Science.gov

Sample records for physical electrochemistry high

  1. Ab-Initio Physics of Electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letchworth Weaver, Kendra; Arias, Tomás

    2010-03-01

    We present a Joint Density Functional Theory (JDFT)footnotetextS. A. Petrosyan, A. A. Rigos, and T. A. Arias, J. Phys. Chem. B, 109, 15436-15444 (2005).^,footnotetextJ. Lischner and T. A. Arias, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 216401 (2008). capturing the key electrostatic interactions between electronic systems and a fluid environment. This novel theory is relevant to the study of electrochemical systems and includes the dielectric properties of the fluid and charge screening due to the presence of ions in solution. We also demonstrate how DFT calculations can address the fundamental physical issues underlying electrochemistry, including the definition of a consistent reference potential, the treatment of charged surfaces under periodic boundary conditions, and the study of the solid-electrolyte interface as a function of the applied potential. Results for interfacial capacitances and potentials of zero charge calculated using these techniques will be compared to experimental values. Our theory allows simulation of a variety of materials, such as intermetallics and complex oxides, in contact with an ionic liquid environment. This method has a wide range of potential applications including catalysis in fuel cells, batteries, and photoelectrochemical cells.

  2. (The latest developments of the physical aspects of electrochemistry)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.H.

    1990-09-24

    The author was one of 26 invited lecturers to discuss the latest developments of the physical aspects of electrochemistry. He interacted extensively with other lecturers and many participants from developing countries. He also visited with the Director of the Italian Synchrotron Radiation Source now under construction in Trieste, Italy.

  3. High-speed electrochemistry using ultramicroelectrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    This research investigates the use of ultramicroelectrodes in performing electrochemistry on microsecond and nanosecond time scales. One purpose of this research was to look at new ways to apply ultramicroelectrodes to high speed experiments. Some of the aspects that are discussed in this thesis are: (a) A novel technique was developed for measuring currents on short time scales that involves conversion of the current to light using a light emitting diode and measuring the light intensity as a function of time using time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC). Computer processing of the light intensity data can convert this data back to current. The technique is capable of measurements on nanosecond time scales, but TCSPC requires tens or hundreds of millions of experiments to obtain a complete set of data and this frequently results in severe electrode fouling problems. (b) Potential step experiments were used instead of potential sweep experiments. Potential step experiments enable the separation in time of the faradaic and charging currents for chemical systems in which the faradaic impedance is greater than the uncompensated solution resistance. (c) For systems in which the faradaic impedance and uncompensated resistance are of the same order of magnitude, a computer simulation was developed which accounts for the interaction of the faradaic and double layer charging processes. (d) Application of short time scale experiments to the study of surface processes. Some processes studied in this work are the oxidation of clean platinum surfaces, electrode reactions of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid adsorbed on mercury, reductive hydrogen adsorption on platinum and double layer charging. (e) A study of the smallest available time constants was performed, taking into account non-idealities in the electrode such as stray capacitance and resistance of the electrode itself.

  4. An Audio-Tutorial Approach to the Teaching of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lower, Stephen K.

    1981-01-01

    Demonstrates how audiotutorial techniques can be applied to the teaching of more advanced subjects (physical chemistry and electrochemistry), and how this can have significant affect on the overall quality of instruction and the mechanics of teaching the course. Includes a general description of audiotutorial instruction. (SK)

  5. A Conceptual Change Teaching Strategy To Facilitate High School Students' Understanding of Electrochemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niaz, Mansoor; Chacon, Eleazar

    2003-01-01

    Describes a study that used a teaching strategy based on two teaching experiments which could facilitate students' conceptual understanding of electrochemistry. Involves two sections (n=29 and n=28) of 10th grade high school students in Venezuela. Concludes that the teaching experiments facilitated student understanding of electrochemistry.…

  6. Inquiry-Based Laboratory Activities in Electrochemistry: High School Students' Achievements and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sesen, Burcin Acar; Tarhan, Leman

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of inquiry-based laboratory activities on high school students' understanding of electrochemistry and attitudes towards chemistry and laboratory work. The participants were 62 high school students (average age 17 years) in an urban public high school in Turkey. Students were assigned to experimental (N =…

  7. Inquiry-Based Laboratory Activities in Electrochemistry: High School Students' Achievements and Attitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acar Sesen, Burcin; Tarhan, Leman

    2013-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of inquiry-based laboratory activities on high school students' understanding of electrochemistry and attitudes towards chemistry and laboratory work. The participants were 62 high school students (average age 17 years) in an urban public high school in Turkey. Students were assigned to experimental ( N = 30) and control groups ( N = 32). The experimental group was taught using inquiry-based laboratory activities developed by the researchers and the control group was instructed using traditional laboratory activities. The results of the study indicated that instruction based on inquiry-based laboratory activities caused a significantly better acquisition of scientific concepts related to electrochemistry, and produced significantly higher positive attitudes towards chemistry and laboratory. In the light of the findings, it is suggested that inquiry-based laboratory activities should be developed and applied to promote students' understanding in chemistry subjects and to improve their positive attitudes.

  8. Conceptual difficulties experienced by senior high school students of electrochemistry: Electric circuits and oxidation-reduction equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnett, Pamela J.; Treagust, David F.

    The purpose of this research was to investigate students' understanding of electrochemistry following a course of instruction. A list of conceptual and propositional knowledge statements was formulated to identify the knowledge base necessary for students to understand electric circuits and oxidation-reduction equations. The conceptual and propositional knowledge statements provided the framework for the development of a semistructured interview protocol which was administered to 32 students in their final year of high school chemistry. The interview questions about electric circuits revealed that several students in the sample were confused about the nature of electric current both in metallic conductors and in electrolytes. Students studying both physics and chemistry were more confused about current flow in metallic conductors than students who were only studying chemistry. In the section of the interview which focused on oxidation and reduction, many students experienced problems in identifying oxidation-reduction equations. Several misconceptions relating to the inappropriate use of definitions of oxidation and reduction were identified. The data illustrate how students attempted to make sense of the concepts of electrochemistry with the knowledge they had already developed or constructed. The implications of the research are that teachers, curriculum developers, and textbook writers, if they are to minimize potential misconceptions, need to be cognizant of the relationship between physics and chemistry teaching, of the need to test for erroneous preconceptions about current before teaching about electrochemical (galvanic) and electrolytic cells, and of the difficulties experienced by students when using more than one model to explain scientific phenomena.

  9. Conceptual difficulties experienced by senior high school students of electrochemistry: Electrochemical (galvanic) and electrolytic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnett, Pamela J.; Treagust, David F.

    This research investigated students' understanding of electrochemistry following a 7-9-week course of instruction. A list of conceptual and propositional knowledge statements was formulated, and this provided the framework for semistructured interviews that were conducted with 32 students in their final year of high school chemistry, following instruction in electrochemistry. Three misconceptions identified in this study and five which have been reported earlier are incorporated into an alternative framework about electric current. The framework is grounded on the notion that a current always involves drifting electrons, even in solution. Another area where students' misconceptions were prevalent was in relation to the sign of the anode and cathode. Students who thought the anode was negatively charged believed cations would move toward it, and those who thought it was positively charged were unable to explain why electrons move away from it. Electrolytic cells also proved troublesome for students. Many students did not associate the positions of the anode and cathode with the polarity of the applied electromotive force (e.m.f.). Other students attempted to reverse features of electrochemical cells and apply the reversals to electrolytic cells. The implications of the research relate to students' interpretation of the language that is used to describe scientific phenomena and the tendency for students to overgeneralize, due to comments made by teachers or statements in textbooks.

  10. Electrochemistry, past and present

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, J.T. ); Orna, M.V. )

    1989-01-01

    This book is on electrochemistry. The authors discuss its history, development, and present status. Topics covered in this book are: foundations of electrochemistry, organic and biological electrochemistry, electroanalytical chemistry, and industrial electrochemistry.

  11. Supramolecular Electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaifer, Angel E.; Gomez-Kaifer, Marielle

    1999-12-01

    This book describes the electrochemical behavior of supramolecular systems. Special emphasis will be given to the electrochemistry of host-guest complexes, monolayer and multilayer assemblies, dendrimers, and other supramolecular assemblies. A fundamental theme throughout the book is to explore the effects that supramolecular structure exerts on the thermodynamics and kinetics of electrochemical reactions. Conversely, attention will be placed to the various ways in which electrochemical or redox conversions can be utilized to control or affect the structure or properties of supramolecular systems. This first book on this topic will be of value for graduate students and advanced researchers in both electrochemistry and supramolecular chemistry.

  12. Phase I and phase II reductive metabolism simulation of nitro aromatic xenobiotics with electrochemistry coupled with high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bussy, Ugo; Chung-Davidson, Yu-Wen; Li, Ke; Li, Weiming

    2014-11-01

    Electrochemistry combined with (liquid chromatography) high resolution mass spectrometry was used to simulate the general reductive metabolism of three biologically important nitro aromatic molecules: 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM), niclosamide, and nilutamide. TFM is a pesticide used in the Laurential Great Lakes while niclosamide and nilutamide are used in cancer therapy. At first, a flow-through electrochemical cell was directly connected to a high resolution mass spectrometer to evaluate the ability of electrochemistry to produce the main reduction metabolites of nitro aromatic, nitroso, hydroxylamine, and amine functional groups. Electrochemical experiments were then carried out at a constant potential of -2.5 V before analysis of the reduction products by LC-HRMS, which confirmed the presence of the nitroso, hydroxylamine, and amine species as well as dimers. Dimer identification illustrates the reactivity of the nitroso species with amine and hydroxylamine species. To investigate xenobiotic metabolism, the reactivity of nitroso species to biomolecules was also examined. Binding of the nitroso metabolite to glutathione was demonstrated by the observation of adducts by LC-ESI(+)-HRMS and the characteristics of their MSMS fragmentation. In conclusion, electrochemistry produces the main reductive metabolites of nitro aromatics and supports the observation of nitroso reactivity through dimer or glutathione adduct formation. PMID:25234306

  13. Conceptual Difficulties Experienced by Senior High School Students of Electrochemistry: Electrochemical (Galvanic) and Electrolytic Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garnett, Pamela J.; Treagust, David F.

    1992-01-01

    This research used semistructured interviews to investigate students' (n=32) understanding of electrochemistry following a 7-9 week course of instruction. Three misconceptions were identified and incorporated with five previously reported into an alternative framework about electric current involving drifting electrons. Also noted was the tendency…

  14. Bipolar electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Fosdick, Stephen E; Knust, Kyle N; Scida, Karen; Crooks, Richard M

    2013-09-27

    A bipolar electrode (BPE) is an electrically conductive material that promotes electrochemical reactions at its extremities (poles) even in the absence of a direct ohmic contact. More specifically, when sufficient voltage is applied to an electrolyte solution in which a BPE is immersed, the potential difference between the BPE and the solution drives oxidation and reduction reactions. Because no direct electrical connection is required to activate redox reactions, large arrays of electrodes can be controlled with just a single DC power supply or even a battery. The wireless aspect of BPEs also makes it possible to electrosynthesize and screen novel materials for a wide variety of applications. Finally, bipolar electrochemistry enables mobile electrodes, dubbed microswimmers, that are able to move freely in solution. PMID:23843205

  15. Electrochemistry in supercritical fluids.

    PubMed

    Branch, Jack A; Bartlett, Philip N

    2015-12-28

    A wide range of supercritical fluids (SCFs) have been studied as solvents for electrochemistry with carbon dioxide and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) being the most extensively studied. Recent advances have shown that it is possible to get well-resolved voltammetry in SCFs by suitable choice of the conditions and the electrolyte. In this review, we discuss the voltammetry obtained in these systems, studies of the double-layer capacitance, work on the electrodeposition of metals into high aspect ratio nanopores and the use of metallocenes as redox probes and standards in both supercritical carbon dioxide-acetonitrile and supercritical HFCs. PMID:26574527

  16. Electrochemistry in supercritical fluids

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Jack A.; Bartlett, Philip N.

    2015-01-01

    A wide range of supercritical fluids (SCFs) have been studied as solvents for electrochemistry with carbon dioxide and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) being the most extensively studied. Recent advances have shown that it is possible to get well-resolved voltammetry in SCFs by suitable choice of the conditions and the electrolyte. In this review, we discuss the voltammetry obtained in these systems, studies of the double-layer capacitance, work on the electrodeposition of metals into high aspect ratio nanopores and the use of metallocenes as redox probes and standards in both supercritical carbon dioxide–acetonitrile and supercritical HFCs. PMID:26574527

  17. Conceptual Difficulties Experienced by Senior High School Students of Electrochemistry: Electric Circuits and Oxidation-Reduction Equations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garnett, Pamela J.; Treagust, David F.

    1992-01-01

    Interview data exemplify students' attempts to integrate the concepts of electrochemistry with related knowledge that they had previously constructed or acquired in other classes. The implications for minimizing potential misconceptions center on the difficulties students experience when using more than one model for explaining scientific…

  18. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    This proposal is for the continuation of the High Energy Physics program at the University of California at Riverside. In hadron collider physics the authors will complete their transition from experiment UA1 at CERN to the DZERO experiment at Fermilab. On experiment UA1 their effort will concentrate on data analysis at Riverside. At Fermilab they will coordinate the high voltage system for all detector elements. They will also carry out hardware/software development for the D0 muon detector. The TPC/Two-Gamma experiment has completed its present phase of data-taking after accumulating 160 pb{sup {minus}}1 of luminosity. The UC Riverside group will continue data and physics analysis and make minor hardware improvement for the high luminosity run. The UC Riverside group is participating in design and implementation of the data acquisition system for the OPAL experiment at LEP. Mechanical and electronics construction of the OPAL hadron calorimeter strip readout system is proceeding on schedule. Data analysis and Monte Carlo detector simulation efforts are proceeding in preparation for the first physics run when IEP operation comenses in fall 1989.

  19. FSU High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Prosper, Harrison B.; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Berg, Bernd; Blessing, Susan K.; Okui, Takemichi; Owens, Joseph F.; Reina, Laura; Wahl, Horst D.

    2014-12-01

    The High Energy Physics group at Florida State University (FSU), which was established in 1958, is engaged in the study of the fundamental constituents of matter and the laws by which they interact. The group comprises theoretical and experimental physicists, who sometimes collaborate on projects of mutual interest. The report highlights the main recent achievements of the group. Significant, recent, achievements of the group’s theoretical physicists include progress in making precise predictions in the theory of the Higgs boson and its associated processes, and in the theoretical understanding of mathematical quantities called parton distribution functions that are related to the structure of composite particles such as the proton. These functions are needed to compare data from particle collisions, such as the proton-proton collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), with theoretical predictions. The report also describes the progress in providing analogous functions for heavy nuclei, which find application in neutrino physics. The report highlights progress in understanding quantum field theory on a lattice of points in space and time (an area of study called lattice field theory), the progress in constructing several theories of potential new physics that can be tested at the LHC, and interesting new ideas in the theory of the inflationary expansion of the very early universe. The focus of the experimental physicists is the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN. The report, however, also includes results from the D0 experiment at Fermilab to which the group made numerous contributions over a period of many years. The experimental group is particularly interested in looking for new physics at the LHC that may provide the necessary insight to extend the standard model (SM) of particle physics. Indeed, the search for new physics is the primary task of contemporary particle physics, one motivated by the need to explain certain facts, such as the

  20. Theoretical High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Christ, Norman H.; Weinberg, Erick J.

    2014-07-14

    we provide reports from each of the six faculty supported by the Department of Energy High Energy Physics Theory grant at Columbia University. Each is followed by a bibliography of the references cited. A complete list of all of the publications in the 12/1/2010-04/30/2014 period resulting from research supported by this grant is provided in the following section. The final section lists the Ph.D. dissertations based on research supported by the grant that were submitted during this period.

  1. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    This proposal is for the continuation of the High Energy Physics Program at the University of California, Riverside. In 1990, we will concentrate on analysis of LEP data from the OPAL detector. We expect to record 10{sup 5} Z`s by the end of 1989 and 10{sup 6} in 1990. This data will be used to measure the number of quark-lepton families in the universe. In the second half of 1990 we will also be occupied with the installation of the D-Zero detector in the Tevatron Collider and the preparation of software for the 1991 run. A new initiative made possible by generous university support is a laboratory for detector development at UCR. The focus will be on silicon strip tracking detectors both for the D-Zero upgrade and for SSC physics. The theory program will pursue further various mass-generating radiative mechanisms for understanding small quark and lepton masses as well as some novel phenomenological aspects of supersymmetry.

  2. High School Physics Teaching Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Teacher, 2012

    2012-01-01

    We divided our high school physics teaching experience into three groups: first year teaching physics, second or third year teaching physics, and four or more years of experience teaching physics. We did this because everything is new for teachers teaching a course for the first time. The second and third time through the course, teachers learn…

  3. Synthesis of convex hexoctahedral Pt micro/nanocrystals with high-index facets and electrochemistry-mediated shape evolution.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jing; Liu, Shuo; Tian, Na; Zhou, Zhi-You; Liu, Hai-Xia; Xu, Bin-Bin; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2013-12-18

    Systematic manipulation of nanocrystal shapes is prerequisite for revealing their shape-dependent physical and chemical properties. Here we successfully prepared a complex shape of Pt micro/nanocrystals: convex hexoctahedron (HOH) enclosed with 48 {15 5 3} high-index facets by electrochemical square-wave-potential (SWP) method. This shape is the last crystal single form that had not been achieved previously for face-centered-cubic (fcc) metals. We further realized the shape evolution of Pt nanocrystals with high-index facets from tetrahexahedron (THH) to the HOH, and finally to trapezohedron (TPH) by increasing either the upper (EU) or lower potential (EL). The shape evolution, accompanied by the decrease of low-coordinated kink atoms, can be correlated with the competitive interactions between preferentially oxidative dissolution of kink atoms at high EU and the redeposition of Pt atoms at the EL. PMID:24299234

  4. Electrochemistry and Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H.

    1984-01-01

    The term electrochemistry implies the use of devices that convert chemical energy into electrical energy and sometimes vice versa. These devices are usually composed of some number of individual cells that are connected together to form a battery. In the cases where these devices cannot be electrically recharged they are usually referred to as primary batteries, whereas if these batteries can be charged and recharged repeatedly, they are called secondary batteries. The past and present uses of primary and secondary batteries in aerospace applications are discussed.

  5. Improving Advanced High School Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spital, Robin David

    2003-04-01

    A National Research Council study committee recently commissioned a "Physics Panel" to evaluate and make recommendations for improving advanced physics education in American high schools [1]. The Physics Panel recommends the creation of a nationally standardized Newtonian Mechanics Unit that would form the foundation of all advanced physics programs. In a one-year program, the Panel recommends that advanced physics students study at most one other major area of physics, so that sufficient time is available to develop the deep conceptual understanding that is the primary goal of advanced study. The Panel emphasizes that final assessments must be improved to focus on depth of understanding, rather than technical problem-solving skill. The Physics Panel strongly endorses the inclusion of meaningful real-world experiences in advanced physics programs, but believes that traditional "cook-book" laboratory exercises are not worth the enormous amount of time and effort spent on them. The Physics Panel believes that the talent and preparation of teachers are the most important ingredients in effective physics instruction; it therefore calls for a concerted effort by all parts of the physics community to remedy the desperate shortage of highly qualified teachers. [1] Jerry P. Gollub and Robin Spital, "Advanced Physics in the High Schools", Physics Today, May 2002.

  6. An aptamer-based biosensing platform for highly sensitive detection of platelet-derived growth factor via enzyme-mediated direct electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Deng, Kun; Xiang, Yang; Zhang, Liqun; Chen, Qinghai; Fu, Weiling

    2013-01-01

    In this work, a new label-free electrochemical aptamer-based sensor (aptasensor) was constructed for detection of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) based on the direct electrochemistry of glucose oxidase (GOD). For this proposed aptasensor, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA)-protected graphene-gold nanoparticles (P-Gra-GNPs) composite was firstly coated on electrode surface to form the interface with biocompatibility and huge surface area for the adsorption of GOD layer. Subsequently, gold nanoclusters (GNCs) were deposited on the surface of GOD to capture PDGF binding aptamer (PBA). Finally, GOD as a blocking reagent was employed to block the remaining active sites of the GNCs and avoid the nonspecific adsorption. With the direct electron transfer of double layer GOD membranes, the aptasensor showed excellent electrochemical response and the peak current decreased linearly with increasing logarithm of PDGF concentration from 0.005 nM to 60 nM with a relatively low limit of detection of 1.7 pM. The proposed aptasensor exhibited high specificity, good reproducibility and long-term stability, which provided a new promising technique for aptamer-based protein detection. PMID:23260677

  7. Dynamic Electrochemistry: Methodology and Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Dennis C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature dealing with novel developments or important trends in electrochemistry. Areas examined include mass transfer, electrode kinetics, surface effects, chemically modified electrodes, coulostatic/galvanostatic methods, bioelectrochemistry, spectroelectrochemistry, and electrode instrumentation. Books, textbooks, and literature…

  8. (High energy physics)

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, B.E.; Roberts, J.B. Jr.

    1991-09-01

    An intense analysis effort on the data we obtained in a seven month run on E704 last year has produced a flood of new results on polarization effects in particle production at 200 GeV/c. We are fortunate to be able to report in detail on those results. Our other Fermilab experiment, E683 (photoproduction of jets) has been delayed an unbelievable amount of time by Fermilab schedule slippages. It was scheduled and ready for beam two years ago As this report is being written, we have been running for two months and are expecting four months of production data taking. In this report we show some of our preliminary results. In addition we are near the end of a six month run on our CERN experiment, NA47 (SMC) which will measure the spin dependent structure functions for the proton and neutron. It is with a sense of relief, mixed with pride, that we report that all the equipment which we constructed for that experiment is currently working as designed. The random coincidence of accelerator schedules has left us slightly dazed, but all experiments are getting done and analyzed in a timely fashion. As members of the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration, we have been preparing for the only currently approved experiment at the SSC. Here we report on our scintillating fiber tracker design and simulation activities. In addition we report the results of our investigation of the detector response to heavy Z particles. Since our last report, we have joined the D0 collaboration with the primary aim of contributing to the D0 upgrade over the next few years. It is also important for us to gain experience in collider physics during the period leading up to the SDC turn-on.

  9. Semiconductor electrochemistry of coal pyrite

    SciTech Connect

    Osseo-Asare, K.; Wei, D.

    1993-02-01

    This project seeks to advance the fundamental understanding of the physics-chemical processes occurring at the pyrite/aqueous interface, in the context of coal cleaning, coal desulfurization, and acid minedrainage. A novel approach to the study of pyrite aqueous electrochemistry is proposed, based on the use of both synthetic and natural ( i.e. coal-derived) pyrite specimens, the utilization of.pyrite both in the form of micro (i.e. colloidal and subcolloidal) and macro (i.e. rotating ring disk) electrodes, and the application of in-situ direct electroanalytical and spectroelectrochemical characterization techniques. The kinetic study of the reaction between sulfide and ferrous ions in solution suggested that the black species formed initially is FeHS[sup +] intermediate. To farther confirm this mechanism, the experiments aimed at establishing the stoichiometry for the intermediate were carried out thermodynamically with a stopped-flow spectrophotometric technique. The results showed that the mole ratio of H[sup [minus

  10. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.; Ma, E.

    1997-07-01

    Hadron collider studies will focus on: (i) the search for the top quark with the newly installed D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, (ii) the upgrade of the D0 detector to match the new main injector luminosity and (iii) R&D on silicon microstrip tracking devices for the SSC. High statistics studies of Z{sup 0} decay will continue with the OPAL detector at LEP. These studies will include a direct measurement of Z decay to neutrinos, the search for Higgs and heavy quark decays of Z. Preparations for the Large Scintillation Neutrino Detector (LSND) to measure neutrino oscillations at LAMPF will focus on data acquisition and testing of photomultiplier tubes. In the theoretical area E. Ma will concentrate on mass-generating radiative mechanisms for light quarks and leptons in renormalizable gauge field theories. J. Wudka`s program includes a detailed investigation of the magnetic-flip approach to the solar neutrino.

  11. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-10

    The Counter Group continues to work on data analysis for Fermilab Experiment E653. Altogether, they expect several thousand reconstructed charm events and approximately 25 B pair events of which 12 have been observed thus far. Preparation continue for Fermilab Experiment E781, a high statistics study of charm baryon production. In the Theory Group, Cutkosky and collaborators study hadron phenomenology and non-perturbative QCD calculations. Levine has a long standing program in computational QED to obtain improved theoretical values for g-2 of the electron. Wolfenstein, Li, and their collaborators have worked on areas of weak interaction phenomenology that may yield insights beyond the standard model, e.g. CP violation and non-zero neutrino masses. Holman has been concerned with phase transitions in gauge theories relevant to cosmological problems. During 1991 most of the group effort was concentrated on the L3 experiment at CERN. Highlights of the results from the analysis of the Z[degrees] resonance include (a) a measurement of the strong coupling constant [alpha][sub s] for b quarks (b) a precision measurement of the average time of B hadrons and (c) a direct determination of the number of light neutrino faculties from the reaction e[sup +]e[sup [minus

  12. High School Physics Teaching Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-04-01

    We divided our high school physics teaching experience into three groups: first year teaching physics, second or third year teaching physics, and four or more years of experience teaching physics. We did this because everything is new for teachers teaching a course for the first time. The second and third time through the course, teachers learn from past experiences and hone their approaches. By the time a teacher is in the fourth year of teaching a course, he or she is more comfortable with the material and better able to understand the ways in which different approaches work with different topics.

  13. High energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-10

    The Counter Group continues to work on data analysis for Fermilab Experiment E653. Altogether, they expect several thousand reconstructed charm events and approximately 25 B pair events of which 12 have been observed thus far. Preparation continue for Fermilab Experiment E781, a high statistics study of charm baryon production. In the Theory Group, Cutkosky and collaborators study hadron phenomenology and non-perturbative QCD calculations. Levine has a long standing program in computational QED to obtain improved theoretical values for g-2 of the electron. Wolfenstein, Li, and their collaborators have worked on areas of weak interaction phenomenology that may yield insights beyond the standard model, e.g. CP violation and non-zero neutrino masses. Holman has been concerned with phase transitions in gauge theories relevant to cosmological problems. During 1991 most of the group effort was concentrated on the L3 experiment at CERN. Highlights of the results from the analysis of the Z{degrees} resonance include (a) a measurement of the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s} for b quarks (b) a precision measurement of the average time of B hadrons and (c) a direct determination of the number of light neutrino faculties from the reaction e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}{gamma}. We also began a major upgrade of the L3 luminosity monitor by replacing PWC chamber by a Si strip system in front of the BGO calorimeters. Finally we have continued our SSC R&D work on BaF{sub 2} by joining the GEM collaboration.

  14. Flare physics at high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.

    1990-01-01

    High-energy processes, involving a rich variety of accelerated particle phenomena, lie at the core of the solar flare problem. The most direct manifestation of these processes are high-energy radiations, gamma rays, hard X-rays and neutrons, as well as the accelerated particles themselves, which can be detected in interplanetary space. In the study of astrophysics from the moon, the understanding of these processes should have great importance. The inner solar system environment is strongly influenced by activity on the sun; the physics of solar flares is of great intrinsic interest; and much high-energy astrophysics can be learned from investigations of flare physics at high energies.

  15. High energy electron positron physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, A.; Soding, P.

    1987-01-01

    With the termination of the physics program at PETRA in a year from now, and with the start of TRISTAN and the SLC and later LEP, an era of e/sup +/e/sup -/ physics will come to an end and a new one begins. The field is changing from a field of a few specialists, to becoming one of the mainstream efforts of the high energy community. It seems appropriate at this moment to summarize what has been learned over the past years, in a way more useful to any high energy physicist in particular to newcomers in the e/sup +/e/sup -/ field. This is the purpose of the book. This book should be used as a reference for future workers in the field of e/sup +/e/sup -/ interactions. It includes the most relevant data, parametrizations, theoretical background, and a chapter on detectors. Contents: Foreword; Detectors for High Energy e/sup +/e/sup -/ Physics; Lepton Pair Production and Electroweak Parameters; Hadron Production, Strong and Electroweak Properties; tau Physics; Recent Results on the Charm Sector; Bottom Physics; Lifetime Measurements of tau, Charmed and Beauty Hadrons; UPSILON Spectroscopy; Hadronic Decays of the UPSILON; Quark and Gluon Fragmentation in the e/sup +/e/sup -/ Continuum; Jet Production and QCD; Two Photon Physics; Search for New Particles.

  16. Fundamentals and applications of electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEvoy, A. J.

    2013-06-01

    The Voltaic pile, invented here on Lake Como 200 years ago, was a crucial step in the development of electrical engineering. For the first time a controlled and reliable source of electric current was available. The science of electrochemistry developed rapidly and is now a key contributor, not just to energy technology but also, for example, to metallurgy and industrial processes. The basic concepts of electrochemistry are presented, with the practical examples of its application in fuel cells, and with the perspective of the history of the subject.

  17. Chelating ionic liquids for reversible zinc electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Kar, Mega; Winther-Jensen, Bjorn; Forsyth, Maria; MacFarlane, Douglas R

    2013-05-21

    Advanced, high energy-density, metal-air rechargeable batteries, such as zinc-air, are of intense international interest due to their important role in energy storage applications such as electric and hybrid vehicles, and to their ability to deal with the intermittency of renewable energy sources such as solar and wind. Ionic liquids offer a number of ideal thermal and physical properties as potential electrolytes in such large-scale energy storage applications. We describe here the synthesis and characterisation of a family of novel "chelating" ILs designed to chelate and solubilize the zinc ions to create electrolytes for this type of battery. These are based on quaternary alkoxy alkyl ammonium cations of varying oligo-ether side chains and anions such as p-toluene sulfonate, bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide and dicyanoamides. This work shows that increasing the ether chain length in the cation from two to four oxygens can increase the ionic conductivity and reduce the melting point from 67 °C to 15 °C for the tosylate system. Changing the anion also plays a significant role in the nature of the zinc deposition electrochemistry. We show that zinc can be reversibly deposited from [N(222(20201))][NTf2] and [N(222(202020201))][NTf2] beginning at -1.4 V and -1.7 V vs. SHE, respectively, but not in the case of tosylate based ILs. This indicates that the [NTf2] is a weaker coordinating anion with the zinc cation, compared to the tosylate anion, allowing the coordination of the ether chain to dominate the behavior of the deposition and stripping of zinc ions. PMID:23558696

  18. NASA Glenn Research Center Electrochemistry Branch Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzo, Michelle A.; Hoberecht, Mark; Reid, Concha

    2010-01-01

    This presentation covers an overview of NASA Glenn's history and heritage in the development of electrochemical systems for aerospace applications. Current programs related to batteries and fuel cells are addressed. Specific areas of focus are Li-ion batteries and Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel cells systems and their development for future Exploration missions. The presentation covers details of current component development efforts for high energy and ultra high energy Li-ion batteries and non-flow-through fuel cell stack and balance of plant development. Electrochemistry Branch capabilities and facilities are also addressed.

  19. Forensic electrochemistry: the electroanalytical sensing of synthetic cathinone-derivatives and their accompanying adulterants in "legal high" products.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jamie P; Metters, Jonathan P; Irving, Craig; Sutcliffe, Oliver B; Banks, Craig E

    2014-01-21

    The production and abuse of new psychoactive substances, known as "legal highs" which mimic traditional drugs of abuse is becoming a global epidemic. Traditional analytical methodologies exist which can provide confirmatory analysis but there is a requirement for an on-the-spot analytical screening tool that could be used to determine whether a substance, or sample matrix contains such legal, or formally "legal highs". In this paper the electrochemical sensing of (±)-methcathinone and related compounds at a range of commercially available electrode substrates is explored. We demonstrate for the first time that this class of "legal highs" are electrochemically active providing a novel sensing protocol based upon their electrochemical oxidation. Screen-printed graphite sensing platforms are favoured due to their proven ability to be mass-produced providing large numbers of reliable and reproducible electrode sensing platforms that preclude the requirement of surface pre-treatment such as mechanical polishing as is the case in the use of solid/re-usable electrode substrates. Additionally they hold potential to be used on-site potentially being the basis of an on-site legal high screening device. Consequently the electroanalytical sensing of (±)-methcathinone (3a), (±)-4′-methylmethcathinone [3b, 4-MMC, (±)-mephedrone] and (±)-4′-methyl-N-ethylcathinone (3c, 4-MEC) is explored using screen-printed sensing platforms with the effect of pH explored upon the analytical response with their analytical efficiency evaluated towards the target legal highs. Interesting at pH values below 6 the voltammetric response quantitatively changes from that of an electrochemically irreversible response to that of a quasi-reversible signature which can be used analytically. It is demonstrated for the first time that the electroanalytical sensing of (±)-methcathinone (3a), (±)-mephedrone (3b) and 4-MEC (3c) are possible with accessible linear ranges found to correspond to 16

  20. High-temperature plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.

    1988-03-01

    Both magnetic and inertial confinement research are entering the plasma parameter range of fusion reactor interest. This paper reviews the individual and common technical problems of these two approaches to the generation of thermonuclear plasmas, and describes some related applications of high-temperature plasma physics.

  1. Development of an Electrochemistry Teaching Sequence using a Phenomenographic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Velazquez, Sorangel

    Electrochemistry is the area of chemistry that studies electron transfer reactions across an interface. Chemistry education researchers have acknowledged that difficulties in electrochemistry instruction arise due to the level of abstraction of the topic, lack of adequate explanations and representations found in textbooks, and a quantitative emphasis in the application of concepts. Studies have identified conceptions (also referred to as misconceptions, alternative conceptions, etc.) about the electrochemical process that transcends academic and preparation levels (e.g., students and instructors) as well as cultural and educational settings. Furthermore, conceptual understanding of the electrochemical process requires comprehension of concepts usually studied in physics such as electric current, resistance and potential and often neglected in introductory chemistry courses. The lack of understanding of physical concepts leads to students. conceptions with regards to the relation between the concepts of redox reactions and electric circuits. The need for instructional materials to promote conceptual understanding of the electrochemical process motivated the development of the electrochemistry teaching sequence presented in this dissertation. Teaching sequences are educational tools that aim to bridge the gap between student conceptions and the scientific acceptable conceptions that instructors expect students to learn. This teaching sequence explicitly addresses known conceptions in electrochemistry and departs from traditional instruction in electrochemistry to reinforce students. previous knowledge in thermodynamics providing the foundation for the explicit relation of redox reactions and electric circuits during electrochemistry instruction. The scientific foundations of the electrochemical process are explained based on the Gibbs free energy (G) involved rather than on the standard redox potential values (E° ox/red) of redox half-reactions. Representations of

  2. Electrochemistry at carbon nanotubes: perspective and issues.

    PubMed

    Dumitrescu, Ioana; Unwin, Patrick R; Macpherson, Julie V

    2009-12-01

    Electrochemistry at carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is a large and growing field, but one in which there is still uncertainty about the fundamental activity of CNTs as electrode materials. On the one hand, there are many reports which focus on the favourable electrochemical properties of CNT electrodes, such as enhanced detection sensitivity, electrocatalytic effects and reduced fouling. On the other hand, other studies suggest that CNTs may be no more electroactive than graphitic powder. Furthermore, it has been proposed that the catalytic nanoparticles from which CNTs are formed may dominate the electrochemical characteristics in some instances. A considerable body of the literature presumes that the CNT sidewall is inert and that edge-plane-graphite-like open ends and defect sites are responsible for the electron transfer activity observed. In contrast, studies of well characterised single-walled nanotube (SWNT) electrodes, either as individual tubes or as two-dimensional networks, suggest sidewall activity. This review highlights how the various discrepancies in CNT electrochemistry may have arisen, by taking a historical view of the field and identifying crucial issues that still need to be solved. When assessing the behaviour of CNT electrodes, it is vitally important that careful consideration is given to the type of CNT used (SWNT or multi-walled), the quality of the material (presence of impurities), the effect of chemical processing steps in the fabrication of electrodes and the experimental arrangements adopted. Understanding these key features is an essential requirement to develop a fundamental understanding of CNT electrochemistry, to allow a wide range of electroanalytical applications, and to move the field forward rationally. As part of this process, high resolution electrochemical and electrical imaging techniques are expected to play a significant role in the future, as well as theoretical developments which examine the fundamentals of electron transfer

  3. A high energy physics perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1997-01-13

    The status of the Standard model and role of symmetry in its development are reviewed. Some outstanding problems are surveyed and possible solutions in the form of additional {open_quotes}Hidden Symmetries {close_quotes} are discussed. Experimental approaches to uncover {open_quotes}New Physics{close_quotes} associated with those symmetries are described with emphasis on high energy colliders. An outlook for the future is given.

  4. Scanning tunneling microscopy and electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvía, A. J.

    1987-03-01

    The experimental gap existing between surface science and heterogeneous chemical kinetics applies also to electrochemistry. Difficulties for modelling the electrode surface topography under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions, particularly for solid electrodes, are presented. Attention is focussed on structural problems of metal/solution interfaces encountered in corrosion and passivation of metals and in electrocatalysis, although the analysis also extends to metal electrodeposition and to semiconductor/solution interfaces. STM has already provided important imaging of preferred oriented platinum electrode surfaces as well as large surface area platinum electrodes exhibiting practically no diffusional and ohmic polarization effects. Possible applications of STM to underpotential deposition of metals and to chemically modified electrodes are envisaged among others. Some future perspectives of STM for electrochemistry are advanced.

  5. Duke University high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Fortney, L.R.; Goshaw, A.T.; Walker, W.D.

    1992-07-01

    This Progress Report presents a review of the research done in 1992 by the Duke High Energy Physics Group. This is the first year of a three-year grant which was approved by the Office of High Energy Physics at DOE after an external review of our research program during the summer of 1991. Our research is centered at Fermilab where we are involved with two active experiments, one using the Tevatron collider (CDF, the Collider Detector Facility) and the other using a proton beam in the high intensity laboratory (E771, study of beauty production). In addition to these running experiments we are continuing the analysis of data from experiments E735 (collider search for a quark-gluon plasma), E705 (fixed target study of direct photon and {sub {Chi}} meson production) and E597 (particle production from hadron-nucleus collisions). Finally, this year has seen an expansion of our involvement with the design of the central tracking detector for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) and an increased role in the governance of the collaboration. Descriptions of these research activities are presented in this report.

  6. High School Physics, Two-Year Colleges, and Physics Majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Susan C.

    2013-09-01

    We have just completed the data collection for our 2012-13 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics and expect to have results to report in the spring. In the interim, we will take a look at physics in two-year colleges (TYCs). In 2007, we surveyed undergraduate seniors in degree-granting physics departments, and we asked these students if they had begun the post-secondary career at a TYC. Nine percent of the physics undergraduate seniors in 2007 had started their college education at a TYC, and these students differ significantly from those who did not start at a TYC. The two graphs at right depict the high school physics experience for these two groups of students. More than one-fourth of those who started at a TYC did not take physics in high school, and only 18% took AP physics. The 6% of those who did not start at a TYC and did not take physics is consistent with the 5% of high school seniors who attend a school where physics is not offered. Their apparent difference of interest in physics in high school is also evident from their knowledge about AP physics offerings: 25% of those who started at a TYC did not know if AP physics was offered at their high school versus only 5% of those who did not start at a TYC. Since their high school physics experiences were so different, it is likely that something happened in their physics courses at the TYC that captured these students' interest in physics.

  7. European Physical Society Conference on High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The European Physical Society Conference on High Energy Physics, organized by the High Energy and Particle Physics Division of the European Physical Society, is a major international conference that reviews biennially since 1971 the state of our knowledge of the fundamental constituents of matter and their interactions. The latest conferences in this series were held in Stockholm, Grenoble, Krakow, Manchester, Lisbon, and Aachen. Jointly organized by the Institute of High Energy Physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the University of Vienna, the Vienna University of Technology, and the Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the 23rd edition of this conference took place in Vienna, Austria. Among the topics covered were Accelerators, Astroparticle Physics, Cosmology and Gravitation, Detector R&D and Data Handling, Education and Outreach, Flavour Physics and Fundamental Symmetries, Heavy Ion Physics, Higgs and New Physics, Neutrino Physics, Non-Perturbative Field Theory and String Theory, QCD and Hadronic Physics, as well as Top and Electroweak Physics.

  8. High School Physics, Two-Year Colleges, and Physics Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan C.

    2013-01-01

    We have just completed the data collection for our 2012-13 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics and expect to have results to report in the spring. In the interim, we will take a look at physics in two-year colleges (TYCs). In 2007, we surveyed undergraduate seniors in degree-granting physics departments, and we asked these students if they…

  9. Factors that Prevent Learning in Electrochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Hans-Jurgen; Marohn, Annette; Harrison, Allan G.

    2007-01-01

    Electrochemistry plays an important role in curricula, textbooks, and in everyday life. The purpose of the present study was to identify and understand secondary-school students' problems in learning electrochemistry at an introductory chemistry level. The investigation covered four areas: (a) electrolytes, (b) transport of electric charges in…

  10. Physical Activity Levels in Portuguese High School Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marmeleira, Jose Francisco Filipe; Aldeias, Nuno Micael Carrasqueira; da Graca, Pedro Miguel dos Santos Medeira

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to evaluate the physical activity (PA) levels of high school Portuguese students during physical education (PE) and investigate the association of PA levels with students' goal orientation and intrinsic motivation. Forty-six students from three high schools participated. Heart rate telemetry and pedometry were used…

  11. High School Student Attitudes about Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rikard, G. Linda; Banville, Dominique

    2006-01-01

    This study examined attitudes of high school students toward fitness and sports activities taught in physical education, and the perceived effectiveness of their physical education curriculum for improving their fitness and skill levels. Students from six high schools and 17 intact physical education classes agreed to participate. Data were…

  12. High School Physics Offerings by Socioeconomic Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-12-01

    This fall we have been examining physics classes in U.S. high schools by the principal's assessment of the socioeconomic profile of each school. This month we turn our focus to the distribution of high school physics enrollment across the different types of physics offered. Not only do fewer students take physics at "worse off" schools (see the October issue), but the types of physics courses students take also differs by socioeconomic profile. About 10% of the students taking physics at "worse off" schools take AP and second-year physics; almost 20% of the students at "better off" schools take these courses. At "worse off" schools, a higher proportion of students are enrolled in conceptual courses, including Physics First and regular physics taught using a conceptual textbook. The data we have presented over the last four months suggests that differences in physics taking in high school by blacks and Hispanics are driven, in part, by underlying socioeconomic factors. Other factors, such as the availability of additional seats in physics classes and the ability of teachers to attract students to physics, also impact physics taking. It is unlikely that the racial and ethnic differences in physics taking in high school will decrease unless the underlying factors are addressed.

  13. Numerical Modeling of the Distributed Electrochemistry and Performance of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Ryan, Emily M.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-12-01

    A cell-level distributed electrochemistry (DEC) modeling tool has been developed to enable prediction of solid oxide fuel cell performance by considering the coupled and spatially varying multi-physics that occur within the tri-layer. The approach calculates the distributed electrochemistry within the electrodes, which includes the charge transfer and electric potential fields, ion transport throughout the tri-layer, and gas distributions within the composite and porous electrodes. The thickness of the electrochemically active regions within the electrodes is calculated along with the distributions of charge transfer. The DEC modeling tool can examine the overall SOFC performance based on electrode microstructural parameters, such as particle size, pore size, porosity factor, electrolyte and electrode phase volume fractions, and triple-phase-boundary length. Recent developments in electrode fabrication methods have lead to increased interest in using graded and nano-structured electrodes to improve the electrochemical performance of SOFCs. This paper demonstrates how the DEC modeling tool can be used to help design novel electrode microstructures by optimizing a graded anode for high electrochemical performance.

  14. Precision Crystal Calorimeters in High Energy Physics

    ScienceCinema

    Ren-Yuan Zhu

    2010-01-08

    Precision crystal calorimeters traditionally play an important role in high energy physics experiments. In the last two decades, it faces a challenge to maintain its precision in a hostile radiation environment. This paper reviews the performance of crystal calorimeters constructed for high energy physics experiments and the progress achieved in understanding crystal?s radiation damage as well as in developing high quality scintillating crystals for particle physics. Potential applications of new generation scintillating crystals of high density and high light yield, such as LSO and LYSO, in particle physics experiments is also discussed.

  15. Semiconductor electrochemistry of coal pyrite

    SciTech Connect

    Osseo-Asare, K.

    1992-05-01

    This project seeks to advance the fundamental understanding of the physicochemical processes occurring at the pyrite/aqueous interface, in the context of coal cleaning, coal desulfurization, and acid mine drainage. A novel approach to the study of pyrite aqueous electrochemistry is proposed, based on the use of both synthetic and natural (i.e. coal-derived) pyrite specimens, the utilization of pyrite both in the form of micro (i.e. colloidal and subcolloidal) and macro (i.e. rotating ring disk)-electrodes, and the application of in-situ direct electroanalytical and spectroelectrochemical characterization techniques. Central to this research is the recognition that pyrite is a semiconductor material. (Photo)electrochemical experiments will be conducted to unravel the mechanisms of anodic and cathodic processes such as those associated with pyrite decomposition and the reduction of oxidants such as molecular oxygen and the ferric ion.

  16. Development of an Electrochemistry Teaching Sequence using a Phenomenographic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Velazquez, Sorangel

    Electrochemistry is the area of chemistry that studies electron transfer reactions across an interface. Chemistry education researchers have acknowledged that difficulties in electrochemistry instruction arise due to the level of abstraction of the topic, lack of adequate explanations and representations found in textbooks, and a quantitative emphasis in the application of concepts. Studies have identified conceptions (also referred to as misconceptions, alternative conceptions, etc.) about the electrochemical process that transcends academic and preparation levels (e.g., students and instructors) as well as cultural and educational settings. Furthermore, conceptual understanding of the electrochemical process requires comprehension of concepts usually studied in physics such as electric current, resistance and potential and often neglected in introductory chemistry courses. The lack of understanding of physical concepts leads to students. conceptions with regards to the relation between the concepts of redox reactions and electric circuits. The need for instructional materials to promote conceptual understanding of the electrochemical process motivated the development of the electrochemistry teaching sequence presented in this dissertation. Teaching sequences are educational tools that aim to bridge the gap between student conceptions and the scientific acceptable conceptions that instructors expect students to learn. This teaching sequence explicitly addresses known conceptions in electrochemistry and departs from traditional instruction in electrochemistry to reinforce students. previous knowledge in thermodynamics providing the foundation for the explicit relation of redox reactions and electric circuits during electrochemistry instruction. The scientific foundations of the electrochemical process are explained based on the Gibbs free energy (G) involved rather than on the standard redox potential values (E° ox/red) of redox half-reactions. Representations of

  17. An Effective Approach to Teaching Electrochemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birss, Viola I.; Truax, D. Rodney

    1990-01-01

    An approach which may be useful for teaching electrochemistry in freshman college chemistry courses is presented. Discussed are the potential problems with teaching this subject and solutions provided by this approach. (CW)

  18. Phun Physics 4 Phemales: Physics Camp for High School Girls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Chuhee; Gu, Jiyeong; Henriquez, Laura

    2014-03-01

    The department of Physics and Astronomy with the department of Science Education at California State University, Long Beach hosted summer program of ``Phun Physics 4 Phemales (PP4P)'' during summer 2012 and summer 2013 with the support from APS public outreach program. PP4P summer camp was hosted along with a two-week summer science camp, Young Scientists Camp, which has been institutionalized for the last 14 years since 1999. More than 2,500 3rd -8th grade students and 250 teachers have participated in the program. PP4P program provided the tools and support that female high school students need to pursue careers in physics and/or science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) field. This girls-only camp created connections among the girls and built confidence. In addition PP4P program introduced students to key principles in physics by a hands-on lab environment and demonstrated the real-world social impact of physics. In summer 2012, high school girls worked on physics experimental project on electronics and in summer 2013 they worked on the mechanics. I would share our experience in this program and the impact on the female high school students. This work was supported by 2012 Public Outreach and Informing the Public Grants from American Physical Society.

  19. Pulsars and high density physics.

    PubMed

    Hewish, A

    1975-06-13

    In outlining the physics of neutron stars, and my good fortune in stumbling upon them, I hope that I have given some idea of the interest and rewards of extending physics beyond the confines of laboratories. These are good times in which to be an astrophysicist. I am also deeply aware of my debt to all my colleagues in the Cavendish Laboratory. Firstly to Sir Martin Ryle for his unique flair in creating so congenial and stimulating a team in which to work. Secondly to Jocelyn Bell for the care, diligence, and persistence that led to our discovery so early in the scintillation program, and finally to my friends who contributed so generously in many aspects of the work. PMID:17798425

  20. PARTICIPATION IN HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS

    SciTech Connect

    White, Christopher

    2012-12-20

    This grant funded experimental and theoretical activities in elementary particles physics at the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT). The experiments in which IIT faculty collaborated included the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment, the MINOS experiment, the Double Chooz experiment, and FNAL E871 - HyperCP experiment. Funds were used to support summer salary for faculty, salary for postdocs, and general support for graduate and undergraduate students. Funds were also used for travel expenses related to these projects and general supplies.

  1. Who's Teaching What in High School Physics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan; Tyler, John

    2015-01-01

    During the 2012-13 school year, approximately 27,000 teachers taught at least one physics course in a U.S. high school. About one-third of those teachers have earned a degree in physics or physics education; the vast majority of the others have earned degrees in a variety of other science fields. About 53,000 physics classes were taught, ranging…

  2. Research in high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Jerome; Block, Martin; Buchholz, David; Gobbi, Bruno; Schellman, Heidi; Miller, Donald; Braaten, Eric; Oakes, Robert; Schellman, Heidi

    1994-07-01

    Progress on Task A centered around data analysis. E835 is now approved. It will extend E760 studies, exploring new charmonium states and featuring an upgraded detector system plus operation at 4--6 times higher luminosity. Results are given on E760 analysis. Task B has 10 papers that have either appeared in print, or have been prepared for publication. They break down into four categories; experimental physics, theoretical physics, and computer computational techniques. They are described here along with an exciting new experimental proposal to use Da(Phi)ne, the (Phi) factory that is being constructed at Frascati National Laboratory. Progress for Task C which includes participating in the D0 project at TeV 1, and the photoproduction experiment, E687, at TeV 2 is given. While Northwestern is not participating in the top quark physics group at D0, they have been involved in the data analysis and the discussions that led to the limits on the top quark mass. Task D comprises the shared services for the Northwestern DOE contract. This includes the maintenance and operation of all computers within the HEP group. The projects supported by Task D during the past year are given. Task E progress was to resolve the apparent conflict between EMC, SMC, and SLAC results on nucleon structure functions and Bjorken sum rules. Task F covered research in hadronic decay of the tau, thermal field theory, plasma effects in astrophysics, and heavy quarkonium. Task G covers E665, a general purpose muon scattering experiment which can detect both the scattered muon and most charged and neutral hadrons produced in the forward region. The Northwest group has collaborated very closely in the past year with the Harvard group on analyses of structure functions and vector meson production in the 1991 data sample.

  3. High Energy Physics Research at Louisiana Tech

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Lee; Greenwood, Zeno; Wobisch, Marcus

    2013-06-28

    The goal of this project was to create, maintain, and strengthen a world-class, nationally and internationally recognized experimental high energy physics group at Louisiana Tech University, focusing on research at the energy frontier of collider-based particle physics, first on the DØ experiment and then with the ATLAS experiment, and providing leadership within the US high energy physics community in the areas of jet physics, top quark and charged Higgs decays involving tau leptons, as well as developing leadership in high performance computing.

  4. High energy physics at UCR

    SciTech Connect

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-07-01

    The hadron collider group is studying proton-antiproton interactions at the world`s highest collision energy 2 TeV. Data-taking with the D0 detector is in progress at Fermilab and the authors have begun the search for the top quark. S. Wimpenny is coordinating the effort to detect t{bar t} decaying to two leptons, the most readily identifiable channel. At UC Riverside design and testing for a silicon tracker for the D0 upgrade is in progress; a parallel development for the SDC detector at SSC is also underway. The major group effort of the lepton group has been devoted to the OPAL experiment at LEP. They will continue to focus on data-taking to improve the quality and quantity of their data sample. A large number of papers have been published based on approximately 500,000 events taken so far. The authors will concentrate on physics analysis which provides stringent tests of the Standard Model. The authors are continuing participation in the RD5 experiment at the SPS to study muon triggering and tracking. The results of this experiment will provide critical input for the design of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment being proposed for the LHC. The theory group has been working on problems concerning the possible vilation of e-{mu}-{tau} universality, effective Lagrangians, neutrino physics, as well as quark and lepton mass matrices.

  5. Electrochemistry at nanometer-sized electrodes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shengli; Liu, Yuwen

    2014-01-14

    Electrodes of nanometer sizes provide a model approach to study the nanoscale electrochemical properties and processes, which are of fundamental and applied significance in a variety of areas including energy and environmental science, scanning probe microscopies, nanofabrication as well as electrochemistry itself. This Perspective reviews recent developments in conceptual understanding, theoretical modelling and simulation, and experimental observation of nanosize-induced properties and phenomena at interfaces between nanometer-sized electrodes and electrolytes. The aim is to provide a view on how the dimension comparability of nanoelectrodes with the electric double layer and the effective electron-tunnelling distance may raise distinct features in interfacial structure and reactivity. The strong coupling between the electrostatic field, the concentration field and the dielectric field of solvent at nanoelectrode/electrolyte interfaces is highlighted. The effects of this coupling on the voltammetric responses of nanoelectrodes are evaluated. Electron transfer kinetics at the nanoelectrode/electrolyte interface is discussed by emphasizing the inappropriateness of the Butler-Volmer (BV) and classic Marcus-Hush (MH) theories at potentials largely departing from the formal potential of the redox moieties and the importance of the long-distance electron tunnelling. The conditions for using the mathematically more straightforward BV and classic MH formalisms as an alternative to the physically more realistic but mathematically unfriendly Marcus-Hush-Chidsey model are analysed. PMID:24276332

  6. GEANT4: Applications in High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, Tariq; Zafar, Abrar Ahmed; Hussain, Talib; Rashid, Haris

    2007-02-14

    GEANT4 is a detector simulation toolkit aimed at studying, mainly experimental high energy physics. In this paper we will give an overview of this software with special reference to its applications in high energy physics experiments. A brief of process methods is given. Object-oriented nature of the simulation toolkit is highlighted.

  7. Solvents' Critical Role in Nonaqueous Lithium-Oxygen Battery Electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    McCloskey, B D; Bethune, D S; Shelby, R M; Girishkumar, G; Luntz, A C

    2011-05-19

    Among the many important challenges facing the development of Li-air batteries, understanding the electrolyte's role in producing the appropriate reversible electrochemistry (i.e., 2Li(+) + O2 + 2e(-) ↔ Li2O2) is critical. Quantitative differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS), coupled with isotopic labeling of oxygen gas, was used to study Li-O2 electrochemistry in various solvents, including carbonates (typical Li ion battery solvents) and dimethoxyethane (DME). In conjunction with the gas-phase DEMS analysis, electrodeposits formed during discharge on Li-O2 cell cathodes were characterized using ex situ analytical techniques, such as X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Carbonate-based solvents were found to irreversibly decompose upon cell discharge. DME-based cells, however, produced mainly lithium peroxide on discharge. Upon cell charge, the lithium peroxide both decomposed to evolve oxygen and oxidized DME at high potentials. Our results lead to two conclusions; (1) coulometry has to be coupled with quantitative gas consumption and evolution data to properly characterize the rechargeability of Li-air batteries, and (2) chemical and electrochemical electrolyte stability in the presence of lithium peroxide and its intermediates is essential to produce a truly reversible Li-O2 electrochemistry. PMID:26295320

  8. [Experimental and theoretical high energy physics program

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, J.; Gaidos, J.A.; Loeffler, F.J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Palfrey, T.R.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.

    1993-04-01

    Experimental and theoretical high-energy physics research at Purdue is summarized in a number of reports. Subjects treated include the following: the CLEO experiment for the study of heavy flavor physics; gas microstrip detectors; particle astrophysics; affine Kac{endash}Moody algebra; nonperturbative mass bounds on scalar and fermion systems due to triviality and vacuum stability constraints; resonance neutrino oscillations; e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions at CERN; {bar p}{endash}p collisions at FNAL; accelerator physics at Fermilab; development work for the SDC detector at SSC; TOPAZ; D-zero physics; physics beyond the standard model; and the Collider Detector at Fermilab. (RWR)

  9. Future of high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Panofsky, W.K.H.

    1984-06-01

    A rough overview is given of the expectations for the extension of high energy colliders and accelerators into the xtremely high energy range. It appears likely that the SSC or something like it will be the last gasp of the conventional method of producing high energy proton-proton collisions using synchrotron rings with superconducting magnets. It is likely that LEP will be the highest energy e+e/sup -/ colliding beam storage ring built. The future beyond that depends on the successful demonstrations of new technologies. The linear collider offers hope in this respect for some extension in energy for electrons, and maybe even for protons, but is too early to judge whether, by how much, or when such an extension will indeed take place.

  10. Electrochemistry "Discovery" Course for Undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Michael Alan; Gupta, Vijay K.

    1997-07-01

    We developed a chemistry selected topics course at Central State University, "Introduction to Laboratory Techniques in Electrochemistry" to: (1) give undergraduates hands-on experience with electrochemical measurements, (2) prepare students for summer research in Fuel Cell and Battery technology. Since students "learn by doing", the course is suitable for undergraduates from sophomore to senior levels. Students complete 6 laboratories, based on a "less is more" philosophy which emphasizes analytic and creative process rather than mandatory topical coverage. Eight electrochemical experiments are available: Construction of Zinc-Copper battery stacks, Lead Acid Battery discharge-charge cycles, Conductimetric titration of aspirin with Ammonium Hydroxide, Ion Selective Electrode determination of Fluoride in water, Cyclic Voltammetry of Potassium Ferricyanide solution, Cyclic Voltammetry of Sulfuric acid on Platinum working electrode, Anodic Stripping Voltammetry of Lead ion in solution, Differential Pulse Polarography of Lead ion in solution. Topics discussed in lecture include: chemical definitions, electrical definitions, Oxidation-Reduction reactions, Electrochemical series, Electrodes, Electrochemical Cells, direct Coulometry, electrolysis, electrochemical process efficiency, equilibrium Potentiometry, real Cell Voltages, Ion Selective Electrode types and designs, reference electrode designs, working electrode materials, pH buffers, Cyclic Voltammetry, Anodic Stripping Voltammetry, Polarography, differential pulse Polarography, and simple electrochemical instrumentation circuits.

  11. Semiconductor electrochemistry of coal pyrite

    SciTech Connect

    Osseo-Asare, K.; Wei, D.

    1992-01-01

    Pyrite synthesis is of interest in many diverse fields, such as geology, fuel processing technology, chemistry, metallurgy, materials science, and so on. Based on fundamental studies of this process, the formation mechanisms of this important sulfide on the earth can be better understood. The studies can also help us to better understand the surface chemistry and electrochemistry of pyrite, thereby assisting in the development of more efficient processes for removal of the sulfide from coal. The work performed during this quarter focuses on the study of the reaction between aqueous sulfide ions and dissolved Fe(II) salts by using a stopped-flow spectrophotometric technique. At a wavelength of 500 mn, no absorption was observed with either aqueous sulfide or dissolved Fe(II) salt alone. However, when the two solutions were mixed, a strong absorbance appeared at the same wavelength. The absorbance-time curve showed that a black material formed at the first few seconds of the reaction, then this material decayed and changed gradually to a lighter dark material within the following several minutes. These processes were pH-dependent. It was more likely to form the black intermediate at the pH range from 7 to 8. This indicates that the reaction between Fe[sup 2+] and HS[sup [minus

  12. UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherfoord, John P.; Johns, Kenneth A.; Shupe, Michael A.; Cheu, Elliott C.; Varnes, Erich W.; Dienes, Keith; Su, Shufang; Toussaint, William Doug; Sarcevic, Ina

    2013-07-29

    The High Energy Physics Group at the University of Arizona has conducted forefront research in elementary particle physics. Our theorists have developed new ideas in lattice QCD, SUSY phenomenology, string theory phenomenology, extra spatial dimensions, dark matter, and neutrino astrophysics. The experimentalists produced significant physics results on the ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider and on the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. In addition, the experimentalists were leaders in detector development and construction, and on service roles in these experiments.

  13. High energy physics in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Month, M.

    1985-10-16

    The US program in high energy physics from 1985 to 1995 is reviewed. The program depends primarily upon work at the national accelerator centers, but includes a modest but diversified nonaccelerator program. Involvement of universities is described. International cooperation in high energy physics is discussed, including the European, Japanese, USSR, and the People's Republic of China's programs. Finally, new facilities needed by the US high energy physics program are discussed, with particular emphasis given to a Superconducting Super Collider for achieving ever higher energies in the 20 TeV range. (LEW)

  14. Computing in high-energy physics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mount, Richard P.

    2016-05-31

    I present a very personalized journey through more than three decades of computing for experimental high-energy physics, pointing out the enduring lessons that I learned. This is followed by a vision of how the computing environment will evolve in the coming ten years and the technical challenges that this will bring. I then address the scale and cost of high-energy physics software and examine the many current and future challenges, particularly those of management, funding and software-lifecycle management. Lastly, I describe recent developments aimed at improving the overall coherence of high-energy physics software.

  15. Guidelines for High School Physics Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Physics Teachers (NJ1), 2002

    2002-01-01

    The American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) developed this document as a resource for high school administrators, parents, and teachers who are interested in developing guidelines for physics curriculum and instruction in their school(s). These guidelines reflect the goals of the AAPT, with an emphasis on instructional strategies and…

  16. Trends in experimental high-energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.

    1982-06-01

    Data from a scan of papers in Physical Review Letters and Physical Review are used to demonstrate that American high-energy physicists show a pattern of accelerator and instrumentation usage characteristic of that expected from the logistic-substitution model of Marchetti and of Fischer and Pry.

  17. AAPT/NSTA High School Physics Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, James

    1983-01-01

    Discusses development of the American Association of Physics Teachers and National Science Teachers Association (AAPT/NSTA) high school physics examination. Includes sample examination questions and distribution of topics: mechanics (30 percent), waves/optics/sound (20 percent), heat/kinetic theory (10 percent), electricity/magnetism (25 percent),…

  18. Research in High Energy Physics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, John S.

    2013-08-09

    This final report details the work done from January 2010 until April 2013 in the area of experimental and theoretical high energy particle physics and cosmology at the University of California, Davis.

  19. Physics Research Methods at Jefferson High.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demchik, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Described are several physics activities developed by a high school: research corner, exploring an invention, construction projects, archives report and archives update, short term research and design projects, essay contest, and special projects. (YP)

  20. Physics at high energy photon photon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1994-06-01

    I review the physic prospects for high energy photon photon colliders, emphasizing results presented at the LBL Gamma Gamma Collider Workshop. Advantages and difficulties are reported for studies of QCD, the electroweak gauge sector, supersymmetry, and electroweak symmetry breaking.

  1. Connecting High School Physics Experiences, Outcome Expectations, Physics Identity, and Physics Career Choice: A Gender Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazari, Zahra; Sonnert, Gerhard; Sadler, Philip M.; Shanahan, Marie-Claire

    2010-01-01

    This study explores how students' physics identities are shaped by their experiences in high school physics classes and by their career outcome expectations. The theoretical framework focuses on physics identity and includes the dimensions of student performance, competence, recognition by others, and interest. Drawing data from the Persistence…

  2. Tungsten Oxides for Photocatalysis, Electrochemistry, and Phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhen-Feng; Song, Jiajia; Pan, Lun; Zhang, Xiangwen; Wang, Li; Zou, Ji-Jun

    2015-09-23

    The conversion, storage, and utilization of renewable energy have all become more important than ever before as a response to ever-growing energy and environment concerns. The performance of energy-related technologies strongly relies on the structure and property of the material used. The earth-abundant family of tungsten oxides (WOx ≤3 ) receives considerable attention in photocatalysis, electrochemistry, and phototherapy due to their highly tunable structures and unique physicochemical properties. Great breakthroughs have been made in enhancing the optical absorption, charge separation, redox capability, and electrical conductivity of WOx ≤3 through control of the composition, crystal structure, morphology, and construction of composite structures with other materials, which significantly promotes the efficiency of processes and devices based on this material. Herein, the properties and synthesis of WOx ≤3 family are reviewed, and then their energy-related applications are highlighted, including solar-light-driven water splitting, CO2 reduction, and pollutant removal, electrochromism, supercapacitors, lithium batteries, solar and fuel cells, non-volatile memory devices, gas sensors, and cancer therapy, from the aspect of function-oriented structure design and control. PMID:26287959

  3. Elementary particle physics and high energy phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, A.R.; Cumalat, J.P.; de Alwis, S.P.; DeGrand, T.A.; Ford, W.T.; Mahanthappa, K.T.; Nauenberg, U.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.

    1992-06-01

    This report discusses the following research in high energy physics: the properties of the z neutral boson with the SLD detector; the research and development program for the SDC muon detector; the fixed-target k-decay experiments; the Rocky Mountain Consortium for HEP; high energy photoproduction of states containing heavy quarks; and electron-positron physics with the CLEO II and Mark II detectors. (LSP).

  4. High energy physics at UC Riverside

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    This report discusses progress made for the following two tasks: experimental high energy physics, Task A, and theoretical high energy physics, Task B. Task A1 covers hadron collider physics. Information for Task A1 includes: personnel/talks/publications; D0: proton-antiproton interactions at 2 TeV; SDC: proton-proton interactions at 40 TeV; computing facilities; equipment needs; and budget notes. The physics program of Task A2 has been the systematic study of leptons and hadrons. Information covered for Task A2 includes: personnel/talks/publications; OPAL at LEP; OPAL at LEP200; CMS at LHC; the RD5 experiment; LSND at LAMPF; and budget notes. The research activities of the Theory Group are briefly discussed and a list of completed or published papers for this period is given.

  5. HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS POTENTIAL AT MUON COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    2000-04-07

    In this paper, high energy physics possibilities and future colliders are discussed. The {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup {minus}} collider and experiments with high intensity muon beams as the stepping phase towards building Higher Energy Muon Colliders (HEMC) are briefly reviewed and encouraged.

  6. Advanced Analysis Methods in High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Pushpalatha C. Bhat

    2001-10-03

    During the coming decade, high energy physics experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron and around the globe will use very sophisticated equipment to record unprecedented amounts of data in the hope of making major discoveries that may unravel some of Nature's deepest mysteries. The discovery of the Higgs boson and signals of new physics may be around the corner. The use of advanced analysis techniques will be crucial in achieving these goals. The author discusses some of the novel methods of analysis that could prove to be particularly valuable for finding evidence of any new physics, for improving precision measurements and for exploring parameter spaces of theoretical models.

  7. Experimental and theoretical high energy physics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Progress in the various components of the UCLA High-Energy Physics Research program is summarized, including some representative figures and lists of resulting presentations and published papers. Principal efforts were in the following areas: (1) UCLA hadronization model, PEP4/9 e(+)e(-) analysis, and (bar-P) decay; (2) ICARUS and astroparticle physics (physics goals, technical progress on electronics, data acquisition, detector performance, long baseline neutrino beam from CERN to the Gran Sasso and ICARUS, future ICARUS program, and WIMP experiment with xenon), B physics with hadron beams and colliders, high-energy collider physics, and the phi factory project; (3) theoretical high-energy physics; (4) H dibaryon search, search for K(sub L)(sup 0) yields (pi)(sup 0)(gamma)(gamma) and (pi)(sup 0)(nu)(bar-nu), and detector design and construction for the FNAL-KTeV project; (5) UCLA participation in the experiment CDF at Fermilab; and (6) VLPC/scintillating fiber R & D.

  8. [High Energy Physics: Research in high energy physics]. Annual report, FY 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Barish, B C

    1982-12-31

    This report discusses high energy physics research on: Quantum chromodynamics; neutrinos; multiparticle spectrometers; inclusive scattering; Mark III detector; and cascade decays of phi resonances. (LSP)

  9. Teaching Computational Physics to High School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cancio, Antonio C.

    2007-10-01

    This talk describes my experience in developing and giving an experimental workshop to expose high school teachers to basic concepts in computer modeling and give them tools to make simple 3D simulations for class demos and student projects. Teachers learned basic techniques of simulating dynamics using high school and introductory college level physics and basic elements of programming. High quality graphics were implemented in an easy to use, open source software package, VPython, currently in use in college introductory courses. Simulations covered areas of everyday physics accessible to computational approaches which would otherwise be hard to treat at introductory level, such as the physics of sports, realistic planetary motion and chaotic motion. The challenges and successes of teaching this subject in an experimental one-week-long workshop format, and to an audience completely new to the subject will be discussed.

  10. Examples from Astronomy for High School Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieterich, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    A formal course in physics is increasingly becoming a standard requirement in the high school curriculum. With that dissemination comes the challenge of reaching and motivating a population that is more diverse in their academic abilities and intrinsic motivation. The abstract nature of pure physics is often made more accessible when motivated by examples from everyday life, and providing copious mathematical as well as conceptual examples has become standard practice in high school physics textbooks. Astronomy is a naturally captivating subject and astronomical examples are often successful in capturing the curiosity of high school students as well as the general population. This project seeks to diversify the range of pedagogical materials available to the high school physics instructor by compiling and publishing specific examples where an astronomical concept can be used to motivate the physics curriculum. This collection of examples will consist of both short problems suitable for daily homework assignments as well as longer project style activities. Collaborations are encouraged and inquiries should be directed to sdieterich at carnegiescience dot edu.This work is funded by the NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowship Program through NSF grant AST-1400680.

  11. A Tape-Lecture Course in Electrochemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheridan, P.

    1978-01-01

    Investigates the possibility of using audio-tapes for self-study courses in technical colleges. This article presents: (1) description of the electrochemistry course taught; (2) results of the assessment of student reaction to the course; and (3) conclusions. (HM)

  12. Electrochemistry in the General Chemistry Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, James Q.

    1983-01-01

    Outlines several ideas on introductory electrochemistry material suitable for college-level general chemistry. These include discussions of conductivity in solids and electrolytes, electrical quantities/properties, electrode potentials, and membrane potentials. Indicates that whatever strategy is used to present this material, the presentation…

  13. COMPILATION OF CURRENT HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Wohl, C.G.; Kelly, R.L.; Armstrong, F.E.; Horne, C.P.; Hutchinson, M.S.; Rittenberg, A.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P.; Addis, L.; Ward, C.E.W.; Baggett, N.; Goldschmidt-Clermong, Y.; Joos, P.; Gelfand, N.; Oyanagi, Y.; Grudtsin, S.N.; Ryabov, Yu.G.

    1981-05-01

    This is the fourth edition of our compilation of current high energy physics experiments. It is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and nine participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), the Institute for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (INS), KEK, Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. The compilation includes summaries of all high energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that (1) were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about April 1981, and (2) had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1977. We emphasize that only approved experiments are included.

  14. High-Pressure Research in Mineral Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazen, Robert M.

    Advances in high-pressure science and technology have transformed solid Earth geophysics. In the last decade, high-pressure researchers have reproduced the full range of Earth pressure and temperature conditions in the laboratory, and they have synthesized single crystals of dense silicate phases, unknown at the Earth's surface yet suspected to comprise most of the Earth's volume. These and other extraordinary accomplishments are chronicled in High-Pressure Research in Mineral Physics, an outgrowth of the third U.S.-Japan High-Pressure seminar, held in Kahuku, Hawaii, January, 13-16, 1986. The well produced and reasonably priced volume is dedicated to Syun-iti Akimoto, dean of Japanese high-pressure research, who recently retired from the University of Tokyo. Akimoto's fascinating historical account of pressure research at the Institute for Solid State Physics at the University of Tokyo is the leadoff article.

  15. Direct Electrochemistry and Electrocatalysis of Myoglobin Immobilized on Graphene-CTAB-Ionic Liquid Nanocomposite Film

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Honggang; Wu, Hong; Wang, Jun; Liu, Jun; Jiang, Yanxia; Sun, Shigang; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-10-01

    We have investigated direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis of myoglobin immobilized on graphene-cetylramethylammonium bromide (CTAB)-ionic liquid nanocomposite film on a glassy carbon electrode. The nanocomposite was characterized by TEM, SEM, XPS, and electrochemistry. It was found that the high surface area of graphene was helpful for immobilizing more proteins and the nanocomposite film can provide a favorable microenvironment for MB to retain its native structure and activity and to achieve reversible direct electron transfer reaction at an electrode. The nanocomposite films also exhibit good stability and catalytic activities for the electrocatalytic reduction of H2O2.

  16. LAPTAG High School Plasma Physics laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layton, William; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick

    1999-11-01

    Six years ago an alliance of about thirty high schools and community colleges, and the UCLA physics department was initiated. LAPTAG (Los Angeles teachers Alliance Group) started with laboratory tours, a Web based astronomy course and a seismology project funded by the Office of the President of the University of California. Laptag has a website: [ http://coke.physics.ucla.edu/laptag] in which these projects as well as websites of the individual schools may be found. Recently we were funded by DOE to construct a plasma physics laboratory, which will reside at UCLA, but used by the high school teachers and their students. The machine is presently under construction by a team of eight high school teachers under the supervision of UCLA plasma physicists. The plasma will be generated by a helicon source, and then drift into a field free test chamber surrounded by confining permanent magnets. The preliminary experiments will be on ion acoustic waves and the mapping of the p! lasma potential. Presently we are giving the teachers a summer course in plasma Physics after which they will write a laboratory manual and lecture notes for a high school laboratory based course. In some schools this will be offered as part of an "AP" course and at others as a special laboratory. The courses will be taught by the high school teachers and offered this Fall semester. We will present pictures of the device, preliminary data, and course material.

  17. Electrochemistry of Q-Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randviir, Edward P.; Brownson, Dale A. C.; Gómez-Mingot, Maria; Kampouris, Dimitrios K.; Iniesta, Jesús; Banks, Craig E.

    2012-09-01

    A newly synthesised type of graphene, Q-Graphene, has been physically and electrochemically characterised with Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy (SEM, TEM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Cyclic Voltammetry (CV). Interpretation of SEM, TEM and XPS data reveal the material to consist of hollow carbon nanospheres of multi-layer graphene (viz. graphite), which exhibit a total oxygen content of ca. 36.0% (atomic weight via XPS). In addition to the carbon structures present, spherical magnesium oxide particles of <=50 nm in diameter are abundantly present in the sample (ca. 16.2%). Interestingly, although the TEM/SEM images show macroporous carbon structures, Raman spectroscopy shows peaks typically characteristic of graphene, which suggests the material is highly heterogeneous and consists of many types of carbon allotropes. Q-Graphene is electrochemically characterised using both inner-sphere and outer-sphere electrochemical redox probes, namely potassium ferrocyanide(ii), hexaammine-ruthenium(iii) chloride and hexachloroiridate(iii), in addition to the biologically relevant and electroactive analytes, norepinephrine, β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and l-ascorbic acid. The electrochemical response of Q-Graphene is benchmarked against edge plane- and basal plane-pyrolytic graphite (EPPG and BPPG respectively), pristine graphene and graphite alternatives. Q-Graphene is found to exhibit fast electron transfer kinetics, likely due to its high proportion of folded edges and surface defects, exhibiting a response similar to that of EPPG - which exhibits fast electron transfer rates due to the high proportion of edge plane sites it possesses. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the specific oxygen content plays a pivotal role in dictating the observed electrochemical response, which is analyte dependant. Consequently there is potential for this new member of the graphene family to be beneficially utilised in various electrochemical

  18. Electrochemistry of Q-graphene.

    PubMed

    Randviir, Edward P; Brownson, Dale A C; Gómez-Mingot, Maria; Kampouris, Dimitrios K; Iniesta, Jesús; Banks, Craig E

    2012-10-21

    A newly synthesised type of graphene, Q-Graphene, has been physically and electrochemically characterised with Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy (SEM, TEM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Cyclic Voltammetry (CV). Interpretation of SEM, TEM and XPS data reveal the material to consist of hollow carbon nanospheres of multi-layer graphene (viz. graphite), which exhibit a total oxygen content of ca. 36.0% (atomic weight via XPS). In addition to the carbon structures present, spherical magnesium oxide particles of ≤50 nm in diameter are abundantly present in the sample (ca. 16.2%). Interestingly, although the TEM/SEM images show macroporous carbon structures, Raman spectroscopy shows peaks typically characteristic of graphene, which suggests the material is highly heterogeneous and consists of many types of carbon allotropes. Q-Graphene is electrochemically characterised using both inner-sphere and outer-sphere electrochemical redox probes, namely potassium ferrocyanide(II), hexaammine-ruthenium(III) chloride and hexachloroiridate(III), in addition to the biologically relevant and electroactive analytes, norepinephrine, β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and l-ascorbic acid. The electrochemical response of Q-Graphene is benchmarked against edge plane- and basal plane-pyrolytic graphite (EPPG and BPPG respectively), pristine graphene and graphite alternatives. Q-Graphene is found to exhibit fast electron transfer kinetics, likely due to its high proportion of folded edges and surface defects, exhibiting a response similar to that of EPPG - which exhibits fast electron transfer rates due to the high proportion of edge plane sites it possesses. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the specific oxygen content plays a pivotal role in dictating the observed electrochemical response, which is analyte dependant. Consequently there is potential for this new member of the graphene family to be beneficially utilised in various electrochemical

  19. Status of (US) High Energy Physics Networking

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, H.E.

    1987-02-01

    The current status of Networking to and between computers used by the High Energy Physics community is discussed. Particular attention is given to developments over the last year and to future prospects. Comparison between the current status and that of two years ago indicates that considerable strides have been made but that much remains to be done to achieve an acceptable level of functionality.

  20. Frontiers for Discovery in High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, R. C.; Katsouleas, T.; Arons, J.; Baring, M.; Deeney, C.; Di Mauro, L.; Ditmire, T.; Falcone, R.; Hammer, D.; Hill, W.; Jacak, B.; Joshi, C.; Lamb, F.; Lee, R.; Logan, B. G.; Melissinos, A.; Meyerhofer, D.; Mori, W.; Murnane, M.; Remington, B.; Rosner, R.; Schneider, D.; Silvera, I.; Stone, J.; Wilde, B.; Zajc. W.

    2004-07-20

    The report is intended to identify the compelling research opportunities of high intellectual value in high energy density physics. The opportunities for discovery include the broad scope of this highly interdisciplinary field that spans a wide range of physics areas including plasma physics, laser and particle beam physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, atomic and molecular physics, materials science and condensed matter physics, intense radiation-matter interaction physics, fluid dynamics, and magnetohydrodynamics

  1. Surprises in High Energy Density Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    Edward Teller's work on what is now called High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) is not so well known as some of his work in other areas of physics. Yet he made substantial contributions since the 1940s and the models that he developed and the problems that he worked on are still relevant today. In this talk we shall look at two major areas in HEDP with the first treated more historically and the second more with a view to recent work that the author and others have undertaken which perhaps indicates future directions.

  2. Controlled thermonuclear fusion, high temperature plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-05-01

    The primary source of nuclear energy comes from the fission process of heavy nuclei. To utilize the energy released by a thermonuclear fusion process, methods of controlling the fusion reaction were studied. This is controlled thermonuclear fusion technology. The fuel used in a thermonuclear fusion process are isotopes of hydrogen: deuterium and tritium. They can be extracted from the almost unlimited seawater. Nuclear fusion also produces very little radioactive waste. Thermonuclear fusion is a promising energy source with an almost unlimited supply; it is economical, safe, and relatively clean. Ways to raise plasma temperature to a very high level and to maintain it to allow fusion reactions to take place are studied. The physical laws of high temperature plasma was studied to reach this goal which resulted in the development of high temperature plasma physics.

  3. New accelerators in high-energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Blewett, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    First, I should like to mention a few new ideas that have appeared during the last few years in the accelerator field. A couple are of importance in the design of injectors, usually linear accelerators, for high-energy machines. Then I shall review some of the somewhat sensational accelerator projects, now in operation, under construction or just being proposed. Finally, I propose to mention a few applications of high-energy accelerators in fields other than high-energy physics. I realize that this is a digression from my title but I hope that you will find it interesting.

  4. UPR/Mayaguez High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, Hector

    2014-10-31

    This year the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez (UPRM) High Energy Physics (HEP) group continued with the ongoing research program outlined in the grant proposal. The program is centered on the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the proton-proton (pp) collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. The main research focus is on data analysis and on the preparation for the High Luminosity (HL) LHC or experiment detector upgrade. The physics data analysis included Higgs Doublet Search and measurement of the (1) Λ0b branching fraction, (2) B meson mass, and (3) hyperon θ-b lifetime. The detector upgrade included work on the preparations for the Forward Pixel (FPIX) detector Silicon Sensor Testing in a production run at Fermilab. In addition, the group has taken responsibilities on the Software Release through our former research associate Dr. Eric Brownson who acted until last December as a Level Two Offline Manager for the CMS Upgrade. In support of the CMS data analysis activities carried out locally, the UPRM group has built and maintains an excellent Tier3 analysis center in Mayaguez. This allowed us to analyze large data samples and to continue the development of algorithms for the upgrade tracking robustness we started several years ago, and we plan to resume in the near future. This project involves computer simulation of the radiation damage to be suffered at the higher luminosities of the upgraded LHC. This year we continued to serve as a source of outstanding students for the field of high energy physics. Three of our graduate students finished their MS work in May, 2014, Their theses research were on data analysis of heavy quark b-physics. All of them are currently enrolled at Ph.D. physics program across the nation. One of them (Hector Moreno) at New Mexico University (Hector Moreno), one at University of New Hampshire (Sandra Santiesteban) and one at University of

  5. Physical Metallurgy of High-Entropy Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Jien-Wei

    2015-08-01

    Two definitions of high-entropy alloys (HEAs), based on composition and entropy, are reviewed. Four core effects, i.e., high entropy, sluggish diffusion, severe lattice distortion, and cocktail effects, are mentioned to show the uniqueness of HEAs. The current state of physical metallurgy is discussed. As the compositions of HEAs are entirely different from that of conventional alloys, physical metallurgy principles might need to be modified for HEAs. The thermodynamics, kinetics, structure, and properties of HEAs are briefly discussed relating with the four core effects of HEAs. Among these, a severe lattice distortion effect is particularly emphasized because it exerts direct and indirect influences on many aspects of microstructure and properties. Because a constituent phase in HEAs can be regarded as a whole-solute matrix, every lattice site in the matrix has atomic-scale lattice distortion. In such a distorted lattice, point defects, line defects, and planar defects are different from those in conventional matrices in terms of atomic configuration, defect energy, and dynamic behavior. As a result, mechanical and physical properties are significantly influenced by such a distortion. Suitable mechanisms and theories correlating composition, microstructure, and properties for HEAs are required to be built in the future. Only these understandings make it possible to complete the physical metallurgy of the alloy world.

  6. Fundamental Physics Explored with High Intensity Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, T.; Homma, K.

    2012-10-01

    Over the last century the method of particle acceleration to high energies has become the prime approach to explore the fundamental nature of matter in laboratory. It appears that the latest search of the contemporary accelerator based on the colliders shows a sign of saturation (or at least a slow-down) in increasing its energy and other necessary parameters to extend this frontier. We suggest two pronged approach enabled by the recent progress in high intensity lasers. First we envision the laser-driven plasma accelerator may be able to extend the reach of the collider. For this approach to bear fruit, we need to develop the technology of high averaged power laser in addition to the high intensity. For this we mention that the latest research effort of ICAN is an encouraging sign. In addition to this, we now introduce the concept of the noncollider paradigm in exploring fundamental physics with high intensity (and large energy) lasers. One of the examples we mention is the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) far beyond TeV without large luminosity. If we relax or do not require the large luminosity necessary for colliders, but solely in ultrahigh energy frontier, we are still capable of exploring such a fundamental issue. Given such a high energetic particle source and high-intensity laser fields simultaneously, we expect to be able to access new aspects on the matter and the vacuum structure from fundamental physical point of views. LWFA naturally exploits the nonlinear optical effects in the plasma when it becomes of relativistic intensity. Normally nonlinear optical effects are discussed based upon polarization susceptibility of matter to external fields. We suggest application of this concept even to the vacuum structure as a new kind of order parameter to discuss vacuum-originating phenomena at semimacroscopic scales. This viewpoint unifies the following observables with the unprecedented experimental environment we envision; the dispersion relation of

  7. Seminal Publications in Electrochemistry and Electroanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Fritz; Inzelt, György; Stojek, Zbigniew

    This compilation of seminal publications in electrochemistry and electroanalysis is neither complete nor are all the listed contributions of the same importance. The authors feel that it might be of interest and very rewarding for people who use electroanalytical methods in the laboratory to go back to the roots and read some of the publications which later initiated strong developments of the science that is presented in this book. Many of the contributions to science cited here became an inherent part of textbooks and common knowledge so that the original work is usually not referred to and access to this information is difficult. The following web pages give access to much more information on the history of electrochemistry and electroanalysis:

  8. High-precision arithmetic in mathematical physics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.

    2015-05-12

    For many scientific calculations, particularly those involving empirical data, IEEE 32-bit floating-point arithmetic produces results of sufficient accuracy, while for other applications IEEE 64-bit floating-point is more appropriate. But for some very demanding applications, even higher levels of precision are often required. Furthermore, this article discusses the challenge of high-precision computation, in the context of mathematical physics, and highlights what facilities are required to support future computation, in light of emerging developments in computer architecture.

  9. Modified fractal iron oxide magnetic nanostructure: A novel and high performance platform for redox protein immobilization, direct electrochemistry and bioelectrocatalysis application.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Hasan; Ranjbari, Elias; Amiri-Aref, Mohaddeseh; Hajian, Ali; Ardakani, Yalda Hosseinzadeh; Amidi, Salimeh

    2016-11-15

    A novel biosensing platform based on fractal-pattern of iron oxides magnetic nanostructures (FIOMNs) and mixed hemi/ad-micelle of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was designed for the magnetic immobilization of hemoglobin (Hb) at a screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE). The FIOMNs was successfully synthesized through hydrothermal approach and characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). In order to provide guidelines for the mixed hemi/ad-micelle formation, zeta-potential isotherms were investigated. The construction steps of the biosensor were evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Direct electron transfer of Hb incorporated into the biocomposite film was realized with a pair of quasi-reversible redox peak at the formal potential of -0.355V vs. Ag/AgCl attributing to heme Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox couple. The results suggested that synergistic functions regarding to the hyper-branched and multidirectional structure of FIOMNs and the dual interaction ability of mixed hemi/ad-micelle array of SDS molecules not only induce an effective electron transfer between the Hb and the underlying electrode (high heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant of 2.08s(-1)) but also provide powerful and special microenvironment for the adsorption of the redox proteins. Furthermore, the biosensor displayed an excellent performance to the electrocatalytic reduction of H2O2 with a detection limit of 0.48µM and Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) value of 44.2µM. The fabricated biosensor represented the features of sensitivity, disposable design, low sample volume, rapid and simple preparation step, and acceptable anti-interferences, which offer great perspectives for the screen-determination of H2O2 in real samples. PMID:27290665

  10. Electrochemistry of Silicon: Instrumentation, Science, Materials and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Volker

    2002-04-01

    Silicon has been and will most probably continue to be the dominant material in semiconductor technology. Although the defect-free silicon single crystal is one of the best understood systems in materails science, its electrochemistry to many people is still a kind of "alchemy". This view is partly due to the interdisciplinary aspects of the topic: Physics meets chemistry at the silicon-electrolyte interface. This book gives a comprehensive overview of this important aspect of silicon technology as well as examples of applications ranging from photonic crystals to biochips. It will serve materials scientists as well as engineers involved in silicon technology as a quick reference with its more than 150 technical tables and diagrams and ca. 1000 references cited for easy access of the original literature.

  11. High energy physics research. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Piroue, P.A.

    1992-10-01

    The goal of this research is to understand the fundamental constituents of matter and their interactions. At this time, the following activities are underway: e{sup {plus}}e{sup {minus}} interactions and Z{sup 0} physics at CERN; studies to upgrade the L3 detector at LHC; very high statistics charm physics at Fermilab; search for the H particle at BNL; search for the fifth force; rare kaon decay experiments at BNL; study of B-meson physics at hadron colliders; e{sup {plus}}e{sup {minus}} pair creation by light at SLAC; R&D related to SSC experiments and the GEM detector; and theoretical research in elementary particle physics and cosmology. The main additions to the activities described in detail in the original grant proposal are (1) an experiment at SLAC (E-144) to study strong-field QED effects in e-laser and {gamma}-laser collisions, and (2) a search for the H particle at BNL (E-188). The R&D efforts for the GEM detector have also considerably expanded. In this paper we give a brief status report for each activity currently under way.

  12. High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Dart, Eli; Bauerdick, Lothar; Bell, Greg; Ciuffo, Leandro; Dasu, Sridhara; Dattoria, Vince; De, Kaushik; Ernst, Michael; Finkelson, Dale; Gottleib, Steven; Gutsche, Oliver; Habib, Salman; Hoeche, Stefan; Hughes-Jones, Richard; Ibarra, Julio; Johnston, William; Kisner, Theodore; Kowalski, Andy; Lauret, Jerome; Luitz, Steffen; Mackenzie, Paul; Maguire, Chales; Metzger, Joe; Monga, Inder; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Nielsen, Jason; Price, Larry; Porter, Jeff; Purschke, Martin; Rai, Gulshan; Roser, Rob; Schram, Malachi; Tull, Craig; Watson, Chip; Zurawski, Jason

    2014-03-02

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements needed by instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In August 2013, ESnet and the DOE SC Offices of High Energy Physics (HEP) and Nuclear Physics (NP) organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by the HEP and NP program offices. Several key findings resulted from the review. Among them: 1. The Large Hadron Collider?s ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC Apparatus) and CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) experiments are adopting remote input/output (I/O) as a core component of their data analysis infrastructure. This will significantly increase their demands on the network from both a reliability perspective and a performance perspective. 2. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments (particularly ATLAS and CMS) are working to integrate network awareness into the workflow systems that manage the large number of daily analysis jobs (1 million analysis jobs per day for ATLAS), which are an integral part of the experiments. Collaboration with networking organizations such as ESnet, and the consumption of performance data (e.g., from perfSONAR [PERformance Service Oriented Network monitoring Architecture]) are critical to the success of these efforts. 3. The international aspects of HEP and NP collaborations continue to expand. This includes the LHC experiments, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) experiments, the Belle II Collaboration, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and others. The international nature of these collaborations makes them heavily

  13. Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP)

    SciTech Connect

    Nandi, S; Strauss, M J; Snow, J; Rizatdinova, F; Abbott, B; Babu, K; Gutierrez, P; Kao, C; Khanov, A; Milton, K A; Neaman, H; H Severini, P Skubic

    2012-02-29

    The DOE EPSCoR implementation grant, with the support from the State of Oklahoma and from the three universities, Oklahoma State University, University of Oklahoma and Langston University, resulted in establishing of the Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP) in 2004. Currently, OCHEP continues to flourish as a vibrant hub for research in experimental and theoretical particle physics and an educational center in the State of Oklahoma. All goals of the original proposal were successfully accomplished. These include foun- dation of a new experimental particle physics group at OSU, the establishment of a Tier 2 computing facility for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and Tevatron data analysis at OU and organization of a vital particle physics research center in Oklahoma based on resources of the three universities. OSU has hired two tenure-track faculty members with initial support from the grant funds. Now both positions are supported through OSU budget. This new HEP Experimental Group at OSU has established itself as a full member of the Fermilab D0 Collaboration and LHC ATLAS Experiment and has secured external funds from the DOE and the NSF. These funds currently support 2 graduate students, 1 postdoctoral fellow, and 1 part-time engineer. The grant initiated creation of a Tier 2 computing facility at OU as part of the Southwest Tier 2 facility, and a permanent Research Scientist was hired at OU to maintain and run the facility. Permanent support for this position has now been provided through the OU university budget. OCHEP represents a successful model of cooperation of several universities, providing the establishment of critical mass of manpower, computing and hardware resources. This led to increasing Oklahoma's impact in all areas of HEP, theory, experiment, and computation. The Center personnel are involved in cutting edge research in experimental, theoretical, and computational aspects of High Energy Physics with the research areas ranging from the

  14. High energy flare physics group summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. M.; Kurfess, J. D.

    1989-01-01

    The contributions of the High Energy Flare Physics Special Session in the American Astronomical Society Solar Physics Division Meeting are reviewed. Oral and poster papers were presented on observatories and instruments available for the upcoming solar maximum. Among these are the space-based Gamma Ray Observatory, the Solar Flare and Cosmic Burst Gamma Ray Experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft, the Soft X Ray Telescope on the spacecraft Solar-A, and the balloon-based Gamma Ray Imaging Device. Ground based observatories with new capabilities include the BIMA mm-wave interferometer (Univ. of California, Berkeley; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of Maryland), Owens Valley Radio Observatory and the Very Large Array. The highlights of the various instrument performances are reported and potential data correlations and collaborations are suggested.

  15. Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects.

    SciTech Connect

    Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Hartman, E. Frederick; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Crozier, Paul Stewart

    2011-02-01

    This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic calculations, the

  16. Bipolar electrochemistry: from materials science to motion and beyond.

    PubMed

    Loget, Gabriel; Zigah, Dodzi; Bouffier, Laurent; Sojic, Neso; Kuhn, Alexander

    2013-11-19

    Bipolar electrochemistry, a phenomenon which generates an asymmetric reactivity on the surface of conductive objects in a wireless manner, is an important concept for many purposes, from analysis to materials science as well as for the generation of motion. Chemists have known the basic concept for a long time, but it has recently attracted additional attention, especially in the context of micro- and nanoscience. In this Account, we introduce the fundamentals of bipolar electrochemistry and illustrate its recent applications, with a particular focus on the fields of materials science and dynamic systems. Janus particles, named after the Roman god depicted with two faces, are currently in the heart of many original investigations. These objects exhibit different physicochemical properties on two opposite sides. This makes them a unique class of materials, showing interesting features. They have received increasing attention from the materials science community, since they can be used for a large variety of applications, ranging from sensing to photosplitting of water. So far the great majority of methods developed for the generation of Janus particles breaks the symmetry by using interfaces or surfaces. The consequence is often a low time-space yield, which limits their large scale production. In this context, chemists have successfully used bipolar electrodeposition to break the symmetry. This provides a single-step technique for the bulk production of Janus particles with a high control over the deposit structure and morphology, as well as a significantly improved yield. In this context, researchers have used the bipolar electrodeposition of molecular layers, metals, semiconductors, and insulators at one or both reactive poles of bipolar electrodes to generate a wide range of Janus particles with different size, composition and shape. In using bipolar electrochemistry as a driving force for generating motion, its intrinsic asymmetric reactivity is again the

  17. High Voltage in Noble Liquids for High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Rebel, B.; Bernard, E.; Faham, C. H.; Ito, T. M.; Lundberg, B.; Messina, M.; Monrabal, F.; Pereverzev, S. P.; Resnati, F.; Rowson, P. C.; Soderberg, M.; Strauss, T.; Tomas, A.; Va'vra, J.; Wang, H.

    2014-08-22

    A workshop was held at Fermilab November 8-9, 2013 to discuss the challenges of using high voltage in noble liquids. The participants spanned the fields of neutrino, dark matter, and electric dipole moment physics. All presentations at the workshop were made in plenary sessions. This document summarizes the experiences and lessons learned from experiments in these fields at developing high voltage systems in noble liquids.

  18. Seismic Research and High School Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayers, J.

    2004-12-01

    Through a series of summer workshops, seismologists at Indiana University have trained secondary physics and earth science teachers in fundamentals of seismology and basic concepts in seismic research. Teachers and students then gain hands on experience in science research through operation of a research quality seismic station sited at the local schools. Physics and earth science students have operated the Northview High School Seismic Station since 1998. Data from the Northview seismometer are stored locally and also transmitted over the Internet to a database at Indiana University. Students have access to local data as well as seismic databases accessible through the Internet to use for research projects. In this presentation, I will describe how these projects have been incorporated into the physics and earth science programs at Northview High School. I will discuss how our teachers and students have benefited from the opportunity to take part in hands-on collaborative scientific research under the guidance of university faculty. In particular, I will describe our participation in a regional seismic network through seismic data acquisition, data analysis using seismological software, and students' experiences in a university-based student research symposium. I reflect on the some of the successes, such as increased student and community interest, resulting from our work with the seismic station. I comment on some of the barriers, such as time constraints and unintended interference from school personnel, to high-school teachers' and students' involvement in scientific research programs. I conclude with a discussion of a successful student seismology project, an examination of blasts from local surface coal mines, that was a finalist in the 2003 INTEL International Science and Engineering Fair

  19. Center for High Temperature Plasma Physics certified

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Maolian

    1985-05-01

    The construction and functions of a research center for high temperature plasma physics and controlled thermonuclear fusion are discussed. It has four of China's largest d.c. pulse generators capable of producing 80 megawatts of power, an induction coil capable of storing 200 million joules of electric energy, and a capacitor bank that can store 8 million joules of energy. It has equipment for producing deionized water, low temperature equipment, a cooling system using refrigerated circulating water, and a heat supply system. The center is one of China's important bases for thermonuclear fusion research.

  20. Research program in theoretical high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, David; Fried, Herbert M.; Jevicki, Antal; Kang, Kyungsik; Tan, Chung-I.

    1989-06-01

    This year's research has dealt with: superstrings in the early universe; the invisible axion emissions from SN1987A; quartic interaction in Witten's superstring field theory; W-boson associated multiplicity and the dual parton model; cosmic strings and galaxy formation; cosmic strings and baryogenesis; quark flavor mixing; p p(-) scattering at TeV energies; random surfaces; ordered exponentials and differential equations; initial value and back-reaction problems in quantum field theory; string field theory and Weyl invariance; the renormalization group and string field theory; the evolution of scalar fields in an inflationary universe, with and without the effects of gravitational perturbations; cosmic string catalysis of skyrmion decay; inflation and cosmic strings from dynamical symmetry breaking; the physic of flavor mixing; string-inspired cosmology; strings at high-energy densities and complex temperatures; the problem of non-locality in string theory; string statistical mechanics; large-scale structures with cosmic strings and neutrinos; the delta expansion for stochastic quantization; high-energy neutrino flux from ordinary cosmic strings; a physical picture of loop bremsstrahlung; cylindrically-symmetric solutions of four-dimensional sigma models; large-scale structure with hot dark matter and cosmic strings; the unitarization of the odderon; string thermodynamics and conservation laws; the dependence of inflationary-universe models on initial conditions; the delta expansion and local gauge invariance; particle physics and galaxy formation; chaotic inflation with metric and matter perturbations; grand-unified theories, galaxy formation, and large-scale structure; neutrino clustering in cosmic-string-induced wakes; and infrared approximations to nonlinear differential equations.

  1. Highly precise clocks to test fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bize, S.; Wolf, P.

    2012-12-01

    Highly precise atomic clocks and precision oscillators are excellent tools to test founding principles, such as the Equivalence Principle, which are the basis of modern physics. A large variety of tests are possible, including tests of Local Lorentz Invariance, of Local Position Invariance like, for example, tests of the variability of natural constants with time and with gravitation potential, tests of isotropy of space, etc. Over several decades, SYRTE has developed an ensemble of highly accurate atomic clocks and oscillators using a large diversity of atomic species and methods. The SYRTE clock ensemble comprises hydrogen masers, Cs and Rb atomic fountain clocks, Sr and Hg optical lattice clocks, as well as ultra stable oscillators both in the microwave domain (cryogenic sapphire oscillator) and in the optical domain (Fabry-Perot cavity stabilized ultra stable lasers) and means to compare these clocks locally or remotely (fiber links in the RF and the optical domain, femtosecond optical frequency combs, satellite time and frequency transfer methods). In this paper, we list the fundamental physics tests that have been performed over the years with the SYRTE clock ensemble. Several of these tests are done thanks to the collaboration with partner institutes including the University of Western Australia, the Max Planck Institut für Quantenoptik in Germany, and others.

  2. Grid Computing in High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avery, Paul

    2004-09-01

    Over the next two decades, major high energy physics (HEP) experiments, particularly at the Large Hadron Collider, will face unprecedented challenges to achieving their scientific potential. These challenges arise primarily from the rapidly increasing size and complexity of HEP datasets that will be collected and the enormous computational, storage and networking resources that will be deployed by global collaborations in order to process, distribute and analyze them. Coupling such vast information technology resources to globally distributed collaborations of several thousand physicists requires extremely capable computing infrastructures supporting several key areas: (1) computing (providing sufficient computational and storage resources for all processing, simulation and analysis tasks undertaken by the collaborations); (2) networking (deploying high speed networks to transport data quickly between institutions around the world); (3) software (supporting simple and transparent access to data and software resources, regardless of location); (4) collaboration (providing tools that allow members full and fair access to all collaboration resources and enable distributed teams to work effectively, irrespective of location); and (5) education, training and outreach (providing resources and mechanisms for training students and for communicating important information to the public). It is believed that computing infrastructures based on Data Grids and optical networks can meet these challenges and can offer data intensive enterprises in high energy physics and elsewhere a comprehensive, scalable framework for collaboration and resource sharing. A number of Data Grid projects have been underway since 1999. Interestingly, the most exciting and far ranging of these projects are led by collaborations of high energy physicists, computer scientists and scientists from other disciplines in support of experiments with massive, near-term data needs. I review progress in this

  3. Development of an Electrochemistry Teaching Sequence Using a Phenomenographic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Velazquez, Sorangel

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemistry is the area of chemistry that studies electron transfer reactions across an interface. Chemistry education researchers have acknowledged that difficulties in electrochemistry instruction arise due to the level of abstraction of the topic, lack of adequate explanations and representations found in textbooks, and a quantitative…

  4. Electrochemistry at Edge of Single Graphene Layer in a Nanopore

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Shouvik; Shim, Jiwook; Rivera, Jose; Jin, Xiaozhong; Estrada, David; Solovyeva, Vita; You, Xiuque; Pak, James; Pop, Eric; Aluru, Narayana; Bashir, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    We study the electrochemistry of single layer graphene edges using a nanopore-based structure consisting of stacked graphene and Al2O3 dielectric layers. Nanopores, with diameters ranging from 5 to 20 nm, are formed by an electron beam sculpting process on the stacked layers. This leads to unique edge structure which, along with the atomically thin nature of the embedded graphene electrode, demonstrates electrochemical current densities as high as 1.2 × 104 A/cm2. The graphene edge embedded structure offers a unique capability to study the electrochemical exchange at an individual graphene edge, isolated from the basal plane electrochemical activity. We also report ionic current modulation in the nanopore by biasing the embedded graphene terminal with respect to the electrodes in the fluid. The high electrochemical specific current density for a graphene nanopore-based device can have many applications in sensitive chemical and biological sensing, and energy storage devices. PMID:23249127

  5. University of Oklahoma - High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Skubic, Patrick L.

    2013-07-31

    The High Energy Physics program at the University of Oklahoma, Pat Skubic, Principal Investigator, is attempting to understand nature at the deepest level using the most advanced experimental and theoretical tools. The four experimental faculty, Brad Abbott, Phil Gutierrez, Pat Skubic, and Mike Strauss, together with post-doctoral associates and graduate students, are finishing their work as part of the D0 collaboration at Fermilab, and increasingly focusing their investigations at the Large Hadron Collidor (LHC) as part of the ATLAS Collaboration. Work at the LHC has become even more exciting with the recent discovery by ATLAS and the other collaboration, CMS, of the long-sought Higgs boson, which plays a key role in generating masses for the elementary constituents of matter. Work of the OUHEP group has been in the three areas of hardware, software, and analysis. Now that the Higgs boson has been discovered, completing the Standard Model of fundamental physics, new efforts will focus on finding hints of physics beyond the standard model, such as supersymmetry. The OUHEP theory group (Kim Milton, PI) also consists of four faculty members, Howie Baer, Chung Kao, Kim Milton, and Yun Wang, and associated students and postdocs. They are involved in understanding fundamental issues in formulating theories of the microworld, and in proposing models that carry us past the Standard Model, which is an incomplete description of nature. They therefore work in close concert with their experimental colleagues. One also can study fundamental physics by looking at the large scale structure of the universe; in particular the ``dark energy'' that seems to be causing the universe to expand at an accelerating rate, effectively makes up about 3/4 of the energy in the universe, and yet is totally unidentified. Dark energy and dark matter, which together account for nearly all of the energy in the universe, are an important probe of fundamental physics at the very shortest distances

  6. The University of Tennessee Department of Physics and Astronomy High-School Physics Internet Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breinig, Marianne

    1997-04-01

    As part of Tennessee's Bicentennial celebration, the state is providing the opportunity for all public schools to be connected with full text and graphics to the Internet. The University of Tennessee Department of Physics and Astronomy High-School Physics Internet Site helps Tennessee High School physics teachers to take maximum advantage of their Internet connections. It provides a way for all High School physics teachers to quickly communicate with faculty when they have physics questions. It makes it easier for teachers to find mentors for special physics projects. The site also provide a setting for all Tennessee High School physics teachers to communicate with each other. Physics teachers themselves are involved in the design of the Internet site. high_school_physics>High-School Physics Internet Site

  7. The HESP (High Energy Solar Physics) project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kai, K.

    1986-01-01

    A project for space observations of solar flares for the coming solar maximum phase is briefly described. The main objective is to make a comprehensive study of high energy phenomena of flares through simultaneous imagings in both hard and soft X-rays. The project will be performed with collaboration from US scientists. The HESP (High Energy Solar Physics) WG of ISAS (Institute of Space and Astronautical Sciences) has extensively discussed future aspects of space observations of high energy phenomena of solar flares based on successful results of the Hinotori mission, and proposed a comprehensive research program for the next solar maximum, called the HESP (SOLAR-A) project. The objective of the HESP project is to make a comprehensive study of both high energy phenomena of flares and quiet structures including pre-flare states, which have been left uncovered by SMM and Hinotori. For such a study simultaneous imagings with better resolutions in space and time in a wide range of energy will be extremely important.

  8. Conceptual problem solving in high school physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Docktor, Jennifer L.; Strand, Natalie E.; Mestre, José P.; Ross, Brian H.

    2015-12-01

    Problem solving is a critical element of learning physics. However, traditional instruction often emphasizes the quantitative aspects of problem solving such as equations and mathematical procedures rather than qualitative analysis for selecting appropriate concepts and principles. This study describes the development and evaluation of an instructional approach called Conceptual Problem Solving (CPS) which guides students to identify principles, justify their use, and plan their solution in writing before solving a problem. The CPS approach was implemented by high school physics teachers at three schools for major theorems and conservation laws in mechanics and CPS-taught classes were compared to control classes taught using traditional problem solving methods. Information about the teachers' implementation of the approach was gathered from classroom observations and interviews, and the effectiveness of the approach was evaluated from a series of written assessments. Results indicated that teachers found CPS easy to integrate into their curricula, students engaged in classroom discussions and produced problem solutions of a higher quality than before, and students scored higher on conceptual and problem solving measures.

  9. Curriculum Diversity and Young Adult Physical Activity: Reflections from High School Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mears, Derrick

    2008-01-01

    This study was to evaluate if exposure to a diverse curriculum in high school physical education had an impact on young adult physical activity. Students from two universities were surveyed concerning high school physical education content exposure and physical activity in four areas. By investigating relationships between content exposure and…

  10. A Distributed Electrochemistry Modeling Tool for Simulating SOFC Performance and Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Ryan, Emily M.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-10-13

    This report presents a distributed electrochemistry (DEC) model capable of investigating the electrochemistry and local conditions with the SOFC MEA based on the local microstructure and multi-physics. The DEC model can calculate the global current-voltage (I-V) performance of the cell as determined by the spatially varying local conditions through the thickness of the electrodes and electrolyte. The simulation tool is able to investigate the electrochemical performance based on characteristics of the electrode microstructure, such as particle size, pore size, electrolyte and electrode phase volume fractions, and triple-phase-boundary length. It can also investigate performance as affected by fuel and oxidant gas flow distributions and other environmental/experimental conditions such as temperature and fuel gas composition. The long-term objective for the DEC modeling tool is to investigate factors that cause electrode degradation and the decay of SOFC performance which decrease longevity.

  11. Electrochemistry and Storage Panel Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stedman, J. K.; Halpert, G.

    1984-01-01

    Design and performance requirements for electrochemical power storage systems are discussed and some of the approaches towards satisfying these constraints are described. Geosynchronous and low Earth orbit applications, radar type load constraints, and high voltage systems requirements are addressed. In addition, flywheel energy storage is discussed.

  12. Statistical Physics of High Dimensional Inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Advani, Madhu; Ganguli, Surya

    To model modern large-scale datasets, we need efficient algorithms to infer a set of P unknown model parameters from N noisy measurements. What are fundamental limits on the accuracy of parameter inference, given limited measurements, signal-to-noise ratios, prior information, and computational tractability requirements? How can we combine prior information with measurements to achieve these limits? Classical statistics gives incisive answers to these questions as the measurement density α =N/P --> ∞ . However, modern high-dimensional inference problems, in fields ranging from bio-informatics to economics, occur at finite α. We formulate and analyze high-dimensional inference analytically by applying the replica and cavity methods of statistical physics where data serves as quenched disorder and inferred parameters play the role of thermal degrees of freedom. Our analysis reveals that widely cherished Bayesian inference algorithms such as maximum likelihood and maximum a posteriori are suboptimal in the modern setting, and yields new tractable, optimal algorithms to replace them as well as novel bounds on the achievable accuracy of a large class of high-dimensional inference algorithms. Thanks to Stanford Graduate Fellowship and Mind Brain Computation IGERT grant for support.

  13. Electrochemistry of orthosilicate-based lithium battery cathodes: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Stefania; Capsoni, Doretta; Casino, Simone; Destro, Matteo; Gerbaldi, Claudio; Bini, Marcella

    2014-06-14

    Lithium metal orthosilicates are attracting a lot of attention owing to their promising prospects as potential high capacity cathode materials for Li-ion batteries. Currently, great efforts are being made in order to achieve the full theoretical specific capacity of 330 mA h g(-1), but many issues remain unsolved (e.g., poor structural and cycling stability), which limit their practical application. The present perspective highlights the importance of assessing the electrochemical behaviour of Li2(Fe,Mn)SiO4 by combining an arsenal of characterization techniques both spectroscopic and structural, in and ex situ. Here, we review the most recent achievements in the investigation of the electrochemical performance of lithium metal orthosilicate cathodes and, through some of our recent results, we attempt to clarify the relationship between the structure and electrochemistry of these compounds. PMID:24764049

  14. Oxygen electrochemistry as a cornerstone for sustainable energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Katsounaros, Ioannis; Cherevko, Serhiy; Zeradjanin, Aleksandar R; Mayrhofer, Karl J J

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemistry will play a vital role in creating sustainable energy solutions in the future, particularly for the conversion and storage of electrical into chemical energy in electrolysis cells, and the reverse conversion and utilization of the stored energy in galvanic cells. The common challenge in both processes is the development of-preferably abundant-nanostructured materials that can catalyze the electrochemical reactions of interest with a high rate over a sufficiently long period of time. An overall understanding of the related processes and mechanisms occurring under the operation conditions is a necessity for the rational design of materials that meet these requirements. A promising strategy to develop such an understanding is the investigation of the impact of material properties on reaction activity/selectivity and on catalyst stability under the conditions of operation, as well as the application of complementary in situ techniques for the investigation of catalyst structure and composition. PMID:24339359

  15. Facile synthesis of cuprous oxide nanoparticles by plasma electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiandi; Chen, Qiang; Li, Junshuai; Xiong, Qing; Yue, Guanghui; Zhang, Xianhui; Yang, Size; Huo Liu, Qing

    2016-07-01

    We report on a simple plasma electrochemistry method for synthesizing cuprous oxide (Cu2O) nanoparticles in the presence of glucose. In this system, Ar plasma in contact with a NaCl solution was used as one electrode, and a Cu plate was immersed in the solution as the counter electrode. The plasma-solution interaction produced many reducing and oxidizing species which can react with the Cu ions released from the Cu electrode. Cu2O nanoparticles, with an average diameter of 22 +/- 6 nm, were formed under the competition of reducing and oxidizing reactions in the solution. The results show that the glucose added in the electrolyte strongly influences the properties of the products. Corresponding to high, medium, and low concentrations of glucose, the products were nanoparticles from amorphous Cu2O, polycrystalline Cu2O, and a mixture of polycrystalline Cu2O and Cu2Cl(OH)3, respectively.

  16. Physics Contests for High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Doug; Nelson, Jim

    1983-01-01

    Describes how the Ontario Section of the American Association of Physics Teachers started a "Grade Eleven Prize Physics Contest" to generate interest in physics and recognize outstanding students. Also describes outcomes of contests, adaptation of the contest by Southeastern Pennsylvania Section, and suggestions for others wanting to begin similar…

  17. Identifying High School Physical Education Physical Activity Patterns after High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barney, David; Pleban, Francis T.; Wilkinson, Carol; Prusak, Keven A.

    2015-01-01

    National standards for physical education (PE) encompass five principles for the purpose of defining what high school students should recognize and be able to perform as a result of a quality PE program. The expectation is that youth will develop an active, healthy lifestyle into adulthood from activities and skills taught in PE. Researchers from…

  18. Carbon electrochemistry in alkaline systems

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, L.; Zuckerbrod, D.

    1983-08-01

    The electrochemical activity of a high surface area furnace black, Black Pearls 2000 and an acetylene black, Shawinigan Black, were studied in 25% KOH at temperatures from 45/sup 0/C to -15/sup 0/C. A relationship was found between the graphitic character of the carbons and their activities for oxygen formation and surface oxide formation, the furnace black being more active for surface oxide formation and the acetylene black being more active for oxygen generation. The carbons behaved similarly in the cathodic region, exhibiting two distinct peaks apparently related to the reduction of oxygen or of surface oxides.

  19. Networking for High Energy and Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Harvey B.

    2007-07-01

    This report gives an overview of the status and outlook for the world's research networks and major international links used by the high energy physics and other scientific communities, network technology advances on which our community depends and in which we have an increasingly important role, and the problem of the Digital Divide, which is a primary focus of ICFA's Standing Committee on Inter-regional Connectivity (SCIC). Wide area networks of sufficient, and rapidly increasing end-to-end capability are vital for every phase of high energy physicists' work. Our bandwidth usage, and the typical capacity of the major national backbones and intercontinental links used by our field have progressed by a factor of more than 1000 over the past decade, and the outlook is for a similar increase over the next decade. This striking exponential growth trend, outstripping the growth rates in other areas of information technology, has continued in the past year, with many of the major national, continental and transoceanic networks supporting research and education progressing from a 10 Gigabits/sec (Gbps) backbone to multiple 10 Gbps links in their core. This is complemented by the use of point-to-point "light paths" to support the most demanding applications, including high energy physics, in a growing list of cases. As we approach the era of LHC physics, the growing need to access and transport Terabyte-scale and later 10 to 100 Terabyte datasets among more than 100 "Tier1" and "Tier2" centers at universities and laboratories spread throughout the world has brought the key role of networks, and the ongoing need for their development, sharply into focus. Bandwidth itself on an increasing scale is not enough. Realizing the scientific wealth of the LHC and our other major scientific programs depends crucially on our ability to use the bandwidth efficiently and reliably, with reliable high rates of data throughput, and effectively, where many parallel large-scale data

  20. Fuzzy systems in high-energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Marcello; Masulli, Francesco; Penna, Massimo

    1996-06-01

    Decision making is one of the major subjects of interest in physics. This is due to the intrinsic finite accuracy of measurement that leads to the possible results to span a region for each quantity. In this way, to recognize a particle type among the others by a measure of a feature vector, a decision must be made. The decision making process becomes a crucial point whenever a low statistical significance occurs as in space cosmic ray experiments where searching in rare events requires us to reject as many background events as possible (high purity), keeping as many signal events as possible (high efficiency). In the last few years, interesting theoretical results on some feedforward connectionist systems (FFCSs) have been obtained. In particular, it has been shown that multilayer perceptrons (MLPs), radial basis function networks (RBFs), and some fuzzy logic systems (FLSs) are nonlinear universal function approximators. This property permits us to build a system showing intelligent behavior , such as function estimation, time series forecasting, and pattern classification, and able to learn their skill from a set of numerical data. From the classification point of view, it has been demonstrated that non-parametric classifiers based FFCSs holding the universal function approximation property, can approximate the Bayes optimal discriminant function and then minimize the classification error. In this paper has been studied the FBF when applied to a high energy physics problem. The FBF is a powerful neuro-fuzzy system (or adaptive fuzzy logic system) holding the universal function approximation property and the capability of learning from examples. The FBF is based on product-inference rule (P), the Gaussian membership function (G), a singleton fuzzifier (S), and a center average defuzzifier (CA). The FBF can be regarded as a feedforward connectionist system with just one hidden layer whose units correspond to the fuzzy MIMO rules. The FBF can be identified both by

  1. High energy physics at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Samios, N.P.

    1982-01-01

    The high energy plans at BNL are centered around the AGS and ISABELLE, or a variant thereof. At present the AGS is maintaining a strong and varied program. This last year a total of 4 x 10/sup 19/ protons were delivered on target in a period of approximately 20 weeks. Physics interest is very strong, half of the submitted proposals are rejected (thereby maintaining high quality experiments) and the program is full over the next two years. The future colliding beam facility will utilize the AGS as an injector and will be a dedicated facility. It will have six intersection regions, run > 10/sup 7/ sec/year, and explore a new domain of energy and luminosity. Common to all the considered alternatives is a large aperture proton ring. These possible choices involve pp, ep, and heavy ion variants. The long term philosophy is to run the AGS as much as possible, continuously to upgrade it in performance and reliability, and then to phase it down as the new collider begins operation. (WHK)

  2. Satellite data transmission in high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hine, M. G. N.

    1981-04-01

    High energy physicists have today to perform their very complex experiments in large collaborations at the particle accelerators in only two laboratories in Europe, CERN and DESY, while carrying on their university responsibilities and the analysis of the experimental data at home. The whole experimental process forms a vast distributed data processing system, in which better data transmission should help the physicists to work together more effectively than today. The natural speeds for communication between people and around computing equipment are in the region of 50 Kb/s through several Mb/s, and the PTT's are only now beginning to consider offering data services in this region. In the USA several firms are actively creating services based on satellite transmission between small earth stations on the customer's premises. In Europe, a small experiment, STELLA, has been set up to explore the interest of such services for the physics community, and to look at technical problems of achieving high speeds and low error rates. The CEPT is now considering whether to offer similar services using the forthcoming European communication satellites (ECS).

  3. Physical chemistry of highly concentrated emulsions.

    PubMed

    Foudazi, Reza; Qavi, Sahar; Masalova, Irina; Malkin, Alexander Ya

    2015-06-01

    This review explores the physics underlying the rheology of highly concentrated emulsions (HCEs) to determine the relationship between elasticity and HCE stability, and to consider whether it is possible to describe all physicochemical properties of HCEs on the basis of a unique physical approach. We define HCEs as emulsions with a volume fraction above the maximum closest packing fraction of monodisperse spheres, φm=0.74, even if droplets are not of polyhedron shape. The solid-like rheological behavior of HCEs is characterized by yield stress and elasticity, properties which depend on droplet polydispersity and which are affected by caging at volume fractions about the jamming concentration, φj. A bimodal size distribution in HCEs diminishes caging and facilitates droplet movement, resulting in HCEs with negligible yield stress and no plateau in storage modulus. Thermodynamic forces automatically move HCEs toward the lowest free energy state, but since interdroplet forces create local minimums - points beyond which free energy temporarily increases before it reaches the global minimum of the system - the free energy of HCEs will settle at a local minimum unless additional energy is added. Several attempts have been undertaken to predict the elasticity of HCEs. In many cases, the elastic modulus of HCEs is higher than the one predicted from classical models, which only take into account spatial repulsion (or simply interfacial energy). Improved models based on free energy calculation should be developed to consider the disjoining pressure and interfacial rheology in addition to spatial repulsion. The disjoining pressure and interfacial viscoelasticity, which result in the deviation of elasticity from the classical model, can be regarded as parameters for quantifying the stability of HCEs. PMID:25869114

  4. Electrochemistry in deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Nkuku, Chiemela A; LeSuer, Robert J

    2007-11-22

    We report the cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and scanning electrochemical microscopy of ferrocene dissolved in deep eutectic solvents (DES), consisting of choline chloride (ChCl) and either trifluoroacetamide (TFA) or malonic acid as the hydrogen-bond donor. Despite the use of ultramicroelectrodes, which were required due to the modest conductivities of the DES employed, linear diffusion behavior was observed in cyclic voltammetric experiments. The high viscosity of 1:2 ChCl/TFA relative to non-aqueous electrochemical solvents leads to a low diffusion coefficient, 2.7 x 10(-8) cm2 s(-1) for ferrocene in this medium. Because of the difficulties in achieving steady-state conditions, SECM approach curves were tip velocity dependent. Under certain conditions, SECM approach curves to an insulating substrate displayed a positive-feedback response. Satisfactory simulation of this unexpected behavior was obtained by including convection terms into the mass transport equations typically used for SECM theory. The observance of positive-feedback behavior at an insulating substrate can be described in terms of a dimensionless parameter, the Peclet number, which is the ratio of the convective and diffusive timescales. Fitting insulator approach curves of ferrocene in 1:2 ChCl/TFA shows an apparent increase in the diffusion coefficient with increasing tip velocity, which can be explained by DES behaving as a shear thinning non-Newtonian fluid. PMID:17973421

  5. A Study on Linking High-School Physics and Perfect Teaching Reformation of College Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiaolai; Li, Qun; Gao, Jiangtao

    2011-01-01

    For the students who have just entered colleges, learning university physics would be a challenge. This paper discusses how to make students who have just finished senior high school physics won't feel difficult in learning university physics and how to guide and cultivate the students' interest in the study of physics so to stimulate the…

  6. Determinants of College Physical Education Class Enrollment: Implications for High School Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildebrand, Kathryn M.; Johnson, Dewayne J.

    2001-01-01

    Examined whether college students participated in physical activities in which they had had positive prior experiences and felt competent performing, administering surveys on their reasons for taking physical activity classes and their perceptions of the quality of their high school physical education. Reasons for taking physical activity classes…

  7. Precision timing calorimeter for high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Duarte, Javier; Peña, Cristián; Spiropulu, Maria; Trevor, Jason; Xie, Si; Ronzhin, Anatoly

    2016-07-01

    Scintillator based calorimeter technology is studied with the aim to achieve particle detection with a time resolution on the order of a few 10 ps for photons and electrons at energies of a few GeV and above. We present results from a prototype of a 1.4×1.4×11.4 cm3 sampling calorimeter cell consisting of tungsten absorber plates and Cerium-doped Lutetium Yttrium Orthosilicate (LYSO) crystal scintillator plates. The LYSO plates are read out with wave lengths shifting fibers which are optically coupled to fast photo detectors on both ends of the fibers. The measurements with electrons were performed at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF) and the CERN SPS H2 test beam. In addition to the baseline setup plastic scintillation counter and a MCP-PMT were used as trigger and as a reference for a time of flight measurement (TOF). We also present measurements with a fast laser to further characterize the response of the prototype and the photo sensors. All data were recorded using a DRS4 fast sampling digitizer. These measurements are part of an R&D program whose aim is to demonstrate the feasibility of building a large scale electromagnetic calorimeter with a time resolution on the order of 10 ps, to be used in high energy physics experiments.

  8. Data Preservation in High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mount, Richard; Brooks, Travis; Le Diberder, Francois; Dubois-Felsmann, Gregory; Neal, Homer; Bellis, Matt; Boehnlein, Amber; Votava, Margaret; White, Vicky; Wolbers, Stephen; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Roser, Robert; Snider, Rick; Lucchesi, Donatella; Denisov, Dmitri; Soldner-Rembold, Stefan; Li, Qizhong; Varnes, Erich; Jonckheere, Alan; Gasthuber, Martin; Gulzow, Volker; /DESY /Marseille, CPPM /Dortmund U. /DESY /Gent U. /DESY, Zeuthen /KEK, Tsukuba /CC, Villeurbanne /CERN /INFN, Bari /Gjovik Coll. Engineering /Karlsruhe, Forschungszentrum /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Carleton U. /Cornell U. /Rutherford

    2012-04-03

    Data from high-energy physics (HEP) experiments are collected with significant financial and human effort and are mostly unique. At the same time, HEP has no coherent strategy for data preservation and re-use. An inter-experimental Study Group on HEP data preservation and long-term analysis was convened at the end of 2008 and held two workshops, at DESY (January 2009) and SLAC (May 2009). This document is an intermediate report to the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA) of the reflections of this Study Group. Large data sets accumulated during many years of detector operation at particle accelerators are the heritage of experimental HEP. These data sets offer unique opportunities for future scientific studies, sometimes long after the shut-down of the actual experiments: new theoretical input; new experimental results and analysis techniques; the quest for high-sensitivity combined analyses; the necessity of cross checks. In many cases, HEP data sets are unique; they cannot and most likely will not be superseded by data from newer generations of experiments. Once lost, or in an unusable state, HEP data samples cannot be reasonably recovered. The cost of conserving this heritage through a collaborative, target-oriented long-term data preservation program would be small, compared to the costs of past experimental projects or to the efforts to re-do experiments. However, this cost is not negligible, especially for collaborations close or past their end-date. The preservation of HEP data would provide today's collaborations with a secure way to complete their data analysis and enable them to seize new scientific opportunities in the coming years. The HEP community will benefit from preserved data samples through reanalysis, combination, education and outreach. Funding agencies would receive more scientific return, and a positive image, from their initial investment leading to the production and the first analysis of preserved data.

  9. Proceedings of the conference on electrochemistry of carbon allotropes: Graphite, fullerenes and diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, K.; Scherson, D.

    1998-02-01

    This conference provided an opportunity for electrochemists, physicists, materials scientists and engineers to meet and exchange information on different carbon allotropes. The presentations and discussion among the participants provided a forum to develop recommendations on research and development which are relevant to the electrochemistry of carbon allotropes. The following topics which are relevant to the electrochemistry of carbon allotropes were addressed: Graphitized and disordered carbons, as Li-ion intercalation anodes for high-energy-density, high-power-density Li-based secondary batteries; Carbons as substrate materials for catalysis and electrocatalysis; Boron-doped diamond film electrodes; and Electrochemical characterization and electrosynthesis of fullerenes and fullerene-type materials. Abstracts of the presentations are presented.

  10. A Statewide High School Physics Question Contest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandin, T. R.

    1983-01-01

    During 1981-82 a physics contest was held in North Carolina in which a new physics question was asked each month. Information is provided for others contemplating a similar task. Areas addressed include costs, prizes (calculators), number of entries, contest rules, contest goals, and such problems as time involvement. (JN)

  11. High School Students' Physical Education Conceptual Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayers, Suzan F.

    2004-01-01

    The value of conceptual physical education knowledge has long been acknowledged (American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, 1969; Kneer, 1981; NASPE, 1995) yet has not been formally measured or assessed. Seven multiple choice tests with established validity and reliability (Ayers, 2001b) were used to assess the concepts…

  12. UPR/Mayaguez High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    López, Angel M.

    2015-10-27

    For the period of sixteen years covered by this report (June 1, 1997 - July 31, 2013) the High Energy Physics Group at the University of Puerto Rico’s Mayaguez Campus (UPRM) carried out an extensive research program that included major experiments at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), the Cornell Electron-positron Collider and CERN. In particular, these were E831 (FOCUS) at Fermilab, CLEOc at Cornell and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The group’s history is one of successful execution and growth. Beginning with one faculty researcher in 1985, it eventually included four faculty researchers, one post-doctoral research associate, two undergraduates and as many as six graduate students at one time working on one of the experiments that discovered the Higgs boson. Some of this expansion was due to the group’s leveraging of funds from the Department of Energy’s core grant to attract funds from National Science Foundation programs not targeted to high energy physics. Besides the group’s research productivity, its other major contribution was the training of a large number of MS students who later went on to successful technical careers in industry as well as academia including many who obtained PhD degrees at US universities. In an attempt to document this history, this final report gives a general description of the Group’s work prior to June 1, 2010, the starting date for the last grant renewal period. Much more detail can, of course, be found in the annual reports submitted up to that date. The work during the last grant period is discussed in detail in a separate section. To summarize the group’s scientific accomplishments, one can point to the results of the experiments. Both FOCUS and CLEOc were designed to carry out precise measurements of processes involving the heavy quarks, charm and bottom. Heavy quarks are particularly interesting because, due to their mass, theoretical calculations

  13. Application of Nuclear Microprobes towards Understanding Complex Ore Geo-electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, J. S.; Szymanski, R.; Large, R.; Ryan, C. G.

    2012-10-01

    We report on recent development on the CSIRO Nuclear Microprobe (NMP) towards catering for long exposure mapping required for large area scanning. A new data collection system based on Labview FPGA highly co-ordinated with beam transport sits at the heart of the upgrade. These upgrades are discussed and an example of the systems use for μ-Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) analysis in the area of complex ore geo-electrochemistry is briefly described.

  14. Graphene and its electrochemistry - an update.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Adriano; Chua, Chun Kiang; Latiff, Naziah Mohamad; Loo, Adeline Huiling; Wong, Colin Hong An; Eng, Alex Yong Sheng; Bonanni, Alessandra; Pumera, Martin

    2016-05-01

    The electrochemistry of graphene and its derivatives has been extensively researched in recent years. In the aspect of graphene preparation methods, the efficiencies of the top-down electrochemical exfoliation of graphite, the electrochemical reduction of graphene oxide and the electrochemical delamination of CVD grown graphene, are currently on par with conventional procedures. Electrochemical analysis of graphene oxide has revealed an unexpected inherent redox activity with, in some cases, an astonishing chemical reversibility. Furthermore, graphene modified with p-block elements has shown impressive electrocatalytic performances in processes which have been historically dominated by metal-based catalysts. Further progress has also been achieved in the practical usage of graphene in sensing and biosensing applications. This review is an update of our previous article in Chem. Soc. Rev. 2010, 39, 4146-4157, with special focus on the developments over the past two years. PMID:27052352

  15. Electrochemistry-based Battery Modeling for Prognostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Matthew J.; Kulkarni, Chetan Shrikant

    2013-01-01

    Batteries are used in a wide variety of applications. In recent years, they have become popular as a source of power for electric vehicles such as cars, unmanned aerial vehicles, and commericial passenger aircraft. In such application domains, it becomes crucial to both monitor battery health and performance and to predict end of discharge (EOD) and end of useful life (EOL) events. To implement such technologies, it is crucial to understand how batteries work and to capture that knowledge in the form of models that can be used by monitoring, diagnosis, and prognosis algorithms. In this work, we develop electrochemistry-based models of lithium-ion batteries that capture the significant electrochemical processes, are computationally efficient, capture the effects of aging, and are of suitable accuracy for reliable EOD prediction in a variety of usage profiles. This paper reports on the progress of such a model, with results demonstrating the model validity and accurate EOD predictions.

  16. Photothermal deflection spectroscopy investigations of uranium electrochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Rudnicki, J.D.; Russo, R.E.

    1993-12-31

    Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy (PDS) has been successfully applied successfully applied to the study of uranium oxide electrochemistry. A brief description of PDS and preliminary results that demonstrate the technique are presented. Concentration gradients formed at the electrode surface are measured by this technique. The gradients give insight into the reaction mechanisms. There is some evidence of the initiation of non-electrochemical dissolution of the uranium oxide. Optical absorption by the uranium oxide is measured by PDS and the first results indicate that the absorption of the surface does not change during electrochemical experiments. This result is contrary to literature measurements of bulk samples that indicate that the optical absorption should be strongly changing.

  17. Gender Differences in Introductory University Physics Performance: The Influence of High School Physics Preparation and Affect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazari, Zahra

    2006-12-01

    The attrition of females studying physics after high school has been a continuing concern for the physics education community. If females are well prepared, feel confident, and do well in introductory college physics, they may be inclined to study physics further. This quantitative study uses HLM to identify factors from high school physics preparation (content, pedagogy, and assessment) and the affective domain that predict female and male performance in introductory college physics. The study includes controls for student demographic and academic background characteristics, and the final dataset consists of 1973 surveys from 54 introductory college physics classes. The results highlight high school physics and affective experiences that differentially predict female and male performance. These experiences include: learning requirements, computer graphing/analysis, long written problems, everyday world examples, community projects cumulative tests/quizzes, father's encouragement, family's belief that science leads to a better career, and the length of time students believe that high school physics would help in university physics. There were also experiences that similarly predict female and male performance. The results paint a dynamic picture of the factors from high school physics and the affective domain that influence the future physics performance of females and males. The implication is that there are many aspects to the teaching of physics in high school that, although widely used and thought to be effective, need reform in their implementation in order to be fully beneficial to females and/or males in college.

  18. What Constitutes a Highly Qualified Physical Education Teacher?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (NJ1), 2007

    2007-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) that is it critical to have highly qualified physical education teachers delivering a standards-based curriculum that will assist children in adopting and maintaining healthy lifestyles. NASPE acknowledges that highly qualified physical education teachers will…

  19. What Constitutes a Highly Qualified Physical Education Teacher?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napper-Owen, Gloria E.; Marston, Rip; Van Volkinburg, Pat; Afeman, Helene; Brewer, Joan

    2008-01-01

    The National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) is an advocate for having highly qualified physical education teachers deliver developmentally appropriate, standards-based instruction in schools. However, a comprehensive definition of what constitutes a highly qualified physical education teacher did not exist until recently.…

  20. What Is a Highly Qualified Adapted Physical Education Teacher?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lytle, Rebecca; Lavay, Barry; Rizzo, Terry

    2010-01-01

    This article presents information related to the new position statement on the definition of a "highly qualified adapted physical education teacher" published by the Adapted Physical Activity Council (a council of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance). It discusses the legal references for "highly qualified"…

  1. 78 FR 50405 - High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Office of Science, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Intent... hereby given that the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel will be renewed for a two-year period beginning...-range planning and priorities in the national high-energy physics program. Additionally, the renewal...

  2. 75 FR 17701 - High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-07

    ... Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: John Kogut, Executive Secretary; High Energy Physics Advisory...

  3. The ATLAS Hadronic Physics Program and High Energy Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinfold, J. L.

    2013-06-01

    The various aspects of the current and future ATLAS programs to explore hadronic physics, including diffraction and forward physic are discussed The emphasis is p laced on those results and future plans that have particular relevance for high-energy, and ultra high-energy, cosmic ray physics. In closing the latest ATLAS resul ts on the search for the Higgs boson are summarized.

  4. Perspectives on High-Energy-Density Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, R. Paul

    2008-11-01

    Much of 21st century plasma physics will involve work to produce, understand, control, and exploit very non-traditional plasmas. High-energy density (HED) plasmas are often examples, variously involving strong Coulomb interactions and few particles per Debeye sphere, dominant radiation effects, strongly relativistic effects, or strongly quantum-mechanical behavior. Indeed, these and other modern plasma systems often fall outside the early standard theoretical definitions of ``plasma''. This presentation will focus on two types of HED plasmas that exhibit non-traditional behavior. Our first example will be the plasmas produced by extremely strong shock waves. Shock waves are present across the entire realm of plasma densities, often in space or astrophysical contexts. HED shock waves (at pressures > 1 Mbar) enable studies in many areas, from equations of state to hydrodynamics to radiation hydrodynamics. We will specifically consider strongly radiative shocks, in which the radiative energy fluxes are comparable to the mechanical energy fluxes that drive the shocks. Modern HED facilities can produce such shocks, which are also present in dense, energetic, astrophysical systems such as supernovae. These shocks are also excellent targets for advanced simulations due to their range of spatial scales and complex radiation transport. Our second example will be relativistic plasmas. In general, these vary from plasmas containing relativistic particle beams, produced for some decades in the laboratory, to the relativistic thermal plasmas present for example in pulsar winds. Laboratory HED relativistic plasmas to date have been those produced by laser beams of irradiance ˜ 10^18 to 10^22 W/cm^2 or by accelerator-produced HED electron beams. These have applications ranging from generation of intense x-rays to production of proton beams for radiation therapy to acceleration of electrons. Here we will focus on electron acceleration, a spectacular recent success and a rare

  5. Analytical Electrochemistry: Theory and Instrumentation of Dynamic Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Dennis C.

    1980-01-01

    Emphasizes trends in the development of six topics concerning analytical electrochemistry, including books and reviews (34 references cited), mass transfer (59), charge transfer (25), surface effects (33), homogeneous reactions (21), and instrumentation (31). (CS)

  6. Analytical Electrochemistry: Methodology and Applications of Dynamic Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heineman, William R.; Kissinger, Peter T.

    1980-01-01

    Reports developments involving the experimental aspects of finite and current analytical electrochemistry including electrode materials (97 cited references), hydrodynamic techniques (56), spectroelectrochemistry (62), stripping voltammetry (70), voltammetric techniques (27), polarographic techniques (59), and miscellany (12). (CS)

  7. Activities report in nuclear and high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    High energy physics research using particle accelerators is summarized. Electron scattering; experiments concerning pions, muons, and antiprotons; theoretical physics; radiochemistry; and technical aspects of the accelerators and associated equipment are discussed.

  8. University of Virginia experimental and theoretical high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.

    1991-01-10

    This report discusses research being done in high energy physics at the University of Virginia in the following areas: charmonium; B mesons decay; B physics at the SCC; and symmetry and field theory. (LSP)

  9. Ninth Grade Physics: A Necessity for High School Science Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilt, John R.

    2005-01-01

    The traditional order in which science courses are taught in U.S. high schools is biology, chemistry, physics. The physics course usually is regarded as very difficult because it requires both high-level mathematical skills and high-level thinking skills; it is taught in the final year of high school to provide time for students to develop the…

  10. Nanoplasmonic biosensor: coupling electrochemistry to localized surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy on nanocup arrays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Diming; Lu, Yanli; Jiang, Jing; Zhang, Qian; Yao, Yao; Wang, Ping; Chen, Bilian; Cheng, Qiaoyuan; Liu, Gang Logan; Liu, Qingjun

    2015-05-15

    The nanoscale Lycurgus cup arrays were hybrid structures of nanocups and nanoparticles with ultrasensitivity to refractive index change. In this study, an electrochemical localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensor was developed by coupling electrochemistry to LSPR spectroscopy measurement on the nanoscale cup arrays (nanoCA). Based on the combination of electrochemistry and LSPR measurement, the electrochemical LSPR on nanoCA was observed with significant resonance wavelength shifts in electrochemical modulation. The synchronous implementation of cyclic voltammetry and optical transmission spectrum can be used to obtain multiply sensing information and investigate the enhancement for LSPR from electrochemical scanning. The electrochemical enhanced LSPR was utilized as biosensor to detect biomolecules. The electrochemical LSPR biosensor with synchronous electrochemical and optical implement showed higher sensitivity than that of conventional optical LSPR measurement. Detecting with multi-transducer parameters and high sensitivity, the electrochemical LSPR provided a promising approach for chemical and biological detection. PMID:25172029

  11. Effect of experimental conditions on size control of Au nanoparticles synthesized by atmospheric microplasma electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xunzhi; Li, Yongsheng; Zhong, Xiaoxia

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric microplasma electrochemistry was utilized to synthesize Au nanoparticles (NPs). The synthesized Au NPs were investigated as a function of reduction current, solution temperature, and stirring (or not) by using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorbance and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was illustrated that high current promoted the growth of Au NPs with small size, and more Au NPs with large size were synthesized as a rise of temperature. The Au NPs often with small size were synthesized as a result of stirring. The production rate, the electrostatic repulsion, and the residence time of the Au NPs at the interfacial region play an important role in the growth of Au NPs. The results shed light upon the roadmap to control the size and particle size distribution (PSD) of Au NPs synthesized by atmospheric microplasma electrochemistry. PMID:25364315

  12. The 2013 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Susan

    2013-01-01

    The data we report on in this column come from the Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers. Since 1987, the American Institute of Physics (AIP) and the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) have sponsored the High School Teacher Survey. Prior to our initial study, much of the previous literature focusing on high school physics employed anecdotal evidence or qualitative surveys for curriculum reviews or explorations of teachers' experiences and pedagogical techniques. As a direct response to this dearth of data, the Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers was initiated in 1986-87 to answer questions about the number of teachers teaching physics, the educational background of these teachers, the number of students enrolled in physics, the variety of physics classes being offered, the demographics of the students and teachers, the textbooks being used, and the number of high schools offering physics regularly. Since the beginning of this study, we have surveyed both public and private high schools in the United States. The results of our study provide the definitive data about physics in U.S. high schools. The initial survey was conducted during the 1986-87 school year. The second was completed during 1989-90. Beginning with the 1992-93 survey, we have conducted the survey every four years. The 2012-13 survey will be the eighth in the series. Thus, we have a rich history of physics teaching in U.S. high schools.

  13. Physics in US High Schools: Truths and Untruths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Susan

    2012-03-01

    Georg Christoph Lichtenberg once noted that ``[t]he most dangerous untruths are truths moderately distorted.'' In this talk, I will look at truths -- and attempt to dispel untruths -- regarding physics in US high schools. Using data from our quadrennial Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers, I'll address questions such as: *Does every student in the US have access to physics in high school? *Does every student take physics in high school? *Does taking physics in high school impact future career paths? *How well do students in different states do with respect to high school physics and preparation for STEM careers? *Do high school physics teachers have physics training? *How well are females and minorities represented in high school physics? *Did every student earning a bachelor's degree in physics from a US institution take physics in high school? I will also consider the impact of high school physics on future academic pursuits in STEM fields using the Science and Engineering Readiness Index (SERI) developed by Paul Cottle and me. SERI provides a way to examine progress in K-12 physical science education on a state-by-state basis. By the way, Lichtenberg was the first person to hold a professorship dedicated to experimental physics in Germany and was one of the first scientists to introduce experiments with apparatus in his lectures. Today he is remembered for his investigations in electricity, for discovering branching discharge patterns on dielectrics now called Lichtenberg figures. As every physicist does, he wanted to get at the truth and avoid distortions. This talk does just that.

  14. Inequities in Physics Access and Enrollment in Urban High Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Angela M.

    2008-10-01

    Despite reports to the contrary, the availability of physics as a course for secondary students is not equitably distributed throughout the U.S. While some schools provide physics access for all, a more common scenario is limited availability to select students. This is particularly true in urban districts, where this study examined access to and availability of high school physics. New York City's secondary schools were surveyed to determine where physics was offered and how many students were enrolled. Statistics were performed to compare differences between physics and non-physics schools. Additionally, organizational factors were examined that relate to physics availability, such as the magnet school configuration, the AP Physics and conceptual physics options, and science curricular sequence. Overall, it was determined that physics availability is limited in NYC schools, a serious inequity that disproportionately affects students of color and poor children. Strategies for improving access and enrollment will be discussed.

  15. Conceptual Problem Solving in High School Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Docktor, Jennifer L.; Strand, Natalie E.; Mestre, José P.; Ross, Brian H.

    2015-01-01

    Problem solving is a critical element of learning physics. However, traditional instruction often emphasizes the quantitative aspects of problem solving such as equations and mathematical procedures rather than qualitative analysis for selecting appropriate concepts and principles. This study describes the development and evaluation of an…

  16. Research activities in high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Electron scattering experiments are described. Construction and testing of the MEA Accelerator and of the instrumentation in the experimental halls was surveyed. Work on the building of a pion channel and a 180 deg electron scattering set-up was also reviewed. Progress in muon and hadron physics, radio and nuclear chemistry and in theoretical and technical departments is outlined.

  17. High energy physics division semiannual report of research activities

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R. )

    1991-08-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1, 1991--June 30, 1991. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  18. 76 FR 53119 - High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ... Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of renewal. SUMMARY: Pursuant... Energy Physics Advisory Panel will be renewed for a two-year period, beginning on August 12, 2011. The... priorities in the national High Energy Physics program. Additionally, the renewal of the HEPAP has...

  19. The Physics Front: Resources for High School Physics & Physical Science Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezrailson, Cathy M.

    2006-12-01

    The overarching goal of the Physics Front, (part of ComPADRE -Physics and Astronomy digital library) is to provide enhanced accessibility to quality physics teaching resources for all pre-college teachers of physics and the physical sciences with special materials for new and “cross-over” teachers. Some highlights/features of the site are: • A collection of physics-related topics with units of instruction including content, tutorials, labs and reference materials. • Descriptions of some PTRA manuals with example activities. • A “Welcome to the Profession” statement from the New Physics Teacher Manual. • Classroom techniques and best practices. • Simulations and images to enhance instruction for students. • Special features and help for the new physics teacher • Discussion Forums • Filing cabinet for sharing and organizing teaching materials Advantages of using The Physics Front: • Peer -reviewed materials • Connections with other physics teachers nation/worldwide • Content and pedagogy support • Venue for sharing, accessing and archiving exemplary teacher-designed materials • Opportunity to contribute to a dynamic and growing online physics teacher community

  20. Synthesis, structure, electronic spectroscopy, photophysics, electrochemistry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of highly-electron-deficient [5,10,15,20-tetrakis(perfluoroalkyl)porphinato]zinc(II ) complexes and their free base derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Goll, J.G.; Moore, K.T.; Therien, M.J.; Ghosh, A.

    1996-09-04

    The synthesis, optical spectroscopy, photophysical properties, electrochemistry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of a series of [5,10,15,20-tetrakis(perfluoroalkyl)porphinato]zinc(II ) complexes and their free base analogs are reported. The title compounds were prepared by a condensation methodology that utilizes perfluoro-1-(2`-pyrrolyl)-1-alkanol precursors and employs continuous water removal throughout the course of the reaction to yield the meso perfluorocarbon-substituted porphyrins. The nature of the porphyrin-pendant meso-perfluoroalkyl group exerts considerable influence over the macrocycle`s solubility properties. The structure of the monopyridyl adduct of [5,10,15,20-tetrakis(heptafluoropropyl)porphinato] zinc(II) features an S{sub 4}-distorted porphyrin core; X-ray data are given. Electrochemical studies carried out on these porphyrin and (porphinato)zinc(II) complexes indicate that meso-perfluoroalkylporphyrins are among the most electron-deficient porphyrinic species known. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiments corroborate the electron poor nature of these systems and evince extreme stabilization of the nitrogen ls orbitals, consonant with particularly effective removal of electron density from the macrocycle by the meso-perfluoroalkyl moieties that is modulated by {sigma}-symmetry orbitals. 27 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. High energy physics research. Final technical report, 1957--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, H.H.

    1995-10-01

    This is the final technical report to the Department of Energy on High Energy Physics at the University of Pennsylvania. It discusses research conducted in the following areas: neutrino astrophysics and cosmology; string theory; electroweak and collider physics; supergravity; cp violation and baryogenesis; particle cosmology; collider detector at Fermilab; the sudbury neutrino observatory; B-physics; particle physics in nuclei; and advanced electronics and detector development.

  2. High energy physics advisory panel`s subpanel on vision for the future of high-energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This report was requested by the Secretary of Energy to (1) define a long-term program for pursuing the most important high-energy physics goals since the termination of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project, (2) assess the current US high-energy physics program, and (3) make recommendations regarding the future of the field. Subjects on which recommendations were sought and which the report addresses were: high-energy physics funding priorities; facilitating international collaboration for future construction of large high-energy physics facilities; optimizing uses of the investment made in the SSC; how to encourage displaced scientists and engineers to remain in high-energy physics and to attract young scientists to enter the field in the future. The report includes a description of the state of high-energy physics research in the context of history, a summary of the SSC project, and documentation of the report`s own origins and development.

  3. Research in experimental High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, P.; Yelton, J.

    1996-12-01

    UF Task B has been funded continuously by the DoE since 1986. Formerly it included work on the D0 experiment at Fermilab which is no longer a part of the UF program. With the addition of Prof. Guenakh Mitselmakher, Dr. Jacobo Konigsberg and one more Assistant Professor to the faculty, the group now has a new Task to incorporate their work at Fermilab and Cern. They intend Task B to continue to cover the major research of Paul Avery and John Yelton, which is presently directed towards the CLEO detector with some effort going to B physics at Fermilab.

  4. The Mesoscopic Electrochemistry of Molecular Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, Paulo R.; Benites, Tiago A.; Davis, Jason J.

    2016-01-01

    Within the context of an electron dynamic (time-dependent) perspective and a voltage driving force acting to redistribute electrons between metallic and addressable molecular states, we define here the associated electron admittance and conductance. We specifically present a mesoscopic approach to resolving the electron transfer rate associated with the electrochemistry of a redox active film tethered to metallic leads and immersed in electrolyte. The methodology is centred on aligning the lifetime of the process of electron exchange with associated resistance and capacitance quantities. Notably, however, these are no longer those empirically known as charge transfer resistance and pseudo-capacitance, but are those derived instead from a consideration of the quantum states contained in molecular films and their accessibility through a scattering region existing between them and the metallic probe. The averaged lifetime (τr) associated with the redox site occupancy is specifically dependent on scattering associated with the quantum channels linking them to the underlying metallic continuum and associated with both a quantum resistance (Rq) and an electrochemical (redox) capacitance (Cr). These are related to electron transfer rate through k = 1/τr = (RqCr)-1. The proposed mesoscopic approach is consistent with Marcus’s (electron transfer rate) theory and experimental measurements obtained by capacitance spectroscopy.

  5. The Mesoscopic Electrochemistry of Molecular Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Paulo R.; Benites, Tiago A.; Davis, Jason J.

    2016-01-01

    Within the context of an electron dynamic (time-dependent) perspective and a voltage driving force acting to redistribute electrons between metallic and addressable molecular states, we define here the associated electron admittance and conductance. We specifically present a mesoscopic approach to resolving the electron transfer rate associated with the electrochemistry of a redox active film tethered to metallic leads and immersed in electrolyte. The methodology is centred on aligning the lifetime of the process of electron exchange with associated resistance and capacitance quantities. Notably, however, these are no longer those empirically known as charge transfer resistance and pseudo-capacitance, but are those derived instead from a consideration of the quantum states contained in molecular films and their accessibility through a scattering region existing between them and the metallic probe. The averaged lifetime (τr) associated with the redox site occupancy is specifically dependent on scattering associated with the quantum channels linking them to the underlying metallic continuum and associated with both a quantum resistance (Rq) and an electrochemical (redox) capacitance (Cr). These are related to electron transfer rate through k = 1/τr = (RqCr)−1. The proposed mesoscopic approach is consistent with Marcus’s (electron transfer rate) theory and experimental measurements obtained by capacitance spectroscopy. PMID:26757677

  6. Profiles of Change: Lessons for Improving High School Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    This feature has told stories of high school physical educators who have refused to accept the status quo of high school physical education programs. They have identified problems, initiated innovations in their own classes, implemented changes beyond their classes, and moved toward institutionalizing improvements throughout their programs and…

  7. The Role of Computing in High-Energy Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalf, Michael

    1983-01-01

    Examines present and future applications of computers in high-energy physics. Areas considered include high-energy physics laboratories, accelerators, detectors, networking, off-line analysis, software guidelines, event sizes and volumes, graphics applications, event simulation, theoretical studies, and future trends. (JN)

  8. Participation in High Energy Physics at the University of Chicago

    SciTech Connect

    Martinec, Emil J.

    2013-06-27

    This report covers research at the University of Chicago in theoretical high energy physics and its connections to cosmology, over the period Nov. 1, 2009 to April 30, 2013. This research is divided broadly into two tasks: Task A, which covers a broad array of topics in high energy physics; and task C, primarily concerned with cosmology.

  9. Physics of Nuclear Collisions at High Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hwa, Rudolph C.

    2012-05-01

    A wide range of problems has been investigated in the research program during the period of this grant. Although the major effort has been in the subject of heavy-ion collisions, we have also studied problems in biological and other physical systems. The method of analysis used in reducing complex data in multiparticle production to simple descriptions can also be applied to the study of complex systems of very different nature. Phase transition is an important phenomenon in many areas of physics, and for heavy-ion collisions we study the fluctuations of multiplicities at the critical point. Human brain activities as revealed in EEG also involve fluctuations in time series, and we have found that our experience enables us to find the appropriate quantification of the fluctuations in ways that can differentiate stroke and normal subjects. The main topic that characterizes the research at Oregon in heavy-ion collisions is the recombination model for the treatment of the hadronization process. We have avoided the hydrodynamical model partly because there is already a large community engaged in it, but more significantly we have found the assumption of rapid thermalization unconvincing. Recent results in studying LHC physics lead us to provide more evidence that shower partons are very important even at low p_T, but are ignored by hydro. It is not easy to work in an environment where the conventional wisdom regards our approach as being incorrect because it does not adhere to the standard paradigm. But that is just what a vibrant research community needs: unconventional approach may find evidences that can challenge the orthodoxy. An example is the usual belief that elliptic flow in fluid dynamics gives rise to azimuthal anisotropy. We claim that it is only sufficient but not necessary. With more data from LHC and more independent thinkers working on the subject what is sufficient as a theory may turn out to be incorrect in reality. Another area of investigation that

  10. Moving High School Students toward Physical Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Lynn Couturier

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses teaching for skill and knowledge competency in high school based on the National Standards and grade-level outcomes. The outcomes guide teachers away from a curriculum that emphasizes competition through team sports, which appeals to just the highly-skilled and competitive students, toward one that is inclusive of all skill…

  11. Black holes and high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grib, A. A.; Pavlov, Yu. V.

    2016-01-01

    Three mechanisms of getting high energies in particle collisions in the ergosphere of the rotating black holes are considered. The consequences of these mechanisms for observation of ultra high energy cosmic rays particles on the Earth as result of conversion of superheavy dark matter particles into ordinary particles are discussed.

  12. High Energy Physics at Tufts University

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-15

    This report discusses the following topics: Neutrino Interactions in the 15-foot Bubble Chamber; Pion and Kaon Production of Charm and Charm-Strange States; Study of Heavy Flavors at the Tagged Particle Spectrometer; Neutrino Oscillations at the Fermilab Main Injector; Soudan II Nucleon Decay Project; Physics at the Antiproton-Proton Collider at {radical}{bar s} = 1.8 TeV; Designing the Solenoidal Detector for the Supercollider; Neutrino Telescope Proposal; Polarization in Inclusive Hyperon Production and QCD Subprocesses; Production and Decay Characteristics of Top Quarks; Scattering in Extended Skyrmion Models and Spin Dependence; Search for Top Quark Production at the Tevatron; Polarization Correlations in Hadronic Production of Top Quarks; and Computation and Networking.

  13. Princeton University High Energy Physics Research

    SciTech Connect

    Marlow, Daniel R.

    2015-06-30

    This is the Final Report on research conducted by the Princeton Elementary Particles group over the approximately three-year period from May 1, 2012 to April 30, 2015. The goal of our research is to investigate the fundamental constituents of matter, their fields, and their interactions; to understand the properties of space and time; and to study the profound relationships between cosmology and particle physics. During the funding period covered by this report, the group has been organized into a subgroup concentrating on the theory of particles, strings, and cosmology; and four subgroups performing major experiments at laboratories around the world: CERN, Daya Bay, Gran Sasso as well as detector R\\&D on the Princeton campus. Highlights in of this research include the discovery of the Higgs Boson at CERN and the measurement of $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}$ by the Daya Bay experiment. In both cases, Princeton researchers supported by this grant played key roles.

  14. High energy physics in cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Lawrence W.

    2013-02-07

    In the first half-century of cosmic ray physics, the primary research focus was on elementary particles; the positron, pi-mesons, mu-mesons, and hyperons were discovered in cosmic rays. Much of this research was carried out at mountain elevations; Pic du Midi in the Pyrenees, Mt. Chacaltaya in Bolivia, and Mt. Evans/Echo Lake in Colorado, among other sites. In the 1960s, claims of the observation of free quarks, and satellite measurements of a significant rise in p-p cross sections, plus the delay in initiating accelerator construction programs for energies above 100 GeV, motivated the Michigan-Wisconsin group to undertake a serious cosmic ray program at Echo Lake. Subsequently, with the succession of higher energy accelerators and colliders at CERN and Fermilab, cosmic ray research has increasingly focused on cosmology and astrophysics, although some groups continue to study cosmic ray particle interactions in emulsion chambers.

  15. University and High School Partnership: Challenging Physics II Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackin, Joan; Sokol, Paul E.

    2003-04-01

    A partnership between Penn State University and a suburban high school allowed high school students to complete a calculus-based high school physics II course in mechanics and electricity/magnetism. This course was not an AP course or a traditional high school second-level course but was modeled on the dynamic physics course at Penn State. This article describes the strategies and technology tools used, data on student outcomes and achievement, and the development and implementation of the course.

  16. High energy collider physics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ruchti, R.C.; Biswas, N.N.; Wayne, M.R.

    1997-12-31

    With the demise of the Superconducting Supercollider (SSC) Project, there was great concern that the technological developments for that accelerator and its associated detectors might well be lost in the aftermath. In the case of scintillating fiber tracking, such as not been the case. During the period 1990--1993, several tracking technologies were under development for SDC, including Scintillating Fiber Tracking, Straw-tubes, and Microstrip Gas Chambers. In summer 1990, several members of the Fiber Tracking Group (FTG) proposed the use of Scintillating Fiber Tracking to the D0 experiment at Fermilab. This proposal was accepted, and D0 now is building a 75,000 fiber channel tracking detector with readout via Visible Light Photon Counters (VLPC) which were devices pioneered by the SDC Fiber Tracking Group. In addition, all the preshower detectors for D0 also make use of fiber readout (in this case waveshifting fibers) and VLPC for photosensing. In February 1993, a full 7 months prior to cancellation of the SSC project by Congress, the SDC experiment rejected scintillating fiber tracking for further development. Fortunately for all concerned, the D0 experiment had already embraced this technology, so this important detector concept could be further developed, refined, and utilized for physics experimentation. In early 2000, data will be taken with the D0 fiber tracker to study Top Quarks, Beauty Particles, Electroweak Physics, QCD phenomena, and to search for new phenomena. The University of Notre Dame has played a fundamental and seminal role in the development and implementation of this detector technology. R. Ruchti has served as cospokesman of the Fiber Tracking Group since its inception in 1989, and has been a pioneer of fiber tracking technology since 1980. In addition, at least one other experiment at Fermilab, E835, has utilized scintillating fibers with VLPC readout to study Charmonium in proton-antiproton collisions using a gas-jet target in the Tevatron

  17. High-Precision Computation and Mathematical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.

    2008-11-03

    At the present time, IEEE 64-bit floating-point arithmetic is sufficiently accurate for most scientific applications. However, for a rapidly growing body of important scientific computing applications, a higher level of numeric precision is required. Such calculations are facilitated by high-precision software packages that include high-level language translation modules to minimize the conversion effort. This paper presents a survey of recent applications of these techniques and provides some analysis of their numerical requirements. These applications include supernova simulations, climate modeling, planetary orbit calculations, Coulomb n-body atomic systems, scattering amplitudes of quarks, gluons and bosons, nonlinear oscillator theory, Ising theory, quantum field theory and experimental mathematics. We conclude that high-precision arithmetic facilities are now an indispensable component of a modern large-scale scientific computing environment.

  18. The Physical Activity Climate in Minnesota Middle and High Schools

    PubMed Central

    Samuelson, Anne; Lytle, Leslie; Pasch, Keryn; Farbakhsh, Kian; Moe, Stacey; Sirard, John Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Background This article describes policies, practices, and facilities that form the physical activity climate in Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota metro area middle and high schools and examines how the physical activity climate varies by school characteristics, including public/private, school location and grade level. Methods Surveys examining school physical activity practices, policies and environment were administered to principals and physical education department heads from 115 middle and high schools participating in the Transdisciplinary Research on Energetics and Cancer-Identifying Determinants of Eating and Activity (TREC-IDEA) study. Results While some supportive practices were highly prevalent in the schools studied (such as prohibiting substitution of other classes for physical education); other practices were less common (such as providing opportunity for intramural (noncompetitive) sports). Public schools vs. private schools and schools with a larger school enrollment were more likely to have a school climate supportive of physical activity. Conclusions Although schools reported elements of positive physical activity climates, discrepancies exist by school characteristics. Of note, public schools were more than twice as likely as private schools to have supportive physical activity environments. Establishing more consistent physical activity expectations and funding at the state and national level is necessary to increase regular school physical activity. PMID:21088313

  19. Atomic physics with highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, P.

    1991-08-01

    This report discusses: One electron outer shell processes in fast ion-atom collisions; role of electron-electron interaction in two-electron processes; multi-electron processes at low energy; multi-electron processes at high energy; inner shell processes; molecular fragmentation studies; theory; and, JRM laboratory operations.

  20. Gender differences in introductory university physics performance: The influence of high school physics preparation and affect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazari, Zahra Sana

    The attrition of females studying physics after high school is a concern to the science education community. Most undergraduate science programs require introductory physics coursework. Thus, success in introductory physics is necessary for students to progress to higher levels of science study. Success also influences attitudes; if females are well-prepared, feel confident, and do well in introductory physics, they may be inclined to study physics further. This quantitative study using multilevel modeling focused on determining factors from high school physics preparation (content, pedagogy, and assessment) and the affective domain that influenced female and male performance in introductory university physics. The study controlled for some university/course level characteristics as well as student demographic and academic background characteristics. The data consisted of 1973 surveys from 54 introductory physics courses within 35 universities across the US. The results highlight high school physics and affective experiences that differentially influenced female and male performance. These experiences include: learning requirements, computer graphing/analysis, long written problems, everyday world examples, community projects, cumulative tests/quizzes, father's encouragement, family's belief that science leads to a better career, and the length of time students believed that high school physics would help in university physics. There were also experiences that had a similar influence on female and male performance. Positively related to performance were: covering fewer topics for longer periods of time, the history of physics as a recurring topic, physics-related videos, and test/quiz questions that involved calculations and/or were drawn from standardized tests. Negatively related to performance were: student-designed projects, reading/discussing labs the day before performing them, microcomputer based laboratories, discussion after demonstrations, and family

  1. New high power linacs and beam physics

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Gray, E.R.; Nath, S.; Crandall, K.R.; Hasegawa, K.

    1997-08-01

    New high-power proton linacs must be designed to control beam loss, which can lead to radioactivation of the accelerator. The threat of beam loss is increased significantly by the formation of beam halo. Numerical simulation studies have identified the space-charge interactions, especially those that occur in rms mismatched beams, as a major concern for halo growth. The maximum-amplitude predictions of the simulation codes must be subjected to independent tests to confirm the validity of the results. Consequently, the authors compare predictions from the particle-core halo models with computer simulations to test their understanding of the halo mechanisms that are incorporated in the computer codes. They present and discuss scaling laws that provide guidance for high-power linac design.

  2. Atomic physics with highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, P.

    1993-10-01

    The past year has been a busy one for all three accelerators: the LINAC, EBIS, and the tandem. The EBIS continues to deliver beams of highly charged ions around the clock for the study of low energy collisions with gases and surfaces. The electron beam energy was upgraded to 10 keV, and intensities of highly charged species such as Xe(44+) were greatly increased. The tandem, the traditional source of highly charged binary encounter electron production at zero degrees were studied for medium Z (Si,Cl,Cu) projectiles. Recoil momentum spectroscopy has been used to separate the contributions to collisional ionization of one-electron ions (C(5+), O(7+), F(8+)) from the nucleus and the electrons of a He target. Marked structure in the binary encounter electron spectra for Cu(sup q+) on H2 targets was measured for moderate velocity projectiles. Electron capture by slow multiply charged (EBIS) projectiles from laser excited targets has been carried out. Cross sections for capture from Na(3s) and Na*(3p) were measured for velocities between 0.1 and 1 au. The extension of these experiments to laser excited Rydberg targets is proceeding. Electron capture cross sections and average Q values for Ar(16+) on He at velocities between 0.23 and 1.67 au were measured. The charge state distribution of the He recoils following large angle scattering of C(4+) and C(6+) ions at 7.5 keV/u has been measured. Cross sections have been measured for up to sextuple capture from C60 (buckminsterfullerene) by highly charged slow projectiles. Coupled channel calculations for double capture from He by slow multicharge ions were carried out.

  3. Precision Timing Calorimeter for High Energy Physics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Duarte, Javier; Pena, Cristian; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Spiropulu, Maria; Trevor, Jason; Xie, Si

    2016-04-01

    Here, we present studies on the performance and characterization of the time resolution of LYSO-based calorimeters. Results for an LYSO sampling calorimeter and an LYSO-tungsten Shashlik calorimeter are presented. We also demonstrate that a time resolution of 30 ps is achievable for the LYSO sampling calorimeter. Timing calorimetry is described as a tool for mitigating the effects due to the large number of simultaneous interactions in the high luminosity environment foreseen for the Large Hadron Collider.

  4. Exploiting plug-and-play electrochemistry for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lixia; Teng, Yong

    2016-04-01

    Electrochemistry has emerged as a powerful analytical technique for chemical analysis of living cells, biologically active molecules and metabolites. Electrochemical biosensor, microfluidics and mass spectrometry are the most frequently used methods for electrochemical detection and monitory, which comprise a collection of extremely useful measurement tools for various fields of biology and medicine. Most recently, electrochemistry has been shown to be coupled with nanotechnology and genetic engineering to generate new enabling technologies, providing rapid, selective, and sensitive detection and diagnosis platforms. The primary focus of this review is to highlight the utility of electrochemical strategies and their conjunction with other approaches for drug metabolism and discovery. Current challenges and possible future developments and applications of electrochemistry in drug studies are also discussed. PMID:27079543

  5. Bringing Technology into college and High School Physics Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zettili, Nouredine

    2007-04-01

    We want to present ideas on ways of bringing technology to college and high school physics classrooms. We focus in particular on our outreach initiative in supporting a number of school districts with ways to improve high school physics education. This initiative is part of Project IMPACTSEED (IMproving Physics And Chemistry Teaching in SEcondary Education), a No-Child Left Behind grant funded by the Alabama Commission on Higher Education. This project is motivated by a major local need: A large number of high school physics teachers teach out of field. IMPACTSEED aims at helping high school teachers learn and master the various physics topics required by the Alabama course of study. Teachers are offered year-round support through a rich variety of programs: a two-week long summer institute, a series of five technology workshops, and onsite year-round support. Through our hands-on approach, we have identified a number of ways of bringing technology into physics classrooms. A number of technology projects were assigned to the teachers so as to show their students how physics connects to the technological devices around us. IMPACTSEED aims at providing our students with a physics education that enjoys continuity and consistency from high school to college.

  6. A comparative study of middle school and high school students' views about physics and learning physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of student epistemological beliefs about physics and learning physics focused on college and post-college students in Western countries. However, little is known about early-grade students in Asian countries. This paper reports Chinese middle and high school students' views about the nature of physics and learning physics, measured by the Colorado Learning Attitudes Survey about Science (CLASS). Two variables—school level and gender—are examined for a series of comparative analyses. Results show that although middle school students received fewer years of education in physics, they demonstrated more expert-like conceptions about this subject matter than high school students. Also, male students in general exhibited more expert-like views than their female counterparts. While such a gender difference remained constant across both middle and high schools, for the most part it was a small-size difference.

  7. Computing support for High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, P.; Yelton, J.

    1996-12-01

    This computing proposal (Task S) is submitted separately but in support of the High Energy Experiment (CLEO, Fermilab, CMS) and Theory tasks. The authors have built a very strong computing base at Florida over the past 8 years. In fact, computing has been one of the main contributions to their experimental collaborations, involving not just computing capacity for running Monte Carlos and data reduction, but participation in many computing initiatives, industrial partnerships, computing committees and collaborations. These facts justify the submission of a separate computing proposal.

  8. Physical processes at high field strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, C.K.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of the radiation produced by the high field interaction with the rare gases have revealed the presence of both copious harmonic production and fluorescence. The highest harmonic observed was the seventeenth (14.6 rm) in Ne, the shortest wavelength ever produced by that means. Strong fluorescence was seen in Ar, Kr, and Xe with the shortest wavelengths observed being below 10 nm. Furthermore, radiation from inner-shell excited configurations in Xe, specifically the 4d/sup 9/5s5p ..-->.. 4d/sup 10/5s manifold at approx. 17.7 nm, was detected. The behaviors of the rare gases with respect to multiquantum ionization, harmonic production, and fluorescence were found to be correlated so that the materials fell into two groups, He and Ne in one and Ar, Kr, and Xe in the other. These experimental findings, in alliance with other studies on inner-shell decay processes, give evidence for a role of atomic correlations in a direct nonlinear process of inner-shell excitation. It is expected that an understanding of these high-field processes will enable the generation of stimulated emission in the x-ray range. 59 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Fourth International Conference on High Energy Density Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, Farhat

    2015-01-06

    The Fourth International Conference on High Energy Density Physics (ICHED 2013) was held in Saint Malo, France, at the Palais du Grand Large on 25-28 June 2013 (http://web.luli.polytechnique.fr/ICHED2013/). This meeting was the fourth in a series which was first held in 2008. This conference covered all the important aspects of High Energy Density Physics including fundamental topics from strong-field physics to creating new states of matter (including radiation-dominated, high-pressure quantum and relativistic plasmas) and ultra-fast lattice dynamics on the timescale of atomic transitions.

  10. LAPTAG, Encouraging High School students to Consider Physics Related Careers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layton, W.; Gekelman, W.; Wise, J.; Rodriguez, N.; Cooperman, S.; Griffen, R.; Altonji, J.; Carrington, F.; Coutts, B.; Barker, K.

    2001-10-01

    The Los Angeles Physics Teachers Alliance Group (LAPTAG) represents high school physics teachers from the entire Los Angeles area. It was formed in 1993 Over the years between twenty and thirty schools have participated. Our Website is at http://coke.physics.ucla.edu/laptag and web service is provided to schools without servers or Internet access. LAPTAG encourages communication between high school and college/university physics teachers by providing regular meetings, tours of laboratories at UCLA and other institutions, and discussion of curricular issues. LAPTAG also provides unique opportunities for student involvement in research projects. Our first project was a distributed seismometer experiment in which ten schools received seismometers. LAPTAG provided a Web based astronomy class in which studied a variable star. During the past three years, we have constructed a plasma device and developed a high school plasma curriculum. These laboratory experiences engage science students and encourage them to enter physics related careers

  11. "Why Do I Slog through the Physics?" Understanding High School Students' Difficulties in Learning Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekici, Erhan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a valid and reliable instrument to assess why physics courses are perceived as one of the most difficult courses among high school students and to investigate the reasons why students have difficulty in learning physics through this scale. This study includes the development and validation studies of the…

  12. Electrochemistry, biosensors and microfluidics: a convergence of fields.

    PubMed

    Rackus, Darius G; Shamsi, Mohtashim H; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2015-08-01

    Electrochemistry, biosensors and microfluidics are popular research topics that have attracted widespread attention from chemists, biologists, physicists, and engineers. Here, we introduce the basic concepts and recent histories of electrochemistry, biosensors, and microfluidics, and describe how they are combining to form new application-areas, including so-called "point-of-care" systems in which measurements traditionally performed in a laboratory are moved into the field. We propose that this review can serve both as a useful starting-point for researchers who are new to these topics, as well as being a compendium of the current state-of-the art for experts in these evolving areas. PMID:25962356

  13. Turnover among High School Physics Teachers. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan; Tesfaye, Casey Langer

    2011-01-01

    In the fall of 2008 the authors contacted a representative sample of over 3,600 high schools in the United States, both public and private, to determine whether or not physics was taught there. They received responses from over 99% of the schools. For the schools which indicated they were offering physics, the authors obtained contact information…

  14. Achievement of U.S. High-School Physics Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandavarkar, Marilda S.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Reports results of the Second International Science Study concerning achievement in physics of U.S. high school students. Makes comparisons between students of 13 other countries and U.S. students, between first- and second-year U.S. physics students, and between U.S. students tested in the mid-1980s and those tested in 1970. (MDH)

  15. High-energy astroparticle physics with CALET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maestro, Paolo

    2013-02-01

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) will be installed on the Exposure Facility of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM-EF) on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2014 where it will measure the cosmic-ray fluxes for five years. Its main scientific goals are to search for dark matter, investigate the mechanism of cosmic-ray acceleration and propagation in the Galaxy and discover possible astrophysical sources of high-energy electrons nearby the Earth. The instrument, under construction, consists of two layers of segmented plastic scintillators for the cosmic-ray charge identification (CHD), a 3 X0-thick tungsten-scintillating fiber imaging calorimeter (IMC) and a 27 X0-thick lead-tungstate calorimeter (TASC). The CHD can provide single-element separation in the interval of atomic number Z from 1 to 40, while IMC and TASC can measure the energy of cosmic-ray particles with excellent resolution in the range from few GeV up to several hundreds of TeV. Moreover, IMC and TASC provide the longitudinal and lateral development of the shower, a key issue for good electron/hadron discrimination. In this paper, we will review the status of the mission, the instrument configuration and its expected performance, and the CALET capability to measure the different components of the cosmic radiation.

  16. Indiana University high energy physics, Task A

    SciTech Connect

    Brabson, B.; Crittenden, R.; Dzierba, A.; Hanson, G.; Martin, H.; Marshall, T.; Mir, R.; Mouthy, T.; Ogren, H.; Rust, D.; Teige, S.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.

    1992-01-01

    During this reporting period the group has been carrying out programs in several areas. These are presented in this paper is follows: The group was a collaborator in the Mark II experiment at the SLC and completed analysis on the experiment. Three students completed their theses this reporting period; the group is the prime mover in (E672), a high mass dimuon experiment which now in its final data collection period. Our group is also a collaborator in the DO collider experiment which is now preparing for the first data run in 1992; the group is a collaborator in the OPAL experiment at LEP which is now taking data. The group also is working on the development of a major offline facility shift and on a silicon vertex chamber for 1993; the group is the prime mover in the construction of a major new experiment (E852) in precision meson spectroscopy. A test run is presently underway and data taking will begin in 1993; and the group is a prime mover in the tracking design of the SDC experiment. The SDC has completed the Technical Design report. Construction will begin in 1993.

  17. High School Physics Courses & Enrollments: Results from the 2012-13 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan; Tesfaye, Casey Langer

    2014-01-01

    This report examines enrollments in high school physics during the 2012-13 school year. Based on data from the most recent survey (which includes both public and private high schools in the U.S.), it is estimated that 39% of the class of 2013 took high school physics before graduating. During the 2012-13 school year, 1.38 million students were…

  18. Theoretical high energy physics research at the University of Chicago

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, J.L.; Martinec, E.J.; Sachs, R.G.

    1990-09-01

    This report discusses research being done at the University of Chicago in High Energy Physics. Some topic covered are: CP violation; intermediate vector bosons; string models; supersymmetry; and rare decay of kaons. (LSP)

  19. The e-Science for High Energy Physics in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Kihyeon; Kim, Hyunwoo

    In this paper, we report the experiences and results of the integration and utilization of e-Science for high-energy physics in Korea. The e-Science for high-energy physics is to study high-energy physics any time and anywhere even if we are not on-site of accelerator laboratories. The contents are 1) data production, 2) data processing and 3) data analysis anytime and anywhere. The data production is to do remote control and take shifts remotely. The data processing is to run jobs anytime, anywhere using grid farms. The data analysis is to work together to publish papers using collaborative environment such as EVO (Enabling Virtual Organization) system. We apply this concept to high energy physics experiments, especially, ALICE experiment at CERN in Europe and CDF experiment at Fermi-lab. And we show the results.

  20. Final Report. Research in Theoretical High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Greensite, Jeffrey P.; Golterman, Maarten F.L.

    2015-04-30

    Grant-supported research in theoretical high-energy physics, conducted in the period 1992-2015 is briefly described, and a full listing of published articles result from those research activities is supplied.

  1. Physics of a high-luminosity Tau-Charm Factory

    SciTech Connect

    King, M.E.

    1992-10-01

    This paper highlights the physics capabilities of a Tau-Charm Factory; i.e., high luminosity ({approximately}10{sup 33}cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}) e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider operating in the center-of-mass energy range of 3-5 GeV, with a high-precision, general-purpose detector. Recent developments in {tau} and charm physics are emphasized.

  2. Who Teaches High School Physics? Results from the 2008-09 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan; Tesfaye, Casey Langer

    2010-01-01

    In the fall of 2008, the authors contacted a representative sample of over 3,600 high schools in the U.S., both public and private, to determine whether or not physics was taught there. They received responses from over 99% of the schools. For the schools which indicated they were offering physics, they obtained contact information for the…

  3. High School Physics Availability: Results from the 2008-09 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan; Tesfaye, Casey Langer

    2010-01-01

    In the fall of 2008, the authors contacted a representative sample of over 3,600 high schools in the U.S.--both public and private--to determine whether or not physics was taught there. They received responses from over 99% of the schools. For the schools which indicated they were offering physics, they obtained contact information for the…

  4. High School Physics Courses & Enrollments: Results from the 2008-09 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan; Tesfaye, Casey Langer

    2010-01-01

    In the fall of 2008, the authors contacted a representative sample of over 3,600 high schools in the U.S., both public and private, to determine whether or not physics was taught there. They received responses from over 99% of the schools. For the schools which indicated they were offering physics, they obtained contact information for the…

  5. XXII International Baldin Seminar on High Energy Physics Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The XXII International Baldin Seminar on High Energy Physics Problems "Relativistic Nuclear Physics and Quantum Chromodynamics", organized by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research was held from September 15 to 20, 2014 in Dubna, Russia. The Seminar continues the series of traditional meetings and was established by an outstanding scientist Academician A.M. Baldin(1926-2001). Among conferences that were organized by Alexander Mikhailovich Baldin of special importance is just this series of the International Seminars on High-Energy Physics Problems started in 1969 with support of M.A. Markov (1908-1994). They have been given an inofficial, somewhat witty, name "Baldin autumn".

  6. LCEC: The Combination of Liquid Chromatography and Electrochemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissinger, Peter T.

    1983-01-01

    Use of combined liquid chromatography and finite-current electrochemistry (LCEC) procedures are discussed. Also discusses the relationship between electroactivity and molecular structure, selectivity in LCEC, and LCEC applications. Because of its selectivity and low detection limits, the procedures are most often applied in biomedical and…

  7. Using a Teaching Model To Correct Known Misconceptions in Electrochemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huddle, Penelope Ann; White, Margaret Dawn; Rogers, Fiona

    2000-01-01

    Describes a concrete teaching model designed to eliminate students' misconceptions about current flow in electrochemistry. The model uses a semi-permeable membrane rather than a salt bridge to complete the circuit and demonstrate the maintenance of cell neutrality. Concludes that use of the model led to improvement in students' understanding at…

  8. Understanding Electrochemistry Concepts Using the Predict-Observe-Explain Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karamustafaoglu, Sevilay; Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    The current study deals with freshman students who study at the Department of Science at the Faculty of Education. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of teaching electrochemistry concepts using Predict-Observe-Explain (POE) strategy. The study was quasi-experimental design using 20 students each in the experimental group (EG) and…

  9. Common Student Misconceptions in Electrochemistry: Galvanic, Electrolytic, and Concentration Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanger, Michael J.; Greenbowe, Thomas J.

    1997-01-01

    Investigates student (N=16) misconceptions concerning electrochemistry related to galvanic, electrolytic, and concentration cells. Findings indicate that most students demonstrating misconceptions were still able to calculate cell potentials correctly. Discusses common misconceptions and possible sources of these. Contains 33 references.…

  10. Alleviating the Common Confusion Caused by Polarity in Electrochemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, P. J.; Gileadi, E.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is some of the confusion encountered in electrochemistry due to misunderstandings of sign conventions and simple mathematical errors. Clarified are issues involving emf series, IUPAC sign conventions, calculation of cell potentials, reference electrodes, the polarity of electrodes in electrochemical devices, and overpotential. (CW)

  11. Facilitating Conceptual Change in Students' Understanding of Electrochemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niaz, Mansoor

    2002-01-01

    Constructs a teaching strategy to facilitate conceptual change in freshman students' understanding of electrochemistry. Provides students with the correct response along with alternative responses (teaching experiments), producing a conflicting situation that is conducive to an equilibration of their cognitive structures. Concludes that the…

  12. Bringing Real Solar Physics to the High School Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaton, Daniel

    2006-06-01

    UNH's Partnership for Research Opportunities to Benefit Education (PROBE) project sends graduate students into high school classrooms across New Hampshire in order to help introduce students to authentic scientific inquiry. As one of ten graduate fellows, I worked with students in in ninth through twelfth grades in physical science, physics, earth science, and astronomy classes; helping students carry out individual and class projects on physics and solar physics. Projects related to solar physics included the production and analysis of plasma using a microwave oven, measurement of the solar constant, measurement of the solar rotation rate, solar spectroscopy, analysis of data from TRACE and SOHO, and the construction of various solar-powered devices. This work was generously supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation's GK-12 initiative (NSF#0338277).

  13. Experimental And Theoretical High Energy Physics Research At UCLA

    SciTech Connect

    Cousins, Robert D.

    2013-07-22

    This is the final report of the UCLA High Energy Physics DOE Grant No. DE-FG02- 91ER40662. This report covers the last grant project period, namely the three years beginning January 15, 2010, plus extensions through April 30, 2013. The report describes the broad range of our experimental research spanning direct dark matter detection searches using both liquid xenon (XENON) and liquid argon (DARKSIDE); present (ICARUS) and R&D for future (LBNE) neutrino physics; ultra-high-energy neutrino and cosmic ray detection (ANITA); and the highest-energy accelerator-based physics with the CMS experiment and CERN’s Large Hadron Collider. For our theory group, the report describes frontier activities including particle astrophysics and cosmology; neutrino physics; LHC interaction cross section calculations now feasible due to breakthroughs in theoretical techniques; and advances in the formal theory of supergravity.

  14. Lecture note on circuit technology for high energy physics experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Hirokazu

    1992-07-01

    This lecture discusses the basic ideas and practice of circuit technology in the context of a high energy physics experiment. The program of this lecture gives access to the integrated circuit technology to be applied for a high luminosity hadron collider experiment.

  15. High-Productivity Computing in Computational Physics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel-Zur, Guy

    2011-03-01

    We describe the development of a new course in Computational Physics at the Ben-Gurion University. This elective course for 3rd year undergraduates and MSc. students is being taught during one semester. Computational Physics is by now well accepted as the Third Pillar of Science. This paper's claim is that modern Computational Physics education should deal also with High-Productivity Computing. The traditional approach of teaching Computational Physics emphasizes ``Correctness'' and then ``Accuracy'' and we add also ``Performance.'' Along with topics in Mathematical Methods and case studies in Physics the course deals a significant amount of time with ``Mini-Courses'' in topics such as: High-Throughput Computing - Condor, Parallel Programming - MPI and OpenMP, How to build a Beowulf, Visualization and Grid and Cloud Computing. The course does not intend to teach neither new physics nor new mathematics but it is focused on an integrated approach for solving problems starting from the physics problem, the corresponding mathematical solution, the numerical scheme, writing an efficient computer code and finally analysis and visualization.

  16. Recent results in high pT physics from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    G. Veramendi

    2004-03-09

    The authors present the most recent high p{sub T} results from the CDF experiment using p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV produced at the Tevatron Collider at Fermilab. They summarize results in electroweak physics, top physics and searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. Many measurements of important signals like W boson, Z boson, and the top quark have been reestablished. Taking advantage of the increase in energy and detector upgrades, these measurements already begin to be competitive with previous results.

  17. CERN and high energy physics, the grand picture

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-21

    The lecture will touch on several topics, to illustrate the role of CERN in the present and future of high-energy physics: how does CERN work? What is the role of the scientific community, of bodies like Council and SPC, and of international cooperation, in the definition of CERN's scientific programme? What are the plans for the future of the LHC and of the non-LHC physics programme? What is the role of R&D; and technology transfer at CERN?

  18. CERN and high energy physics, the grand picture

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    The lecture will touch on several topics, to illustrate the role of CERN in the present and future of high-energy physics: how does CERN work? What is the role of the scientific community, of bodies like Council and SPC, and of international cooperation, in the definition of CERN's scientific programme? What are the plans for the future of the LHC and of the non-LHC physics programme? What is the role of R&D; and technology transfer at CERN?

  19. Experimental and theoretical high energy physics research. [UCLA

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, Charles D.; Cline, David B.; Byers, N.; Ferrara, S.; Peccei, R.; Hauser, Jay; Muller, Thomas; Atac, Muzaffer; Slater, William; Cousins, Robert; Arisaka, Katsushi

    1992-01-01

    Progress in the various components of the UCLA High-Energy Physics Research program is summarized, including some representative figures and lists of resulting presentations and published papers. Principal efforts were directed at the following: (I) UCLA hadronization model, PEP4/9 e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} analysis, {bar P} decay; (II) ICARUS and astroparticle physics (physics goals, technical progress on electronics, data acquisition, and detector performance, long baseline neutrino beam from CERN to the Gran Sasso and ICARUS, future ICARUS program, and WIMP experiment with xenon), B physics with hadron beams and colliders, high-energy collider physics, and the {phi} factory project; (III) theoretical high-energy physics; (IV) H dibaryon search, search for K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma} and {pi}{sup 0}{nu}{bar {nu}}, and detector design and construction for the FNAL-KTeV project; (V) UCLA participation in the experiment CDF at Fermilab; and (VI) VLPC/scintillating fiber R D.

  20. The use of nuclear physics and high energy physics detectors in medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Guerra, Alberto; Bisogni, Maria Giuseppina

    2013-06-01

    The development of radiation detectors in the field of nuclear and particle physics has had a terrific impact in medical imaging since this latter discipline took off in late '70 with the invention of the CT scanners. The massive use in Nuclear Physics and High Energy Physics of position sensitive gas detectors, of high Z and high density scintillators coupled to Photomultiplier (PMT) and Position Sensitive Photomultipliers (PSPMT), and of solid state detectors has triggered during the last 30 years a series of novel applications in Medical Imaging with ionizing radiation. The accelerated scientific progression in genetics and molecular biology has finally generated what it is now called Molecular Imaging. This field of research presents additional challenges not only in the technology of radiation detector, but more and more in the ASIC electronics, fast digital readout and parallel software. In this paper we will try to present how Nuclear Physics/High Energy Physics and Medical Imaging have both benefited by the cross-fertilization of research activities between the two fields and how much they will take advantage in the future.

  1. High Energy Physics at Tufts University Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Gary R.; Oliver, William P.; Napier, Austin; Gallagher, Hugh R.

    2012-07-18

    In this Final Report, we the researchers of the high energy physics group at Tufts University summarize our works and achievements in three frontier areas of elementary particle physics: (i) Neutrino physics at the Intensity Frontier, (ii) Collider physics at the Energy Frontier, and (iii) Theory investigations of spin structure and quark-gluon dynamics of nucleons using quantum chromodynamics. With our Neutrino research we completed, or else brought to a useful state, the following: Data-taking, physics simulations, physics analysis, physics reporting, explorations of matter effects, and detector component fabrication. We conducted our work as participants in the MINOS, NOvA, and LBNE neutrino oscillation experiments and in the MINERvA neutrino scattering experiment. With our Collider research we completed or else brought to a useful state: Data-taking, development of muon system geometry and tracking codes, software validation and maintenance, physics simulations, physics analysis, searches for new particles, and study of top-quark and B-quark systems. We conducted these activities as participants in the ATLAS proton-proton collider experiment at CERN and in the CDF proton-antiproton collider experiment at Fermilab. In our Theory research we developed QCD-based models, applications of spin phenomenology to fundamental systems, fitting of models to data, presenting and reporting of new concepts and formalisms. The overarching objectives of our research work have always been: 1) to test and clarify the predictions of the Standard Model of elementary particle physics, and 2) to discover new phenomena which may point the way to a more unified theoretical framework.

  2. Problems with the rush toward advanced physics in high schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gollub, Jerry

    2003-04-01

    The Advanced Placement (AP) Program has a major impact on the physics experience of many high school students. It affects admission to college, course choices and performance in college, and subsequent career decisions. A study committee of the National Research Council published a review of these programs in 2002, and concluded that while the program has many positive features, important problems need to be addressed. [1] The programs are not currently consistent with what we have learned about student learning from cognitive research. Students are often poorly prepared for AP courses, because of lack of coordination within schools. The Physics AP-B (non-calculus) program is too broad to allow most high school students to achieve an adequate level of conceptual understanding. Participation by minority students in these programs is far below that of other students. The AP exams need to be re-evaluated to insure that they actually measure conceptual understanding and complex reasoning. The AP exams are sometimes used inappropriately to rate teachers or schools. College and high school courses are poorly coordinated, with the result that students often take an introductory physics survey as many as three times. Policies on college credit for AP courses differ widely. These problems cannot be fixed by the College Board alone. [1] Jerry P. Gollub and Robin Spital, "Advanced Physics in the High Schools", Physics Today, May 2002.

  3. The Effect of a Female Physical Educator's Physical Appearance on Physical Fitness Knowledge and Attitudes of Junior High Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Melony Blair; Adams, Thomas M., II; Comeau, Matthew J.

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to determine if a female physical educator's appearance of body fatness affects 1) the cognitive performance of junior high school students on a test of health-related fitness knowledge, and 2) student attitudes toward the instructor. Ninety-three seventh through ninth grade students from two schools, participated in a…

  4. Elementary particle physics and high energy phenomena. [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, A.R.; Cumalat, J.P.; De Alwis, S.P.; DeGrand, T.A.; Ford, W.T.; Mahanthappa, K.T.; Nauenberg, U.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.

    1992-06-01

    Experimental and theoretical high-energy physics programs at the University of Colorado are reported. Areas of concentration include the following: study of the properties of the Z[sup 0] with the SLD detector; fixed-target K-decay experiments; the R D program for the muon system: the SDC detector; high-energy photoproduction of states containing heavy quarks; electron--positron physics with the CLEO II detector at CESR; lattice QCD; and spin models and dynamically triangulated random surfaces. 24 figs., 2 tabs., 117 refs.

  5. Integration of electrochemistry in micro-total analysis systems for biochemical assays: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Song; Chen, Hui; Kong, Jilie

    2009-11-15

    Micro-total analysis systems (microTAS) integrate different analytical operations like sample preparation, separation and detection into a single microfabricated device. With the outstanding advantages of low cost, satisfactory analytical efficiency and flexibility in design, highly integrated and miniaturized devices from the concept of microTAS have gained widespread applications, especially in biochemical assays. Electrochemistry is shown to be quite compatible with microanalytical systems for biochemical assays, because of its attractive merits such as simplicity, rapidity, high sensitivity, reduced power consumption, and sample/reagent economy. This review presents recent developments in the integration of electrochemistry in microdevices for biochemical assays. Ingenious microelectrode design and fabrication methods, and versatility of electrochemical techniques are involved. Practical applications of such integrated microsystem in biochemical assays are focused on in situ analysis, point-of-care testing and portable devices. Electrochemical techniques are apparently suited to microsystems, since easy microfabrication of electrochemical elements and a high degree of integration with multi-analytical functions can be achieved at low cost. Such integrated microsystems will play an increasingly important role for analysis of small volume biochemical samples. Work is in progress toward new microdevice design and applications. PMID:19782186

  6. ITER physics design guidelines at high aspect ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uckan, N. A.

    1991-09-01

    The physics requirements for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) design are formulated in a set of physics design guidelines. These guidelines, established by the ITER Physics Group during the Conceptual Design Activity (CDA, 1988--90), were based on credible extrapolations of the tokamak physics database as assessed during the CDA, and defined a class of tokamak designs (with plasma current I is approximately 20 MA and aspect ratio A is approximately 2.5--3.5) that meet the ITER objectives. Recent U.S. studies have indicated that there may be significant benefits if the ITER-CDA design point is moved from the low aspect ratio, high current baseline (A = 2.79, I = 22 MA) to a high aspect ratio machine at Ais approximately 4, I is approximately 15 MA, especially regarding steady-state, technology-testing performance. To adequately assess the physics and technology testing capability of higher aspect ratio design options, several changes are proposed to the original ITER guidelines to reflect the latest developments in physics understanding at higher aspect ratios. The critical issues for higher aspect ratio design options are the uncertainty in scaling of confinement with aspect ratio, the variation of vertical stability with elongation and aspect ratio, plasma shaping requirements, ability to control and maintain plasma current and q-profiles for MHD stability (and volt-second consumption), access for current drive, restrictions on field ripple and divertor plate incident angles, etc.

  7. Compilation of current high-energy physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wohl, C.G.; Kelly, R.L.; Armstrong, F.E.

    1981-05-01

    This is the fourth edition of the compilation of current high energy physics experiments. It is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and nine participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), the Institute for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (INS), KEK, Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. The compilation includes summaries of all high energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that (1) were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about April 1981, and (2) had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1977. Only approved experiments are included.

  8. Compilation of current high-energy-physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wohl, C.G.; Kelly, R.L.; Armstrong, F.E.

    1980-04-01

    This is the third edition of a compilation of current high energy physics experiments. It is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and ten participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), the Institute for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (INS), KEK, Rutherford (RHEL), Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. The compilation includes summaries of all high energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that (1) were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about January 1980, and (2) had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1976.

  9. High Energy Physics at the University of Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Liss, Tony M.; Thaler, Jon J.

    2013-07-26

    This is the final report for DOE award DE-FG02-91ER40677 (“High Energy Physics at the University of Illinois”), covering the award period November 1, 2009 through April 30, 2013. During this period, our research involved particle physics at Fermilab and CERN, particle physics related cosmology at Fermilab and SLAC, and theoretical particle physics. Here is a list of the activities described in the final report: * The CDF Collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron * Search For Lepton Flavor Violation in the Mu2e Experiment At Fermilab * The ATLAS Collaboration at the CERN Large Hadron Collider * the Study of Dark Matter and Dark Energy: DES and LSST * Lattice QCD * String Theory and Field Theory * Collider Phenomenology

  10. Laboratory for Nuclear Science. High Energy Physics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Milner, Richard

    2014-07-30

    High energy and nuclear physics research at MIT is conducted within the Laboratory for Nuclear Science (LNS). Almost half of the faculty in the MIT Physics Department carry out research in LNS at the theoretical and experimental frontiers of subatomic physics. Since 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy has funded the high energy physics research program through grant DE-FG02-05ER41360 (other grants and cooperative agreements provided decades of support prior to 2004). The Director of LNS serves as PI. The grant supports the research of four groups within LNS as “tasks” within the umbrella grant. Brief descriptions of each group are given here. A more detailed report from each task follows in later sections. Although grant DE-FG02-05ER41360 has ended, DOE continues to fund LNS high energy physics research through five separate grants (a research grant for each of the four groups, as well as a grant for AMS Operations). We are pleased to continue this longstanding partnership.

  11. An Experimental and Theoretical High Energy Physics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Shipsey, Ian

    2012-07-31

    The Purdue High Energy Physics Group conducts research in experimental and theoretical elementary particle physics and experimental high energy astrophysics. Our goals, which we share with high energy physics colleagues around the world, are to understand at the most fundamental level the nature of matter, energy, space and time, and in order to explain the birth, evolution and fate of the Universe. The experiments in which we are currently involved are: CDF, CLEO-c, CMS, LSST, and VERITAS. We have been instrumental in establishing two major in-house facilities: The Purdue Particle Physics Microstructure Detector Facility (P3MD) in 1995 and the CMS Tier-2 center in 2005. The research efforts of the theory group span phenomenological and theoretical aspects of the Standard Model as well as many of its possible extensions. Recent work includes phenomenological consequences of supersymmetric models, string theory and applications of gauge/gravity duality, the cosmological implications of massive gravitons, and the physics of extra dimensions.

  12. The limitations of mathematical modeling in high school physics education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forjan, Matej

    The theme of the doctoral dissertation falls within the scope of didactics of physics. Theoretical analysis of the key constraints that occur in the transmission of mathematical modeling of dynamical systems into field of physics education in secondary schools is presented. In an effort to explore the extent to which current physics education promotes understanding of models and modeling, we analyze the curriculum and the three most commonly used textbooks for high school physics. We focus primarily on the representation of the various stages of modeling in the solved tasks in textbooks and on the presentation of certain simplifications and idealizations, which are in high school physics frequently used. We show that one of the textbooks in most cases fairly and reasonably presents the simplifications, while the other two half of the analyzed simplifications do not explain. It also turns out that the vast majority of solved tasks in all the textbooks do not explicitly represent model assumptions based on what we can conclude that in high school physics the students do not develop sufficiently a sense of simplification and idealizations, which is a key part of the conceptual phase of modeling. For the introduction of modeling of dynamical systems the knowledge of students is also important, therefore we performed an empirical study on the extent to which high school students are able to understand the time evolution of some dynamical systems in the field of physics. The research results show the students have a very weak understanding of the dynamics of systems in which the feedbacks are present. This is independent of the year or final grade in physics and mathematics. When modeling dynamical systems in high school physics we also encounter the limitations which result from the lack of mathematical knowledge of students, because they don't know how analytically solve the differential equations. We show that when dealing with one-dimensional dynamical systems

  13. Metal-air batteries: from oxygen reduction electrochemistry to cathode catalysts.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fangyi; Chen, Jun

    2012-03-21

    Because of the remarkably high theoretical energy output, metal-air batteries represent one class of promising power sources for applications in next-generation electronics, electrified transportation and energy storage of smart grids. The most prominent feature of a metal-air battery is the combination of a metal anode with high energy density and an air electrode with open structure to draw cathode active materials (i.e., oxygen) from air. In this critical review, we present the fundamentals and recent advances related to the fields of metal-air batteries, with a focus on the electrochemistry and materials chemistry of air electrodes. The battery electrochemistry and catalytic mechanism of oxygen reduction reactions are discussed on the basis of aqueous and organic electrolytes. Four groups of extensively studied catalysts for the cathode oxygen reduction/evolution are selectively surveyed from materials chemistry to electrode properties and battery application: Pt and Pt-based alloys (e.g., PtAu nanoparticles), carbonaceous materials (e.g., graphene nanosheets), transition-metal oxides (e.g., Mn-based spinels and perovskites), and inorganic-organic composites (e.g., metal macrocycle derivatives). The design and optimization of air-electrode structure are also outlined. Furthermore, remarks on the challenges and perspectives of research directions are proposed for further development of metal-air batteries (219 references). PMID:22254234

  14. Particle Physics in High School: A Diagnose Study.

    PubMed

    Tuzón, Paula; Solbes, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    The science learning process improves when the contents are connected to students' lives. Particle physics has had a great impact in our society in the last years and has changed the theoretical picture about matter fundamental dynamics. Thus, we think that academic contents about matter components and interactions should be updated. With this study we aim to characterize the level of knowledge of high school students about this topic. We built a test with questions about classical atomic models, particle physics, recent discoveries, social implications and students opinions about it. Contrary to our first suspicion, students' answers show a high variability. They have new physics ideas and show a great interest towards modern concepts. We suggest including an updated view of this topic as part of the curriculum. PMID:27253377

  15. Harvard University High Energy Physics. [Annual report, 1992--1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The mainly experimental research program in high energy physics at Harvard is summarized in a descriptive fashion according to the following outline: Proton{endash}antiproton colliding beam program at Fermilab -- CDF (forward/backward electromagnetic calorimeters -- FEM, central muon extension -- CMX, gas calorimetry and electronics development, front-end electronics upgrades, software development, physics analysis, timetable), electron -- positron collisions in the upsilon region -- CLEO (the hardware projects including CLEO II barrel TOF system and silicon drift detector R&D, physics analysis), search for {nu}{sub {mu}} to {nu}{sub {tau}} oscillations with the NOMAD experiment at CERN, the solenoidal detector collaboration at the SSC, muon scattering at FNAL -- E665, the L3 experiment, and phenomenological analysis of high-energy {bar p}p cross sections. 149 refs.

  16. Particle Physics in High School: A Diagnose Study

    PubMed Central

    Solbes, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    The science learning process improves when the contents are connected to students’ lives. Particle physics has had a great impact in our society in the last years and has changed the theoretical picture about matter fundamental dynamics. Thus, we think that academic contents about matter components and interactions should be updated. With this study we aim to characterize the level of knowledge of high school students about this topic. We built a test with questions about classical atomic models, particle physics, recent discoveries, social implications and students opinions about it. Contrary to our first suspicion, students’ answers show a high variability. They have new physics ideas and show a great interest towards modern concepts. We suggest including an updated view of this topic as part of the curriculum. PMID:27253377

  17. High School Physics Availability: Results from the 2012-13 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan; Tesfaye, Casey Langer

    2014-01-01

    In this report, the authors share their analysis of the data from over 3,500 high schools in the U.S. beginning with an examination of the availability of physics in U.S. high schools. The schools in their sample are a nationally-representative random sample of the almost 25,000 high schools in forty-nine of the fifty states. Table 1 shows the…

  18. Physical Activity Levels in Coeducational and Single-Gender High School Physical Education Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannon, James; Ratliffe, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of coeducational (coed) and single-gender game-play settings on the activity levels of Caucasian and African American high school physical education students. Students participated in flag football, ultimate Frisbee, and soccer units. Classes were as follows: there were two coed classes, two…

  19. Stellar Evolution and Cosmology in High School Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlton, Claudine

    1979-01-01

    Described is a three-week unit on stellar evolution and cosmology taught as part of a one-year introductory high school physics course for seniors. Prerequisite topics necessary for a student's understanding of the material and topics covered during the unit are presented. (BT)

  20. High-energy Physics with Hydrogen Bubble Chambers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Alvarez, L. W.

    1958-03-07

    Recent experience with liquid hydrogen bubble chambers of 25 and 40 cm dia. in high-energy physics experiments is discussed. Experiments described are: interactions of K{sup -} mesons with protons, interactions of antiprotons with protons, catalysis of nuclear fusion reactions by muons, and production and decay of hyperons from negative pions. (W.D.M.)

  1. Action Research: Tiered Instruction in a High School Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courville, Keith

    2010-01-01

    (Purpose) This article describes the use of tiered instruction, a specific form of differentiation, within the author's high school Physics classroom. A background and discussion on the nature of tiered instruction is also included. (Findings) Topics addressed in this paper include: (1) the necessity of differentiation within the classroom; (2)…

  2. "Slow Science": Building Scientific Concepts in Physics in High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigozzi, Lucia; Tarchi, Christian; Falsini, Paola; Fiorentini, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a progressive-learning approach to physics, based on knowledge-building pedagogy, was compared to a content-centered approach in which explanations, experiments, and discussions are centered on the transmission of knowledge. Forty-six students attending the first year of high school participated in this study over a whole school…

  3. High-energy density physics at Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrnes, P.

    1993-03-01

    This brochure describes the facilities of the Above Ground Experiments 2 (AGEX 2) and the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) programs at Los Alamo. Combined, these programs represent, an unparalleled capability to address important issues in high-energy density physics that are critical to the future defense, energy, and research needs of the United States. The mission of the AGEX 2 program at Los Alamos is to provide additional experimental opportunities for the nuclear weapons program. For this purpose we have assembled at Los Alamos the broadest array of high-energy density physics facilities of any laboratory in the world. Inertial confinement fusion seeks to achieve thermonuclear burn on a laboratory scale through the implosion of a small quantity of deuterium and tritium fuel to very high pressure and temperature. The Los Alamos ICF program is focused on target physics. With the largest scientific computing center in the world, We can perform calculations of unprecedented sophistication and precision. We field experiments at facilities worldwide--including our own Trident and Mercury lasers--to confirm our understanding and to provide the necessary data base to proceed toward the historic goal of controlled fusion in the laboratory. The ultrahigh magnetic fields produced in our high explosive pulsed-power generators can be used in a wide variety of solid state physics and temperature superconductor studies. The structure and dynamics of planetary atmospheres can be simulated through the compression of gas mixtures.

  4. Integrating Computer Simulations into High School Physics Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronen, Miky; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes a project aimed at examining the problems involved in a large scale integration of computerized simulations into the present structure of physics teaching in Israeli high schools. Assessment by students, teachers, and the project team indicated general satisfaction with the project. Discusses difficulties of implementing computer-based…

  5. Physical Activity in High School during "Free-Time" Periods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Pedro; Sousa, Michael; Sá, Carla; Ribeiro, José; Mota, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine youth physical activity (PA) in free-time periods during high school days and their contribution to total PA. Differences in terms of sex, age, body mass index and school level were assessed in a sample of Portuguese adolescents. Participants totalled 213 (135 girls), aged 14.6 ± 1.7, from two different…

  6. Teaching High School Physics with a Story-Line

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dagenais, Andre

    2010-01-01

    High school physics curricula are designed to meet a number of goals, all of which compete for classroom and homework time. The process-oriented goals include the development of skills in problem solving, measurement, analyzing data, and research, particularly in this world of internet based, unfiltered information. Content goals, on the other…

  7. High School Students' Perceptions of Their Physics Teachers in Cyprus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koutsoulis, Michalis; Avraamidou, Lucy

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports findings of a research study that aimed to examine a group of high school students' perceptions of their physics teachers. A secondary goal of the research was to determine whether students focus more on the specific characteristics of the teacher and if they perceive certain characteristics more important than others. The study…

  8. Why the Drop in High School Physics Classes: Textbook Readability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Clifford; Watson, Hoyt F.

    1978-01-01

    Examining the reading level of two series of high school physics texts widely used between 1954 and 1976, this study indicates that the reading level of these two texts did increase during the 1960s while at the same time there was a decline in overall reading ability as reflected by SAT scores. (JC)

  9. Effectiveness of "Tutorials for Introductory Physics" in Argentinean High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benegas J.; Flores, J. Sirur

    2014-01-01

    This longitudinal study reports the results of a replication of "Tutorials in Introductory Physics" in high schools of a Latin-American country. The main objective of this study was to examine the suitability of "Tutorials" for local science education reform. Conceptual learning of simple resistive electric circuits was…

  10. High School Student Physics Research Experience Yields Positive Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podolak, K. R.; Walters, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    All high school students that wish to continue onto college are seeking opportunities to be competitive in the college market. They participate in extra-curricular activities which are seen to foster creativity and the skills necessary to do well in the college environment. In the case of students with an interest in physics, participating in a…

  11. Teaching RLC Parallel Circuits in High-School Physics Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Alpár

    2015-01-01

    This paper will try to give an alternative treatment of the subject "parallel RLC circuits" and "resonance in parallel RLC circuits" from the Physics curricula for the XIth grade from Romanian high-schools, with an emphasis on practical type circuits and their possible applications, and intends to be an aid for both Physics…

  12. Research in high energy physics. Closeout report, 1992--1996

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This is the closeout report for DOE supported research in high energy physics for the period 1992-1996, under grant number DE-FG03-92ER40689 at the Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics (SCIPP) at UC Santa Cruz. The research during this period consisted primarily of: (1) data taking with the SLD detector at the SLC at SLCA. This effort built on substantial work on commissioning of the SLC accelerator and has resulted in the single most accurate measurement of the Weinberg angle. (2) Participation in the ALEPH physics program at LEP and LEP-2 at CERN in Geneva, with a technical emphasis on its silicon vertex detector and physics emphasis on events containing b quarks. (3) Electronics development for the leading proton spectrometer for the ZEUS experiment at DESY in Hamburg, data taking with ZEUS, and studies of both diffractive and rare events. (4) Participation in the SMC experiment at CERN, with a particular interest in searches for lepton flavor violation. (5) Participation in design and construction activities for the BaBar detector for CP violation studies at SLAC. (6) Design, testing and development for a silicon tracker for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, building on our earlier work for the SSC. (7) Theoretical physics program emphasizing phenomenology, electroweak radiative corrections, Higgs physics, unification, supersymmetry, and some issues in cosmology. We summarize below the accomplishments in each of the areas listed above.

  13. Modular safety interlock system for high energy physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kieffer, J.; Golceff, B.V.

    1980-10-01

    A frequent problem in electronics systems for high energy physics experiments is to provide protection for personnel and equipment. Interlock systems are typically designed as an afterthought and as a result, the working environment around complex experiments with many independent high voltages or hazardous gas subsystems, and many different kinds of people involved, can be particularly dangerous. A set of modular hardware has been designed which makes possible a standardized, intergrated, hierarchical system's approach and which can be easily tailored to custom requirements.

  14. Numerical relativity and high energy physics: Recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor; Crispino, Luis C. B.; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Herdeiro, Carlos; Sperhake, Ulrich

    2016-07-01

    We review recent progress in the application of numerical relativity techniques to astrophysics and high-energy physics. We focus on recent developments regarding the spin evolution in black hole binaries, high-energy black hole collisions, compact object solutions in scalar-tensor gravity, superradiant instabilities, hairy black hole solutions in Einstein’s gravity coupled to fundamental fields, and the possibility to gain insight into these phenomena using analog gravity models.

  15. High energy expenditure masks low physical activity in obesity

    PubMed Central

    DeLany, James P.; Kelley, David E.; Hames, Kazanna C.; Jakicic, John M.; Goodpaster, Bret H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate energy expenditure in lean and obese individuals, focusing particularly on physical activity and severely obese individuals. Design Total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) was assessed using doubly labeled water, resting metabolic rate (RMR) by indirect calorimetry, activity EE (AEE) by difference and time spent in physical activity by multisensor activity monitors. Subjects 177 lean, Class I and severely obese individuals (age 31–56, BMI 20–64 kg/m2). Results All components of EE were elevated in obese individuals. For example, TDEE was 2404±95 kcal/d in lean and 3244 ± 48 kcal/d in Class III obese. After appropriate adjustment, RMR was similar in all groups. Analysis of AEE by body weight and obesity class indicated a lower AEE in the obese. Confirming lower physical activity, obese individuals spent less time engaged in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (2.7±1.3, 1.8±0.6, 2.0±1.4 and 1.2±1.0 hr/d in lean, Class I, Class II and Class III), and more time in sedentary behaviors. Conclusions There was no indication of metabolic efficiency in even the severely obese, as adjusted RMR was similar across all groups. The higher AEE observed in the obese is consistent with a higher cost of activities due to higher body weight. However, the magnitude of the higher AEE (20 to 25% higher in obese) is lower than expected (weight approximately 100% higher in Class III). Confirming a lower volume of physical activity in the obese, the total time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and average daily MET level were lower with increasing obesity. These findings demonstrate that high body weight in obesity leads to a high TDEE and AEE which masks the fact that they are less physically active, which can be influenced by duration or intensity of activity, than lean individuals. PMID:23090575

  16. Strain Engineering to Modify the Electrochemistry of Energy Storage Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralidharan, Nitin; Carter, Rachel; Oakes, Landon; Cohn, Adam P.; Pint, Cary L.

    2016-06-01

    Strain engineering has been a critical aspect of device design in semiconductor manufacturing for the past decade, but remains relatively unexplored for other applications, such as energy storage. Using mechanical strain as an input parameter to modulate electrochemical potentials of metal oxides opens new opportunities intersecting fields of electrochemistry and mechanics. Here we demonstrate that less than 0.1% strain on a Ni-Ti-O based metal-oxide formed on superelastic shape memory NiTi alloys leads to anodic and cathodic peak potential shifts by up to ~30 mV in an electrochemical cell. Moreover, using the superelastic properties of NiTi to enable strain recovery also recovers the electrochemical potential of the metal oxide, providing mechanistic evidence of strain-modified electrochemistry. These results indicate that mechanical energy can be coupled with electrochemical systems to efficiently design and optimize a new class of strain-modulated energy storage materials.

  17. Strain Engineering to Modify the Electrochemistry of Energy Storage Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan, Nitin; Carter, Rachel; Oakes, Landon; Cohn, Adam P.; Pint, Cary L.

    2016-01-01

    Strain engineering has been a critical aspect of device design in semiconductor manufacturing for the past decade, but remains relatively unexplored for other applications, such as energy storage. Using mechanical strain as an input parameter to modulate electrochemical potentials of metal oxides opens new opportunities intersecting fields of electrochemistry and mechanics. Here we demonstrate that less than 0.1% strain on a Ni-Ti-O based metal-oxide formed on superelastic shape memory NiTi alloys leads to anodic and cathodic peak potential shifts by up to ~30 mV in an electrochemical cell. Moreover, using the superelastic properties of NiTi to enable strain recovery also recovers the electrochemical potential of the metal oxide, providing mechanistic evidence of strain-modified electrochemistry. These results indicate that mechanical energy can be coupled with electrochemical systems to efficiently design and optimize a new class of strain-modulated energy storage materials. PMID:27283872

  18. Electrochemistry of dioxygen in lithium-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardwick, Laurence

    2014-03-01

    The non-aqueous lithium-oxygen battery is one of a host of emerging opportunities available for enhanced energy storage. Unlike a conventional battery where the reagents are contained within the cell, the lithium-oxygen cell uses dioxygen from the atmosphere to electrochemically form the discharge product lithium peroxide. Degrees of reversible oxidation and formation of lithium peroxide has been demonstrated in a number of non-aqueous electrolyte classes, mostly notably in dimethysulfoxide based electrolytes, thus making the lithium-oxygen cell a potential energy storage device. This talk will present our groups recent results of the electrochemistry of dioxygen in non-aqueous electrolytes, of which particular electrolytes could have practical application within a lithium-oxygen cell. Discussion will touch upon how the electrochemistry can be related to electrode substrate and will be presented with in situ spectroscopic studies that identify intermediate and surface species during the oxygen reduction reaction. Support from the EPSRC is gratefully acknowledged

  19. Strain Engineering to Modify the Electrochemistry of Energy Storage Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, Nitin; Carter, Rachel; Oakes, Landon; Cohn, Adam P; Pint, Cary L

    2016-01-01

    Strain engineering has been a critical aspect of device design in semiconductor manufacturing for the past decade, but remains relatively unexplored for other applications, such as energy storage. Using mechanical strain as an input parameter to modulate electrochemical potentials of metal oxides opens new opportunities intersecting fields of electrochemistry and mechanics. Here we demonstrate that less than 0.1% strain on a Ni-Ti-O based metal-oxide formed on superelastic shape memory NiTi alloys leads to anodic and cathodic peak potential shifts by up to ~30 mV in an electrochemical cell. Moreover, using the superelastic properties of NiTi to enable strain recovery also recovers the electrochemical potential of the metal oxide, providing mechanistic evidence of strain-modified electrochemistry. These results indicate that mechanical energy can be coupled with electrochemical systems to efficiently design and optimize a new class of strain-modulated energy storage materials. PMID:27283872

  20. Fighting for physics and Earth science in Florida's high schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottle, Paul

    2009-11-01

    During its Spring 2009 session, the Florida Legislature considered a bill that would have suspended its comprehensive standardized test in high school science and substituted an end-of-course test in biology to satisfy the requirements of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act. By doing so, the bill would have further deemphasized high school physics and Earth science in a state where physics courses are sometimes not available in high schools (even in International Baccalaureate programs) and where the state's own statistics say that only 16% of high school graduates have taken a physics course. A group of about one hundred science faculty from thirteen colleges and universities in Florida responded with a letter to Governor Crist and visits to legislators asking that the biology-only provisions be defeated (and they were). The group has now produced a white paper on high school science requirements that has been distributed to government and business leaders and been publicized via op-ed pieces and news items in several media outlets statewide. This poster will describe the situation in Florida and the faculty group's efforts. It will also compare Florida's high school requirements in science with those in the other SESAPS states.

  1. Synthesis, Electrochemistry, and Photophysics of Aza-BODIPY Porphyrin Dyes.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Simon; Bucher, Léo; Desbois, Nicolas; Bucher, Christophe; Andraud, Chantal; Gros, Claude P

    2016-03-24

    The synthesis of dyad and triad aza-BODIPY-porphyrin systems in two steps starting from an aryl-substituted aza-BODIPY chromophore is described. The properties of the resulting aza-BODIPY-porphyrin conjugates have been extensively investigated by means of electrochemistry, spectroelectrochemistry, and absorption/emission spectroscopy. Fluorescence measurements have revealed a dramatic loss of luminescence intensity, mainly due to competitive energy transfer and photoinduced electron transfer involving charge separation followed by recombination. PMID:26938146

  2. Solvolysis, Electrochemistry, and Development of Synthetic Building Blocks from Sawdust.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Bichlien H; Perkins, Robert J; Smith, Jake A; Moeller, Kevin D

    2015-12-18

    Either aldehyde or cinnamyl ether products can be selectively extracted from raw sawdust by controlling the temperature and pressure of a solvolysis reaction. These materials have been used as platform chemicals for the synthesis of 15 different synthetic substrates. The conversion of the initial sawdust-derived materials into electron-rich aryl substrates often requires the use of oxidation and reduction chemistry, and the role electrochemistry can play as a sustainable method for these transformations has been defined. PMID:26544912

  3. High Energy Density Physics and Exotic Acceleration Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, T.; Colby, E.; /SLAC

    2005-09-27

    The High Energy Density and Exotic Acceleration working group took as our goal to reach beyond the community of plasma accelerator research with its applications to high energy physics, to promote exchange with other disciplines which are challenged by related and demanding beam physics issues. The scope of the group was to cover particle acceleration and beam transport that, unlike other groups at AAC, are not mediated by plasmas or by electromagnetic structures. At this Workshop, we saw an impressive advancement from years past in the area of Vacuum Acceleration, for example with the LEAP experiment at Stanford. And we saw an influx of exciting new beam physics topics involving particle propagation inside of solid-density plasmas or at extremely high charge density, particularly in the areas of laser acceleration of ions, and extreme beams for fusion energy research, including Heavy-ion Inertial Fusion beam physics. One example of the importance and extreme nature of beam physics in HED research is the requirement in the Fast Ignitor scheme of inertial fusion to heat a compressed DT fusion pellet to keV temperatures by injection of laser-driven electron or ion beams of giga-Amp current. Even in modest experiments presently being performed on the laser-acceleration of ions from solids, mega-amp currents of MeV electrons must be transported through solid foils, requiring almost complete return current neutralization, and giving rise to a wide variety of beam-plasma instabilities. As keynote talks our group promoted Ion Acceleration (plenary talk by A. MacKinnon), which historically has grown out of inertial fusion research, and HIF Accelerator Research (invited talk by A. Friedman), which will require impressive advancements in space-charge-limited ion beam physics and in understanding the generation and transport of neutralized ion beams. A unifying aspect of High Energy Density applications was the physics of particle beams inside of solids, which is proving to

  4. Future high precision experiments and new physics beyond Standard Model

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Mingxing.

    1993-01-01

    High precision (< 1%) electroweak experiments that have been done or are likely to be done in this decade are examined on the basis of Standard Model (SM) predictions of fourteen weak neutral current observables and fifteen W and Z properties to the one-loop level, the implications of the corresponding experimental measurements to various types of possible new physics that enter at the tree or loop level were investigated. Certain experiments appear to have special promise as probes of the new physics considered here.

  5. Future high precision experiments and new physics beyond Standard Model

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Mingxing

    1993-04-01

    High precision (< 1%) electroweak experiments that have been done or are likely to be done in this decade are examined on the basis of Standard Model (SM) predictions of fourteen weak neutral current observables and fifteen W and Z properties to the one-loop level, the implications of the corresponding experimental measurements to various types of possible new physics that enter at the tree or loop level were investigated. Certain experiments appear to have special promise as probes of the new physics considered here.

  6. 2010 ELECTROCHEMISTRY GRC, JANUARY 9-15, 2010, VENTURA, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Creager

    2010-12-31

    Electrochemical science plays a crucial role in many important technologies and is intimately involved in many natural phenomena. Several new Gordon Research Conferences have appeared recently that are dedicated to electrochemical technologies, however electrochemistry as a discipline continues to thrive and provide the underpinnings of these technologies. The 2010 Electrochemistry GRC will focus on a wide range of fundamental electrochemical phenomena and materials and on their application in areas involving energy storage, information storage, chemical analysis, and motion actuation. The meeting will include sessions dedicated to the following specific topics: electrochemical energy storage (e.g. batteries; at least two sessions); electrochemical motion actuation (e.g. electrokinesis); electrocatalysis; electrochemistry in digital information storage; and bioelectrochemistry (including bioanalysis). An Open Session devoted to highlighting the activities of {approx}10 young investigators and non-North American visitors via brief 10-minute talks, and two open poster sessions highlighting the contributions of approximately 60 conference participants including graduate students, will be held. Altogether the conference is expected to include approximately 90 presentations. As has been the case in the recent past, the meeting will bring together participants from academia, national labs, and the private sector, including senior and junior-level scientists, postdoctoral scientists, and graduate students for informal interactions and exchange of ideas. An affiliated Gordon-Kenan Research Seminar (GRS) will also be held with the conference. Special efforts will be made to invite participation from members of underrepresented groups.

  7. Environmental management/pollution prevention/environmental electrochemistry opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Nosenchuck, N.H.

    1994-12-31

    Thank you for inviting me to be your keynoter. I`m impressed by what you`ve accomplished through the years and the program that you`ve put together for this International Forum on Environmental Electrochemistry. Above all, we must remember what has brought us together. We must be aware of the challenge, the need, the opportunity we have before us. Sustainable economic development that is responsive to environmental concerns is vital to continued national prosperity. Coincidentally, there are boundless environmental electrochemistry opportunities in environmental management and pollution prevention. The basic approach to environmental protection in this country, for far too many years, has been, for the most part, reactive. As a society, we react to crisis; and in the environmental business, we react to environmental crisis. We react to problems that already were posing substantial ecological and human health risks and problems that already were causing significant public concern. We need both a quality and results-oriented national environmental electrochemistry program.

  8. Merits of online electrochemistry liquid sample desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EC/LS DESI MS).

    PubMed

    Looi, Wen Donq; Brown, Blake; Chamand, Laura; Brajter-Toth, Anna

    2016-03-01

    A new online electrochemistry/liquid sample desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EC/LS DESI MS) system with a simple electrochemical thin-layer flow-through cell was developed and tested using N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine (DMPA) as a model probe. Although oxidation of DMPA is observed as a result of ionization of LS in positive ion mode LS DESI, application of voltage to the online electrochemical (EC) cell in EC/LS DESI MS increases yields of oxidation products. An advantage of LS DESI MS is its sensitivity in aqueous electrolyte solutions, which improves efficiency of electrochemical reactions in EC/LS DESI MS. In highly conductive low pH aqueous buffer solutions, oxidation efficiency is close to 100 %. EC/ESI MS typically requires mixed aqueous/organic solvents and low electrolyte concentrations for efficient ionization in MS, limiting efficiency of electrochemistry online with MS. Independently, the results verify higher electrochemical oxidation efficiency during positive mode ESI than during LS DESI. Graphical abstract Detection of DMPA oxidation in online electrochemical cell with EC/LS DESI MS. PMID:26886744

  9. Scanning thermo-ionic microscopy for probing local electrochemistry at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshghinejad, Ahmadreza; Nasr Esfahani, Ehsan; Wang, Peiqi; Xie, Shuhong; Geary, Timothy C.; Adler, Stuart B.; Li, Jiangyu

    2016-05-01

    Conventional electrochemical characterization techniques based on voltage and current measurements only probe faradaic and capacitive rates in aggregate. In this work we develop a scanning thermo-ionic microscopy (STIM) to probe local electrochemistry at the nanoscale, based on imaging of Vegard strain induced by thermal oscillation. It is demonstrated from both theoretical analysis and experimental validation that the second harmonic response of thermally induced cantilever vibration, associated with thermal expansion, is present in all solids, whereas the fourth harmonic response, caused by local transport of mobile species, is only present in ionic materials. The origin of STIM response is further confirmed by its reduced amplitude with respect to increased contact force, due to the coupling of stress to concentration of ionic species and/or electronic defects. The technique has been applied to probe Sm-doped Ceria and LiFePO4, both of which exhibit higher concentrations of mobile species near grain boundaries. The STIM gives us a powerful method to study local electrochemistry with high sensitivity and spatial resolution for a wide range of ionic systems, as well as ability to map local thermomechanical response.

  10. Prospective Physics Teachers' Views on Their Knowledge about the New Concepts in Turkish High School Physics Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapucu, Serkan; Yildirim, Ufuk

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to a) investigate prospective physics teachers' views on their knowledge about new physics concepts introduced in Turkish High School Physics Curricula; b) investigate the sources of their acquired knowledge about these new physics concepts; and c) explore if there were differences in views on knowledge about…

  11. Conceptual design and experiments of electrochemistry-flushing technology for the remediation of historically Cr(Ⅵ)-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Sun, Delin; Hu, Siyang; Hu, Jing; Yuan, Xingzhong

    2016-02-01

    A conceptual design and experiments, electrochemistry-flushing (E-flushing), using electrochemistry to enhance flushing efficiency for the remediation of Cr(Ⅵ)-contaminated soil is presented. The rector contained three compartments vertically superposed. The upper was airtight cathode compartment containing an iron-cathode. The middle was soil layer. The bottom was anode compartment containing an iron-anode and connected to a container by circulation pumps. H2 and OH(-) ions were produced at cathode. H2 increased the gas pressure in cathode compartment and drove flushing solution into soil layer forming flushing process. OH(-) ions entered into soil layer by eletromigration and hydraulic flow to enhance the desorption of Cr(Ⅵ). High potential gradient was applied to accelerate the electromigration of desorbed Cr(Ⅵ) ions and produced joule heat to increase soil temperature to enhance Cr(Ⅵ) desorption. In anode compartment, Fe(2+) ions produced at iron-anode reduced the desorbed Cr(Ⅵ) into Cr(3+) ions, which reacted with OH(-) ions forming Cr(OH)3. Experimental results show that Cr(Ⅵ) removal efficiency of E-flushing experiments was more than double of flushing experiments and reached the maximum of removal efficiency determined by desorption kinetics. All electrochemistry processes were positively used in E-flushing technology. PMID:26539706

  12. Atomic physics experiments at the high energy storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöhlker, Thomas; Litvinov, Yuri A.; the SPARC Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR), will offer unprecedented experimental opportunities. The Stored Particles Atomic Research Collaboration (SPARC) at FAIR aims at creating a worldwide unique research program with highly charged ions by utilizing storage ring and trapping facilities. The foreseen experiments will address physics at strong, ultra-short electromagnetic fields including the fundamental interactions between electrons and heavy nuclei as well as the experiments at the border between nuclear and atomic physics. In view of the staged construction of the FAIR facility, SPARC worked out an early realization scheme for experiments with highly-charged heavy-ions at relativistic energies to be conducted in the High-Energy Storage Ring.

  13. Massive affordable computing using ARM processors in high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. W.; Hamilton, A.

    2015-05-01

    High Performance Computing is relevant in many applications around the world, particularly high energy physics. Experiments such as ATLAS, CMS, ALICE and LHCb generate huge amounts of data which need to be stored and analyzed at server farms located on site at CERN and around the world. Apart from the initial cost of setting up an effective server farm the cost of power consumption and cooling are significant. The proposed solution to reduce costs without losing performance is to make use of ARM® processors found in nearly all smartphones and tablet computers. Their low power consumption, low cost and respectable processing speed makes them an interesting choice for future large scale parallel data processing centers. Benchmarks on the CortexTM-A series of ARM® processors including the HPL and PMBW suites will be presented as well as preliminary results from the PROOF benchmark in the context of high energy physics will be analyzed.

  14. Who Teaches High School Physics? Results from the 2012-13 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan; Tyler, John

    2014-01-01

    During the 2012-13 academic year, the authors collected data from a representative national sample of over 3,500 public and private high schools across the U.S. to inquire about physics availabilities and offerings. This report describes their findings.

  15. Parameterized neural networks for high-energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, Pierre; Cranmer, Kyle; Faucett, Taylor; Sadowski, Peter; Whiteson, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    We investigate a new structure for machine learning classifiers built with neural networks and applied to problems in high-energy physics by expanding the inputs to include not only measured features but also physics parameters. The physics parameters represent a smoothly varying learning task, and the resulting parameterized classifier can smoothly interpolate between them and replace sets of classifiers trained at individual values. This simplifies the training process and gives improved performance at intermediate values, even for complex problems requiring deep learning. Applications include tools parameterized in terms of theoretical model parameters, such as the mass of a particle, which allow for a single network to provide improved discrimination across a range of masses. This concept is simple to implement and allows for optimized interpolatable results.

  16. Pulsed power drivers for ICF and high energy density physics

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, J.J.; Matzen, M.K.; McDaniel, D.H.

    1995-12-31

    Nanosecond Pulsed Power Science and Technology has its origins in the 1960s and over the past decade has matured into a flexible and robust discipline capable of addressing key physics issues of importance to ICF and high Energy Density Physics. The major leverage provided by pulsed power is its ability to generate and deliver high energy and high power at low cost and high efficiency. A low-cost, high-efficiency driver is important because of the very large capital investment required for multi-megajoule ignition-class systems. High efficiency is of additional importance for a commercially viable inertial fusion energy option. Nanosecond pulsed power has been aggressively and successfully developed at Sandia over the past twenty years. This effort has led to the development of unique multi-purpose facilities supported by highly capable diagnostic, calculational and analytic capabilities. The Sandia Particle-beam Fusion Program has evolved as part of an integrated national ICF Program. It applies the low-cost, high-efficiency leverage provided by nanosecond pulsed power systems to the longer-term goals of the national program, i.e., the Laboratory Microfusion Facility and Inertial Fusion Energy. A separate effort has led to the application of nanosecond pulsed power to the generation of intense, high-energy laboratory x-ray sources for application to x-ray laser and radiation effects science research. Saturn is the most powerful of these sources to date. It generates {approximately}500 kilojoules of x-rays from a magnetically driven implosion (Z-pinch). This paper describes results of x-ray physics experiments performed on Saturn, plans for a new Z-pinch drive capability for PBFA-II, and a design concept for the proposed {approximately}15 MJ Jupiter facility. The opportunities for ICF-relevant research using these facilities will also be discussed.

  17. Physical activity and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Plaisance, Eric P; Grandjean, Peter W

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains one of the leading causes of death and disability in developed countries around the world despite the documented success of lifestyle and pharmacological interventions. This illustrates the multifactorial nature of atherosclerosis and the use of novel inflammatory markers as an adjunct to risk factor reduction strategies. As evidence continues to accumulate that inflammation is involved in all stages of the development and progression of atherosclerosis, markers of inflammation such as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) may provide additional information regarding the biological status of the atherosclerotic lesion. Recent investigations suggest that physical activity reduces CRP levels. Higher levels of physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness are consistently associated with 6-35% lower CRP levels. Longitudinal training studies that have demonstrated reductions in CRP concentrations range from 16% to 41%, an effect that may be independent of baseline levels of CRP, body composition or weight loss. The average change in CRP associated with physical activity appears to be at least as good, if not better, than currently prescribed pharmacological interventions in similar populations. The primary purpose of this review will be to present evidence from both cross-sectional and longitudinal investigations that physical activity lowers CRP levels in a dose-response manner. Finally, this review will examine factors such as body composition, sex, blood sample timing, diet and smoking, which may influence the CRP response to physical activity. PMID:16646631

  18. Reaching the Critical Mass: The Twenty Year Surge in High School Physics. Findings from the 2005 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers. AIP Report. Number R-442

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuschatz, Michael; McFarling, Mark; White, Susan

    2008-01-01

    This report traces the growth of high school physics in American school over the past twenty years. Highlights of the report include: (1) Enrollments in high school physics continue to grow; (2) Increase in number and proportion of physics teachers; (3) Number of students taking honors, advance placement or second-year physics course has nearly…

  19. The Future of High-Pressure Mineral Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebermann, Robert C.

    2005-10-01

    Research in mineral physics is essential in interpreting observational data from many other disciplines in the Earth sciences, including geodynamics, seismology, geochemistry, petrology, geomagnetism, and planetary science, as well as materials science and climate studies, as illustrated in Figure 1. The field of high-pressure mineral physics is highly interdisciplinary and fundamentally multidisciplinary. Mineral physicists do not always study minerals or use only physics; they study the science of materials that compose the Earth and other planets, and employ concepts and techniques from chemistry, physics, materials science, and biology. A dramatic example of this interdisciplinarity in action occurred during the past year. The experimental discovery and theoretical confirmation in 2004 of a new phase of magnesium metasilicate (MgSiO3) stable only at pressures above 100 Gigapascals (and termed the postperovskite phase) has had an immediate and profound impact on multidisciplinary studies of the deep mantle of the Earth (see article by Lay et al. in the 4 January 2005 issue of Eos).

  20. A Comparison of the Fitness, Obesity, and Physical Activity Levels of High School Physical Education Students across Race and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Kathryn L.; Wojcik, Janet R.; DeWaele, Christi S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Little is known about the physical fitness, obesity, and physical activity (PA) levels of high school students in physical education classes when comparing racial and gender groups. Purpose: To compare the fitness, obesity, and PA levels of female and male students of different racial groups in 6 high schools in the southeastern…

  1. Scintillation counters in modern high-energy physics experiments (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharzheev, Yu. N.

    2015-07-01

    Scintillation counters (SCs) based on organic plastic scintillators (OPSs) are widely used in modern high-energy physics (HEP) experiments. A comprehensive review is given to technologies for production of OPS strips and tiles (extrusion, injection molding, etc.), optical and physical characteristics of OPSs, and methods of light collection based on the use of wavelength-shifting (WLS) fibers coupled to multipixel vacuum and silicon PMs. Examples are given of the use of SCs in modern experiments involved in the search for quarks and new particles, including the Higgs boson (D0, CDF, ATLAS, CMS), new states of matter (ALICE), CP violation (LHCb, KLOE), neutrino oscillations (MINOS, OPERA), and cosmic particles in a wide mass and energy interval (AMS-02). Scintillation counters hold great promise for future HEP experiments (at the ILC, NICA, FAIR) due to properties of a high segmentation, WLS fiber light collection, and multipixel silicon PMT readout.

  2. Radiation Physics for Space and High Altitude Air Travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Goldhagen, P.; Saganti, P.; Shavers, M. R.; McKay, Gordon A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are of extra-solar origin consisting of high-energy hydrogen, helium, and heavy ions. The GCR are modified by physical processes as they traverse through the solar system, spacecraft shielding, atmospheres, and tissues producing copious amounts of secondary radiation including fragmentation products, neutrons, mesons, and muons. We discuss physical models and measurements relevant for estimating biological risks in space and high-altitude air travel. Ambient and internal spacecraft computational models for the International Space Station and a Mars mission are discussed. Risk assessment is traditionally based on linear addition of components. We discuss alternative models that include stochastic treatments of columnar damage by heavy ion tracks and multi-cellular damage following nuclear fragmentation in tissue.

  3. HEPDOOP: High-Energy Physics Analysis using Hadoop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhimji, W.; Bristow, T.; Washbrook, A.

    2014-06-01

    We perform a LHC data analysis workflow using tools and data formats that are commonly used in the "Big Data" community outside High Energy Physics (HEP). These include Apache Avro for serialisation to binary files, Pig and Hadoop for mass data processing and Python Scikit-Learn for multi-variate analysis. Comparison is made with the same analysis performed with current HEP tools in ROOT.

  4. High Energy Density Physics on LULI2000 Laser Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, M.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Ozaki, N.; Ravasio, A.; Vinci, T.; Lepape, S.; Tanaka, K.; Riley, D.

    2006-07-01

    We present here a summary of some High Density Energy Physics experiments performed on the new facility LULI 2000. First, different flyer plate targets scheme have been tested loading shock in fused-quartz plate. Temperature data along the Hugoniot curve have been obtained. Second, a strongly coupled and degenerated Aluminium plasma has been probed by X-ray Thomson scattering. Compton shift from electrons has been observed in various density conditions.

  5. High energy physics - The large and the small

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, Alberto

    2012-09-24

    In this Sixth International School on Field Theory and Gravitation, I was invited to give this talk to the students and researchers of Field Theory mainly about LHC - The Large Hadron Collider and results. I will try to summarize the main daily life of the high energy physics and give an idea about the experiments and the expectations for the near future. I will comment the present results and the prospects to LHC/CMS.

  6. US/Japan cooperation in high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-11-01

    The objective of the Implementing Arrangement was to further the energy programs of both countries by establishing a framework for cooperation in the field of high energy physics, including research, accelerator and detector instrumentation research and development, the fabrication and subsequent use of new experimental devices and facilities, and related joint efforts as may be mutually agreed. Over the years, this cooperation has been very effective and has strengthened the overall collaborative efforts and the understanding between our nations and their citizens. It has demonstrated to the world our ability to work together to attack difficult problems. High Energy Physics goes across national borders; the bond is clearly intellectual and common ground is shared for the benefit of all in a most effective manner. This review covers the activities conducted under the aegis of the US/Japan Committee for Cooperation in High Energy Physics during the past five years (1988-1993). This was the second such US review of the US/Japan cooperative activities; the first was held in 1987.

  7. Plasma Physics, Fusion Science, and California High School Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correll, Donald

    2004-11-01

    In order to further engage California HIgh School science teachers in plasma physics and fusion science, a collaboration was formed between LLNL's Fusion Energy Program and the University of California's Edward Teller Education Center (etec.ucdavis.edu). California's Science Content Standards for high school physics (www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/scphysics.asp) were used to create a public lecture (education.llnl.gov/sos/) that covered "students are expected to achieve" physics topics relevant to astrophysical and fusion plasma research. In addition to the lecture, a two day workshop for the Edward Teller Education Symposium, September 24 - 25, 2004 (education.llnl.gov/symposium2004) was designed around plasma spectroscopy (education.llnl.gov/symposium2004/agenda_astro.html). Plasma spectroscopy was chosen as the "anchor" to the workshop given the breadth and depth of the field to both astrophysical and fusion plasma research. Workshop participation includes lectures, tours, spectroscopic measurements, and building a 'spectroscope' for use in the teachers' respective high school classrooms. Accomplishments will be reported and future plans will be presented that include development of a one to two week expanded workshop that includes plasma research methods and advanced science skills essential to guiding students to conduct research projects.

  8. Theoretical Problems in High Resolution Solar Physics, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athay, G. (Editor); Spicer, D. S. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The Science Working Group for the High Resolution Solar Observatory (HRSO) laid plans beginning in 1984 for a series of workshops designed to stimulate a broadbased input from the scientific community to the HRSO mission. These workshops have the dual objectives of encouraging an early start on the difficult theoretical problems in radiative transfer, magnetohydrodynamics, and plasma physics that will be posed by the HRSO data, and maintaining current discussions of results in high resolution solar studies. This workshop was the second in the series. The workshop format presented invited review papers during the formal sessions and contributed poster papers for discussions during open periods. Both are presented.

  9. High pt and photon physics with ALICE at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dai-Cui; Wan, Ren-Zhuo; Mao, Ya-Xian; Schutz, Y.; Wang, Meng-Liang; Ma, Ke; Wang, Ya-Ping; Yin, Zhong-Bao; Cai, Xu; Kharlov, Y.; Conesa, G.; C., Roy

    2010-09-01

    ALICE, A Large Ion Collider Experiment, is dedicated to study the QCD matter at extreme high temperature and density to understand the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) and phase transition. High-transverse-momentum photons and neutral mesons from the initial hard scattering of partons can be measured with ALICE calorimeters, PHOS (PHOton Spectrometer) and EMCAL (ElectroMagnetic CALorimeter). Combing the additional central tracking detectors, the γ-jet and π0-jet measurements thus can be accessed. These measurements offer us a sensitive tomography probe of the hot-dense medium generated in the heavy ion collisions. In this paper, high pT and photon physics is discussed and the ALICE calorimeters capabilities of high-transverse-momentum neutral mesons and γ-jet measurements are presented.

  10. PREFACE: High Energy Particle Physics Workshop (HEPPW2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornell, Alan S.; Mellado, B.

    2015-10-01

    The motivation for this workshop began with the discovery of the Higgs boson three years ago, and the realisation that many problems remain in particle physics, such as why there is more matter than anti-matter, better determining the still poorly measured parameters of the strong force, explaining possible sources for dark matter, naturalness etc. While the newly discovered Higgs boson seems to be compatible with the Standard Model, current experimental accuracy is far from providing a definitive statement with regards to the nature of this new particle. There is a lot of room for physics beyond the Standard Model to emerge in the exploration of the Higgs boson. Recent measurements in high-energy heavy ion collisions at the LHC have shed light on the complex dynamics that govern high-density quark-gluon interactions. An array of results from the ALICE collaboration have been highlighted in a recent issue of CERN courier. The physics program of high-energy heavy ion collisions promises to further unveil the intricacies of high-density quark-gluon plasma physics. The great topicality of high energy physics research has also seen a rapid increase in the number of researchers in South Africa pursuing such studies, both experimentally through the ATLAS and ALICE colliders at CERN, and theoretically. Young researchers and graduate students largely populate these research groups, with little experience in presenting their work, and few support structures (to their knowledge) to share experiences with. Whilst many schools and workshops have sought to educate these students on the theories and tools they will need to pursue their research, few have provided them with a platform to present their work. As such, this workshop discussed the various projects being pursued by graduate students and young researchers in South Africa, enabling them to develop networks for future collaboration and discussion. The workshop took place at the iThemba Laboratories - North facility, in

  11. Providing a computing environment for a high energy physics workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholls, J.

    1991-03-01

    Although computing facilities have been provided at conferences and workshops remote from the hose institution for some years, the equipment provided has rarely been capable of providing for much more than simple editing and electronic mail over leased lines. This presentation describes the pioneering effort involved by the Computing Department/Division at Fermilab in providing a local computing facility with world-wide networking capability for the Physics at Fermilab in the 1990's workshop held in Breckenridge, Colorado, in August 1989, as well as the enhanced facilities provided for the 1990 Summer Study on High Energy Physics at Snowmass, Colorado, in June/July 1990. Issues discussed include type and sizing of the facilities, advance preparations, shipping, on-site support, as well as an evaluation of the value of the facility to the workshop participants.

  12. Scintillating crystals for precision crystal calorimetry in high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, R.

    1998-11-01

    Scintillating crystals in future high energy physics experiments face a new challenge to maintain its performance in a hostile radiation environment. This paper discusses the effects of radiation damage in scintillating crystals. The importance of maintaining crystal{close_quote}s light response uniformity and the feasibility to build a precision crystal calorimeter under radiation are elaborated. The mechanism of radiation damage in scintillating crystals is also discussed. While the damage in alkali halides is found to be caused by the oxygen/hydroxyl contamination, it is the structure defects, such as oxygen vacancies, cause damage in oxides. Material analysis used to reach these conclusions are presented in details. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Collapsing Bubble in Metal for High Energy Density Physics Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, S F; Barnard, J J; Leung, P T; Yu, S S

    2011-04-13

    This paper presents a new idea to produce matter in the high energy density physics (HEDP) regime in the laboratory using an intense ion beam. A gas bubble created inside a solid metal may collapse by driving it with an intense ion beam. The melted metal will compress the gas bubble and supply extra energy to it. Simulations show that the spherical implosion ratio can be about 5 and at the stagnation point, the maximum density, temperature and pressure inside the gas bubble can go up to nearly 2 times solid density, 10 eV and a few megabar (Mbar) respectively. The proposed experiment is the first to permit access into the Mbar regime with existing or near-term ion facilities, and opens up possibilities for new physics gained through careful comparisons of simulations with measurements of quantities like stagnation radius, peak temperature and peak pressure at the metal wall.

  14. The edge- and basal-plane-specific electrochemistry of a single-layer graphene sheet

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wenjing; Zhou, Yu; Li, Yingru; Li, Chun; Peng, Hailin; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Zhongfan; Dai, Liming; Shi, Gaoquan

    2013-01-01

    Graphene has a unique atom-thick two-dimensional structure and excellent properties, making it attractive for a variety of electrochemical applications, including electrosynthesis, electrochemical sensors or electrocatalysis, and energy conversion and storage. However, the electrochemistry of single-layer graphene has not yet been well understood, possibly due to the technical difficulties in handling individual graphene sheet. Here, we report the electrochemical behavior at single-layer graphene-based electrodes, comparing the basal plane of graphene to its edge. The graphene edge showed 4 orders of magnitude higher specific capacitance, much faster electron transfer rate and stronger electrocatalytic activity than those of graphene basal plane. A convergent diffusion effect was observed at the sub-nanometer thick graphene edge-electrode to accelerate the electrochemical reactions. Coupling with the high conductivity of a high-quality graphene basal plane, graphene edge is an ideal electrode for electrocatalysis and for the storage of capacitive charges. PMID:23896697

  15. Bringing Earth Magnetism Research into the High School Physics Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. V.; Bluth, G.; Engel, E.; Kurpier, K.; Foucher, M. S.; Anderson, K. L.

    2015-12-01

    We present our work in progress from an NSF CAREER project that aims to integrate paleomagnetic research and secondary school physics education. The research project is aimed at quantifying the strength and geometry of the Precambrian geomagnetic field. Investigation of the geomagnetic field behavior is crucial for understanding the mechanisms of field generation, and the development of the Earth's atmosphere and biosphere, and can serve as a focus for connecting high-level Earth science research with a standard physics curriculum. High school science teachers have participated in each summer field and research component of the project, gaining field and laboratory research experience, sets of rock and mineral samples, and classroom-tested laboratory magnetism activities for secondary school physics and earth science courses. We report on three field seasons of teacher field experiences and two years of classroom testing of paleomagnetic research materials merged into physics instruction on magnetism. Students were surveyed before and after dedicated instruction for both perceptions and attitude towards earth science in general, then more specifically on earth history and earth magnetism. Students were also surveyed before and after instruction on major earth system and magnetic concepts and processes, particularly as they relate to paleomagnetic research. Most students surveyed had a strongly positive viewpoint towards the study of Earth history and the importance of studying Earth Sciences in general, but were significantly less drawn towards more specific topics such as mineralogy and magnetism. Students demonstrated understanding of Earth model and the basics of magnetism, as well as the general timing of life, atmospheric development, and magnetic field development. However, detailed knowledge such as the magnetic dynamo, how the magnetic field has changed over time, and connections between earth magnetism and the development of an atmosphere remained largely

  16. Research in High Energy Physics at Duke University

    SciTech Connect

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V.; Goshaw, Al; Kruse, Mark; Oh, Seog; Scholberg, Kate; Walter, Chris

    2013-07-29

    This is the Closeout Report for the research grant in experimental elementary particle physics, carried out by the Duke University High Energy Physics (HEP) group. We re- port on physics results and detector development carried out under this grant, focussing on the recent three-year grant period (2010 to 2013). The Duke HEP group consisted of seven faculty members, two senior scientists, ve postdocs and eight graduate students. There were three thrusts of the research program. Measurements at the energy frontier at CDF and ATLAS were used to test aspects of elementary particle theory described by the Stan- dard Model (SM) and to search for new forces and particles beyond those contained within the SM. The neutrino sector was explored using data obtained from a large neutrino detector located in Japan, and R & D was conducted on new experiments to be built in the US. The measurements provided information about neutrino masses and the manner in which neutri- nos change species in particle beams. Two years ago we have started a new research program in rare processes based on the Mu2E experiment at Fermilab. This research is motivated by the search for the ! e transition with unprecedented sensitivity, a transition forbidden in the standard model but allowed in supersymmetric and other models of new physics. The high energy research program used proton and antiproton colliding beams. The experiments were done at the Fermilab Tevatron (proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV) and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (proton-proton collisions at 7-8 TeV). The neutrino program used data obtained from the Super-Kamiokande detec- tor. This water- lled Cherenkov counter was used to detect and measure the properties of neutrinos produced in cosmic ray showers, and from neutrino beams produced from acceler- ators in Japan. The Mu2E experiment will use a special stopped muon beam to be built at Fermilab.

  17. Research in High Energy Physics at Duke University

    SciTech Connect

    Goshaw, Alfred; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kruse, Mark; Oh, Seog; Scholberg, Kate; Walter, Chris

    2013-07-29

    This is the Closeout Report for the research grant in experimental elementary particle physics, carried out by the Duke University High Energy Physics (HEP) group. We re- port on physics results and detector development carried out under this grant, focussing on the recent three-year grant period (2010 to 2013). The Duke HEP group consisted of seven faculty members, two senior scientists, five postdocs and eight graduate students. There were three thrusts of the research program. Measurements at the energy frontier at CDF and ATLAS were used to test aspects of elementary particle theory described by the Stan- dard Model (SM) and to search for new forces and particles beyond those contained within the SM. The neutrino sector was explored using data obtained from a large neutrino detector located in Japan, and R & D was conducted on new experiments to be built in the US. The measurements provided information about neutrino masses and the manner in which neutri- nos change species in particle beams. Two years ago we have started a new research program in rare processes based on the Mu2E experiment at Fermilab. This research is motivated by the search for the {mu} {yields} e transition with unprecedented sensitivity, a transition forbidden in the standard model but allowed in supersymmetric and other models of new physics. The high energy research program used proton and antiproton colliding beams. The experiments were done at the Fermilab Tevatron (proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV) and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (proton-proton collisions at 7-8 TeV). The neutrino program used data obtained from the Super-Kamiokande detector. This water-filled Cherenkov counter was used to detect and measure the properties of neutrinos produced in cosmic ray showers, and from neutrino beams produced from acceler- ators in Japan. The Mu2E experiment will use a special stopped muon beam to be built at Fermilab.

  18. Southern California Area Modern Physics Institute (SCAMPI): A Model Enhancement Program in Modern Physics for High School Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nanes, Roger; Jewett, John W.

    1994-01-01

    Describes a program aimed at assisting high school physics teachers with incorporating modern physics concepts into the curriculum. Summer and academic year activities are described. Project evaluation indicates the project promoted modern physics instruction and an increase in teacher self-esteem. (DDR)

  19. Large-Volume High-Pressure Mineral Physics in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebermann, Robert C.; Prewitt, Charles T.; Weidner, Donald J.

    American high-pressure research with large sample volumes developed rapidly in the 1950s during the race to produce synthetic diamonds. At that time the piston cylinder, girdle (or belt), and tetrahedral anvil devices were invented. However, this development essentially stopped in the late 1950s, and while the diamond anvil cell has been used extensively in the United States with spectacular success for high-pressure experiments in small sample volumes, most of the significant technological advances in large-volume devices have taken place in Japan. Over the past 25 years, these technical advances have enabled a fourfold increase in pressure, with many important investigations of the chemical and physical properties of materials synthesized at high temperatures and pressures that cannot be duplicated with any apparatus currently available in the United States.

  20. Physical and mechanical metallurgy of high purity Nb accelerator cavities.

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, N. T.; Bieler, T. R.; Pourgoghart , F.; Compton, C.; Hartwig, K. T.; Baars, D.; Zamiri, A.; Chandrasekaran, S.; Darbandi, P.; Jiang, H.; Skoug, E.; Balachandran, S.; Ice, G. E.; Liu, W.; Michigan State Univ.; Texas A & M Univ.; ORNL

    2010-01-01

    In the past decade, high Q values have been achieved in high purity Nb superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Fundamental understanding of the physical metallurgy of Nb that enables these achievements is beginning to reveal what challenges remain to establish reproducible and cost-effective production of high performance SRF cavities. Recent studies of dislocation substructure development and effects of recrystallization arising from welding and heat treatments and their correlations with cavity performance are considered. With better fundamental understanding of the effects of dislocation substructure evolution and recrystallization on electron and phonon conduction, as well as the interior and surface states, it will be possible to design optimal processing paths for cost-effective performance using approaches such as hydroforming, which minimizes or eliminates welds in a cavity.

  1. Highly physical penumbra solar radiation pressure modeling with atmospheric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Robert; Flury, Jakob; Bandikova, Tamara; Schilling, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    We present a new method for highly physical solar radiation pressure (SRP) modeling in Earth's penumbra. The fundamental geometry and approach mirrors past work, where the solar radiation field is modeled using a number of light rays, rather than treating the Sun as a single point source. However, we aim to clarify this approach, simplify its implementation, and model previously overlooked factors. The complex geometries involved in modeling penumbra solar radiation fields are described in a more intuitive and complete way to simplify implementation. Atmospheric effects are tabulated to significantly reduce computational cost. We present new, more efficient and accurate approaches to modeling atmospheric effects which allow us to consider the high spatial and temporal variability in lower atmospheric conditions. Modeled penumbra SRP accelerations for the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites are compared to the sub-nm/s2 precision GRACE accelerometer data. Comparisons to accelerometer data and a traditional penumbra SRP model illustrate the improved accuracy which our methods provide. Sensitivity analyses illustrate the significance of various atmospheric parameters and modeled effects on penumbra SRP. While this model is more complex than a traditional penumbra SRP model, we demonstrate its utility and propose that a highly physical model which considers atmospheric effects should be the basis for any simplified approach to penumbra SRP modeling.

  2. High Intensity Particle Physics at PW-class laser facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, Stepan; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Esirkepov, Timur; Kando, Masaki; Rosanov, Nikolay; Korn, Georg; Bulanov, Sergey V.; Leemans, Wim P.

    2015-11-01

    The processes typical for high intensity particle physics, i.e., the interactions of charged particles with strong electromagnetic fields, have attracted considerable interest recently. Some of these processes, previously believed to be of theoretical interest only, are now becoming experimentally accessible. High intensity electromagnetic (EM) fields significantly modify the interactions of particles and EM fields, giving rise to the phenomena that are not encountered either in classical or perturbative quantum theory of these interactions. One of such phenomena is the radiation reaction, which radically influences the electron motion in an electromagnetic standing wave formed by two super-intense counter-propagating laser pulses. Depending on the laser intensity and wavelength, either classical or quantum mode of radiation reaction prevail, or both are strong. When radiation reaction dominates, electron motion evolves to limit cycles and strange attractors. This creates a new framework for high energy physics experiments on an interaction of energetic charged particle beams and colliding super-intense laser pulses. Work supported by U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  3. Atomic physics with highly charged ions. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, P.

    1994-08-01

    The study of inelastic collision phenomena with highly charged projectile ions and the interpretation of spectral features resulting from these collisions remain as the major focal points in the atomic physics research at the J.R. Macdonald Laboratory, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas. The title of the research project, ``Atomic Physics with Highly Charged Ions,`` speaks to these points. The experimental work in the past few years has divided into collisions at high velocity using the primary beams from the tandem and LINAC accelerators and collisions at low velocity using the CRYEBIS facility. Theoretical calculations have been performed to accurately describe inelastic scattering processes of the one-electron and many-electron type, and to accurately predict atomic transition energies and intensities for x rays and Auger electrons. Brief research summaries are given for the following: (1) electron production in ion-atom collisions; (2) role of electron-electron interactions in two-electron processes; (3) multi-electron processes; (4) collisions with excited, aligned, Rydberg targets; (5) ion-ion collisions; (6) ion-molecule collisions; (7) ion-atom collision theory; and (8) ion-surface interactions.

  4. Duke University high energy physics. Progress report, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Fortney, L.R.; Goshaw, A.T.; Walker, W.D.

    1992-07-01

    This Progress Report presents a review of the research done in 1992 by the Duke High Energy Physics Group. This is the first year of a three-year grant which was approved by the Office of High Energy Physics at DOE after an external review of our research program during the summer of 1991. Our research is centered at Fermilab where we are involved with two active experiments, one using the Tevatron collider (CDF, the Collider Detector Facility) and the other using a proton beam in the high intensity laboratory (E771, study of beauty production). In addition to these running experiments we are continuing the analysis of data from experiments E735 (collider search for a quark-gluon plasma), E705 (fixed target study of direct photon and {sub {Chi}} meson production) and E597 (particle production from hadron-nucleus collisions). Finally, this year has seen an expansion of our involvement with the design of the central tracking detector for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) and an increased role in the governance of the collaboration. Descriptions of these research activities are presented in this report.

  5. High school student physics research experience yields positive results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podolak, K. R.; Walters, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    All high school students that wish to continue onto college are seeking opportunities to be competitive in the college market. They participate in extra-curricular activities which are seen to foster creativity and the skills necessary to do well in the college environment. In the case of students with an interest in physics, participating in a small scale research project while in high school gives them the hands on experience and ultimately prepares them more for the college experience. SUNY Plattsburgh’s Physics department started a five-week summer program for high school students in 2012. This program has proved not only beneficial for students while in the program, but also as they continue on in their development as scientists/engineers. Independent research, such as that offered by SUNY Plattsburgh’s five-week summer program, offers students a feel and taste of the culture of doing research, and life as a scientist. It is a short-term, risk free way to investigate whether a career in research or a particular scientific field is a good fit.

  6. An introduction to the physics of high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.A.; Syphers, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    This book is an outgrowth of a course given by the authors at various universities and particle accelerator schools. It starts from the basic physics principles governing particle motion inside an accelerator, and leads to a full description of the complicated phenomena and analytical tools encountered in the design and operation of a working accelerator. The book covers acceleration and longitudinal beam dynamics, transverse motion and nonlinear perturbations, intensity dependent effects, emittance preservation methods and synchrotron radiation. These subjects encompass the core concerns of a high energy synchrotron. The authors apparently do not assume the reader has much previous knowledge about accelerator physics. Hence, they take great care to introduce the physical phenomena encountered and the concepts used to describe them. The mathematical formulae and derivations are deliberately kept at a level suitable for beginners. After mastering this course, any interested reader will not find it difficult to follow subjects of more current interests. Useful homework problems are provided at the end of each chapter. Many of the problems are based on actual activities associated with the design and operation of existing accelerators.

  7. Operational Radiation Protection in High-Energy Physics Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Rokni, S.H.; Fasso, A.; Liu, J.C.; /SLAC

    2012-04-03

    An overview of operational radiation protection (RP) policies and practices at high-energy electron and proton accelerators used for physics research is presented. The different radiation fields and hazards typical of these facilities are described, as well as access control and radiation control systems. The implementation of an operational RP programme is illustrated, covering area and personnel classification and monitoring, radiation surveys, radiological environmental protection, management of induced radioactivity, radiological work planning and control, management of radioactive materials and wastes, facility dismantling and decommissioning, instrumentation and training.

  8. High-energy physics software parallelization using database techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argante, E.; van der Stok, P. D. V.; Willers, I.

    1997-02-01

    A programming model for software parallelization, called CoCa, is introduced that copes with problems caused by typical features of high-energy physics software. By basing CoCa on the database transaction paradimg, the complexity induced by the parallelization is for a large part transparent to the programmer, resulting in a higher level of abstraction than the native message passing software. CoCa is implemented on a Meiko CS-2 and on a SUN SPARCcenter 2000 parallel computer. On the CS-2, the performance is comparable with the performance of native PVM and MPI.

  9. PRaVDA: High Energy Physics towards proton Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, T.

    2016-07-01

    Proton radiotherapy is an increasingly popular modality for treating cancers of the head and neck, and in paediatrics. To maximise the potential of proton radiotherapy it is essential to know the distribution, and more importantly the proton stopping powers, of the body tissues between the proton beam and the tumour. A stopping power map could be measured directly, and uncertainties in the treatment vastly reduce, if the patient was imaged with protons instead of conventional x-rays. Here we outline the application of technologies developed for High Energy Physics to provide clinical-quality proton Computed Tomography, in so reducing range uncertainties and enhancing the treatment of cancer.

  10. Phenoxazine Based Units- Synthesis, Photophysics and Electrochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Nowakowska-Oleksy, Anna; Cabaj, Joanna

    2010-01-01

    A few new phenoxazine-based conjugated monomers were synthesized, characterized, and successfully used as semiconducting materials. The phenoxazine-based oligomers have low ionization potentials or high-lying HOMO levels (~4.7 eV), which were estimated from cyclic voltammetry. Conjugated oligomers offer good film—forming, mechanical and optical properties connected with their wide application. These results demonstrate that phenoxazine-based conjugated mers are a promising type of semiconducting and luminescent structures able to be used as thin films in organic electronics. PMID:20625802

  11. MIGHTY MURINES: NEUTRINO PHYSICS AT VERY HIGH ENERGY MUON COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    KING,B.J.

    2000-05-05

    An overview is given of the potential for neutrino physics studies through parasitic use of the intense high energy neutrino beams that would be produced at future many-TeV muon colliders. Neutrino experiments clearly cannot compete with the collider physics. Except at the very highest energy muon colliders, the main thrust of the neutrino physics program would be to improve on the measurements from preceding neutrino experiments at lower energy muon colliders, particularly in the fields of B physics, quark mixing and CP violation. Muon colliders at the 10 TeV energy scale might already produce of order 10{sup 8} B hadrons per year in a favorable and unique enough experimental environment to have some analytical capabilities beyond any of the currently operating or proposed B factories. The most important of the quark mixing measurements at these energies might well be the improved measurements of the important CKM matrix elements {vert_bar}V{sub ub}{vert_bar} and {vert_bar}V{sub cb}{vert_bar} and, possibly, the first measurements of {vert_bar}V{sub td}{vert_bar} in the process of flavor changing neutral current interactions involving a top quark loop. Muon colliders at the highest center-of-mass energies that have been conjectured, 100--1,000 TeV, would produce neutrino beams for neutrino-nucleon interaction experiments with maximum center-of-mass energies from 300--1,000 GeV. Such energies are close to, or beyond, the discovery reach of all colliders before the turn-on of the LHC. In particular, they are comparable to the 314 GeV center-of-mass energy for electron-proton scattering at the currently operating HERA collider and so HERA provides a convenient benchmark for the physics potential. It is shown that these ultimate terrestrial neutrino experiments, should they eventually come to pass, would have several orders of magnitude more luminosity than HERA. This would potentially open up the possibility for high statistics studies of any exotic particles, such as

  12. High School Physics Textbooks, Resources and Teacher Resourcefulness: Results from the 2012-13 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tesfaye, Casey Langer; White, Susan

    2014-01-01

    What textbooks are physics teachers using? How highly do they rate those textbooks? What other types of materials do teachers use? The textbooks and other resources used by high school physics teachers in the US have evolved along with the changing demands of physics classes and the evolving set of options available to teachers. In this report,…

  13. REPORT OF RESEARCH ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND FUTURE GOALS HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, Mark B.; Kapustin, Anton N.; Schwarz, John Henry; Carroll, Sean; Ooguri, Hirosi; Gukov, Sergei; Preskill, John; Hitlin, David G.; Porter, Frank C.; Patterson, Ryan B.; Newman, Harvey B.; Spiropulu, Maria; Golwala, Sunil; Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2014-08-26

    Caltech High Energy Physics (HEP) has a broad program in both experimental and theoretical physics. We are known for our creativity and leadership. The future is uncertain and we strive to be involved in all the major areas of experimental and theoretical HEP physics so no matter where the important discoveries occur we are well positioned to play an important role. An outstanding group of postdoctoral scholars, graduate students, staff scientists, and technical and administrative personnel support our efforts in experimental and theoretical physics. The PI’s on this grant are involved in the following program of experimental and theoretical activities: I) EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS Our CMS group, led by Harvey Newman and Maria Spiropulu, has played a key role in the discovery and interpretation of the Higgs boson and in searches for new physics. They have important hardware responsibilities in both ECAL and HCAL and are also involved in the upgrades needed for the High Luminosity LHC. Newman's group also develops and operates Grid-based computing, networking, and collaborative systems for CMS and the US HEP community. The charged lepton (Mu2e) and quark BaBar flavor physics group is led by David Hitlin and Frank Porter. On Mu2e they have been instrumental in the design of the calorimeter. Construction responsibilities include one third of the crystals and associated readout as well as the calibration system. They also will have responsibility for a major part of the online system software. Although data taking ceased in 2008 the Caltech BaBar group is active on several new forefront analyses. The neutrino group is led by Ryan Patterson. They are central to NOvA's core oscillation physics program, to calibration, and to detector readiness being responsible for the production and installation of 12,000 APD arrays. They have key roles in neutrino appearance and disappearance analysis in MINOS and MINOS+. Sunil Golwala leads the dark matter direct detection effort. Areas

  14. The Survey and Analysis of Excellent Senior High School Physics Teachers' Professional Growth Actuality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Haibin; Liu, Tingting

    2010-01-01

    Excellent senior high school physics teachers are the backbone power in the new course reform of physics in China. The excellent senior high school physics teachers' professional growth actuality in Shandong is surveyed in this article by the self-made "Questionnaire of Excellent Senior High School Physics Teachers' Professional Growth",…

  15. Scanning Electrochemical Cell Microscopy: A Versatile Technique for Nanoscale Electrochemistry and Functional Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebejer, Neil; Güell, Aleix G.; Lai, Stanley C. S.; McKelvey, Kim; Snowden, Michael E.; Unwin, Patrick R.

    2013-06-01

    Scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM) is a new pipette-based imaging technique purposely designed to allow simultaneous electrochemical, conductance, and topographical visualization of surfaces and interfaces. SECCM uses a tiny meniscus or droplet, at the end of a double-barreled (theta) pipette, for high-resolution functional imaging and nanoscale electrochemical measurements. Here we introduce this technique and provide an overview of its principles, instrumentation, and theory. We discuss the power of SECCM in resolving complex structure-activity problems and provide considerable new information on electrode processes by referring to key example systems, including graphene, graphite, carbon nanotubes, nanoparticles, and conducting diamond. The many longstanding questions that SECCM has been able to answer during its short existence demonstrate its potential to become a major technique in electrochemistry and interfacial science.

  16. Scanning electrochemical cell microscopy: a versatile technique for nanoscale electrochemistry and functional imaging.

    PubMed

    Ebejer, Neil; Güell, Aleix G; Lai, Stanley C S; McKelvey, Kim; Snowden, Michael E; Unwin, Patrick R

    2013-01-01

    Scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM) is a new pipette-based imaging technique purposely designed to allow simultaneous electrochemical, conductance, and topographical visualization of surfaces and interfaces. SECCM uses a tiny meniscus or droplet, at the end of a double-barreled (theta) pipette, for high-resolution functional imaging and nanoscale electrochemical measurements. Here we introduce this technique and provide an overview of its principles, instrumentation, and theory. We discuss the power of SECCM in resolving complex structure-activity problems and provide considerable new information on electrode processes by referring to key example systems, including graphene, graphite, carbon nanotubes, nanoparticles, and conducting diamond. The many longstanding questions that SECCM has been able to answer during its short existence demonstrate its potential to become a major technique in electrochemistry and interfacial science. PMID:23560932

  17. The Rich Electrochemistry and Redox Reactions of the Copper Sites in the Cellular Prion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Feimeng; Millhauser, Glenn L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews recent electrochemical studies of the copper complexes of prion protein (PrP) and its related peptides, and correlates their redox behavior to chemical and biologically relevant reactions. Particular emphasis is placed on the difference in redox properties between copper in the octarepeat (OR) and the non-OR domains of PrP, as well as differences between the high and low copper occupancy states in the OR domain. Several discrepancies in literature concerning these differences are discussed and reconciled. The PrP copper complexes, in comparison to copper complexes of other amyloidogenic proteins/peptides, display a more diverse and richer redox chemistry. The specific protocols and caveats that need to be considered in studying the electrochemistry and redox reactions of copper complexes of PrP, PrP-derived peptides, and other related amyloidogenic proteins are summarized. PMID:23144499

  18. PROBING THE PHYSICAL CONDITIONS OF ATOMIC GAS AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Neeleman, Marcel; Wolfe, Arthur M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2015-02-10

    A new method is used to measure the physical conditions of the gas in damped Lyα systems (DLAs). Using high-resolution absorption spectra of a sample of 80 DLAs, we are able to measure the ratio of the upper and lower fine-structure levels of the ground state of C{sup +} and Si{sup +}. These ratios are determined solely by the physical conditions of the gas. We explore the allowed physical parameter space using a Monte Carlo Markov chain method to constrain simultaneously the temperature, neutral hydrogen density, and electron density of each DLA. The results indicate that at least 5% of all DLAs have the bulk of their gas in a dense, cold phase with typical densities of ∼100 cm{sup –3} and temperatures below 500 K. We further find that the typical pressure of DLAs in our sample is log (P/k{sub B} ) = 3.4 (K cm{sup –3}), which is comparable to the pressure of the local interstellar medium (ISM), and that the components containing the bulk of the neutral gas can be quite small with absorption sizes as small as a few parsecs. We show that the majority of the systems are consistent with having densities significantly higher than expected for a purely canonical warm neutral medium, indicating that significant quantities of dense gas (i.e., n {sub H} > 0.1 cm{sup –3}) are required to match observations. Finally, we identify eight systems with positive detections of Si II*. These systems have pressures (P/k{sub B} ) in excess of 20,000 K cm{sup –3}, which suggest that these systems tag a highly turbulent ISM in young, star-forming galaxies.

  19. Electrochemistry of thiobacillus ferrooxidans interactions with pyrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesic, Batric; Kim, Inbeum

    1993-10-01

    A cyclic voltammetry technique was used to study the interactions of mineral-pyrite during bioleaching with the bacterium Thiobacillus (T.) ferrooxidans over its entire growth cycle. Invariably, the pyrite surface drastically changed its properties on the second day of bacterial rowth (bioleaching). After 2 days, the cyclic voltammograms (CVs) were insensitive to convective diffusion produced by stirring. The product layer was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction, and chemical analysis. The SEM study revealed an extremely high density of bacteria on the pyrite surface. The high density of bacteria, along with the solid reaction products formed on the pyrite surface, created conditions for crack/pore diffusion, explaining why the CVs became insensitive to convective diffusion (stirring) in solution. X-ray diffraction study confirmed jarosite as a product layer. A mechanism is proposed by which T. ferrooxidans cells serve as nucleation sites for jarosite formation.

  20. Electrochemistry of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans interactions with pyrite

    SciTech Connect

    Pesic, B. . Coll. of Mines and Earth Resources); Kim, I. )

    1993-10-01

    A cyclic voltammetry technique was used to study the interactions of mineral-pyrite during bioleaching with the bacterium Thiobacillus (T.) ferrooxidans over its entire growth cycle. Invariably, the pyrite surface drastically changed its properties on the second day of bacterial growth (bioleaching). After 2 days, the cyclic voltammograms (CVs) were insensitive to convective diffusion produced by stirring. The product layer was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction, and chemical analysis. The SEM study revealed an extremely high density of bacteria on the pyrite surface. The high density of bacteria, along with the solid reaction products formed on the pyrite surface, created conditions for crack/pore diffusion, explaining why the CVs became insensitive to convective diffusion (stirring) in solution. X-ray diffraction study confirmed jarosite as a product layer. A mechanism is proposed by which T. ferrooxidans cells serve as nucleation sites for jarosite formation.

  1. Electrochemistry of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans reactions with pyrite

    SciTech Connect

    Pesic, B.

    1991-01-01

    The interactions of mineral-pyrite with T. ferrooxidans were studied by using a cyclic voltametry technique. The interactions with bacteria were examined during the entire growth stage of bacterial (fermentation). The pyrite surface invariably drastically changed its properties at the second day of fermentation. Beyond two days of fermentation, the cyclic voltamograms were insensitive to convective diffusion produced by stirring. The product layer was examined by SEM, X-ray diffraction and chemical analysis. The SEM study revealed that bacteria populated the pyrite surface at an extremely high density levels. The high density of bacteria, and the solid reaction products formed on the pyrite surface created conditions for pore diffusion which explained why the CVs became insensitive to convective diffusion in solution (stirring). The X-ray diffraction study confirmed jarosite as a product layer. A mechanism of T. ferrooxidans cells serving as nucleation sites for jarosite formation is proposed. 16 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. High energy physics program at Texas A M University

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    The Texas A M high energy physics program has achieved significant mile-stones in each of its research initiatives. We are participating in two major operating experiments, CDF and MACRO; the development of two new detector technologies, liquid scintillating fiber calorimetry and knife-edge chambers; and two SSC detector proposals, SDC and TEXAS/EMPACT. We have developed prototypes of a liquid-scintillator fiber calorimeter system, in which internally reflecting channels are imbedded in a lead matrix and filled with liquid scintillator. This approach combines the performance features of fiber calorimetry and the radiation hardness of liquid scintillator, and is being developed for forward calorimetry in TEXAS/EMPACT. A new element in this program is the inclusion of a theoretical high energy physics research program being carried out by D. Nanopoulos and C. Pope. D. Nanopoulos has succeeded in building a string-derived model that unifies all known interactions: flipped SU(5), which is the leading candidate for a TOE. The impact of this work on string phenomenology certainly has far reaching consequences. C. Pope is currently working on some generalizations of the symmetries of string theory, known as W algebras. These are expected to have applications in two- dimensional conformal field theory, two-dimensional extensions of gravity and topological gravity, and W-string theory. The following report presents details of the accomplishments of the Texas A M program over the past year and the proposed plan of research for the coming year.

  3. Data driven parallelism in experimental high energy physics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Martin

    1987-08-01

    I present global design principles for the implementation of High Energy Physics data analysis code on sequential and parallel processors with mixed shared and local memory. Potential parallelism in the structure of High Energy Physics tasks is identified with granularity varying from a few times 10 8 instructions all the way down to a few times 10 4 instructions. It follows the hierarchical structure of detector and data acquisition systems. To take advantage of this - yet preserving the necessary portability of the code - I propose a computational model with purely data driven concurrency in Single Program Multiple Data (SPMD) mode. The Task granularity is defined by varying the granularity of the central data structure manipulated. Concurrent processes coordinate themselves asynchroneously using simple lock constructs on parts of the data structure. Load balancing among processes occurs naturally. The scheme allows to map the internal layout of the data structure closely onto the layout of local and shared memory in a parallel architecture. It thus allows to optimize the application with respect to synchronization as well as data transport overheads. I present a coarse top level design for a portable implementation of this scheme on sequential machines, multiprocessor mainframes (e.g. IBM 3090), tightly coupled multiprocessors (e.g. RP-3) and loosely coupled processor arrays (e.g. LCAP, Emulating Processor Farms).

  4. High Energy Physics Program at Texas A and M University

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The high energy physics program has continued its experimental activities over. In CDF, the Texas A M group has led an effort to design an upgrade for the silicon vertex detector, and is currently working with the rest of the collaboration on the next major data taking run. In MACRO, work was done on the development of the final version of the wave form digitizing system being implemented for the entire scintillator system. This work is nearing completion, and the system is expected to be up and running on the detector by summer 1993. Work was done within the SDC group to develop gas microstrip chambers for use in precision tracking at the SSC, and in the GEM group, toward the development of a suitable forward calorimeter design. The theoretical high energy physics program has continued the study of a very successful string-derived model that unifies all known interactions: flipped SU(5), which is the leading candidate for a TOE. Work has also continued on some generalizations of the symmetries of string theory, known as W algebras. These are expected to have applications in two-dimensional conformal field theory, two-dimensional extensions of gravity and topological gravity and W-string theory.

  5. Analyzing high energy physics data using database computing: Preliminary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baden, Andrew; Day, Chris; Grossman, Robert; Lifka, Dave; Lusk, Ewing; May, Edward; Price, Larry

    1991-01-01

    A proof of concept system is described for analyzing high energy physics (HEP) data using data base computing. The system is designed to scale up to the size required for HEP experiments at the Superconducting SuperCollider (SSC) lab. These experiments will require collecting and analyzing approximately 10 to 100 million 'events' per year during proton colliding beam collisions. Each 'event' consists of a set of vectors with a total length of approx. one megabyte. This represents an increase of approx. 2 to 3 orders of magnitude in the amount of data accumulated by present HEP experiments. The system is called the HEPDBC System (High Energy Physics Database Computing System). At present, the Mark 0 HEPDBC System is completed, and can produce analysis of HEP experimental data approx. an order of magnitude faster than current production software on data sets of approx. 1 GB. The Mark 1 HEPDBC System is currently undergoing testing and is designed to analyze data sets 10 to 100 times larger.

  6. High-Efficiency Solar Cell Concepts: Physics, Materials, and Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mascarenhas, A.; Francoeur, S.; Seong, M. J.; Fluegel, B.; Zhang, Y.; Wanlass, M. W.

    2005-01-01

    Over the past three decades, significant progress has been made in the area of high-efficiency multijunction solar cells, with the effort primarily directed at current-matched solar cells in tandem. The key materials issues here have been obtaining semiconductors with the required bandgaps for sequential absorption of light in the solar spectrum and that are lattice matched to readily available substrates. The GaInP/GaAs/Ge cell is a striking example of success achieved in this area. Recently, several new approaches for high-efficiency solar cell design have emerged, that involve novel methods for tailoring alloy bandgaps, as well as alternate technologies for hetero-epitaxy of III-V's on Si. The advantages and difficulties expected to be encountered with each approach will be discussed, addressing both the materials issues and device physics whilst contrasting them with other fourth-generation solar cell concepts.

  7. Neural network chips for trigger purposes in high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gemmeke, H.; Eppler, W.; Fischer, T.

    1996-12-31

    Two novel neural chips SAND (Simple Applicable Neural Device) and SIOP (Serial Input - Operating Parallel) are described. Both are highly usable for hardware triggers in particle physics. The chips are optimized for a high input data rate at a very low cost basis. The performance of a single SAND chip is 200 MOPS due to four parallel 16 bit multipliers and 40 bit adders working in one clock cycle. The chip is able to implement feedforward neural networks, Kohonen feature maps and radial basis function networks. Four chips will be implemented on a PCI-board for simulation and on a VUE board for trigger and on- and off-line analysis. For small sized feedforward neural networks the bit-serial neuro-chip SIOP may lead to even smaller latencies because each synaptic connection is implemented by its own bit serial multiplier and adder.

  8. High order methods for elliptic problems in plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pataki, Andras

    In this dissertation, we develop fast high order solvers for two elliptic problems in plasma physics. The first is the Grad-Shafranov equation, a nonlinear elliptic PDE that describes the magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium of three dimensional, axisymmetric plasmas. A high order solver is desirable to ensure the accurate evaluation of derivatives, required both for the computation of physical quantities and for studying perturbations near equilibrium. Using suitable scaling, we transform the problem from cylindrical coordinates to a nonlinear Poisson problem in Cartesian coordinates. We compute the conformal map from the original domain to the unit circle where we build a separation of variables based solver to obtain a high order, accurate solution. A fixed point or eigenvalue outer iteration is used to solve the nonlinear equation. Our second problem is the computation of the Coulomb collision operator that arises in kinetic models of plasmas. The collision operator can be written in terms of two Rosenbluth potentials obtained by solving a Poisson and a biharmonic problem in the velocity variables. For these PDEs we describe a new class of fast solvers in cylindrical coordinates with free-space radiation conditions. By combining integral equation methods in the radial variable with Fourier methods in the angular and z directions, we show that high-order accuracy can be achieved in both the solution and its derivatives. A weak singularity arises in the Fourier transform with respect to z that is handled with special purpose quadratures. Such solvers are ideally suited to the Rosenbluth potentials, since the collision operator is expressed in terms of up to fourth derivatives of the potentials, placing stringent demands on the computational order. Also, since axisymmetry is generally assumed in the velocity variables, the use of cylindrical coordinates reduces the three dimensional problem to a two dimensional computation.

  9. Physics of High Performance Dueterium-Tritium Plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, K. M.; White, R.; Wieland, R. M.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Wong, K. L.; Wurden, G. A.; Batha, S.; Lamarche, P.; LeBlanc, B.; Levinton, F. M.; Beer, M.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Belov, A.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Fu, G. Y.; Furth, H. P.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Krasilnikov, A. V.; Meade, D. M.; Medley, S. S.; Mika, R.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Mirnov, S. V.; Schilling, G.; Schivell, J.; Schmidt, G. L.; Scott, S. D.; Semenov, I.; Berk, H.; Bernabei, S.; Bitter, M.; Breizman, B.; Dorland, W.; Phillips, P.; Bretz, N. L.; Budny, R.; Bush, C.E.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L. R.; Hammett, G. W.; Herrmann, H. W.; Herrmann, M.; Hill, K. W.; Hogan, G. R.; Hosea, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    During the past two years, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been used to study fusion power production,isotope effects associated with tritium fueling, and alpha-particle physics in several operational regimes. The peak fusion power has been increased to 10.7 MW in the supershot mode through the use of increased plasma current and toroidal magnetic field and extensive lithium wall conditioning. The high-internal-inductance (high -li) regime in TFTR has been extended in plasma current and has achieved 8.7 MW of fusion power. Studies of the effects of tritium on confinement have now been carried out in ohmic, NBI- and ICRF-heated L-mode and reversed-shear plasmas. In general, there is an enhancement in confinement time in D-T plasmas which is most pronounced in supershot and high-li discharges, weaker in L-mode plasmas with NBI and ICRF heating and smaller still in ohmic plasmas. In reversed-shear discharges with sufficient deuterium-NBI heating power, internal transport barriers have been observed to form, leading to enhanced confinement. Large decreases in the ion heat conductivity and particle transport are inferred within the transport barrier.It appears that higher heating power is required to trigger the formation of a transport barrier with D-T NBI and the isotope effect on energy confinement is nearly absent in these enhanced reverse-shear plasmas. Many alpha-particle physics issues have been studied in the various operating regimes including confinement of the alpha particles, their redistribution by sawteeth, and their loss due to MHD instabilities with low toroidal mode numbers. In weak-shear plasmas, alpha-particle destabilization of a toroidal Alfven eigenmode has been observed.

  10. Effectiveness of Tutorials for Introductory Physics in Argentinean high schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benegas, J.; Flores, J. Sirur

    2014-06-01

    This longitudinal study reports the results of a replication of Tutorials in Introductory Physics in high schools of a Latin-American country. The main objective of this study was to examine the suitability of Tutorials for local science education reform. Conceptual learning of simple resistive electric circuits was determined by the application of the single-response multiple-choice test "Determining and Interpreting Resistive Electric Circuits Concepts Test" (DIRECT) to high school classes taught with Tutorials and traditional instruction. The study included state and privately run schools of different socioeconomic profiles, without formal laboratory space and equipment, in classes of mixed-gender and female-only students, taught by novice and experienced instructors. Results systematically show that student learning is significantly higher in the Tutorials classes compared with traditional teaching for all of the studied conditions. The results also show that long-term learning (one year after instruction) in the Tutorials classes is highly satisfactory, very similar to the performance of the samples of college students used to develop the test DIRECT. On the contrary, students following traditional instruction returned one year after instruction to the poor performance (<20%) shown before instruction, a result compatible with the very low level of conceptual knowledge of basic physics recently determined by a systematic study of first-year students attending seven universities in Spain and four Latin-American countries. Some replication and adaptation problems and difficulties of this experience are noted, as well as recommendations for successful use of Tutorials in high schools of similar educational systems.

  11. High Energy Nuclear Physics:. From Bear Mountain to the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLerran, Larry

    2013-06-01

    I review the development of high energy nuclear physics, in particular the attempts to make new forms of matter in hadronic collisions. I begin with early experimental work done at the Bevelac, the AGS and the SPS. Early theoretical work concentrated on understanding properties of quark and gluonic matter at high temperature and density, the Quark Gluon Plama (QGP), particularly using the methods of lattice gauge theory. Recent theoretical work has involved attempts to more quantitatively describe data coming from experiments at RHIC and LHC. In addition, new forms of matter have been proposed to describe the early times in hadronic collisions. The Color Glass Condensate (CGC) is the high density gluonic matter that initially composes colliding high energy nuclei. The Glasma is highly coherent color electric and color magnetic fields radiating gluons that eventually thermalize. Methods derivative of strongly interacting gauge theory (AdSCFT Correspondence) have been employed to qualitatively understand finite temperature QCD when the intrinsic strength of interactions is strong. The RHIC and LHC experiments provide compelling experimental data to establish that the matter produced in ultra-relativistic heavy is a strongly interacting Quark Gluon Plasma (sQGP). To what degree, in my opinion, the sQGP is a thermally equilibrated Quark Gluon Plasma, or a Glasma is not yet determined...

  12. Construction and direct electrochemistry of orientation controlled laccase electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ying; Zhang, Jiwei; Huang, Xirong; Wang, Tianhong

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • A recombinant laccase with Cys-6×His tag at the N or C terminus was generated. • Orientation controlled laccase electrodes were constructed via self assembly. • The electrochemical behavior of laccase electrodes was orientation dependent. • The C terminus tagged laccase was better for bioelectrocatalytic reduction of O{sub 2}. - Abstract: A laccase has multiple redox centres. Chemisorption of laccases on a gold electrode through a polypeptide tag introduced at the protein surface provides an isotropic orientation of laccases on the Au surface, which allows the orientation dependent study of the direct electrochemistry of laccase. In this paper, using genetic engineering technology, two forms of recombinant laccase which has Cys-6×His tag at the N or C terminus were generated. Via the Au-S linkage, the recombinant laccase was assembled orientationally on gold electrode. A direct electron transfer and a bioelectrocatalytic activity toward oxygen reduction were observed on the two orientation controlled laccase electrodes, but their electrochemical behaviors were found to be quite different. The orientation of laccase on the gold electrode affects both the electron transfer pathway and the electron transfer efficiency of O{sub 2} reduction. The present study is helpful not only to the in-depth understanding of the direct electrochemistry of laccase, but also to the development of laccase-based biofuel cells.

  13. Electrochemistry of Graphene Edge Embedded Nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shouvik; Shim, Jiwook; Rivera, Jose; Jin, Xiaozhong; Estrada, David; Solovyeva, Vita; You, Xiuque; Pak, James; Pop, Eric; Aluru, Narayana; Bashir, Rashid

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate a stacked graphene- Al2O3 dielectric nanopore architecture to investigate electrochemical activity at graphene edges. It has proven to be difficult to isolate electrochemical activity at the graphene edges from those at the basal planes. We use 24 nm of Al2O3 to isolate the graphene basal planes from an ionic fluid environment. Nanopores ranging from 5 to 20 nm are formed by an electron beam sculpting process to expose graphene edges. Electrochemical measurements at isolated graphene edges show current densities as high as 1.2 x 104 A/cm2, 300x greater than those reported for carbon nanotubes. Additionally, we modulate nanopore conductance by tuning the graphene edge electrochemical current as a function of the applied bias on the embedded graphene electrode. Our results indicate that electrochemical devices based on graphene nanopores have promising applications as sensitive chemical and biological sensors, energy storage devices, and DNA sequencing.

  14. High School Students' Approaches to Learning Physics with Relationship to Epistemic Views on Physics and Conceptions of Learning Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiou, Guo-Li; Lee, Min-Hsien; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Knowing how students learn physics is a central goal of physics education. The major purpose of this study is to examine the strength of the predictive power of students' epistemic views and conceptions of learning in terms of their approaches to learning in physics. Sample, design and method: A total of 279 Taiwanese high…

  15. Physics of high performance deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, K.M.; Barnes, C.W.; Batha, S.

    1996-11-01

    During the past two years, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been used to study fusion power production, isotope effects associated with tritium fueling, and alpha-particle physics in several operational regimes. The peak fusion power has been increased to 10.7 MW in the supershot mode through the use of increased plasma current and toroidal magnetic field and extensive lithium wall conditioning. The high-internal-inductance (high-I{sub i}) regime in TFTR has been extended in plasma current and has achieved 8.7 MW of fusion power. Studies of the effects of tritium on confinement have now been carried out in ohmic, NBI- and ICRF- heated L-mode and reversed-shear plasmas. In general, there is an enhancement in confinement time in D-T plasmas which is most pronounced in supershot and high-I{sub i} discharges, weaker in L-mode plasmas with NBI and ICRF heating and smaller still in ohmic plasmas. In reversed-shear discharges with sufficient deuterium-NBI heating power, internal transport barriers have been observed to form, leading to enhanced confinement. Large decreases in the ion heat conductivity and particle transport are inferred within the transport barrier. It appears that higher heating power is required to trigger the formation of a transport barrier with D-T NBI and the isotope effect on energy confinement is nearly absent in these enhanced reverse-shear plasmas. Many alpha-particle physics issues have been studied in the various operating regimes including confinement of the alpha particles, their redistribution by sawteeth, and their loss due to MHD instabilities with low toroidal mode numbers. In weak-shear plasmas, alpha-particle destabilization of a toroidal Alfven eigenmode has been observed.

  16. Electrochemistry and spectroelectrochemistry of nitroxyl free radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, J.R.; Swarts, S.G.; Sevilla, M.D.; Malinski, T.

    1988-06-30

    This work reports electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical studies of the two nitroxyl radicals 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) and 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-3-pyrrolin-1-yloxy (3-carbamoyl-PROXYL). Oxidation and reduction reactions have been observed in aqueous media over the pH range 2-12 in the potential range -0.8 to +0.8 V by differential pulse voltammetry, cyclic voltammetry, and thin-layer UV-visible spectroelectrochemistry, and the reaction products have been characterized by IR, NMR, and ESR spectrometry. At pH values less than 10, characteristic electrochemical behavior is observed to be analogous for both radicals, and the products from electron transfer compare quite favorably with those found by pulse radiolysis of aqueous solutions of nitroxyl radicals. At pH 2-9, a stable cation from a reversible oxidation and hydroxylamine following an irreversible reduction, as well as hydroxylated cation at pH higher than 9, are the same as those obtained in pulse radiolysis experiments. Spectroscopic evidence indicates that behavior following reduction at high pH differs for the two radicals. At pH 12, reduced TEMPO may undergo structural changes leading to the formation of a new radical consisting of a seven-membered ring.

  17. High-energy hadron physics at J-PARC

    SciTech Connect

    Kumano, S.

    2008-10-13

    The J-PARC facility is near completion and experiments will start in 2009 on nuclear and particle physics projects. In this article, the J-PARC facility is introduced, and possible projects are discussed in high-energy hadron physics by using the primary proton beam of 30-50 GeV. There are proposed experiments on charm-production and Drell-Yan processes as well as single spin asymmetries for investigating quark and gluon structure of the nucleon and nuclei. Parton-energy loss could be studied in the Drell-Yan processes. There is also a proposal on hadron-mass modifications in a nuclear medium by using the proton beam. In addition, possible topics include transition from hadron to quark degrees of freedom by elastic pp scattering, color transparency by (p,2p), short-range correlation in nuclear force by (p,2pN), tensor structure functions for spin-one hadrons, fragmentation functions, and generalized partem distributions in the ERBL region although proposals are not written on these projects. If proton-beam polarization is attained, it is possible to investigate details of nucleon spin structure. In the last part of this article, our own studies are explained on partem distribution functions in connection with the J-PARC projects.

  18. In-Depth Characterization of Protein Disulfide Bonds by Online Liquid Chromatography-Electrochemistry-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Switzar, Linda; Nicolardi, Simone; Rutten, Julie W.; Oberstein, Saskia A. J. Lesnik; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; van der Burgt, Yuri E. M.

    2016-01-01

    Disulfide bonds are an important class of protein post-translational modifications, yet this structurally crucial modification type is commonly overlooked in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics approaches. Recently, the benefits of online electrochemistry-assisted reduction of protein S-S bonds prior to MS analysis were exemplified by successful characterization of disulfide bonds in peptides and small proteins. In the current study, we have combined liquid chromatography (LC) with electrochemistry (EC) and mass analysis by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) MS in an online LC-EC-MS platform to characterize protein disulfide bonds in a bottom-up proteomics workflow. A key advantage of a LC-based strategy is the use of the retention time in identifying both intra- and interpeptide disulfide bonds. This is demonstrated by performing two sequential analyses of a certain protein digest, once without and once with electrochemical reduction. In this way, the "parent" disulfide-linked peptide detected in the first run has a retention time-based correlation with the EC-reduced peptides detected in the second run, thus simplifying disulfide bond mapping. Using this platform, both inter- and intra-disulfide-linked peptides were characterized in two different proteins, ß-lactoglobulin and ribonuclease B. In order to prevent disulfide reshuffling during the digestion process, proteins were digested at a relatively low pH, using (a combination of) the high specificity proteases trypsin and Glu-C. With this approach, disulfide bonds in ß-lactoglobulin and ribonuclease B were comprehensively identified and localized, showing that online LC-EC-MS is a useful tool for the characterization of protein disulfide bonds.

  19. Socioeconomic Factors Affecting Minority Physics Taking in U.S. High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Teacher, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In the September issue, we saw that a lower proportion of Hispanics and blacks take physics in U.S. high schools than do whites and Asians. Last month, we examined physics offerings and students by socioeconomic profile of the high school as reported by the principal. We saw that there were more physics classes and more physics students at…

  20. Image Classification Applied to High Energy Physics Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timcheck, Jonathan; Hughes, Richard; Merz, Garrett; Winer, Brian

    2015-04-01

    We present a method for applying image classification algorithms to signal discrimination in high energy physics events. Deep Convolutional Neural Networks (DCNNs), state-of-the-art computational models inspired by the visual cortex, are trained to distinguish top-quark pair events from W +4jets events by looking at the electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters of a generalized detector as an unrolled, flat image. DCNNs are capable of learning compact hierarchical representations, i.e., the important features in these events, and subsequently aggregate these features to perform classification. Our method yields performance competitive with that of traditional analyses and may be a useful tool in the upcoming higher-energy, higher-luminosity environment at the LHC due to its lack of dependence on isolated objects. Computational resources provided by the Ohio Supercomputer Center.

  1. Detectors and signal processing for high-energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P.

    1981-01-01

    Basic principles of the particle detection and signal processing for high-energy physics experiments are presented. It is shown that the optimum performance of a properly designed detector system is not limited by incidental imperfections, but solely by more fundamental limitations imposed by the quantum nature and statistical behavior of matter. The noise sources connected with the detection and signal processing are studied. The concepts of optimal filtering and optimal detector/amplifying device matching are introduced. Signal processing for a liquid argon calorimeter is analyzed in some detail. The position detection in gas counters is studied. Resolution in drift chambers for the drift coordinate measurement as well as the second coordinate measurement is discussed.

  2. High energy physics program at Texas A and M University

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    The Texas A M experimental high energy physics program continued to reach significant milestones in each of its research initiatives during the course of the past year. We are participating in two major operating experiments, CDF and MACRO. In CDF, the Texas A M group has spearheaded the test beam program to recalibrate the Forward Hadron Calorimeter for the upcoming CDF data run, as well as contributing to the ongoing analysis work on jets and b-quarks. In MACRO, we have assisted in the development of the final version of the wave form digitizing system being implemented for the entire scintillator system. The construction of the first six supermodules of the detector has been completed and all six are currently taking data with streamer chambers while four have the completed scintillator counter system up and running. We have built and tested prototypes of a liquid-scintillator fiber calorimeter system, in which internally reflecting channels are imbedded in a lead matrix and filled with liquid scintillator. This approach combines the performance features of fiber calorimetry and the radiation hardness of liquid scintillator, and is being developed for forward calorimetry at the SSC. The microstrip chamber is a new technology for precision track chambers that offers the performance required for future hadron colliders. The theoretical high energy physics program has continued to develop during the past funding cycle. We have continued the study of their very successful string-derived model that unifies all known interactions; flipped SU(5), which is the leading candidate for a TOE. Work has continued on some generalizations of the symmetries of string theory, known as W algebras. These are expected to have applications in two-dimensional conformal field theory, two-dimensional extensions of gravity and topological gravity and W-string theory.

  3. High energy physics studies. Progress report for Task B

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, J.; Mandelkern, M.A.

    1991-08-01

    Task B is involved in a unified program investigating charmed quark physics in two different, yet related accelerator experiments. The first of these is Fermilab Experiment E760, a high resolution study of the formation of charmonium states in proton-antiproton interactions. E760, which is actively running at the present time, has already produced results adding significantly to knowledge of the properties of several charmonium states, and is engaged in an important search for new states which cannot be formed in electron-positron collisions. The second experiment, which the Task B Group has joined during the past year, is an intensive study of charmonium and charmed mesons using electron-positron collisions in the BEijing Spectrometer (BES) at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC). This is a collaboration between several universities in the United States, SLAC and the Institute of High Energy Physics in Beijing. Work on one of the group`s previous projects, a search for baryonium states in proton-antinucleon interactions at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) at CERN, was completed during the past contract year, and final papers reporting results have been submitted for publication. The entire Task B Group is participating in the E760 project at Fermilab. Although the UCI group`s primary responsibility has been the design, construction, calibration, installation and operation of the lead glass Central Calorimeter, which is the principal component of the detector, the group has participated significantly in all facets of the preparation, installation and running of the experiment. These activities have included work on the development of the data acquisition system, trigger design, software development and code management, participation in beam deceleration and beam operation during running, and data analysis on a variety of channels.

  4. Future Accelerator Challenges in Support of High-Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.; Zisman, M.S.

    2008-05-03

    Historically, progress in high-energy physics has largely been determined by development of more capable particle accelerators. This trend continues today with the imminent commissioning of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, and the worldwide development effort toward the International Linear Collider. Looking ahead, there are two scientific areas ripe for further exploration--the energy frontier and the precision frontier. To explore the energy frontier, two approaches toward multi-TeV beams are being studied, an electron-positron linear collider based on a novel two-beam powering system (CLIC), and a Muon Collider. Work on the precision frontier involves accelerators with very high intensity, including a Super-BFactory and a muon-based Neutrino Factory. Without question, one of the most promising approaches is the development of muon-beam accelerators. Such machines have very high scientific potential, and would substantially advance the state-of-the-art in accelerator design. The challenges of the new generation of accelerators, and how these can be accommodated in the accelerator design, are described. To reap their scientific benefits, all of these frontier accelerators will require sophisticated instrumentation to characterize the beam and control it with unprecedented precision.

  5. High school students' scientific epistemological beliefs, self-efficacy in learning physics and attitudes toward physics: a structural equation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapucu, Serkan; Bahçivan, Eralp

    2015-05-01

    Background: There are some theoretical evidences that explain the relationships between core beliefs (i.e., epistemological beliefs) and peripheral beliefs (self-efficacy in learning) in the literature. The close relationships of such type of beliefs with attitudes are also discussed by some researchers. Constructing a model that investigates these relationships by considering theoretical and empirical evidences can empower researchers to discuss these relationships more comprehensively. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the relationships among Turkish high school students' scientific epistemological beliefs, self-efficacy in learning physics and their attitudes toward physics. Sample: A total of 632 high school students participated in this study; however, 269 female and 229 male (a total of 498) high school students' data were used. Design and methods: Three distinct instruments that measure scientific epistemological beliefs, self-efficacy in learning physics and attitudes toward physics were combined into a unique questionnaire form and it was distributed to high school students. To explore the relationships among these variables, structural equation modeling was used. Results: The results showed that scientific epistemological belief dimensions uncovered by the nature of knowing (source and justification) significantly and positively related to both self-efficacy in learning physics and attitudes toward other important physics dimensions. Additionally, self-efficacy in learning physics significantly and positively predicted attitudes toward multiple physics dimensions (importance, comprehension and requirement). However, epistemological belief dimensions related to the nature of knowledge (certainty and development) did not have significant impact on self-efficacy in learning physics or attitudes toward physics. Conclusions: This study concludes that there are positive and significant relationships among Turkish high school students' scientific

  6. The Physics Teacher: The Physics First Curriculum for High School: Do Chemists Even Know This Is Happening?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Roy W.

    2008-04-01

    The featured articles report on a suggested rearrangement of the science sequence in U.S. high schools called "Physics First". In this plan, conceptual physics is taken in the ninth grade followed by chemistry and biology. Several physicists comment on the plan, suggested by Leon Lederman in 1998. A forgotten 1940 paper in this Journal is credited as the real origin of "Physics First".

  7. High Energy Physics: Report of research accomplishments and future goals, FY 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Barish, B C

    1983-12-31

    Continuing research in high energy physics carried out by the group from the California Institute of Technology. The program includes research in theory, phenomenology, and experimental high energy physics. The experimental program includes experiments at SLAC, FERMILAB, and DESY.

  8. High Energy Physics: Report of research accomplishments and furture goals, FY1983

    SciTech Connect

    Barish, B C

    1981-05-08

    Continuing research in high energy physics carried out by the group from the California Institute of Technology. The program includes research in theory, phenomenology, and experimental high energy physics. The experimental program includes experiments at SLAC and FERMILAB.

  9. PREFACE: XIV International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yifang

    2011-03-01

    The International Conferences on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (also known as the Calor Conference series, started in October 1990 at Fermilab) address all aspects of calorimetric particle detection and measurement, with an emphasis on high energy physics experiments. The XIV International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (Calor 2010) was held at the campus of the Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing, China, from May 10-14, 2010. This conference brought together more than 110 participants from 20 countries, including senior scientists and young physicists. During the five days of the conference, 98 presentations were given in seven plenary sessions. The attendees had in-depth discussions on the latest developments and innovations in calorimetry, including the exciting new LHC results. From the presentations, 83 papers were published in this proceedings. The success of the conference was due to the participants' enthusiasm and the excellent talks given by the speakers, and to the conveners for organizing the individual sessions. We would like to thank the International Advisory Committee for giving us the opportunity to host this Conference in Beijing. Finally we would like to thank all the people involved in the organization of the Conference, who have provided valuable local support. Yifang WangChair of Local Organizing Committee International Advisory Committee M DanilovITEP Moscow M DiemozINFN Roma I A EreditatoBern F L FabbriINFN Frascati T KobayashiICEPP Tokyo M LivanPavia University & INFN P LubranoINFN Perugia S MagillANL Argonne A MaioLIPP Lisbon H OberlackMPI Munich A ParaFermilab R WigmansTTU Lubbock R YoshidaANL Argonne R ZhuCaltech Local Organizing Committee Y WangIHEP (Chair) Y GaoTshinghua University T HuIHEP (Scientific secretary) C LiUSTC W LiIHEP J LuIHEP P WangIHEP T XuIHEP L ZhouIHEP Session Conveners 1) Materials and detectors - Junguang Lu (IHEP), Francesca Nessi (CERN) 2) Algorithm and simulation - Nural Akchurin

  10. Equilibrium statistical-thermal models in high-energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawfik, Abdel Nasser

    2014-05-01

    We review some recent highlights from the applications of statistical-thermal models to different experimental measurements and lattice QCD thermodynamics that have been made during the last decade. We start with a short review of the historical milestones on the path of constructing statistical-thermal models for heavy-ion physics. We discovered that Heinz Koppe formulated in 1948, an almost complete recipe for the statistical-thermal models. In 1950, Enrico Fermi generalized this statistical approach, in which he started with a general cross-section formula and inserted into it, the simplifying assumptions about the matrix element of the interaction process that likely reflects many features of the high-energy reactions dominated by density in the phase space of final states. In 1964, Hagedorn systematically analyzed the high-energy phenomena using all tools of statistical physics and introduced the concept of limiting temperature based on the statistical bootstrap model. It turns to be quite often that many-particle systems can be studied with the help of statistical-thermal methods. The analysis of yield multiplicities in high-energy collisions gives an overwhelming evidence for the chemical equilibrium in the final state. The strange particles might be an exception, as they are suppressed at lower beam energies. However, their relative yields fulfill statistical equilibrium, as well. We review the equilibrium statistical-thermal models for particle production, fluctuations and collective flow in heavy-ion experiments. We also review their reproduction of the lattice QCD thermodynamics at vanishing and finite chemical potential. During the last decade, five conditions have been suggested to describe the universal behavior of the chemical freeze-out parameters. The higher order moments of multiplicity have been discussed. They offer deep insights about particle production and to critical fluctuations. Therefore, we use them to describe the freeze-out parameters

  11. Data intensive high energy physics analysis in a distributed cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, A.; Agarwal, A.; Anderson, M.; Armstrong, P.; Fransham, K.; Gable, I.; Harris, D.; Impey, R.; Leavett-Brown, C.; Paterson, M.; Podaima, W.; Sobie, R. J.; Vliet, M.

    2012-02-01

    We show that distributed Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) compute clouds can be effectively used for the analysis of high energy physics data. We have designed a distributed cloud system that works with any application using large input data sets requiring a high throughput computing environment. The system uses IaaS-enabled science and commercial clusters in Canada and the United States. We describe the process in which a user prepares an analysis virtual machine (VM) and submits batch jobs to a central scheduler. The system boots the user-specific VM on one of the IaaS clouds, runs the jobs and returns the output to the user. The user application accesses a central database for calibration data during the execution of the application. Similarly, the data is located in a central location and streamed by the running application. The system can easily run one hundred simultaneous jobs in an efficient manner and should scale to many hundreds and possibly thousands of user jobs.

  12. Remote Sensing: Radio Frequency Detection for High School Physics Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggett, Daniel; Jeandron, Michael; Maddox, Larry; Yoshida, Sanichiro

    2011-10-01

    In an effort to give high school students experience in real world science applications, we have partnered with Loranger High School in Loranger, LA to mentor 9 senior physics students in radio frequency electromagnetic detection. The effort consists of two projects: Mapping of 60 Hz noise around the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), and the construction of a 20 MHz radio telescope for observations of the Sun and Jupiter (Radio Jove, NASA). The results of the LIGO mapping will aid in strategies to reduce the 60 Hz line noise in the LIGO noise spectrum. The Radio Jove project will introduce students to the field of radio astronomy and give them better insight into the dynamic nature of large solar system objects. Both groups will work together in the early stages as they learn the basics of electromagnetic transmission and detection. The groups will document and report their progress regularly. The students will work under the supervision of three undergraduate mentors. Our program is designed to give them theoretical and practical knowledge in radiation and electronics. The students will learn how to design and test receiver in the lab and field settings.

  13. Planetary Defense and the High Temperture Physical Properties of Meteorites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowski, D. R.; Sears, D. W. G.; Bryson, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Ames Meteorite Characterization Laboratory is examining the physical proprerties of a diverse selection of meteorites. Each meteorite will be processed by the full suite of observations and measurements: petrographic/microscopic studies, density, porosity, albedo, shock effects, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, emissivity, and acoustic velocity. Of these measurments, density and porosity are the most studied to date (Macke, 2010; Britt and Consolmagno, 2003). The thermal properties of meteorites are less well understood. Thermal conductivity, heat capacity, and thermal emissivity are important data for a number of applications but especially to understanding the behavior of a meteor as it passes through the atmosphere. Opeil et al. (2010) have shown that meteorites have a thermal conductivities lower than the pure minerals they are composed of by a factor of 3 to 10, with the values coming to a roughly constant number from 150 to 300 K. Calculated conductivity numbers from Yomogida and Matsui (1983) show the H chondrites have the higest conductivity in the range of 3.8 W/m*K at 200 K and then slowly decreases to 3.2 W/m*K at 400 K. Whereas they show the LL chondrites do not reach 1 W/m*K over the temperature range 100 to 400 K. While there have been several high temperature spectroscopic studies of meteorites, to date all experimental data for the physical properties of meteorites were obtained at temperatures below 400 K, since previous studies were made in attempts to understand the formation and evolution of asteroids. Our laboratory will focus on understanding the thermal properties of materials at temperatures above 300 K and, where possible, up to atmospheric entry temperatures. Work on pure minerals has shown that thermal conductivity decreases as temperatures exceed 300 K but it is unknown whether this holds true for meteorites. We will describe our laboratory and procedures, and present some preliminary data, at the meeting.

  14. [High energy particle physics at Purdue, 1990--1991]. [Dept. of Physics, Purdue Univ. , West Lafayette, Indiana

    SciTech Connect

    Gaidos, J.A.; Loeffler, F.J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Palfrey, T.R.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.

    1991-05-01

    Progress made in the experimental and theoretical high energy physics program is reviewed. The CLEO experiment, particle astrophysics, dynamical symmetry breaking in gauge theories, the Collider Detector at Fermilab, the TOPAZ Experiment, and elementary particle physics beyond the standard model are included.

  15. Electrochemistry Corrosion Properties of Pulsed Laser Welding Hastelloy C-276

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, G.; Niu, F.; Wu, D.; Qu, Y.

    Based on the welding quality requirement of Hastelloy C276 in the extreme environment, the electrochemistry corrosion property of laser welding Hastelloy C276 was evaluated in the neutral, acid and alkaline solutions, and the corroded surface was observed by the co-focal laser scanning microscope to confirm the corrosion mechanism. The results indicated, the corrosion trend of the weld was weaker than that of base metal in the neutral and acid solutions, but in the alkaline solutions, the corrosion trend of the base metal was weaker. However, the corrosion rate of the weld was much slower than that of base metal in all solutions. At the point of corrosion mechanism, in the acid and alkaline solutions, the base metal and weld showed the uniform corrosion. However, in the neutral solution, the selective corrosion and intergranular corrosion occurred in the base metal and the weld, respectively.

  16. Bipolar electrochemistry for cargo-lifting in fluid channels.

    PubMed

    Loget, Gabriel; Kuhn, Alexander

    2012-05-01

    We report for the first time the vertical propulsion of conducting beads in liquid filled capillaries by bipolar electrochemistry. The beads, when exposed to an external electric field, act as bipolar electrodes showing hydroquinone oxidation on one side and proton reduction on the other side. The related asymmetric bubble generation occurring at the bottom part of the beads drives their motion. The characteristic features of the propulsion can be tuned by changing parameters such as the applied electric field or the capillary shape. Using a conical capillary, we show that a Yo-Yo type motion can be induced. The quite versatile concept can then be used for cargo-lifting and is of potential interest for microfluidic applications in LOC devices. PMID:22418898

  17. The Readiness of High School Students to Pursue First Year Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramnarain, U.; Molefe, P.

    2012-01-01

    A high failure rate at first year physics is often attributed to the lack of readiness of high school students to pursue such studies. This research explores this issue and reports on the perceptions of five physics lecturers at a South African university on the preparedness of high school students for first year physics. Qualitative data was…

  18. 76 FR 19986 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-11

    ... High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory... Kogut, Executive Secretary; High Energy Physics Advisory Panel; U.S. Department of Energy;...

  19. 78 FR 46330 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ... High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Office of Science, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory... Secretary; High Energy Physics Advisory Panel; U.S. Department of Energy; SC-25/ Germantown Building,...

  20. 78 FR 12043 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ... High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Office of Science, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory... Kogut, Executive Secretary; High Energy Physics Advisory Panel; U.S. Department of Energy;...

  1. 78 FR 69839 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-21

    ... High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of Open Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory... Secretary; High Energy Physics Advisory Panel; U.S. Department of Energy; SC-25/ Germantown Building,...

  2. 75 FR 63450 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    .../NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory... CONTACT: John Kogut, Executive Secretary; High Energy Physics Advisory Panel; U.S. Department of...

  3. High School Physics Teacher Preparation: Results from the 2012-13 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan; Tyler, John

    2015-01-01

    This report examines teachers' self-assessed preparedness to teach physics, their membership in professional organizations, and where they turn for help when they have questions. Almost every teacher reports feeling at least adequately prepared to teach basic physics knowledge and the application of physics to everyday experience. The smallest…

  4. Do Physical Activity Facilities near Schools Affect Physical Activity in High School Girls?

    PubMed Central

    Trilk, Jennifer L.; Ward, Dianne S.; Dowda, Marsha; Pfeiffer, Karin A.; Porter, Dwayne E.; Hibbert, James; Pate, Russell R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate associations between the number of physical activity facilities within walking distance of school and physical activity behavior in 12th grade girls during after-school hours. Methods Girls (N=1394) from 22 schools completed a self-report to determine physical activity after 3:00 pm. The number of physical activity facilities within a 0.75-mile buffer of the school was counted with a Geographic Information System. Associations between the number of facilities and girls’ physical activity were examined using linear mixed-model analysis of variance. Results Overall, girls who attended schools with ≥ 5 facilities within the buffer reported more physical activity per day than girls in schools with < 5 facilities. In addition, girls who attended rural schools with ≥ 5 facilities reported ~12% more physical activity per day than girls who attended rural schools with < 5 facilities. No difference existed for girls in urban/suburban schools with ≥ 5 vs. < 5 facilities. Conclusion When school siting decisions are made, the number of physical activity facilities surrounding the school should be considered to encourage physical activity in 12th grade girls. PMID:21334248

  5. Pedagogical content knowledge and preparation of high school physics teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etkina, Eugenia

    2010-07-01

    This paper contains a scholarly description of pedagogical practices of the Rutgers Physics/Physical Science Teacher Preparation program. The program focuses on three aspects of teacher preparation: knowledge of physics, knowledge of pedagogy, and knowledge of how to teach physics (pedagogical content knowledge—PCK). The program has been in place for 7 years and has a steady production rate of an average of six teachers per year who remain in the profession. The main purpose of the paper is to provide information about a possible structure, organization, and individual elements of a program that prepares physics teachers. The philosophy of the program and the coursework can be implemented either in a physics department or in a school of education. The paper provides details about the program course work and teaching experiences and suggests ways to adapt it to other local conditions.

  6. Sophisticated Epistemologies of Physics versus High-Stakes Tests: How Do Elite High School Students Respond to Competing Influences about How to Learn Physics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yerdelen-Damar, Sevda; Elby, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates how elite Turkish high school physics students claim to approach learning physics when they are simultaneously (i) engaged in a curriculum that led to significant gains in their epistemological sophistication and (ii) subject to a high-stakes college entrance exam. Students reported taking surface (rote) approaches to…

  7. Unveiling the High Energy Obscured Universe: Hunting Collapsed Objects Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ubertini, P.; Bazzano, A.; Cocchi, M.; Natalucci, L.; Bassani, L.; Caroli, E.; Stephen, J. B.; Caraveo, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Villa, G.

    2005-01-01

    A large part of energy from space is coming from collapsing stars (SN, Hypernovae) and collapsed stars (black holes, neutron stars and white dwarfs). The peak of their energy release is in the hard-X and gamma-ray wavelengths where photons are insensitive to absorption and can travel from the edge the Universe or the central core of the Galaxy without loosing the primordial information of energy, time signature and polarization. The most efficient process to produce energetic photons is gravitational accretion of matter from a "normal" star onto a collapsed companion (LGxMcollxdMacc/dtx( 1Rdisc)-dMacc/dt x c2), exceeding by far the nuclear reaction capability to generate high energy quanta. Thus our natural laboratory for "in situ" investigations are collapsed objects in which matter and radiation co-exist in extreme conditions of temperature and density due to gravitationally bent geometry and magnetic fields. This is a unique opportunity to study the physics of accretion flows in stellar mass and super-massive Black Holes (SMBHs), plasmoids generated in relativistic jets in galactic microQSOs and AGNs, ionised plasma interacting at the touching point of weakly magnetized NS surface, GRB/Supernovae connection, and the mysterious origins of "dark" GRB and X-ray flash.

  8. Solid-state electrochemistry on the nanometer and atomic scales: the scanning probe microscopy approach.

    PubMed

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Yang, Sang Mo; Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; Vasudevan, Rama K; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2016-08-01

    Energy technologies of the 21(st) century require an understanding and precise control over ion transport and electrochemistry at all length scales - from single atoms to macroscopic devices. This short review provides a summary of recent studies dedicated to methods of advanced scanning probe microscopy for probing electrochemical transformations in solids at the meso-, nano- and atomic scales. The discussion presents the advantages and limitations of several techniques and a wealth of examples highlighting peculiarities of nanoscale electrochemistry. PMID:27146961

  9. Solid-state electrochemistry on the nanometer and atomic scales: the scanning probe microscopy approach

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Yang, Sang Mo; Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; Vasudevan, Rama K.; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2016-04-21

    Energy technologies of the 21st century require an understanding and precise control over ion transport and electrochemistry at all length scales – from single atoms to macroscopic devices. Our short review provides a summary of recent studies dedicated to methods of advanced scanning probe microscopy for probing electrochemical transformations in solids at the meso-, nano- and atomic scales. In this discussion we present the advantages and limitations of several techniques and a wealth of examples highlighting peculiarities of nanoscale electrochemistry.

  10. Solid-state electrochemistry on the nanometer and atomic scales: the scanning probe microscopy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Yang, Sang Mo; Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; Vasudevan, Rama K.; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2016-07-01

    Energy technologies of the 21st century require an understanding and precise control over ion transport and electrochemistry at all length scales - from single atoms to macroscopic devices. This short review provides a summary of recent studies dedicated to methods of advanced scanning probe microscopy for probing electrochemical transformations in solids at the meso-, nano- and atomic scales. The discussion presents the advantages and limitations of several techniques and a wealth of examples highlighting peculiarities of nanoscale electrochemistry.

  11. Success in Introductory College Physics: The Role of High School Preparation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadler, Philip M.; Tai, Robert H.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the extent to which a high school physics course prepares students for college physics success. In this study of 1,933 introductory college physics students, demographic and schooling factors account for a large fraction of the variation in college physics grades at 18 colleges and universities from around the nation. (Author/SAH)

  12. Physical Activity Levels of Overweight and Nonoverweight High School Students during Physical Education Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannon, James C.

    2008-01-01

    Background: This study examined physical activity (PA) levels of overweight and nonoverweight African American and Caucasian students (n = 198) during game play in physical education classes. Methods: Body fat percentages (%BFs) were determined using the skinfold technique and Slaughter et al prediction equations. Girls were classified as…

  13. Attitude towards Physics Lessons and Physical Experiments of the High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaya, Hasan; Boyuk, Ugur

    2011-01-01

    In order that students can develop researching, questioning, critical thinking, problem solving and decision making skills, so that they become lifelong learning individuals, they should be improved regarding their knowledge, understanding and attitude towards natural sciences. Attitudes towards physics lessons and physical experiments of high…

  14. Physical Activity and Quality of Life Experienced by Highly Active Individuals with Physical Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giacobbi, Peter R., Jr.; Stancil, Michael; Hardin, Brent; Bryant, Lance

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined links between physical activity and quality of life experienced by individuals with physical disabilities recruited from a wheelchair user's basketball tournament. The participants included 12 male and 14 female adults between the ages of 18-54 (M = 31.12, SD = 10.75) who all reported one or more condition(s) that…

  15. Promoting Lifelong Physical Activity and High Level Performance: Realising an Achievable Aim for Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacNamara, Aine; Collins, Dave; Bailey, Richard; Toms, Martin; Ford, Paul; Pearce, Gemma

    2011-01-01

    Background: Even though all school-aged children in most countries experience some form of curricular physical education many do not maintain a lifelong involvement in sport or physical activity. From a theoretical perspective, the development models that dominate sport are limited by their staged and linear approaches to development (e.g. Cote's…

  16. Curricular Issues in Urban High School Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidlein, Robert; Vickers, Brad; Chepyator-Thomson, Rose

    2014-01-01

    Urban physical education curriculum articles are sparsely published in major educational journals (Chepyator-Thomson et al., 2008; Culp, 2005). This leaves urban physical educators the daunting task to modify and prepare curriculum based on formal class training and educational workshops and to interpret journal articles to be applied to the urban…

  17. Problems and Solutions for High School Physics in Turkey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dogan, Mevlut; Oruncak, Bekir; Gunbayi, Ilhan

    2002-01-01

    Presents a study that investigates participating (n=70) teachers and (n=940) students' perceptions of physics. Reports that students have the most difficulty with magnetism but the most interest in electricity, optics, and motion. Discusses the possibilities for making physics more attractive to students. (YDS)

  18. Career Fitness Training for High School Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, Erin; Karlstad, Julia A.

    2004-01-01

    Physical education can contribute to the career readiness and development needs of students by providing them with training to meet the physical fitness standards required for many occupations. A course for career fitness training could prepare students for the fitness requirements of careers in law enforcement, firefighting, and the military.…

  19. Quantitative Physical Science (QPS) in the Junior High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Githens, Sherwood, Jr.

    1970-01-01

    Describes the development and organization of a course begun in 1962 consisting of a sequence of manipulative learning operations. The laboratory operations of Quantitative Physical Science lead the student through the fundamentals of instrumentation and of measurement processes. Principles studied include physical, electrical, chemical, and wave…

  20. Learning Pathways in High-School Level Quantum Atomic Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niedderer, Hans; Petri, Juergen

    Investigations of changes in conceptions during physics instruction are the logical and necessary steps to follow successful international research on students' preinstructional conceptions. The theoretical perspective integrates currently available frameworks of cognition, cognitive states, and cognitive processes in physics. Particular emphasis…

  1. Strategies for Invitational Physical Education in the Junior High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Gary L.

    Invitational education maintains that each individual possesses relatively untapped potential for intellectual and psychological development and that this potential may best be realized in a nurturing environment. Utilizing an invitational approach to physical education, physical education teachers may invite students to succeed. Guidelines for…

  2. The use of effective variables in high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, Matthew Todd

    In high energy physics, we often gain by systematically reducing the formal description of a physical system or the data sets that come from particle colliders. Converting the naive, original setup results in a more useful set of couplings, fields, or observables, which we call effective variables. This thesis considers several examples of them: We take a φ4 scalar field theory and renormalize it according to the equations of Wilsonian exact renormalization group. Whatever the initial setup of the theory, this results in an infinite number of operators. We demonstrate a procedure to remove all interaction terms except for the quartic. We find its coupling has the same one-loop beta-function as obtained from standard renormalization group. We also examine the relationship between little Higgs and 5d composite models with identical symmetries. By performing an "extreme" deconstruction, one can reduce any warped composite model to a little Higgs theory on a handful of sites. We find that the finiteness of the Higgs potential in 5d is due to the same collective symmetry breaking as in the little Higgs. We compare a 4d and 5d model with the same symmetry to the data. We see that the 5d model has difficulty meeting several constraints simultaneously. By contrast, the Minimal Moose with custodial symmetry is viable in a large region of its parameter space. Finally, we turn our attentions to the hadron collider environment. In the context of SUSY extended by U(1)', production of an initial Z' gauge boson gives us an additional kinematic constraint. We use this to implement a novel method to measure all of the superpartner masses involved in its decay. For certain final states with two invisible particles, one can construct kinematic observables bounded above by parent particle masses. Additionally, we study other effects of extending the MSSM by a Z '. The production cross-section of sleptons is enhanced over the MSSM, so the discovery potential for sleptons is greatly

  3. High Energy Physics: Proceedings of the Fifth Latin American Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano Salinas, C. J.; Pereyra Ravinez, O.; Ochoa Jiménez, R.; Masperi, Luis

    2006-04-01

    Preface -- Series editorial board and other committees -- Local organizing committee -- Foreword by the editors -- Gallery -- Homages. In Memoriam Luis Masperi. Round table: collaborations in physics in Latin America -- Lectures. An introduction to strings and some of its phenomenological aspects / G. Aldazabal. Neutrino phenomenology / E. Roulet. An introduction to cosmology / D. J. H. Chung. Innovative experimental particle physics through technological advances-past, present and future / H. W. K. Cheung -- Seminars. Grand unification and physics beyond the standard model / E. Ma. QCD evolution in dense medium / M. B. Gay Ducati. Future experiments-GRID and LHC / A. Santoro. BTeV: using heavy quark decays to test the standard model / M. Sheaff. Recent results from CDF and DO experiments / C. Avila. Matter under extreme conditions the ALICE experiment / G. Herrera Corral and ALICE-Mexico. Recent results from PHOBOS at RHIC / E. Garcia -- Contributions. SO(10) as the minimal supersymmetric GUT / A. Melfo. A supersymmetric three-family model without Higgsinos / W. A. Ponce and L. A. Sánchez. Area-preserving diffeomorphisms groups, the Majorana representation of spins, and SU(N) / J. D. Swain. On the magnetized Kerr-Newman black hole electrodynamics / E. P. Esteban. Supernova neutrinos and the absolute scale of neutrino masses-a Bayesian approach / E. Nardi. Loop quantum gravity and ultra high energy cosmic rays / J. Alfaro and G. A. Palma. QQ¯ bound states in an extended QCD2 model / P. Labraña, J. Alfaro and A. A. Andrianov. Observational constraints on Lorentz symmetry deformation / J. Alfaro and M. Cambiaso. Variable-mass dark matter and the age of the universe / U. Franca and R. Rosenfeld. Dynamical study of spinodal decomposition in heavy ion collisions / A. Barraṍn and J. A. López. Predictions for single spin asymmetries in inclusive reactions involving photons / V. Gupta, C. J. Solano Salinas and H. S. Mani. Bosonization and the generalized Mandelstam

  4. High Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-07-28

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space, and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the US Department of Energy's SciDAC program has produced accelerator-modeling tools that have been employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. The authors discuss the Synergia framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable of handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. Our authors present Synergia's design principles and its performance on HPC platforms.

  5. High Performance Computing Modeling Advances Accelerator Science for High-Energy Physics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Amundson, James; Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis

    2014-07-28

    The development and optimization of particle accelerators are essential for advancing our understanding of the properties of matter, energy, space, and time. Particle accelerators are complex devices whose behavior involves many physical effects on multiple scales. Therefore, advanced computational tools utilizing high-performance computing are essential for accurately modeling them. In the past decade, the US Department of Energy's SciDAC program has produced accelerator-modeling tools that have been employed to tackle some of the most difficult accelerator science problems. The authors discuss the Synergia framework and its applications to high-intensity particle accelerator physics. Synergia is an accelerator simulation package capable ofmore » handling the entire spectrum of beam dynamics simulations. Our authors present Synergia's design principles and its performance on HPC platforms.« less

  6. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Richard A.; Wasserman, Harvey

    2010-11-24

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the leading scientific computing facility for the Department of Energy's Office of Science, providing high-performance computing (HPC) resources to more than 3,000 researchers working on about 400 projects. NERSC provides large-scale computing resources and, crucially, the support and expertise needed for scientists to make effective use of them. In November 2009, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), and DOE's Office of High Energy Physics (HEP) held a workshop to characterize the HPC resources needed at NERSC to support HEP research through the next three to five years. The effort is part of NERSC's legacy of anticipating users needs and deploying resources to meet those demands. The workshop revealed several key points, in addition to achieving its goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. The chief findings: (1) Science teams need access to a significant increase in computational resources to meet their research goals; (2) Research teams need to be able to read, write, transfer, store online, archive, analyze, and share huge volumes of data; (3) Science teams need guidance and support to implement their codes on future architectures; and (4) Projects need predictable, rapid turnaround of their computational jobs to meet mission-critical time constraints. This report expands upon these key points and includes others. It also presents a number of case studies as representative of the research conducted within HEP. Workshop participants were asked to codify their requirements in this case study format, summarizing their science goals, methods of solution, current and three-to-five year computing requirements, and software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel, multi-core environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. The report includes

  7. Langston University - High Energy Physics (LU-HEP)

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, Dr., Joel

    2012-08-13

    This final report is presented by Langston University (LU) for the project entitled "Langston University High Energy Physics" (LUHEP) under the direction of principal investigator (PI) and project director Professor Joel Snow. The project encompassed high energy physics research performed at hadron colliders. The PI is a collaborator on the DZero experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, IL, USA and the ATLAS experiment at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland and was during the entire project period from April 1, 1999 until May 14, 2012. Both experiments seek to understand the fundamental constituents of the physical universe and the forces that govern their interactions. In 1999 as member of the Online Systems group for Run 2 the PI developed a cross-platform Python-based, Graphical User Interface (GUI) application for monitoring and control of EPICS based devices for control room use. This served as a model for other developers to enhance and build on for further monitoring and control tasks written in Python. Subsequently the PI created and developed a cross-platform C++ GUI utilizing a networked client-server paradigm and based on ROOT, the object oriented analysis framework from CERN. The GUI served as a user interface to the Examine tasks running in the D\\O\\ control room which monitored the status and integrity of data taking for Run 2. The PI developed the histogram server/control interface to the GUI client for the EXAMINE processes. The histogram server was built from the ROOT framework and was integrated into the D\\O\\ framework used for online monitoring programs and offline analysis. The PI developed the first implementation of displaying histograms dynamically generated by ROOT in a Web Browser. The PI's work resulted in several talks and papers at international conferences and workshops. The PI established computing software infrastructure at LU and U. Oklahoma (OU) to do analysis of DZero production data and produce simulation data

  8. ``But you're just a physics booster!'' -- Why political advocacy for high school physics is crucial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottle, Paul

    2010-10-01

    There is no shortage of research-based arguments supporting the importance of high school physics. A study from the University of South Florida demonstrates the importance of high school physics for the preparation of future STEM professionals [1]. A white paper from the National Academy of Education [2] states that the usual biology-chemistry-physics sequence in high school is ``out of order'' and points out that students in 9th grade biology classes are taught concepts that make no sense to them because they ``know little about atoms and next to nothing about the chemistry and physics that can help them make sense of these structures and their functions.'' Nevertheless, in Florida the high school physics-taking rate has been declining for several years and a large fraction of the International Baccalaureate programs do not even offer IB Physics. I will argue that physicists must collectively advocate in the political arena for the expansion and improvement of high school physics. I will also provide a few examples of collective actions by scientists that may have influenced the formulation of the new high school graduation requirements in Florida. Finally, I will argue that we must lobby our colleagues in the Colleges of Education to devote their scarce resources to recruiting and training teachers in the physical sciences. [4pt] [1] W. Tyson, R. Lee, K.M. Borman, and M.A. Hanson, {Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk} 12, 243 (2007). [0pt] [2] National Academy of Education White Paper ``Science and Mathematics Education,'' (http://www.naeducation.org/Science/and/Mathematics/Education/White/Paper.pdf).

  9. Active Physics Problem Based Learning for High Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenkraft, Arthur

    2006-12-01

    Active Physics bridges research and practice. This NSF supported curriculum project uses a 7E instructional model and a problem based learning approach. Students learn physics on a need to know basis as they construct solutions to challenges such as developing a sport that can be played on the moon, creating an appliance package for developing countries, designing a light and sound show, or building a museum exhibit. In addition to meeting the content requirements of an introductory physics course, there is also an emphasis on engineering design principles and on essential questions. The excitement and frustration of trying to bridge research and practice will be discussed.

  10. Average Exceptional Lie Group Hierarchy and High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    El Naschie, M. S.

    2008-05-29

    Starting from an invariant total dimension for an exceptional Lie symmetry groups hierarchy, we drive all the essential characteristic and coupling constants of the fundamental interactions of physics. It is shown in a most simplistic fashion that all physical fields are various transfinite scaling transformation and topological deformation of each other. An extended standard model on the other hand turned out to be a compact sub group H of a version of E7 exceptional Lie group E7(-5) with dim H = 69. Thus particle physics, electromagnetism as well as gravity and the bulk are all representable via modular spaces akin to the famous compactified version of F. Klein's modular curve.

  11. High School Physical Education Teachers' Beliefs about Teaching Students with Mild to Severe Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casebolt, Kevin M.; Hodge, Samuel R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze high school physical education teachers' beliefs about teaching students with disabilities in inclusive physical education. The participants (3 men, 2 women) were certified physical education teachers at four suburban high schools. The research method was descriptive-qualitative using a case study approach…

  12. Students' Beliefs, Attitudes, and Conceptual Change in a Traditional High School Physics Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, April Dean; Chiappetta, Eugene L.

    This study investigates the relationships between student beliefs about the nature of science, student attitudes, and conceptual change about the nature of forces in a traditional high school physics classroom. Students (N=28) in the study were junior-level high school honors students in an introductory physics class. The physics instruction was…

  13. 77 FR 33449 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-06

    ... High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Office of Science, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory... Energy Physics Advisory Panel; U.S. Department of Energy; SC-25/ Germantown Building, 1000...

  14. PREFACE: The EPS High Energy Particle Physics Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, Roger

    2008-03-01

    HEPP2007, the EPS High Energy Particle Physics Conference, was held in Manchester from July 19-26 2007. It brought together 580 delegates across the whole subject: from string theorists to detector technologists, from young postgraduate students to senior professors. Geographically they came from the UK, from the rest of Europe, from North America, and from the rest of the world. It covered the whole spectrum of the subject, not only accelerator-based experiments but also its astrophysical and cosmological aspects. The parallel and plenary talks can be found in these proceedings. A key feature of the conference, as always, was the award of the prizes: this year the EPS prize was awarded to Makoto Kobayashi and Toshihide Maskawa for their explanation of CP violation with a 6 quark model—Kobayashi came to accept it in person. The Gribov medal went to Niklas Beisert, the outreach prize to Richard Jacobsson and Charles Timmermans and the Young Physicist prizer to I Furic, G Gomez-Ceballos and S Menzemer. Parallel sessions were held in Manchester University, and plenary talks were held in the Bridgewater Hall in Manchester Town centre, a magnificent modern venue whose positive and co-operative staff enabled the conference to make the most of the impressive surroundings. We were able to put the hall to its proper purpose one evening with a concert by the Fairey Band—one of the distinctive brass bands who form part of the rich musical tradition of the North of England, and came as something new and different to many of the delegates. The conference ran smoothly and successfully, thanks largely to hard work by the local organising committee who devoted a lot of time to planning, producing ideas, and anticipating potential problems. Many of them were not from Manchester itself but from other universities and laboratories in the North of England, so their dedication was especially appreciated. The EPS committee also played a major part, by the selection of plenary

  15. Atlas Pulsed Power Facility for High Energy Density Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.B.; Ballard, E.O.; Barr, G.W.; Bowman, D.W.; Chochrane, J.C.; Davis, H.A.; Elizondo, J.M.; Gribble, R.F.; Griego, J.R.; Hicks, R.D.; Hinckley, W.B.; Hosack, K.W.; Nielsen, K.E.; Parker, J.V.; Parsons, M.O.; Rickets, R.L.; Salazar, H.R.; Sanchez, P.G.; Scudder, D.W.; Shapiro, C.; Thompson, M.C.; Trainor, R.J.; Valdez, G.A.; Vigil, B.N.; Watt, R.G.; Wysock, F.J.

    1999-06-07

    The Atlas facility, now under construction at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), will provide a unique capability for performing high-energy-density experiments in support of weapon-physics and basic-research programs. It is intended to be an international user facility, providing opportunities for researchers from national laboratories and academic institutions around the world. Emphasizing institutions around the world. Emphasizing hydrodynamic experiments, Atlas will provide the capability for achieving steady shock pressures exceeding 10-Mbar in a volume of several cubic centimeters. In addition, the kinetic energy associated with solid liner implosion velocities exceeding 12 km/s is sufficient to drive dense, hydrodynamic targets into the ionized regime, permitting the study of complex issues associated with strongly-coupled plasmas. The primary element of Atlas is a 23-MJ capacitor bank, comprised of 96 separate Marx generators housed in 12 separate oil-filled tanks, surrounding a central target chamber. Each tank will house two, independently-removable maintenance units, with each maintenance unit consisting of four Marx modules. Each Marx module has four capacitors that can each be charged to a maximum of 60 kilovolts. When railgap switches are triggered, the marx modules erect to a maximum of 240 kV. The parallel discharge of these 96 Marx modules will deliver a 30-MA current pulse with a 4-5-{micro}s risetime to a cylindrical, imploding liner via 24 vertical, tri-plate, oil-insulated transmission lines. An experimental program for testing and certifying all Marx and transmission line components has been completed. A complete maintenance module and its associated transmission line (the First Article) are now under construction and testing. The current Atlas schedule calls for construction of the machine to be complete by August, 2000. Acceptance testing is scheduled to begin in November, 2000, leading to initial operations in January, 2001.

  16. Mechanisms underlying obesity resistance associated with high spontaneous physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Teske, Jennifer A.; Billington, Charles J.; Kotz, Catherine M.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity resistance due to elevated orexin signaling is accompanied by high levels of spontaneous physical activity (SPA). The behavioral and neural mechanisms underlying this observation have not been fully worked out. We determined the contribution of hypothalamic orexin receptors (OXR) to SPA stimulated by orexin A (OXA), whether OXA-stimulated SPA was secondary to arousal and whether voluntary wheel running led to compensations in 24-h SPA. We further tested whether orexin action on dopamine one receptors (DA1R) in the substantia nigra (SN) plays an important role in generation of SPA. To test this, SPA response was determined in lean and obese rats with cannulae targeted towards the rostral lateral hypothalamus (rLH) or SN. Sleep/wake states were also measured in rats with rLH cannula and EEG/EMG radiotelemetry transmitters. SPA in lean rats was more sensitive to antagonism of the orexin 1 receptor (OX1R) and in the early response to the orexin 2 agonist. OXA increased arousal equally in lean and obese rodents, which is discordant from the greater SPA response in lean rats. Obesity resistant rats ran more and wheel running was directly related to 24-h SPA levels. The OX1R antagonist, SB-334867-A, and the DA1R antagonist, SCH3390, in SN more effectively reduced SPA stimulated by OXA in OR rats. These data suggest OXA-stimulated SPA is not secondary to enhanced arousal, propensity for SPA parallels inclination to run and that orexin action on dopaminergic neurons in SN may participate in mediation of SPA and running wheel activity. PMID:24161277

  17. Theoretical studies in high energy nuclear physics. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This paper is a progress report for the period 1-1-93 to 6-30-95 on a project primarily directed at the application of high energy physics techniques to nuclear structure studies, and the ability to study hadron dynamics through interactions with nuclear targets. This work has included the first legitimate QCD calculations of hard coherent diffractive processes off nucleon (nuclear) targets which established novel features of color transparency phenomenon not anticipated in the previous intuitive or QCD inspired model calculations and predicted the fast increase of the cross section for electroproduction of {rho}-mesons with increase of the energy, which was confirmed very recently by the first HERA data on this reaction. First theoretical demonstration that color transparency phenomenon for the hard diffractive processes follow from QCD in the kinematics when both x{yields}0 and Q{sup 2}{yields}{infinity}. Establishing the pattern of color (cross section) fluctuations in hadrons. Confirmed by the FNAL inelastic diffraction data. Finding that in realistic quark, skyrmion models of a hadron large momentum transfer elastic lepton-hadron scattering occurs through formation of small spatial size configurations. Discovering a novel class of color transparency sensitive double interaction processes which is complementary to quasielastic reactions originally suggested by S. Brodsky and A. Mueller. Adopting ideas suggested elsewhere for hadron initiated reactions they developed a method for taking into account nuclear correlations in (e,e{prime}p) reactions. Such an approach gives practical possibility to overcome ambiguities of optical model approximation used before and to reliably interpret color transparency effects at intermediate Q{sup 2}.

  18. Experience, gender, and performance: Connecting high school physics experience and gender differences to introductory college physics performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Robert H.

    Current science educational practice is coming under heavy criticism based on the dismaying results of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study of 1998, the latest in a series of large scale surveys; and from research showing the appallingly low representation of females in science-related fields. These critical evaluations serve to draw attention to science literacy in general and lack of persistence among females in particular, two issues that relate closely to the "preparation for future study" goal held by many high school science teachers. In other words, these teachers often seek to promote future success and to prevent future failure in their students' academic careers. This thesis studies the connection between the teaching practices recommended by reformers and researchers for high school teachers, and their students' subsequent college physics performance. The teaching practices studied were: laboratory experiences, class discussion experiences, content coverage, and reliance on textbooks. This study analyzed a survey of 1500 students from 16 different lecture-format college physics courses at 14 different universities. Using hierarchical linear modeling, this study accounted for course-level variables (Calculus-based/Non-calculus course type, professor's gender, and university selectivity). This study controlled for the student's parents education, high school science/mathematics achievement, high school calculus background, and racial background. In addition, the interactions between gender and both pedagogical/curricular and course-level variables were analyzed. The results indicated that teaching fewer topics in greater depth in high school physics appeared to be helpful to college physics students. An interaction between college course type and content coverage showed that students in Calculus-based physics reaped even greater benefits from a depth-oriented curriculum. Also students with fewer labs per month in high school physics

  19. High Energy Density Physics:. the Laser Field of Tomorrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Richard R.

    2013-03-01

    Ever since its invention, the laser has become an increasingly important tool for physics research. Indeed, the laser has made it possible to not only study many extant physical phenomena, but also to actually produce matter in conditions that don't exist in nature, or more precisely, don't exist on the earth. In this lecture, I discuss how the development of lasers that produce ultra-short (˜fsec) and ultra-intense (≥1020 W/cm2) laser pulses actually produce plasmas that are at a density and temperature that exist only in stars. In doing so I discuss some of the basics of these extreme pulses interacting with electrons, yielding surprisingly intriguing physical phenomena. Finally, I argue that this field is an essential element in any comprehensive physical research endeavor, explicitly citing its fundamental relationship with the development of clean, unlimited fusion energy power.

  20. Monte Carlo programs and other utilities for high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Palounek, A.P.T. ); Youssef, S. . Supercomputer Computations Research Inst.)

    1990-05-01

    The Software Standards and Documentation Group of the Workshop on Physics and Detector Simulation for SSC Experiments has compiled a list of physics generators, detector simulations, and related programs. This is not meant to be an exhaustive compilation, nor is any judgment made about program quality; it is a starting point or a more complete bibliography. Where possible we have included an author and source for the code. References for most programs are in the final section.

  1. The Crisis in High-School Physics Teaching: Places Where Things Are Right.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Jack M.; Ingoldsby, Tim C.

    1983-01-01

    Describes several outstanding high school physics programs and analyzes the reasons for their success. This analysis suggests a set of conditions for creating successful programs at other schools. A list of goals for successful physics programs is included. (JN)

  2. The electrochemistry of SIMFUEL in dilute alkaline hydrogen peroxide solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldik, Jon

    The work described in this thesis is a study of the electrochemistry of SIMFUEL (SIMulated nuclear FUEL) in dilute, alkaline hydrogen peroxide solutions. In the first set of experiments, the reaction of H2O 2 on SIMFUEL electrodes was studied electrochemically and under open circuit conditions in 0.1 mol L-1 NaCl solutions at pH 9.8. The composition of the oxidized UO2 surface was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Hydrogen peroxide reduction was found to be catalyzed by the formation of a mixed UIV/UV (UO 2+x) surface layer, but to be blocked by the accumulation of UVI species (UO3· yH2O or adsorbed (UO2)2+) on the electrode surface. The formation of this UVI layer blocks both H2O2 reduction and oxidation, thereby inhibiting the potentially rapid H2O2 decomposition reaction to H2O and O2. Decomposition is found to proceed at a rate controlled by the desorption of the adsorbed (UO2)2+ or reduction of adsorbed O2 species. Reduction of (O2) ads is coupled to the slow oxidative dissolution of UO2 and formation of a corrosion product deposit of UO3· yH2O. In the second series of experiments, the electrochemical reduction of hydrogen peroxide on SIMFUEL was studied using the steady-state polarization technique. Kinetic parameters for the reaction, such as Tafel slopes and reaction orders, were determined. The results were interpreted in terms of a chemical-electrochemical mechanism involving UIV/UV donor-acceptor reduction sites. The large values of the Tafel slopes and the fractional reaction orders with respect to H2O2 can be understood in terms of the potential-dependent surface coverage of active sites, similar to that observed in the reduction of hydrogen peroxide on oxidized copper surfaces. The effects of pH over the range 10-13 were also investigated. The H2O 2 reduction currents were nearly independent of pH in the range 10-11, but were slowed at more alkaline values. The change in pH dependence appears to be related to the acid-base properties

  3. Single-crystal-like NiO colloidal nanocrystal-aggregated microspheres with mesoporous structure: Synthesis and enhanced electrochemistry, photocatalysis and water treatment properties

    SciTech Connect

    Suo, Zhirong; Dong, Xiaonan; Liu, Hui

    2013-10-15

    A new microwave-assisted hydrothermal synthetic route based on the self-assembly and subsequently controlled thermal decomposition process is proposed to fabricate nickel oxide colloidal nanocrystal aggregated microspheres (CNAMs) with mesoporous structure. XRD, EDS, SEM, TEM. FTIR, and N{sub 2} adsorption and desorption isotherm techniques are employed for morphology and structure characterizations. The as-prepared nickel oxide CNAMs, which has a high surface area (234 m{sup 2}/g) with narrow pore distribution at around 3.25 nm, are composed of numerous hexagonal mesoporous nanocrystals of approximately 50–60 nm in size, and present a single-crystal-like characteristic. The experimental results also demonstrated that the CNAMs showed outstanding performance in electrochemistry, photocatalysis and waste water treatment due to their special hierarchical and mesoporous structure, presenting the promising candidate for catalysis and catalysis support materials. - Graphical abstract: CNAMs with mesoporous structure synthesized via a simple microwave-assisted hydrothermal method was applied in electrochemistry and catalysis and exhibited enhanced performance. Display Omitted - Highlights: • CNAMs with mesoporous structure are achieved via a simple microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. • Morphology, structure and pore distribution of sample particles is specifically controlled. • The samples show enhanced properties in electrochemistry and catalysis due to hierarchical structure.

  4. Characterization of high school mathematics and physics language genres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Michelle L.

    Research indicates that language factors play a critical role in the learning of school mathematics and science. Symbols and language-forms have been created to represent and discuss mathematical ideas. Understanding language factors, therefore, is critical in improving the teaching and learning of school mathematics and science. The specific goal of this research was to characterize language genres found in secondary school mathematics and physics classrooms. The research presented here was conducted in two secondary school classrooms---one algebra and one physics---taught by the same teacher. The focus was on the discourse between the teacher and her students. In both mathematics and physics, the teacher attended to the meaning of mathematical concepts and processes, but the talk differed. Physics talk focused on developing meaning for the physics concepts through activities and discussion, which were accompanied by mathematical calculations and analyses. Algebra talk, on the other hand, was procedural and narrative in nature. Thus physics talk was more descriptive of individual concepts and situation, and was more explanatory and exploratory than algebra talk. All discourse inevitably reflects one's thinking and beliefs about the content of that discourse. Thus talking algebra and talking physics, as observed in this study, both represented the teacher's beliefs about teaching and learning and the nature of the school curriculum. Even for a teacher with a strong academic background in both mathematics and science, integrating across the curriculum can be hindered by the approved school curriculum and by the reality of the particular classroom context. Providing professional development and implementing one of several available integrated curricula would be needed if more integration were to be implemented. This study presents a literature-based description of the conceptual notion of language genre. It additionally presents a conceptualization of mathematics and

  5. Using the Electrochemistry of the Electrospray Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2007-01-01

    Electrospray mass spectrometry (ES-MS) is one of the more widely used analysis methods in science today, impacting fields as diverse as conventional chemistry to biotechnology and materials science. , Even 20 years after bursting onto the mass spectrometry scene, the underlying processes in ES ionization continue to be better understood exposing new opportunities for the technique. , , , , Such is the case for the improved understanding related to the electrochemical processes inherent to the operation of this ion source, , , which is the topic of this report. Electrospray ionization involves three main steps prior to mass analysis: the generation and charging of the ES droplets; droplet evaporation and the production of gas-phase ions; and secondary processes that modify the gas-phase ions in the atmosphere and the sub-atmospheric pressure sampling regions of the mass spectrometer. Integral to the generation and charging of the ES droplets are electrochemical reactions that occur at the conductive contact/solution interface within or near the ES emitter to maintain the quasi-continuous production of charged droplets and ultimately gas-phase ions. The basic electrochemical phenomena concerning the ES ion source were first brought to wide attention in the mass spectrometry community by Kebarle and co-workers in the early 1990's,8 but the electrochemistry of electrostatic spray devices and possible analytical consequences resulting from this phenomenon were realized and discussed in the literature at least as far back as the mid-1970's. When asked to intercede in a debate on the significance of electrochemistry in the ES ionization (ESI) process, 2002 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry John Fenn noted that to him " the idea that electrochemical reactions might be taking place in an ES ion source was too obvious to mention. That products of such reactions are of vital significance in the overall ESI process was much less obvious. Indeed, it seems fair to say that with few

  6. Under-Represented Minorities in High School Physics: Results from the 2008-09 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan; Tesfaye, Casey Langer

    2011-01-01

    In the fall of 2008, the authors contacted a representative sample of over 3,600 high schools in the U.S., both public and private, to determine whether or not physics was taught there. They received responses from over 99% of the schools. For the schools which indicated they were offering physics, they obtained contact information for the…

  7. Female Students in High School Physics: Results from the 2008-09 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Susan; Tesfaye, Casey Langer

    2011-01-01

    In the fall of 2008, the authors contacted a representative sample of over 3,600 high schools in the U.S., both public and private, to determine whether or not physics was taught there. The authors received responses from over 99% of the schools. For the schools which indicated they were offering physics, they obtained contact information for the…

  8. Implementation of physics and everyday thinking in a high school classroom: Concepts and argumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belleau, Shelly N.; Ross, Mike J.; Otero, Valerie K.

    2012-02-01

    The Physics and Everyday Thinking (PET) curriculum is based on educational research and consists of carefully sequenced sets of activities intended to help students develop physics ideas through guided experimentation and questioning with extensive small group and whole class discussion. A high school physics teacher has adapted and implemented the PET curriculum in a low-income urban high school with the aim of removing barriers that typically limit access to traditional physics curriculum. Though PET was not designed for secondary physics students, this teacher has worked closely with physics education research faculty and graduate students to simultaneously modify, implement, and investigate the impact of PET on urban high school students' physics learning. Preliminary results indicate that the PET curriculum has great potential to provide students with opportunities for success in understanding physics concepts, as well as helping to develop scientific argumentation strategies.

  9. Lattice computations for high energy and nuclear physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, K.

    2013-08-01

    An overview is given on present lattice field theory computations. We demonstrate the progress obtained in the field due to algorithmic, conceptual and supercomputer advances. We discuss as particular examples Higgs boson mass bounds in lattice Higgs-Yukawa models and the baryon spectrum, the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon and nuclear physics for lattice QCD. We emphasize a number of major challenges lattice field theory is still facing and estimate the computational cost for simulations at physical values of the pion mass.

  10. Opportunities for high-sensitivity charm physics at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.M.; Burnstein, R.A.; Lederman, L.M.; Rubin, H.A.; Brown, C.N.; Christian, D.C.; Gelfand, N.M.; Kwan, S.W.; Chen, T.Y.; He, M.; Koetke, D.D.; Napier, A.; Papavassiliou, V.; Yu, X.Q.

    1996-07-01

    The CO initiative under consideration at Fermilab makes feasible a charm experiment reconstructing >10{sup 9} charm decays, four orders - of magnitude beyond the largest extant sample. The experiment might commence data-taking as early as 1999. In addition to programmatic charm physics such as spectroscopy, lifetimes, and QCD tests, it will have significant new-physics reach in the areas of CP violation, flavor-changing neutral-current and lepton-number-violating decays, and D{sup o} {bar D} {bar {sup o}} mixing, and should observe direct CP violation in Cabibbo-suppressed D decays if it occurs at the level predicted by the Standard Model.

  11. The Early Universe and High-Energy Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schramm, David N.

    1983-01-01

    Many properties of new particle field theories can only be tested by comparing their predictions about the physical conditions immediately after the big bang with what can be reconstructed about this event from astronomical data. Facts/questions about big bang, unified field theories, and universe epochs/mass are among the topics discussed. (JN)

  12. Yoga for PE: Engaging High School Students Physically and Mentally

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otto, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    The administration and community used to place little or no value on physical education and attendance, and attitudes toward our profession were stereotypical and disrespectful. Yet, at some level, there were people quietly longing for a change. This article describes how the author used her passion for yoga to win over her students and,…

  13. Teaching Laser Physics: High Brow or Low Brow?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weichel, H.; Pedrotti, L. S.

    1974-01-01

    Laser physics can be addressed and presented at three different levels of conceptual and mathematical sophistication. In this paper, the three levels are defined and characterized. Advantages and disadvantages of each approach are discussed, and recommendations for choosing a particular approach to match student level and interest are offered.…

  14. High-Speed Video Analysis in a Conceptual Physics Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desbien, Dwain M.

    2011-01-01

    The use of probe ware and computers has become quite common in introductory physics classrooms. Video analysis is also becoming more popular and is available to a wide range of students through commercially available and/or free software. Video analysis allows for the study of motions that cannot be easily measured in the traditional lab setting…

  15. Experimental High Energy Physics Brandeis University Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Blocker, Craig A.; Bensinger, James; Sciolla, Gabriella; Wellenstein, Hermann

    2013-07-26

    During the past three years, the Brandeis experimental particle physics group was comprised of four faculty (Bensinger, Blocker, Sciolla, and Wellenstein), one research scientist, one post doc, and ten graduate students. The group focused on the ATLAS experiment at LHC. In 2011, the LHC delivered 5/fb of pp colliding beam data at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. In 2012, the center-of-mass energy was increased to 8 TeV, and 20/fb were delivered. The Brandeis group focused on two aspects of the ATLAS experiment -- the muon detection system and physics analysis. Since data taking began at the LHC in 2009, our group actively worked on ATLAS physics analysis, with an emphasis on exploiting the new energy regime of the LHC to search for indications of physics beyond the Standard Model. The topics investigated were Z' -> ll, Higgs -> ZZ* -. 4l, lepton flavor violation, muon compositeness, left-right symmetric theories, and a search for Higgs -> ee. The Brandeis group has for many years been a leader in the endcap muon system, making important contributions to every aspect of its design and production. During the past three years, the group continued to work on commissioning the muon detector and alignment system, development of alignment software, and installation of remaining chambers.

  16. 36th International Conference on High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Australian particle physics community was honoured to host the 36th ICHEP conference in 2012 in Melbourne. This conference has long been the reference event for our international community. The announcement of the discovery of the Higgs boson at the LHC was a major highlight, with huge international press coverage. ICHEP2012 was described by CERN Director-General, Professor Rolf Heuer, as a landmark conference for our field. In additional to the Higgs announcement, important results from neutrino physics, from flavour physics, and from physics beyond the standard model also provided great interest. There were also updates on key accelerator developments such as the new B-factories, plans for the LHC upgrade, neutrino facilities and associated detector developments. ICHEP2012 exceeded the promise expected of the key conference for our field, and really did provide a reference point for the future. Many thanks to the contribution reviewers: Andy Bakich, Csaba Balazs, Nicole Bell, Catherine Buchanan, Will Crump, Cameron Cuthbert, Ben Farmer, Sudhir Gupta, Elliot Hutchison, Paul Jackson, Geng-Yuan Jeng, Archil Kobakhidze, Doyoun Kim, Tong Li, Antonio Limosani (Head Editor), Kristian McDonald, Nikhul Patel, Aldo Saavedra, Mark Scarcella, Geoff Taylor, Ian Watson, Graham White, Tony Williams and Bruce Yabsley.

  17. Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromley, D. Allan

    1980-01-01

    The author presents the argument that the past few years, in terms of new discoveries, insights, and questions raised, have been among the most productive in the history of physics. Selected for discussion are some of the most important new developments in physics research. (Author/SA)

  18. Electrochemistry of magnesium electrolytes in ionic liquids for secondary batteries.

    PubMed

    Vardar, Gulin; Sleightholme, Alice E S; Naruse, Junichi; Hiramatsu, Hidehiko; Siegel, Donald J; Monroe, Charles W

    2014-10-22

    The electrochemistry of Mg salts in room-temperature ionic liquids (ILs) was studied using plating/stripping voltammetry to assess the viability of IL solvents for applications in secondary Mg batteries. Borohydride (BH4(-)), trifluoromethanesulfonate (TfO(-)), and bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (Tf2N(-)) salts of Mg were investigated. Three ILs were considered: l-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (BMIM)-Tf2N, N-methyl-N-propylpiperidinium (PP13)-Tf2N, and N,N-diethyl-N-methyl(2-methoxyethyl)ammonium (DEME(+)) tetrafluoroborate (BF4(-)). Salts and ILs were combined to produce binary solutions in which the anions were structurally similar or identical, if possible. Contrary to some prior reports, no salt/IL combination appeared to facilitate reversible Mg plating. In solutions containing BMIM(+), oxidative activity near 0.8 V vs Mg/Mg(2+) is likely associated with the BMIM cation, rather than Mg stripping. The absence of voltammetric signatures of Mg plating from ILs with Tf2N(-) and BF4(-) suggests that strong Mg/anion Coulombic attraction inhibits electrodeposition. Cosolvent additions to Mg(Tf2N)2/PP13-Tf2N were explored but did not result in enhanced plating/stripping activity. The results highlight the need for IL solvents or cosolvent systems that promote Mg(2+) dissociation. PMID:25248147

  19. Mechanics and electrochemistry of ionic polymer metal composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Youngsu; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2014-11-01

    Ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs) are electroactive materials composed of a hydrated ionomeric membrane that is sandwiched between noble metal electrodes. Here, we propose a modeling framework to study quasi-static large deformations and electrochemistry of IPMCs. Specifically, IPMC kinematics is described in terms of its mechanical deformation, the concentration of mobile counterions neutralizing the ionomer, and the electric potential. The chemoelectromechanical constitutive behavior is obtained from a Helmholtz free energy density, which accounts for mechanical stretching, ion mixing, and electric polarization. The three-dimensional framework is specialized to plane bending of thin IPMCs. Hence, we propose a structural model, where the moment and the charge stored along the IPMC are computed from the solution of a modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck system, in terms of the through-the-thickness coordinate. For small static deformations, we present a semianalytical solution based on the method of matched asymptotic expansions, which is ultimately used to study IPMC sensing and actuation. We demonstrate that the linearity of IPMC actuation in a broad voltage range could be attributed to the interplay of two competing nonlinear phenomena, associated with Maxwell stress and osmotic pressure. In agreement with experimental observations, our model confirms the possibility of tailoring IPMC actuation by varying the counterion size and the concentration of fixed ions. Finally, the model is successful in predicting the significantly different voltage levels displayed by IPMC sensors and actuators, which are associated with remarkable variations in the ion mixing and polarization energies.

  20. Direct electrochemistry of nitrate reductase from the fungus Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Kalimuthu, Palraj; Ringel, Phillip; Kruse, Tobias; Bernhardt, Paul V

    2016-09-01

    We report the first direct (unmediated) catalytic electrochemistry of a eukaryotic nitrate reductase (NR). NR from the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, is a member of the mononuclear molybdenum enzyme family and contains a Mo, heme and FAD cofactor which are involved in electron transfer from NAD(P)H to the (Mo) active site where reduction of nitrate to nitrite takes place. NR was adsorbed on an edge plane pyrolytic graphite (EPG) working electrode. Non-turnover redox responses were observed in the absence of nitrate from holo NR and three variants lacking the FAD, heme or Mo cofactor. The FAD response is due to dissociated cofactor in all cases. In the presence of nitrate, NR shows a pronounced cathodic catalytic wave with an apparent Michaelis constant (KM) of 39μM (pH7). The catalytic cathodic current increases with temperature from 5 to 35°C and an activation enthalpy of 26kJmol(-1) was determined. In spite of dissociation of the FAD cofactor, catalytically activity is maintained. PMID:27060250

  1. Perspective on Electrospray Ionization and Its Relation to Electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozniak, Boguslaw P.; Cole, Richard B.

    2015-03-01

    The phenomenon of electrospraying of liquids is presented from the perspective of the electrochemistry involved. Basics of current and liquid flow in the capillary and spray tip are discussed, followed by specifics of charging and discharging of the sprayed liquid surface. Fundamental theories and numerical modeling relating electrospray current to solution and spray parameters are described and then compared with our own experimentally obtained data. The method of mapping potentials and currents inside the electrospray capillary by using an inserted electrically-isolated small wire probe electrode is discussed in detail with illustrations from new and published data. Based on these experimentally obtained results, a new mathematical model is derived. The introduced "nonlinear resistor electrospray capillary model" divides the electrospray capillary into small sections, adds their contributions, and then, by transition to infinitely small section thickness, produces analytical formulas that relate current and potential maps to other properties of the electrospraying liquid: primarily conductivity and current density. The presentation of the model is undertaken from an elementary standpoint, and it offers the possibility to obtain quantitative information regarding operating parameters from typical analytical systems subjected to electrospray. The model stresses simplicity and ease of use; examples applying experimental data are shown and some predictions of the model are also presented. The developed nonlinear resistor electrospray capillary model is intended to provide a new quantitative basis for improving the understanding of electrochemical transformations occurring in the electrospray emitter. A supplemental material section gives full derivation of the model and discusses other consequences.

  2. Electrochemistry of lithium-oxygen batteries using microelectrode voltammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemanick, E. Joseph

    2014-02-01

    The electrochemistry of non-aqueous lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries on both reduction and oxidation was investigated using carbon black and single-walled nanotube (SWNT) microcavity electrodes. Two oxidative peaks were observed on oxidation (charge). The first peak at 3.0-3.7 V vs. Li/Li+ was limited in storable charge (∼8 × 103 C cm-3). The oxidation potential of this first peak was independent of Li2O2 thickness (as measured by total charge on reduction) and assigned to interfacial Li2O2, lying between the bulk of the Li2O2 and the carbon surface. A second peak between 4.0 and 4.6+ V showed significant discharge product thickness dependence on oxidation potential and was assigned to bulk Li2O2, away from the carbon surface. On reduction (discharge), deposition of the interfacial Li2O2 showed a significant overpotential indicated by the ratio of interfacial/bulk Li2O2 formed at varying reduction potentials. SWNT were shown to effectively decrease the Li-O2 average charge overpotential for a given charge by increasing the electrode surface area available for formation of interfacial discharge products.

  3. Analysis of the electrochemistry of hemes with Ems spanning 800 mV

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhong; Gunner, M. R.

    2009-01-01

    The free energy of heme reduction in different proteins is found to vary over more than 18 kcal/mol. It is a challenge to determine how proteins manage to achieve this enormous range of Ems with a single type of redox cofactor. Proteins containing 141 unique hemes of a-, b-, and c-type, with bis-His, His-Met, and aquo-His ligation were calculated using Multi-Conformation Continuum Electrostatics (MCCE). The experimental Ems range over 800 mV from −350 mV in cytochrome c3 to 450 mV in cytochrome c peroxidase (vs. SHE). The quantitative analysis of the factors that modulate heme electrochemistry includes the interactions of the heme with its ligands, the solvent, the protein backbone, and sidechains. MCCE calculated Ems are in good agreement with measured values. Using no free parameters the slope of the line comparing calculated and experimental Ems is 0.73 (R2 = 0.90), showing the method accounts for 73% of the observed Em range. Adding a +160 mV correction to the His-Met c-type hemes yields a slope of 0.97 (R2 = 0.93). With the correction 65% of the hemes have an absolute error smaller than 60 mV and 92% are within 120 mV. The overview of heme proteins with known structures and Ems shows both the lowest and highest potential hemes are c-type, whereas the b-type hemes are found in the middle Em range. In solution, bis-His ligation lowers the Em by ≈205 mV relative to hemes with His-Met ligands. The bis-His, aquo-His, and His-Met ligated b-type hemes all cluster about Ems which are ≈200 mV more positive in protein than in water. In contrast, the low potential bis-His c-type hemes are shifted little from in solution, whereas the high potential His-Met c-type hemes are raised by ≈300 mV from solution. The analysis shows that no single type of interaction can be identified as the most important in setting heme electrochemistry in proteins. For example, the loss of solvation (reaction field) energy, which raises the Em, has been suggested to be a major factor in

  4. Gender Differences in the High School and Affective Experiences of Introductory College Physics Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazari, Zahra; Sadler, Philip M.; Tai, Robert H.

    2008-10-01

    The disparity in persistence between males and females studying physics has been a topic of concern to physics educators for decades. Overall, while female students perform as well as or better than male students, they continue to lag considerably in terms of persistence. The most significant drop in females studying physics occurs between high school and college.2 Since most female physicists report that they became attracted to physics and decided to study it further while in high school, according to the International Study of Women in Physics,3 it is problematic that high school is also the stage at which females begin to opt out at much higher rates than males. Although half of the students taking one year of physics in high school are female, females are less likely than males to take a second or Advanced Placement (AP) physics course.4 In addition, the percentage of females taking the first physics course in college usually falls between 30% and 40%. In other words, although you may see gender parity in a first high school physics course, this parity does not usually persist to the next level of physics course. In addition, even if there is parity in a high school physics course, it does not mean that males and females experience the course in the same way. It is this difference in experience that may help to explain the drop in persistence of females.

  5. 75 FR 57463 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory...., Washington, DC 20037. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: John Kogut, Executive Secretary; High Energy...

  6. 75 FR 6651 - Office of Science; High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ... Office of Science; High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP..., MD 20814. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: John Kogut, Executive Secretary; High Energy...

  7. 76 FR 8358 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory...., Washington, DC 20037. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: John Kogut, Executive Secretary; High Energy...

  8. 77 FR 64799 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-23

    ... High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP...., Bethesda, MD 20814. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: John Kogut, Executive Secretary; High Energy...

  9. 76 FR 41234 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory...., Washington, DC 20037. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: John Kogut, Executive Secretary; High Energy...

  10. 77 FR 4027 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ... High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Science. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory...., Washington, DC 20037. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: John Kogut, Executive Secretary; High Energy...

  11. Reduced Graphene Oxide Thin Film on Conductive Substrates by Bipolar Electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anis, Allagui; Mohammad, Ali Abdelkareem; Hussain, Alawadhi; Ahmed, S. Elwakil

    2016-02-01

    Recent years have shown an increased interest in developing manufacturing processes for graphene and its derivatives that consider the environmental impact and large scale cost-effectiveness. However, today’s most commonly used synthesis routes still suffer from their excessive use of harsh chemicals and/or the complexity and financial cost of the process. Furthermore, the subsequent transfer of the material onto a substrate makes the overall process even more intricate and time-consuming. Here we describe a single-step, single-cell preparation procedure of metal-supported reduced graphene oxide (rGO) using the principle of bipolar electrochemistry of graphite in deionized water. Under the effect of an electric field between two stainless steel feeder electrodes, grapheme layers at the anodic pole of the wireless graphite were oxidized into colloidal dispersion of GO, which migrated electrophoretically towards the anodic side of the cell, and deposited in the form of rGO (d(002) = 0.395 nm) by van der Waals forces. For substrates chemically more susceptible to the high anodic voltage, we show that the electrochemical setup can be adapted by placing the latter between the wireless graphite and the stainless steel feeder anode. This method is straightforward, inexpensive, environmentally-friendly, and could be easily scaled up for high yield and large area production of rGO thin films.

  12. Reduced Graphene Oxide Thin Film on Conductive Substrates by Bipolar Electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Anis, Allagui; Mohammad, Ali Abdelkareem; Hussain, Alawadhi; Ahmed, S Elwakil

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have shown an increased interest in developing manufacturing processes for graphene and its derivatives that consider the environmental impact and large scale cost-effectiveness. However, today's most commonly used synthesis routes still suffer from their excessive use of harsh chemicals and/or the complexity and financial cost of the process. Furthermore, the subsequent transfer of the material onto a substrate makes the overall process even more intricate and time-consuming. Here we describe a single-step, single-cell preparation procedure of metal-supported reduced graphene oxide (rGO) using the principle of bipolar electrochemistry of graphite in deionized water. Under the effect of an electric field between two stainless steel feeder electrodes, grapheme layers at the anodic pole of the wireless graphite were oxidized into colloidal dispersion of GO, which migrated electrophoretically towards the anodic side of the cell, and deposited in the form of rGO (d(002) = 0.395 nm) by van der Waals forces. For substrates chemically more susceptible to the high anodic voltage, we show that the electrochemical setup can be adapted by placing the latter between the wireless graphite and the stainless steel feeder anode. This method is straightforward, inexpensive, environmentally-friendly, and could be easily scaled up for high yield and large area production of rGO thin films. PMID:26883173

  13. Dispersion of Nanocrystalline Fe3O4 within Composite Electrodes: Insights on Battery-Related Electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Bock, David C; Pelliccione, Christopher J; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Jiajun; Knehr, K W; Wang, Jun; Wang, Feng; West, Alan C; Marschilok, Amy C; Takeuchi, Kenneth J; Takeuchi, Esther S

    2016-05-11

    Aggregation of nanosized materials in composite lithium-ion-battery electrodes can be a significant factor influencing electrochemical behavior. In this study, aggregation was controlled in magnetite, Fe3O4, composite electrodes via oleic acid capping and subsequent dispersion in a carbon black matrix. A heat treatment process was effective in the removal of the oleic acid capping agent while preserving a high degree of Fe3O4 dispersion. Electrochemical testing showed that Fe3O4 dispersion is initially beneficial in delivering a higher functional capacity, in agreement with continuum model simulations. However, increased capacity fade upon extended cycling was observed for the dispersed Fe3O4 composites relative to the aggregated Fe3O4 composites. X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of electrodes post cycling indicated that the dispersed Fe3O4 electrodes are more oxidized in the discharged state, consistent with reduced reversibility compared with the aggregated sample. Higher charge-transfer resistance for the dispersed sample after cycling suggests increased surface-film formation on the dispersed, high-surface-area nanocrystalline Fe3O4 compared to the aggregated materials. This study provides insight into the specific effects of aggregation on electrochemistry through a multiscale view of mechanisms for magnetite composite electrodes. PMID:27096464

  14. Reduced Graphene Oxide Thin Film on Conductive Substrates by Bipolar Electrochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Anis, Allagui; Mohammad, Ali Abdelkareem; Hussain, Alawadhi; Ahmed, S. Elwakil

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have shown an increased interest in developing manufacturing processes for graphene and its derivatives that consider the environmental impact and large scale cost-effectiveness. However, today’s most commonly used synthesis routes still suffer from their excessive use of harsh chemicals and/or the complexity and financial cost of the process. Furthermore, the subsequent transfer of the material onto a substrate makes the overall process even more intricate and time-consuming. Here we describe a single-step, single-cell preparation procedure of metal-supported reduced graphene oxide (rGO) using the principle of bipolar electrochemistry of graphite in deionized water. Under the effect of an electric field between two stainless steel feeder electrodes, grapheme layers at the anodic pole of the wireless graphite were oxidized into colloidal dispersion of GO, which migrated electrophoretically towards the anodic side of the cell, and deposited in the form of rGO (d(002) = 0.395 nm) by van der Waals forces. For substrates chemically more susceptible to the high anodic voltage, we show that the electrochemical setup can be adapted by placing the latter between the wireless graphite and the stainless steel feeder anode. This method is straightforward, inexpensive, environmentally-friendly, and could be easily scaled up for high yield and large area production of rGO thin films. PMID:26883173

  15. Dispersion of nanocrystalline Fe3O4 within composite electrodes: Insights on battery-related electrochemistry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    David C. Bock; Takeuchi, Kenneth J.; Pelliccione, Christopher J.; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Jiajun; Knehr, K. W.; Wang, Jun; Wang, Feng; West, Alan C.; Marschilok, Amy C.; et al

    2016-04-20

    Aggregation of nanosized materials in composite lithium-ion-battery electrodes can be a significant factor influencing electrochemical behavior. In this study, aggregation was controlled in magnetite, Fe3O4, composite electrodes via oleic acid capping and subsequent dispersion in a carbon black matrix. A heat treatment process was effective in the removal of the oleic acid capping agent while preserving a high degree of Fe3O4 dispersion. Electrochemical testing showed that Fe3O4 dispersion is initially beneficial in delivering a higher functional capacity, in agreement with continuum model simulations. However, increased capacity fade upon extended cycling was observed for the dispersed Fe3O4 composites relative to themore » aggregated Fe3O4 composites. X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of electrodes post cycling indicated that the dispersed Fe3O4 electrodes are more oxidized in the discharged state, consistent with reduced reversibility compared with the aggregated sample. Higher charge-transfer resistance for the dispersed sample after cycling suggests increased surface-film formation on the dispersed, high-surface-area nanocrystalline Fe3O4 compared to the aggregated materials. Furthermore, this study provides insight into the specific effects of aggregation on electrochemistry through a multiscale view of mechanisms for magnetite composite electrodes.« less

  16. Recent Trends in Participation in Physical Education among U.S. High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowry, Richard; Wechsler, Howell; Kann, Laura; Collins, Janet L.

    2001-01-01

    Analyzed data on physical education (PE) enrollment, daily PE attendance, and being physically active in PE among high school students, using 1991-97 Youth Risk Behavior Survey data. Although PE enrollment did not change over time, the prevalence of students who attended PE daily and who were physically active more than 20 minutes per class…

  17. High Energy Physics division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1998--June 30, 1998.

    SciTech Connect

    Ayres, D. S.; Berger, E. L.; Blair, R.; Bodwin, G. T.; Drake, G.; Goodman, M. C.; Guarino, V.; Klasen, M.; Lagae, J.-F.; Magill, S.; May, E. N.; Nodulman, L.; Norem, J.; Petrelli, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Repond, J.; Schoessow, P. V.; Sinclair, D. K.; Spinka, H. M.; Stanek, R.; Underwood, D.; Wagner, R.; White, A. R.; Yokosawa, A.; Zachos, C.

    1999-03-09

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1, 1998 through June 30, 1998. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of Division publications and colloquia are included.

  18. High Energy Physics Division. Semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, R.; Schoessow, P.; Talaga, R.

    1995-12-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1, 1995-July 31, 1995. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  19. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1992--December 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R.

    1993-07-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of July 1, 1992--December 30, 1992. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  20. Meeting the Challenge of Students' Understanding of Formulae in High-School Physics: A Learning Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagno, Esther; Berger, Hana; Eylon, Bat-Sheva

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we describe a diagnostic study to investigate students' understanding of two basic formulae in physics. Based on the findings of the study, we have developed a classroom activity focused on the interpretation of formulae. The activity was developed cooperatively by physics education researchers and high-school physics teachers and…

  1. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.; Rezmer, R.; Wagner, R.

    1997-07-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1 - June 30, 1996. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. List of Division publications and colloquia are included.

  2. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1, 1994-June 30, 1994. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  3. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1992--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R.

    1992-11-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1, 1992--June 30, 1992. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  4. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, R.; Schoessow, P.; Talaga, R.

    1995-04-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of July 1, 1994--December 31, 1994. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  5. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R.

    1993-12-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1, 1993--June 30, 1993. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  6. Putting Physics First: Three Case Studies of High School Science Department and Course Sequence Reorganization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Douglas B.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the process of shifting to a "Physics First" sequence in science course offerings in three school districts in the United States. This curricular sequence reverses the more common U.S. high school sequence of biology/chemistry/physics, and has gained substantial support in the physics education community over the…

  7. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, R.; Moonier, P.; Schoessow, P.; Talaga, R.

    1994-05-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of July 1, 1993--December 31, 1993. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  8. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities July 1, 1997 - December 31, 1997.

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.; Rezmer, R.; Schuur, C.; Wagner, R.

    1998-08-11

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period July 1, 1997--December 31, 1997. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of Division publications and colloquia are included.

  9. Their Turn To Teach: High School Students Teach Physics to Elementary Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffat, Ann Greenlaw; Schmidt, Ryan

    2001-01-01

    Describes an assignment requiring high school physics students to design and teach physical science lessons to elementary students in grades 1-5. Working in groups of three or four, the physics students followed a prescribed timeline to develop their activities, prepare demonstrations, and present the lessons. Presents a detailed teaching…

  10. The World in Slow Motion: Using a High-Speed Camera in a Physics Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewanto, Andreas; Lim, Geok Quee; Kuang, Jianhong; Zhang, Jinfeng; Yeo, Ye

    2012-01-01

    We present a physics workshop for college students to investigate various physical phenomena using high-speed cameras. The technical specifications required, the step-by-step instructions, as well as the practical limitations of the workshop, are discussed. This workshop is also intended to be a novel way to promote physics to Generation-Y…

  11. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R.

    1992-04-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of July 1, 1991--December 31, 1991. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  12. Photoelectroconversion by Semiconductors: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Qinbai; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents an experiment designed to give students some experience with photochemistry, electrochemistry, and basic theories about semiconductors. Uses a liquid-junction solar cell and illustrates some fundamental physical and chemical principles related to light and electricity interconversion as well as the properties of semiconductors. (JRH)

  13. Investigations in Experimental and Theoretical High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Krennrich, Frank

    2013-07-29

    We report on the work done under DOE grant DE-FG02-01ER41155. The experimental tasks have ongoing efforts at CERN (ATLAS), the Whipple observatory (VERITAS) and R&D work on dual readout calorimetry and neutrino-less double beta decay. The theoretical task emphasizes the weak interaction and in particular CP violation and neutrino physics. The detailed descriptions of the final report on each project are given under the appropriate task section of this report.

  14. An Experimental High Energy Physics Program: Task D

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, V.E.; Carmony, D.D.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Gutay, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses: The CDF for {bar p}-p Collisions at FNAL; The L3 Detector for e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} Collisions at CERN; The SCD Detector for pp Collisions at the SSCL (calorimeters); The SDC Detector for pp Collisions at the SSCL (muon detector); The CO experiment for {bar p}-p Collisions at FNAL; and Accelerator Physics at Fermilab.

  15. New physics and chemistry in high electrostatic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karahka, M. L.; Kreuzer, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Fields of the order of volts per meter exist along micron-sized tips. They are of the magnitude of fields inside atoms and molecules and can affect their electronic structure. This leads to a continuous periodic table resulting in new field-induced chemistry. We will present a tutorial treatment of this new physics and chemistry explaining such surprising phenomena like covalent bonding of helium to metal surfaces, metallization of semiconductors and insulators, and more.

  16. Extreme light. An intense pursuit of fundamental high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourou, Gérard; Wheeler, Jonathan A.; Tajima, Toshiki

    2015-09-01

    By the compression of petawatt pulses to multi-exawatt, a new route for the generation of Schwinger intensities capable of producing highenergy radiation and particle beams with extremely short time structure down to the attosecond-zeptosecond regime is being presented. Far from the traditional laser investigation in the eV regime, this laser-based approach offers a new paradigm to investigate the structure of vacuum and applications to subatomic physics.

  17. Using social media in a high school physics classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-03-01

    In today's classrooms students have ever increasing access to technology and social media. Rather than try and suppress the use of it in my classroom, I have embraced it and use it as a tool to foster collaboration and science writing with my physics students. There are many platforms to engage your students online, from simple and free to dynamic and costly, but the benefits of using social media for your students is worth giving it try.

  18. Introductory Physics for Engineers, Chemists, and Future High School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Gay

    2001-03-01

    University Physics II is an introductory calculus-based electromagnetism and optics course, (UPII). Our goal in revising the course was to improve the level of student learning, confidence, and enjoyment of science, while maintaining the resource level common to large institutions (teaching assistants in labs, large lectures, etc.) The program is successful, based on all indicators. Student confidence is up, particularly women are as confident as the men at the end of the course, with a strong correlation between confidence and performance. The students who complete the class with a C or better go on to complete a degree in SMET. This is by far the majority, as we make it very hard not to learn the material. Students given a 50-minute closed-book problem-solving test from a 1990 class (ave=53.8%) finished in 35 minutes with an average of 69.2%. They outperformed previous classes where the concepts had been specifically addressed by 10-18% on conceptual multiple-choice questions. Our students have a higher retention to degree than the rest of the university. Second semester introductory physics is often where the number of physics majors declines. Yet, in UPII we recruit more students into physics than are lost in the preceding semesters. Graduation rates went from four or less to 12 or more concurrent with our first UPII students graduating. Enrollment continues to increase. Our method involves leading the student from concrete "hands-on" examples to conceptual understanding through group discussion. Quantitative experimental results provide verification. Concepts are related to everyday phenomena familiar to the student. Students are taught to reason in a structured manner about both conceptual and quantitative problems. Cooperative learning, found to improve retention of female and minority students, is emphasized. Important features and implementation of the course will be discussed.

  19. Providing a computing environment for a high energy physics workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, C.; Butler, J.; Carter, T.; DeMar, P.; Fagan, D.; Gibbons, R.; Grigaliunas, V.; Haibeck, M.; Haring, P.; Horvath, C.; Hughart, N.; Johnstad, H.; Jones, S.; Kreymer, A.; LeBrun, P.; Lego, A.; Leninger, M.; Loebel, L.; McNamara, S.; Nguyen, T.; Nicholls, J.; O'Reilly, C.; Pabrai, U.; Pfister, J.; Ritchie, D.; Roberts, L.; Sazama, C.; Wohlt, D. ); Carven, R. (Wiscons

    1989-12-01

    Although computing facilities have been provided at conferences and workshops remote from the host institution for some years, the equipment provided has rarely been capable of providing for much more than simple editing and electronic mail. This report documents the effort involved in providing a local computing facility with world-wide networking capability for a physics workshop so that we and others can benefit from the knowledge gained through the experience.

  20. Large size LSO and LYSO crystal scintillators for future high-energy physics and nuclear physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianming; Zhang, Liyuan; Zhu, Ren-yuan

    2007-03-01

    The high energy and nuclear physics community is interested in fast bright heavy crystal scintillators, such as cerium-doped LSO and LYSO. An investigation is being carried out to explore the potential use of the LSO and LYSO crystals in future physics experiments. Optical and scintillation properties, including longitudinal transmittance, emission and excitation spectra, light output, decay kinetics and light response uniformity, were measured for three long (2.5×2.5×20 cm) LSO and LYSO samples from different vendors, and were compared to a long BGO sample of the same size. The degradation of optical and scintillation properties under γ-ray irradiations and the radiation-induced phosphorescence were also measured for two long LYSO samples. Possible applications for a crystal calorimeter in future high energy and nuclear physics experiments are discussed.

  1. High speed optical wireless data transmission system for particle sensors in high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, W.; Corsini, R.; Ciaramella, E.; Dell'Orso, R.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.

    2015-08-01

    High speed optical fiber or copper wire communication systems are frequently deployed for readout data links used in particle physics detectors. Future detector upgrades will need more bandwidth for data transfer, but routing requirements for new cables or optical fiber will be challenging due to space limitations. Optical wireless communication (OWC) can provide high bandwidth connectivity with an advantage of reduced material budget and complexity of cable installation and management. In a collaborative effort, Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna and INFN Pisa are pursuing the development of a free-space optical link that could be installed in a future particle physics detector or upgrade. We describe initial studies of an OWC link using the inner tracker of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector as a reference architecture. The results of two experiments are described: the first to verify that the laser source transmission wavelength of 1550 nm will not introduce fake signals in silicon strip sensors while the second was to study the source beam diameter and its tolerance to misalignment. For data rates of 2.5 Gb/s and 10 Gb/s over a 10 cm working distance it was observed that a tolerance limit of ±0.25 mm to ±0.8 mm can be obtained for misaligned systems with source beam diameters of 0.38 mm to 3.5 mm, respectively.

  2. Physical Education and Moral Development: An Intervention Programme to Promote Moral Reasoning through Physical Education in High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mouratidou, Katerina; Goutza, Stavroula; Chatzopoulos, Dimitrios

    2007-01-01

    Moral development is one of the goals of physical education (PE). However, few programmes have been implemented to investigate how moral development is promoted in PE settings. This study was designed in order to explore the effectiveness of a six-week specially designed moral development intervention in the PE domain in high school students, and…

  3. Collider Aspects of Flavour Physics at High Q

    SciTech Connect

    del Aguila, F.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Allanach, B.C.; Alwall, J.; Andreev, Yu.; Aristizabal Sierra, D.; Bartl, A.; Beccaria, M.; Bejar, S.; Benucci, L.; Bityukov, S.; Borjanovic, I.; Bozzi, G.; Burdman, G.; Carvalho, J.; Castro, N.; Clerbaux, B.; de Campos, F.; de Gouvea, A.; Dennis, C.; Djouadi, A.; /Cambridge U., DAMTP /Louvain U., CP3 /Moscow, INR /Valencia U. /Vienna U. /Salento U. /INFN, Lecce /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Barcelona, IFAE /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Karlsruhe U. /Sao Paulo U. /LIP, Coimbra /Brussels U. /Sao Paulo U., Guaratingueta /Northwestern U. /Oxford U. /Orsay, LPT /Athens U. /Lisbon U.

    2008-03-07

    This chapter of the report of the 'Flavour in the era of LHC' workshop discusses flavor related issues in the production and decays of heavy states at LHC, both from the experimental side and from the theoretical side. We review top quark physics and discuss flavor aspects of several extensions of the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry, little Higgs model or models with extra dimensions. This includes discovery aspects as well as measurement of several properties of these heavy states. We also present public available computational tools related to this topic.

  4. Parameter estimation of an electrochemistry-based lithium-ion battery model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoudi, Ramin; Uchida, Thomas; McPhee, John

    2015-09-01

    Parameters for an electrochemistry-based Lithium-ion battery model are estimated using the homotopy optimization approach. A high-fidelity model of the battery is presented based on chemical and electrical phenomena. Equations expressing the conservation of species and charge for the solid and electrolyte phases are combined with the kinetics of the electrodes to obtain a system of differential-algebraic equations (DAEs) governing the dynamic behavior of the battery. The presence of algebraic constraints in the governing dynamic equations makes the optimization problem challenging: a simulation is performed in each iteration of the optimization procedure to evaluate the objective function, and the initial conditions must be updated to satisfy the constraints as the parameter values change. The ε-embedding method is employed to convert the original DAEs into a singularly perturbed system of ordinary differential equations, which are then used to simulate the system efficiently. The proposed numerical procedure demonstrates excellent performance in the estimation of parameters for the Lithium-ion battery model, compared to direct methods that are either unstable or incapable of converging. The obtained results and estimated parameters demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed simulation approach and homotopy optimization procedure.

  5. ZnO/Cu nanocomposite: a platform for direct electrochemistry of enzymes and biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chi; Xu, Chunxiang; Wang, Xuemei

    2012-03-01

    Unique structured nanomaterials can facilitate the direct electron transfer between redox proteins and the electrodes. Here, in situ directed growth on an electrode of a ZnO/Cu nanocomposite was prepared by a simple corrosion approach, which enables robust mechanical adhesion and electrical contact between the nanostructured ZnO and the electrodes. This is great help to realize the direct electron transfer between the electrode surface and the redox protein. SEM images demonstrate that the morphology of the ZnO/Cu nanocomposite has a large specific surface area, which is favorable to immobilize the biomolecules and construct biosensors. Using glucose oxidase (GOx) as a model, this ZnO/Cu nanocomposite is employed for immobilization of GOx and the construction of the glucose biosensor. Direct electron transfer of GOx is achieved at ZnO/Cu nanocomposite with a high heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant of 0.67 ± 0.06 s(-1). Such ZnO/Cu nanocomposite provides a good matrix for direct electrochemistry of enzymes and mediator-free enzymatic biosensors. PMID:22309190

  6. Glucose oxidase-graphene-chitosan modified electrode for direct electrochemistry and glucose sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Xinhuang; Wang, Jun; Wu, Hong; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Liu, Jun; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-11-01

    Direct electrochemistry of a glucose oxidase (GOD)/graphene/chitosan nanocomposite was studied. The immobilized enzyme retains its bioactivity, exhibits a surface confined, reversible two-proton and two-electron transfer reaction, and has good stability, activity and a fast heterogeneous electron transfer rate with the rate constant (ks) of 2.83 s-1. A much higher enzyme loading (1.12 × 10-9 mol/cm2) is obtained as compared to the bare glass carbon surface. This GOD/graphene/chitosan nanocomposite film can be used for sensitive detection of glucose. The biosensor exhibits a wider linearity range from 0.08 mM to 12 mM glucose with a detection limit of 0.02 mM and much higher sensitivity (37.93 μA mM-1 cm-2) as compared with other nanostructured supports. The excellent performance of the biosensor is attributed to large surface-to-volume ratio and high conductivity of graphene, and good biocompatibility of chitosan, which enhances the enzyme absorption and promotes direct electron transfer between redox enzymes and the surface of electrodes.

  7. Selection and Physical Properties of High-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, G. W.

    2014-09-01

    Extremely Red Objects (EROs) and BzKs continue to attract considerable interest. It has been suggested that they may be the direct progenitors of present-day massive E/S0 galaxies, and can provide crucial constraints on the current galaxy formation and evolution models. Therefore, the key question is to measure the relative fraction of OGs (old galaxies) and DGs (young, and dusty starburst galaxies) in the sample of EROs. Many groups have been currently investigating the fractions of these two ERO populations using a variety of observational approaches, but the fraction of OGs and DGs from different surveys is different. In the meantime, a number of observations suggest that the epoch of z˜2 also plays an important role in galaxy formation and evolution for various reasons: the cosmic star formation rate density (SFRD) begins to drop at z˜2 from a flat plateau at higher redshifts; the morphological type mix of field galaxies changes remarkably at z˜2; the number density of QSOs has a peak at z˜2; and about 50% to 70% of the stellar mass assembly of galaxies took place in the redshift range 1physical properties of passive and star-forming galaxies at z˜2 in the AEGIS field, and (3) the mid-infrared spectroscopy and multi-wavelength study of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) at z˜2 in the AEGIS field. Chapter 1 gives a brief review on the research progresses of EROs at z˜1, BzKs at z˜2, and ULIRGs at z˜2, respectively. In Chapter 2 we present a quantitative study of the classification of EROs in the UDF and COSMOS field. Our sample includes 5264 (COSMOS, K_{Vega} ≤19.2) and 24 EROs (UDF, K_{Vega}≤22.0) with (i-K)_{AB}≥2.45. Using the fitting method of spectral energy distribution (SED), [3.6]-[8.0] color, and the nonparametric measures of galaxy morphology, we classify EROs into two classes: DGs and OGs. We find

  8. Physical characteristics of geosynchronous high power communications satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Drackett, T.M.

    1995-12-31

    With the advent of the Information Superhighway, many organizations have been spurred into re-examining current spacecraft architectures to determine how the significantly higher communications capacities of the future will be accommodated. Opinion is divided on many issues in this arena, and none more so than the discussion that revolves around whether several large satellites in Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO) offer a better all-round service to the user community than a fleet of small satellites in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). Although this paper does not attempt to debate this particular issue, a clear finding of the work carried out by the author and others, was that considerable growth potential exists by simply increasing the physical size and capacity of conventional geosynchronous satellites while causing a minimal impact on existing ground systems and infrastructures. The work described here forms part of a power systems study carried out by Lockheed Martin Astro Space (Astro), and funded by the Department of Energy (DOE), to investigate how photovoltaic and reactor based power technology can be applied to spacecraft with payloads in the 20 kW to 100 kW range. The scope of this paper is to address how the payload type, power source technology and launch vehicle selection influence the physical characteristics of satellites with payloads of this magnitude.

  9. High Energy Physics Research with the CMS Experiment at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Gail G.

    2013-05-31

    The highlight of our last budget period, June 1, 2010, to May 31, 2013, was the discovery of the Higgs boson by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), announced on July 4, 2012, and for which François Englert and Peter Higgs were awarded the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics on October 8, 2013. The Higgs boson was postulated in 1964 to explain how elementary particles obtain mass and was the missing piece of the Standard Model. However, the Standard Model does not describe everything that we know. There are many unanswered questions, such as how can the Higgs boson have the mass that we have observed, are there more Higgs bosons, why is there more matter than antimatter, and what is the invisible dark matter, which constitutes about 85% of the matter in the universe. Our group played a significant role in the discovery of the Higgs boson and in subsequent analyses. We also carried out searches for new physics, in ways that could help elucidate some of the remaining questions. Our role in the CMS detector focused on the Tracker, a silicon strip outer tracker and pixel inner tracker.

  10. Memristive crypto primitive for building highly secure physical unclonable functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yansong; Ranasinghe, Damith C.; Al-Sarawi, Said F.; Kavehei, Omid; Abbott, Derek

    2015-08-01

    Physical unclonable functions (PUFs) exploit the intrinsic complexity and irreproducibility of physical systems to generate secret information. The advantage is that PUFs have the potential to provide fundamentally higher security than traditional cryptographic methods by preventing the cloning of devices and the extraction of secret keys. Most PUF designs focus on exploiting process variations in Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology. In recent years, progress in nanoelectronic devices such as memristors has demonstrated the prevalence of process variations in scaling electronics down to the nano region. In this paper, we exploit the extremely large information density available in nanocrossbar architectures and the significant resistance variations of memristors to develop an on-chip memristive device based strong PUF (mrSPUF). Our novel architecture demonstrates desirable characteristics of PUFs, including uniqueness, reliability, and large number of challenge-response pairs (CRPs) and desirable characteristics of strong PUFs. More significantly, in contrast to most existing PUFs, our PUF can act as a reconfigurable PUF (rPUF) without additional hardware and is of benefit to applications needing revocation or update of secure key information.

  11. Yale High Energy Physics Research: Precision Studies of Reactor Antineutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Heeger, Karsten M.

    2014-09-13

    This report presents experimental research at the intensity frontier of particle physics with particular focus on the study of reactor antineutrinos and the precision measurement of neutrino oscillations. The experimental neutrino physics group of Professor Heeger and Senior Scientist Band at Yale University has had leading responsibilities in the construction and operation of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment and made critical contributions to the discovery of non-zero$\\theta_{13}$. Heeger and Band led the Daya Bay detector management team and are now overseeing the operations of the antineutrino detectors. Postdoctoral researchers and students in this group have made leading contributions to the Daya Bay analysis including the prediction of the reactor antineutrino flux and spectrum, the analysis of the oscillation signal, and the precision determination of the target mass yielding unprecedented precision in the relative detector uncertainty. Heeger's group is now leading an R\\&D effort towards a short-baseline oscillation experiment, called PROSPECT, at a US research reactor and the development of antineutrino detectors with advanced background discrimination.

  12. Memristive crypto primitive for building highly secure physical unclonable functions

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yansong; Ranasinghe, Damith C.; Al-Sarawi, Said F.; Kavehei, Omid; Abbott, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Physical unclonable functions (PUFs) exploit the intrinsic complexity and irreproducibility of physical systems to generate secret information. The advantage is that PUFs have the potential to provide fundamentally higher security than traditional cryptographic methods by preventing the cloning of devices and the extraction of secret keys. Most PUF designs focus on exploiting process variations in Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology. In recent years, progress in nanoelectronic devices such as memristors has demonstrated the prevalence of process variations in scaling electronics down to the nano region. In this paper, we exploit the extremely large information density available in nanocrossbar architectures and the significant resistance variations of memristors to develop an on-chip memristive device based strong PUF (mrSPUF). Our novel architecture demonstrates desirable characteristics of PUFs, including uniqueness, reliability, and large number of challenge-response pairs (CRPs) and desirable characteristics of strong PUFs. More significantly, in contrast to most existing PUFs, our PUF can act as a reconfigurable PUF (rPUF) without additional hardware and is of benefit to applications needing revocation or update of secure key information. PMID:26239669

  13. Memristive crypto primitive for building highly secure physical unclonable functions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yansong; Ranasinghe, Damith C; Al-Sarawi, Said F; Kavehei, Omid; Abbott, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Physical unclonable functions (PUFs) exploit the intrinsic complexity and irreproducibility of physical systems to generate secret information. The advantage is that PUFs have the potential to provide fundamentally higher security than traditional cryptographic methods by preventing the cloning of devices and the extraction of secret keys. Most PUF designs focus on exploiting process variations in Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology. In recent years, progress in nanoelectronic devices such as memristors has demonstrated the prevalence of process variations in scaling electronics down to the nano region. In this paper, we exploit the extremely large information density available in nanocrossbar architectures and the significant resistance variations of memristors to develop an on-chip memristive device based strong PUF (mrSPUF). Our novel architecture demonstrates desirable characteristics of PUFs, including uniqueness, reliability, and large number of challenge-response pairs (CRPs) and desirable characteristics of strong PUFs. More significantly, in contrast to most existing PUFs, our PUF can act as a reconfigurable PUF (rPUF) without additional hardware and is of benefit to applications needing revocation or update of secure key information. PMID:26239669

  14. The virtual library in action: Collaborative international control of high-energy physics pre-print

    SciTech Connect

    Kreitz, P.A.; Addis, L.; Galic, H.; Johnson, T.

    1996-02-01

    This paper will discuss how control of the grey literature in high-energy physics pre-prints developed through a collaborative effort of librarians and physicists. It will highlight the critical steps in the development process and describe one model of a rapidly evolving virtual library for high-energy physics information. In conclusion, this paper will extend this physics model to other areas of grey literature management.

  15. Martian Dust Devil Electron Avalanche Process and Associated Electrochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Telana L.; Farrell, William M.; Delory, Gregory T.; Nithianandam, Jeyasingh

    2010-01-01

    Mars' dynamic atmosphere displays localized dust devils and larger, global dust storms. Based on terrestrial analog studies, electrostatic modeling, and laboratory work these features will contain large electrostatic fields formed via triboelectric processes. In the low-pressure Martian atmosphere, these fields may create an electron avalanche and collisional plasma due to an increase in electron density driven by the internal electrical forces. To test the hypothesis that an electron avalanche is sustained under these conditions, a self-consistent atmospheric process model is created including electron impact ionization sources and electron losses via dust absorption, electron dissociation attachment, and electron/ion recombination. This new model is called the Dust Devil Electron Avalanche Model (DDEAM). This model solves simultaneously nine continuity equations describing the evolution of the primary gaseous chemical species involved in the electrochemistry. DDEAM monitors the evolution of the electrons and primary gas constituents, including electron/water interactions. We especially focus on electron dynamics and follow the electrons as they evolve in the E field driven collisional gas. When sources and losses are self-consistently included in the electron continuity equation, the electron density grows exponentially with increasing electric field, reaching an equilibrium that forms a sustained time-stable collisional plasma. However, the character of this plasma differs depending upon the assumed growth rate saturation process (chemical saturation versus space charge). DDEAM also shows the possibility of the loss of atmospheric methane as a function of electric field due to electron dissociative attachment of the hydrocarbon. The methane destruction rates are presented and can be included in other larger atmospheric models.

  16. Realtime structural electrochemistry of platinum clusters using dispersive XAFS

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, P.G.; Conradson, S.D.; Wilson, M.S.; Gottesfeld, S.; Raistrick, I.D.

    1993-12-31

    Chemical reference tables state that the standard potential for the reaction of Pt with water, Pt + 2H{sub 2}O {r_arrow} Pt(OH){sub 2} + 2H{sup +} + 2e{sup {minus}}, is 0.98 V, and electrochemical studies propose that this reaction may occur at potentials as low as 0.8 V. Using dispersive x-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, the authors have directly probed the structural evolution of a Pt catalyst operating in-situ in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell during cyclic voltammetry. The changes in the number of Pt and O nearest-neighbors and the Pt charge demonstrate a close correspondence with features in the voltammogram. Because dispersive XAFS is very sensitive to detecting structural changes, they have been able to detect the presence of chemisorbed oxygen at potentials of 0.6--0.9 V in the anodic sweep. Since double-layer charging is regarded as the only process in this region for bulk Pt, these results may reflect a limitation of previous (indirect) studies on Pt electrochemistry, or they may indicate that these clusters are different from their bulk metal counterparts. Exploiting the time-resolving capability of dispersive XAFS, they also monitored changes in the Pt charge and the number of O and Pt nearest-neighbors during the electrochemical oxidation and reduction of the Pt clusters in real-time. The results are inconsistent with those expected from the place-exchange mechanism for the formation of the surface oxide on bulk Pt electrodes in aqueous solution; Pt{sub red} (k{sub 1}) {yields} Pt (submonolayer O)(k{sub 2}) {yields} PtO{sub x} (place exchanged Pt and O atoms: k{sub 1} >> k{sub 2}). Their current model for understanding these behaviors is that, relative to bulk Pt, unusual types of surface sites play a major role in determining the reactivity of these clusters.

  17. Electrochemistry applied to biomass. Progress report, October 1980-September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Chum, H. L.

    1982-04-01

    The electrochemical conversion of biomass-derived compounds, obtained through thermochemical pretreatments, into valuable organic chemicals, petrochemical substitutes, and energy-intensive chemicals is investigated. A hardwood-derived lignin obtained from ethanol extraction of the explosively depressurized aspen has been investigated. We have partially characterized this lignin material, and have also submitted it to electrolyses under controlled potential. The electrolytic conditions employed so far affect mainly the carbonyl groups of the ethanol-extracted steam-exploded aspen lignin. We have some evidence of demethoxylation and changed phenolic content after electrolysis. During product isolation, fractionation of the lignin occurs. The material with decreased methoxyl content may be suitable to replace phenol in phenol-formaldehyde-type resins. We are continuing these electrochemical and chemical investigations. Gel-permeation chromatography is being used to separate and characterize the several lignin fractions. In addition, we are carrying out electrolyses under more powerful reducing conditions which may lead to the cleavage of the main bonds in the lignin molecule (the ..beta..-0-4 ether linkages) producing monomeric and dimeric phenolic compounds. The electrochemistry and photoelectrochemistry of levulinic (4-oxo-pentanoic) acid, the major product of controlled degradation of cellulose by acids, have been investigated. This acid can be viewed as a major product of biomass thermochemical pretreatment or as a by-product of acid hydrolysis to fermentable sugars. Since this acid can be present in waste streams of biomass processing, we investigated the photoelectrochemical reactions of this acid on slurries composed of semiconductor/metal particles. The semiconductor investigated was undoped n-TiO/sub 2/, as anatase, anatase-rutile mixture, or rutile.

  18. Resource Letter AFHEP-1: Accelerators for the Future of High-Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, William A.

    2012-02-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to literature concerning the development of accelerators for the future of high-energy physics. Research articles, books, and Internet resources are cited for the following topics: motivation for future accelerators, present accelerators for high-energy physics, possible future machine, and laboratory and collaboration websites.

  19. High energy physics: Report of research accomplishments and future goals, FY 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-09-01

    This report discusses high energy physics research in the following areas: research in theoretical physics; phenomenology; experimental computer facility at Caltech; Beijing BES; MACRO; CLEO II; SLD; L3 at LEP; the B Factory Research and Development Program; Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) GEM Detector; and a high resolution barium fluoride calorimeter for the SSC.

  20. Physics Last: A Historical Study of the Development of the US High School Science Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Keith; Robbins, Dennis M.

    This study explores how and when physics became the last course in U.S. high school science and what impact this had on high school physics offerings and student enrollment. Four main areas of historical data were identified: (1) national and state education statistics; (2) reports from major organizations on reform and policy; (3) reports from…