted in a separation zone and comprises contacting the mixture with a semipermeable membrane effecting selective diffusion of hydrogen while maintaining across the zone a magnetic field gradient effecting movement of oxygen in a direction away from the membrane.

  12. Use of a yeast-based membrane protein expression technology to overexpress drug resistance efflux pumps.

    PubMed

    Lamping, Erwin; Cannon, Richard D

    2010-01-01

    Azole antifungal drugs are used widely to treat people with oral fungal infections. Unfortunately, fungi can develop resistance to these drugs. This resistance can be due to the overexpression or mutation of cytochrome P450 14alpha-lanosterol demethylase, also known as ERG11 or CYP51, and/or the overexpression of membrane-located multidrug efflux pumps. We have developed a heterologous membrane protein expression system that can be used to study the structure and function of these proteins in the non-pathogenic, genetically stable, and versatile eukaryotic model organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this chapter we describe the techniques used to express the Candida albicans efflux pump Cdr1p in S. cerevisiae. PMID:20717788

  13. Expression of two membrane fusion proteins, synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa and vesicle-associated membrane protein, in choroid plexus epithelium.

    PubMed

    Chung, I; Burkart, A; Szmydynger-Chodobska, J; Dodd, K A; Trimble, W S; Miller, K V; Shim, M; Chodobski, A

    2003-01-01

    In addition to being the major site of cerebrospinal fluid formation, the choroid plexus epithelium emerges as an important source of polypeptides in the brain. Physiologically regulated release of some polypeptides synthesized by the choroid plexus has been shown. The molecular mechanisms underlying this polypeptide secretion have not been characterized, however. In the present study, synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa and vesicle-associated membrane protein, two membrane fusion proteins playing a critical role in exocytosis in neurons and endocrine cells, were found to be expressed in the choroid plexus epithelium. It was also shown that in choroidal epithelium, synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa and vesicle-associated membrane protein stably interact. Two members of the vesicle-associated membrane protein family, vesicle-associated membrane protein-1 and vesicle-associated membrane protein-2, were expressed in the rat choroid plexus at the messenger RNA and protein level. However, their newly discovered isoforms, vesicle-associated membrane protein-1b and vesicle-associated membrane protein-2b, produced by alternative RNA splicing, were not detected in choroidal tissue. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that vesicle-associated membrane protein is confined to the cytoplasm of choroidal epithelium, whereas synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa is associated with plasma membranes, albeit with a varied cellular distribution among species studied. Specifically, in the rat choroid plexus, synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa was localized to the basolateral membrane domain of choroidal epithelium and was expressed in small groups of cells. In comparison, in ovine and human choroidal tissues, apical staining for synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa was found in the majority of epithelial cells. These species-related differences in cellular synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa distribution suggested that the synaptosome-associated protein of

  14. Gene expression analysis of Drosophilaa Manf mutants reveals perturbations in membrane traffic and major metabolic changes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background MANF and CDNF are evolutionarily conserved neurotrophic factors that specifically support dopaminergic neurons. To date, the receptors and signalling pathways of this novel MANF/CDNF family have remained unknown. Independent studies have showed upregulation of MANF by unfolded protein response (UPR). To enlighten the role of MANF in multicellular organism development we carried out a microarray-based analysis of the transcriptional changes induced by the loss and overexpression of Drosophila Manf. Results The most dramatic change of expression was observed with genes coding membrane transport proteins and genes related to metabolism. When evaluating in parallel the ultrastructural data and transcriptome changes of maternal/zygotic and only zygotic Manf mutants, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and membrane traffic alterations were evident. In Drosophila Manf mutants the expression of several genes involved in Parkinson's disease (PD) was altered as well. Conclusions We conclude that besides a neurotrophic factor, Manf is an important cellular survival factor needed to overcome the UPR especially in tissues with high secretory function. In the absence of Manf, the expression of genes involved in membrane transport, particularly exocytosis and endosomal recycling pathway was altered. In neurodegenerative diseases, such as PD, correct protein folding and proteasome function as well as neurotransmitter synthesis and uptake are crucial for the survival of neurons. The degeneration of dopaminergic neurons is the hallmark for PD and our work provides a clue on the mechanisms by which the novel neurotrophic factor MANF protects these neurons. PMID:22494833

  15. Tetracyclines increase lipid phosphate phosphatase expression on plasma membranes and turnover of plasma lysophosphatidate.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoyun; Zhao, Yuan Y; Dewald, Jay; Curtis, Jonathan M; Brindley, David N

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular lysophosphatidate and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) are important bioactive lipids, which signal through G-protein-coupled receptors to stimulate cell growth and survival. The lysophosphatidate and S1P signals are terminated partly by degradation through three broad-specificity lipid phosphate phosphatases (LPPs) on the cell surface. Significantly, the expression of LPP1 and LPP3 is decreased in many cancers, and this increases the impact of lysophosphatidate and S1P signaling. However, relatively little is known about the physiological or pharmacological regulation of the expression of the different LPPs. We now show that treating several malignant and nonmalignant cell lines with 1 μg/ml tetracycline, doxycycline, or minocycline significantly increased the extracellular degradation of lysophosphatidate. S1P degradation was also increased in cells that expressed high LPP3 activity. These results depended on an increase in the stabilities of the three LPPs and increased expression on the plasma membrane. We tested the physiological significance of these results and showed that treating rats with doxycycline accelerated the clearance of lysophosphatidate, but not S1P, from the circulation. However, administering 100 mg/kg/day doxycycline to mice decreased plasma concentrations of lysophosphatidate and S1P. This study demonstrates a completely new property of tetracyclines in increasing the plasma membrane expression of the LPPs. PMID:26884614

  16. Restrained expression, a method to overproduce toxic membrane proteins by exploiting operator-repressor interactions.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Anoop; Ridilla, Marc; Yernool, Dinesh A

    2011-01-01

    A major rate-limiting step in determining structures of membrane proteins is heterologous protein production. Toxicity often associated with rapid overexpression results in reduced biomass along with low yields of target protein. Mitigation of toxic effects was achieved using a method we call "restrained expression," a controlled reduction in the frequency of transcription initiation by exploiting the infrequent transitions of Lac repressor to a free state from its complex with the lac-operator site within a T7lac promoter that occur in the absence of the inducer isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside. In addition, production of the T7 RNA polymerase that drives transcription of the target is limited using the tightly regulated arabinose promoter in Escherichia coli strain BL21-AI. Using this approach, we can achieve a 200-fold range of green fluorescent protein expression levels. Application to members of a family of ion pumps results in 5- to 25-fold increases in expression over the benchmark BL21(DE3) host strain. A viral ion channel highly toxic to E. coli can also be overexpressed. In comparative analyses, restrained expression outperforms commonly used E. coli expression strategies. The mechanism underlying improved target protein yield arises from minimization of protein aggregation and proteolysis that reduce membrane integrity and cell viability. This study establishes a method to overexpress toxic proteins. PMID:21031485

  17. Expression of membrane glycoproteins in normal keratinocytes and squamous carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Rayter, Z. ); McIlhinney, R. ); Gusterson, B. )

    1989-08-01

    Con A acceptor glycoproteins were analyzed by 2D-PAGE and {sup 125}I-Con A overlay in three squamous carcinoma cell lines and compared with those in the simian virus (SV40)-transformed keratinocyte cell line SVK-14 and in normal keratinocytes. The majority of the glycoproteins identified by this technique were expressed at similar levels in all of the cells examined, independent of the culture conditions used. A cell surface glycoprotein gp34 was increased in the tumor cells compared with normal keratinocytes and expression varied with the culture density. Another glycoprotein, gp21, was found to be increased in expression in normal keratinocytes and stratified hyperconfluent cultures of squamous carcinoma cell lines. This paper describes the potential of this technique to identify membrane glycoproteins which may be expressed as a function of proliferation or differentiation.

  18. Overexpression of the Maize psbA Gene Enhances Drought Tolerance Through Regulating Antioxidant System, Photosynthetic Capability, and Stress Defense Gene Expression in Tobacco.

    PubMed

    Huo, Yongjin; Wang, Meiping; Wei, Yangyang; Xia, Zongliang

    2015-01-01

    The psbA (encoding D1 protein) plays an important role in protecting photosystem II (PSII) from oxidative damage in higher plants. In our previous study, the role of the psbA from maize (Zea mays. L) in response to SO2 stress was characterized. To date, information about the involvement of the psbA gene in drought response is scarce. Here we found that overexpression (OE) of ZmpsbA showed increased D1 protein abundance and enhanced drought stress tolerance in tobacco. The drought-tolerant phenotypes of the OE lines were accompanied by increases of key antioxidant enzymes SOD, CAT, and POD activities, but decreases of hydrogen peroxide, malondialdehyde, and ion leakage. Further investigation showed that the OE plants had much less reductions than the wild-type in the net photosynthesis rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (Gs), and the maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm) during drought stress; indicating that OE of ZmpsbA may alleviate photosynthesis inhibition during drought. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that there was significantly increased expression of NtLEA5, NtERD10C, NtAREB, and NtCDPK2 in ZmpsbA-OE lines. Together, our results indicate that ZmpsbA improves drought tolerance in tobacco possibly by alleviating photosynthesis reduction, reducing reactive oxygen species accumulation and membrane damage, and modulating stress defense gene expression. ZmpsbA could be exploited for engineering drought-tolerant plants in molecular breeding of crops. PMID:26793207

  19. Rab4GTPase modulates CFTR function by impairing channel expression at plasma membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, Sunil K. . E-mail: ssaxena@stevens.edu; Kaur, Simarna; George, Constantine

    2006-03-03

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), an autosomal recessive disorder, is caused by the disruption of biosynthesis or the function of a membrane cAMP-activated chloride channel, CFTR. CFTR regulatory mechanisms include recruitment of channel proteins to the cell surface from intracellular pools and by protein-protein interactions. Rab proteins are small GTPases involved in regulated trafficking controlling vesicle docking and fusion. Rab4 controls recycling events from endosome to the plasma membrane, fusion, and degradation. The colorectal cell line HT-29 natively expresses CFTR and responds to cAMP stimulation with an increase in CFTR-mediated currents. Rab4 over-expression in HT-29 cells inhibits both basal and cAMP-stimulated CFTR-mediated currents. GTPase-deficient Rab4Q67L and GDP locked Rab4S22N both inhibit channel activity, which appears characteristically different. Active status of Rab4 was confirmed by GTP overlay assay, while its expression was verified by Western blotting. The pull-down and immunoprecipitation experiments suggest that Rab4 physically interacts with CFTR through protein-protein interaction. Biotinylation with cell impermeant NHS-Sulfo-SS-Biotin implies that Rab4 impairs CFTR expression at cell surface. The enhanced cytosolic CFTR indicates that Rab4 expression restrains CFTR appearance at the cell membrane. The study suggests that Rab4 regulates the channel through multiple mechanisms that include protein-protein interaction, GTP/GDP exchange, and channel protein trafficking. We propose that Rab4 is a dynamic molecule with a significant role in CFTR function.

  20. Gene Expression Pattern of Cells From Inflamed and Normal Areas of Osteoarthritis Synovial Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Cécile; Dubuc, Jean-Emile; Montell, Eulàlia; Vergés, Josep; Munaut, Carine; Noël, Agnès; Henrotin, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the gene expression patterns of synovial cells from inflamed or normal/reactive areas of synovial membrane obtained from the same patient with osteoarthritis (OA). Methods At the time of total knee replacement, synovial tissues were obtained from 12 patients with knee OA. The inflammation status of the synovial membrane was characterized according to macroscopic criteria and classified as normal/reactive or inflamed. Biopsy samples were cultured separately for 7 days. Microarray gene expression profiling was performed on normal/reactive and inflamed areas. Western blot and immunohistochemistry were used to confirm the identified genes that were differentially expressed. Results We identified 896 genes that were differentially expressed between normal/reactive and inflamed areas. The key pathways were related to inflammation, cartilage metabolism, Wnt signaling, and angiogenesis. In the inflammation network, the genes TREM1 and S100A9 were strongly up-regulated. The genes MMP3, MMP9, CTSH (cathepsin H), and CTSS (cathepsin S) were significantly up-regulated in the cartilage catabolism pathway, while the most up-regulated anabolism enzyme gene was HAS1. In the Wnt signaling pathway, the genes for Wnt-5a and low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 5 were up-regulated, while the gene FZD2 and the gene for Dkk-3 were down-regulated. Finally, STC1, which codes for a protein involved in angiogenesis, was identified as the most up-regulated gene in inflamed compared with normal/reactive areas. Conclusion This study is the first to identify different expression patterns between 2 areas of the synovial membrane from the same patient. These differences concern several key pathways involved in OA pathogenesis. This analysis also provides information regarding new genes and proteins as potential targets of treatment. PMID:24757147

  1. Cell-free Co-expression of Functional Membrane Proteins and Apolipoprotein, Forming Soluble Nanolipoprotein Particles*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Cappuccio, Jenny A.; Blanchette, Craig D.; Sulchek, Todd A.; Arroyo, Erin S.; Kralj, Joel M.; Hinz, Angela K.; Kuhn, Edward A.; Chromy, Brett A.; Segelke, Brent W.; Rothschild, Kenneth J.; Fletcher, Julia E.; Katzen, Federico; Peterson, Todd C.; Kudlicki, Wieslaw A.; Bench, Graham; Hoeprich, Paul D.; Coleman, Matthew A.

    2008-01-01

    Here we demonstrate rapid production of solubilized and functional membrane protein by simultaneous cell-free expression of an apolipoprotein and a membrane protein in the presence of lipids, leading to the self-assembly of membrane protein-containing nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs). NLPs have shown great promise as a biotechnology platform for solubilizing and characterizing membrane proteins. However, current approaches are limited because they require extensive efforts to express, purify, and solubilize the membrane protein prior to insertion into NLPs. By the simple addition of a few constituents to cell-free extracts, we can produce membrane proteins in NLPs with considerably less effort. For this approach an integral membrane protein and an apolipoprotein scaffold are encoded by two DNA plasmids introduced into cell-free extracts along with lipids. For this study reported here we used plasmids encoding the bacteriorhodopsin (bR) membrane apoprotein and scaffold protein Δ1–49 apolipoprotein A-I fragment (Δ49A1). Cell free co-expression of the proteins encoded by these plasmids, in the presence of the cofactor all-trans-retinal and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine, resulted in production of functional bR as demonstrated by a 5-nm shift in the absorption spectra upon light adaptation and characteristic time-resolved FT infrared difference spectra for the bR → M transition. Importantly the functional bR was solubilized in discoidal bR·NLPs as determined by atomic force microscopy. A survey study of other membrane proteins co-expressed with Δ49A1 scaffold protein also showed significantly increased solubility of all of the membrane proteins, indicating that this approach may provide a general method for expressing membrane proteins enabling further studies. PMID:18603642

  2. Expression of calcium transport proteins in the extraembryonic membranes of a viviparous snake, Virginia striatula.

    PubMed

    Fregoso, Santiago P; Stewart, James R; Ecay, Tom W

    2012-06-01

    Yolk is the primary source of calcium for embryonic growth and development for most squamates, irrespective of mode of parity. The calcified eggshell is a secondary source for embryonic calcium in all oviparous eggs, but this structure is lost in viviparous lineages. Virginia striatula is a viviparous snake in which embryos obtain calcium from both yolk and placental transport of uterine calcium secretions. The developmental pattern of embryonic calcium acquisition in V. striatula is similar to that for oviparous snakes. Calbindin-D(28K) is a marker for epithelial calcium transport activity and plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA) provides the energy to catalyze the final step in calcium transport. Expression of calbindin-D(28K) and PMCA was measured by immunoblotting in yolk sac splanchnopleure and chorioallantois of a developmental series of V. striatula to test the hypothesis that these proteins mediate calcium transport to embryos. In addition, we compared the expression of calbindin-D(28K) in extraembryonic membranes of V. striatula throughout development to a previously published expression pattern in an oviparous snake to test the hypothesis that the ontogeny of calcium transport function is independent of reproductive mode. Expression of calbindin-D(28K) increased in yolk sac splanchnopleure and chorioallantois coincident with calcium mobilization from yolk and uterine sources and with embryonic growth. The amount of PMCA in the chorioallantois did not change through development suggesting its expression is not rate limiting for calcium transport. The pattern of expression of calbindin-D(28K) and PMCA confirms our initial hypothesis that these proteins mediate embryonic calcium uptake. In addition, the developmental pattern of calbindin-D(28K) expression in V. striatula is similar to that of an oviparous snake, which suggests that calcium transport mechanisms and their regulation are independent of reproductive mode. PMID:22821861

  3. Candidate Gene and MicroRNA Expression in Fetal Membranes and Preterm Delivery Risk.

    PubMed

    Enquobahrie, Daniel A; Hensley, Mark; Qiu, Chunfang; Abetew, Dejene F; Hevner, Karin; Tadesse, Mahlet G; Williams, Michelle A

    2016-06-01

    We investigated candidate gene and microRNA (miRNA) expression in amnion and chorion in relation to risk of preterm delivery (PTD). Amnion and chorion were separated from placenta and collected at delivery from participants who delivered at term (N = 10) and from participants who delivered preterm following spontaneous labor (sPTL-PTD; N = 10), premature rupture of membranes (PPROM-PTD; N = 10), and preeclampsia (PE-PTD; N = 10). Expression of genes (metalloproteinase [MMP] 2, MMP-9, and tissue inhibitors of MMP-1) and miRNAs (miR-199a*, -202*, -210, -214, -223, and -338) was profiled using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction approaches. Adjusted multinomial logistic regression models were used to calculate relative risk ratios (RRR), 95% confidence intervals, and P values. Among controls, the expression of miR-199a*, -202*, and -214 was lower in the amnion compared with their expression in the chorion, whereas the expression of miR-210 was higher in the amnion compared with its expression in the chorion (all P values < .05). In the amnion, MMP-9 expression was associated with PTD risk (overall P value = .0092), and MMP-9 expression was positively associated with the risk of PPROM-PTD (RRR: 31.10) and inversely associated with the risk of PE-PTD (RRR:6.55e-6), although individual associations were not statistically significant. In addition, in the amnion, the expression of miR-210 (RRR: 0.45; overall P value = .0039) was inversely associated with the risk of PE-PTD, and miR-223 was inversely associated with all subtypes of PTD (overall P value = .0400). The amnion and chorion differ in their miRNA expression. The expression of MMP-9, miR-210, and -223 in the amnion is associated with PTD risk. PMID:26507872

  4. Oxygen concentration inside a functioning photosynthetic cell.

    PubMed

    Kihara, Shigeharu; Hartzler, Daniel A; Savikhin, Sergei

    2014-05-01

    The excess oxygen concentration in the photosynthetic membranes of functioning oxygenic photosynthetic cells was estimated using classical diffusion theory combined with experimental data on oxygen production rates of cyanobacterial cells. The excess oxygen concentration within the plesiomorphic cyanobacterium Gloeobactor violaceus is only 0.025 μM, or four orders of magnitude lower than the oxygen concentration in air-saturated water. Such a low concentration suggests that the first oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria in solitary form could have evolved ∼2.8 billion years ago without special mechanisms to protect them against reactive oxygen species. These mechanisms instead could have been developed during the following ∼500 million years while the oxygen level in the Earth's atmosphere was slowly rising. Excess oxygen concentrations within individual cells of the apomorphic cyanobacteria Synechocystis and Synechococcus are 0.064 and 0.25 μM, respectively. These numbers suggest that intramembrane and intracellular proteins in isolated oxygenic photosynthetic cells are not subjected to excessively high oxygen levels. The situation is different for closely packed colonies of photosynthetic cells. Calculations show that the excess concentration within colonies that are ∼40 μm or larger in diameter can be comparable to the oxygen concentration in air-saturated water, suggesting that species forming colonies require protection against reactive oxygen species even in the absence of oxygen in the surrounding atmosphere. PMID:24806920

  5. LAPTM5: A novel lysosomal-associated multispanning membrane protein preferentially expressed in hematopoietic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Adra, C.N.; Zhu, Shaochun; Ko, Jone-Long

    1996-07-15

    While a large body of knowledge about cell membrane proteins exists, much less is known about the repertoire and function of integral membrane proteins of intracellular organelles. In looking for novel classes of genes that are functionally important to hematopoietic cells, we have cloned the cDNA for a gene preferentially expressed in adult hematopoietic tissues. During embryonic development the gene is expressed in both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic tissues. In cell lines the gene is expressed specifically in hematopoietic lineages, whereas in normal adult tissues the mRNA is preferentially detected at high levels in lymphoid and myeloid tissues. The predicted protein is a pentaspanner with no homology to known genes and conserved across evolution. Immunocytological and cell fractionation studies with a specific antibody revealed a protein localizing in lysosomes. The gene, provisionally named LAPTM5, maps to chromosome 1p34. The expression pattern of the gene together with preliminary evidence that the protein interacts with ubiquitin indicates that the protein may have a special functional role during embryogenesis and in adult hematopoietic cells. 53 refs., 9 figs.

  6. Purification of Human and Mammalian Membrane Proteins Expressed in Xenopus laevis Frog Oocytes for Structural Studies.

    PubMed

    Boggavarapu, Rajendra; Hirschi, Stephan; Harder, Daniel; Meury, Marcel; Ucurum, Zöhre; Bergeron, Marc J; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes the isolation of recombinant human and mammalian membrane proteins expressed in Xenopus laevis frog oocytes for structural studies. The cDNA-derived cRNA of the desired genes is injected into several hundreds of oocytes, which are incubated for several days to allow protein expression. Recombinant proteins are then purified via affinity chromatography. The novelty of this method comes from the design of a plasmid that produces multi-tagged proteins and, most importantly, the development of a protocol for efficiently discarding lipids, phospholipids, and lipoproteins from the oocyte egg yolk, which represent the major contaminants in protein purifications. Thus, the high protein purity and good yield obtained from this method allows protein structure determination by transmission electron microscopy of single detergent-solubilized protein particles and of 2D crystals of membrane protein embedded in lipid bilayers. Additionally, a radiotracer assay for functional analysis of the expressed target proteins in oocytes is described. Overall, this method is a valuable option for structural studies of mammalian and particularly human proteins, for which other expression systems often fail. PMID:27485339

  7. Expression of recombinant dystrophin and its localization to the cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Lee, C C; Pearlman, J A; Chamberlain, J S; Caskey, C T

    1991-01-24

    Duchenne's muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked progressive myopathy caused by a defect in the DMD gene locus. The gene corresponding to the DMD locus produces a 14-kilobase (kb) messenger RNA that codes for a large cytoskeletal membrane protein, dystrophin. DMD and Becker's muscular dystrophy are the consequences of dystrophin mutations. The exact biological function of dystrophin remains unknown but it has been demonstrated that it is localized to the cytoplasmic face of the cell membrane and has direct interaction with several other membrane proteins. We report here the synthesis of a 14-kb full-length complementary DNA for the mouse muscle dystrophin mRNA and the expression of this cDNA in COS cells. The recombinant dystrophin is indistinguishable from mouse muscle dystrophin by western blot analysis with anti-dystrophin antibodies and was shown by an immunofluorescent technique to be localized in the cell membrane. Our successful construction of a functional full-length cDNA opens opportunities for the study of structure and function of dystrophin and provides an opportunity to initiate gene therapy studies. PMID:1824797

  8. Expression of the axonal membrane glycoprotein M6a is regulated by chronic stress.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Ben; Fuchs, Eberhard; Flügge, Gabriele

    2009-01-01

    It has been repeatedly shown that chronic stress changes dendrites, spines and modulates expression of synaptic molecules. These effects all may impair information transfer between neurons. The present study shows that chronic stress also regulates expression of M6a, a glycoprotein which is localised in axonal membranes. We have previously demonstrated that M6a is a component of glutamatergic axons. The present data reveal that it is the splice variant M6a-Ib, not M6a-Ia, which is strongly expressed in the brain. Chronic stress in male rats (3 weeks daily restraint) has regional effects: quantitative in situ hybridization demonstrated that M6a-Ib mRNA in dentate gyrus granule neurons and in CA3 pyramidal neurons is downregulated, whereas M6a-Ib mRNA in the medial prefrontal cortex is upregulated by chronic stress. This is the first study showing that expression of an axonal membrane molecule is differentially affected by stress in a region-dependent manner. Therefore, one may speculate that diminished expression of the glycoprotein in the hippocampus leads to altered output in the corresponding cortical projection areas. Enhanced M6a-Ib expression in the medial prefrontal cortex (in areas prelimbic and infralimbic cortex) might be interpreted as a compensatory mechanism in response to changes in axonal projections from the hippocampus. Our findings provide evidence that in addition to alterations in dendrites and spines chronic stress also changes the integrity of axons and may thus impair information transfer even between distant brain regions. PMID:19180239

  9. The γ3 Chain of Laminin is Widely But Differentially Expressed in Murine Basement Membranes: Expression and Functional Studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong N.; Radner, Stephanie; French, Margaret M.; Pinzón-Duarte, Germán; Daly, Gerard H.; Burgeson, Robert E.; Koch, Manuel; Brunken, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Laminins are heterotrimeric extracellular glycoproteins found in, but not confined to, basement membranes (BMs). They are important components in formation of the molecular networks of BMs as well as in cell polarity, cell differentiation and tissue morphogenesis. Each laminin is composed by an α, a β and a γ chain. Previous studies have shown that the γ3 chain is partnered with either the β1 chain (in placenta) or β2 chain (in the CNS) (Libby et al., 2000). Several studies, including our own, suggested that the γ3 chain is expressed in both apical and basal compartments (Gersdorff et al., 2005; Koch et al., 1999; Yan and Cheng, 2006). This study investigates the expression pattern of the γ3 chain in mouse. We developed three new γ3-reactive antibodies, and we show that the γ3 chain is present in BMs. The distribution pattern is considerably more restricted than that of the γ1 chain and within any tissue there is differential deposition into BM compartments. This is particularly true in the retina and brain, where γ3 is uniquely expressed in a subset of the vascular basement membranes and the pial surface. We used conventional genetic ablation techniques to remove the γ3 chain in mice; unlike other laminin null mice (α5, β2, γ1 nulls) (Miner et al., 1998; Noakes et al., 1995; Smyth et al., 1999), these mice live a normal lifespan and have only minor abnormalities, the most striking of which are ectopic granule cells in the cerebellum and an apparent increase in capillary branching in the outer retina. These data support the suggestion that the γ3 chain is deposited in BMs and contributes some unique properties to their function, particularly in the nervous system. PMID:22222602

  10. Progesterone, Inflammatory Cytokine (TNF-α), and Oxidative Stress (H2O2) Regulate Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1 Expression in Fetal Membrane Cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yan; Murtha, Amy P; Feng, Liping

    2016-09-01

    Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) is an important novel mediator of progesterone (P4) function in fetal membrane cells. We demonstrated previously that PGRMC1 is differentially expressed in fetal membranes among pregnancy subjects and diminished in preterm premature rupture of membrane subjects. In the current study, we aim to elucidate whether PGRMC1 expression is regulated by P4, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and H2O2 in fetal membrane cells. Primary cultured membrane cells were serum starved for 24 hours followed by treatments of P4, 17 hydroxyprogesterone caproate, and medroxyprogesterone 17 acetate (MPA) at 10(-7) mol/L with ethanol as vehicle control; TNF-α at 10, 20, and 50 ng/mL with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) as control; and H2O2 at 10 and 100 μmol/L with culture media as control for 24, 48, and 72 hours. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression of PGRMC1 was quantified using polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively. We found that PGRMC1 protein expression was regulated by MPA, TNF-α, and H2O2 in a dose-dependent manner. This regulation is also specific to the type of cell (amnion, chorion, or decidua). The upregulation of PGRMC1 by MPA might be mediated through glucocorticoid receptor (GR) demonstrated using amnion and chorion cells model with GR knockdown by specific small interfering RNA transfection. The mRNA expression of PGRMC1 was decreased by H2O2 (100 μmol/L) treatment in amnion cells, which might ultimately result in downregulation of PGRMC1 protein as our data demonstrated. None of other treatments changed PGRMC1 mRNA level in these cells. We conclude that these stimuli act as regulatory factors of PGRMC1 in a cell-specific manner. PMID:26919974

  11. Differential Regulation of Membrane CD14 Expression and Endotoxin-Tolerance in Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shu-Min; Frevert, Charles W.; Kajikawa, Osamu; Wurfel, Mark M.; Ballman, Kimberly; Mongovin, Stephen; Wong, Venus A.; Selk, Amy; Martin, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY CD14 is important in the clearance of bacterial pathogens from lungs. However, the mechanisms that regulate the expression of membrane CD14 (mCD14) on alveolar macrophages (AM) have not been studied in detail. This study examines the regulation of mCD14 on AM exposed to Escherichia coli in vivo and in vitro and explores the consequences of changes in mCD14 expression. The expression of mCD14 was decreased on AM exposed to E. coli in vivo and AM incubated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or E. coli in vitro. Polymyxin B abolished LPS effects but only partially blocked the effects of E. coli. Blockade of extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathways attenuated LPS and E. coli-induced decrease in mCD14 expression. Inhibition of proteases abrogated the LPS-induced decrease in mCD14 expression on AM and the release of sCD14 into the supernatants, but did not affect the response to E. coli. The production of TNF-α in response to a second challenge with Staphylococcus aureus or zymosan was decreased in AM following incubation with E. coli but not LPS. These studies show that distinct mechanisms regulate the expression of mCD14 and the induction of endotoxin-tolerance in AM and suggest that AM function is impaired at sites of bacterial infection. PMID:15059784

  12. Erythroid 5-aminolevulinate synthase mediates the upregulation of membrane band 3 protein expression by iron.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qianchuan; Li, Jinying; Feng, Weihua; Xu, Yanqun; Huang, Zhenxia; Lv, Shuqing; Zhou, Hong; Gao, Lei

    2010-03-01

    Iron deficiency leads to abnormal expression and function of band 3 protein in erythrocytes, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. The mRNA of erythroid-specific 5-aminolevulinate synthase (eALAS) contains an iron response element and the eALAS protein is an important mediator of iron utilization by erythrocytes. In this study, we investigated the effect of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) mediated silencing of eALAS on the expression of band 3 protein induced by iron. By real-time RT-PCR and Western blot we showed that at mRNA and protein level iron-induced expression of band 3 protein was lower in eALAS-shRNA transfected K562 cells than in control cells. Of note, the lowest expression was detected in K562 cells cultured in iron deficiency condition (p < 0.01). Thus either iron deficiency or depletion of eALAS could suppress the expression of erythroid band 3 protein. These results demonstrated for the first time that iron and the iron-regulatory system regulate the expression of the erythrocyte membrane proteins. PMID:20087844

  13. Susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates to ceftazidime is unrelated to the expression of the outer membrane protein OprC.

    PubMed

    Pérez, F J; Navarro, D; Gimeno, C; García-de-Lomas, J

    1997-01-01

    Previously, it has been postulated that the porin OprC facilitates the diffusion of ceftazidime through the outer membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To further investigate this claim, the outer membrane protein (OMP) profiles of 22 ceftazidime-susceptible clinical isolates were analyzed. No correlation was found between MIC values and the level of expression of OprC. Further, OprC was either undetectable or expressed in reduced amounts in 12 isolates. In contrast, OprF and OprE were present in all isolates studied. This study suggests that OprC is dispensable for the permeation of ceftazidime through the outer membrane of P. aeruginosa. PMID:8996738

  14. Proteomic analysis of Lawsonia intracellularis reveals expression of outer membrane proteins during infection.

    PubMed

    Watson, Eleanor; Alberdi, M Pilar; Inglis, Neil F; Lainson, Alex; Porter, Megan E; Manson, Erin; Imrie, Lisa; Mclean, Kevin; Smith, David G E

    2014-12-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is the aetiological agent of the commercially significant porcine disease, proliferative enteropathy. Current understanding of host-pathogen interaction is limited due to the fastidious microaerophilic obligate intracellular nature of the bacterium. In the present study, expression of bacterial proteins during infection was investigated using a mass spectrometry approach. LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of two isolates of L. intracellularis from heavily-infected epithelial cell cultures and database mining using fully annotated L. intracellularis genome sequences identified 19 proteins. According to the Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) functional classification, proteins were identified with roles in cell metabolism, protein synthesis and oxidative stress protection; seven proteins with putative or unknown function were also identified. Detailed bioinformatic analyses of five uncharacterised proteins, which were expressed by both isolates, identified domains and motifs common to other outer membrane-associated proteins with important roles in pathogenesis including adherence and invasion. Analysis of recombinant proteins on Western blots using immune sera from L. intracellularis-infected pigs identified two proteins, LI0841 and LI0902 as antigenic. The detection of five outer membrane proteins expressed during infection, including two antigenic proteins, demonstrates the potential of this approach to interrogate L. intracellularis host-pathogen interactions and identify novel targets which may be exploited in disease control. PMID:25457368

  15. Expression, localisation and phylogeny of a novel family of plant-specific membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kasaras, A; Kunze, R

    2010-09-01

    In a screen for senescence-associated genes in Arabidopsis thaliana, a novel, highly up-regulated membrane protein was identified. It is a member of an uncharacterised, strictly plant-specific gene family and was named AtDMP1 (Arabidopsis thaliana DUF679 domain membrane protein 1). The AtDMP proteins are predicted to have four transmembrane spans, with cytosolic amino- and carboxy-termini. In this study, we investigated the phylogenetic distribution of DMP proteins, their tissue-specific expression and subcellular localisation in A. thaliana. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Physcomitrella patens genomes in dicots contain only a single DMP gene copy, whereas there are five to 13 DMP genes and 11-16 in monocots, many of which supposedly result from recent gene duplications. The ubiquitous occurrence of DMP proteins in green plants and their absence from other kingdoms suggest a role in plant-specific processes. In A. thaliana, expression of nine out of ten DMP genes was detected. The expression patterns were found to be markedly tissue- and development-specific; thus, functional redundancy of most proteins is unlikely. The occurrence of several AtDMPs in tissues undergoing senescence (AtDMP1, -3, -4), dehiscence (AtDMP7) or abscission (AtDMP2, -4, -7) suggests involvement of DMPs in different types of programmed cell death. AtDMP-eGFP fusion proteins were found to localise either to the endoplasmic reticulum, the tonoplast or, under certain conditions, to both membrane systems. Further investigations are in progress to elucidate functions of the AtDMP proteins. PMID:20712629

  16. A Conserved Motif in the Membrane Proximal C-Terminal Tail of Human Muscarinic M1 Acetylcholine Receptors Affects Plasma Membrane Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ehlert, Frederick J.; Shults, Crystal A.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the functional role of a conserved motif, F(x)6LL, in the membrane proximal C-tail of the human muscarinic M1 (hM1) receptor. By use of site-directed mutagenesis, several different point mutations were introduced into the C-tail sequence 423FRDTFRLLL431. Wild-type and mutant hM1 receptors were transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, and the amount of plasma membrane-expressed receptor was determined by use of intact, whole-cell [3H]N-methylscopolamine binding assays. The plasma membrane expression of hM1 receptors possessing either L430A or L431A or both point mutations was significantly reduced compared with the wild type. The hM1 receptor possessing a L430A/L431A double-point mutation was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and atropine treatment caused the redistribution of the mutant receptor from the ER to the plasma membrane. Atropine treatment also caused an increase in the maximal response and potency of carbachol-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis elicited by the L430A/L431A mutant. The effect of atropine on the L430A/L431A receptor mutant suggests that L430 and L431 play a role in folding hM1 receptors, which is necessary for exit from the ER. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we also identified amino acid residues at the base of transmembrane-spanning domain 1 (TM1), V46 and L47, that, when mutated, reduce the plasma membrane expression of hM1 receptors in an atropine-reversible manner. Overall, these mutagenesis data show that amino acid residues in the membrane-proximal C-tail and base of TM1 are necessary for hM1 receptors to achieve a transport-competent state. PMID:19841475

  17. Prostate-specific membrane antigen protein expression in tumor tissue and risk of lethal prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kasperzyk, Julie L.; Finn, Stephen P.; Flavin, Richard; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Lis, Rosina; Hendrickson, Whitney K.; Clinton, Steven K.; Sesso, Howard D.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Stampfer, Meir J.; Loda, Massimo; Mucci, Lorelei A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Over-expression of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) in tumor tissue and serum has been linked to increased risk of biochemical recurrence in surgically treated prostate cancer patients, but no studies have assessed its association with disease-specific mortality. Methods We examined whether high PSMA protein expression in prostate tumor tissue was associated with lethal disease, and with tumor biomarkers of progression, among participants of two US-based cohorts (n=902, diagnosed 1983–2004). We used Cox proportional hazards regression to calculate multivariable hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of lethal prostate cancer, defined as disease-specific death or development of distant metastases (n=95). Partial Spearman rank correlation coefficients were used to correlate PSMA with tumor biomarkers. Results During an average 13 years of follow-up, higher PSMA expression at prostatectomy was significantly associated with lethal prostate cancer (age-adjusted HRQuartile(Q)4vs.Q1=2.42; p-trend<0.01). This association was attenuated and non-significant (multivariable-adjusted HRQ4vs.Q1=1.01; p-trend=0.52) after further adjusting for Gleason score and PSA at diagnosis. High PSMA expression was significantly (p<0.05) correlated with higher Gleason score and PSA at diagnosis, increased tumor angiogenesis, lower vitamin D receptor and androgen receptor expression, and absence of ERG expression. Conclusions High tumor PSMA expression was not an independent predictor of lethal prostate cancer in the current study. PSMA expression likely captures, in part, malignant features of Gleason grade and tumor angiogenesis. Impact PSMA is not a strong candidate biomarker for predicting prostate cancer-specific mortality in surgically treated patients. PMID:24130224

  18. Microsomal membrane proteome of low grade diffuse astrocytomas: Differentially expressed proteins and candidate surveillance biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Polisetty, Ravindra Varma; Gautam, Poonam; Gupta, Manoj Kumar; Sharma, Rakesh; Gowda, Harsha; Renu, Durairaj; Shivakumar, Bhadravathi Marigowda; Lakshmikantha, Akhila; Mariswamappa, Kiran; Ankathi, Praveen; Purohit, Aniruddh K.; Uppin, Megha S.; Sundaram, Challa; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse astrocytoma (DA; WHO grade II) is a low-grade, primary brain neoplasm with high potential of recurrence as higher grade malignant form. We have analyzed differentially expressed membrane proteins from these tumors, using high-resolution mass spectrometry. A total of 2803 proteins were identified, 340 of them differentially expressed with minimum of 2 fold change and based on ≥2 unique peptides. Bioinformatics analysis of this dataset also revealed important molecular networks and pathways relevant to tumorigenesis, mTOR signaling pathway being a major pathway identified. Comparison of 340 differentially expressed proteins with the transcript data from Grade II diffuse astrocytomas reported earlier, revealed about 190 of the proteins correlate in their trends in expression. Considering progressive and recurrent nature of these tumors, we have mapped the differentially expressed proteins for their secretory potential, integrated the resulting list with similar list of proteins from anaplastic astrocytoma (WHO Grade III) tumors and provide a panel of proteins along with their proteotypic peptides, as a resource that would be useful for investigation as circulatory plasma markers for post-treatment surveillance of DA patients. PMID:27246909

  19. Microsomal membrane proteome of low grade diffuse astrocytomas: Differentially expressed proteins and candidate surveillance biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Polisetty, Ravindra Varma; Gautam, Poonam; Gupta, Manoj Kumar; Sharma, Rakesh; Gowda, Harsha; Renu, Durairaj; Shivakumar, Bhadravathi Marigowda; Lakshmikantha, Akhila; Mariswamappa, Kiran; Ankathi, Praveen; Purohit, Aniruddh K; Uppin, Megha S; Sundaram, Challa; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse astrocytoma (DA; WHO grade II) is a low-grade, primary brain neoplasm with high potential of recurrence as higher grade malignant form. We have analyzed differentially expressed membrane proteins from these tumors, using high-resolution mass spectrometry. A total of 2803 proteins were identified, 340 of them differentially expressed with minimum of 2 fold change and based on ≥2 unique peptides. Bioinformatics analysis of this dataset also revealed important molecular networks and pathways relevant to tumorigenesis, mTOR signaling pathway being a major pathway identified. Comparison of 340 differentially expressed proteins with the transcript data from Grade II diffuse astrocytomas reported earlier, revealed about 190 of the proteins correlate in their trends in expression. Considering progressive and recurrent nature of these tumors, we have mapped the differentially expressed proteins for their secretory potential, integrated the resulting list with similar list of proteins from anaplastic astrocytoma (WHO Grade III) tumors and provide a panel of proteins along with their proteotypic peptides, as a resource that would be useful for investigation as circulatory plasma markers for post-treatment surveillance of DA patients. PMID:27246909

  20. Increased aquaporin 1 and 5 membrane expression in the lens epithelium of cataract patients.

    PubMed

    Barandika, Olatz; Ezquerra-Inchausti, Maitane; Anasagasti, Ander; Vallejo-Illarramendi, Ainara; Llarena, Irantzu; Bascaran, Lucia; Alberdi, Txomin; De Benedetti, Giacomo; Mendicute, Javier; Ruiz-Ederra, Javier

    2016-10-01

    In this work we have analyzed the expression levels of the main aquaporins (AQPs) expressed in human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) using 112 samples from patients treated with cataract surgery and 36 samples from individuals treated with refractive surgery, with transparent lenses as controls. Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is the main AQP, representing 64.1% of total AQPs in HLECs, with aquaporin-5 (AQP5) representing 35.9% in controls. A similar proportion of each AQP in cataract was found. Although no differences were found at the mRNA level compared to controls, a significant 1.65-fold increase (p=0.001) in AQP1protein expression was observed in HLECs from cataract patients, with the highest differences being found for nuclear cataracts (2.1-fold increase; p<0.001). A similar trend was found for AQP5 (1.47-fold increase), although the difference was not significant (p=0.161). Moreover we have shown increased membrane AQP5 protein expression in HLECs of patients with cataracts. No association of AQP1 or AQP5 expression levels with age or sex was observed in either group. Our results suggest regulation of AQP1 and AQP5 at the post-translational level and support previous observations on the implication of AQP1 and 5 in maintenance of lens transparency in animal models. Our results likely reflect a compensatory response of the crystalline lens to delay cataract formation by increasing the water removal rate. PMID:27497833

  1. Organic micropollutants in aerobic and anaerobic membrane bioreactors: Changes in microbial communities and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Harb, Moustapha; Wei, Chun-Hai; Wang, Nan; Amy, Gary; Hong, Pei-Ying

    2016-10-01

    Organic micro-pollutants (OMPs) are contaminants of emerging concern in wastewater treatment due to the risk of their proliferation into the environment, but their impact on the biological treatment process is not well understood. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of the presence of OMPs on the core microbial populations of wastewater treatment. Two nanofiltration-coupled membrane bioreactors (aerobic and anaerobic) were subjected to the same operating conditions while treating synthetic municipal wastewater spiked with OMPs. Microbial community dynamics, gene expression levels, and antibiotic resistance genes were analyzed using molecular-based approaches. Results showed that presence of OMPs in the wastewater feed had a clear effect on keystone bacterial populations in both the aerobic and anaerobic sludge while also significantly impacting biodegradation-associated gene expression levels. Finally, multiple antibiotic-type OMPs were found to have higher removal rates in the anaerobic MBR, while associated antibiotic resistance genes were lower. PMID:27441825

  2. Heterologous Expression and Purification Systems for Structural Proteomics of Mammalian Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Membrane proteins (MPs) are responsible for the interface between the exterior and the interior of the cell. These proteins are implicated in numerous diseases, such as cancer, cystic fibrosis, epilepsy, hyperinsulinism, heart failure, hypertension and Alzheimer's disease. However, studies on these disorders are hampered by a lack of structural information about the proteins involved. Structural analysis requires large quantities of pure and active proteins. The majority of medically and pharmaceutically relevant MPs are present in tissues at very low concentration, which makes heterologous expression in large-scale production-adapted cells a prerequisite for structural studies. Obtaining mammalian MP structural data depends on the development of methods that allow the production of large quantities of MPs. This review focuses on the different heterologous expression systems, and the purification strategies, used to produce large amounts of pure mammalian MPs for structural proteomics. PMID:18629259

  3. Expression and characterization of plasma membrane aquaporins in stomatal complexes of Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Heinen, Robert B; Bienert, Gerd Patrick; Cohen, David; Chevalier, Adrien S; Uehlein, Norbert; Hachez, Charles; Kaldenhoff, Ralf; Le Thiec, Didier; Chaumont, François

    2014-10-01

    Stomata, the microscopic pores on the surface of the aerial parts of plants, are bordered by two specialized cells, known as guard cells, which control the stomatal aperture according to endogenous and environmental signals. Like most movements occurring in plants, the opening and closing of stomata are based on hydraulic forces. During opening, the activation of plasma membrane and tonoplast transporters results in solute accumulation in the guard cells. To re-establish the perturbed osmotic equilibrium, water follows the solutes into the cells, leading to their swelling. Numerous studies have contributed to the understanding of the mechanism and regulation of stomatal movements. However, despite the importance of transmembrane water flow during this process, only a few studies have provided evidence for the involvement of water channels, called aquaporins. Here, we microdissected Zea mays stomatal complexes and showed that members of the aquaporin plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) subfamily are expressed in these complexes and that their mRNA expression generally follows a diurnal pattern. The substrate specificity of two of the expressed ZmPIPs, ZmPIP1;5 and ZmPIP1;6, was investigated by heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes and yeast cells. Our data show that both isoforms facilitate transmembrane water diffusion in the presence of the ZmPIP2;1 isoform. In addition, both display CO2 permeability comparable to that of the CO2 diffusion facilitator NtAQP1. These data indicate that ZmPIPs may have various physiological roles in stomatal complexes. PMID:25082269

  4. Ankyrin and band 3 differentially affect expression of membrane glycoproteins but are not required for erythroblast enucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Peng; Lodish, Harvey F.

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ankyrin and band 3 are not required for erythroblasts enucleation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Loss of ankyrin does not affect erythroid membrane glycoprotein expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Loss of band 3 influences erythroid membrane glycoprotein expression. -- Abstract: During late stages of mammalian erythropoiesis the nucleus undergoes chromatin condensation, migration to the plasma membrane, and extrusion from the cytoplasm surrounded by a segment of plasma membrane. Since nuclear condensation occurs in all vertebrates, mammalian erythroid membrane and cytoskeleton proteins were implicated as playing important roles in mediating the movement and extrusion of the nucleus. Here we use erythroid ankyrin deficient and band 3 knockout mouse models to show that band 3, but not ankyrin, plays an important role in regulating the level of erythroid cell membrane proteins, as evidenced by decreased cell surface expression of glycophorin A in band 3 knockout mice. However, neither band 3 nor ankyrin are required for enucleation. These results demonstrate that mammalian erythroblast enucleation does not depend on the membrane integrity generated by the ankyrin-band 3 complex.

  5. Cell-based capacitance sensor for analysis of EGFR expression on cell membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dong-Myeong; Shin, Yong-Cheol; Ha, Ji Hye; Lee, Jong-Ho; Han, Dong-Wook; Kim, Jong-Man; Kim, Hyung Kook; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2013-02-01

    Cancer cells have many kinds of cancer biomarkers. Among them, the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors can show a possibility for a cancer marker because the over-expression of EGF receptor is related with fibrous, colorectal, cervical and gastric tumorigenesis. We fabricated the capacitance sensor with a gap area of 50 μm × 200 μm by using photolithography and lift-off method. Using the capacitance sensor, we investigated the time dependent capacitance changes of different kinds of fibrous cells, such as HT1080 fibrosarcoma, L-929 fibroblast cell line and nHDF dermal fibroblast primary cell. We found that when we put the EGF, the capacitance decreased due to the immobilization of EGF to EGF receptor on the cell membrane. The quantitative determination of EGF receptor level for various fibrous cells was carried out and the results showed good correlation with conventional method. Based on our results, we suggest that the capacitance sensor can measure the expression level of the EGF receptor on cell membrane and be a good candidate as a cancer diagnosis.

  6. Potassium-dependent changes in the expression of membrane-associated proteins in barley roots

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando, M.; Kulpa, J.; Siddiqi, M.Y.; Glass, A.D.M. )

    1990-04-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Halcyon) seedlings which has been grown in full strength complete inorganic nutrient media (containing 6 millimolar K{sup +}) had high internal K{sup +} concentrations and low values of K{sup +} ({sup 86}Rb{sup +}) influx when influx was measured from solutions containing 100 micromolar K{sup +}. Transfer of these plants to solutions lacking K{sup +} resulted in significant reductions of root and shoot K{sup +} concentrations and values of K{sup +} ({sup 86}Rb{sup +}) influx increased by greater than 10-fold within 3 days. When plants treated in this way were returned to complete solutions, containing K{sup +}, the changes induced by K{sup +} deprivation were reversed. Parallel studies of microsomal membranes by means of SDS-PAGE demonstrated that the expression of a group of polypeptides increased or decreased in parallel with changes of K{sup +} ({sup 86}Rb{sup +}) influx. Most prominent of these were 45 and 34 kilodalton polypeptides which specifically responded to K{sup +} status of the barley plants; their expression was not enhanced by N or P deprivation. The 45 kilodalton polypeptide was susceptible to degradation by a membrane associated protease when microsomes were washing in buffer containing 0.2 millimolar PMSF. This loss was prevented by increasing PMSF concentration to 2 millimolar.

  7. Expression and functional analysis of the rice plasma-membrane intrinsic protein gene family.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lei; Wang, Zi Yi; Lin, Hong; Cui, Wei Er; Chen, Jun; Liu, Meihua; Chen, Zhang Liang; Qu, Li Jia; Gu, Hongya

    2006-03-01

    Plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) are a subfamily of aquaporins that enable fast and controlled translocation of water across the membrane. In this study, we systematically identified and cloned ten PIP genes from rice. Based on the similarity of the amino acid sequences they encoded, these rice PIP genes were classified into two groups and designated as OsPIP1-1 to OsPIP1-3 and OsPIP2-1 to OsPIP2-7 following the nomenclature of PIP genes in maize. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis identified three root-specific and one leaf-specific OsPIP genes. Furthermore, the expression profile of each OsPIP gene in response to salt, drought and ABA treatment was examined in detail. Analysis on transgenic plants over-expressing of either OsPIP1 (OsPIP1-1) or OsPIP2 (OsPIP2-2) in wild-type Arabidopsis, showed enhanced tolerance to salt (100 mM of NaCl) and drought (200 mM of mannitol), but not to salt treatment of higher concentration (150 mM of NaCl). Taken together, these data suggest a distinct role of each OsPIP gene in response to different stresses, and should add a new layer to the understanding of the physiological function of rice PIP genes. PMID:16541126

  8. Sequence analysis and recombinant expression of a 28-kilodalton Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum rare outer membrane protein (Tromp2).

    PubMed Central

    Champion, C I; Blanco, D R; Exner, M M; Erdjument-Bromage, H; Hancock, R E; Tempst, P; Miller, J N; Lovett, M A

    1997-01-01

    In this study, we report the cloning, sequencing, and expression of the gene encoding a 28-kDa Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum rare outer membrane protein (TROMP), designated Tromp2. The tromp2 gene encodes a precursor protein of 242 amino acids including a putative signal peptide of 24 amino acids ending in a type I signal peptidase cleavage site of Leu-Ala-Ala. The mature protein of 218 amino acids has a calculated molecular weight of 24,759 and a calculated pI of 7.3. The predicted secondary structure of Tromp2 shows nine transmembrane segments of amphipathic beta-sheets typical of outer membrane proteins. Recombinant Tromp2 (rTromp2) was expressed with its native signal peptide, using a tightly regulated T7 RNA polymerase expression vector. Under high-level expression conditions, rTromp2 fractionated exclusively with the Escherichia coli outer membrane. Antiserum raised against rTromp2 was generated and used to identify native Tromp2 in cellular fractionations. Following Triton X-114 extraction and phase separation of T. pallidum, the 28-kDa Tromp2 protein was detected prominently in the detergent phase. Alkali and high-salt treatment of purified outer membrane from T. pallidum, conditions which remove peripherally associated membrane proteins, demonstrated that Tromp2 is an integral membrane protein. Whole-mount immunoelectron microscopy of E. coli cells expressing rTromp2 showed specific surface antibody binding. These findings demonstrate that Tromp2 is a membrane-spanning outer membrane protein, the second such protein to be identified for T. pallidum. PMID:9023206

  9. Effect of UV irradiation on expression of membrane IL 1 by rat macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Lange-Wantzin, G.; Rothlein, R.; Kahn, J.; Faanes, R.B.

    1987-06-01

    The effect of UV-B irradiation on the expression of membrane-associated IL 1 (mIL 1) by rat pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) was studied. We found that although there was an increase in secreted IL 1 by PAM exposed to UV-B, the expression of mIL 1 was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, PAM that were allowed to express mIL 1 before UV-B irradiation had a faster decay of mIL 1 activity than unirradiated cells. These data suggested that mIL 1 expression is inhibited by UV-B irradiation, and that under normal circumstances, mIL 1 synthesis and degradation is at a steady state, with the half-life of mIL 1 activity being 24 hr when assayed in an IL 1-dependent cell line proliferation assay. These data indicate that secreted forms of IL 1 and mIL 1 are differentially regulated and that the therapeutic effects of UV irradiation may be due to its inhibition of mIL 1 activity.

  10. Differential expression of epithelial basement membrane components nidogens and perlecan in corneal stromal cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Santhanam, Abirami; Torricelli, Andre A. M.; Wu, Jiahui; Marino, Gustavo K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the expression of corneal epithelial basement membrane (EBM) components in different corneal stromal cell types. In vitro model systems were used to explore the expression of EBM components nidogen-1, nidogen-2, and perlecan that are the primary components in the lamina lucida and the lamina densa that defectively regenerate in corneas with stromal opacity after in −9.0 D photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). Methods Primary rabbit corneal stromal cells were cultured using varying serum concentrations and exogenous growth factors, including fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, to optimize the growth of each cell type of interest. The expression of the keratocyte-specific marker keratocan and the myofibroblast-specific marker α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) were analyzed with real-time PCR, western blot, and immunocytochemical staining to evaluate the specificity of the cell types and select optimal conditions (high keratocan and low α-SMA for keratocytes; low keratocan and high α-SMA for myofibroblasts; low keratocan and low α-SMA for corneal fibroblasts). The expression of the EBM components nidogen-1, nidogen-2, and perlecan was evaluated in each corneal cell type using real-time PCR, immunostaining, and western blotting. In agreement with previous studies, serum-free DMEM was found to be optimal for keratocytes, DMEM with 10% serum and 40 ng/ml FGF-2 yielded the best marker profile for corneal fibroblasts, and DMEM with 1% serum and 2 ng/ml TGF-β1 was found to be optimal for myofibroblasts. Results Nidogen-1 and nidogen-2 mRNAs were highly expressed in keratocytes, whereas perlecan was highly expressed in myofibroblasts. In keratocytes, nidogen-2 and perlecan proteins were expressed predominantly in intracellular compartments, whereas in myofibroblasts expression of both EBM components was observed diffusely throughout the cell. Although the perlecan mRNA levels were high

  11. Prognostic Significance of EBV Latent Membrane Protein 1 Expression in Lymphomas: Evidence from 15 Studies

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yuan; Lu, Mei Ping; Lin, Hong; Zhang, Da Wei; Liu, Ying; Li, Qing Dong; Lv, Zhi Gang; Xu, Jia Ren; Chen, Ren Jie; Zhu, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Background Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection has been associated with lymphoma development. EBV latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is essential for EBV-mediated transformation and progression of different human cells, including lymphocytes. This meta-analysis investigated LMP1 expression with prognosis of patients with lymphoma. Methods The electronic databases of PubMed, Embase, and Chinese Biomedicine Databases were searched. There were 15 published studies available for a random effects model analysis. Quality assessment was performed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale for cohort studies. A funnel plot was used to investigate publication bias, and sources of heterogeneity were identified by meta-regression analysis. The combined hazard ratios (HR) and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals of LMP1 expression were calculated by comparison to the overall survival. Results Overall, there was no statistical significance found between LMP1 expression and survival of lymphoma patients (HR 1.25 [95% CI, 0.92–1.68]). In subgroup analyses, LMP1 expression was associated with survival in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) (HR  = 1.84, 95% CI: 1.02–3.34), but not with survival of patients with Hodgkin disease (HD) (HR  =  1.03, 95% CI: 0.74–1.44). In addition, significant heterogeneity was present and the meta-regression revealed that the outcome of analysis was mainly influenced by the cutoff value. Conclusions This meta-analysis demonstrated that LMP1 expression appears to be an unfavorable prognostic factor for overall survival of NHL patients. The data suggested that EBV infection and LMP1 expression may be an important factor for NHL development or progression. PMID:23613723

  12. Intraepidermal expression of basement membrane components in the lesional skin of a patient with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, T; Ko, T; Honoki, K; Hatoko, M; Shirai, T; Vnittanakom, P

    1999-02-01

    The patient was a 15-year-old male. Since birth, he had developed blistering and erosion of the skin. Biopsy skin specimen of the bullous lesions showed subepidermal blister formation. Electron microscopic examination revealed that tissue separation had occurred at the sublamina densa level. By indirect immunofluorescence using antibodies specific for alpha 6 integrin, laminin 5, type IV collagen, and type VII collagen, all of these basement membrane components were detected as coarse granular intracytoplasmic deposits only in the basal and suprabasal cells of the blister roof. In the non-blistered regions, these basement membrane components showed a linear pattern similar to that seen in normal skin. These findings suggest that intraepidermal expression of basement membrane components was closely related to the blister formation. The biological meaning of intraepidermal expression of basement membrane components were also discussed. PMID:10091480

  13. Proteomic Analysis of the Rat Canalicular Membrane Reveals Expression of a Complex System of P4-ATPases in Liver

    PubMed Central

    Chaubey, Pururawa Mayank; Hofstetter, Lia; Roschitzki, Bernd; Stieger, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Transport processes in the canalicular membrane are key elements in bile formation and are the driving force of the enterohepatic circulation of bile salts. The canalicular membrane is constantly exposed to the detergent action of bile salts. One potential element protecting the canalicular membrane from the high canalicular bile salt concentrations may be bile salt resistant microdomains, however additional factors are likely to play a role. To obtain more insights into the molecular composition of the canalicular membrane, the proteome of highly purified rat canalicular membrane vesicles was determined. Isolated rat canalicular membrane vesicles were stripped from adhering proteins, deglycosylated and protease digested before subjecting the samples to shot gun proteomic analysis. The expression of individual candidates was studied by PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. A total of 2449 proteins were identified, of which 1282 were predicted to be membrane proteins. About 50% of the proteins identified here were absent from previously published liver proteomes. In addition to ATP8B1, four more P4-ATPases were identified. ATP8A1 and ATP9A showed expression specific to the canalicular membrane, ATP11C at the bLPM and ATP11A in an intracellular vesicular compartment partially colocalizing with RAB7A and EEA1 as markers of the endosomal compartment. This study helped to identify additional P4-ATPases from rat liver particularly in the canalicular membrane, previously not known to be expressed in liver. These P4-ATPases might be contributing for maintaining transmembrane lipid homeostasis in hepatocytes. PMID:27347675

  14. Proteomic Analysis of the Rat Canalicular Membrane Reveals Expression of a Complex System of P4-ATPases in Liver.

    PubMed

    Chaubey, Pururawa Mayank; Hofstetter, Lia; Roschitzki, Bernd; Stieger, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Transport processes in the canalicular membrane are key elements in bile formation and are the driving force of the enterohepatic circulation of bile salts. The canalicular membrane is constantly exposed to the detergent action of bile salts. One potential element protecting the canalicular membrane from the high canalicular bile salt concentrations may be bile salt resistant microdomains, however additional factors are likely to play a role. To obtain more insights into the molecular composition of the canalicular membrane, the proteome of highly purified rat canalicular membrane vesicles was determined. Isolated rat canalicular membrane vesicles were stripped from adhering proteins, deglycosylated and protease digested before subjecting the samples to shot gun proteomic analysis. The expression of individual candidates was studied by PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. A total of 2449 proteins were identified, of which 1282 were predicted to be membrane proteins. About 50% of the proteins identified here were absent from previously published liver proteomes. In addition to ATP8B1, four more P4-ATPases were identified. ATP8A1 and ATP9A showed expression specific to the canalicular membrane, ATP11C at the bLPM and ATP11A in an intracellular vesicular compartment partially colocalizing with RAB7A and EEA1 as markers of the endosomal compartment. This study helped to identify additional P4-ATPases from rat liver particularly in the canalicular membrane, previously not known to be expressed in liver. These P4-ATPases might be contributing for maintaining transmembrane lipid homeostasis in hepatocytes. PMID:27347675

  15. Gene expression analysis of membrane transporters and drug-metabolizing enzymes in the lung of healthy and COPD subjects

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Tove; Hegelund Myrbäck, Tove; Olsson, Marita; Seidegård, Janeric; Werkström, Viktoria; Zhou, Xiao-Hong; Grunewald, Johan; Gustavsson, Lena; Nord, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    This study describes for the first time the expression levels of genes encoding membrane transporters and drug-metabolizing enzymes in the lungs of ex-smoking patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Membrane transporters and drug-metabolizing enzymes are key determinants of drug uptake, metabolism, and elimination for systemically administered as well as inhaled drugs, with consequent influence on clinical efficacy and patient safety. In this study, while no difference in gene expression was found between healthy and COPD subjects, we identified a significant regional difference in mRNA expression of both membrane transporters and drug-metabolizing enzymes between central and peripheral tissue in both healthy and COPD subjects. The majority of the differentially expressed genes were higher expressed in the central airways such as the transporters SLC2A1 (GLUT1), SLC28A3 (CNT3), and SLC22A4 (OCTN1) and the drug-metabolizing enzymes GSTZ1, GSTO2, and CYP2F1. Together, this increased knowledge of local pharmacokinetics in diseased and normal lung may improve modeling of clinical outcomes of new chemical entities intended for inhalation therapy delivered to COPD patients. In addition, based on the similarities between COPD and healthy subjects regarding gene expression of membrane transporters and drug-metabolizing enzymes, our results suggest that clinical pharmacological studies in healthy volunteers could be a valid model of COPD patients regarding drug disposition of inhaled drugs in terms of drug metabolism and drug transporters. PMID:25505599

  16. Expression of the major outer membrane protein of Chlamydia trachomatis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Manning, D S; Stewart, S J

    1993-01-01

    The major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of Chlamydia trachomatis was expressed in Escherichia coli. To assess whether it assembled into a conformationally correct structure at the cell surface, we characterized the recombinant MOMP (rMOMP) by Western immunoblot analysis, indirect immunofluorescence, and immunoprecipitation with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that recognize contiguous and conformational MOMP epitopes. Western blot analysis showed that most of the rMOMP comigrated with authentic monomer MOMP, indicating that its signal peptide was recognized and cleaved by E. coli. The rMOMP could not be detected on the cell surface of viable or formalin-killed E. coli organisms by indirect immunofluorescence staining with a MAb specific for a MOMP contiguous epitope. In contrast, the same MAb readily stained rMOMP-expressing E. coli cells that had been permeabilized by methanol fixation. A MAb that recognizes a conformational MOMP epitope and reacted strongly with formalin- or methanol-fixed elementary bodies failed to stain formalin- or methanol-fixed E. coli expressing rMOMP. Moreover, this MAb did not immunoprecipitate rMOMP from expressing E. coli cells even though it precipitated the authentic protein from lysates of C. trachomatis elementary bodies. Therefore we concluded that rMOMP was not localized to the E. coli cell surface and was not recognizable by a conformation-dependent antibody. These results indicate that rMOMP expressed by E. coli is unlikely to serve as an accurate model of MOMP structure and function. They also question the utility of rMOMP as a source of immunogen for eliciting neutralizing antibodies against conformational antigenic sites of the protein. Images PMID:8406797

  17. Expression and Functions of CreD, an Inner Membrane Protein in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsin-Hui; Lin, Yi-Tsung; Chen, Wei-Ching; Huang, Yi-Wei; Chen, Shiang-Jiuun; Yang, Tsuey-Ching

    2015-01-01

    CreBC is a highly conserved two-component regulatory system (TCS) in several gram-negative bacteria, including Escherichia coli, Aeromonas spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. CreD is a conserved gene that encodes a predicted inner-membrane protein and is located near the creBC loci. Activation of CreBC increases creD expression; therefore, creD expression is generally used as a measure of CreBC activation in E. coli, Aeromonas spp., and P. aeruginosa systems. In this article, we aim to elucidate the expression of creD and further to investigate its functions in S. maltophilia. In spite of a short intergenic region of 81 bp between creBC and creD, creD is expressed separately from the adjacent creBC operon and from a promoter immediately upstream of creD (PcreD) in S. maltophilia. We found that the promoter activity of PcreD is negatively regulated by the creBC TCS, positively regulated by the bacterial culture density, and not affected by β-lactams. Furthermore, creD expression is not significantly altered in the presence of the phosphor-mimic variant of CreB, CreB(D55E), which mimics activated CreB. The functions of CreD of S. maltophilia were assessed by comparison among the following: wild-type KJ; the creD isogenic mutant, KJΔCreD; and the complementary strain, KJΔCreD(pCreD). The mutant lacking creD had cell division defects and aberrations in cell envelope integrity, which then triggered the σE-mediated envelope stress response. Thus, the results indicated that CreD plays a critical role in the maintenance of envelope integrity. PMID:26698119

  18. Immunohistochemical expression of basement membrane proteins of verrucous carcinoma of the oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Arduino, Paolo G; Carrozzo, Marco; Pagano, Marco; Broccoletti, Roberto; Scully, Crispian; Gandolfo, Sergio

    2010-06-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity is an extremely invasive tumour of stratified squamous epithelium that spreads throughout degradation of the basement membrane (BM) and extra-cellular matrix. Oral verrucous carcinoma (VC) is a rare low-grade variant of oral SCC that penetrates into the subepithelial connective tissue. It also has a different clinical behaviour from classical oral SCC. We investigated the immunohistochemical expression of laminin, laminin-5, collagen IV and fibronectin in VC, severe epithelial dysplasia (SED) and SCC in order to analyse if the pattern of these molecules expression contributes to the differences in the biological behaviour of these diseases. The staining pattern of laminin was less intensive in SCC compared with SED and VC, and collagen IV expression was increased in VC compared with SED. Discontinuities of laminin, collagen IV and fibronectin were more evident in SED than in VC. This study indicates that VC has a biological behaviour different from SED or SCC, observable by immunohistochemistry in the BM zone. PMID:19506920

  19. Low plasma membrane expression of the miltefosine transport complex renders Leishmania braziliensis refractory to the drug.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Cañete, María P; Carvalho, Luís; Pérez-Victoria, F Javier; Gamarro, Francisco; Castanys, Santiago

    2009-04-01

    Miltefosine (hexadecylphosphocholine, MLF) is the first oral drug with recognized efficacy against both visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis. However, some clinical studies have suggested that MLF shows significantly less efficiency against the cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania braziliensis. In this work, we have determined the cellular and molecular basis for the natural MLF resistance observed in L. braziliensis. Four independent L. braziliensis clinical isolates showed a marked decrease in MLF sensitivity that was due to their inability to internalize the drug. MLF internalization in the highly sensitive L. donovani species requires at least two proteins in the plasma membrane, LdMT, a P-type ATPase involved in phospholipid translocation, and its beta subunit, LdRos3. Strikingly, L. braziliensis parasites showed highly reduced levels of this MLF translocation machinery at the plasma membrane, mainly because of the low expression levels of the beta subunit, LbRos3. Overexpression of LbRos3 induces increased MLF sensitivity not only in L. braziliensis promastigotes but also in intracellular amastigotes. These results further highlight the importance of the MLF translocation machinery in determining MLF potency and point toward the development of protocols to routinely monitor MLF susceptibility in geographic areas where L. braziliensis might be prevalent. PMID:19188379

  20. The role of putrescine in the regulation of proteins and fatty acids of thylakoid membranes under salt stress

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Sheng; Yuan, Yinghui; Chen, Jie; Sun, Jin; Zhang, Wenhua; Tang, Yuanyuan; Zhong, Min; Guo, Shirong

    2015-01-01

    Polyamines can alleviate the inhibitory effects of salinity on plant growth by regulating photosynthetic efficiency. However, little information is available to explain the specific mechanisms underlying the contribution of polyamines to salt tolerance of the photosynthetic apparatus. Here, we investigated the role of putrescine (Put) on the photosynthetic apparatus of cucumber seedlings under salt stress. We found that NaCl stress resulted in severe ion toxicity and oxidative stress in cucumber chloroplasts. In addition, salinity caused a significant increase in the saturated fatty acid contents of thylakoid membranes. Put altered unsaturated fatty acid content, thereby alleviating the disintegration of thylakoid grana lamellae and reducing the number of plastoglobuli in thylakoid membranes. BN-PAGE revealed Put up-regulated the expression of ATP synthase, CP47, D1, Qb, and psbA proteins and down-regulated CP24, D2, and LHCII type III in NaCl-stressed thylakoid membranes. qRT-PCR analysis of gene expression was used to compare transcript and protein accumulation among 10 candidate proteins. For five of these proteins, induced transcript accumulation was consistent with the pattern of induced protein accumulation. Our results suggest that Put regulates protein expression at transcriptional and translational levels by increasing endogenous polyamines levels in thylakoid membranes, which may stabilise photosynthetic apparatus under salt stress. PMID:26435404

  1. The role of putrescine in the regulation of proteins and fatty acids of thylakoid membranes under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Shu, Sheng; Yuan, Yinghui; Chen, Jie; Sun, Jin; Zhang, Wenhua; Tang, Yuanyuan; Zhong, Min; Guo, Shirong

    2015-01-01

    Polyamines can alleviate the inhibitory effects of salinity on plant growth by regulating photosynthetic efficiency. However, little information is available to explain the specific mechanisms underlying the contribution of polyamines to salt tolerance of the photosynthetic apparatus. Here, we investigated the role of putrescine (Put) on the photosynthetic apparatus of cucumber seedlings under salt stress. We found that NaCl stress resulted in severe ion toxicity and oxidative stress in cucumber chloroplasts. In addition, salinity caused a significant increase in the saturated fatty acid contents of thylakoid membranes. Put altered unsaturated fatty acid content, thereby alleviating the disintegration of thylakoid grana lamellae and reducing the number of plastoglobuli in thylakoid membranes. BN-PAGE revealed Put up-regulated the expression of ATP synthase, CP47, D1, Qb, and psbA proteins and down-regulated CP24, D2, and LHCII type III in NaCl-stressed thylakoid membranes. qRT-PCR analysis of gene expression was used to compare transcript and protein accumulation among 10 candidate proteins. For five of these proteins, induced transcript accumulation was consistent with the pattern of induced protein accumulation. Our results suggest that Put regulates protein expression at transcriptional and translational levels by increasing endogenous polyamines levels in thylakoid membranes, which may stabilise photosynthetic apparatus under salt stress. PMID:26435404

  2. Filamin-A Increases the Stability and Plasma Membrane Expression of Polycystin-2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Zheng, Wang; Wang, Zuocheng; Yang, JungWoo; Hussein, Shaimaa; Tang, Jingfeng; Chen, Xing-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Polycystin-2 (PC2), encoded by the PKD2 gene, is mutated in ~15% of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Filamins are actin-binding proteins implicated in scaffolding and membrane stabilization. Here we studied the effects of filamin on PC2 stability using filamin-deficient human melanoma M2, filamin-A (FLNA)-replete A7, HEK293 and IMCD cells together with FLNA siRNA/shRNA knockdown (KD). We found that the presence of FLNA is associated with higher total and plasma membrane PC2 protein expression. Western blotting analysis in combination with FLNA KD showed that FLNA in A7 cells represses PC2 degradation, prolonging the half-life from 2.3 to 4.4 hours. By co-immunoprecipitation and Far Western blotting we found that the FLNA C-terminus (FLNAC) reduces the FLNA-PC2 binding and PC2 expression, presumably through competing with FLNA for binding PC2. We further found that FLNA mediates PC2 binding with actin through forming complex PC2-FLNA-actin. FLNAC acted as a blocking peptide and disrupted the link of PC2 with actin through disrupting the PC2-FLNA-actin complex. Finally, we demonstrated that the physical interaction of PC2-FLNA is Ca-dependent. Taken together, our current study indicates that FLNA anchors PC2 to the actin cytoskeleton through complex PC2-FLNA-actin to reduce degradation and increase stability, and possibly regulate PC2 function in a Ca-dependent manner. PMID:25861040

  3. Filamin-a increases the stability and plasma membrane expression of polycystin-2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Zheng, Wang; Wang, Zuocheng; Yang, JungWoo; Hussein, Shaimaa; Tang, Jingfeng; Chen, Xing-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Polycystin-2 (PC2), encoded by the PKD2 gene, is mutated in ~15% of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Filamins are actin-binding proteins implicated in scaffolding and membrane stabilization. Here we studied the effects of filamin on PC2 stability using filamin-deficient human melanoma M2, filamin-A (FLNA)-replete A7, HEK293 and IMCD cells together with FLNA siRNA/shRNA knockdown (KD). We found that the presence of FLNA is associated with higher total and plasma membrane PC2 protein expression. Western blotting analysis in combination with FLNA KD showed that FLNA in A7 cells represses PC2 degradation, prolonging the half-life from 2.3 to 4.4 hours. By co-immunoprecipitation and Far Western blotting we found that the FLNA C-terminus (FLNAC) reduces the FLNA-PC2 binding and PC2 expression, presumably through competing with FLNA for binding PC2. We further found that FLNA mediates PC2 binding with actin through forming complex PC2-FLNA-actin. FLNAC acted as a blocking peptide and disrupted the link of PC2 with actin through disrupting the PC2-FLNA-actin complex. Finally, we demonstrated that the physical interaction of PC2-FLNA is Ca-dependent. Taken together, our current study indicates that FLNA anchors PC2 to the actin cytoskeleton through complex PC2-FLNA-actin to reduce degradation and increase stability, and possibly regulate PC2 function in a Ca-dependent manner. PMID:25861040

  4. Light-harvesting processes in the dynamic photosynthetic antenna.

    PubMed

    Duffy, C D P; Valkunas, L; Ruban, A V

    2013-11-21

    We present our perspective on the theoretical basis of light-harvesting within the photosynthetic membrane. Far from being a static structure, the photosynthetic membrane is a highly dynamic system, with protein mobility playing an important role in the damage/repair cycle of photosystem II (PSII), in balancing the input of energy between PSI and PSII, and in the photoprotection of PSII in response to a sudden excess of illumination. The concept of a photosynthetic antenna is illustrated and the state transition phenomenon is discussed as an example of purposeful antenna mobility. We discuss fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching as a technique for visualising membrane mobility, before introducing light-induced grana membrane reorganisation as an integral part of the rapid photoprotective switch in plants. We then discuss current theoretical approaches to modelling the energy transfer dynamics of the PSII antenna: the atomistic models of intra-complex transfer and the coarse-grained approach to the inter-complex dynamics. Finally we discuss the future prospect of extending these methods, beyond the static picture of the membrane, to the dynamic PSII photosynthetic antenna. PMID:23868502

  5. High-Yield Expression of a Catalytically Active Membrane-Bound Protein: Human P450 Oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Sandee, Duanpen

    2011-01-01

    P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is a two-flavin protein that reduces microsomal P450 enzymes and some other proteins. Preparation of active bacterially expressed human POR for biochemical studies has been difficult because membrane-bound proteins tend to interact with column matrices. To reduce column-protein interactions and permit more vigorous washing, human POR lacking 27 N-terminal residues (N-27 POR) was modified to carry a C-terminal Gly3His6-tag (N-27 POR-G3H6). When expressed in Escherichia coli, N-27 POR-G3H6 could be purified to apparent homogeneity by a modified, single-step nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography, yielding 31 mg POR per liter of culture, whereas standard purification of native N-27 POR required multiple steps, yielding 5 mg POR per liter. Both POR proteins had absorption maxima at 375 and 453 nm and both reduced cytochrome c with indistinguishable specific activities. Using progesterone as substrate for bacterially expressed purified human P450c17, the Michaelis constant for 17α-hydroxylase activity supported by N-27 POR or N-27 POR-G3H6 were 1.73 or 1.49 μm, and the maximal velocity was 0.029 or 0.026 pmol steroids per picomole P450 per minute, respectively. Using 17-hydroxypregnenolone as the P450c17 substrate, the Michaelis constant for 17,20 lyase activity using N-27 POR or N-27 POR-G3H6 was 1.92 or 1.89 μm and the maximal velocity was 0.041 or 0.042 pmol steroid per picomole P450 per minute, respectively. Thus, N-27 POR-G3H6 is equally active as native N-27 POR. This expression and purification system permits the rapid preparation of large amounts of highly pure, biologically active POR and may be generally applicable for the preparation of membrane-bound proteins. PMID:21586563

  6. Membrane Systems in Cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Liberton, Michelle L.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2008-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes with highly differentiated membrane systems. In addition to a Gram-negative-type cell envelope with plasma membrane and outer membrane separated by a periplasmic space, cyanobacteria have an internal system of thylakoid membranes where the fully functional electron transfer chains of photosynthesis and respiration reside. The presence of different membrane systems lends these cells a unique complexity among bacteria. Cyanobacteria must be able to reorganize the membranes, synthesize new membrane lipids, and properly target proteins to the correct membrane system. The outer membrane, plasma membrane, and thylakoid membranes each have specialized roles in the cyanobacterial cell. Understanding the organization, functionality, protein composition and dynamics of the membrane systems remains a great challenge in cyanobacterial cell biology.

  7. Efficiency of Membrane Protein Expression Following Infection with Recombinant Adenovirus of Polarized Non-Transformed Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Müller, Claudia; Blenkinsop, Timothy A; Stern, Jeffrey H; Finnemann, Silvia C

    2016-01-01

    Transient expression of exogenous proteins facilitates studies of molecular mechanisms and utility for transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in culture. Here, we compared expression of the membrane protein β5 integrin-GFP (β5-GFP) in two recently established models of differentiated human RPE, adult RPE stem cell-derived RPE and primary fetal RPE, upon infection with recombinant adenovirus or transfection with DNA in liposomes. We varied viral titer and duration of virus incubation and examined β5-GFP and the tight junction marker ZO-1 in manipulated cells by confocal microscopy. Fewer than 5 % of cells expressed β5-GFP after liposome-mediated transfection. The percentage of cells with detectable β5-GFP exceeded 90 % after adenovirus infection for as little as 1 h. Decreasing virus titer two-fold did not alter the fraction of cells expressing β5-GFP but increased variability of β5-GFP level among cells. In cells with low expression levels, β5-GFP localized mostly to the apical plasma membrane like endogenous αvβ5 integrin. In cells with high expression levels, β5-GFP localized to the cytoplasm in addition to the apical surface suggesting accumulation in trafficking compartments. Altogether, adenovirus delivery yields efficient exogenous membrane protein expression of correct polarity in differentiated human RPE cells in culture. PMID:26427482

  8. Linking Gene Expression and Membrane Lipid Composition of Arabidopsis[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Szymanski, Jedrzej; Brotman, Yariv; Willmitzer, Lothar; Cuadros-Inostroza, Álvaro

    2014-01-01

    Glycerolipid metabolism of plants responds dynamically to changes in light intensity and temperature, leading to the modification of membrane lipid composition to ensure optimal biochemical and physical properties in the new environment. Although multiple posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms have been reported to be involved in the process, the contribution of transcriptional regulation remains largely unknown. Here, we present an integrative analysis of transcriptomic and lipidomic data, revealing large-scale coordination between gene expression and changes in glycerolipid levels during the Arabidopsis thaliana response to light and temperature stimuli. Using a multivariate regression technique called O2PLS, we show that the gene expression response is strictly coordinated at the biochemical pathway level and occurs in parallel with changes of specific glycerolipid pools. Five interesting candidate genes were chosen for further analysis from a larger set of candidates identified based on their close association with various groups of glycerolipids. Lipidomic analysis of knockout mutant lines of these five genes showed a significant relationship between the coordination of transcripts and glycerolipid levels in a changing environment and the effects of single gene perturbations. PMID:24642935

  9. Induced expression of neuronal membrane attack complex and cell death by Alzheimer's beta-amyloid peptide.

    PubMed

    Shen, Y; Sullivan, T; Lee, C M; Meri, S; Shiosaki, K; Lin, C W

    1998-06-15

    beta-amyloid peptide (A beta) and complement-derived membrane attack complex (MAC) are co-localized in senile plaques of brains from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. But the relationship between A beta and complement activation is unclear. We have used human neurotypic cells, differentiated SH-SY5Y, as a model system to examine regulation of neuronal MAC expression and cell death by A beta. We demonstrated that mRNAs (C1q, C2, C3, C4, C5, C6, C7, C8 and C9) and proteins (C1q, C3 and C9) for the major components of the classical complement cascade are present in the SH-SY5Y neurotypic cells, indicating that neuronal cells can synthesize the necessary proteins required for MAC formation. Furthermore, immunocytochemical studies showed the A beta-induced neuronal MAC expression on the SH-SY5Y cells after CD59 was removed by PIPLC or blocked by anti-CD59 antibody. Meanwhile, increased A beta-induced neuronal cell death was observed following treatment with anti-CD59. Taken together, these results suggest that A beta activates neuronal complement cascade to induce MAC, and a deficiency of endogenous complement regulatory proteins, e.g., CD59, may increase the vulnerability of neurons to complement-mediated cytotoxicity. PMID:9689469

  10. Statin Therapy and the Expression of Genes that Regulate Calcium Homeostasis and Membrane Repair in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Draeger, Annette; Sanchez-Freire, Verónica; Monastyrskaya, Katia; Hoppeler, Hans; Mueller, Matthias; Breil, Fabio; Mohaupt, Markus G.; Babiychuk, Eduard B.

    2010-01-01

    In skeletal muscle of patients with clinically diagnosed statin-associated myopathy, discrete signs of structural damage predominantly localize to the T-tubular region and are suggestive of a calcium leak. The impact of statins on skeletal muscle of non-myopathic patients is not known. We analyzed the expression of selected genes implicated in the molecular regulation of calcium and membrane repair, in lipid homeostasis, myocyte remodeling and mitochondrial function. Microscopic and gene expression analyses were performed using validated TaqMan custom arrays on skeletal muscle biopsies of 72 age-matched subjects who were receiving statin therapy (n = 38), who had discontinued therapy due to statin-associated myopathy (n = 14), and who had never undergone statin treatment (n = 20). In skeletal muscle, obtained from statin-treated, non-myopathic patients, statins caused extensive changes in the expression of genes of the calcium regulatory and the membrane repair machinery, whereas the expression of genes responsible for mitochondrial function or myocyte remodeling was unaffected. Discontinuation of treatment due to myopathic symptoms led to a normalization of gene expression levels, the genes encoding the ryanodine receptor 3, calpain 3, and dystrophin being the most notable exceptions. Hence, even in clinically asymptomatic (non-myopathic) patients, statin therapy leads to an upregulation in the expression of genes that are concerned with skeletal muscle regulation and membrane repair. PMID:20489141

  11. Proteome and Differential Expression Analysis of Membrane and Cytosolic Proteins from Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Strains K-10 and 187.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known of the protein expression in Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) and how this contributes to pathogenesis. In the present study, proteins from both outer membranes and cytosol were prepared from two strains of MAP; a laboratory-adapted strain K-10 and a recent isola...

  12. Channel Catfish, Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque 1818, Tetraspanin Membrane Protein Family: Characterization and Expression Analysis of CD81 cDNA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CD81, also known as the target of an antiproliferative antibody 1 (TAPA-1), is a member of tetraspanin integral membrane protein family. This protein plays many important roles in immune functions. In this report, we characterized and analyzed expression of the channel catfish CD81 transcript. T...

  13. Interleukin-1-induced gene expression requires the membrane-raft-dependent internalization of the interleukin-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Windheim, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) binding to its receptor triggers signaling events at the plasma membrane that are essential but not sufficient for the induction of the IL-1-dependent gene expression. In addition, the ligand-induced endocytosis of the IL-1 receptor and signaling events that are initiated after the internalization of the IL-1 receptor presumably involving signaling endosomes are critical for the IL-1-induced gene expression. In this study, we investigate the role of membrane domains, commonly denoted as lipid rafts, in the IL-1-induced signal transduction. We demonstrate that the internalization of the IL-1 receptor depends on the integrity of lipid rafts and that the disruption of lipid rafts strongly reduces the IL-1-induced gene expression. Interestingly, the IL-1-dependent signaling events activated at the plasma membrane are not influenced by the disruption of lipid rafts suggesting that IL-1 signaling is initiated in a non-raft domain of the plasma membrane. Subsequently, the IL-1 receptor is translocated to lipid rafts where receptor endocytosis occurs to enable the internalization-dependent IL-1 signaling to activate the IL-1-induced gene expression. PMID:27327966

  14. Expression of three topologically distinct membrane proteins elicits unique stress response pathways in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Teresa M.; Jordan, Rick; Lyons-Weiler, James; Adelman, Joshua L.; Needham, Patrick G.; Kleyman, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Misfolded membrane proteins are retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are subject to ER-associated degradation, which clears the secretory pathway of potentially toxic species. While the transcriptional response to environmental stressors has been extensively studied, limited data exist describing the cellular response to misfolded membrane proteins. To this end, we expressed and then compared the transcriptional profiles elicited by the synthesis of three ER retained, misfolded ion channels: The α-subunit of the epithelial sodium channel, ENaC, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, CFTR, and an inwardly rectifying potassium channel, Kir2.1, which vary in their mass, membrane topologies, and quaternary structures. To examine transcriptional profiles in a null background, the proteins were expressed in yeast, which was previously used to examine the degradation requirements for each substrate. Surprisingly, the proteins failed to induce a canonical unfolded protein response or heat shock response, although messages encoding several cytosolic and ER lumenal protein folding factors rose when αENaC or CFTR was expressed. In contrast, the levels of these genes were unaltered by Kir2.1 expression; instead, the yeast iron regulon was activated. Nevertheless, a significant number of genes that respond to various environmental stressors were upregulated by all three substrates, and compared with previous microarray data we deduced the existence of a group of genes that reflect a novel misfolded membrane protein response. These data indicate that aberrant proteins in the ER elicit profound yet unique cellular responses. PMID:25759377

  15. Theory of fluorescence induction in photosystem II: derivation of analytical expressions in a model including exciton-radical-pair equilibrium and restricted energy transfer between photosynthetic units.

    PubMed Central

    Lavergne, J; Trissl, H W

    1995-01-01

    The theoretical relationships between the fluorescence and photochemical yields of PS II and the fraction of open reaction centers are examined in a general model endowed with the following features: i) a homogeneous, infinite PS II domain; ii) exciton-radical-pair equilibrium; and iii) different rates of exciton transfer between core and peripheral antenna beds. Simple analytical relations are derived for the yields and their time courses in induction experiments. The introduction of the exciton-radical-pair equilibrium, for both the open and closed states of the trap, is shown to be equivalent to an irreversible trapping scheme with modified parameters. Variation of the interunit transfer rate allows continuous modulation from the case of separated units to the pure lake model. Broadly used relations for estimating the relative amount of reaction centers from the complementary area of the fluorescence kinetics or the photochemical yield from fluorescence levels are examined in this framework. Their dependence on parameters controlling exciton decay is discussed, allowing assessment of their range of applicability. An experimental induction curve is analyzed, with a discussion of its decomposition into alpha and beta contributions. The sigmoidicity of the induction kinetics is characterized by a single parameter J related to Joliot's p, which is shown to depend on both the connectivity of the photosynthetic units and reaction center parameters. On the other hand, the relation between J and the extreme fluorescence levels (or the deviation from the linear Stern-Volmer dependence of 1/phi f on the fraction of open traps) is controlled only by antenna connectivity. Experimental data are consistent with a model of connected units for PS II alpha, intermediate between the pure lake model of unrestricted exciton transfer and the isolated units model. PMID:7647250

  16. Alterations in cortisol concentrations and expression of certain genes associated with neutrophil functions in cows developing retention of fetal membranes.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Rupal; Prasad, Shiv; Kumaresan, A; Kaur, M; Manimaran, A; Dang, A K

    2015-12-15

    Elevated cortisol concentrations have been reported to impair the functions and alter the life span of neutrophils in cows. The present study assessed the cortisol concentrations and expression of few genes related to longevity (Fas, Caspase 3, Bcl2) and margination (CD 62L, CD 18/11b) of neutrophils in relation to retention of fetal membranes (RFM) in dairy cows. Cortisol concentrations were significantly higher on the day of calving and day 2 postpartum in RFM cows than normal cows. Expression of CD 62L was significantly lower on the day of calving and day 2 postpartum in RFM cows than normal cows. While expression of Fas and GR was significantly lower on the day of calving, expression of Bcl2 was lower on day 7±2 pre-partum in RFM cows compared to normal cows. No significant difference was observed in the expression of CD 18/11b and Caspase 3 between RFM and normal cows. Cortisol concentration was negatively correlated with expression of GR, Fas, CD 62L, CD18/CD11b and Caspase 3, while positively correlated with immature neutrophil percentage and expression of Bcl2. It may be inferred that cortisol concentrations and expression of certain genes associated with lifespan and margination of neutrophils were altered in cows developing RFM compared to those expelled the fetal membranes normally. PMID:26384698

  17. A Lentiviral Vector Allowing Physiologically Regulated Membrane-anchored and Secreted Antibody Expression Depending on B-cell Maturation Status.

    PubMed

    Fusil, Floriane; Calattini, Sara; Amirache, Fouzia; Mancip, Jimmy; Costa, Caroline; Robbins, Justin B; Douam, Florian; Lavillette, Dimitri; Law, Mansun; Defrance, Thierry; Verhoeyen, Els; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2015-11-01

    The development of lentiviral vectors (LVs) for expression of a specific antibody can be achieved through the transduction of mature B-cells. This approach would provide a versatile tool for active immunotherapy strategies for infectious diseases or cancer, as well as for protein engineering. Here, we created a lentiviral expression system mimicking the natural production of these two distinct immunoglobulin isoforms. We designed a LV (FAM2-LV) expressing an anti-HCV-E2 surface glycoprotein antibody (AR3A) as a membrane-anchored Ig form or a soluble Ig form, depending on the B-cell maturation status. FAM2-LV induced high-level and functional membrane expression of the transgenic antibody in a nonsecretory B-cell line. In contrast, a plasma cell (PC) line transduced with FAM2-LV preferentially produced the secreted transgenic antibody. Similar results were obtained with primary B-cells transduced ex vivo. Most importantly, FAM2-LV transduced primary B-cells efficiently differentiated into PCs, which secreted the neutralizing anti-HCV E2 antibody upon adoptive transfer into immunodeficient NSG (NOD/SCIDγc(-/-)) recipient mice. Altogether, these results demonstrate that the conditional FAM2-LV allows preferential expression of the membrane-anchored form of an antiviral neutralizing antibody in B-cells and permits secretion of a soluble antibody following B-cell maturation into PCs in vivo. PMID:26281898

  18. Loss of membranous VEGFR1 expression is associated with an adverse phenotype and shortened survival in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lebok, Patrick; Huber, Julia; Burandt, Eike-Christian; Lebeau, Annette; Marx, Andreas Holger; Terracciano, Luigi; Heilenkötter, Uwe; Jänicke, Fritz; Müller, Volkmar; Paluchowski, Peter; Geist, Stefan; Wilke, Christian; Simon, Ronald; Sauter, Guido; Quaas, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a key process in tumor growth and progression, which is controlled by vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) and their receptors (VEGFRs). In order to better understand the prevalence and prognostic value of VEGFR1 expression in breast cancer, a tissue microarray containing >2,100 breast cancer specimens, with clinical follow-up data, was analyzed by immunohistochemistry using an antibody directed against the membrane-bound full-length receptor protein. The results demonstrated that membranous VEGFR1 staining was detected in all (5 of 5) normal breast specimens. In carcinoma specimens, membranous staining was negative in 3.1%, weak in 6.3%, moderate in 10.9%, and strong in 79.7% of the 1,630 interpretable tissues. Strong staining was significantly associated with estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor expression, but was inversely associated with advanced tumor stage (P=0.0431), high Bloom-Richardson-Ellis Score for Breast Cancer grade and low Ki67 labeling index (both P<0.0001). Cancers with moderate to strong (high) VEGFR1 expression were associated with significantly improved overall survival, as compared with tumors exhibiting negative or weak (low) expression (P=0.0015). This association was also detected in the subset of nodal-positive cancers (P=0.0018), and in the subset of 185 patients who had received tamoxifen as the sole therapy (P=0.001). In conclusion, these data indicated that membrane-bound VEGFR1 is frequently expressed in normal and cancerous breast epithelium. In addition, reduced or lost VEGFR1 expression may serve as a marker for poor prognosis in patients with breast cancer, who might not optimally benefit from endocrine therapy. PMID:27357606

  19. Regulation of the photosynthetic apparatus under fluctuating growth light.

    PubMed

    Tikkanen, Mikko; Grieco, Michele; Nurmi, Markus; Rantala, Marjaana; Suorsa, Marjaana; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2012-12-19

    Safe and efficient conversion of solar energy to metabolic energy by plants is based on tightly inter-regulated transfer of excitation energy, electrons and protons in the photosynthetic machinery according to the availability of light energy, as well as the needs and restrictions of metabolism itself. Plants have mechanisms to enhance the capture of energy when light is limited for growth and development. Also, when energy is in excess, the photosynthetic machinery slows down the electron transfer reactions in order to prevent the production of reactive oxygen species and the consequent damage of the photosynthetic machinery. In this opinion paper, we present a partially hypothetical scheme describing how the photosynthetic machinery controls the flow of energy and electrons in order to enable the maintenance of photosynthetic activity in nature under continual fluctuations in white light intensity. We discuss the roles of light-harvesting II protein phosphorylation, thermal dissipation of excess energy and the control of electron transfer by cytochrome b(6)f, and the role of dynamically regulated turnover of photosystem II in the maintenance of the photosynthetic machinery. We present a new hypothesis suggesting that most of the regulation in the thylakoid membrane occurs in order to prevent oxidative damage of photosystem I. PMID:23148275

  20. Regulation of the photosynthetic apparatus under fluctuating growth light

    PubMed Central

    Tikkanen, Mikko; Grieco, Michele; Nurmi, Markus; Rantala, Marjaana; Suorsa, Marjaana; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2012-01-01

    Safe and efficient conversion of solar energy to metabolic energy by plants is based on tightly inter-regulated transfer of excitation energy, electrons and protons in the photosynthetic machinery according to the availability of light energy, as well as the needs and restrictions of metabolism itself. Plants have mechanisms to enhance the capture of energy when light is limited for growth and development. Also, when energy is in excess, the photosynthetic machinery slows down the electron transfer reactions in order to prevent the production of reactive oxygen species and the consequent damage of the photosynthetic machinery. In this opinion paper, we present a partially hypothetical scheme describing how the photosynthetic machinery controls the flow of energy and electrons in order to enable the maintenance of photosynthetic activity in nature under continual fluctuations in white light intensity. We discuss the roles of light-harvesting II protein phosphorylation, thermal dissipation of excess energy and the control of electron transfer by cytochrome b6f, and the role of dynamically regulated turnover of photosystem II in the maintenance of the photosynthetic machinery. We present a new hypothesis suggesting that most of the regulation in the thylakoid membrane occurs in order to prevent oxidative damage of photosystem I. PMID:23148275

  1. Lessons from an α-Helical Membrane Enzyme: Expression, Purification, and Detergent Optimization for Biophysical and Structural Characterization.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jennifer L; Kalyoncu, Sibel; Lieberman, Raquel L

    2016-01-01

    This chapter outlines the protocol developed in our lab to produce a multipass α-helical membrane protein. We present our work flow, from ortholog selection to protein purification, including molecular biology for plasmid construction, protein expression in E. coli, membrane isolation and detergent solubilization, protein purification and tag removal, biophysical assessment of protein stability in different detergents, and detergent concentration determination using thin-layer chromatography. We focus on results from our ongoing work with intramembrane aspartyl proteases from archaeal organisms. PMID:27485343

  2. Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis Membrane Protein Expression in Response to Electron Acceptor Availability

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, Carol S.; Khare, Tripti; Verberkmoes, Nathan; O'Loughlin, Ed; Lindberg, Carl; Thompson, Melissa; Hettich, Robert

    2006-04-05

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a gram negative metal-reducing bacterium, can utilize a large number of electron acceptors. In the natural environment, S. oneidensis utilizes insoluble metal oxides as well as soluble terminal electron acceptors. The purpose of this ERSP project is to identify differentially expressed proteins associated with the membranes of S. oneidensis MR-1 cells grown with different electron acceptors, including insoluble metal oxides. We hypothesize that through the use of surface labeling, subcellular fractionation, and a combination of proteome analysis tools, proteins involved in the reduction of different terminal electron acceptors will be elucidated. We are comparing the protein profiles from cells grown with the soluble electron acceptors oxygen and fumarate and with those from cells grown with the insoluble iron oxides goethite, ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite. Comparison of the cell surface proteins isolated from cells grown with oxygen or anaerobically with fumarate revealed an increase in the abundance of over 25 proteins in anaerobic cells, including agglutination protein and flagellin proteins along with the several hypothetical proteins. In addition, the surface protein composition of cells grown with the insoluble iron oxides varies considerably from the protein composition observed with either soluble electron acceptor as well as between the different insoluble acceptors.

  3. Selection for mutants altered in the expression or export of outer membrane porin OmpF.

    PubMed Central

    Sodergren, E J; Davidson, J; Taylor, R K; Silhavy, T J

    1985-01-01

    Strains in which the lacZ gene (which specifies beta-galactosidase) is fused to a gene encoding an envelope protein often exhibit a phenotype termed overproduction lethality. In such strains, high-level synthesis of the cognate hybrid protein interferes with the process of protein export, and this leads ultimately to cell death. A variation of this phenomenon has been discovered with lacZ fusions to the gene specifying the major outer membrane porin protein OmpF. In this case, we find that lambda transducing phage carrying an ompF-lacZ fusion will not grow on a host strain that constitutively overexpresses ompF. We have exploited this observation to develop a selection for ompF mutants. Using this protocol, we have isolated mutants altered in ompF expression and have identified mutations that block OmpF export. Our results suggest that it should be possible to adapt this selection for use with other genes specifying exported proteins. Images PMID:2987179

  4. Isoform-Specific Up-Regulation of Plasma Membrane Ca2+ATPase Expression During Colon and Gastric Cancer Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ribiczey, Polett; Tordai, Attila; Andrikovics, Hajnalka; Filoteo, Adelaida G.; Penniston, John T.; Enouf, Jocelyne; Enyedi, Ágnes; Papp, Béla; Kovács, Tünde

    2007-01-01

    Summary In this work we demonstrate a differentiation-induced up-regulation of the expression of plasma membrane Ca2+ATPase (PMCA) isoforms being present in various gastric/colon cancer cell types. We found PMCA1b as the major isoform in non-differentiated cancer cell lines, whereas the expression level of PMCA4b was significantly lower. Cell differentiation initiated with short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and trichostatin A, or spontaneous differentiation of post-confluent cell cultures resulted in a marked induction of PMCA4b expression, while only moderately increased PMCA1b levels. Up-regulation of PMCA4b expression was demonstrated both at the protein and mRNA levels, and closely correlated with the induction of established differentiation markers. In contrast, the expression level of the Na+/K+-ATPase or that of the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ATPase 2 protein did not change significantly under these conditions. In membrane vesicles obtained from SCFA-treated gastric/colon cancer cells a marked increase in the PMCA-dependent Ca2+ transport activity was observed, indicating a general increase of PMCA function during the differentiation of these cancer cells. Because various PMCA isoforms display distinct functional characteristics, we suggest that up-regulated PMCA expression, together with a major switch in PMCA isoform pattern may significantly contribute to the differentiation of gastric/colon cancer cells. The analysis of PMCA expression may provide a new diagnostic tool for monitoring the tumor phenotype. PMID:17433436

  5. Cold acclimation and BnCBF17-over-expression enhance photosynthetic performance and energy conversion efficiency during long-term growth of Brassica napus under elevated CO2 conditions.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Keshav; Gadapati, Winona; Savitch, Leonid V; Singh, Jas; Hüner, Norman P A

    2012-11-01

    The effects of cold acclimation and long-term elevated CO(2) on photosynthetic performance of wild-type (WT) and BnCBF17-over-expressing line of Brassica napus cv. Westar (BnCBF17-OE) grown at either 20/16 °C (non-acclimated) or 5/5 °C (cold acclimated) and at either ambient (380 μmol C mol(-1)) or elevated (700 μmol C mol(-1)) CO(2) were studied. Compared with non-acclimated WT, the BnCBF17-OE grown at 20 °C mimicked the effects of cold acclimation on WT B. napus with respect to compact dwarf phenotype and increased rates of light-saturated CO(2) assimilation and photosynthetic electron transport. This was associated with enhanced energy conversion efficiency into biomass as assessed by decreased excitation pressure coupled to decreased dependence on non-photochemical energy dissipation for a given irradiance. Growth at elevated CO(2) decreased the light and CO(2)-saturated rates of photosynthesis by 30 % for non-acclimated WT relative to growth at ambient CO(2). This was associated with inhibition in electron transport rates (20 %), decrease in amount of rbcL (35 %) and cytosolic FBPase (70 %) and increased excitation pressure and non-photochemical quenching in elevated versus ambient CO(2)-grown non-acclimated WT. In contrast, light and CO(2)-saturated rates of photosynthesis, electron transport, excitation pressure, non-photochemical quenching and levels of rbcL, cytosolic FBPase and Lhcb1 were insensitive to growth under elevated CO(2) in BnCBF17-OE and cold-acclimated WT. Thus, BnCBF17-over-expression and cold acclimation maintain enhanced energy conversion efficiency and reduced sensitivity to feedback-limited photosynthesis during long-term growth of B. napus under elevated CO(2). Our results indicated that CBFs transcription factors regulate not only freezing tolerance but also has major whole plant effects. PMID:22847022

  6. Abnormal gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines and their membrane-bound receptors in the lymphocytes of depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Rizavi, Hooriyah S; Ren, Xinguo; Zhang, Hui; Bhaumik, Runa; Pandey, Ghanshyam N

    2016-06-30

    Abnormalities of protein levels of proinflammatory cytokines and their soluble receptors have been reported in plasma of depressed patients. In this study, we examined the role of cytokines and their membrane-bound receptors in major depressive disorder (MDD). We determined the protein and mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and mRNA expression of their membrane-bound receptors in the lymphocytes from 31 hospitalized MDD patients and 30 non-hospitalized normal control (NC) subjects. The subjects were diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria. Protein levels of cytokines were determined by ELISA, and mRNA levels in lymphocytes were determined by the qPCR method. We found that the mean mRNA levels of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, their receptors, TNFR1, TNFR2, IL-1R1 and the antagonist IL-1RA were significantly increased in the lymphocytes of MDD patients compared with NC. No significant differences in the lymphocyte mRNA levels of IL-1R2, IL-6R, and Gp130 were observed between MDD patients and NC. These studies suggest abnormal gene expression of these cytokines and their membrane-bound receptors in the lymphocytes of MDD patients, and that their mRNA expression levels in the lymphocytes could be a useful biomarker for depression. PMID:27138824

  7. Molecular cloning and expression of Neisseria meningitidis class 1 outer membrane protein in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, A K; Heckels, J E; Clarke, I N

    1987-01-01

    A genomic library of meningococcal DNA from a clinical isolate of Neisseria meningitidis was constructed in the expression vector lambda gt11. Outer membrane complex was prepared from the same strain and used to immunize rabbits to raise polyclonal anti-outer membrane complex serum. The amplified library was probed with this polyclonal serum, and seven expressing recombinants were isolated; further investigations indicated these to be identical. The expressed meningococcal gene in these recombinants was fused to vector beta-galactosidase and shown to encode epitopes present on the 42-kilodalton class 1 outer membrane protein. Estimation of the size of the recombinant fusion protein suggests that up to 40 kilodaltons of protein-coding sequence is present. The lambda gt11 recombinant contains a 3.4-kilobase DNA insert, which has been recloned into a plasmid and characterized by restriction endonuclease analysis. A restriction fragment from the insert, representing the protein-coding region hybridizes to a single 2.2-kilobase XbaI fragment from the homologous strain and to similar-sized XbaI fragments in other strains of meningococci, expressing antigenically distinct class 1 proteins. Images PMID:3117690

  8. Immunochemical Analysis of the Temporal and Tissue-Specific Expression of an Avena sativa Plasma Membrane Determinant 1

    PubMed Central

    Lynes, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    An immunoglobulin Mk monoclonal (F8IVE9) antibody raised against oat (Avena sativa cv Garry) root homogenate has been produced and characterized. The predominant target bound by this antibody is a 62-kilodalton protein (p62) that is expressed in both oat root and oat shoot cells. Treatment of the oat antigen with periodate, or with recombinant N-glycanase, affects the F8IVE9 binding to the antigen, suggesting that the specific epitope for this monoclonal antibody involves a carbohydrate determinant. Levels of p62 present in cells of the oat root increase approximately twofold as the root tissue matures during the first 11 days postgermination. In contrast, levels of expression in shoot tissue remain relatively constant during the same period. The p62 antigen has been shown to be expressed at the plasma membrane by immunohistochemical means, by immunofluorescent labeling of protoplasts, and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis of purified plasma membrane. The F8IVE9 antigenic target appears to be uniformly distributed through root tissue but is differentially expressed in specific sections of the shoot. F8IVE9 antibody also binds to antigens expressed in a number of other species, including clover, corn, pea, broccoli, mustard, and bean, and has been shown to bind to Samanea protoplast plasma membranes. This monoclonal antibody may prove to be useful for a variety of investigations, including an analysis of the specific patterns of cellular differentiation that occur during early morphogenesis, and the characterization of plasma membrane-associated elements in plants. ImagesFigure 3Figure 5Figure 7 PMID:16668621

  9. Molecular identification and differential expression of sensory neuron membrane proteins in the antennae of the black cutworm moth Agrotis ipsilon.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shao-Hua; Yang, Ruo-Nan; Guo, Meng-Bo; Wang, Gui-Rong; Wu, Kong-Ming; Guo, Yu-Yuan; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Zhang, Yong-Jun

    2013-04-01

    The insect sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs) SNMP1 and SNMP2 are transmembrane domain-containing proteins and are homologs of the vertebrate CD36 transmembrane proteins. It has been suggested that SNMPs play a significant role in insect chemoreception. Previous studies have demonstrated that SNMP1 is expressed in the pheromone-sensitive olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), whereas SNMP2 is expressed in the supporting cells. In this study, we identified two full-length SNMP transcripts, AipsSNMP1 and AipsSNMP2, in the black cutworm moth Agrotis ipsilon (Hufnagel). The qRT-PCR results indicated that the AipsSNMP1 and AipsSNMP2 transcripts were expressed significantly higher in the antennae than in other tissues of both sexes. The expression of AipsSNMP1 and AipsSNMP2 in the antennae from different development stages of both sexes was investigated and was shown to begin to express in the pupae stage from 3days before emergence and then increased dramatically at the day of the emergence, and the high expression levels were maintained during the following 4days after the emergence in both sexes. The mating status had no effect on the expression levels of the AipsSNMP1 and AipsSNMP2 transcripts. Consistent with previous in situ hybridization studies in other Lepidoptera insects, our immunolocalization results at protein level demonstrated that both AipsSNMP1 and AipsSNMP2 were expressed in pheromone-sensitive sensilla trichodea but with a completely different expression profile. AipsSNMP1 is more uniformed and highly expressed along the membrane of the ORN dendrites, whereas AipsSNMP2 is widely distributed at the bottom of the sensilla trichodea and highly localized in the sensillum lymph. Our studies provide further detailed evidence for the involvement and general functional role of insect SNMPs in the detection of sex pheromones and general odorant molecules. PMID:23454276

  10. Towards autotrophic tissue engineering: Photosynthetic gene therapy for regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chávez, Myra Noemi; Schenck, Thilo Ludwig; Hopfner, Ursula; Centeno-Cerdas, Carolina; Somlai-Schweiger, Ian; Schwarz, Christian; Machens, Hans-Günther; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Bono, María Rosa; Allende, Miguel L; Nickelsen, Jörg; Egaña, José Tomás

    2016-01-01

    The use of artificial tissues in regenerative medicine is limited due to hypoxia. As a strategy to overcome this drawback, we have shown that photosynthetic biomaterials can produce and provide oxygen independently of blood perfusion by generating chimeric animal-plant tissues during dermal regeneration. In this work, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of photosynthetic biomaterials in vivo after engraftment in a fully immunocompetent mouse skin defect model. Further, we show that it is also possible to genetically engineer such photosynthetic scaffolds to deliver other key molecules in addition to oxygen. As a proof-of-concept, biomaterials were loaded with gene modified microalgae expressing the angiogenic recombinant protein VEGF. Survival of the algae, growth factor delivery and regenerative potential were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. This work proposes the use of photosynthetic gene therapy in regenerative medicine and provides scientific evidence for the use of engineered microalgae as an alternative to deliver recombinant molecules for gene therapy. PMID:26474040

  11. A Novel R2R3-MYB Transcription Factor BpMYB106 of Birch (Betula platyphylla) Confers Increased Photosynthesis and Growth Rate through Up-regulating Photosynthetic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chenguang; Li, Chenghao

    2016-01-01

    We isolated a R2R3-MYB transcription factor BpMYB106, which regulates photosynthesis in birch (Betula platyphylla Suk.). BpMYB106 mainly expresses in the leaf and shoot tip of birch, and its protein is localized in the nucleus. We further fused isolated a 1588 bp promoter of BpMYB106 and analyzed it by PLACE, which showed some cis-acting elements related to photosynthesis. BpMYB106 promoter β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter fusion studies gene, the result, showed the GUS reporter gene in transgenic birch with BpMYB106 promoter showed strong activities in shoot tip, cotyledon margins, and mature leaf trichomes. The overexpression of BpMYB106 in birch resulted in significantly increased trichome density, net photosynthetic rate, and growth rate as compared with the wild-type birch. RNA-Seq profiling revealed the upregulation of several photosynthesis-related genes in the photosynthesis and oxidative phosphorylation pathways in the leaves of transgenic plants. Yeast one-hybrid analysis, coupled with transient assay in tobacco, revealed that BpMYB106 binds a MYB binding site MYB2 in differentially expressed gene promoters. Thus, BpMYB106 may directly activate the expression of a range of photosynthesis related genes through interacting with the MYB2 element in their promoters. Our study demonstrating the overexpression of BpMYB106—a R2R3-MYB transcription factor—upregulates the genes of the photosynthesis and oxidative phosphorylation pathways to improve photosynthesis. PMID:27047502

  12. Membrane-attached Cytokines Expressed by mRNA Electroporation Act as Potent T-Cell Adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Weinstein-Marom, Hadas; Pato, Aviad; Levin, Noam; Susid, Keren; Itzhaki, Orit; Besser, Michal J; Peretz, Tamar; Margalit, Alon; Lotem, Michal; Gross, Gideon

    2016-01-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines are widely explored in different adoptive cell therapy protocols for enhancing survival and function of the transferred T cells, but their systemic administration is often associated with severe toxicity which limits their clinical use. To confine cytokine availability to the therapeutic T cells, we expressed 3 key cytokines, IL-2, IL-12, and IL-15, as integral T-cell membrane proteins. To prevent permanent activation of growth signaling pathways, we delivered these genes to T cells through mRNA electroporation. The engineered cytokines could be detected on the surface of mRNA-transfected cells and binding to their cell-surface receptors mainly occurred in cis. The 3 human cytokines supported the ex vivo growth of activated human CD8 and CD4 T cells for at least 6 days posttransfection, comparably to high-dose soluble IL-2. Similarly, membrane IL-2, membrane IL-12, and, to a lesser extent, membrane IL-15, were comparable with their soluble counterparts in supporting proliferation of splenic mouse CD8 T cells. Following electroporation of human CD8 T cells and antimelanoma tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, membrane cytokines synergized with constitutively active toll-like receptor 4 in inducing interferon-γ secretion. Efficient cooperation with TLR4 was also evident in the upregulation of the activation molecules CD25, CD69, CD137 (4-1BB), and CD134 (OX40). Taken together, membrane cytokines expressed through mRNA transfection emerge as effective tools for enhancing T-cell proliferation and function and may have potential use in adoptive T-cell therapy. PMID:26849075

  13. Evolution of heliobacteria: implications for photosynthetic reaction center complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vermaas, W. F.; Blankenship, R. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The evolutionary position of the heliobacteria, a group of green photosynthetic bacteria with a photosynthetic apparatus functionally resembling Photosystem I of plants and cyanobacteria, has been investigated with respect to the evolutionary relationship to Gram-positive bacteria and cyanobacteria. On the basis of 16S rRNA sequence analysis, the heliobacteria appear to be most closely related to Gram-positive bacteria, but also an evolutionary link to cyanobacteria is evident. Interestingly, a 46-residue domain including the putative sixth membrane-spanning region of the heliobacterial reaction center protein show rather strong similarity (33% identity and 72% similarity) to a region including the sixth membrane-spanning region of the CP47 protein, a chlorophyll-binding core antenna polypeptide of Photosystem II. The N-terminal half of the heliobacterial reaction center polypeptide shows a moderate sequence similarity (22% identity over 232 residues) with the CP47 protein, which is significantly more than the similarity with the Photosystem I core polypeptides in this region. An evolutionary model for photosynthetic reaction center complexes is discussed, in which an ancestral homodimeric reaction center protein (possibly resembling the heliobacterial reaction center protein) with 11 membrane-spanning regions per polypeptide has diverged to give rise to the core of Photosystem I, Photosystem II, and of the photosynthetic apparatus in green, purple, and heliobacteria.

  14. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes β-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries. PMID:26389924

  15. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms.

    PubMed

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-09-01

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes β-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries. PMID:26389924

  16. The Photosynthetic Cycle

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Calvin, Melvin

    1955-03-21

    A cyclic sequence of transformations, including the carboxylation of RuDP (ribulose diphosphate) and its re-formation, has been deduced as the route for the creation of reduced carbon compounds in photosynthetic organisms. With the demonstration of RuDP as substrate for the carboxylation in a cell-free system, each of the reactions has now been carried out independently in vitro. Further purification of this last enzyme system has confirmed the deduction that the carboxylation of RuDP leads directly to the two molecules of PGA (phosphoglyceric acid) involving an internal dismutation and suggesting the name "carboxydismutase" for the enzyme. As a consequence of this knowledge of each of the steps in the photosynthetic CO{sub 2} reduction cycle, it is possible to define the reagent requirements to maintain it. The net requirement for the reduction of one molecule of CO{sub 2} is four equivalents of [H]and three molecules of ATP (adenine triphosphate). These must ultimately be supplied by the photochemical reaction. Some possible ways in which this may be accomplished are discussed.

  17. A proteomic study reveals novel insights into the diversity of aquaporin forms expressed in the plasma membrane of plant roots.

    PubMed Central

    Santoni, Véronique; Vinh, Joëlle; Pflieger, Delphine; Sommerer, Nicolas; Maurel, Christophe

    2003-01-01

    Aquaporins are channel proteins that facilitate the diffusion of water across cell membranes. The genome of Arabidopsis thaliana encodes 35 full-length aquaporin homologues. Thirteen of them belong to the plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) subfamily and predominantly sit at the plasma membrane (PM). In the present work we combine separations of membrane proteins (by one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis) with identification by MS (matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization-time-of-flight and electrospray-ionization tandem MS) to take an inventory of aquaporin isoforms expressed in the PM of Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Our analysis provides direct evidence for the expression of five PIPs (PIP1;1, PIP1;5, PIP2;1, PIP2;2 and PIP2;7) in the root PM and suggests the presence of at least three other PIP isoforms. In addition, we show that the same PIP isoform can be present under several forms with distinct isoelectric points. More specifically, we identify phosphorylated aquaporins in the PIP1 and PIP2 subgroups and suggest the existence of other post-translational modifications. Their identification should provide clues to reveal novel molecular mechanisms for aquaporin regulation. PMID:12678916

  18. Overcoming the toxicity of membrane peptide expression in bacteria by upstream insertion of Asp-Pro sequence.

    PubMed

    Montigny, Cédric; Penin, François; Lethias, Claire; Falson, Pierre

    2004-01-28

    Transmembrane (TM) peptides often induce toxic effects when expressed in bacteria, probably due to membrane destabilization. We report here that in the case of the TM domains of hepatitis C virus (HCV) E1 and E2 envelope proteins, which are both particularly toxic for the bacteria, the insertion of the Asp-Pro (DP) sequence dramatically reduced their toxicities and promoted their expressions when produced as glutathione S-transferase (GST) GST-DP-TM chimeras. Subcellular fractionation showed that these chimeras co-sediment with the membrane fraction and contain active GST that could be solubilized with a mild detergent. Surprisingly, immuno-gold electron microscopy clearly showed that such chimeras are not localized in the membrane but in the cytosol. We thus postulate that they likely form proteo-lipidic aggregates, which prevent the bacteria from toxicity by sequestering the TM part of the chimeras. The reduction of toxicity in the presence of the Asp-Pro sequence is possibly due to Asp's negative charge that probably disadvantages the binding of the TM peptides to the membrane. In addition, the structural features of Pro residue could promote the formation of chimera aggregates. PMID:14757220

  19. Isotopically Labeled Expression in E. coli, Purification, and Refolding of the Full Ectodomain of the Influenza Virus Membrane Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Curtis-Fisk, Jaime; Spencer, Ryan M.; Weliky, David P.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes methods to produce an isotopically labeled 23 kDa viral membrane protein with purified yield of 20 mg/L of E. coli shake flask culture. This yield is sufficient for NMR structural studies and the protein production methods are simple, straightforward, and rapid and likely applicable to other recombinant membrane proteins expressed in E. coli. The target FHA2 protein is the full ectodomain construct of the influenza virus hemagglutinin protein which catalyzes fusion between the viral and the cellular endosomal membranes during infection. The high yield of FHA2 was achieved by: (1) initial growth in rich medium to A600 ~ 8 followed by a switch to minimal medium and induction of protein expression; and (2) obtaining protein both from purification of the detergent-soluble lysate and from solubilization, purification, and refolding of inclusion bodies. The high cell density was achieved after optimization of pH, oxygenation, and carbon source and concentration, and the refolding protocol was optimized using circular dichroism spectroscopy. For a single residue of membrane-associated FHA2 that was obtained from purification and refolding of inclusion bodies, native conformation was verified by the 13CO chemical shift measured using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. PMID:18640277

  20. A gene-fusion strategy for stoichiometric and co-localized expression of light-gated membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kleinlogel, Sonja; Terpitz, Ulrich; Legrum, Barbara; Gökbuget, Deniz; Boyden, Edward S; Bamann, Christian; Wood, Phillip G; Bamberg, Ernst

    2011-12-01

    The precise co-localization and stoichiometric expression of two different light-gated membrane proteins can vastly improve the physiological usefulness of optogenetics for the modulation of cell excitability with light. Here we present a gene-fusion strategy for the stable 1:1 expression of any two microbial rhodopsins in a single polypeptide chain. By joining the excitatory channelrhodopsin-2 with the inhibitory ion pumps halorhodopsin or bacteriorhodopsin, we demonstrate light-regulated quantitative bi-directional control of the membrane potential in HEK293 cells and neurons in vitro. We also present synergistic rhodopsin combinations of channelrhodopsin-2 with Volvox carteri channelrhodopsin-1 or slow channelrhodopsin-2 mutants, to achieve enhanced spectral or kinetic properties, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of our fusion strategy to determine ion-turnovers of as yet uncharacterized rhodopsins, exemplified for archaerhodopsin and CatCh, or to correct pump cycles, exemplified for halorhodopsin. PMID:22056675

  1. Enhancement of cell surface expression and receptor functions of membrane progestin receptor α (mPRα) by progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1): evidence for a role of PGRMC1 as an adaptor protein for steroid receptors.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Peter; Pang, Yefei; Dong, Jing

    2014-03-01

    A variety of functions have been proposed for progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1), including acting as a component of a membrane progestin receptor and as an adaptor protein. Here we show that stable overexpression of human PGRMC1 in nuclear progesterone receptor (PR)-negative breast cancer cell lines causes increased expression of PGRMC1 and membrane progesterone receptor α (mPRα) on cell membranes that is associated with increased specific [(3)H]progesterone binding. The membrane progestin binding affinity and specificity were characteristic of mPRα, with a Kd of 4.7 nM and high affinity for the mPR-specific agonist, Org OD 02-0, and low affinity for corticosteroids. Progestin treatment caused activation of G proteins, further evidence for increased expression of functional mPRs on PGRMC1-transfected cell membranes. Immunocytochemical and coimmunoprecipitation studies showed a close association of PGRMC1 with mPRα in cell membranes. Transfection of PGRMC1 into spontaneously immortalized rat granulosa cells was associated with membrane expression of PGRMC1 and mPRα as well as antiapoptotic effects of progestins that were abolished after cotransfection with small interfering RNA for mPRα. These data demonstrate that PGRMC1 can act as an adaptor protein, transporting mPRα to the cell surface, and that the progestin binding and apoptotic functions previously ascribed to PGRMC1 are dependent on cell surface expression of mPRα. Collectively, the results suggest PGRMC1 and mPRα are components of a membrane progesterone receptor protein complex. Increased expression of estrogen receptor β was also observed in the membranes of PGRMC1-transfected cells, suggesting that PGRMC1 can act as an adaptor protein for multiple classes of steroid receptors. PMID:24424068

  2. Expression of the moss PpLEA4-20 gene in rice enhances membrane protection and client proteins stability.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Deng, Dandan; Chen, Xi; Wu, Baomei; Hu, Ke; Qiu, Tianhang; Cui, Suxia; Huang, Fang

    2015-05-01

    Green vegetative tissues of the moss Physcomitrella patens possess a powerful ability to tolerate severe drought stress. Proteomics analysis have revealed that a large number of late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins were key players in the drought tolerance of the photosynthetic tissues. PpLEA4-20, a member of the moss LEA protein family, was selected for further function study using an ectopic expression method in rice. Through molecular identification via PCR, southern blotting and TAIL-PCR, we demonstrated that the PpLEA4-20 gene was transformed and inserted into a non-encoded region in chromosome 4 of rice and expressed stably in transgenic rice. Unexpectedly, PpLEA4-20 protein emerged as two high-expressed spots on 2-D gels generated from transgenic rice, suggesting that PpLEA4-20 proteins are complete compatible and might be modified in rice. Both growth and physiological analysis showed that seedlings of transgenic PpLEA4-20 rice displayed altered phenotypes and tolerance to salt. In addition, electrolyte leakage was reduced in transgenic PpLEA4-20 compared to wild type under stress conditions. Anti-aggregation analysis found that the PpLEA4-20 protein expressed in rice remained soluble at high temperature and in addition to some native proteins from transgenic PpLEA4-20 rice. Based on Nano LC MS/MS analysis, we identified several proteins from transgenic PpLEA4-20 rice of increased heat-stability. Our results provide evidence for a role of PpLEA4-20 in salt tolerance and stabilization of client proteins. PMID:25791479

  3. Photosynthetic light reactions: integral to chloroplast retrograde signalling.

    PubMed

    Gollan, Peter J; Tikkanen, Mikko; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2015-10-01

    Chloroplast retrograde signalling is ultimately dependent on the function of the photosynthetic light reactions and not only guides the acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus to changing environmental and metabolic cues, but has a much wider influence on the growth and development of plants. New information generated during the past few years about regulation of photosynthetic light reactions and identification of the underlying regulatory proteins has paved the way towards better understanding of the signalling molecules produced in chloroplasts upon changes in the environment. Likewise, the availability of various mutants lacking regulatory functions has made it possible to address the role of excitation energy distribution and electron flow in the thylakoid membrane in inducing the retrograde signals from chloroplasts to the nucleus. Such signalling molecules also induce and interact with hormonal signalling cascades to provide comprehensive information from chloroplasts to the nucleus. PMID:26318477

  4. Characterization of a multiple endogenously expressed Adenosine triphosphate-Binding Cassette transporters using nuclear and cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns

    PubMed Central

    Khadeer, M.A.; Shimmo, R.; Wainer, I.W.; Moaddel, R.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is an aggressive form of human astrocytoma, with poor prognosis due to multi-drug resistance to a number of anticancer drugs. The observed multi-drug resistance is primarily due to the efflux activity of ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) efflux transporters such as Pgp, MRP1 and BCRP. The expression of these transporters has been demonstrated in nuclear and cellular membranes of the LN-229 human glioblastoma cell line. Nuclear membrane and cellular membrane fragments from LN229 cells were immobilized on the IAM stationary phase to create nuclear and cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns, (NMAC(LN229)) and (CMAC(LN229)), respectively. Pgp, MRP1and BCRP transporters co-immobilized on both columns was characterized and compared by establishing the binding affinities for estrone-3-sulfate (3.8 vs 3.7μM), verapamil (0.6 vs 0.7μM) and prazosin (0.099 vs 0.033μM) on each column and no significant differences were observed. Since the marker ligands had overlapping selectivities, the selective characterization of each transporter was carried out by saturation of the binding sites of the non-targeted transporters. The addition of verapamil (Pgp and MRP1 substrate) to the mobile phase allowed the comparative screening of 8 compounds at the nuclear and cellular BCRP using etoposide as the marker ligand. AZT increased the retention of etoposide (+15%), a positive allosteric interaction, on the CMAC(LN229) column and decreased it (−5%) on the NMAC(LN229), while the opposite effect was produced by rhodamine. The results indicate that there are differences between the cellular and nuclear membrane expressed BCRP and that NMAC and CMAC columns can be used to probe these differences. PMID:24642394

  5. Prebiotic photosynthetic reactions.

    PubMed

    Chittenden, G J; Schwartz, A W

    1981-01-01

    Historically, numerous attempts have been made to mimic - by means of inorganic model reactions - the photosynthetic fixation of CO2 by green plants. The literature in this field is strewn with claims and counter-claims. Two factors have led us to reexamine this subject: firstly; doubts concerning the highly reducing model for the atmosphere of the primitive Earth and secondly; recent results which demonstrate that photoreductive fixation is feasable on a suitable catalytic surface, for both CO2 and N2. The latter observation is of particular interest due to the well-known susceptibility of NH3 to photolytic destruction. Our review of the literature leads us to suggest that similar processes would have been plausible for the primitive Earth and could have been prebiotic precursors to an early development of CO2-fixing autotrophs. PMID:6791723

  6. Cytokinin membrane receptors participate in regulation of plastid genome expression in the skotomorphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Doroshenko, A S; Danilova, M N; Kudryakova, N V; Soloviev, A A; Kusnetsov, V V

    2016-07-01

    Analysis by real-time PCR of single and double insertion mutants of A. thaliana with inactivated cytokinin receptor genes showed that the level of transcripts of some of plastid genes during skotomorphogenesis depended on the state of functionally active receptor AHK3. The cytokinin-regulated plastid encoded genes involved the housekeeping genes (rpoB and accD) and the genes for photosynthetic proteins (ndhA, psbA, atpB, and psaA). However, the absence of hormone activation of plastid encoded genes engaged in the translation of plastid proteins, rRNA (rrn16), and tRNA (trnE), indirectly indicate the disruption of the synthesis of chloroplast proteins in the dark. PMID:27599515

  7. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque, 1818) tetraspanin membrane protein family: Identification, characterization, and expression analysis of CD63 cDNA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CD63, known as lysosome associated membrane protein 3 (LAMP-3), is a member of the tetraspanin integral membrane protein family. This protein plays many important roles in immuno-physiological functions. In this communication, we report the identification, characterization, and expression analysis...

  8. The effects of down-regulating expression of Arabidopsis thaliana membrane-associated acyl-CoA binding protein 2 on acyl-lipid composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiple classes of acyl-CoA binding proteins are encoded by plant genomes, including a plant-unique class of predicted integral membrane-proteins. Transcript analysis revealed that both of the integral membrane-acyl-CoA binding proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana, ACBP1 and ACBP2, are expressed in al...

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cell Membrane Protein Expression from Phenotypically Diverse Cystic Fibrosis Isolates Demonstrates Host-Specific Adaptations.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Karthik Shantharam; Pascovici, Dana; Penesyan, Anahit; Goel, Apurv; Venkatakrishnan, Vignesh; Paulsen, Ian T; Packer, Nicolle H; Molloy, Mark P

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative, nosocomial, highly adaptable opportunistic pathogen especially prevalent in immuno-compromised cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The bacterial cell surface proteins are important contributors to virulence, yet the membrane subproteomes of phenotypically diverse P. aeruginosa strains are poorly characterized. We carried out mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteome analysis of the membrane proteins of three novel P. aeruginosa strains isolated from the sputum of CF patients and compared protein expression to the widely used laboratory strain, PAO1. Microbes were grown in planktonic growth condition using minimal M9 media, and a defined synthetic lung nutrient mimicking medium (SCFM) limited passaging. Two-dimensional LC-MS/MS using iTRAQ labeling enabled quantitative comparisons among 3171 and 2442 proteins from the minimal M9 medium and in the SCFM, respectively. The CF isolates showed marked differences in membrane protein expression in comparison with PAO1 including up-regulation of drug resistance proteins (MexY, MexB, MexC) and down-regulation of chemotaxis and aerotaxis proteins (PA1561, PctA, PctB) and motility and adhesion proteins (FliK, FlgE, FliD, PilJ). Phenotypic analysis using adhesion, motility, and drug susceptibility assays confirmed the proteomics findings. These results provide evidence of host-specific microevolution of P. aeruginosa in the CF lung and shed light on the adaptation strategies used by CF pathogens. PMID:27246823

  10. Protein Disulfide Isomerase Chaperone ERP-57 Decreases Plasma Membrane Expression of the Human GnRH Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yánez, Rodrigo Ayala; Conn, P. Michael

    2012-01-01

    Retention of misfolded proteins by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a quality control mechanism involving the participation of endogenous chaperones such as calnexin (CANX) which interact and restrict plasma membrane expression of gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR), a G protein coupled receptor. CANX also interacts with ERP-57, a thiol oxidoreductase chaperone present in the ER. CANX along with ERP-57, promotes the formation of disulfide bond bridges in nascent proteins. The human GnRH receptor (hGnRHR) is stabilized by two disulfide bond bridges (Cys14-Cys200 and Cys114-Cys196), that, when broken, its expression at plasma membrane decreases. To determine if the presence of chaperones CANX and ERP-57 exert an influence over membrane routing and second messenger activation, we assessed the effect of various mutants including those with broken bridges (Cys→Ala) along with the wild type hGnRHR. The effect of chaperones on mutants was insignificant, whereas the overexpression of ERP-57 led to a wild type hGnRHR retention which was further enhanced by cotransfection with CANX cDNA disclosing receptor retention by ERP-57 augmented by CANX, suggesting a quality control mechanism. PMID:20029959