Sample records for physical weathering processes

  1. Data Processing in Space Weather Physics Models in the Meridian Project

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deng sun-gen; Zhang hong-hai; Chi xue-bin; Guo xiao-cheng; Peng zhong

    2010-01-01

    In the Meridian Project, two space weather physics models, L1-magnetosphere-ionosphere causal chain(L1 model), and numerical magnetosphere database service, are provided as e-Science application services through the space weather computation grid environment, which provides a web-based portal for space weather studies users. We call the computation grid environment as a computing gateway. The computing gateway integrates space weather applications, space weather

  2. Field and laboratory experiments on weathering rates of granodiorite: Separation of chemical and physical processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tadashi Yokoyama; Yukinori Matsukura

    2006-01-01

    To study the rate and mechanism of granitic rock weathering, field weathering experiments using granodiorite tablets (diameter 3.5 cm, height 1.1 cm, weight 30 g) were conducted at a catchment over 10 yr. The tablets were exposed at three positions having different weathering conditions: ground surface, above aquifer, and in aquifer. The weight of the tablets decreased linearly with time:

  3. Weathering the escarpment: chemical and physical rates and processes, south-eastern

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Benjamin C. Burke; Arjun M. Heimsath; Jean L. Dixon; John Chappell; Kyungsoo Yoo

    Differences in chemical weathering extent and character are expected to exist across topographic escarpments due to spatial gradients of climatic and\\/or tectonic forcing. The passive margin escarpment of south-eastern Australia has a debated but generally accepted model of propagation in which it retreated (within 40 Ma) to near its current position following rifting between Australia and New Zealand 85-100 Ma

  4. Quantification of physical weathering rates using thermodynamics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Gans; S. Arens; S. J. Schymanski; A. Kleidon

    2010-01-01

    Physical weathering plays an important role in the global rock cycle in that it breaks up primary rock, thereby increasing the surface area for chemical weathering and providing the substrate for soil formation. We use a simple, thermodynamics based approach to quantify magnitudes of weathering, their spatial variation across climatic regions and their sensitivity to climatic change. Our approach is

  5. Cosmic weather, physical-chemical systems, and the technosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirsky, B. M.; Bruns, A. V.

    2010-12-01

    This paper is a short review of publications on the influence that solar activity and geomagnetic disturbances (cosmic weather) have on physical-chemical systems. The effects of cosmic weather may some-times be detected by the presence of an uncontrolled factor in these experiments. Direct reactions to cosmic weather are reliably identified in quantitative observations over various test systems, mainly water solutions. The effects of cosmic weather are also found from the data obtained by monitoring some simple physical systems, including semiconductors. All these effects are either cosmic physical rhythms or they are easily registered sporadic heliogeophysical events (e.g., magnetic storms). There are convincing data that demonstrate the influence that cosmic weather has on the accident rate in various engineering and physical systems. Researchers are at odds on the physical nature of the main physical agent, but the contribution of electromagnetic fields to these processes is considered important.

  6. Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Rachelle Tuttle

    2005-10-25

    Meteorologists study the weather by recording and analyzing data. You can become an amateur meteorologist by building your own weather station and keeping a record of your measurements. After a while, you\\'ll notice the weather patterns that allow meteorologists to forecast the weather. Tasks: 1. As a group you will build a weather station outside. 2. Your group will build instruments to measure the weather. 3. Each person will record the data in personal weather journals. Process: 1.Since weather happens outside, you\\'ll need to make ...

  7. Physical weathering and modification of a rhyolitic hyaloclastite in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vet, S. J.; Mittelmeijer-Hazeleger, M. C.; Braakhekke, J. J. M.; Cammeraat, L. H.

    2014-06-01

    Fragmental volcanic glass or `hyaloclastite' is a common glaciovolcanic eruption product that is formed in large abundance during basaltic, andesitic and rhyolitic subglacial eruptions. The physical weathering of rhyolitic hyaloclastites differs notably from basaltic hyaloclastites due to differences in cementation and edifice consolidation. As rhyolitic glasses are also much rarer, comparatively little is known about their physical weathering and fracturing characteristics. In the presented study, we provide a process-oriented analysis of the physical modification of subglacially erupted rhyolitic hyaloclastites from the Bláhnúkur edifice in Torfajökull (Iceland). Frost weathering experiments were performed to determine how vesicular glass particles fragment to finer particle sizes. The surficial porosity of the glass drives such frost weathering through the process of pore pressurisation and was quantified using high-pressure mercury intrusion. Uniaxial compression experiments were carried out to understand how the glass structure responds to the application of external stress. The observed fracturing in both experimental treatments was found to adhere to fractal statistics, which allowed the compression experiments to be used in conjunction with the frost weathering experiments for inferring the fracturing characteristics of rhyolitic volcanic glasses. Transport processes by wind and gravity were simulated by long-duration abrasion experiments in rock tumblers (through granular avalanching), but these low-energy particle interactions were not found to significantly abrade particles. A notable result from our fragmentation experiments was the production of <10 ?m particles. This size range is considered respirable and illustrates how physical weathering can continuously create potentially harmful ash textures; a process which is often overlooked in health hazard assessments after volcanic eruptions. Fragmentation by post-eruptive weathering can lead to overestimations of the fine ash fraction produced by syneruptive fragmentation and granulometric studies therefore need to be appreciative of the effects of such secondary fracturing processes.

  8. Defeating the Doppler Dilemma : Space Physics Meets Weather Radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James Stagliano

    2002-01-01

    The Doppler Dilemma is the embodiment of the Shannon Information Theorem and defines a fundamental inverse relationship upon the simultaneous detection of range and velocity. Much research in signal processing techniques in the weather radar community has centered on overcoming the Doppler Dilemma. The most promising work employs methods originally developed in space physics, particularly ionospheric research. In this paper,

  9. Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. LAi

    2007-02-08

    This project will help you understand the weather and investigate weather interactively. What are the components of weather? How do you measure weather? Investigate the WeatherScholastic: Weather WatchWeatherWeather Center for Our 4th Grade ...

  10. Interactive (De)Weathering of an Image using Physical Models

    E-print Network

    Nayar, Shree K.

    Interactive (De)Weathering of an Image using Physical Models Srinivasa G. Narasimhan and Shree K}@cs.columbia.edu Abstract Images of scenes acquired in bad weather have poor con- trasts and colors. It is known that the degradation of image quality due to bad weather is exponential in the depths of the scene points. Therefore

  11. Salt-Induced Physical Weathering of Stone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiro, M.; Ruiz-Agudo, E.; Rodriguez-Navarro, C.

    2010-12-01

    Salt weathering is recognized as an important mechanism that contributes to the modeling and shaping of the earth’s surface, in a range of environments spanning from the Sahara desert to Antarctica. It also contributes to the degradation and loss of cultural heritage, particularly carved stone and historic buildings. Soluble salts have recently been suggested to contribute to the shaping of rock outcrops on Mars and are being identified in other planetary bodies such as the moons of Jupiter (Europa and IO)1. Soluble salts such as sulfates, nitrates, chlorides and carbonates of alkali and alkali earth metals can crystallize within the porous system of rocks and building stones, exerting sufficient pressure against the pore walls to fracture the substrate. This physical damage results in increased porosity, thus providing a higher surface area for salt-enhanced chemical weathering. To better understand how salt-induced physical weathering occurs, we have studied the crystallization of the particularly damaging salt, sodium sulfate2, in a model system (a sintered porous glass of controlled porosity and pore size). For this elusive task of studying sub-surface crystallization in pores, we combined a variety of instruments to identify which phases crystallized during evaporation and calculated the supersaturation and associated crystallization pressure that caused damage. The heat of crystallization was measured using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), providing the timing of crystallization events and phase transitions3, while the evaporation rate was recorded using thermal gravimetry (TG). These methods enabled calculation of the sodium sulfate concentration in solution at every point during evaporation. Two-dimensional X-ray diffraction (2D-XRD) performs synchrotron-like experiments in a normal lab by using a Molybdenum X-ray source (more than 5 times more penetrative than conventional Copper source). Using this method, we determined that the first phase to form within our porous system was the metastable heptahydrate (NaSO4?7H2O)4, followed by mirabilite (NaSO4?10H2O), and finally thenardite (NaSO4). Combining this sequence with data from TG/DSC, we calculated the supersaturation of the solution with respect to each crystallizing phase as well as the associated crystallization pressure5. In situ environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) complemented 2D-XRD data by giving high magnification images of crystallization and phase transitions during dissolution/precipitation cycles. These results give us a clear understanding of sodium sulfate behavior during evaporative crystallization. Further studies will examine different salts and different substrates. This research will help us to better understand the crystallization of salts and associated weathering in cultural heritage, natural environments and possibly, in other planetary bodies. [1] Rodriguez-Navarro, C. (1998) Geophys. Res. Lett., 25, 3249-3252. [2] Rodriguez-Navarro, C., et al. (2000), Cement Concrete Res., 30, 1527-1534. [3] Espinosa, R., Scherer, G., (2008), Environ. Geol., 56, 605-621. [4] Hamilton, A., Hall, C., (2008), J. Anal. Atom. Spectrom., 23, 840-844. [5] Steiger, M., Asmussen, S., (2008), Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 72, 4291-4306.

  12. Ch.13 Weathering, Karst Landscapes, and Mass Movement

    E-print Network

    Pan, Feifei

    processes: Physical weathering and chemical weathering ! Physical weathering process, also called change, and stability. ! The internal and external countering processes act on landscapes simultaneously at different rates. #12;Differential weathering Delicate Arch, Arches National Park, Utah #12;Landscape System

  13. Concurrent Physical Aging and Polymer Degradation during Weathering of Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croll, Stuart; Fernando, Dilhan

    2006-03-01

    A polyester-urethane coating system was subjected to ``accelerated'' weathering cycles under UV light, elevated temperature and moisture (in a Q-Sun 1000® chamber). Cross-link density values obtained from high temperature modulus data demonstrated chain scission with increased exposure. However, increasing Tg and tensile modulus with weathering require an additional explanation to chemical degradation. Physical aging was explored to explain the behavior. Regular and modulated DSC analysis of the coating clearly shows increasing enthalpy recovery with increased weathering of the coating. Enthalpy recovery rate in degraded polymer films was much larger than in films that had only undergone the thermal component of exposure. An effort was also made to characterize the concurrent physical-chemical aging effects by tracking the changes in the non-linearity of the molecular relaxation times and the distribution of molecular relaxation times of the weathered coating. Understanding the physical relaxation properties of polymers subjected to accelerated weathering may help in resolving differences between natural weathering and accelerated weathering cycles, and also may be used to refine models for lifetime prediction of coatings.

  14. Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Stearns

    2008-10-25

    This is a first grade weather unit. SEASONS Fall Winter Build a Snowman Spring Summer What things determine and effect the weather? Cloud Precipitation Sunshine Temperature Visibility Wind Direction Wind Force WEATHER VIDEOS Tornado Hurricane Hail Lightning FUN AND GAMES Dress the Bear for the Weather The Great Weather Race Game Weather coloring books for kids ...

  15. Understanding Space Weather and the Physics Behind It

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knipp, D. J.; Gross, N. A.

    2011-12-01

    A new textbook on space weather, Understanding Space Weather and the Physics Behind It, aimed at upper-level undergraduates and beginning graduate students, contains numerous examples of basic physics applications in space weather. We will highlight a few of the examples from the text. In addition, new material is being developed to support the many references to NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) graphics and scales. Our intent is to provide background and improved understanding of the underpinnings of the operational images. In this presentation we provide a set of questions, tools, and exercises that guide inquiry into the observations and proxies behind some of elements on SWPC's home page. Our materials include observation sequences for the types of space weather disturbances discussed in SWPC's Report of Solar and Geophysical Activity and the NOAA Space Weather Scales. Our instructional materials are in standard electronic document formats and in "dashboard" format supported by tools from the Integrated Space Weather Analysis platform at NASA's Community Coordinated Modeling Center.

  16. Image processing for weather satellite cloud segmentation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. J. H. Leung; J. E. Jordan

    1995-01-01

    Image segmentation of weather satellite imagery is an important first step in an automated weather forecasting system. Accurate cloud extraction is also important in the determination of solar radiative transfer in atmospheric research, where satellite observations are used as inputs to global climate models to predict climatic change. Most of the current cloud extraction algorithms tend to be quite complicated

  17. Physical Origins of Space Weather Impacts: Open Physics Questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2011-12-01

    Beginning with the era of development of electrical telegraph systems in the early 19th century, physical processes in the space environment on the Sun, in the interplanetary medium, and around Earth have influenced the design and operations of ever-increasing and sophisticated technical systems, both in space and on the ground. Understanding of Earth's space environment has increased enormously in the last century and one-half. Nevertheless, many of the physical processes that produced effects on early cable and wireless technologies continue to plague modern-day systems. And as new technologies are developed for improved communications, surveillance, navigation, and conditions for human space flight, the solar-terrestrial environment often offers surprises to their safe, secure and uninterrupted operations. This talk will address some of the challenges that I see to the successful operations of some modern-day technical systems that are posed by significant deficiencies of understanding of physical processes operating from the Sun to the Earth.

  18. Enhancement of physical weathering of building stones by microbial populations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sophia Papida; William Murphy; Eric May

    2000-01-01

    Two limestones from Crete, Greece and a dolomite from Mansfield, UK were subjected to combined microbial and physical weathering simulation cycles, in an attempt to assess the contribution of each agent of decay. Sound stone discs were exposed to different temperature and wet\\/dry cycling regimes involving treatment with distilled water or solutions of sodium chloride or sodium sulphate. Before the

  19. Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Hendricks

    2007-12-06

    Introduction: How much do you know about weather? What kinds of weather do we have surrounding us? What is the weather like today? You may know a lot about weather already, you may not. Either way, you will learn more now as we take a look into what causes our weather and the methods we use to record and predict it. We will all become meteorologists, which are scientists who study the atmosphere and can predict weather. Put on your raincoats, and lets started! Task: You are the resident meteorologist at a local news station. It is your job to record and predict the weather each day, and then present it that night on the evening news. Not only should you be able to show the weather that we will be experiencing right ...

  20. Gombosi Receives 2013 Space Weather and Nonlinear Waves and Processes Prize: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Robert P.

    2014-08-01

    The Space Physics and Aeronomy section of AGU awards the Space Weather and Nonlinear Waves and Processes Prize to Tamas Gombosi of the University of Michigan. Gombosi, the founding director of the Center for Space Environment Modeling, has been a leader in space weather research, a visionary in space weather numerical modeling for several decades, and a pioneer of international space physics collaboration. Gombosi's major contributions to space weather include the development of the first time-dependent numerical model of the terrestrial polar wind and the creation of the BATS-R-US magnetohydrodynamic model, a powerful and versatile numerical tool widely used today for modeling the global geospace, the heliosphere, and the solar interior.

  1. Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) provides these two Websites on weather. The first site serves as a major hub for information related to weather, with links to primary data sources, forecasts, maps, images (such as the latest satellite imagery for North America), and a wealth of other data, including space weather. Researchers will also find links to national weather research centers and other related agencies.

  2. Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Miss Jennie

    2009-10-22

    What are the different types of weather? In this project you will compare different types of weather by drawing pictures and making it into a flip book. First you will begin by learning about the different types of weather. Read about each topic. Then get together with your partner and draw a picture of each type of weather. 1. Thunder storm Thunder storm Thunder storm Kids 2. Lightning Lightning Lightning picture 3. Tornado Tornadoes Tornado Kids 4. ...

  3. Sensitivity of mineral dissolution rates to physical weathering : A modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opolot, Emmanuel; Finke, Peter

    2015-04-01

    There is continued interest on accurate estimation of natural weathering rates owing to their importance in soil formation, nutrient cycling, estimation of acidification in soils, rivers and lakes, and in understanding the role of silicate weathering in carbon sequestration. At the same time a challenge does exist to reconcile discrepancies between laboratory-determined weathering rates and natural weathering rates. Studies have consistently reported laboratory rates to be in orders of magnitude faster than the natural weathering rates (White, 2009). These discrepancies have mainly been attributed to (i) changes in fluid composition (ii) changes in primary mineral surfaces (reactive sites) and (iii) the formation of secondary phases; that could slow natural weathering rates. It is indeed difficult to measure the interactive effect of the intrinsic factors (e.g. mineral composition, surface area) and extrinsic factors (e.g. solution composition, climate, bioturbation) occurring at the natural setting, in the laboratory experiments. A modeling approach could be useful in this case. A number of geochemical models (e.g. PHREEQC, EQ3/EQ6) already exist and are capable of estimating mineral dissolution / precipitation rates as a function of time and mineral mass. However most of these approaches assume a constant surface area in a given volume of water (White, 2009). This assumption may become invalid especially at long time scales. One of the widely used weathering models is the PROFILE model (Sverdrup and Warfvinge, 1993). The PROFILE model takes into account the mineral composition, solution composition and surface area in determining dissolution / precipitation rates. However there is less coupling with other processes (e.g. physical weathering, clay migration, bioturbation) which could directly or indirectly influence dissolution / precipitation rates. We propose in this study a coupling between chemical weathering mechanism (defined as a function of reactive area, solution composition, temperature, mineral composition) and the physical weathering module in the SoilGen model which calculates the evolution of particle size (used for surface area calculation) as influenced by temperature gradients. The solution composition in the SoilGen model is also influenced by other processes such as atmospheric inputs, organic matter decomposition, cation exchange, secondary mineral formation and leaching. We then apply this coupled mechanism on a case study involving 3 loess soil profiles to analyze the sensitivity of mineral weathering rates to physical weathering. Initial results show some sensitivity but not that dramatic. The less sensitivity was attributed to dominance of resistant primary minerals (> 70% quartz). Scenarios with different sets of mineralogy will be tested and sensitivity results in terms of silicate mineral dissolution rates and CO2-consumption will be presented in the conference. References Sverdrup H and Warfvinge P., 1993. Calculating field weathering rates using a mechanistic geochemical model PROFILE. Applied Geochemistry, 8:273-283. White, A.F., 2009. Natural weathering rates of silicate minerals. In: Drever, J.I. (Ed.), Surface and Ground Water, Weathering and Soils. In: Holland, H.D., Turekian, K.K. (Eds.), Treatise on Geochemistry. vol. 5. Elsevier-Pergamon, Oxford, pp. 133-168.

  4. Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Edheads offers a Macromedia Flash Player enhanced interactive module allowing students to predict the weather by examining weather maps. Through this website, users can become familiar with the concepts of warm and cold fronts, wind direction and speed, air pressure, and humidity. Teachers looking to incorporate this site in their classroom can check out the "Teacher's Guide" for helpful hints on using the site with students.

  5. Future L5 Missions for Solar Physics and Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchere, Frederic; Gopalswamy, Nat

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and corotating interaction regions (CIR) are the sources of intense space weather in the heliosphere. Most of the current knowledge on CMEs accumulated over the past few decades has been derived from observations made from the Sun-Earth line, which is not the ideal vantage point to observe Earth-affecting CMEs (Gopalswamy et al., 2011a,b). In this paper, the advantages of remote-sensing and in-situ observations from the Sun-Earth L5 point are discussed. Locating a mission at Sun-Earth L5 has several key benefits for solar physics and space weather: (1) off the Sun-Earth line view is critical in observing Earth-arriving parts of CMEs, (2) L5 coronagraphic observations can also provide near-Sun space speed of CMEs, which is an important input to models that forecast Earth-arrival time of CMEs, (3) backside and frontside CMEs can be readily distinguished even without inner coronal imagers, (4) preceding CMEs in the path of Earth-affecting CMEs can be identified for a better estimate of the travel time, (5) CIRs reach the L5 point a few days before they arrive at Earth, and hence provide significant lead time before CIR arrival, (6) L5 observations can provide advance knowledge of CME and CIR source regions (coronal holes) rotating to Earth view, and (7) magnetograms obtained from L5 can improve the surface magnetic field distribution used as input to MHD models that predict the background solar wind. The paper also discusses L5 mission concepts that can be achieved in the near future. References Gopalswamy, N., Davila, J. M., St. Cyr, O. C., Sittler, E. C., Auchère, F., Duvall, T. L., Hoeksema, J. T., Maksimovic, M., MacDowall, R. J., Szabo, A., Collier, M. R. (2011a), Earth-Affecting Solar Causes Observatory (EASCO): A potential International Living with a Star Mission from Sun-Earth L5 JASTP 73, 658-663, DOI: 10.1016/j.jastp.2011.01.013 Gopalswamy, N., Davila, J. M., Auchère, F., Schou, J., Korendyke, C. M. Shih, A., Johnston, J. C., MacDowall, R. J., Maksimovic, M., Sittler, E., et al. (2011b), Earth-Affecting Solar Causes Observatory (EASCO): a mission at the Sun-Earth L5, Solar Physics and Space Weather Instrumentation IV. Ed. Fineschi, S. & Fennelly, J., Proceedings of the SPIE, Volume 8148, article id. 81480Z, DOI: 10.1117/12.901538

  6. Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Caitlin

    2009-10-21

    In the project you will learn about thunderstorms and tornadoes and play a weather matching game. What exactly are thunderstorms and tornadoes? Use your T- chart to explain some facts about a thunderstorm and a tornado as we review each. T-Chart Begin by reviewing what a thunderstorm is and how they form. Thunderstorm information What is a thunderstorm? What are thunderstorms most likely to occur? What causes thunder? Next review what a tornado ...

  7. Development of Weather Processing System by Integrating Weather Data into GIS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sridhar Vadlapudi

    City decision-makers need the ability to integrate timely, accurate weather data into GIS analysis systems. First, one must understand the important relationship of GIS and Weather. GIS allows the user to electronically map and \\

  8. Van Allen Probes Science Gateway and Space Weather Data Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, G.; Barnes, R. J.; Weiss, M.; Fox, N. J.; Mauk, B.; Potter, M.; Kessel, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Van Allen Probes Science Gateway acts as a centralized interface to the instrument Science Operation Centers (SOCs), provides mission planning tools, and hosts a number of science related activities such as the mission bibliography. Most importantly, the Gateway acts as the primary site for processing and delivering the VAP Space Weather data to users. Over the past year, the web-site has been completely redesigned with the focus on easier navigation and improvements of the existing tools such as the orbit plotter, position calculator and magnetic footprint tool. In addition, a new data plotting facility has been added. Based on HTML5, which allows users to interactively plot Van Allen Probes summary and space weather data. The user can tailor the tool to display exactly the plot they wish to see and then share this with other users via either a URL or by QR code. Various types of plots can be created, including simple time series, data plotted as a function of orbital location, and time versus L-Shell. We discuss the new Van Allen Probes Science Gateway and the Space Weather Data Pipeline.

  9. Distinctive space weathering on Vesta from regolith mixing processes.

    PubMed

    Pieters, C M; Ammannito, E; Blewett, D T; Denevi, B W; De Sanctis, M C; Gaffey, M J; Le Corre, L; Li, J-Y; Marchi, S; McCord, T B; McFadden, L A; Mittlefehldt, D W; Nathues, A; Palmer, E; Reddy, V; Raymond, C A; Russell, C T

    2012-11-01

    The surface of the asteroid Vesta has prominent near-infrared absorption bands characteristic of a range of pyroxenes, confirming a direct link to the basaltic howardite-eucrite-diogenite class of meteorites. Processes active in the space environment produce 'space weathering' products that substantially weaken or mask such diagnostic absorption on airless bodies observed elsewhere, and it has long been a mystery why Vesta's absorption bands are so strong. Analyses of soil samples from both the Moon and the asteroid Itokawa determined that nanophase metallic particles (commonly nanophase iron) accumulate on the rims of regolith grains with time, accounting for an observed optical degradation. These nanophase particles, believed to be related to solar wind and micrometeoroid bombardment processes, leave unique spectroscopic signatures that can be measured remotely but require sufficient spatial resolution to discern the geologic context and history of the surface, which has not been achieved for Vesta until now. Here we report that Vesta shows its own form of space weathering, which is quite different from that of other airless bodies visited. No evidence is detected on Vesta for accumulation of lunar-like nanophase iron on regolith particles, even though distinct material exposed at several fresh craters becomes gradually masked and fades into the background as the craters age. Instead, spectroscopic data reveal that on Vesta a locally homogenized upper regolith is generated with time through small-scale mixing of diverse surface components. PMID:23128227

  10. Efficient Methods of Doppler Processing for Coexisting Land and Weather Clutter

    E-print Network

    Candan, Cagatay

    Efficient Methods of Doppler Processing for Coexisting Land and Weather Clutter C¸ a~gatay Candan@metu.edu.tr, aoyilmaz@metu.edu.tr Abstract--The joint suppression of returns from land and weather clutter is required in many radar applications. Although the optimal method of land-weather clutter suppression is known

  11. Physical process Mechanical mechanisms

    E-print Network

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    1 Physical process Generation · Mechanical mechanisms F = m·a · Electric/Magnetic mechanisms F = B·i·l · Fluid dynamic/Hydraulic mechanisms q, p, ij · Thermal/Optical #12;2 Source unit and source mechanisms ­ Monopoles......volume fluctuations ­ Dipoles ......pressure fluctuations

  12. Evidence for Physical Weathering of Iron Meteorite Meridiani Planum (Heat Shield Rock) on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, J. W.; McCoy, T. J.; Schröder, C.

    2009-12-01

    Meteorites on the surfaces of other solar system bodies can provide natural experiments for monitoring weathering processes. In the case of Mars, clues to the more subtle aspects of water occurrence and reaction may be revealed by the effects of highly sensitive aqueous alteration processes, while physical processes may be recorded through aeolian abrasion effects. Over the past 2000 sols, the two Mars Exploration Rover (MER) spacecraft have formally identified a minimum of 11 meteorite candidates [1-3], with many more unofficial candidates likely, posing an intriguing set of questions concerning their chemical, mineralogical, and morphological conditions. Five meteorite candidates, including the newly discovered MER-B rock Block Island, and one confirmed meteorite [Meridiani Planum (MP; originally Heat Shield Rock)] [4] have been investigated with the rover arm instruments. All contain levels of ferric iron, which should not be present in pristine samples (i.e. without fusion crust and/or alteration phases). Moreover, preliminary morphologic evidence contributes to the case of possible chemical weathering in Block Island. Scrutiny of a Microscopic Imager (MI) mosaic of MP shows clear evidence for both localized aeolian sculpting, and the Widmanstätten pattern common to sliced and acid-etched surfaces of many iron-nickel meteorites. These latter features are manifest as millimeter-sized chevrons and subparallel linearities, most prominent across a partially brushed surface approximately 3 x 2 cm in area. Similar patterns are observed on a number of hot and cold desert meteorites (e.g. Drum Mountain and Ft. Stockton), and are attributed to physical ablation by sand grains differentially weathering the kamacite and taenite lamellae within the rock. A similar or identical process is interpreted as responsible for the features observed in MP. Other macro-scale features on MP are of questionable weathering origin. While some prefer a regmaglypt interpretation for the cavities in MP, others question whether differential weathering (either aqueous or physical) of softer sulfide (troilite) nodules or other inclusions such as schreibersite [5] in the metal matrix may be at least partly responsible. A discontinuous coating of darker material, interpreted to be oxide (though it is uncertain whether this is relict fusion crust or weathering rind), appears in the MI images also to have been polished and sculpted by abrasive forces. Laboratory experiments designed to address the requirements for iron shaping by wind abrasion would help provide constraints on the wind velocities involved in these processes. Preliminary results for Block Island display many features that are also consistent with aeolian abrasion. References: [1] Schröder C. et al. (2008) JGR 113, E06S22, doi:10.1029/2007JE002990. [2] Ashley J. W. et al. (2009) LPSC XL. [3] Schröder C. et al. (2009) LPSC XL. [4] Connolly H.C.J. et al. (2006) Meteoritical Bulletin #90, Meteoritics and Planet Sci. 41(9): p. 1383-1418. [5] Fleischer I. et al. (2009) Meteoritics and Planet Sci. 44, p. A70.

  13. Assessing the Effects of Weather Conditions on Physical Activity Participation Using Objective Measures

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Catherine B.; Ryan, Daniel A.

    2009-01-01

    Habitual physical activity is an important determinant of health, yet many people are considered to be inactive. Identification of the obstacles to greater participation is necessary for the development of strategies to overcome those obstacles. The weather has been identified as a perceived barrier to participation in physical activity, but exactly which adverse weather conditions are most important, and the extent to which they contribute to decreases in physical activity have rarely been quantified in populations. In the past decade, a small number of studies have used publicly available databases to examine the quantitative effects of weather (e.g., temperature, precipitation, wind) on physical activity in children, adolescents and adults. This review examines our historical, qualitative versus emerging, quantitative understanding of how specific weather conditions affect a population’s activity. PMID:20054460

  14. Influence of cirrus clouds on weather and climate processes A global perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, K.-N.

    1986-01-01

    Current understanding and knowledge of the composition and structure of cirrus clouds are reviewed and documented in this paper. In addition, the radiative properties of cirrus clouds as they relate to weather and climate processes are described in detail. To place the relevance and importance of cirrus composition, structure and radiative properties into a global perspective, pertinent results derived from simulation experiments utilizing models with varying degrees of complexity are presented; these have been carried out for the investigation of the influence of cirrus clouds on the thermodynamics and dynamics of the atmosphere. In light of these reviews, suggestions are outlined for cirrus-radiation research activities aimed toward the development and improvement of weather and climate models for a physical understanding of cause and effect relationships and for prediction purposes.

  15. Book Review: Dolores Knipp’s Understanding Space Weather and the Physics Behind It

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldwin, Mark

    2012-08-01

    Delores Knipp's textbook Understanding Space Weather and the Physics Behind It provides a comprehensive resource for space physicists teaching in a variety of academic departments to introduce space weather to advanced undergraduates. The book benefits from Knipp's extensive experience teaching introductory and advanced undergraduate physics courses at the U.S. Air Force Academy. The fundamental physics concepts are clearly explained and are connected directly to the space physics concepts being discussed. To expand upon the relevant basic physics, current research areas and new observations are highlighted, with many of the chapters including contributions from a number of leading space physicists.

  16. Weathering processes implied from analysis of small Martian avalanche chutes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, R.

    1992-01-01

    It has been proposed that the smaller features of martian spur and gully slope morphology, located along the upper walls of Valles Marineris, are avalanche chutes. A three-dimensional stability back-analysis technique was developed and applied to these small avalanche chutes, yielding average values of cohesion and angle of internal friction for the mobile layer materials on these slopes at the time of each slope failure. Generally, the analysis showed that at the time of each slope failure material strengths had been reduced to those of moderately cohesive debris down through depths of tens of meters. These results have implications and possible constraints for the nature and rate of martian weathering processes.

  17. wradlib - an Open Source Library for Weather Radar Data Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaff, Thomas; Heistermann, Maik; Jacobi, Stephan

    2014-05-01

    Even though weather radar holds great promise for the hydrological sciences, offering precipitation estimates with unrivaled spatial and temporal resolution, there are still problems impeding its widespread use, among which are: almost every radar data set comes with a different data format with public reading software being available only rarely. standard products as issued by the meteorological services often do not serve the needs of original research, having either too many or too few corrections applied. Especially when new correction methods are to be developed, researchers are often forced to start from scratch having to implement many corrections in addition to those they are actually interested in. many algorithms published in the literature cannot be recreated using the corresponding article only. Public codes, providing insight into the actual implementation and how an approach deals with possible exceptions are rare. the radial scanning setup of weather radar measurements produces additional challenges, when it comes to visualization or georeferencing of this type of data. Based on these experiences, and in the hope to spare others at least some of these tedious tasks, wradlib offers the results of the author's own efforts and a growing number of community-supplied methods. wradlib is designed as a Python library of functions and classes to assist users in their analysis of weather radar data. It provides solutions for all tasks along a typical processing chain leading from raw reflectivity data to corrected, georeferenced and possibly gauge adjusted quantitative precipitation estimates. There are modules for data input/output, data transformation including Z/R transformation, clutter identification, attenuation correction, dual polarization and differential phase processing, interpolation, georeferencing, compositing, gauge adjustment, verification and visualization. The interpreted nature of the Python programming language makes wradlib an ideal tool for interactive data exploration and analysis. Based on the powerful scientific python stack (numpy, scipy, matplotlib) and in parts augmented by functions compiled in C or Fortran, most routines are fast enough to also allow data intensive re-analyses or even real-time applications. From the organizational point of view, wradlib is intended to be community driven. To this end, the source code is made available using a distributed version control system (DVCS) with a publicly hosted repository. Code may be contributed using the fork/pull-request mechanism available to most modern DVCS. Mailing lists were set up to allow dedicated exchange among users and developers in order to fix problems and discuss new developments. Extensive documentation is a key feature of the library, and is available online at http://wradlib.bitbucket.org. It includes an individual function reference as well as examples, tutorials and recipes, showing how those routines can be combined to create complete processing workflows. This should allow new users to achieve results quickly, even without much prior experience with weather radar data.

  18. Signal Processing Algorithms for the Terminal Doppler Weather Radar: Build 2

    E-print Network

    Cho, John Y. N.

    Signal Processing Algorithms for the Terminal Doppler Weather Radar: Build 2 February 21, 2010 John to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161 Signal Processing) was developed for the Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR), enhanced signal processing algorithms taking

  19. Multi-PRI Signal Processing for the Terminal Doppler Weather Radar. Part I: Clutter Filtering

    E-print Network

    Cho, John Y. N.

    Multi-PRI Signal Processing for the Terminal Doppler Weather Radar. Part I: Clutter Filtering JOHN (Cho et al. 2003). Multi-PRI signals can be processed to effectively sepa- rate different-trip weather Multiple pulse repetition interval (multi-PRI) transmission is part of an adaptive signal transmission

  20. Low-Frequency Weather and the Emergence of the Climate Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

    E-print Network

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    Low-Frequency Weather and the Emergence of the Climate S. Lovejoy Department of Physics, Mc, Paris, France Météo France, Paris, France We survey atmospheric variability from weather scales up quenched, leading to a scaling "low-frequency weather" regime extending out to c 10­100 years

  1. Low-Frequency Weather and the Emergence of the Climate Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

    E-print Network

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    Low-Frequency Weather and the Emergence of the Climate S. Lovejoy Department of Physics, Mc, Paris, France Meteo France, Paris, France We survey atmospheric variability from weather scales up are rapidly quenched, leading to a scaling "low-frequency weather" regime extending out to Le::::: 10

  2. Physical processes in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, F. L.; Huebner, W. F.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses physical processes in comets which involve solar and nuclear radial forces that affect the motions of gases and icy grains, gas-phase chemistry very close to the nuclei of large comets near the sun, sublimation of icy grains, dissociation of parent molecules into radicals and of radicals into atoms, and ionization by sunlight and collisions. The composition and dimensions of nuclei are examined along with variations in intrinsic brightness, the nature of volatiles, gas production rates in the coma, characteristics of icy grains in the coma, and the structure of streamers, ion tails, and dust tails. The structure of the coma is described in detail on the basis of spectroscopic observations of several comets. The origin of comets is briefly reviewed together with the relation of comets to earth, the interplanetary complex, and the interstellar medium. Desirable future observations are noted, especially by space missions to comets.

  3. Some Techniques for Three-dimensional Doppler Weather Radar Data Processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pu Zhang; Hong Shu; Yan Liu; Yang Li

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we develop some techniques for three- dimensional Doppler weather radar data processing. These techniques are mainly used for Doppler weather radar data preprocessing, data resampling, data storage, and data visualization. A median filter is employed to remove data singularity and make data smooth. Radar data in the spherical coordinate system is transformed into data in the Cartesian

  4. The Space Physics of Life: Searching for Biosignatures on Habitable Icy Worlds Affected by Space Weathering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.

    2006-01-01

    Accessible surfaces of the most likely astrobiological habitats (Mars, Europa, Titan) in the solar system beyond Earth are exposed to various chemical and hydrologic weathering processes directly or indirectly induced by interaction with the overlying space environment. These processes can be both beneficial, through provision of chemical compounds and energy, and destructive, through chemical dissociation or burial, to detectable presence of biosignatures. Orbital, suborbital, and surface platforms carrying astrobiological instrumentation must survive, and preferably exploit, space environment interactions to reach these habitats and search for evidence of life or its precursors. Experience from Mars suggests that any detection of biosignatures must be accompanied by characterization of the local chemical environment and energy sources including irradiation by solar ultraviolet photons and energetic particles from the space environment. Orbital and suborbital surveys of surface chemistry and astrobiological potential in the context of the space environment should precede targeted in-situ measurements to maximize probability of biosignature detection through site selection. The Space Physics of Life (SPOL) investigation has recently been proposed to the NASA Astrobiology Institute and is briefly described in this presentation. SPOL is the astrobiologically relevant study of the interactions and relationships of potentially? or previously inhabited, bodies of the solar system with the surrounding environments. This requires an interdisciplinary effort in space physics, planetary science, and radiation biology. The proposed investigation addresses the search for habitable environments, chemical resources to support life, and techniques for detection of organic and inorganic signs of life in the context of the space environment.

  5. Effect of Weathering Processes on Mineralogical and Mechanical Properties of Volcanic Rocks Used as Ballast Material for Railway Between Sabuncupinar and Kütahya in Western Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abiddin Erguler, Zeynal; Ad?güzel, Ömer; Derman, Mustafa

    2015-04-01

    Geomaterials used in engineering projects and man-made structures such as railway ballasts, buildings, historical structures, monuments and tombstones naturally weather as a result of various physico-chemical factors. Due to being long-term exposure to the anthroposphere, geomaterials used for these purposes provides important information to the researchers for understanding the effect of weathering processes on their time dependent physical, mineralogical and mechanical changes. Thus, researchers frequently can take advantage of available engineering time of man-made structures to assess weathering properties of the geomaterials used in their construction in terms of time dependent durability and stability of these structures. Considering the fact that railway ballasts produced from natural deposits of limestone, dolomite, granite, basalt etc., supply an important contribution for evaluation weathering processes, a research was carried out to determine the effect of weathering as a function of time on physical, mineralogical and mechanical properties of ballasts used for railway between Kütahya and Sabuncup?nar in western Turkey. For this purpose, fresh and weathered rock samples exposed to physical and chemical weathering processes at different times were collected from quarry located in Sabuncup?nar and nearby railway. This volcanic rock was previously classified as basalt based on the detailed mineralogical and geochemical analyses performed at the laboratories of the Mineral Research & Exploration General Directorate located in Ankara (Turkey). In-situ characteristics of sampling site were also investigated at different locations of quarry site by line surveying technique to describe the influence of discontinuity conditions on the weathering rate of selected rocks. Several techniques were utilized to determine time dependent deterioration in mineralogical and chemical composition of these samples for understanding their weathering rate. The porosity, water absorption by weight, weight loss after slake durability index and freezing-thawing tests and Los Angeles abrasion value of these samples subjected to weathering processes at different time intervals at field conditions were also determined to measure the time dependent resistance of collected ballast materials against natural weathering processes. When all results obtained from mineralogical and chemical analyses, field observations and further laboratory tests are considered, it can be concluded that collected ballast materials provide important information for understanding weathering rate of basalt. Furthermore, despite of being exposure to the anthroposphere for very long time, the very little water absorption content, resistance to extreme weather conditions and very angular characteristics of collected samples indicate that these previously used materials can still serve the purpose as ballast materials in accordance to related standards (TS 7043 and EN 13450).

  6. A reactive transport perspective on the links between physical erosion rates, fluid flow and chemical weathering rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, K.; Kouba, C. M.; Rosen, V. B.; Weinman, B. A.; Yoo, K.; Mudd, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    Chemical weathering rates are theoretically governed by the balance between the time that fluid spends in contact with the rock, or the fluid transit time, and the time required to reach chemical equilibrium. Physical erosion is expected to be the first order control on the chemical equilibrium timescale because the supply of fresh mineral increases the rate of approach to chemical equilibrium. In weathering environments where fluid transit times are long relative to the equilibrium timescale, chemical weathering rates should increase with increasing water flux (or runoff) because the concentration of weathering products is always fixed by chemical equilibrium. By extension, short fluid transit times and/or long chemical equilibrium times result in lower concentrations and a plateau in chemical weathering rates with increasing runoff. To assess the relationship between physical erosion and equilibrium time scales, we analyzed soil water, stream and gas compositions across multiple seasons along three hillslope transects in the Feather River Basin, California, with varying erosion rates but identical lithology, vegetation and climate. We use the depth gradients in solute profiles and mineral saturation states to assess the equilibrium length scales (the depth over which fluids reach chemical equilibrium), which can then be compared to the equilibrium and transit time scales based on water fluxes measured by chloride mass balance. Calculated equilibrium length scales increase from an average of 30-40 cm at high erosion rate transect, to 80 to 100 cm at lower erosion rates. At high erosion rates, the fluids reach chemical equilibrium in the soil zone, and there is little driving force for chemical weathering in the saprolite. At lower erosion rates, the equilibrium length scale extends into the saprolite, while minimal weathering occurs in the soil zone because of passivation of mineral surfaces by secondary minerals. Liquid saturation also increases with decreasing erosion rate—this may favor biological activity that further enhances weathering in the saprolite resulting in the high CO2 levels (ca. 2 to 5%) in the saprolite at low erosion rates. Across all three transects, chemical weathering rates are limited by the rate of fluid flow and not the rate of mineral supply: average infiltration rates are highest at the higher erosion rate transect, resulting in higher rates of chemical denudation. Thermodynamic limitation of chemical weathering rates is consistent with the streamwater concentrations, which show minimal variation with discharge (i.e. chemostatic behavior). A substantial reservoir of immobile solute, which is observed here to increase with increasing erosion rate, appears to play an important role in facilitating thermodynamic limitation. Collectively, these results support the theoretical model for solute production described above, and emphasize the importance of considering the thermodynamic limitations on chemical weathering rates that are set by the physical process of erosion and fluid flow.

  7. Application of LSS-decomposition in weather radar signal processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. S. Semenova; F. J. Yanovsky; I. V. Shelevytsky

    2012-01-01

    In this paper new approach for weather radar signal analysis and dangerous meteorological zones detection is discussed. It is based on time-frequency LSS decomposition. In order to provide reliable information about the object location and its intensity, the confidence intervals calculation is fulfilled.

  8. Processing satellite weather data: a status report - part I

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles L. Bristor

    1962-01-01

    Less than 500 radiosonde observations are available for the current twice daily three dimensional weather analysis over the Northern Hemisphere--a coverage far less than is required for short term advices and for input to numerical prediction computations. Global observations from operational satellites as a complement to existing data networks show promise of filling this need. TIROS computer programs now being

  9. Activity 3SOLAR PHYSICS AND TERRESTRIAL EFFECTS 59Space Weather Prediction Center

    E-print Network

    as the solar collection material. Ethylene glycol (antifreeze) might be used, or even a photovoltaic cell couldActivity 3SOLAR PHYSICS AND TERRESTRIAL EFFECTS 2+ 4= 59Space Weather Prediction Center Activity 3 Measuring the Solar Constant Purpose With this activity, we will let solar radiation raise the temperature

  10. Coupling of physical erosion and chemical weathering after phases of intense human activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonejans, Jerome; Vanacker, Veerle; Opfergelt, Sophie; Ameijeiras-Mariño, Yolanda; Kubik, Peter W.

    2014-05-01

    Anthropogenic disturbance of natural vegetation profoundly alters the lateral and vertical fluxes of soil nutrients and particles at the land surface. Human-induced acceleration of soil erosion can thereby result in an imbalance between physical erosion, soil production and chemical weathering. The (de-)coupling between physical erosion and chemical weathering in ecosystems with strong anthropogenic disturbances is not yet fully understood, as earlier studies mostly focused on natural ecosystems. In this study, we explore the chemical weathering intensity for four study sites located in the Internal Zone of the Spanish Betic Cordillera. Most of the sites belong to the Nevado-Filabres complex, but are characterized by different rates of long-term exhumation, 10Be catchment-wide denudation and hill slope morphology. Denudation rates are generally low, but show large variation between the three sites (from 23 to 246 mm kyr-1). The magnitude of denudation rates is consistent with longer-term uplift rates derived from marine deposits, fission-track measurements and vertical fault slip rates. Two to three soil profiles were sampled per study site at exposed ridge tops. All soils overly fractured mica schist, and are very thin (< 60cm). In each soil profile, we sampled 5 depth slices, rock fragments and the (weathered) bedrock. In total, 38 soil and 20 rock samples were analyzed for their chemical composition. The chemical weathering intensity is constrained by the Chemical Depletion Fraction that is based on a chemical mass balance approach using Zr as an immobile element. Chemical weathering accounts for 5 to 35% of the total mass lost due to denudation. We observe systematically higher chemical weathering intensities (CDFs) in sites with lower denudation rates (and vice versa), suggesting that weathering is supply-limited. Our measurements of soil elemental losses from 10 soil profiles suggest that the observed variation in chemical weathering is strongly associated with long-term 10Be derived denudation rates, and tectonic uplift rates. Our data do not provide direct evidence of an imbalance between soil production and chemical weathering, despite more than 2000 years of intense human activity.

  11. Gombosi Receives 2013 Space Weather and Nonlinear Waves and Processes Prize: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gombosi, Tamas

    2014-08-01

    It is a great honor to be the recipient of AGU's inaugural Space Weather and Nonlinear Waves and Processes Prize. I am truly humbled by this recognition because there are many other highly deserving colleagues in our research field.

  12. New Space Weather and Nonlinear Waves and Processes Prize announced for 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    At the 2011 Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif., AGU announced the creation of a new award: the Space Weather and Nonlinear Waves and Processes Prize. The prize, which is being made possible by a generous contribution from longtime AGU members and NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, scientists Bruce Tsurutani and Olga Verkhoglyadova, will recognize an AGU member scientist and will come with a $10,000 award. Tsurutani has served as a researcher with JPL since 1972 and is currently a senior research scientist. He was also the president of AGU's Space Physics and Aeronomy section from 1990 to 1992 and is a recipient of AGU's John Adam Fleming Medal, given “for original research and technical leadership in geomagnetism, atmospheric electricity, aeronomy, space physics, and related sciences.” Verkhoglyadova served as a professor of space physics in the Department of Astrophysics and Space Physics at Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, in the Ukraine, prior to coming to the United States. Their leadership and dedication to AGU and to their field are apparent in their passion for this prize.

  13. CHEMICAL WEATHERING AND SOLUTION CHEMISTRY IN ACID FOREST SOILS: DIFFERENTIAL INFLUENCE OF SOIL TYPE, BIOTIC PROCESSES, AND H+ DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the investigation, weathering rates were calculated for three eastern North American forest soils using five separate estimation techniques. In addition, leaching experiments were performed to examine the influence of selected environmental variables on the weathering process....

  14. Understanding space weather to shield society

    E-print Network

    Schrijver, Karel

    Understanding space weather to shield society Improving understanding and forecasts of space weather requires addressing scientific challenges within the network of physical processes that connect the Sun to society. The roadmap team identified the highest-priority areas within the Sun-Earth space-weather

  15. Association of Day Length and Weather Conditions with Physical Activity Levels in Older Community Dwelling People

    PubMed Central

    Witham, Miles D.; Donnan, Peter T.; Vadiveloo, Thenmalar; Sniehotta, Falko F.; Crombie, Iain K.; Feng, Zhiqiang; McMurdo, Marion E. T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Weather is a potentially important determinant of physical activity. Little work has been done examining the relationship between weather and physical activity, and potential modifiers of any relationship in older people. We therefore examined the relationship between weather and physical activity in a cohort of older community-dwelling people. Methods We analysed prospectively collected cross-sectional activity data from community-dwelling people aged 65 and over in the Physical Activity Cohort Scotland. We correlated seven day triaxial accelerometry data with daily weather data (temperature, day length, sunshine, snow, rain), and a series of potential effect modifiers were tested in mixed models: environmental variables (urban vs rural dwelling, percentage of green space), psychological variables (anxiety, depression, perceived behavioural control), social variables (number of close contacts) and health status measured using the SF-36 questionnaire. Results 547 participants, mean age 78.5 years, were included in this analysis. Higher minimum daily temperature and longer day length were associated with higher activity levels; these associations remained robust to adjustment for other significant associates of activity: age, perceived behavioural control, number of social contacts and physical function. Of the potential effect modifier variables, only urban vs rural dwelling and the SF-36 measure of social functioning enhanced the association between day length and activity; no variable modified the association between minimum temperature and activity. Conclusions In older community dwelling people, minimum temperature and day length were associated with objectively measured activity. There was little evidence for moderation of these associations through potentially modifiable health, environmental, social or psychological variables. PMID:24497925

  16. Geochemical balance of lateritization processes and climatic signatures in weathering profiles overlain by ferricretes in Central Africa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anicet Beauvais

    1999-01-01

    A simple geochemical balance of lateritization processes governing the development of several tens of meters of weathering profiles overlain by ferricretes is estimated on the basis of detailed mineralogical and geochemical data. The lateritic weathering mantle of the “Haut–Mbomou” area in Central Africa is composed of different weathering layers described from the base to the top of vertical profiles as

  17. TIMBER HARVESTING AND LONG-TERM PRODUCTIVITY: WEATHERING PROCESSES AND SOIL DISTURBANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Both timber harvesting and amelioration practices can cause chemical and physical changes in soil. hese changes can affect factors which alter soil mineral stability and weathering rates, potentially changing inputs to the nutrient cycle. his paper discusses possible effects of h...

  18. The Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment : A CubeSat for Space Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palo, Scott; Li, Xinlin; Gerhardt, David; Turner, Drew; Hoxie, V.; Kohnert, Rick; Batiste, Susan

    Energetic particles, electrons and protons either directly associated with solar flares or trapped in the terrestrial radiation belt, have a profound space weather impact. A National Science Foundation supported 3U CubeSat mission with a single instrument, Relativistic Electrons and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile), is proposed to address fundamental scientific questions relating to these high energy particles. Of key importance are the relation-ship between solar flares and energetic particles and the acceleration and loss mechanism of outer radiation belt electrons. REPTile, operating in a highly inclined low earth orbit, will measure differential fluxes of relativistic electrons in the energy range of 0.5-3.5 MeV and pro-tons in 10-40 MeV. The Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment cubesat will be designed, integrated and testing by students at the University of Colorado under the oversight of pro-fessional engineers with the Laboratory of Atmospheric and Space Physics who have extensive space hardware experience. Our design philosophy is to use commercially off the shelf (COTS) parts where available and only engage in detailed designed where COTS parts cannot meet the system needs. The top level science requirements for the mission have driven the system and subsystem level performance requirements and the specific design choices such as a passive magnetic attitude system and instrument design. In this paper we will present details of the CSSWE design and management approach. Specifically we will discuss the top level science requirements for the mission and show that these measurements are novel and will address open questions in the scientific community. The overall system architecture resulting from a flow-down of these requirements will be presented with a focus on the novel aspects of the system including the instrument design. Finally we will discuss how this project is organized and man-aged as part of the Department of Aerospace Engineering graduate projects course sequence along with the integration of professional engineers in the program. It is often underappreciated that the management of a student project, given the transient nature of the students in the program, is more challenging than many of the technical aspects. We will discuss our process to managing this project risk along with our pedagological philosophy for student learning and its relationship to a small satellite program.

  19. Interstellar Dust: Physical Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, A. P.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    1993-01-01

    Dust is formed in stellar environments, and destroyed by sputtering, shattering and vaporization in shock waves due to cloud-cloud collisions and supernova blast waves. Dust is also destroyed during star formation. We review the dust formation and destruction balance. The calculated destruction time-scale is less than or equal to one billion years and the star dust injection time-scale is approx. 2.5 billion years. Hence, the fractions of elemental carbon and silicon locked up in stardust are less than 0.3 and less than 0.15, respectively. An efficient ISM dust formation route is therefore implied. In particular, in dense clouds dust grows; through the processes of coagulation and the accretion of gas phase molecules e.g. H20, CO, CH4. These icy materials may then be photoprocessed to refractory materials in more diffuse regions. The resulting carbonaceous grain mantle may actually be the glue that holds the coagulated grains together.

  20. Leaching process of rare earths from weathered crust elution-deposited rare earth ore

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jun TIAN; Ru-an CHI; Jing-qun YIN

    2010-01-01

    In order to strengthen the leaching procedure, the chemical processes of leaching rare earths (RE) from the weathered crust elution-deposited rare earth ore were investigated frow the viewpoints of kinetics, hydrodynamic and mass transfer. The results show that the leaching hydrodynamics follows the Darcy law. The leaching kinetics can be described by the shrinking core model; the leaching process is

  1. Sun, weather, and climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.; Goldberg, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The general field of sun-weather/climate relationships, that is, apparent weather and climate responses to solar activity is introduced and theoretical and experimental suggestions for further research to identify and investigate the unknown causal mechanisms are provided. Topics of discussion include: (1) solar-related correlation factors and energy sources; (2) long-term climatic trends; (3) short-term meteorological correlations; (4) miscellaneous obscuring influences; (5) physical processes and mechanisms; (6) recapitulation of sun-weather relationships; and (7) guidelines for experiments.

  2. Chemical weathering processes in the Yalong River draining the eastern Tibetan Plateau, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Si-Liang; Chetelat, Benjamin; Yue, Fujun; Zhao, Zhiqi; Liu, Cong-Qiang

    2014-07-01

    To better understand chemical weathering and controlling processes in the Yalong River of the eastern Tibetan Plateau, this study presents major ion concentrations and stable isotopes of the dissolved loads. The isotopic compositions (?13C-DIC, ?34S and ?18O-SO4) of the dissolved loads are very useful to quantify solute sources and define the carbon budget related with chemical weathering in riverine systems. The isotopic composition of sulphate demonstrates that most of the sulphate is derived from sulphide oxidation, particularly in the upper reach of the Yalong River. The correlations between ?13C-DIC, water chemistry and isotopes of sulphate, suggest that the carbon dynamics are mainly affected by carbonate weathering by sulphuric acid and equilibration processes. Approximately 13% of the dissolved inorganic carbon in the Yalong River originates from carbonate weathering by strong acid. The CO2 consumption rates are estimated to be 2.8 × 105 mol/km2/yr and 0.9 × 105 mol/km2/yr via carbonate and silicate weathering in the Yalong River, respectively. In this study, the influence of sulphide oxidation and metamorphic CO2 on the carbon budget is estimated for the Yalong River draining the eastern Tibetan Plateau.

  3. Working Process Development For Weathering Degree Mapping Of Stone Monument Using Reflectance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, C.; Park, H.

    2008-12-01

    Most stone monuments have been weathered on the field with exposure of rain and wind during hundreds or thousands years. Reflectance spectroscopy can be applied to assess weathering degree of those stone monuments composed of granite which is the most general material of stone monument in Korea. Weathering degree was analyzed by using reflected and transmitted electromagnetic energy based on the theory of reflectance spectroscopy on the surface of rock to identify rock forming minerals using their diagnostic spectral absorption features. This method could be used as an improved nondestructive assessment method compared with conventional subjective and qualitative assessment methods. We tested feasibility of this technique for actual granite stone monuments. Granite is generally composed of quartz, feldspars and micas. Feldspars are changed to clay minerals such as kaolinite and illite after weathering process. Biotite of mica produce iron oxides which induce color changes on surface of rocks. The experiments were conducted using field spectrometer FieldSpec®3 of ASD Inc. and the range of measurement was form 350µm to 2500µm wavelength. Spectral reflectance of weathering products at each measuring point was processed by removing delineated convex hull from raw reflectance curves to exclude background effects and to extract quantitative absorption depths which indicate relative distribution degree of weathering products. We produced deterioration map on the surface of the monument by interpolating absorption depth values of each point with consideration of spatial distribution of measurements. For facilitation of practical uses a chain of working process of this method was designed using whole experimental processes.

  4. Two-dimensional gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, physical property modeling and automated production of component maps to assess the weathering of pollutants.

    PubMed

    Antle, Patrick M; Zeigler, Christian D; Livitz, Dimitri G; Robbat, Albert

    2014-10-17

    Local conditions influence how pollutants will weather in subsurface environments and sediment, and many of the processes that comprise environmental weathering are dependent upon these substances' physical and chemical properties. For example, the effects of dissolution, evaporation, and organic phase partitioning can be related to the aqueous solubility (SW), vapor pressure (VP), and octanol-water partition coefficient (KOW), respectively. This study outlines a novel approach for estimating these physical properties from comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC×GC/MS) retention index-based polyparameter linear free energy relationships (LFERs). Key to robust correlation between GC measurements and physical properties is the accurate and precise generation of retention indices. Our model, which employs isovolatility curves to calculate retention indices, provides improved retention measurement accuracy for families of homologous compounds and leads to better estimates of their physical properties. Results indicate that the physical property estimates produced from this approach have the same error on a logarithmic-linear scale as previous researchers' log-log estimates, yielding a markedly improved model. The model was embedded into a new software program, allowing for automated determination of these properties from a single GC×GC analysis with minimal model training and parameter input. This process produces component maps that can be used to discern the mechanism and progression of how a particular site weathers due to dissolution, organic phase partitioning, and evaporation into the surrounding environment. PMID:25223613

  5. Physical and chemical weathering rates and CO 2 consumption in a tropical lateritic environment: the upper Niger basin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-Loup Boeglin; Jean-Luc Probst

    1998-01-01

    The chemical composition of Niger river water measured bimonthly at Bamako (Mali) during the period 1990–1992 provides an estimate of present weathering rates in the upper Niger basin. The dominant weathering process is kaolinite formation (`monosiallitization'). However, seasonal variations promote gibbsite formation in the rainy season (September) and smectite development in the dry season (May). The results show that lateritic

  6. Pb isotope systematics in volcanic river system: Constraints about weathering processes

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Pb isotope systematics in volcanic river system: Constraints about weathering processes Ph. NEGREL.negrel@brgm.fr, r.millot@brgm.fr, e.petelet@brgm.fr, We present a series of lead isotopes in soils and sediments, as witnessed by lead isotopic variations in conjunction with Rb/La ratios and lead contents. Using Pb isotope

  7. Natural arsenic contamination of Holocene alluvial aquifers by linked tectonic, weathering, and microbial processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Saunders; M.-K. Lee; A. Uddin; S. Mohammad; Richard T. Wilkin; Mostafa Fayek; Nic E. Korte

    2005-01-01

    Linked tectonic, geochemical, and biologic processes lead to natural arsenic contamination of groundwater in Holocene alluvial aquifers, which are the main threat to human health around the world. These groundwaters are commonly found a long distance from their ultimate source of arsenic, where chemical weathering of As-bearing minerals occurs. We propose a “GBH-As” model that ties together all of the

  8. Processes within Earth's atmosphere control hazardous weather events such as hurricanes and droughts, and contribute to

    E-print Network

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    spacecraft in low-Earth orbit, each carrying a compact GPS Radio Occultation (GPS-RO) sensor that measures/NASA) Quick Facts Launch date: October 2014 Launch location: TBD Mission target: Low-Earth orbit PrimaryProcesses within Earth's atmosphere control hazardous weather events such as hurricanes

  9. Shenandoah National Park Phenology Project-Weather data collection, description, and processing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, John W.; Aiello, Danielle P.; Osborne, Jesse D.

    2010-01-01

    The weather data described in this document are being collected as part of a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) study of changes in Shenandoah National Park (SNP) landscape phenology (Jones and Osbourne, 2008). Phenology is the study of the timing of biological events, such as annual plant flowering and seasonal bird migration. These events are partially driven by changes in temperature and precipitation; therefore, phenology studies how these events may reflect changes in climate. Landscape phenology is the study of changes in biological events over broad areas and assemblages of vegetation. To study climate-change relations over broad areas (at landscape scale), the timing and amount of annual tree leaf emergence, maximum foliage, and leaf fall for forested areas are of interest. To better link vegetation changes with climate, weather data are necessary. This report documents weather-station data collection and processing procedures used in the Shenandoah National Park Phenology Project.

  10. AN URBAN WEATHER GENERATOR COUPLING BUILDING SIMULATIONS WITH A PHYSICALLY BASED URBAN MODEL

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruno Bueno Unzeta; Leslie K. Norford; Rex Britter

    Building simulation programs predict the thermal performance of buildings under certain weather conditions. Weather information is usually taken from an available weather data file obtained from the closest meteorological station. However, the differences between the local urban climate and the conditions at the closest meteorological station can lead to inaccurate building simulation results. This paper presents an Urban Weather Generator

  11. A New Multi-Wavelength Synoptic Network for Solar Physics and Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Frank; Roth, Markus; Thompson, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Continuous solar observations are important for many research topics in solar physics, such as magnetic field evolution, flare and CME characteristics, and p-mode oscillation measurements. In addition, space weather operations require constant streams of solar data as input. The deployment of a number of identical instruments around the world in a network has proven to be a very effective strategy for obtaining nearly continuous solar observations. The financial costs of a network are 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than space-based platforms; network instrumentation can be easily accessed for maintenance and upgrades; and telemetry bandwidth is readily available. Currently, there are two solar observing networks with consistent instruments: BiSON and GONG, both designed primarily for helioseismology. In addition, GONG has been augmented with continual magnetic field measurements and H-alpha imagery, with both being used for space weather operational purposes. However, GONG is now 18 years old and getting increasingly more challenging to maintain. There are also at least three scientific motivations for a multi-wavelength network: Recent advances in helioseismology have demonstrated the need for multi-wavelength observations to allow more accurate interpretation of the structure and dynamics below sunspots. Vector magnetometry would greatly benefit from multi-wavelength observations to provide height information and resolve the azimuthal ambiguity. Finally, space weather operations always need a consistent reliable source of continual solar data. This presentation will outline the scientific need for a multi-wavelength network, and discuss some concepts for the design of the instrumentation. A workshop on the topic will be held in Boulder this April.

  12. Deducing Weathering Processes Using Silicon Isotopes in the Ganges Alluvial Plain, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frings, P.; De La Rocha, C. L.; Fontorbe, G.; Chakrapani, G.; Clymans, W.; Conley, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Ganges Alluvial Plain ('GAP') is the sedimentary infill of the foreland basin created during Himalayan orogeny. Freshly eroded material from the Himalaya and southern cratonic tributaries is deposited into a system with long water-sediment interaction times, creating potential for further generation of river weathering fluxes. To quantify weathering processes in the GAP, 51 sites including all major tributaries were sampled in a September 2013 campaign and analysed for major and minor ions, Ge/Si ratios and ?30Si, ?13C and ?18O. Net dissolved Si (DSi) and major cation yields are 2 to 5 times lower in the GAP than the Himalaya, and at a whole basin scale approximate the global average, indicating that the plain apparently moderates the efficiency of Himalayan weathering rates. Mainstem ?30Si spans 0.81 to 1.93‰ (see figure) and gives the impression of a system buffered to moderate DSi and ?30Si. Ge/Si ratios (µmol/mol) are higher than expected in the Himalaya (>3), reflecting input of Ge-enriched water from hot springs, and decline to ~1.4 in the GAP. For the Himalayan sourced rivers, ?30Si increases with distance from the Himalayan front, and can not be explained entirely by conservative mixing with higher ?30Si peninsular and GAP streams. To a first degree, the ?30Si data suggest incorporation of Si into secondary minerals as the key fractionating process, and that this occurs both in situ during initial weathering and progressively in the GAP. Partitioning of solutes between sources is complicated in the GAP. Consistent with previous work, carbonate weathering dominates the ion fluxes, but with substantial contributions from saline/alkaline soil salts, the chlorination of wastewater and highly variable rainfall chemistry. Due to these contributions, precisely inferring the input from silicate weathering is difficult. We introduce a novel method to infer silicate-weathering rates that exploits the fractionation of Si during clay formation to account for the loss of DSi from solution.

  13. Inclusions in precious Australian opals offer a unique access to Martian-like weathering processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Gemma; Rey, Patrice; Carter, Elizabeth

    2015-04-01

    Spectral signatures of the surface of Mars indicate a variety of hydrated minerals, including Al- and Fe/Mg-rich phyllosilicates, iron oxides, sulfates, and opaline silica. Their formation has been attributed to a long-lived low-temperature aqueous weathering history (e.g. Bishop et al., 2008; Ehlmann et al., 2013) followed by a period of intense acidic oxidative weathering (e.g. Carter et al., 2013). Very acidic weathering, driven by volcanic-derived sulfuric acid, is possible on a regional scale on Mars because of the lack of carbonate. On Earth, however, low-pH weathering on a regional scale is unusual because of the abundance of carbonate. Finding regional-scale Martian analogues on Earth is therefore a challenge. The Great Artesian Basin (GAB) in central Australia formed during the Early Cretaceous from the deposition of pyrite-rich volcaniclastic sediments in a cold, muddy, anoxic and shallow continental sea. Following mid-Cretaceous sea regression, a deep (~100 m) weathering profile recorded a protracted episode (~from 97 to 60 Ma) of oxidative weathering during continuous uplift and denudation, which stopped 60 myr ago. Since then, the weathering profile, which consists of Al- and Fe-rich phyllosilicates, iron oxides, and sulfates, has been constantly reworked. Interestingly, this profile hosts the bulk of the world's precious opal deposits. Since no opal deposit can be found in post-60 Ma rock formations, it is most likely that opal is part of the weathering profile developed during the drying out of central Australia. We analysed the mineral inclusions from six opal samples from the GAB to better document the early oxidative weathering. Using VNIR and Raman spectroscopy we were able to identify a variety of minerals including ferrihydrite, barite, gypsum and alunite replaced by goethite. This mineralogical assemblage is indicative of acidic oxidative conditions that points to Martian-like acidic weathering. We propose that acidity was derived from the oxidation of biogenic pyrite, and that the quasi absence of carbonates allowed very acidic conditions to take hold at a regional scale. If this model is valid, central Australia may be one of the best terrestrial analogues for the understanding of some of Mars' weathering processes. References Bishop, J.L., Noe Dobrea, E.Z., McKeown, N.K., Parente, M., Ehlmann, B.L., Michalski, J.R., Milliken, R.E., Poulet, F., Swayze, G.A., Mustard, J.F., Murchie, S.L. and Bibring, J.-P. (2008): Phyllosilicate Diversity and Past Aqueous Activity Revealed at Mawrth Vallis, Mars, Science 321(5890), 830-833. Carter, J., Poulet, F., Bibring, J.-P., Mangold, N., Murchie, S. (2013): Hydrous minerals of Mars as seen by the CRISM and OMEGA imaging spectrometer: Updated global view, Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets 118, 831-858. Ehlmann, B. L., Berger, G., Mangold, N., Michalski, J. R., Catling, D. C., Ruff, S. W., Chassefière, E., Niles, P. B., Chevrier, V., Poulet, F. (2013): Geochemical Consequences of Widespread Clay Minerals Formation in Mars' Ancient Crust, Space Science Review 174, 329-364.

  14. Experimental simulations of the physical weathering of a rhyolitic glaciovolcanic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vet, Sebastiaan; Mittelmeijer-Hazeleger, Marjo; Braakhekke, Jochem; Cammeraat, Erik

    2013-04-01

    Hyaloclastites are a common eruption product formed during subglacial eruptions. These glassy materials are often found in periglacial environments and they are highly abundant in the environments in Iceland and on planet Mars. Physical weathering results therefore primarily from freeze-thaw cycles and abrasion during aeolian transport. We studied various facets of the mechanical modification of these materials using a fresh rhyolitic hyaloclastite from the Bláhnúkur edifice in Torfajökull (Iceland). Experiments were set up to simulate the environmental conditions during freeze-thaw cycles. Physico-mechanical properties were measured for understanding scale effects from freezing of water inside pores and tensile strengths from volumetric expansion of ice. Fracturing was found to occur primarily by crystallisation inside larger vesicles and interparticle pore spaces, whereas surface pores only marginally contributed to superficial crack propagation. Experimental simulations of aeolian abrasion consisted of tumbling sand-sized particles for 15 weeks (equivalent to transport distances of >500 km) in rotating drums. Compared to the effects of ice-induced weathering, abrasion only leads to marginal textural alterations. Larger, centimetre-sized components in glassy breccias are therefore considered to be most susceptible to the destructive effects of periglacial environments and contribute the most to the formation of new sandy textures.

  15. Effects on Climate Records of Changes in National Weather Service Humidity Processing Procedures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William P. Elliott; Rebecca J. Ross; Barry Schwartz

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. National Weather Service has recently corrected an error in radiosonde humidity data reduction algorithms, eliminated a sonde thats processing contained another error, and recently made a further change in the humidity data reduction algorithm. They also introduced new procedures for reporting humidity from radiosondes. These changes will affect the climate records of U.S. upper-air humidity. Because the changes

  16. Automatic processing, quality assurance and serving of real-time weather data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Matthew; Cornford, Dan; Bastin, Lucy; Jones, Richard; Parker, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    Recent advances in technology have produced a significant increase in the availability of free sensor data over the Internet. With affordable weather monitoring stations now available to individual meteorology enthusiasts, a reservoir of real time data such as temperature, rainfall and wind speed can now be obtained for most of the world. Despite the abundance of available data, the production of usable information about the weather in individual local neighbourhoods requires complex processing that poses several challenges. This paper discusses a collection of technologies and applications that harvest, refine and process this data, culminating in information that has been tailored toward the user. In this instance, this allows a user to make direct queries about the weather at any location, even when this is not directly instrumented, using interpolation methods provided by the INTAMAP project. A simplified example illustrates how the INTAMAP web processing service can be employed as part of a quality control procedure to estimate the bias and residual variance of user contributed temperature observations, using a reference standard based on temperature observations with carefully controlled quality. We also consider how the uncertainty introduced by the interpolation can be communicated to the user of the system, using UncertML, a developing standard for uncertainty representation.

  17. Si transfers during Archean weathering processes traced by silicon isotopes and Ge/Si ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delvigne, Camille; Opfergelt, Sophie; Hofmann, Axel; Cardinal, Damien; André, Luc

    2015-04-01

    Weathering conditions in the Mesoarchean are poorly constrained. Recent advances in analytical capabilities have added Si isotopes and Ge/Si ratios to the repertoire of tracers used in the study of soil formation processes: neoformation of secondary clay minerals is associated with large Si isotope and Ge/Si fractionation in response to desilication processes and the weathering degree [1, 2, 3, 4]. Here we combine Si isotopes and Ge/Si ratios of a Mesoarchean paleosol (~2.95 Ga) and of nearly coeval but younger shales as proxies of weathering processes and Si mass transfer at the early Earth's surface. The paleosol is developed on andesite and shows a well defined mineralogical and chemical differentiation. In a first step, similar to modern soils, neoformation of secondary clay minerals in the paleosol was associated with fractionation of Si isotopes and Ge/Si ratios in response to chemical weathering degree and soil desilication. In a second step, the loss of Fe(II)-rich minerals, likely Fe-rich smectites, due to low pO2 conditions produced additional control on Si and Ge mobilities. Opposite fractionation behaviors are observed: products of desilication acted as 28Si and Ge sink while the leaching of Fe(II)-rich minerals released 28Si and Ge to soil solutions. Furthermore, the shales deposited immediately after the paleosol display ?30Si and Ge/Si compositions which may be explained as mixtures of the recognized Archean paleosols components. Their recording within the sedimentary pile suggests that the observed weathering-induced desilication might have been widely effective during the Mesoarchean as well as Fe(II)-rich minerals leaching in a lesser extent and pointing out these processes as determinant in the Si transfers from continents to hydrosphere. [1] Kurtz et al., (2002) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 66, 1525-1537 [2] Ziegler et al., (2005) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 69, 4597-4610. [3] Opfergelt et al., (2010) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 74, 225-240. [4] Steinhoefel et al., (2011) Chem. Geol. 286, 280-289.

  18. Gravestone Weathering

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Leanne Wiberg

    2000-01-01

    In this activity (located on pages 9-14 of PDF), learners visit a cemetery to examine the distinguishing characteristics of rock weathering. After researching stone weathering and acid rain, learners apply their knowledge to collect data related to chemical decomposition and physical disintegration at a cemetery site. This detailed lesson guide includes tips for educators, pre/post activity suggestions, hands-outs, and background information.

  19. Reconfigurable data acquisition system for weather radar applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rishi Khasgiwale; Luko Krnan; Atchuthan Perinkulam; Russell Tessier

    2005-01-01

    Tornado, hazardous weather and flood detection radars demand high-throughput, high-speed data acquisition and processing. Weather-processing systems need to be capable of implementing powerful signal processing algorithms on the raw data collected by the radars. Following processing, data is distributed to the end-user in real-time for timely and accurate detection of imminent weather disasters. Since physical accessibility to such systems is

  20. Generation of abnormal trace element abundances in Antarctic eucrites by weathering processes

    SciTech Connect

    Mittlefehldt, D.W. (Lockheed ESC, Houston, TX (USA)); Lindstrom, M.M. (NASA/Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Based on REEs, Antarctic eucrites can be divided into two groups: those showing normal trace element characteristics and those showing abnormal trace element abundances. Many Antarctic eucrite, polymict eucrite, and basaltic clast samples show the abnormal trace element abundances with REE patterns exhibiting positive Ce anomalies, positive Eu anomalies, and low abundances of the remainder of the REEs, with the LREEs generally being at lower relative abundances than the HREEs. We believe the unusual REE patterns of abnormal Antarctic eucrites arise from weathering effects generated in or on the Antarctic ice. Our suggested scenario involves formation of melt water and its equilibration in or on the Antarctic ice. Our suggested scenario involves formation of melt water and its equilibration with the atmosphere which promotes dissolution of REE-rich phosphates and oxidation of Ce. Tetravalent CE can then be fractionated from the trivalent REE in solution. The details of the weathering process are unclear and will require detailed chemical and SEM investigations of eucrites for their elucidation. We predict that rapidly chilled eucrites with glassy, rather than crystalline, mesostates will be more likely to survive the Antarctic environment without alteration of their REE patterns. Occasional S, Se, and K enrichments are likely due to weathering in the Antarctic environment as well, but these enrichments are not well correlated with Ce anomalies.

  1. Some topics on geochemistry of weathering: a review.

    PubMed

    Formoso, Milton L L

    2006-12-01

    Weathering is a complex process comprising physical disaggregation, chemical and biological decomposition of rocks and minerals transforming complex structure minerals in simpler ones. Hydrolysis of silicates is perhaps the most important process but associated certainly to biological weathering. It is discussed the role ofwaters: activities/concentrations of chemical species, pH, Eh, importance of complexes. Weathering is not only a destructive process. It can concentrate chemical species and form mineral deposits (kaolin, bauxite, Fe, Mn, P, Nb, Au). Weathering studies are important in pedology, engineering geology, hydrogeology, paleoclimatology and ecology. The use of stonemeal is based upon the study of rock weathering. PMID:17143414

  2. Characterization of an Antarctic Mars Analog Soil and Implications for Martian Weathering Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdam, A. C.; Leshin, L. A.; Sharp, T. G.; Harvey, R. P.; Farquhar, J.

    2005-12-01

    Terrestrial analogs can be used to gain insight into potential martian weathering processes and the role of water in the near-surface environment. We are investigating the mineralogy and chemical properties of a fine size fraction of a soil weathered from the Ferrar Dolerite. The soil was collected near Lewis Cliff in the Transantarctic Mountains. The Ferrar exhibits mineralogical similarities to martian basaltic lithologies, as represented by the shergottites [Harvey, 2001]. Production of fines from this parent rock in the cold, arid Antarctic makes the fines a promising Mars analog material. The analog soil fines have been studied with SEM/EDS, IR spectroscopy, XRD, TEM, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. XRD-derived semi-quantitative mineral abundances reveal that the Antarctic fines contain ~30% primary phases (plagioclase feldspar, pyroxenes, a small amount of quartz) and ~70% secondary phases (clays and clay-like mineraloids, zeolites, and ~50% calcium sulfates). The fines' thermal IR spectrum revealed silicate, bound water and sulfate features, consistent with the XRD-derived mineralogy. The significant amount of secondary phases present indicate that even in the Earth's coldest, driest environment, there is enough water and energy to weather some primary minerals. Atmospheric sulfate aerosols may have been important in producing the fines' abundant sulfate salts. Oxygen isotope studies of Antarctic Dry Valleys sulfates have revealed a ?17O anomaly, which suggests the sulfates are not just from sea salt (?17O =0) but also from atmospheric oxidation of gaseous sulfur compounds (e.g. marine biogenic dimethylsulfide) [e.g. Bao et al., 2000]. The anomaly implies that atmospheric sulfur aerosols interact with rocks and soils in Antarctica, similar to the acid fog model for martian weathering [e.g. Banin et al. 1997]. We have obtained an average ?17O value of +1.67±0.05‰ for the sulfates in the Antarctic fines being investigated here. This indicates that, in this Lewis Cliff soil as well, some of the sulfate in sulfate salts was contributed from atmospheric sources. Also, several clay-like aggregate particles examined contain sulfur. Iron oxides and clays in soils can absorb sulfate anions [e.g. Parfitt and Smart, 1978]. TEM work has revealed that many particles are clays or clay-like mineraloids, which exhibit a range of crystallinity and stacking disorder, or aggregates of these. While some particles were well crystalline clays or amorphous secondary products, most clay-like particles exhibited short-range order. Also, gypsum, primary minerals and particles in which secondary minerals are associated with primary minerals were observed. The presence of particles consisting of clay minerals and mineraloids of varying crystallinity and layer orientation, or aggregates of these, indicates that the Antarctic environment does not preclude significant chemical weathering, but it is consistent with limited water availability. Using the diverse dataset produced by applying multiple techniques, the characteristics of the fines support the hypothesis that chemical weathering products were produced by interaction of acidic aerosols with soils and rocks. Additional alteration by small amounts of water (e.g. thin water films) is also a likely contributor to the weathering process.

  3. Weathering and weathering rates of natural stone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Erhard M.

    1987-06-01

    Physical and chemical weathering were studied as separate processes in the past. Recent research, however, shows that most processes are physicochemical in nature. The rates at which calcite and silica weather by dissolution are dependent on the regional and local climatic environment. The weathering of silicate rocks leaves discolored margins and rinds, a function of the rocks' permeability and of the climatic parameters. Salt action, the greatest disruptive factor, is complex and not yet fully understood in all its phases, but some of the causes of disruption are crystallization pressure, hydration pressure, and hygroscopic attraction of excess moisture. The decay of marble is complex, an interaction between disolution, crack-corrosion, and expansion-contraction cycies triggered by the release of residual stresses. Thin spalls of granites commonly found near the street level of buildings are generally caused by a combination of stress relief and salt action. To study and determine weathering rates of a variety of commercial stones, the National Bureau of Standards erected a Stone Exposure Test Wall in 1948. Of the many types of stone represented, only a few fossiliferous limestones permit a valid measurement of surface reduction in a polluted urban environment.

  4. Physical Processes in Earth and Environmental Sciences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mike Leeder; Marta Pérez-Arlucea

    2006-01-01

    This book provides a sound introduction to the basic physical processes that dominate the workings of the Earth, its atmosphere and hydrosphere. It systematically introduces the physical processes involved in the Earth's systems without assuming an advanced physics or mathematical background.

  5. Space-weathering processes and products on volatile-rich asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britt, D.; Schelling, P.; Consolmagno, G.; Bradley, T.

    2014-07-01

    Space weathering is a generic term for the effects on atmosphereless solid bodies in the solar system from a range of processes associated with direct exposure to the space environment. These include impact processes (shock, vaporization, fragmentation, heating, melting, and ejecta formation), radiation damage (from galactic and solar cosmic rays), solar-wind effects (irradiation, ion implantation, and sputtering), and the chemical reactions driven by these processes. The classic example of space weathering is the formation of the lunar spectral red slope associated with the production of nanophase Fe (npFe0) in the dusty lunar regolith (C.R. Chapman, 2004, Annual Review of Earth & Planet. Sci. 32, C.M. Pieters, 2000, MAPS 35). Similar npFe0 has been recovered from asteroid (25143) Itokawa and some asteroid classes do exhibit modest spectral red slopes (T. Noguchi, 2011, Science 333). Space weathering can be thought of as driven by a combination of the chemical environment of space (hard vacuum, low oxygen fugacity, solar-wind implantation of hydrogen) along with thermal energy supplied by micrometeorite impacts. The forward modeling of space weathering as thermodynamically-driven decomposition of common rock-forming minerals suggests the production of a range of daughter products: (1) The silicate products typically lose oxygen, other volatile elements (i.e., sulfur and sodium), and metallic cations, producing minerals that are typically more disordered and less optically active than the original parent materials. (2) The decomposed metallic cations form in nano-sized blebs including npFe0, on the surfaces or in condensing rims of mineral grains. This creates a powerful optical component as seen in the lunar red slope. Surfaces with exposed npFe0 are an ideal environment for catalyzing further reactions. (3) The liberated volatile elements and gases (O, S, Na) may form an observable exosphere (e.g., Moon and Mercury) and can either escape from the body or recombine with available solar-wind-implanted hydrogen to form trace amounts of water and OH. Mineral decomposition can be thought of as the first stage of space weathering. It produces weathered surfaces somewhat depleted in volatile elements, creates a predictable set of minor or trace minerals, and leaves the surfaces with catalytic species, primarily npFe0. However, a second stage of further reactions and weathering depends upon the presence of ''feed-stock'' components that can participate in catalyzed chemical reactions on exposed surfaces. For volatile-rich small bodies, the available materials are not only silicates, but a volatile feedstock that can include water, carbon monoxide, ammonia, to name a few. Thermodynamically-driven decomposition of silicates will produce trace amounts of npFe0 which are ideal sites for Fischer-Tropsch type (FTT) catalytic reactions that can produce organics in situ on the asteroids including alkanes, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, and amino acids (J.E. Elsila, 2012, MAPS 47). The mix and range of products depends on the composition and morphology of the mineral surface, energy inputs produced by the micrometeorite impacts or other processes, and the composition of the input volatile feedstock. FFT reactions generate long-chain carbon compounds and amino acids. Secondary reactions that generate more complex carbon compounds and amino acids are likely to occur as the organic material matures. Weathering maturity can be thought of as a function of the abundance and diversity of the weathering products. Since the npFe0 is not destroyed in the reaction, continued micrometeorite bombardment would result in continuing processing and recombination of the existing organic feedstock. More weathering would result in progressively longer-chain carbon compounds as well as more complex and diverse amino acids, and eventually the kerogen-like insoluble-organic matter that forms a large fraction of carbonaceous meteorites. This insight has several major implications for our planetary science and, potentially, the formation of the precursors of l

  6. Chemical weathering and diagenesis of a cold desert soil from Wright Valley, Antarctica - An analog of Martian weathering processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K.; Mckay, D. S.; Wentworth, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    Weathering, diagenesis, and chemical alteration of a soil profile from the Dry Valleys of Antarctica are investigated as an analog to soil development within the Martian regolith. Soil samples from a soil pit one meter deep on Prospect Mesa, Wright Valley, are examined for their major element concentrations, water-soluble cations and anions, carbon, sulfur, and water concentrations, and related petrographic characteristics of weathering in a cold, dry environment. A petrographic study of the samples suggests that most silicate mineral and lithic fragments exhibit some degree of alteration. Chemical alteration occurs both in samples above and within the permanently frozen zone. The concentrations of water-soluble cations, for example, Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), and anions, Cl(-), SO4(2-), NO3(-), are found to decrease significantly from the surface to the permanently frozen zone, suggesting a major movement of water-soluble species. It is also found that enrichments in secondary mineral abundances correlate with the water soluble ion concentrations. The formation of zeolites is seen throughout the soil column; these, it is thought, may be reservoirs for volatile storage within the regolith.

  7. Interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation processes during acidic weathering of multicomponent minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; King, Helen E.; Patiño-López, Luis D.; Putnis, Christine V.; Geisler, Thorsten; Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos M.; Putnis, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    The chemical weathering of carbonate and silicate minerals on the Earth's surface controls important geochemical processes such as erosion rates and soil formation, ore genesis or climate evolution. The dissolution of most of these minerals is typically incongruent, and results in the formation of surface coatings (altered layers, also known as leached layers). These coatings may significantly affect mineral dissolution rates over geological timescales, and therefore a great deal of research has been conducted on them. However, the mechanism of leached layer formation is a matter of vigorous debate. Here we report on an in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and real-time Mach-Zehnder phase-shift interferometry (PSI) study of the dissolution of wollastonite, CaSiO3, and dolomite, CaMg(CO3)2, as an example of surface coating formation during acidic weathering of multicomponent minerals. Our in situ results provide clear direct experimental evidence that leached layers are formed in a tight interface-coupled two-step process: stoichiometric dissolution of the pristine mineral surfaces and subsequent precipitation of a secondary phase (silica in the case of wollastonite, or hydrated magnesium carbonate in the case of dolomite) from a supersaturated boundary layer of fluid in contact with the mineral surface. This occurs despite the bulk solution remaining undersaturated with respect to the secondary phase. The validation of such a mechanism given by the results reported here completely changes the conceptual framework concerning the mechanism of chemical weathering, and differs significantly from the concept of preferential leaching of cations postulated by most currently accepted incongruent dissolution models.

  8. Weather Forecasting

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    John Nielsen-Gammon

    1996-09-01

    Weather Forecasting is a set of computer-based learning modules that teach students about meteorology from the point of view of learning how to forecast the weather. The modules were designed as the primary teaching resource for a seminar course on weather forecasting at the introductory college level (originally METR 151, later ATMO 151) and can also be used in the laboratory component of an introductory atmospheric science course. The modules assume no prior meteorological knowledge. In addition to text and graphics, the modules include interactive questions and answers designed to reinforce student learning. The module topics are: 1. How to Access Weather Data, 2. How to Read Hourly Weather Observations, 3. The National Collegiate Weather Forecasting Contest, 4. Radiation and the Diurnal Heating Cycle, 5. Factors Affecting Temperature: Clouds and Moisture, 6. Factors Affecting Temperature: Wind and Mixing, 7. Air Masses and Fronts, 8. Forces in the Atmosphere, 9. Air Pressure, Temperature, and Height, 10. Winds and Pressure, 11. The Forecasting Process, 12. Sounding Diagrams, 13. Upper Air Maps, 14. Satellite Imagery, 15. Radar Imagery, 16. Numerical Weather Prediction, 17. NWS Forecast Models, 18. Sources of Model Error, 19. Sea Breezes, Land Breezes, and Coastal Fronts, 20. Soundings, Clouds, and Convection, 21. Snow Forecasting.

  9. Spatial gradient of chemical weathering and its coupling with physical erosion in the soils of the Betic Cordillera (SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonejans, Jerome; Vanacker, Veerle; Opfergelt, Sophie; Ameijeiras-Mariño, Yolanda; Kubik, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The production and denudation of soil material are controlled by chemical weathering and physical erosion which influence one another. Better understanding and quantification of this relationship is critical to understand biogeochemical cycles in the critical zone. The intense silicate weathering that is taking place in young mountain ranges is often cited to be a negative feedback that involves a long-term reduction of the atmospheric CO2 and the temperature cooling. However the possible (de)coupling between weathering and erosion is not fully understood for the moment and could reduce the effect of the feedback. This study is conducted in the eastern Betic Cordillera located in southeast Spain. The Betic Cordillera is composed by several mountains ranges or so-called Sierras that are oriented E-W to SE-NW and rise to 2000m.a.s.l. The Sierras differ in topographic setting, tectonic activity, and slightly in climate and vegetation. The mountain ranges located in the northwest, such as the Sierra Estancias, have the lowest uplift rates ( ~20-30 mm/kyr); while those in the southeast, such as the Sierra Cabrera, have the highest uplift rates ( >150mm/kyr). The sampling was realised into four small catchments located in three different Sierras. In each of them, two to three soil profiles were excavated on exposed ridgetops, and samples were taken by depth slices. The long-term denudation rate at the sites is inferred from in-situ 10Be CRN measurements. The chemical weathering intensity is constrained using a mass balance approach that is based on the concentration of immobile elements throughout the soil profile (CDF). Our results show that the soil depth decreases with an increase of the denudation rates. Chemical weathering accounts for 5 to 35% of the total mass lost due to denudation. Higher chemical weathering intensities (CDFs) are observed in sites with lower denudation rates (and vice versa). The data suggest that chemical weathering intensities are strongly associated with long-term 10Be derived denudation rates. Several causative factors may contribute to this observation, amongst which variation in climate, topography, and vegetation that are all associated with the measured variation in denudation rates. Finally, our data do not support a positive relation between the weathering rate and the physical erosion rate in the soil.

  10. Water quality mapping and assessment, and weathering processes of selected aflaj in Oman.

    PubMed

    Ghrefat, Habes Ahmad; Jamarh, Ahmad; Al-Futaisi, Ahmed; Al-Abri, Badr

    2011-10-01

    There are more than 4,000 falaj (singular of a peculiar dug channel) distributed in different regions in Oman. The chemical characteristics of the water in 42 falaj were studied to evaluate the major ion chemistry; geochemical processes controlling water composition; and suitability of water for drinking, domestic, and irrigation uses. GIS-based maps indicate that the spatial distribution of chemical properties and concentrations vary within the same region and the different regions as well. The molar ratios of (Ca + Mg)/Total cations, (Na + K)/Total cations, (Ca + Mg)/(Na + K), (Ca + Mg)/(HCO? + SO?), and Na/Cl reveal that the water chemistry of the majority of aflaj are dominated by carbonate weathering and evaporite dissolution, with minor contribution of silicate weathering. The concentrations of most of the elements were less than the permissible limits of Omani standards and WHO guidelines for drinking water and domestic use and do not generally pose any health and environmental problems. Some aflaj in ASH Sharqiyah and Muscat regions can be used for irrigation with slight to severe restriction because of the high levels of electrical conductivity, total dissolved solids, chloride, and sodium absorption ratio. PMID:21210214

  11. NUMERICAL MODELING OF FINE SEDIMENT PHYSICAL PROCESSES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoellhamer, David H.

    1985-01-01

    Fine sediment in channels, rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters undergo several physical processes including flocculation, floc disruption, deposition, bed consolidation, and resuspension. This paper presents a conceptual model and reviews mathematical models of these physical processes. Several general fine sediment models that simulate some of these processes are reviewed. These general models do not directly simulate flocculation and floc disruption, but the conceptual model and existing functions are shown to adequately model these two processes for one set of laboratory data.

  12. Statistical Post-processing Methods for Down-selecting Numerical Weather Prediction Multiphysics Ensembles for Wind Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. A.; Haupt, S. E.; Young, G. S.; Kolczynski, W. C.; McCandless, T. C.

    2011-12-01

    Ensembles of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models are used to predict the range of possible future atmospheric states, and the corresponding forecast uncertainty. There are many different ways to configure NWP ensembles. While there is currently no agreement on a single best method to configure ensembles, several studies indicate that an ensemble should account for both initial and lateral boundary condition error and model error. A common way to account for model error is through a multiphysics approach - with ensemble members using different combinations of physical parameterization schemes. The multiphysics approach raises the issue of how best to choose a few combinations of physics schemes from the large number of possible combinations. This study examines objective statistical post-processing methods to down-select a smaller multiphysics ensemble from a large one, for the purposes of adequately representing model error in an ensemble. We build a 42-member multiphysics ensemble using the WRF-ARW model. Forecasts are run for 48 h every fifth day from December 2009 to November 2010. Because wind energy applications require that ensemble spread should accurately represent uncertainty in low-level mean wind, verification focuses primarily on boundary layer winds. Various approaches for down-selection are examined, including principal component analysis and k-means clustering, both in a univariate and multivariate context. We then statistically dress, or calibrate, the ensemble probability density function using Bayesian model averaging.

  13. Spectral evidence of size dependent space weathering processes on asteroid surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffey, M. J.; Bell, J. F.; Brown, R. H.; Burbine, T. H.; Piatek, J. L.; Reed, K. L.; Chaky, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    Most compositional characterizations of the minor planets are derived from analysis of visible and near-infrared reflectance spectra. However, such spectra are derived from light which has only interacted with a very thin surface layer. Although regolith processes are assumed to mix all near-surface lithologic units into this layer, it has been proposed that space weathering processes can alter this surface layer to obscure the spectral signature of the bedrock lithology. It has been proposed that these spectral alteration processes are much less pronounced on asteroid surfaces than on the lunar surface, but the possibility of major spectral alteration of asteroidal optical surfaces has been invoked to reconcile S-asteroids with ordinary chondrites. The reflectance spectra of a large subset of the S-asteroid population have been analyzed in a systematic investigation of the mineralogical diversity within the S-class. In this sample, absorption band depth is a strong function of asteroid diameter. The S-asteroid band depths are relatively constant for objects larger than 100 km and increase linearly by factor of two toward smaller sizes (approximately 40 km). Although the S-asteroid surface materials includes a diverse variety of silicate assemblages, ranging from dunites to basalts, all compositional subtypes of the S-asteroids conform to this trend. The A-, R-, and V-type asteroids which are primarily silicate assemblages (as opposed to the metal-silicate mixtures of most S-asteroids) follow a parallel but displaced trend. Some sort of textural or regolith equilibrium appears to have been attained in the optical surfaces of asteroids larger than about 100 km diameter but not on bodies below this size. The relationships between absorption band depth, spectral slope, surface albedo and body size provide an intriguing insight into the nature of the optical surfaces of the S-asteroids and space weathering on these objects.

  14. Putting Weather into Weather Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. A.; Smith, L. A.

    2001-12-01

    Just as weather forecasting has a colorful and often farsighted history within geophysics, financial mathematics has a long and turbulent history within mathematics. Thus it is no surprise that the intersection of real physics and real financial mathematics provides a rich source of problems and insight in both fields. This presentation targets open questions in one such intersection: quantifying ``weather risk.'' There is no accepted (operational) method for including deterministic information from simulation models (numerical weather forecasts, either best guess or by ensemble forecasting methods), into the stochastic framework most common within financial mathematics. Nor is there a stochastic method for constructing weather surrogates which has been proven successful in application. Inasmuch as the duration of employable observations is short, methods of melding short term, medium-range and long term forecasts are needed. On these time scales, model error is a substantial problem, while many methods of traditional statistical practice are simply inappropriate given our physical understanding of the system. A number of specific open questions, along with a smaller number of potential solutions, will be presented. >http://www.maths.ox.ac.uk/~lenny/WeatherRisk

  15. Reproducibility of Carbon and Water Cycle by an Ecosystem Process Based Model Using a Weather Generator and Effect of Temporal Concentration of Precipitation on Model Outputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyauchi, T.; Machimura, T.

    2014-12-01

    GCM is generally used to produce input weather data for the simulation of carbon and water cycle by ecosystem process based models under climate change however its temporal resolution is sometimes incompatible to requirement. A weather generator (WG) is used for temporal downscaling of input weather data for models, where the effect of WG algorithms on reproducibility of ecosystem model outputs must be assessed. In this study simulated carbon and water cycle by Biome-BGC model using weather data measured and generated by CLIMGEN weather generator were compared. The measured weather data (daily precipitation, maximum, minimum air temperature) at a few sites for 30 years was collected from NNDC Online weather data. The generated weather data was produced by CLIMGEN parameterized using the measured weather data. NPP, heterotrophic respiration (HR), NEE and water outflow were simulated by Biome-BGC using measured and generated weather data. In the case of deciduous broad leaf forest in Lushi, Henan Province, China, 30 years average monthly NPP by WG was 10% larger than that by measured weather in the growing season. HR by WG was larger than that by measured weather in all months by 15% in average. NEE by WG was more negative in winter and was close to that by measured weather in summer. These differences in carbon cycle were because the soil water content by WG was larger than that by measured weather. The difference between monthly water outflow by WG and by measured weather was large and variable, and annual outflow by WG was 50% of that by measured weather. The inconsistency in carbon and water cycle by WG and measured weather was suggested be affected by the difference in temporal concentration of precipitation, which was assessed.

  16. Space Weathering of Asteroid Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Clark R.

    2004-05-01

    Visible and near-infrared spectra of reflected sunlight from asteroid surfaces exhibit features that hold the promise for identifying surface mineralogy. However, the very surfaces that are observed by remote-sensing are also subject to impingement by micrometeoroids and solar wind particles, which are believed to play the dominant role in space weathering, which is the time-dependent modification of an asteroid's reflectance spectrum. Such space weathering has confused the interpretations of telescopic spectra of asteroids, especially concerning the possible association of common ordinary chondritic meteorites with so-called S-type asteroids. Recent spacecraft studies of asteroids (especially of Eros by NEAR-Shoemaker) have documented aspects of space weathering processes, but we still do not understand the physics of space weathering well enough to confidently assay mineralogy of diverse asteroids by remote-sensing. A review of the intellectual history of this topic reveals the complexity of interdisciplinary research on far-away astronomical bodies.

  17. Meteorites on Mars as Planetary Research Tools with Special Considerations for Martian Weathering Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, James Warren

    2011-09-01

    The occurrence of exogenic, meteoritic materials on the surface of any world presents opportunities to explore a variety of significant problems in the planetary sciences. In the case of Mars, meteorites found on its surface may help to (1) constrain atmospheric conditions during their time of arrival; (2) provide insights into possible variabilities in meteoroid type sampling between Mars and Earth space environments; (3) aid in our understanding of soil, dust, and sedimentary rock chemistry; (4) assist with the calibration of crater-age dating techniques; and (5) provide witness samples for chemical and mechanical weathering processes. The presence of reduced metallic iron in approximately 88 percent of meteorite falls renders the majority of meteorites particularly sensitive to oxidation by H2O interaction. This makes them excellent markers for H2O occurrence. Several large meteorites have been discovered at Gusev Crater and Meridiani Planum by the Mars Exploration Rovers (MERs). Significant morphologic characteristics interpretable as weathering features in the Meridiani suite of iron meteorites include a (1) large pit lined with delicate iron protrusions suggestive of inclusion removal by corrosive interaction; (2) differentially eroded kamacite and taenite lamellae on three of the meteorites, providing relative timing through cross-cutting relationships with deposition of (3) an iron oxide-rich dark coating; and (4) regmaglypted surfaces testifying to regions of minimal surface modification; with other regions in the same meteorites exhibiting (5) large-scale, cavernous weathering. Iron meteorites found by Mini-TES at both Meridiani Planum and Gusev Crater have prompted laboratory experiments designed to explore elements of reflectivity, dust cover, and potential oxide coatings on their surfaces in the thermal infrared using analog samples. Results show that dust thickness on an iron substrate need be only one tenth as great as that on a silicate rock to obscure its infrared signal. In addition, a database of thermal emission spectra for 46 meteorites was prepared to aid in the on-going detection and interpretation of these valuable rocks on Mars using Mini-TES instruments on both MER spacecraft. Applications to the asteroidal sciences are also relevant and intended for this database.

  18. Process Physics: Inertia, Gravity and the Quantum

    E-print Network

    Reginald T. Cahill

    2001-10-29

    Process Physics models reality as self-organising relational or semantic information using a self-referentially limited neural network model. This generalises the traditional non-process syntactical modelling of reality by taking account of the limitations and characteristics of self-referential syntactical information systems, discovered by Goedel and Chaitin, and the analogies with the standard quantum formalism and its limitations. In process physics space and quantum physics are emergent and unified, and time is a distinct non-geometric process. Quantum phenomena are caused by fractal topological defects embedded in and forming a growing three-dimensional fractal process-space. Various features of the emergent physics are briefly discussed including: quantum gravity, quantum field theory, limited causality and the Born quantum measurement metarule, inertia, time-dilation effects, gravity and the equivalence principle, a growing universe with a cosmological constant, black holes and event horizons, and the emergence of classicality.

  19. Experience with software process in physics projects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Guatelli; B. Mascialino; L. Moneta; I. Papadopoulos; A. Pfeiffer; M. G. Pia; M. Piergentili

    2004-01-01

    A rigorous software process is known to be one of the key elements for the success of a software project. In spite of its role being widely recognized in software engineering, the adoption of a process is quite unusual in the physics research environment. We present the experience gained in the application of the unified process to a variety of

  20. Experience with Software Process in Physics Projects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Guatelli; B. Mascialino; L. Moneta; I. Papadopoulos; A. Pfeiffer; M. G. Pia; M. Piergentili

    2005-01-01

    A rigorous software process is known to be one of the key elements for the success of a software project. In spite of its role being widely recognized in software engineering, the adoption of a process is quite unusual in the physics research environment. We present the experience gained in the application of the Unified Process to a variety of

  1. Rock Abrasion as Seen by the MSL Curiosity Rover: Insights on Physical Weathering on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, N.; Day, M. D.; Le Mouelic, S.; Martin-Torres, F. J.; Newsom, H. E.; Sullivan, R. J., Jr.; Ullan, A.; Wiens, R. C.; Zorzano, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Mars is a dry planet, with actively blowing sand in many regions. In the absence of stable liquid water and an active hydrosphere, rates of chemical weathering are slow, such that aeolian abrasion is a dominant agent of landscape modification where sand is present and winds above threshold occur at sufficient frequency. Reflecting this activity, ventifacts, rocks that have been abraded by windborne particles, and wind-eroded outcrops, are common. They provide invaluable markers of the Martian wind record and insight into climate and landscape modification. Ventifacts are distributed along the traverse of the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover. They contain one or more diagnostic features and textures: Facets, keels, basal sills, elongated pits, scallops/flutes, grooves, rock tails, and lineations. Keels at the junction of facets are sharp enough to pose a hazard MSL's wheels in some areas. Geomorphic and textural patterns on outcrops indicate retreat of windward faces. Moonlight Valley and other depressions are demarcated by undercut walls and scree boulders, with the valley interiors containing fewer rocks, most of which show evidence for significant abrasion. Together, this suggests widening and undercutting of the valley walls, and erosion of interior rocks, by windblown sand. HiRISE images do not show any dark sand dunes in the traverse so far, in contrast to the large dune field to the south that is migrating up to 2 m per year. In addition, ChemCam shows that the rock Bathurst has a rind rich in mobile elements that would be removed in an abrading environment. This indicates that rock abrasion was likely more dominant in the past, a hypothesis consistent with rapid scarp retreat as suggested by the cosmogenic noble gases in Yellowknife Bay. Ventifacts and evidence for bedrock abrasion have also been found at the Pathfinder, Spirit, and Opportunity sites, areas, like the Curiosity traverse so far, that lack evidence for current high sand fluxes. Yardangs are also common on the planet, regardless of whether local sand is mobile. This suggest that abrasion on Mars is an episodic process driven by the passage of sand in which rock retreat rates, based on fluxes of current active dunes, may reach 10s of microns per year. Such a process has acted, over long time scales, to imprint upon the surface a record of sand activity.

  2. Characterizing the process and quantifying the rate of subaerial rock weathering on desert surfaces using roughness analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushkin, Amit; Sagy, Amir; Trabelci, Eran

    2013-04-01

    Subaerial weathering of rocks is a common process observed on desert surfaces on Earth and other planetary terrestrial surfaces such as on Mars. On Earth, this weathering process has been previously identified as one of the key erosion agent driving geomorphic surface evolution and the development of desert pavements. And yet, fundamental aspects of the process, such as the relative contribution of the different weathering modes that drive it (e.g., mechanical breakdown of rocks, chemical weathering, aeolian abrasion and exfoliation) as well as the rate by which this weathering process occurs have not been systematically examined. Here, we present a new approach for quantitatively addressing these fundamental aspects of process geomorphology on desert surfaces. We focus here on co-genetic desert alluvial surfaces of different ages, i.e. alluvial chronosequences, which provide excellent recorders for the evolution of boulder-strewn surfaces into smooth desert pavements through in-situ subaerial weathering of rocks. Our approach combines independent measures of two different surface attributes: High resolution (mm-scale) 3D ground-based laser scanning (LiDAR) of surface micro-topography, and numerical dating of surface age. Roughness analysis of the LiDAR data in power spectral density (PSD) space allows us to characterize the geometric manifestation of rock weathering on the surface and to distinguish between the different weathering modes. Numerical age constraints provide independent estimates for the time elapsed since the process began. Accordingly, we are able to constrain surface roughness evolution on alluvial fan desert chronosequences through time, and present PSD analysis of surface roughness as a new quantitative tool to examine the process of subaerial rock weathering in desert environments. In this study we present results from two late Quaternary alluvial chronosequences along the Dead Sea Transform in the hyper-arid Negev desert of southern Israel. LiDAR scanning was applied on representative areas (~30-50 m2) of 10 separate surfaces ranging from rough Holocene surfaces to fairly smooth surfaces with well-developed pavements displaying an OSL age of 87 kyr. We find typical and recurring time-dependent changes in the offset as well as shape of the PSD curves in both chronosequences: PSD offset is continuously reduced over time reflecting the overall reduction in the amplitude of roughness at all wavelengths. The PSD curves display progressive moderation of slopes at the longer wavelengths with the moderation point itself systematically shifted to shorter wavelengths. This characteristic evolution of PSD offset and slope moderation at longer wavelengths reflects the typical break up of boulder-sized clasts through time as the surfaces mature into well-developed desert pavements and points towards mechanical breakdown as the dominant weathering mode. In addition, we are able to determine the rate by which the larger clasts are removed from the system. We build on these new insights into process and rate of rock weathering to propose PSD analysis of surface roughness as a complementary method for constraining the age of desert alluvial surfaces in places where 'conventional' dating cannot be applied.

  3. Coupling Chemical and Physical Weathering Across the Passive Margin Escarpment of Southeastern Australia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. C. Burke; A. M. Heimsath; A. F. White

    2006-01-01

    The soil production function determined from in situ produced cosmogenic nuclides (10Be and ^{26}Al) across the Great Escarpment of Australia is uniform despite varying precipitation rates and elevations across the escarpment. The inferred escarpment propagation history also suggests that differences in character and rate of chemical weathering should be apparent given the relatively recent origin of the escarpment during trans-Tasman

  4. Geography & Weather. Weather Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mogil, H. Michael; Levine, Barbara G.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are 35 activities that center around television and newspaper weather reports. Geography, weather, and other disciplines are included as well as various grade levels. Available resource materials are listed and their uses explained. Parent, administrator, and other faculty member involvement is emphasized. (KR)

  5. Weather Data Gamification 

    E-print Network

    Gargate, Rohit

    2013-07-25

    . With the huge amount of weather data available, we have designed and developed a fantasy weather game. People manage a team of cities with the goal of predicting weather better than other players in their league, and in the process gain an understanding...

  6. Scattering processes in atomic physics, nuclear physics, and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchedrin, Gavriil

    The universal way to probe a physical system is to scatter a particle or radiation off the system. The results of the scattering are governed by the interaction Hamiltonian of the physical system and scattered probe. An object of the investigation can be a hydrogen atom immersed in a laser field, heavy nucleus exposed to a flux of neutrons, or space-time metric perturbed by the stress-energy tensor of neutrino flux in the early Universe. This universality of scattering process designates the Scattering Matrix, defined as the unitary matrix of the overlapping in and out collision states, as the central tool in theoretical physics. In this Thesis we present our results in atomic physics, nuclear physics, and cosmology. In these branches of theoretical physics the key element that unifies all of them is the scattering matrix. Additionally, within the scope of Thesis we present underlying ideas responsible for the unification of various physical systems. Within atomic physics problems, namely the axial anomaly contribution to parity nonconservation in atoms, and two-photon resonant transition in a hydrogen atom, it was the scattering matrix which led to the Landau-Yang theorem, playing the central role in these problems. In scattering problems of cosmology and quantum optics we developed and implemented mathematical tools that allowed us to get a new point of view on the subject. Finally, in nuclear physics we were able to take advantage of the target complexity in the process of neutron scattering which led to the formulation of a new resonance width distribution for an open quantum system.

  7. Pb isotope systematics in volcanic river system: Constraints about weathering processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrel, P. J.; Millot, R.; Petelet-Giraud, E.; Guerrot, C.

    2012-12-01

    We present a series of lead isotopes in soils and sediments developed on volcanic rocks forming a small watershed flowing through the Massif Central (France). The Massif Central volcanic province is a widespread area of Tertiary to Recent continental alkaline volcanism comprising alkali basalts and basanites. The Allanche watershed has an area of 160 km2, a maximum altitude in the watershed of 1400 m (a.s.l.) and the relief between the extreme sampling points of 340 m The river is 29 km long from headwaters to the outlet and from its origin in the Cézallier area to its mouth in the Allagnon river (a tributary of the Allier river), the Allanche river flows through the volcanic terrains of the lava plateau (11 to 2.5 Ma). Main bedrocks are basanites (nepheline or leucitic basalts), with SiO2 around 41-45%, low Na2O + K2O (<5%), and with modal or normative nepheline or leucite and a ground mass of clinopyroxene and plagioclase. Surrounding rocks are feldspatic basalts with SiO2 close to 46-49%, low Na2O + K2O (<5%). The main phase in these basalts is plagioclase with normative nepheline, hyperstene and olivine. Crustal contamination (e.g. by granite, gneiss or metasedimentary granulite, as stated by Downes, 1987, doi: 10.1144/GSL.SP.1987.030.01.25) has occurred in the differentiated magmas of both series, as witnessed by lead isotopic variations in conjunction with Rb/La ratios and lead contents. Using Pb isotope ratios, major and trace elements (from Négrel and Deschamps, 1996, Aquatic Geochemistry, 2, 1-27) we therefore compare sediments and soils evolution over the Allanche river watershed. K and Ca are considered as mobile reference elements and illustrate the weathering state of soils and sediments relative to parent rocks through a large decrease in K and Ca content when compared to Si; the sediments being less depleted than soils. Lead, with regards to Si shows three behaviour with depleted Si content- same lead content that bedrock, depleted Si content- less lead content and depleted Si content - high lead content that bedrock. The comparison of 1000Pb/K versus Si/K ratio evidenced the evolution line from weathering processes and the lead enrichment from atmospheric deposition as a major contributor to explain the deviation of several points from this line. Lead isotopes decrease from bedrock to sediments-soils without any clear relationship when compared to lead contents. The use of Pb-isotopic compositions showed that most of the lead budget in sediments and soils result from bedrock weathering with an influence of gasoline additive-lead derived inputs and a lack of lead input from agricultural activities.

  8. Space Weathering of Asteroids: Issues Remain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, C. R.

    2003-05-01

    After decades of debate, consensus now exists that asteroid reflectance spectra are affected by space weathering. Based on a recent consensus [1] about the physical processes that space weather the Moon, we can realistically hypothesize about the causes of asteroidal space weathering and about how the processes might be manifested on different types of asteroids. But issues and questions remain. While vapor deposition on grains dominates lunar space weathering, for asteroids the relative vapor production by solar wind sputtering versus micrometeorite impact (or even other processes masked on the Moon) remains uncertain. Particularly troublesome are the different styles of space weathering on Ida and Eros; these otherwise similarly sized SIV asteroids differ mainly in being either in the belt or in near-Earth space, but how does that affect space weathering so dramatically? A vital issue is the timescale for space weathering to be manifested, or to mature, under various conditions (e.g. in or out of the belt, for different taxonomic types, or for different sizes). An extraordinary discovery may finally help provide an answer. Nesvorny et al. [2,3] have discovered how to date the creation of specific asteroids (i.e. in a catastrophic collisional break-up) with a robust precision of several percent, competitive with meteoritic age-dating techniques except that we know which specific asteroids the dates pertain to. The Karin cluster, within the S-type Koronis family, formed 5.8 +/-0.2 Myr ago. This age is of the order of estimates of space-weathering/regolith-evolution timescales. Spectral studies of Karin cluster members, and members of other dated families, may determine the absolute rates of space weathering processes. That in turn can elucidate the physical processes and permit better extrapolation to other asteroids. References: [1] B. Hapke (2001) J. Geophys. Res. 106, 10039-10073; [2] D. Nesvorny et al. (2002) Nature 417, 720-722; [3] D. Nesvorny et al. (2003) Astrophys. J. 591, 486-497.

  9. Places and Processes: Physical Processes in Shaping Places

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2001-01-01

    In this lesson, students analyze the roles of climate, tectonic and other physical processes in shaping places by selecting two states and explaining the processes that may have shaped their current environments. Although it focuses on places in the United States, this lesson can easily be adapted to other regions of the world.

  10. Physical conditions for the r-process

    SciTech Connect

    Wanajo, S.; Tachibana, T.; Goriely, S. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Excellence Cluster Universe, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching and Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Senior High School of Waseda University, Nerima, Tokyo 177-0044 (Japan); Institut d'Astronomie et d'Astrophysique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, C.P. 226, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2012-11-12

    Recent works show that the r-process can proceed by competition between neutron capture and {beta}-decay in low temperature environments (< 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} K; cold r-process) where photo-disintegration plays no role. This is in contrast to the traditional picture of the r-process in high temperature environments ({approx} 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} K; hot r-process) where the (n, {gamma})-({gamma}, n) equilibrium holds. In this study, we explore nucleosynthesis calculations based on a site-independent model to elucidate the physical conditions leading to cold and hot r-processes.

  11. Weather Forecasting

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This activity is designed to give students an understanding of how to forecast weather and how to use weather reports for their personal benefit. They will be able to tell what weather is, read weather instruments, understand basic cloud formations in relation to the weather, and make forecasts for two days in advance.

  12. A processing-modeling routine to use rough data from automatic weather stations in snowpack mass dynamics modeling at fine temporal resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanzi, Francesco; De Michele, Carlo; Ghezzi, Antonio; Jommi, Cristina; Pepe, Monica

    2015-04-01

    We discuss a proposal of coupled routine to process rough data from automatic weather stations at an hourly resolution and to model snowpack mass dynamics. Seasonal snow represents an important component of the water cycle in mountain environment, and the modeling of its mass dynamics is a living topic in modern hydrology, given the expected modifications of the climate in the near future. Nevertheless, model forcing, calibration and evaluation operations are often hampered by the noisiness of rough data from automatic weather stations. The noise issue include, among others, non-physical temperature-based fluctuations of the signal or gauge under-catch. Consequently, it can be difficult to quantify precipitation inputs, accumulation/ablation periods or melt-runoff timing and amounts. This problem is particularly relevant at fine temporal resolution (e.g., the hourly one). To tackle this issue, 40 SNOTEL sites from western US are here considered, and the proposed processing-modeling routine is applied on multi-year datasets to assess its performances to both process hourly data and model snowpack dynamics. A simple one-layer snowpack model is used for this purpose. Specific attention is paid to remove sub-daily erroneous oscillations of snow depth. Under these assumptions, we can separate events of different types and recover catch deficiency by means of a data-fusion procedure that relies on the mass conservation law, instead of site- or instrument-specific relations. Since the considered model needs the calibration of two parameters, and given that sub-daily physical oscillations in snow depth data are difficult to be separated from instrument noise, a coupled processing-modeling procedure has been designed. Results prove that noise can be successfully removed from data, and that sub-daily data-series can be exploited as useful sources to model snowpack dynamics.

  13. Computational Physics on Graphics Processing Units

    E-print Network

    Ari Harju; Topi Siro; Filippo Federici-Canova; Samuli Hakala; Teemu Rantalaiho

    2013-03-06

    The use of graphics processing units for scientific computations is an emerging strategy that can significantly speed up various different algorithms. In this review, we discuss advances made in the field of computational physics, focusing on classical molecular dynamics, and on quantum simulations for electronic structure calculations using the density functional theory, wave function techniques, and quantum field theory.

  14. Weather Watch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bratt, Herschell Marvin

    1973-01-01

    Suggests a number of ways in which Federal Aviation Agency weather report printouts can be used in teaching the weather section of meteorology. These weather sequence reports can be obtained free of charge at most major airports. (JR)

  15. Weather Vane

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Fresno Community Science Workshop

    2011-01-01

    In this meteorology activity, learners build weather vanes using straws, paperclips, and cardstock. Learners will explore wind and air resistance as well as how weather vanes are used to understand and predict weather.

  16. Distribution System Reliability Assessment Incorporating Weather Effects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Billinton; J. Acharya

    2006-01-01

    Electrical distribution systems usually exist in outdoor environments. The weather creates varying degrees of physical stress on system components exposed to fluctuating weather conditions. The failure rate of an element is greatly enhanced in bad weather situations and the likelihood of multiple line failures is much higher in bad weather than in normal weather. The phenomenon of coincident failures of

  17. Lakshmanan,V., 2012: Image processing of weather radar reflectivity data: Should it be done in Z or dBZ?, Electronic J. Severe Storms Meteor., 7 (3), 18.

    E-print Network

    Lakshmanan, Valliappa

    Lakshmanan,V., 2012: Image processing of weather radar reflectivity data: Should it be done in Z or dBZ?, Electronic J. Severe Storms Meteor., 7 (3), 1­8. Image Processing of Weather RadarBZ is better for such applications. 1. Motivation Image processing of weather radar reflectivity fields (the

  18. Process for the physical segregation of minerals

    DOEpatents

    Yingling, Jon C.; Ganguli, Rajive

    2004-01-06

    With highly heterogeneous groups or streams of minerals, physical segregation using online quality measurements is an economically important first stage of the mineral beneficiation process. Segregation enables high quality fractions of the stream to bypass processing, such as cleaning operations, thereby reducing the associated costs and avoiding the yield losses inherent in any downstream separation process. The present invention includes various methods for reliably segregating a mineral stream into at least one fraction meeting desired quality specifications while at the same time maximizing yield of that fraction.

  19. Weather variability, ecological processes and optimization of soil micro-environment for rangeland restoration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arid and semi-arid rangelands occupy over half of the earth’s surface and are characterized by relatively high variability in seasonal and annual patterns of precipitation. Invasive plants compete for soil and water resources and exacerbate inherent weather limitations for native plant establishmen...

  20. The snowball Earth aftermath: Exploring the limits of continental weathering processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guillaume Le Hir; Yannick Donnadieu; Yves Goddéris; Raymond T. Pierrehumbert; Galen P. Halverson; Mélina Macouin; Anne Nédélec; Gilles Ramstein

    2008-01-01

    article i nfo Carbonates capping Neoproterozoic glacial deposits contain peculiar sedimentological features and geochemical anomalies ascribed to extraordinary environmental conditions in the snowball Earth aftermath. It is commonly assumed that post-snowball climate dominated by CO2 partial pressures several hundred times greater than modern levels, would be characterized by extreme temperatures, a vigorous hydrological cycle, and associated high continental weathering rates.

  1. Application of GIS for processing and establishing the correlation between weather radar reflectivity and precipitation data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Gorokhovich; G. Villarini

    2005-01-01

    Correlation between weather radar reflectivity and precipitation data collected by rain gauges allows empirical formulae to be obtained that can be used to create continuous rainfall surfaces from discrete data. Such surfaces are useful in distributed hydrologic modelling and early warning systems in flood management. Because of the spatial relationship between rain gauge locations and radar coverage area, GIS provides

  2. NASA's Advancements in Space-Based Spectrometry Lead to Improvements in Weather Prediction and Understanding of Climate Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel

    2010-01-01

    AIRS is a precision state of the art High Spectral Resolution Multi-detector IR grating array spectrometer that was launched into a polar orbit on EOS Aqua in 2002. AIRS measures most of the infra-red spectrum with very low noise from 650/cm to 2660/cm with a resolving power of 2400 at a spatial resolution of 13 km. The objectives of AIRS were to perform accurate determination of atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles in up to 90% partial cloud cover conditions for the purpose of improving numerical weather prediction and understanding climate processes. AIRS data has also been used to determine accurate trace gas profiles. A brief overview of the retrieval methodology used to analyze AIRS observations under partial cloud cover will be presented and sample results will be shown from the weather and climate perspectives.

  3. Physical Synthesis TechniquesPhysical Synthesis TechniquesPhysical Synthesis TechniquesPhysical Synthesis Techniques Thin Film Processes

    E-print Network

    Liu, Kai

    Physical Synthesis TechniquesPhysical Synthesis TechniquesPhysical Synthesis TechniquesPhysical Synthesis Techniques Thin Film Processes (Vossen & Kern, Academic Press) #12;I. SputteringI. Sputtering SubstrateSubstrate + Target atom A i Target + + + Ar ion -V High purity sputtering gas necessary Typically 0

  4. Weathering in the cold: Granite hillslopes in Osborn Mountain, WY and Bodmin Moor, UK

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. G. Riggins; S. P. Anderson; R. S. Anderson

    2010-01-01

    Low temperatures generally limit rates of chemical weathering, and hence might be expected to limit development and evolution of mobile regolith in cold climates. Chemical and physical processes operate to release material from bedrock into the mobile regolith. Rock is weakened by chemical weathering, while physical breakdown produces particles susceptible to transport. We examine two hillslopes mantled with mobile regolith

  5. Building and Using Coupled Models for the Space Weather System: Lessons Learned

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jack Quinn; Jeffrey Hughes; Daniel N. Baker; Jon Linker; John Lyon; Stanley C. Solomon; Michael Wiltberger

    2009-01-01

    Numerical modeling of the space weather system is at an exciting juncture, in some ways similar to that of terrestrial weather modeling in the 1950s [e.g., Siscoe, 2006, 2007]. Improved scientific understanding of the physical processes underlying space weather, combined with advancing computational capabilities, is making physics-based modeling of the Sun-Earth system increasingly useful not only for scientific research but

  6. OpenWeather: a peer-to-peer weather data transmission protocol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adrian Yanes

    2011-01-01

    The study of the weather is performed using instruments termed weather stations. These weather stations are distributed around the world, collecting the data from the different phenomena. Several weather organizations have been deploying thousands of these instruments, creating big networks to collect weather data. These instruments are collecting the weather data and delivering it for later processing in the collections

  7. Weathering properties of treated southern yellow pine wood examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and physical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salaita, Ghaleb N.; Ma, Frank M. S.; Parker, Trudy C.; Hoflund, Gar B.

    2008-04-01

    In this study the weathering behavior of southern yellow pine (SYP) wood samples pretreated in different solutions has been examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and various types of physical characterization regarding material loss and discoloration. The treatment solutions include water as a control, a commercially available water repellent (WR) wood treating additive and polyethylene glycol (PEG) products including PEG PLUS™, PEG 8000 solutions and Compound 20M in varying concentrations. All contained the wood preservative chromated copper arsenate (CCA). One sample was treated with a CCA solution only. The treatments were carried out at 20 °C and 150 psig for 1/2 h after exposure to vacuum (28 mmHg) for 15 min. Simulated weathering was achieved in an Atlas 65-W Weather-Ometer for 2000 h with both light and dark periods and rain. The temperature ranged from 23 °C during the dark cycle to 35 °C during the light cycle. With weathering the XPS O/C ratios increase due to oxidation of the surface. Exposure to UV light results in bond breakage and reaction with oxygen in the presence of air to form organic functional groups such as ?, ?, C dbnd O and/or O-C-O. These oxidized products can protect the underlying wood from deterioration if they are insoluble in water and remain on the surface as a protective coating. If soluble, rain washes the compounds away and assists in the degradation. Correlated changes are observed in the XPS O/C ratios, the high-resolution XPS C 1s spectra, the SEM micrographs and physical measurements including thickness alteration, weight loss, and discoloration by yellowing or whitening of the weathered wood. The PEG treatments are effective in protecting wood with the 2% PEG PLUS treatment providing the best weathering behavior similar to that of the CCA treatment. The WR and water treatments yield the poorest weathering properties.

  8. Physical processes in spin polarized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kulsrud, R.M.; Valeo, E.J.; Cowley, S.

    1984-05-01

    If the plasma in a nuclear fusion reactor is polarized, the nuclear reactions are modified in such a way as to enhance the reactor performance. We calculate in detail the modification of these nuclear reactions by different modes of polarization of the nuclear fuel. We also consider in detail the various physical processes that can lead to depolarization and show that they are by and large slow enough that a high degree of polarization can be maintained.

  9. Weathering properties of treated southern yellow pine wood examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and physical characterization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ghaleb N. Salaita; Frank M. S. Ma; Trudy C. Parker; Gar B. Hoflund

    2008-01-01

    In this study the weathering behavior of southern yellow pine (SYP) wood samples pretreated in different solutions has been examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and various types of physical characterization regarding material loss and discoloration. The treatment solutions include water as a control, a commercially available water repellent (WR) wood treating additive and polyethylene glycol

  10. Humps and hollows: basalt weathering in low-latitude mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Jasper; Grab, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Physical, chemical and biological weathering processes are significant contributors to landscape development in mountain blocks worldwide, and over long time scales, but the interplay between different weathering processes is uncertain. Jurassic-age basalt lava flows underlie the Drakensberg mountain range of eastern Lesotho, southern Africa (summits 3200-3400 m asl), and weathered bedrock is commonly exposed on flat plateau surfaces. Subaerial weathering throughout the Quaternary and Holocene has resulted in a range of weathering forms, some of which exploit pre-existing cooling fractures within the basalts, and some of which are independent of geological control. These forms include pseudokarst-style potholes, karren and other microforms. The geometry, chemistry of water contained within the potholes, seasonal presence of ice, sediment and organic residues all suggest that physical, chemical and biological weathering processes are significant at different times and in different ways in subaerial weathering. Moreover, it is also likely that these process-types show pronounced seasonal variability that means that the interplay between different processes is subtle. Aggregated rates of land surface denudation or geomorphic development of single landforms therefore hide this subtle interplay between different processes. Changes in mountain summit soil depth (through soil erosion), ecosystems and climate will change this balance between different processes, and will operate over different spatial and temporal scales.

  11. Anvil Forecast Tool in the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System, Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III

    2008-01-01

    Meteorologists from the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) and Spaceflight Meteorology Group have identified anvil forecasting as one of their most challenging tasks when predicting the probability of violations of the Lightning Launch Commit Criteria and Space Light Rules. As a result, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) created a graphical overlay tool for the Meteorological Interactive Data Display Systems (MIDDS) to indicate the threat of thunderstorm anvil clouds, using either observed or model forecast winds as input.

  12. UM Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sponsored by The Weather Underground at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, UM Weather bills itself as the "Internet's premier source of weather information." The site offers several general audience tools such as the Fast Forecast for any city in the US, ski weather, and weather cams. But, it also provides access to over two dozen weather software packages, a new computer model forecasts page, and most impressively a list of close to 400 other weather related Web sites. Professionals and researchers will appreciate the non-technical feel of the site and the valuable information they can procure from it.

  13. Severe Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)

    2005-04-01

    Meteorologists disagree as to what constitutes severe weather. However, most concur that thunderstorms, tornadoes, and hurricanes, all considered to be "convective" weather, fit the definition of severe weather, which is a weather condition likely to cause hardship. This science guide will explore each of the three weather phenomena. By virtue of their locations, most students are familiar with at least one of the three severe weather events. Students who tour the web sites will have an opportunity to make connections between the familiar and the perhaps less understood weather events.

  14. Studying the Space Weather Features of the High-Latitude Ionosphere by Using a Physics-Based Data Assimilation Model and Observational Data from Ground Magnetometer Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L.; Schunk, R. W.; Scherliess, L.; Sojka, J. J.; Eccles, J. V.

    2011-12-01

    The high-latitude ionosphere is a very dynamic region in the solar-terrestrial environment. Frequent disturbances in the region can adversely affect numerous military and civilian technologies. Accurate specifications and forecasts of the high-latitude electrodynamic and plasma structures have fundamental space weather importance for enabling mitigation of adverse effects. Presently, most of the space-weather models use limited observations and/or indices to define a set of empirical drivers for physical models to move forward in time. Since the empirical drivers have a "climatological" nature and there are significant physical inconsistencies among various empirical drivers due to independent statistical analysis of different observational data, the specifications of high-latitude space environment from these space weather models cannot truthfully reflect the weather features. In fact, unrealistic small- and large-scale structures could be produced in the specifications and forecasts from these models. We developed a data assimilation model for the high-latitude ionospheric plasma dynamics and electrodynamics to overcome these hurdles. With a set of physical models and an ensemble Kalman filter, the data assimilation model can determine the self-consistent structures of the high-latitude convection electric field, ionospheric conductivity, and the key drivers associated with these quantities by ingesting data from multiple observations. These ingested data include the magnetic perturbation from the ground-based magnetometers in the high-latitude regions, magnetic measurements of IRIDIUM satellites, SuperDARN line-of-sight velocity, and in-situ drift velocity measured by DMSP satellites. As a result, the assimilation model can capture the small- and large-scale plasma structures and sharp electrodynamic boundaries, thus, can provide a more accurate picture of the high-latitude space weather. In this presentation, we will first briefly describe the data-assimilation model of high-latitude electrodynamics and its strengths over the other space-weather models. Then we will present the space weather features produced by the model for quiet and storm periods constrained by the data from ground magnetometer arrays. This will demonstrate the dynamic variability of the high-latitude ionosphere. Finally, we will present high-resolution ionospheric modeling results of the time-evolution and spatial features of the high-latitude plasma structures to further demonstrate the model's capability in producing the space weather features in the high-latitude ionosphere. These results will illuminate the importance of real-time data availability and data assimilation models for accurate specification and forecasting of space weather.

  15. Automated Data Preparation and Physics Mining Tools for Space Weather Studies (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimabadi, H.; Sipes, T.

    2009-12-01

    Heliophysics is a data centric field which relies heavily on the use of spacecraft data for further advances. The prevalent approach to analysis of spacecraft data is based on visual inspection of data. As a result, the vast majority of the collected data from various missions has gone unexplored. The computer aided algorithmic approach to data analysis as facilitated through data mining techniques are essential for analysis of large data sets and enable discovery of hidden information and patterns in the data. Many data analysis problems in space weather stand to benefit from the application of data mining techniques. Examples include identifying spacecraft charging signatures in plasma detectors, identifying plasma frequency lines in wave spectrograms (and hence density), detecting and classifying substorm infection features, among others (R. Friedel, private communication). Thus while the need for advanced algorithmic approach to data exploration and knowledge discovery is generally recognized by experimentalists, the adoption of such techniques (“data mining”) has been slow. This has been partly due to the steep learning curve of some of the techniques and/or the requirement to have a working knowledge of statistics. Another factor is the existence of a plethora of data mining approaches, and it is often a daunting task for a scientist to determine the appropriate technique. Our goal has been to make such tools accessible to non-experts and remove it from gee-whiz domain to a practical tool that will become part of the standard arsenal of data analysis. To this end, we have developed an automated data mining technique called MineTool. Its first deployment to analysis of Cluster has been very successful (Karimabadi et al., JGR, 114, A06216 , 2009) and this tool is gaining adoption among experimentalists. In this talk, we will provide an overview of this tool, illustrate its use through examples, and discuss future directions of research.

  16. BBC Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    At this website, the BBC offers an array of materials dealing with weather. Meteorologists can discover employment opportunities. Individuals with spectacular photographs of weather phenomenon can submit their images to the photo gallery. Students and educators can find introductory materials on basic weather concepts, forecasting, extreme events, and broadcasting the weather. The website offers fun weather-related games and projects, a meteorology glossary, and links to other educational websites.

  17. Weather Forecasting for Radio Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    Weather Forecasting for Radio Astronomy Part I: The Mechanics and Physics Ronald J Maddalena August 1, 2008 #12;Outline Part I Background -- research inspirations and aspirations Vertical weather, .... Part II Results on refraction & air mass (with Jeff Paradis) Part III Results on opacity, weather

  18. Generation of abnormal trace element abundances in Antarctic eucrites by weathering processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.; Lindstrom, Marilyn M.

    1991-01-01

    Data were obtained on the trace- and major-element compositions of 16 Antarctic abnormal eucrites, many of which exhibiting positive (but sometimes negative) Ce anomalies, positive Eu anomalies, and low abundances of the remainder of the REEs. The results of data analysis suggest that the unusual REE patterns of abnormal Antarctic eucrites arise from weathering effects generated in or on the Antarctic ice. The suggested scenario involves the formation of melt water and its equilibration with the atmosphere, promoting the dissolution of REE-rich phosphates and the oxidation of Ce. As a result, tetravalent Ce is fractionated from the trivalent REE in solution.

  19. Living in the Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)

    2006-12-13

    What is weather? Is climate different from weather? It doesn't matter where you live or where you travel, weather patterns influence your daily life. In this guide, students will engage in exploring and predicting the conditions in the atmosphere that are responsible for weather patterns and climatic conditions, and investigate how extreme weather impacts humans and the environment. While many of the keywords embedded into the "Living in the Weather" themes will be familiar, do your students really understand them? This guide provides teacher-tested, reliable links that allow you and your students to "surf" the internet in a quest to better understand how atmospheric conditions directly relate to weather on Earth. Understanding weather and climate can be a great opportunity for you to engage students in topics and themes that connect Earth and space science, life science, and physical science in a real way. The National Science Education Standards (NSES) focus on the study of weather and climate and their impact on human life. This guide uses the ongoing work and technology of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (known to the public simply as NOAA). NOAA scientists study our planet Earth in a global way. Working together with scientists worldwide, NOAA scientists study the diversity of living organisms (including humans) and their impact on our environment--not only in our country but in every country and continent around the world.

  20. Protein Folding as a Physical Stochastic Process

    E-print Network

    Kerson Huang

    2007-07-17

    We model protein folding as a physical stochastic process as follows. The unfolded protein chain is treated as a random coil described by SAW (self-avoiding walk). Folding is induced by hydrophobic forces and other interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, which can be taken into account by imposing conditions on SAW. The resulting model is termed CSAW (conditioned self-avoiding walk. Conceptually, the mathematical basis is a generalized Langevin equation. In practice, the model is implemented on a computer by combining SAW and Monte Carlo. To illustrate the flexibility and capabilities of the model, we consider a number of examples, including folding pathways, elastic properties, helix formation, and collective modes.

  1. Space Weathering of Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Space weathering discussions have generally centered around soils but exposed rocks will also incur the effects of weathering. On the Moon, rocks make up only a very small percentage of the exposed surface and areas where rocks are exposed, like central peaks, are often among the least space weathered regions we find in remote sensing data. However, our studies of weathered Ap 17 rocks 76015 and 76237 show that significant amounts of weathering products can build up on rock surfaces. Because rocks have much longer surface lifetimes than an individual soil grain, and thus record a longer history of exposure, we can study these products to gain a deeper perspective on the weathering process and better assess the relative impo!1ance of various weathering components on the Moon. In contrast to the lunar case, on small asteroids, like Itokowa, rocks make up a large fraction of the exposed surface. Results from the Hayabusa spacecraft at Itokowa suggest that while the low gravity does not allow for the development of a mature regolith, weathering patinas can and do develop on rock surfaces, in fact, the rocky surfaces were seen to be darker and appear spectrally more weathered than regions with finer materials. To explore how weathering of asteroidal rocks may differ from lunar, a set of ordinary chondrite meteorites (H, L, and LL) which have been subjected to artificial space weathering by nanopulse laser were examined by TEM. NpFe(sup 0) bearing glasses were ubiquitous in both the naturally-weathered lunar and the artificially-weathered meteorite samples.

  2. GEM-AQ, an on-line global multiscale chemical weather modelling system: model description and evaluation of gas phase chemistry processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W. Kaminski; L. Neary; J. Struzewska; J. C. McConnell; A. Lupu; J. Jarosz; K. Toyota; S. L. Gong; J. Côté; X. Liu; K. Chance; A. Richter

    2008-01-01

    Tropospheric chemistry and air quality processes were implemented on-line in the Global Environmental Multiscale weather prediction model. The integrated model, GEM-AQ, was developed as a platform to investigate chemical weather at scales from global to urban. The current chemical mechanism is comprised of 50 gas-phase species, 116 chemical and 19 photolysis reactions, and is complemented by a sectional aerosol module

  3. Home Weatherization Visit

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Secretary Steven Chu visits a home that is in the process of being weatherized in Columbus, OH, along with Ohio Governor Ted Strickland and Columbus Mayor Michael Coleman. They discuss the benefits of weatherization and how funding from the recovery act is having a direct impact in communities across America.

  4. Home Weatherization Visit

    ScienceCinema

    Chu, Steven

    2013-05-29

    Secretary Steven Chu visits a home that is in the process of being weatherized in Columbus, OH, along with Ohio Governor Ted Strickland and Columbus Mayor Michael Coleman. They discuss the benefits of weatherization and how funding from the recovery act is having a direct impact in communities across America.

  5. Weather Report

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This printable weather report is designed to help students easily note a field site's important meteorological details. The one-page PDF form asks for the following information: date, temperature, precipitation, weather type, and wind speed (based on environmental clues).

  6. Winter Weather

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About CDC.gov . Natural Disasters and Severe Weather Earthquakes Being Prepared Emergency Supplies Home Hazards Indoor Safety ... What's New A - Z Index Disasters & Severe Weather Earthquakes Extreme Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis Volcanoes ...

  7. Weather Talk

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Weather Talk is a primer on weather and naval meteorology. It provides a brief overview of major weather elements and is presented in a non-mathematical way, so that the reader will have a better understanding of the basic mechanisms of weather and use it to their advantage and safety in planning and carrying out their own activities. The site explains temperature, wind, pressure, atmospheric moisture, air masses and fronts, thunderstorms, tornadoes, hurricanes, and climatology.

  8. Fair weather atmospheric electricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, R. G.

    2011-06-01

    Not long after Franklin's iconic studies, an atmospheric electric field was discovered in "fair weather" regions, well away from thunderstorms. The origin of the fair weather field was sought by Lord Kelvin, through development of electrostatic instrumentation and early data logging techniques, but was ultimately explained through the global circuit model of C.T.R. Wilson. In Wilson's model, charge exchanged by disturbed weather electrifies the ionosphere, and returns via a small vertical current density in fair weather regions. New insights into the relevance of fair weather atmospheric electricity to terrestrial and planetary atmospheres are now emerging. For example, there is a possible role of the global circuit current density in atmospheric processes, such as cloud formation. Beyond natural atmospheric processes, a novel practical application is the use of early atmospheric electrostatic investigations to provide quantitative information on past urban air pollution.

  9. Space Weather Priorities for Kinetic-Global Modeling (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onsager, T. G.

    2010-12-01

    Space weather is undergoing a major transformation whereby the demand for decision-capable information is beginning to far exceed our ability to produce the needed information. The limitations in our space weather capabilities are due to a number of factors, including a sparsity of data, limitations in our ability to assimilate data into our models, and the difficulties in modeling the diversity of scales and processes that control the solar-terrestrial environment. The increasing demand for space weather information creates the imperative to focus our research not only on improving our understanding of basic physical processes, but also on achieving specific outcomes that yield near-term progress in areas of high demand. Whereas, for example, full-physics, kinetic-global codes of particle acceleration and magnetic reconnection are important long-term goals, efforts to parameterize the sub-grid-scale physics or to implement intermediate solutions could lead to important near-term improvements in mitigating space weather impacts, as well as improve our understanding of the physical processes. This presentation will summarize the major areas where space weather information is needed, and discuss areas where advances in kinetic-global model development could have the most immediate impact on space weather services.

  10. World Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Elias, Jaume Sanchez

    2014-02-20

    What's going on in the world of weather? Are there storms around Sri Lanka? What about the snows of Kilimanjaro? These can be pressing questions, indeed, and the World Weather app is a great way to stay in touch with weather patterns around the globe. Users will find that they can just type in a city name to see the current weather and also zoom around the globe as they see fit. It's a remarkable addition to the world of existing weather tracking apps and is compatible with all operating systems.

  11. Weather Watcher

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Singer, Mike

    As spring progresses, weather conditions can continue to fluctuate dramatically, something that may foil vacation plans or other outings. Keeping that in mind, visitors may do well to download the Weather Watcher application created by Mike Singer. With this application, users may automatically retrieve the current weather conditions, look through hourly forecasts, keep abreast of severe weather alerts, and take a look at weather maps for almost any city world-wide. This application is compatible with all systems running Windows 98 and above.

  12. Weather impacts on space operations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Madura; B. Boyd; W. Bauman; N. Wyse; M. Adams

    1992-01-01

    The efforts of the 45th Weather Squadron of the USAF to provide weather support to Patrick Air Force Base, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Eastern Range, and the Kennedy Space Center are discussed. Its weather support to space vehicles, particularly the Space Shuttle, includes resource protection, ground processing, launch, and Ferry Flight, as well as consultations to the Spaceflight Meteorology

  13. Using Forecasting to Teach Weather Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubota, Y.; Takahashi, T.

    2009-09-01

    Weather affects our lives and hence, is a popular topic in daily conversations and in the media. Therefore, it is not only important to teach weather, but is also a good idea to use 'weather' as a topic in science teaching. Science education has two main objectives: to acquire scientific concepts and methods. Weather forecasting is an adequate theme to teach scientific methods because it is dependent on observation. However, it is not easy to forecast weather using only temporal observation. We need to know the tendency of 'weather change' via consecutive and/or continuous weather observation. Students will acquire scientific-observation skills through weather observation. Data-processing skills would be enhanced through a weather-forecasting contest. A contest should be announced within 5 days of school events, such as a school excursion and field day. Students submit their own weather forecast by gathering weather information through the internet, news paper and so on. A weather-forecasting contest compels the student to observe the weather more often. We currently have some different weather forecasts. For example, American weather-related companies such as ACCU weather and Weather Channel provide weather forecast for the many locations all over the world. Comparing these weather forecasting with actual weather, participants such as students could evaluate the differences between forecasted and actual temperatures. Participants will judge the best weather forecast based on the magnitude of the difference. Also, participants evaluate the 'hitting ratio' of each weather forecast. Students can learn elementary statistics by comparing various weather forecasts. We have developed our weather web-site that provides our own weather forecasting and observation. Students acquire science skills using our weather web-site. We will report our lessen plans and explain our weather web-site.

  14. Modelling the impacts of weather and climate variability on crop productivity over a large area: A new process-based model development, optimization, and uncertainties analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fulu Tao; Masayuki Yokozawa; Zhao Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Process-based crop models are increasingly being used to investigate the impacts of weather and climate variability (change) on crop growth and production, especially at a large scale. Crop models that account for the key impact mechanisms of climate variability and are accurate over a large area must be developed. Here, we present a new process-based general Model to capture the

  15. The influence of regional urbanization and abnormal weather conditions on the processes of human climatic adaptation on mountain resorts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artamonova, M.; Golitsyn, G.; Senik, I.; Safronov, A.; Babyakin, A.; Efimenko, N.; Povolotskaya, N.; Topuriya, D.; Chalaya, E.

    2012-04-01

    This work is a further development in the study of weather pathogenic index (WPI) and negative influence of urbanization processes on the state of people's health with adaptation disorder. This problem is socially significant. According to the data of the WHO, in the world there are from 20 to 45% of healthy people and from 40 to 80% of people with chronic diseases who suffer from the raised meteosensitivity. As a result of our researches of meteosensitivity of people during their short-duration on mountain resorts there were used negative adaptive reactions (NAR) under 26 routine tests, stress-reactions under L.H. Garkavi's hemogram, vegetative indices, tests of neuro-vascular reactivity, signs of imbalance of vegetative and neurohumoral regulation according to the data of biorhythm fractal analysis and sudden aggravations of diseases (SAD) as an indicator of negative climatic and urbanization influence. In 2010-2011 the Caucasian mountain resorts were having long periods of climatic anomalies, strengthening of anthropogenic emissions and forest fires when record-breaking high waves of NAR and SAD were noticed. There have also been specified indices ranks of weather pathogenicity from results of comparison of health characteristics with indicators of synoptico-dynamic processes according to Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF); air ionization N+, N-, N+/N- spectra of aerosol particles (the size from 500 to 20000 nanometers) and concentrations of chemically active gases (O3, NO, NO2, ), volatile phytoorganic substances in the surface atmosphere, bactericidal characteristics of vegetation by criterion ?2 (not above 0,05). It has allowed us to develop new physiological optimum borders, norm and pessimum, to classify emergency ecologo-weather situations, to develop a new techniques of their forecasting and prevention of meteopathic reactions with meteosensitive patients (Method of treatment and the early (emergency) and planned prevention meteopatic reactions in patients with coronary heart disease, hypertension stage I-II syndrome disadaptative using the transcranial mezo diencephalic modulation / L.I.Zherlitsina, N.V. Efimenko, N.P. Povolotskaya, I.I. Velikanov. the Patent for the invention No.2422128, RU (11) 2 422 128 (13) C1 from 6/27/2011; Bull.13). We have observed that such anthropogenic characteristics as accumulation of aerosol with the size of particles 500-5000 nanometers in the lower atmosphere in the quantity more than 60 particles/sm3 (getting to alveoli); decrease in quantity of negative ions (N-) lower than 200 ions/sm3, high coefficient of ions unipolarity (N+/N-) - more than 4-6; mass concentration of aerosol more than 150 mkg/m3 and other modules of the environment can act as limited markers for the forecast of dangerous NAR, SAD and taking of urgent radical preventive measures. These techniques of medical weather forecast and meteo prevention can be used in other mountain regions of the world. The studies were performed by support of the Program "Basic Sciences for Medicine" and RFBR project No.10-05-01014_a.

  16. Weather Research and Forecasting Model Goals: Develop an advanced mesoscale forecast

    E-print Network

    , hierarchical design, coding standards ­ Plug compatible physics, dynamical cores ­ Registry to describe ­ Atmospheric process studies ­ Other geophysical fluid dynamical applications · Numerical weather research conducted by 15 WRF Working Groups · Software framework provides portable, scalable code with plug

  17. Thermodynamics of Irreversible Processes. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Michael; Gallucci, V. F.

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. This module describes the application of irreversible thermodynamics to biology. It begins with…

  18. JOINT DRY/WET WEATHER TREATMENT OF MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER AT CLATSKANIE, OREGON

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the two year plant scale evaluation of physical and biological processes used for joint treatment of dry weather and storm generated sanitary sewer flow. The project was conducted in Clatskanie, OR at the City's new joint dry/wet weather sewage treatment pla...

  19. Space Weathering of Lunar Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, S. K.; Keller, L. P.; Christoffersen, R.; Rahman, Z.

    2012-01-01

    All materials exposed at the lunar surface undergo space weathering processes. On the Moon, boulders make up only a small percentage of the exposed surface, and areas where such rocks are exposed, like central peaks, are often among the least space weathered regions identified from remote sensing data. Yet space weathered surfaces (patina) are relatively common on returned rock samples, some of which directly sample the surface of larger boulders. Because, as witness plates to lunar space weathering, rocks and boulders experience longer exposure times compared to lunar soil grains, they allow us to develop a deeper perspective on the relative importance of various weathering processes as a function of time.

  20. Rock-weathering by lichens in Antarctic: patterns and mechanisms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chen Jie; Hans-Peter Blume

    2002-01-01

    Saxicolous species of lichens are able to induce and accelerate weathering of their rock substrate, and effects of lichens\\u000a on substrate can be attributed to both physical and chemical causes. This paper is focused on biotic weathering actions of\\u000a epilithic and endolithic species on the different rock types (sandstones and volcanogenic rocks) in Antarctica. The patterns,\\u000a mechanisms, processes and neoformations

  1. Wide variability in physical activity environments and weather-related outdoor play policies in child-care centers within a single county of Ohio

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, Kristen A; Sherman, Susan N; Khoury, Jane C; Foster, Karla E; Saelens, Brian E; Kalkwarf, Heidi J

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To examine the variability of physical activity environments and outdoor play-policies in child-care centers, and to determine if they are associated with center demographic characteristics Design Telephone survey—the Early Learning Environments Physical Activity and Nutrition Telephone Survey (ELEPhANTS) Setting Child-care centers in Hamilton County (Cincinnati area), Ohio, 2008–9. Participants Directors of all 185 licensed full-time child-care centers in Hamilton County. Outcome Measures Descriptive measures of center playground and indoor physical activity environments, and weather-related outdoor-play policies. Results 162 (88%) centers responded. Most (93%) centers reported an on-site playground, but only half reported their playgrounds as large, at least 1/3rd covered in shade, or having a variety of portable play equipment. Only half reported having a dedicated indoor gross-motor room where children could be active during inclement weather. Only 20% of centers allowed children to go outside in temperatures below 32°F, and 43% of centers reported allowing children outdoors during light rain. A higher percent of children receiving tuition-assistance was associated with lower quality physical activity facilities and stricter weather-related practices. National accreditation was associated with more physical-activity promoting practices. Conclusion We found considerable variability in the indoor and outdoor playground offerings among child-care centers, even within a single county of Ohio. Per center policy and limited inside options, children’s active opportunities are curtailed due to sub-freezing temperatures or light rain. Policy change and parent/teacher education may be needed to ensure children achieve ample opportunity for daily physical activity. PMID:21199969

  2. New weather forecasting aid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A new, computerized weather analysis and display system developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is being used to provide air traffic controllers in Colorado with up-to-date information on weather systems that could affect aircraft within their control areas. The system, called PROFS (Prototype Regional Observing and Forecasting Services), was under development for four years at NOAA's Environmental Research Laboratories in Boulder, and is undergoing operational evaluation at the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA's) Denver Air Route Traffic Control Center in Longmont, Colo. FAA officials see the new system as a first step in upgrading the weather support services for the nation's air traffic control system. Originally created to help National Weather Service personnel with their forecasting duties (Eos, April 13, 1982, p. 233), the PROFS system was specially tailored for aviation use before being installed at the Longmont center. The system uses computers to process weather data from satellites, regional radar, wind profilers, a network of automated weather stations in eastern Colorado, and other sources, some of which are not normally available to forecasters. When this information is collected and formatted, weather personnel at the center can choose from several types of visual display on their terminals, depending on what information they require. The forecasters can then make printed copies of any display and distribute them within moments to controllers who use the information to alert air traffic to storms, wind shifts, and other weather disturbances.

  3. The Stress Process in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankenship, Bonnie Tjeerdsma

    2007-01-01

    Negative stress in physical education can reduce a student's enjoyment of physical activity and destroy the individual's desire to be a lifelong mover. The purpose of this article is to explore the concept of stress in physical education. Stress is defined as a substantial imbalance between the demand of a situation and the individual's capability…

  4. Weather Instruments

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Topic in Depth discusses the variety of instruments used to collect climate and weather data. The first two websites provide simple introductions to the many weather instruments. Bethune Academy's Weather Center (1) discusses the functions of psychrometers, anemometers, weather balloons, thermometers, and barometers. The Illinois State Water Survey (2) furnishes many images of various instruments that collect data daily for legal issues, farmers, educators, students, and researchers. The third website (3), created by the Center for Improving Engineering and Science Education (CIESE), provides a classroom activity to educate users on how to build and use weather instruments. By the end of the group project, students should know all about wind vanes, rain gauges, anemometers, and thermometers. Next, the Miami Museum of Science provides a variety of activities to help students learn about the many weather instruments including wind scales and wind chimes (4). Students can learn about the wind, air pressure, moisture, and temperature. At the fifth website, the Tyson Research Center at Washington University describes the devices it uses in its research (5). At the various links, users can find out the center's many projects that utilize meteorological data such as acid rain monitoring. The sixth website, a pdf document created by Dr. John Guyton at the Mississippi State University Extension Service, provides guidance to teachers about the education of weather patterns and instruments (6). Users can find helpful information on pressure systems, humidity, cloud patterns, and much more. Next, the University of Richmond discusses the tools meteorologists use to learn about the weather (7). While providing materials about the basic tools discussed in the other websites, this site also offers information about weather satellites, radar, and computer models. After discovering the many weather instruments, users can learn about weather data output and analysis at the Next Generation Weather Lab website (8). This expansive website provides an abundance of surface data and upper air data as well as satellite and radar images for the United States.

  5. DOE Workshop; Pan-Gass Conference on the Representation of Atmospheric Processes in Weather and Climate Models

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, PI Hugh

    2012-09-21

    This is the first meeting of the whole new GEWEX (Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment) Atmospheric System Study (GASS) project that has been formed from the merger of the GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) Project and the GEWEX Atmospheric Boundary Layer Studies (GABLS). As such, this meeting will play a major role in energizing GEWEX work in the area of atmospheric parameterizations of clouds, convection, stable boundary layers, and aerosol-cloud interactions for the numerical models used for weather and climate projections at both global and regional scales. The representation of these processes in models is crucial to GEWEX goals of improved prediction of the energy and water cycles at both weather and climate timescales. This proposal seeks funds to be used to cover incidental and travel expenses for U.S.-based graduate students and early career scientists (i.e., within 5 years of receiving their highest degree). We anticipate using DOE funding to support 5-10 people. We will advertise the availability of these funds by providing a box to check for interested participants on the online workshop registration form. We will also send a note to our participants' mailing lists reminding them that the funds are available and asking senior scientists to encourage their more junior colleagues to participate. All meeting participants are encouraged to submit abstracts for oral or poster presentations. The science organizing committee (see below) will base funding decisions on the relevance and quality of these abstracts, with preference given to under-represented populations (especially women and minorities) and to early career scientists being actively mentored at the meeting (e.g. students or postdocs attending the meeting with their advisor).

  6. The global control of silicate weathering rates and the coupling with physical erosion: new insights from rivers of the Canadian Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millot, Romain; Gaillardet, Jérôme; Dupré, Bernard; Allègre, Claude Jean

    2002-02-01

    The chemical evolution of the surface of the Earth is controlled by the interaction of rainwaters, the atmosphere and the continental crust. That is the main reason why the knowledge of the parameters that control chemical denudation on Earth is of crucial importance. We report chemical and isotopic analyses for river waters from the Canadian Shield in order to estimate chemical weathering fluxes. We present a comparison of the chemical composition and Sr isotopic composition of a set of rivers sampled in the Slave Province (Northwest Territories, Canada) and in the Grenville Province (Québec, Canada). The surface waters of these high latitude catchments are very dilute, with the Slave rivers about three times more concentrated than the Grenville rivers. A detailed analysis of the Sr isotopic composition and chemical signature of these rivers shows that silicate weathering reactions are not the only mechanisms that control solute concentrations. An atmospheric component, constituted by the dissolution of evaporite and carbonate aerosols, is necessary to explain the dispersion of chemical ratios such as Ca/Na, Mg/Na, Sr/Na and Cl/Na. These aerosols probably have a local origin. Chemical denudation rates for the Slave Province are four times lower than those found in the Grenville Province (0.35 and 1.55 tons/km 2/yr respectively). Compared to a panel of surface waters from other shield areas of the world, the Slave Province appears to have the lowest chemical denudation rate in the world. In a chemical weathering rate vs. temperature plot, shield rivers define a triangular relationship, hot climate being able to produce the most variable denudation rates. But no simple relationship between chemical weathering rates and temperature or runoff is observed, in contrast to rivers draining basaltic areas. We show that a global power law (0.66 exponent) exists between chemical denudation rates and physical denudation rates, indicating that the shield areas with low mechanical denudation (such as the Slave Province or Cameroon) have also low chemical denudation rates. These results give importance to physical denudation in determining the chemical weathering rates of silicates. We think that any further modeling on Earth's long term climate will have to take into account this fundamental coupling between mechanical and chemical weathering fluxes.

  7. Process Physics: From Quantum Foam to General Relativity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reginald T. Cahill

    2002-01-01

    Progress in the new information-theoretic process physics is reported in which the link to the phenomenology of general relativity is made. In process physics the fundamental assumption is that reality is to be modelled as self-organising semantic (or internal or relational) information using a self-referentially limited neural network model. Previous progress in process physics included the demonstration that space and

  8. Getting Middle-School Students up and Moving: What's the Role of School and Neighborhood Environments...and the Weather: Studying the Effect of Neighborhood and School Environments on Youth Physical Activity Levels. Program Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakashian, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Researchers at the Harvard Prevention Research Center at Harvard University School of Public Health examined how physical and social environments of schools and neighborhoods shape routine physical activities of students attending 10 middle schools in the Boston area. They also analyzed the effect of weather conditions on student physical

  9. Weather Forecasting

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Twin Cities Public Television, Inc.

    2005-01-01

    This activity (on page 2 of the PDF) is a full inquiry investigation into meteorology and forecasting. Learners will research weather folklore, specifically looking for old-fashioned ways of predicting the weather. Then, they'll record observations of these predictors along with readings from their own homemade barometer, graphing the correct predictions for analysis. Relates to linked video, DragonflyTV: Forecasting.

  10. AN overview of the FLYSAFE datalink solution for the exchange of weather information: supporting aircrew decision making processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Mirza; A. Drouin

    2009-01-01

    FLYSAFE is an Integrated Project of the 6th framework of the European Commission with the aim to improve flight safety through the development of an avionics solution the Next Generation Integrated Surveillance System (NGISS), which is supported by a ground based network of Weather Information Management Systems (WIMS) and access points in the form of the Ground Weather Processor (GWP).

  11. Rates of Chemical Weathering

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Michael Passow

    In this activity, students will investigate the weathering of rocks by chemical processes. They will use effervescent cleansing tablets as a model for rock, and vary surface area, temperature, and acidity to see how rapidly the "rock" dissolves. This investigation will help them understand three of the factors that affect the rate of chemical weathering and develop better understanding of how to design controlled experiments by exploring only one experimental variable at a time.

  12. Weathering and Erosion

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-06-26

    In this multi-station lab, learners conduct a series of experiments to explore the processes and effects of weathering and erosion. Using the results from these explorations, learners design and conduct an experiment comparing the rate of erosion in different biomes. Use this activity to teach weathering and erosion, and also to illustrate how scientists often use the results of one experiment to inspire another. This activity is intended to be conducted over multiple meetings.

  13. Extrapolation of space weathering processes to other small solar system bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffey, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    A diverse range of processes were invoked as the dominant factor or as important contributory factors in the modification of the optical surface and regolith of the moon. These include impact vitrification by large and small projectiles, solar wind implantation and the reduction of oxidized iron during energetic events, sputtering and crystal lattice damage by energetic cosmic rays, shock metamorphism of minerals, mixing of diverse lithologies by impacts, and contamination by external materials. These processes are also potentially important on the rocky surfaces of other small solar system bodies. For icy bodies, several additional processes are also possible, including formation of complex organic compounds from methane and ammonia-bearing ices by ultraviolet irradiation and the condensation of vapor species to form frost layers in the polar or cooler regions of objects at appropriate heliocentric distances. The lunar case, even when completely understood, will not extend in a simple linear fashion to other small rocky objects, nor will the optical surfaces of those objects all be affected to the same degree by each process. The major factors that will control the relative efficacy of a possible mechanism include the efficiency of ejecta retention and the degree to which the regolith materials experience multiple events (primarily a function of body size, escape velocity, and impactor velocities); the mean duration of typical regolith particle exposure at the optical surface and within reach of the micrometeorite, cosmic ray, solar wind, or UV fluxes (a function of the rate and scale of regolith mixing, production, and removal processes); the incident flux of solar (low energy) cosmic rays, solar wind, or UV radiation (inverse square of heliocentric distance) or of galactic (high energy) cosmic rays (slowly increasing flux with heliocentric distance); and the compositional and mineralogical nature of the surface being affected. In general, those processes that depend upon either the retention of impact ejecta or on the presence of multigenerational regoliths should be substantially less effective on smaller bodies with lower escape velocities. However, there are important exceptions to this generalization. For example, a process that involves the hypervelocity impact of small particles into a fine-grained regolith may be able to effectively retain highly shocked or melted material due to the nature of shock wave propagation in such a heterogeneous material.

  14. TIME SERIES ANALYSIS OF REMOTELY-SENSED TIR EMISSION: linking anomalies to physical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlidou, E.; van der Meijde, M.; Hecker, C.; van der Werff, H.; Ettema, J.

    2013-12-01

    In the last 15 years, remote sensing has been evaluated for detecting thermal anomalies as precursor to earthquakes. Important issues that need yet to be tackled include definition of: (a) thermal anomaly, taking into account weather conditions, observation settings and ';natural' variability caused by background sources (b) the length of observations required for this purpose; and (c) the location of detected anomalies, which should be physically related to the tectonic activity. To determine whether thermal anomalies are statistical noise, mere meteorological conditions, or actual earthquake-related phenomena, we apply a novel approach. We use brightness temperature (top-of-atmosphere) data from thermal infrared imagery acquired at a hypertemporal (sub-hourly) interval, from geostationary weather satellites over multiple years. The length of the time series allows for analysis of meteorological effects (diurnal, seasonal or annual trends) and background variability, through the application of a combined spatial and temporal filter to distinguish extreme occurrences from trends. The definition of potential anomalies is based on statistical techniques, taking into account published (geo)physical characteristics of earthquake related thermal anomalies. We use synthetic data to test the performance of the proposed detection method and track potential factors affecting the results. Subsequently, we apply the method on original data from Iran and Turkey, in quiescent and earthquake-struck periods alike. We present our findings with main focus to assess resulting anomalies in relation to physical processes thereby considering: (a) meteorological effects, (b) the geographical, geological and environmental settings, and (c) physically realistic distances and potential physical relations with the activity of causative faults.

  15. Removing Adherent Noise from Image Sequences in Rainy Weather by Spatio-Temporal Image Processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Isao Fukuchi; Atsushi Yamashita; Toru Kaneko; Kenjiro T. Miura

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a method that can remove view-disturbing noise from image sequences by spatio-temporal image processing. In outdoor environments on rainy days, pictures taken by a camera are often degraded because of adherent noise, such as water drops on the surface of the lens-protecting glass of the camera. To solve this problem, our method uses image sequences captured with

  16. Genesis of karren in Kentucky Lake, Tennessee: Interaction of geologic structure, weathering processes, and bioerosion

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, M.A.; Smith, W.L. (Univ. of Tennessee, Martin, TN (United States))

    1993-03-01

    While karst features formed along marine coastlines are commonly reported, shoreline karst features produced within lacustrine systems have received little attention. The shoreline of Bond Island'' in Kentucky Lake has evolved a distinctive karren geomorphology not recognized elsewhere in the lake. The karren consist of well-developed clint and grike topography, trench formation, solution pits, flutes, and runnels, and pit and tunnel development. Two processes are responsible for the karren. First, freshwater dissolution and wave action on structurally fractured Decatur Limestone (Silurian) mechanically and chemically weaken the entire exposed surface. Second, a seasonal cycle of winter freeze-thaw and frost wedging followed by spring bioerosion overprints the first set of processes. Bioerosion by chemical dissolution involving a complex association of predominantly chironomids, algae, fungi, and bryozoa results in preferential dissolution along joints, stylolites, and bedding planes to form shallow spindle-shaped solution pits over the entire surface and sides of the karren. The solution pits average 1 cm length by 0.4 cm depth densely covering rock surfaces. This study suggests that seasonal bioerosion may constitute a more important geomorphic factor in lacustrine systems than previously recognized.

  17. Planetary Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This lesson plan is part of the DiscoverySchool.com lesson plan library for grades 6-8. It focuses on the weather conditions on other planets. After learning more about weather patterns, students research the weather on a given planet and create a visual display of the conditions there. It includes objectives, materials, procedures, discussion questions, evaluation ideas, suggested readings, and vocabulary. There are videos available to order which complement this lesson, and links to teaching tools for making custom quizzes, worksheets, puzzles and lesson plans.

  18. Bell Labs - Physical Sciences - Silicon Processing Introduction

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website includes a description of silicon processing from Bell Laboratories. Silicon chips are prepared by an elaborate sequence of processing steps applied to a silicon wafer. Keywords: Patterning, implantation, oxidation, metallization, photoresist

  19. Physical and numerical analysis of three dimensional extrusion process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hasan Sofuoglu; Hasan Gedikli

    2004-01-01

    Three dimensional extrusion process was simulated by utilizing physical modeling technique and numerical method based on the finite element analysis. Plasticine, a soft modeling material, which shows elastic–plastic flow behavior, and conical die were used in the extrusion process for both physical and numerical simulations. The extrusion billet was made from alternating slabs of black and stone color of Plasticine

  20. Simulation and Analysis of Physical Processes for Aiding Technology Development

    E-print Network

    Cole, Dan C.

    4/16/03 1 Simulation and Analysis of Physical Processes for Aiding Technology Development Dan Cole Dept. Manufacturing Engineering, Boston University #12;4/16/03 2 Simulation of Physical Processes of technology helps to dictate the appropriate level of simulation/modeling. Both directions are useful! One

  1. Electrical Storm Simulation to Improve the Learning Physics Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martínez Muñoz, Miriam; Jiménez Rodríguez, María Lourdes; Gutiérrez de Mesa, José Antonio

    2013-01-01

    This work is part of a research project whose main objective is to understand the impact that the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) has on the teaching and learning process on the subject of Physics. We will show that, with the use of a storm simulator, physics students improve their learning process on one hand they understand…

  2. Research Papers Leaf Processing by Wild Chimpanzees: Physically Defended Leaves

    E-print Network

    Research Papers Leaf Processing by Wild Chimpanzees: Physically Defended Leaves Reveal Complex Andrews, Fife, Scotland Abstract The manual processing of eight species of leaf was investigated in the M-group chimpanzees of Mahale Mountains National Park, Tanzania. Leaf species varied in the extent to which physical

  3. Weather Tools

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Miami Museum of Science provides a variety of activities to help students learn about the many weather instruments including wind scales and wind chimes. Students can learn about the wind, air pressure, moisture, and temperature.

  4. Classification algorithms for weather radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Felix Yanovsky; Vitaly Marchuk; Yaroslav Ostrovsky; Yulia Averyanova

    2008-01-01

    Theory, measurements, and signal processing applying to the radar remote sensing of weather objects are considered. Algorithms for hydrometeor type and turbulence intensity recognition are developed and analyzed. Particularly, fuzzy logic and neural network approaches are applied for weather radar signal processing.

  5. Exploring Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Miss Emily

    2010-01-29

    Second Grade Standard 3: Students will develop an understanding of their environment. Objective 2: Observe and describe weather. Indicator a: Observe and describe patterns of change in weather. Monday, February 1st: Look at the five-day forecast for Salt Lake City, Utah at Five day forecasts. The high temperature for the day will be in red and the low temperature will be in blue. Make sure you look at the temperature listed in degrees Farenheit (F) not degrees Celcius (C). Make ...

  6. Weather Creator

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    KShumway

    2009-09-28

    This project explores factors that help create severe winter weather. An interactive simulation provides hands-on experience, followed by guiding questions and resource exploration. Form groups of three. Explore the following simulation: Weather Maker Simulator Use the simulation to answer the following questions on paper. 1. In general, when are winds formed? 2. When winds are blowing, how can you get them to stop? 3. What can you do to make it rain or even snow? 4. Does it always snow when ...

  7. Space Weather at Earth and its Relationship to Planetary Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastwood, J. P.

    2013-09-01

    Space weather research at Earth largely concerns the practical impact of space plasma physics. In this overview talk we will consider the sources of space weather, areas of impact, and the monitoring of space weather including a presentation of the Sunjammer solar sail technology demonstration mission. We will then consider the concept of planetary space weather, and explore the differences and synergies that exist between this general research area and the study of space weather at Earth.

  8. CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL PROCESS AND MECHANISM MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this task is to develop and test chemical and physical mechanisms for use in the chemical transport models of EPA's Models-3. The target model for this research is the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. These mechanisms include gas and aqueous phase ph...

  9. Turbulence and Fluid Flow: Perspectives. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, James R.

    This module is part of a series on Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems. The materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process.…

  10. Climate signal and weather noise

    SciTech Connect

    Leith, C.E.

    1995-04-01

    A signal of small climate change in either the real atmosphere or numerical simulation of it tends to be obscured by chaotic weather fluctuations. Time-lagged covariances of such weather processes are used to estimate the sampling errors of time average estimates of climate parameters. Climate sensitivity to changing external influences may also be estimated using the fluctuation dissipation relation of statistical mechanics. Answers to many climate questions could be provided by a realistic stochastic model of weather and climate.

  11. A SYSTEM FOR REALISTIC WEATHER RENDERING

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kirk Riley; Charles Hansen; Jason Levit

    Weather visualization has traditionally been restricted to surface models and 2-D representations. We present a visually accurate method for rendering volumetric multi-field weather data that includes cloud water, ice, rain, snow, and graupel hydrometeors. This representation better communicates the complex 3-D nature of weather, by rendering it according to physically based lighting and scattering characteristics of hydrometeor particles. The rendering

  12. Space Weather and Management of Environmental Risks and Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirjola, R.; Kauristie, K.; Lappalainen, H.

    "Space Weather" is defined as electromagnetic and particle conditions in the space environment that can disturb space-borne and ground-based technological systems (e.g. satellite operation, telecommunication, aviation, electric power transmission) and even endanger human health. Thus, space weather is of great importance to the society since people are dependent on reliable operation of modern technology, interruptions of which may lead to large economical and other losses. Physical processes involved in space weather constitute a complicated chain from the Sun to the Earth's surface. Thus, a full understanding of space weather and the risks it produces requires expertise in many different disciplines of science and technology. Space weather is a new subject among the natural risks and hazards which threaten the society and its infrastructure (although the first observations of ground effects of space weather were already made about 150 years ago). Monitoring systems for the management of other risks, such as floods, forest fires, etc., and for security are, to a great extent, based on satellite observations. Spacecraft and the communication between satellites and the ground are vulnerable to space weather. Thus, besides being a direct risk to technological systems, space weather may also be indirectly adverse to risk management. These two aspects of space weather are considered in a proposal to be submitted to EU's Sixth Framework Programme under the "Aeronautics and Space" priority in the "Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) / Risk Management" area in March 2004. The proposal coordinated by the Finnish Meteorological Institute with five to ten participating institutes is called SW-RISK ("Space Weather - Risk Indices from Scientific Know-how").

  13. Impact of terrestrial weather on the upper atmosphere

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. J. Fuller-Rowell; R. A. Akmaev; F. Wu; A. Anghel; N. Maruyama; D. N. Anderson; M. V. Codrescu; M. Iredell; S. Moorthi; H.-M. Juang; Y.-T. Hou; G. Millward

    2008-01-01

    A whole atmosphere model has been developed to demonstrate the impact of terrestrial weather on the upper atmosphere. The dynamical core is based on the NWS Global Forecast System model, which has been extended to cover altitudes from the ground to 600 km. The model includes the physical processes responsible for the stochastic nature of the lower atmosphere, which is

  14. The Weather Doctor

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Heidorn, Keith C.

    Published by Spectrum Educational Enterprises, The Weather Doctor Web site is maintained by meteorologist Keith Heidorn. Visitors to the site will find everything from the joys of weather watching, to making rain, to weather history, to much more. Coming from someone who clearly enjoys what they do, this site explores unique aspects of weather including weather people, weather history, and weather and arts.

  15. Atmospheric physical processes regulating diurnal and seasonal variations in CO2 fluxes over a large reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Zhang, Q.; Katul, G. G.; Cole, J. J.; Chapin, T.

    2014-12-01

    As the role of carbon emissions from inland waters in regional and global carbon budget has become increasing apparent, better understanding the influence of environmental variables on CO2 exchange requires direct, long-term eddy covariance measurements of CO2 fluxes across the water-atmosphere interface. Here we provide analysis of CO2 fluxes over a large southern inland water body of Ross Barnett Reservoir in central Mississippi in 2008. It is found that greater atmospheric instability at night leads to approximately 70% greater CO2 effluxes than during daytime. Frequent synoptic weather events associated with extratropical cyclones induce CO2 flux pulses, resulting in further increase in annual CO2 effluxes by 16%. Therefore, our measurements indicate that CO2 emission rates from global inland waters, which do not account for the influence of these atmospheric physical processes on CO2 exchange across the water-air interface, are likely underestimated by approximately 42%. Field measurements and modeling efforts to estimate CO2 emissions should consider this daytime-nighttime efflux difference and the missing emissions during these synoptic weather events.

  16. Developing Tutorials for Advanced Physics Students: Processes and Lessons Learned

    E-print Network

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Developing Tutorials for Advanced Physics Students: Processes and Lessons Learned Charles Baily electrodynamics, active learning, course transformation. PACS: 01.40.Fk, 01.40.gb INTRODUCTION A common theme in physics education research (PER) is that students will learn more when they are active participants

  17. Weathering effects on the structure and reactivity of US coals: Final report, July 15, 1984-July 14, 1987. [Many data

    SciTech Connect

    Meuzelaar, H.L.C.; Hill, G.R.; Yun, Yongseung; Jakab, E.; Windig, W.; Urban, D.; Yon, Kyung Yol; Oestreich, J.; East, J.

    1987-01-01

    This report covers the work performed from July 1984 to July 1987 under the project entitled ''Weathering Effects on Structure and Reactivity of US Coals'' (grant number FG22-84PC70798). The main objectives of the study were to investigate the structural changes in coal during the weathering process as well as to develop a simple, reliable weathering index, which can monitor indirectly the weathering-induced changes in physical and chemical properties. Although there have been numerous publications on structure and reactivity of coal, most data reported in the literature thus far have been obtained on coal samples of uncertain weathering status and therefore need to be interpreted with great caution. Weathering has a profound effect on many important coal properties such as heating value, caking characteristics, acidity, flotability and reactivity in liquefaction, combustion and gasification processes. The objective of developing a weathering index is to predict these coal property changes due to weathering without resorting to real-time measurements or pilot plant runs. This report is comprised of four main chapters: I. Structural Changes due to Weathering; II. Material Balance in Weathering Process; III. Development of a Reliable Weathering Index; and IV. Proposed Weathering Mechanisms. A battery of sophisticated analytical tools and techniques was employed during this study. Pyrolysis mass spectrometry in time-integrated, as well as in time-resolved modes with computer-aided data analysis techniques (such as factor and discriminant analysis), gas chromatography, thermogravimetry/mass spectrometry and solvent extraction were used for determining the role of oxygen during the weathering process. Pyrolysis mass spectrometry, Free Swelling Index and a novel slurry pH technique were employed as weathering indicators. 170 refs.

  18. Wild Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    In this online, interactive module, students learn about severe weather (thunderstorms, hurricanes, tornadoes, and blizzards) and the key features for each type of "wild weather" using satellite images. The module is part of an online course for grades 7-12 in satellite meteorology, which includes 10 interactive modules. The site also includes lesson plans developed by teachers and links to related resources. Each module is designed to serve as a stand-alone lesson, however, a sequential approach is recommended. Designed to challenge students through the end of 12th grade, middle school teachers and students may choose to skim or skip a few sections.

  19. Unisys Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Unisys weather website offers a host of weather analyses and forecasts. In the Analyses link, visitors can find satellite images as well as surface, upper air, and radar images. Visitors can learn the intricacies of Unisys's many forecast models such as the Nested Grid Model (NGM), Aviation Model, and the Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) Model. Users can find archived hurricane data for the Atlantic, the Eastern Pacific, and the Western Pacific. The site also furnishes archived surface maps, infrared satellite images, upper air charts, and sea surface temperature (SST) plots.

  20. Weather Forecasting

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this online, interactive module, students will learn how to interpret weather patterns from satellite images, predict storm paths and forecast the weather for their area. The module is part of an online course for grades 7-12 in satellite meteorology, which includes 10 interactive modules. The site also includes lesson plans developed by teachers and links to related resources. Each module is designed to serve as a stand-alone lesson, however, a sequential approach is recommended. Designed to challenge students through the end of 12th grade, middle school teachers and students may choose to skim or skip a few sections.

  1. Weather One

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1969-12-31

    From the University of Illinois Extension comes the Weather One instructional Web site for kids. The lesson consists of six pages that cover various weather related topics including seasons, clouds, the atmosphere, wind, global warming, and storms. Each page describes the particular subject, provides related photographs, and contains several activities that reinforce the learning. For example, the clouds page shows how kids can make a cloud and create a collage out of simple material found around the house. The effective organization and clean look of the site will surely make it easy for students to follow and enjoy.

  2. Wonderful Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Broadhead

    2007-11-06

    Second Grade Standard 3: Students will develop an understanding of their environment. Objective 2: Observe and describe weather. Indicator a: Observe and describe patterns of change in weather. Monday November 6th: Look at the five-day forecast for Logan Utah at Five Day Forecast in Utah. The high temperature for the day will be in red and the low temperature will be in blue. Look at the temperature listed in degrees Farenheit (F) not degrees Celcius (C). Make a bar graph for the ...

  3. Weather Forecasting

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-01-01

    Weather Forecasting is one of several online guides produced by the Weather World 2010 project at the University of Illinois. These guides use multimedia technology and the dynamic capabilities of the web to incorporate text, colorful diagrams, animations, computer simulations, audio, and video to introduce topics and concepts in the atmospheric sciences. This module introduces forecast methods and the numerous factors one must consider when attempting to make an accurate forecast. Sections include forecasting methods for different scenarios, surface features affecting forecasting, forecasting temperatures for day and night, and factors for forecasting precipitation.

  4. Device Physics of Solution Processable Solar Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason Erik Lewis

    2011-01-01

    This Ph.D work reports the studies of photovoltaic devices produced by solution processable methods. Two material systems are of interest: one is based on organic semiconductors, and another on organic\\/inorganic hybrid composites. Specifically, organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices are made using photoactive materials consisted of a ?-conjugated polymer [Poly(3-hexylthiophene), or P3HT] and fullerene derivative [phenyl-C60-butric acid methyl ester, or PCBM] in

  5. Some Physical Processes in Dusty Plasmas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Rosenberg

    2001-01-01

    Ionized gases containing fine (?m to sub-?m sized) charged dust grains, referred to as dusty plasmas, occur in diverse cosmic\\u000a and laboratory environments. Dust occurs in many space and astrophysical environments, including planetary rings, comets,\\u000a the Earth's ionosphere, and interstellar molecular clouds. Dust also occurs in laboratory plasmas, including processing plasmas,\\u000a and crystallized dusty plasmas. Charged dust can lead to

  6. The Topographic Control of Chemical Weathering in Hillslope Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, K.; Amundson, R.; Heimsath, A. M.; Dietrich, W. E.; Brimhall, G. H.

    2004-12-01

    Chemical weathering drives biogeochemical cycles from local to global scales, and has the power to regulate the earth's climate on geological time scales. However, little is known of the spatial variation in weathering on hillslopes, and the mechanisms behind those variations. This study addresses the topographic control on soil chemical weathering on convex uplands. We developed a process-based mass balance model that integrates chemical mass losses with physical sediment transport. We applied the model along a ˜60 meter long, semi-arid eucalyptus-grassland savanna hillslope underlain by granodiorite, in the southwestern Australian Highlands. Measurements of soil elemental chemistry, cosmogenic isotope-based saprolite-to-soil conversion rates, and a fine scale topographic survey provided model data. The soil weathering rates varied from the losses of ˜35 g m-2 yr-1 on the ridge to the net gains of ˜28 g m-2 yr-1 at the lowest portion of the slope. A net chemical mass loss occurred in all soils along the entire slope, decreasing from ˜65 % near the convex ridge to ˜35 % at the base of the slope. The mechanism for the apparent discrepancy between spatially constrained weathering rates and net weathering losses (relative to saprolite) is that as sediment moves faster with an increasing slope gradient in the downslope direction, soils eroded from upslope positions pass quickly through the downslope zones of chemical gains, which are able to only partially replenish the pre-weathered soil material. Differences in chemical mobility of elements, and biological nutrient demand, significantly modified the spatial redistribution of elements released by weathering: P and Ca, relative to Si, Al, and Fe, were preferentially retained, particularly within an apron of relatively high fertility that mantled the hillslope base. Finally, when chemical weathering losses were subtracted from the overall sediment mass balance, the slope-dependent physical soil transport rate was reduced by half, and the resulting physical transport was found to increase nonlinearly with increasing slope gradients. In conclusion, this study integrates chemical weathering and physical transport on convex uplands, complementing recent watershed scale analyses and providing a spatial perspective of both weathering and elemental redistribution on hillslopes that have applications to ecology as well as geochemistry.

  7. Quantum speed limit for physical processes.

    PubMed

    Taddei, M M; Escher, B M; Davidovich, L; de Matos Filho, R L

    2013-02-01

    The evaluation of the minimal evolution time between two distinguishable states of a system is important for assessing the maximal speed of quantum computers and communication channels. Lower bounds for this minimal time have been proposed for unitary dynamics. Here we show that it is possible to extend this concept to nonunitary processes, using an attainable lower bound that is connected to the quantum Fisher information for time estimation. This result is used to delimit the minimal evolution time for typical noisy channels. PMID:23414007

  8. Calibrating DOE-2 to Weather and Non-Weather-Dependent Loads for a Commercial Building: Data Processing Routines to Calibrate a DOE-2 Model, Volume II

    E-print Network

    Bronson, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    or 1> Choose "0" to process one year's worth of data, filling in missing data if necessary. Choose "1" to generate the smallest n x 24 matrix containing the input data. name of the 123AUTO.WK1 macro without its *.std extension. Example: 3... # DEVELOPED BY: Energy Systems Laboratory, Mechanical Engr. Dept., # Texas A&M University., College Station, Texas 77843-3123, # (409)- 845-1560 # SUPPORTED BY: State of Texas Governor's Energy Management Center # # COPYRIGHT NOTICE: This program bears a...

  9. Process of converting polluting particles, emitted in chemical or physical processes, into harmless substances

    SciTech Connect

    Hooykaas, C.W.

    1982-03-02

    Harmful metals containing particles being emitted in chemical or physical processes, such as in iron production or in combustion processes, are caught and intimately divided in a molten metallurgic slag in order to avoid pollution problems.

  10. Today's Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This activity is part of Planet Diary and contains an online exploration of weather maps. Students use current maps to learn about and locate different features such as low-pressure areas and fronts. They then explore how these are related to severe storms.

  11. Weather Stations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is a series of seven brief activities about Jupiter's atmosphere and weather. Learners will look at Jupiter's distinct banded appearance, violent storms, and clouds of many different colors. The activities are part of Explore! Jupiter's Family Secrets, a series designed to engage children in space and planetary science in libraries and informal learning environments.

  12. Weather Alert

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

    Students discuss the characteristics of storms, including the relationship of weather fronts and storms. Using everyday materials, they develop models of basic lightning detection systems (similar to a Benjamin Franklin design) and analyze their models to determine their effectiveness as community storm warning systems.

  13. TESTING SOLIDS SETTING APPARATUSES FOR DESIGN AND OPERATION OF WET-WEATHER FLOW SOLIDS-LIQUID SEPARATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was a side-by-side comparison of two settling evaluation methods: one traditional and one new. The project investigated whether these column tests were capable of capturing or representing the rapidly settling particles present in wet-weather flows (WWF). The report r...

  14. Two-Photon Physics in Hadronic Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Carl Carlson; Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2007-11-01

    Two-photon exchange contributions to elastic electron-scattering are reviewed. The apparent discrepancy in the extraction of elastic nucleon form factors between unpolarized Rosenbluth and polarization transfer experiments is discussed, as well as the understanding of this puzzle in terms of two-photon exchange corrections. Calculations of such corrections both within partonic and hadronic frameworks are reviewed. In view of recent spin-dependent electron scattering data, the relation of the two-photon exchange process to the hyperfine splitting in hydrogen is critically examined. The imaginary part of the two-photon exchange amplitude as can be accessed from the beam normal spin asymmetry in elastic electron-nucleon scattering is reviewed. Further extensions and open issues in this field are outlined.

  15. Petrography and geochemical characteristics of the sediments of the small River Hemavati, Southern India: Implications for provenance and weathering processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sensarma, S.; Rajamani, V.; Tripathi, Jayant K.

    2008-04-01

    Small rivers (? 100 km length) are likely to drain fewer rock types. Therefore, their solutes and sediments are good indicators of weathering environments typical of their basins and help constraining the nature of their source rocks. To understand this, the texture, mineralogy, major and trace element compositions of the sediments deposited by the River Hemavati, a northern upland tributary of the Cauvery River in southern India, are analyzed and discussed. The Hemavati sediments are overall of fine sand size (mean 2-3?), and have high concentrations of FeO (? 7 wt.%), TiO 2 (? 1.2 wt.%), Cr (? 350 ppm) and Ni (? 125 ppm). Major and trace element distribution call for a binary source for the sediments, and particularly point to contrasting climatic conditions of their provenances. The source areas in the upstream and downstream parts are exposed to sub-humid high relief and sub-arid low relief conditions, respectively, with distinct weathering characteristics. The CIA values (85-48) decrease from near the source to downstream, suggesting that the downstream rain-shadow part of the catchment suffered only minor chemical weathering. On the other hand, the REE distribution in the Hemavati sediments indicates contrasting lithologies in their provenance, and is not controlled by chemical weathering. On the basis of REE patterns, the sediments are divided into two compositional groups. The Type 1 sediments have a REE chemistry similar to the upper continental crust, and have been derived from the > 3.2 Ga composite peninsular gneisses occurring in the low-lying, semi-arid Mysore Plateau. The Type 2 sediments, however, have dominantly intermediate to mafic granulite contributions from the tectonically uplifted Western Ghats, weathered under sub-humid conditions. High concentrations of FeO, TiO 2, Cr and Ni in the sediments suggest mafic-dominated source lithologies in the upper catchment, a feature also confirmed by field observations and petrographic study.

  16. Weathering processes and the composition of inorganic material transported through the orinoco river system, Venezuela and Colombia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stallard, R.F.; Koehnken, L.; Johnsson, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    The composition of river-borne material in the Orinoco River system is related primarily to erosion regime, which in turn is related to tectonic setting; especially notable is the contrast between material derived from tectonically active mountain belts and that from stable cratonic regions. For a particular morpho-tectonic region, the compositional suites of suspended sediment, bed material, overback deposits, and dissolved phases are fairly uniform are are typically distinct from whose of other regions. For each region, a consistent set of chemical weathering reactions can be formulated to explain the composition of dissolved and solid loads. In developing these formulations, erosion on slopes and storage of solids in soils and alluvial sediments are important considerations. Compositionally verymature sediment is derived from areas of thick soils where erosion is transport limited and from areas where sediments are stored for extended periods of time in alluvial deposits. Compositionally immature sediments are derived from tectonically active mountain belts where erosion is weathering limited. Weathering-limited erosion also is important in the elevated parts of the Guayana Shield within areas of sleep topography. Compared to the mountain belts, sediments derived from elevated parts of the Shield are more mature. A greater degree of chemical weathering seems to be needed to erode the rock types typical of the Shield. The major-element chemistry and mineral composition of sediment delivered by the Orinoco River to the ocean are controlled by rivers that have their headwaters in mountain belts and cross the Llanos, a region of alluvial plains within the foreland basin. The composition of sediments in rivers that drain the Shield seems to be established primarily at the site of soil formation, whereas for rivers that drain the mountain belts, additional weathering occurs during s episodes of storage on alluvial plains as sediments are transported across the Llanos to the main stem of the Orinoco. After mixing into the main stem, there seems to be little subsequent alteration of sediment. ?? 1991.

  17. An integrated biochemical and physical model for the composting process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francina Sole-Mauri; Josep Illa; Albert Magrí; Francesc X. Prenafeta-Boldú; Xavier Flotats

    2007-01-01

    A dynamic model for the composting process has been developed, which integrates several biochemical and physical processes. Different microbial populations (mesophilic and thermophilic bacteria, actinomycetes and fungi) have been considered, each specialized in certain types of polymeric substrates (carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin) and their hydrolysis products. Heat and mass transfer between the three phases of the system

  18. Basic physical processes in pulsed metal vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrash, Gueorgii G.

    1990-06-01

    A review of investigations of basic physical processes in gas discharge metal vapor lasers, operating on transitions from resonance to metastable level is presented. Processes during excitation pulse and also during interpulse period of time between successive excitation pulses are discussed.

  19. Physical-chemical processes in a protoplanetary cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavrukhina, Avgusta K.

    1991-01-01

    Physical-chemical processes in a protoplanetary cloud are discussed. The following subject areas are covered: (1) characteristics of the chemical composition of molecular interstellar clouds; (2) properties and physico-chemical process in the genesis of interstellar dust grains; and (3) the isotope composition of volatiles in bodies of the Solar System.

  20. Process evaluation results from the HEALTHY physical education intervention

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Process evaluation is an assessment of the implementation of an intervention. A process evaluation component was embedded in the HEALTHY study, a primary prevention trial for Type 2 diabetes implemented over 3 years in 21 middle schools across the United States. The HEALTHY physical education (PE) i...

  1. AN AUTOMATED CARTOGRAPHIC GENERALIZATION PROCESS: A PSEUDO-PHYSICAL MODEL

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Joubran; Abu Daoud; Y. Doytsher

    Automating the map generalization process has traditionally been a major focus of research in cartography and GIS environment, even though a usable holistic generalization method is still lacking. The model described in this paper examines the generalization process from a new standpoint that views the map as a stage in area warfare. A pseudo physical model was developed for automated

  2. Physical processes in polar stratospheric ice clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Turco, Richard; Jordan, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    A one dimensional model of cloud microphysics was used to simulate the formation and evolution of polar stratospheric ice clouds. Some of the processes which are included in the model are outlined. It is found that the clouds must undergo preferential nucleation upon the existing aerosols just as do tropospheric cirrus clouds. Therefore, there is an energy barrier between stratospheric nitric acid particles and ice particles implying that nitric acid does not form a continuous set of solutions between the trihydrate and ice. The Kelvin barrier is not significant in controlling the rate of formation of ice particles. It was found that the cloud properties are sensitive to the rate at which the air parcels cool. In wave clouds, with cooling rates of hundreds of degrees per day, most of the existing aerosols nucleate and become ice particles. Such clouds have particles with sizes on the order of a few microns, optical depths on order of unity and are probably not efficient at removing materials from the stratosphere. In clouds which form with cooling rates of a few degrees per day or less, only a small fraction of the aerosols become cloud particles. In such clouds the particle radius is larger than 10 microns, the optical depths are low and water vapor is efficiently removed. Seasonal simulations show that the lowest water vapor mixing ratio is determined by the lowest temperature reached, and that the time when clouds disappear is controlled by the time when temperatures begin to rise above the minimum values.

  3. Weather from the Stratosphere?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Mark P.; Thompson, David W. J.; Shuckburgh, Emily F.; Norton, Warwick A.; Gillett, Nathan P.

    2006-01-01

    Is the stratosphere, the atmospheric layer between about 10 and 50 km, important for predicting changes in weather and climate? The traditional view is that the stratosphere is a passive recipient of energy and waves from weather systems in the underlying troposphere, but recent evidence suggests otherwise. At a workshop in Whistler, British Columbia (1), scientists met to discuss how the stratosphere responds to forcing from below, initiating feedback processes that in turn alter weather patterns in the troposphere. The lowest layer of the atmosphere, the troposphere, is highly dynamic and rich in water vapor, clouds, and weather. The stratosphere above it is less dense and less turbulent (see the figure). Variability in the stratosphere is dominated by hemispheric-scale changes in airflow on time scales of a week to several months. Occasionally, however, stratospheric air flow changes dramatically within just a day or two, with large-scale jumps in temperature of 20 K or more. The troposphere influences the stratosphere mainly through atmospheric waves that propagate upward. Recent evidence shows that the stratosphere organizes this chaotic wave forcing from below to create long-lived changes in the stratospheric circulation. These stratospheric changes can feed back to affect weather and climate in the troposphere.

  4. Titan's Methane Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roe, Henry G.

    2012-05-01

    Conditions in Titan's troposphere are near the triple point of methane, the second most abundant component of its atmosphere. Our understanding of Titan's lower atmosphere has shifted considerably in the past decade. Ground-based observations, Hubble Space Telescope images, and data returned from the Cassini and Huygens spacecraft show that Titan's troposphere hosts a methane-based meteorology in direct analogy to the water-based meteorology of Earth. What once was thought to be a quiescent place, lacking in clouds or localized weather and changing only subtly on long seasonal timescales, is now understood to be a dynamic system with significant weather events regularly occurring against the backdrop of dramatic seasonal changes. Although the observational record of Titan's weather covers only a third of its 30-year seasonal cycle, Titan's atmospheric processes appear to be more closely analogous to those of Earth than to those of any other object in our solar system.

  5. Process Physics: From Quantum Foam to General Relativity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reginald T. Cahill

    2002-01-01

    Progress in the new information-theoretic process physics is reported in\\u000awhich the link to the phenomenology of general relativity is made. In process\\u000aphysics the fundamental assumption is that reality is to be modelled as\\u000aself-organising semantic (or internal or relational) information using a\\u000aself-referentially limited neural network model. Previous progress in process\\u000aphysics included the demonstration that space and

  6. Weather Science Hotlist

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1969-12-31

    The Franklin Institute Online offers the metadata Web site Weather Science Hotlist. The page contains dozens of links organized into ten topics that include Online Exhibits, Weather Right Now, Background Information, Severe Weather, El Nino/ La Nina, Historical Weather, Career Connections, Activities, Atmosphere, and Weather Forecasting. A great source for anyone looking for online weather information.

  7. Weather Cycles

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Mitchell

    2010-09-23

    We are professionals in the teaching profession. We designed this project for children ranging from 4th grade to 6th grade. This project explores factors that help create severe winter weather. An interactive simulation provides hands-on experience, followed by guiding questions and resource exploration. YOU WILL NEED: Paper with copied questions, Overhead projector and Students broken up into groups of 3. Form groups of three. Have each group explore the following simulation: Weather Maker Simulator Have students use the simulation to answer the following questions on paper. They should be discussing the questions in their groups. 1. In general, when are winds formed? 2. When winds are blowing, how can you get them to stop? 3. What ...

  8. Honeycomb Weathering of Limestone Formations

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Honeycomb weathering of sandstone located on the shores of Puget Sound occurs when expanding salt crystals break fragments of rock, creating a small hole that becomes larger as the process repeats itself over time....

  9. Significant impacts of radiation physics in the Weather Research and Forecasting model on the precipitation and dynamics of the West African Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R.; Jin, J.; Wang, S.-Y.; Gillies, R. R.

    2015-03-01

    Precipitation from the West African Monsoon (WAM) provides food security and supports the economy in the region. As a consequence of the intrinsic complexities of the WAM's evolution, accurate simulations of the WAM and its precipitation regime, through the application of regional climate models, are challenging. We used the coupled Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) and Community Land Model (CLM) to explore impacts of radiation physics on the precipitation and dynamics of the WAM. Our results indicate that the radiation physics schemes not only produce biases in radiation fluxes impacting radiative forcing, but more importantly, result in large bias in precipitation of the WAM. Furthermore, the different radiation schemes led to variations in the meridional gradient of surface temperature between the north that is the Sahara desert and the south Guinean coastline. Climate diagnostics indicated that the changes in the meridional gradient of surface temperature affect the position and strength of the African Easterly Jet as well as the low-level monsoonal inflow from the Gulf of Guinea. The net result was that each radiation scheme produced differences in the WAM precipitation regime both spatially and in intensity. Such considerable variances in the WAM precipitation regime and dynamics, resulting from radiation representations, likely have strong feedbacks within the climate system and so have inferences when it comes to aspects of predicted climate change both for the region and globally.

  10. Remote sensing of atmospheric particulates: Technological innovation and physical limitations in applications to short-range weather prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, R. J.; Kropfil, R.; Hallett, J.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques for remote sensing of particles, from cloud droplet to hailstone size, using optical and microwave frequencies are reviewed. The inherent variability of atmospheric particulates is examined to delineate conditions when the signal can give information to be effectively utilized in a forecasting context. The physical limitations resulting from the phase, size, orientation and concentration variability of the particulates are assessed.

  11. Weather Activities

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This entertaining, interactive website is the perfect tool to educate users about the basics of weather forecasting and reporting. The two educational modules, created by EdHeads, each contain three levels and are designed for grades four through nine. While discovering how to predict a three-day forecast, students learn about warm and cold fronts, wind direction and speed, high and low pressure systems, isobars, and humidity. Teachers can find a helpful guide discussing how best to use the site as well as providing an overview of science standards, lesson plans, and pre- and post-tests for students.

  12. Weather Tamers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Donna R. Sterling

    2007-03-01

    Problem-based learning experiences that extend at least two weeks provide an opportunity for students to investigate a real-world problem while learning science content and skills in an exciting way. Meteorology provides a wealth of problems students can investigate while learning specific science concepts and skills found frequently in middle level national and state curricula standards. The hands-on activity described in this article helps students learn about the science behind weather events by planning, constructing, and testing models of cities exposed to a series of simulated hurricanes and tornado conditions.

  13. Mountain Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mountains can be awe-inspiring both for the vistas they provide and for the weather events and long-term climate systems they support. This interactive feature illustrates how a moisture-laden air mass interacts with a mountain slope to produce characteristic patterns of precipitation over the mountain and surrounding areas. Viewers can see how clouds and precipitation form as the air mass ascends the windward side of the peak, and observe the rain shadow created on the leeward side by the descending, warmed, and moisture-depleted air. A background essay and list of discussion questions supplement the interactive feature.

  14. Weather Photography

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ph.D. student Harald Edens describes himself as a "photographer of lightning, clouds, atmospheric optical phenomena and astronomy". His Web site entitled Weather Photography proves this by providing a stunning collection of photographs and movies of atmospheric optics, lightning, clouds, and astronomy. The author describes how the photographs were taken, what equipment was used, and even discusses many of the phenomenon being observed such as mirages and halos. An added bonus of this very interesting site is that the author generously allows free personal use of the photographs.

  15. Destructive Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    alizabethirwin

    2010-11-03

    What are the effects of different types of destructive weather? Learn All About Hurricanes Record on your chart 3 things that you learned. Watch a Hurricane Video These are the devastating Effects of Hurricanes Learn All About Tornadoes Record on your chart 3 things that you learned. Watch a Tornado Video These are the devastating Effects of tornadoes Learn All About Thunderstorms Record on your chart 3 things that you learned. These are the devastating Effects of thunderstorms Follow these important tips To keep safe. ...

  16. Biological Production in Lakes. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Ecological Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, R. A.; Carey, G. F.

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. Primary production in aquatic ecosystems is carried out by phytoplankton, microscopic plants…

  17. Pressure and Buoyancy in Aquatic Ecosystems. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Christina E.

    This module is part of a series designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. This module explores some of the characteristics of aquatic organisms which can be…

  18. Soil Heat Flow. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, James R.

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. Soil heat flow and the resulting soil temperature distributions have ecological consequences…

  19. Continuous simulation of hypothetical physics processes with multiple free parameters

    E-print Network

    Jiahang Zhong; Run-Sheng Huang; Shih-Chang Lee

    2012-05-31

    We propose a new approach to simulate hypothetical physics processes which are defined by multiple free parameters. Compared to the conventional grid-scan approach, the new method can produce accurate estimations of the detector acceptance and signal event yields continuously over the parameter space with fewer simulation events. The performance of this method is illustrated with two realistic cases.

  20. Adaptive Numerical Algorithms in Space Weather Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toth, Gabor; vanderHolst, Bart; Sokolov, Igor V.; DeZeeuw, Darren; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Fang, Fang; Manchester, Ward B.; Meng, Xing; Nakib, Dalal; Powell, Kenneth G.; Stout, Quentin F.; Glocer, Alex; Ma, Ying-Juan; Opher, Merav

    2010-01-01

    Space weather describes the various processes in the Sun-Earth system that present danger to human health and technology. The goal of space weather forecasting is to provide an opportunity to mitigate these negative effects. Physics-based space weather modeling is characterized by disparate temporal and spatial scales as well as by different physics in different domains. A multi-physics system can be modeled by a software framework comprising of several components. Each component corresponds to a physics domain, and each component is represented by one or more numerical models. The publicly available Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) can execute and couple together several components distributed over a parallel machine in a flexible and efficient manner. The framework also allows resolving disparate spatial and temporal scales with independent spatial and temporal discretizations in the various models. Several of the computationally most expensive domains of the framework are modeled by the Block-Adaptive Tree Solar wind Roe Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code that can solve various forms of the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations, including Hall, semi-relativistic, multi-species and multi-fluid MHD, anisotropic pressure, radiative transport and heat conduction. Modeling disparate scales within BATS-R-US is achieved by a block-adaptive mesh both in Cartesian and generalized coordinates. Most recently we have created a new core for BATS-R-US: the Block-Adaptive Tree Library (BATL) that provides a general toolkit for creating, load balancing and message passing in a 1, 2 or 3 dimensional block-adaptive grid. We describe the algorithms of BATL and demonstrate its efficiency and scaling properties for various problems. BATS-R-US uses several time-integration schemes to address multiple time-scales: explicit time stepping with fixed or local time steps, partially steady-state evolution, point-implicit, semi-implicit, explicit/implicit, and fully implicit numerical schemes. Depending on the application, we find that different time stepping methods are optimal. Several of the time integration schemes exploit the block-based granularity of the grid structure. The framework and the adaptive algorithms enable physics based space weather modeling and even forecasting.

  1. Adaptive numerical algorithms in space weather modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Gábor; van der Holst, Bart; Sokolov, Igor V.; De Zeeuw, Darren L.; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Fang, Fang; Manchester, Ward B.; Meng, Xing; Najib, Dalal; Powell, Kenneth G.; Stout, Quentin F.; Glocer, Alex; Ma, Ying-Juan; Opher, Merav

    2012-02-01

    Space weather describes the various processes in the Sun-Earth system that present danger to human health and technology. The goal of space weather forecasting is to provide an opportunity to mitigate these negative effects. Physics-based space weather modeling is characterized by disparate temporal and spatial scales as well as by different relevant physics in different domains. A multi-physics system can be modeled by a software framework comprising several components. Each component corresponds to a physics domain, and each component is represented by one or more numerical models. The publicly available Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) can execute and couple together several components distributed over a parallel machine in a flexible and efficient manner. The framework also allows resolving disparate spatial and temporal scales with independent spatial and temporal discretizations in the various models. Several of the computationally most expensive domains of the framework are modeled by the Block-Adaptive Tree Solarwind Roe-type Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code that can solve various forms of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations, including Hall, semi-relativistic, multi-species and multi-fluid MHD, anisotropic pressure, radiative transport and heat conduction. Modeling disparate scales within BATS-R-US is achieved by a block-adaptive mesh both in Cartesian and generalized coordinates. Most recently we have created a new core for BATS-R-US: the Block-Adaptive Tree Library (BATL) that provides a general toolkit for creating, load balancing and message passing in a 1, 2 or 3 dimensional block-adaptive grid. We describe the algorithms of BATL and demonstrate its efficiency and scaling properties for various problems. BATS-R-US uses several time-integration schemes to address multiple time-scales: explicit time stepping with fixed or local time steps, partially steady-state evolution, point-implicit, semi-implicit, explicit/implicit, and fully implicit numerical schemes. Depending on the application, we find that different time stepping methods are optimal. Several of the time integration schemes exploit the block-based granularity of the grid structure. The framework and the adaptive algorithms enable physics-based space weather modeling and even short-term forecasting.

  2. Weathering crusts on peridotite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucher, Kurt; Stober, Ingrid; Müller-Sigmund, Hiltrud

    2015-05-01

    Chemical weathering of dark-green massive peridotite, including partly serpentinized peridotite, produces a distinct and remarkable brown weathering rind when exposed to the atmosphere long enough. The structure and mineral composition of crusts on rocks from the Ronda peridotite, Spain, have been studied in some detail. The generic overall weathering reaction serpentinized peridotite + rainwater = weathering rind + runoff water describes the crust-forming process. This hydration reaction depends on water supply from the outcrop surface to the reaction front separating green peridotite from the brown crust. The reaction pauses after drying and resumes at the front after wetting. The overall net reaction transforms olivine to serpentine in a volume-conserving replacement reaction. The crust formation can be viewed as secondary serpentinization of peridotite that has been strongly altered by primary hydrothermal serpentinization. The reaction stoichiometry of the crust-related serpentinization is preserved and reflected by the composition of runoff waters in the peridotite massif. The brown color of the rind is caused by amorphous Fe(III) hydroxide, a side product from the oxidation of Fe(II) released by the dissolution of fayalite component in olivine.

  3. The Weather Dude

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Walker, Nick.

    2002-01-01

    The Weather Dude is a weather education Web site offered by meteorologist Nick Walker of The Weather Channel. For kids, the site offers a great online textbook entitled Weather Basics, which explains everything from precipitation to the seasons, using simple text and fun graphics. Other fun things for kids include weather songs, questions and quizzes, weather proverbs, and more. Teachers are also provided with helpful resources such as weather activity sheets and printable blank maps, as well as many other links to weather forecasts and information that will help make teaching about weather fun.

  4. Reconnaissance of Field Sites for the Study of Chemical Weathering on the Guayana Shield, South America

    SciTech Connect

    Steefell, C I

    2003-02-01

    Despite the fact that chemical weathering of silicate rocks plays an important role in the draw-down of CO{sub 2} over geologic time scales (Berner and Berner, 1996), the overall controls on the rate of chemical weathering are still not completely understood. Lacking a mechanistic understanding of these controls, it remains difficult to evaluate a hypothesis such as that presented by Raymo and Ruddiman (1992), who suggested that enhanced weathering and CO{sub 2} draw-down resulting from the uplift of the Himalayas contributed to global cooling during the Cenozoic. At an even more fundamental level, the three to four order of magnitude discrepancy between laboratory and field weathering rates is still unresolved (White et al., 1996). There is as yet no comprehensive, mechanistic model for silicate chemical weathering that considers the coupled effects of precipitation, vadose zone flow, and chemical reactions. The absence of robust process models for silicate weathering and the failure to resolve some of these important questions may in fact be related-the controls on the overall rates of weathering cannot be understood without considering the weathering environment as one in which multiple, time-dependent chemical and physical processes are coupled (Malmstrom, 2000). Once chemical weathering is understood at a mechanistic process level, the important controls on chemical weathering (physical erosion, temperature, precipitation) can be folded into larger scale models tracking the global carbon cycle. Our goal in this study was to carry out the preliminary work needed to establish a field research site for chemical weathering om the Cuayana Shield in South America. The Guayana Shield is a Precambrian province greater than 1.5 billion years old covering portions of Venezuela, Guyana (the country), Surinam, French Guiana, and Brazil (Figure 1). More important than the age of the rocks themselves, however, is the age of the erosion surface developed on the Shield, with estimates ranging as old as 65 million years. Preserved mostly in highlands, this very old erosion surface represents an end-member site where physical erosion has been significantly slower than the rate of chemical weathering. Much of the Shield is also noteworthy for the fact that chemical weathering is still occurring today, thus offering the chance to study a system in which a present day weathering regime is accompanied by an integrated weathering record over millions of years (Soler and Lasaga, 2000). If rates of chemical weathering can be determined for this very old weathering system where physical erosion is minor, they can then be compared with rates determined from sites with similar annual temperatures and rainfall, but much higher physical erosion rates. Comparative studies of this kind can provide a parameterization of chemical weathering rates as a function of physical erosion and tectonic uplift that can be used in global models for the carbon cycle.

  5. Terminal Doppler weather radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Michelson; W. W. Shrader; J. G. Wieler

    1990-01-01

    The terminal Doppler weather radar (TDWR) system, now under development, will provide automatic detection of microbursts and low-level wind shear. This paper discusses the TDWR performance parameters and describes its structural elements, including the antenna subsystem, the transmitter, the receiver\\/exciter, the digital signal processor, and the radar product generator\\/remote monitoring subsystem. Attention is also given to the processes of the

  6. Laboratory Studies of Fundamental Physics Processes in Space Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Masaaki

    2003-10-01

    Despite the enormous difference in physical scales, there are striking similarities in the behavior of laboratory and space plasmas. In the recent decade, a fruitful cross fertilization has been initiated between laboratory plasma physicists and space-astrophysicists in multidisciplinary meetings. The advances in laboratory plasma physics, along with the recent surge of space astrophysical data from satellites, have made collaborative research very useful for obtaining new understanding of key space and astrophysical phenomena. The recent rapid advance of numerical simulations has played an important role to bridge laboratory data with space-astrophysical observations. Many common plasma physics mechanisms have been identified in our research fields that study plasma waves, particle acceleration, magnetic reconnection, dynamos, transport and, more generally, plasma's self-organization phenomena. For example, the magnetic reconnection phenomenon is considered to be a key process in the evolution of solar flares, in the dynamics of the earth's magnetosphere and in the formation process of stars. It is also one of the most important self-organization processes in fusion research plasmas. It is crucial for both fields to understand the basic physics of magnetic reconnection. The present talk presents examples of common plasma physics issues which are extensively investigated among laboratory and space astrophysics research. Special focus is put on magnetic self-organization phenomena [1] which include magnetic reconnection [2] and dynamos [3]. During the past decade, many "physics-issue-dedicated" laboratory experiments have been constructed to address the specified physics mechanisms of space-astrophysical phenomena. They can generate fundamental physics processes in a controlled manner and provide well-correlated data of plasma parameters simultaneously at multiple locations. This talk reviews the most recent progress of these dedicated laboratory experiments as well as comparison of the data with space astrophysical observations and numerical simulation results. The talk also covers the goals and principles of the recent new initiatives to attack the common frontier of both laboratory and space astrophysics research. [1] J.B. Taylor, Rev. Modern phys.,vol.58, 741 (1986) [2] M. Yamada, Earth Planets Space, vol.53, 539 (2001) [3] H. Ji and S. Prager, Magnetohydrodynamics, vol.38,191 (2002)

  7. Weather information network including graphical display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leger, Daniel R. (Inventor); Burdon, David (Inventor); Son, Robert S. (Inventor); Martin, Kevin D. (Inventor); Harrison, John (Inventor); Hughes, Keith R. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An apparatus for providing weather information onboard an aircraft includes a processor unit and a graphical user interface. The processor unit processes weather information after it is received onboard the aircraft from a ground-based source, and the graphical user interface provides a graphical presentation of the weather information to a user onboard the aircraft. Preferably, the graphical user interface includes one or more user-selectable options for graphically displaying at least one of convection information, turbulence information, icing information, weather satellite information, SIGMET information, significant weather prognosis information, and winds aloft information.

  8. Clarification Concepts for Treating Peak Wet-Weather Wastewater Flows

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roderick Reardon

    2005-01-01

    Clarification can be an effective process for treating wet weather flows. The effectiveness of clarification in removing pollutants will depend on the characteristics of the suspended solids in wet weather. Suspended solids in wet weather flows can be significantly different from the suspended solids in dry weather flows. Hence determination of organic content, particle size distributions, and most importantly settling

  9. Localized Weathering: Implications for Theoretical and Applied Studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven J. Gordon; Ronald I. Dorn

    2005-01-01

    In situ quantification of localized weathering processes on basalt flows in New Mexico and Hawaii demonstrates that small-area factors can be more important than other more readily observable factors. Further, it demonstrates that the factorial concept of the Pope Boundary-Layer weathering model is partially solvable, that organic weathering can accentuate glass weathering (with implications for climate models and storage of

  10. Results from the Second Forum on the Future Role of the Human in the Forecast Process. Part II: Cognitive Psychological Aspects of Expert Weather Forecasters

    E-print Network

    Schultz, David

    : Cognitive Psychological Aspects of Expert Weather Forecasters NEIL A. STUART* NOAA/National Weather Service on the cognitive psychological aspects of expert weather forecasters. The first presentation discussed the learning and is discussed in Stuart et al. (2006a). The second session addressed the cognitive psychological aspects

  11. Evidence for biological mediation of K and P weathering inferred from a new process-based soil evolution model and soil chronosequences from Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M.; Gloor, E.

    2012-12-01

    The productivity of many tropical forests is limited by the availability of nutrients such as phosphorus (P). Nutrient limitation thus has consequences for the global climate because it alters the response of vegetation productivity to changing CO2 concentrations. The amount of mineral derived nutrients available to vegetation depends upon a number of factors such as the age of the soil, the weatherability of rock minerals, the mechanism of nutrient uptake by the vegetation and the leaching intensity of the soils. An understanding of the interactions between pedogenetic processes and nutrient cycling can therefore enhance our understanding of ecosystem dynamics. Studies examining the interactions between soil processes and nutrient availability are limited, mainly because of the long timescales over which many of these processes operate and of the difficulty in isolating individual soil processes. Data from soil climate-sequences and chronosequences can potentially shed light on these interactions when combined with a model which includes soil forming processes over pedogenic timescales. We have developed a process-based soil evolution model which can be evaluated with measurements of soil properties in order to understand such biogeochemical cycles. The mechanistic, soil evolution model presented includes the major processes of soil formation including i) mineral weathering, ii) percolation of rainfall, iii) leaching of solutes, iv) surface erosion, v) bioturbation and vi) vegetation-soil interactions. The specific properties the model simulates over timescales of tens to hundreds of thousand years are, soil depth, vertical profiles of elemental composition, soil solution pH and organic carbon distribution. Modelled soil properties are compared with measured soil properties from basaltic soil chronosequences in Hawaii. The model generally agrees well with the soil chronosequences. Here we focus on one particularly interesting result regarding the role of the biosphere on weathering. Model results demonstrate that the biosphere greatly influences modelled soil properties. A good agreement is observed between measured and modelled Na, which is not a plant nutrient and Mg and Ca which are less strongly cycled, across both an age and rainfall gradient, suggesting a good understanding of modelled soil processes. However, the model underestimates the relative depletion of K and P from the soil profiles. Nutrient uptake in the model is controlled by the rate of evapotranspiration and the concentration of the nutrient in the soil solution. Independently, there is experimental evidence for roots actively inducing the release of non-exchangeable nutrients from minerals. The differences between measured and modelled K and P profiles therefore indirectly provides evidence for this mechanism of nutrient acquisition and highlights the important role vegetation and mycorrhiza play in accelerating the release of specific nutrients from minerals. This result suggests that biologically enhanced mineral weathering should be recognized when interpreting soil properties in order to understand soil-vegetation interactions.

  12. Weather Prediction Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacmeister, Julio T.

    Awareness of weather and concern about weather in the proximate future certainly must have accompanied the emergence of human self-consciousness. Although weather is a basic idea in human existence, it is difficult to define precisely.

  13. Winter Weather Checklists

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health Matters What's New Preparation & Planning Disasters & Severe Weather Earthquakes Extreme Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis ... Weather Information on Specific Types of Emergencies Winter Weather Checklists Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ...

  14. Hot Weather Tips

    MedlinePLUS

    HOT Weather Tips Printer-friendly version We all suffer in hot weather. However, for elderly and disabled people and ... stress and following these tips for dealing with hot weather. Wear cool clothing: See that the person ...

  15. Bioremediation of a weathered and a recently oil-contaminated soils from Brazil: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Trindade, P V O; Sobral, L G; Rizzo, A C L; Leite, S G F; Soriano, A U

    2005-01-01

    The facility with which hydrocarbons can be removed from soils varies inversely with aging of soil samples as a result of weathering. Weathering refers to the result of biological, chemical and physical processes that can affect the type of hydrocarbons that remain in a soil. These processes enhance the sorption of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) to the soil matrix, decreasing the rate and extent of biodegradation. Additionally, pollutant compounds in high concentrations can more easily affect the microbial population of a recently contaminated soil than in a weathered one, leading to inhibition of the biodegradation process. The present work aimed at comparing the biodegradation efficiencies obtained in a recently oil-contaminated soil (spiked one) from Brazil and an weathered one, contaminated for four years, after the application of bioaugmentation and biostimulation techniques. Both soils were contaminated with 5.4% of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) and the highest biodegradation efficiency (7.4%) was reached for the weathered contaminated soil. It could be concluded that the low biodegradation efficiencies reached for all conditions tested reflect the treatment difficulty of a weathered soil contaminated with a high crude oil concentration. Moreover, both soils (weathered and recently contaminated) submitted to bioaugmentation and biostimulation techniques presented biodegradation efficiencies approximately twice as higher as the ones without the aforementioned treatment (natural attenuation). PMID:15620743

  16. Influence of different natural physical fields on biological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashinsky, A. L.

    2001-01-01

    In space flight conditions gravity, magnetic, and electrical fields as well as ionizing radiation change both in size, and in direction. This causes disruptions in the conduct of some physical processes, chemical reactions, and metabolism in living organisms. In these conditions organisms of different phylogenetic level change their metabolic reactions undergo changes such as disturbances in ionic exchange both in lower and in higher plants, changes in cell morphology for example, gyrosity in Proteus ( Proteus vulgaris), spatial disorientation in coleoptiles of Wheat ( Triticum aestivum) and Pea ( Pisum sativum) seedlings, mutational changes in Crepis ( Crepis capillaris) and Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana) seedling. It has been found that even in the absence of gravity, gravireceptors determining spatial orientation in higher plants under terrestrial conditions are formed in the course of ontogenesis. Under weightlessness this system does not function and spatial orientation is determined by the light flux gradient or by the action of some other factors. Peculiarities of the formation of the gravireceptor apparatus in higher plants, amphibians, fish, and birds under space flight conditions have been observed. It has been found that the system in which responses were accompanied by phase transition have proven to be gravity-sensitive under microgravity conditions. Such reactions include also the process of photosynthesis which is the main energy production process in plants. In view of the established effects of microgravity and different natural physical fields on biological processes, it has been shown that these processes change due to the absence of initially rigid determination. The established biological effect of physical fields influence on biological processes in organisms is the starting point for elucidating the role of gravity and evolutionary development of various organisms on Earth.

  17. Stacking of blocks by chimpanzees: developmental processes and physical understanding

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Misato Hayashi

    2007-01-01

    The stacking-block task has been used to assess cognitive development in both humans and chimpanzees. The present study reports\\u000a three aspects of stacking behavior in chimpanzees: spontaneous development, acquisition process following training, and physical\\u000a understanding assessed through a cylindrical-block task. Over 3 years of longitudinal observation of block manipulation, one\\u000a of three infant chimpanzees spontaneously started to stack up cubic

  18. The physics of Reionization: processes relevant for SKA observations

    E-print Network

    Semelin, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The local intensity of the 21 cm signal emitted during the Epoch of Reionization that will be mapped by the SKA is modulated by the amount of neutral hydrogen. Consequently, understanding the process of reionization of the intergalactic medium (IGM) is crucial for predicting and interpreting the upcoming observations. After presenting the basic physics and most meaningful quantities pertaining to the process of reionization, we will review recent progress in our understanding of the production and escape of ionizing photons in primordial galaxies and of their absorption in the IGM especially in so-called minihalos and Lyman Limit Systems.

  19. The Weathering of Micrometeorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Ginneken, M.; Genge, M. J.; Folco, L.

    2014-09-01

    Despite the favorable conditions for their preservation, micrometeorites from Antarctica are affected by terrestrial weathering. Here we present a comprehensive work on the weathering of micrometeorites from Antarctica.

  20. Space Weathering on Airless Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieters, C. M.; Blewett, D. T.; Hiroi, T.; Marchi, S.; McFadden, L. A.; Noble, S. K.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Taylor, L. A.; Reddy, V.

    2012-12-01

    Space weathering refers to an array of processes that measurably alter the character of surfaces that are exposed to the space environment with time. Important observations and constraints come from integration of ground truth sample information and remotely sensed data for the surface. Currently, such combined sample and remote data are available for the Moon, a few near-Earth asteroids (NEAs), and Vesta. Although common processes exist on every planetary body visited, the character of surface alteration by space weathering on airless bodies is very dependent on the particular space environment and the geology and composition of the host. For the Moon, lunar samples have provided a direct link between exposure to the space environment and the development and accumulation of nanophase reduced iron (npFe^0) on soil grains [1]. The optical properties of npFe^0 are well defined experimentally [2]. The resulting effects on lunar materials include reduction of diagnostic absorption bands, prominence of a red-sloped near-infrared (NIR) continuum, and lower albedo [3]. For Eros and Hyabusa, two NEAs visited by spacecraft, similar, but less pronounced optical effects are observed [4]. The in situ Eros measurements and returned Hyabusa samples confirm both bodies are ordinary chondritic in composition despite the optical alteration of their surface [5]. The main-belt proto-planet Vesta has long been associated with HED basaltic achondrite meteorites [6]. Data from Dawn reveal an anti-correlation between mineral band strength and albedo often observed around fresh craters. However, no association is seen with NIR continuum slope implying little development of significant npFe^0 [7]. Several physical and compositional reasons that hinder npFe^0 creation on Vesta are now recognized; alteration processes are instead more linked with dispersal of opaques and regolith mixing processes [7, 8]. Space weathering and evolution of the optical properties of regolith on airless bodies include the following general principles: A. Accumulation of nanophase opaque coatings on regolith grains with time is a common process and involves solar wind bombardment and/or micrometeoroid vaporization. This may be more dominant in the inner solar system. B. Although recent impacts often produce local heterogeneity at a crater, repeated impact mixing by smaller events results in apparent surficial homogenization over time. There is a suggestion that regolith mixing may be dominant for low-gravity regimes. Common related products involve impact darkening that creates and disperses micron-scale opaques [9] that darken but do not 'redden' the surface. C. Surface gravity and electrostatic forces strongly affect the development and retention of space weathering products. These are currently poorly quantified but steady-state processes appear to provide regional uniformity. References: 1. Keller & McKay, GCA, 1997; Taylor et al., JGR, 2001; 2010; Noble et al., MaPS, 2001. 2. Sasaki et al., Nature, 2001; Noble et al., Icarus, 2007. 3 Pieters et al., MaPS, 2000; Hapke JGR, 2001. 4. Clark et al., MaPS, 2001; Binzel et al., MaPS, 2001; Hiroi et al., Nature, 2006. 5. Trombke et al., Science, 2000; Nakamura et al., Science, 2011. 6. McCord et al., Science, 1970; De Sanctis et al., Science, 2012. 7. Pieters et al., Nature in press, 2012. 8. McCord et al., Nature in press; Reddy et al., Icarus, submitted. 9. Britt & Pieters, GCA, 1994.

  1. Linking Weathering, Rock Moisture Dynamics, Geochemistry, Runoff, Vegetation and Atmospheric Processes through the Critical Zone: Graduate Student led Research at the Eel River Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, W. E.

    2014-12-01

    In the Eel River Critical Zone Observatory lies Rivendell, a heavily-instrumented steep forested hillslope underlain by nearly vertically dipping argillite interbedded with sandstone. Under this convex hillslope lies "Zb", the transition to fresh bedrock, which varies from less than 6 m below the surface near the channel to 20 m at the divide. Rempe and Dietrich (2014, PNAS) show that the Zb profile can be predicted from the assumption that weathering occurs when drainage is induced in the uplifting fresh bedrock under hillslopes by lateral head gradients driven by channel incision at the hillslope boundary. Infiltrating winter precipitation is impeded at the lower conductivity boundary at Zb, generating perched groundwater that dynamically pulses water laterally to the channel, controlling stream runoff. Below the soil and above the water table lies an unsaturated zone through which all recharge to the perched groundwater (and thus all runoff to channels) occurs. It is this zone and the waters in them that profoundly affect critical zone processes. In our seasonally dry environment, the first rains penetrate past the soil and moisten the underlying weathered bedrock (Salve et al., 2012, WRR). It takes about 200 to 400 mm of cumulative rain, however, before the underlying groundwater rises significantly. Oshun et al (in review) show that by this cumulative rainfall the average of the wide-ranging isotopic signature of rain reaches a nearly constant average annual value. Consequently, the recharging perched groundwater shows only minor temporal isotopic variation. Kim et al, (2014, GCA) find that the winter high-flow groundwater chemistry is controlled by relatively fast-reacting cation exchange processes, likely occurring in transit in the unsaturated zone. Oshun also demonstrates that the Douglas fir rely on this rock moisture as a water source, while the broadleaf trees (oaks and madrone) use mostly soil moisture. Link et al (2014 WRR) show that Doug fir declines in transpiration rate significantly compared to the madrone during summer high water stress periods, with may induce feedbacks from the forest to atmospheric temperature and humidity. Collectively these studies spotlight the seasonally dynamic unsaturated zone in the weathered bedrock beneath the soil as key to understanding critical zone processes.

  2. COSMIC GPS Ionospheric Sensing and Space Weather

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. A. Hajj; L. C. Lee; X. Pi; L. J. Romans; W. S. Schreiner; P. R. Straus; C. Wang

    2000-01-01

    As our civilization becomes more dependent on space based technologies, we become more vulnerable to conditions in space weather. Accurate space weather specification and forecasting require proper modeling which account for the coupling between the sun, the magnetosphere, the thermosphere, the ionosphere and the mesosphere. In spite of the tremendous advances that have been made in understanding the physics behind

  3. R-process nucleosynthesis calculations with complete nuclear physics input

    E-print Network

    I. Petermann; A. Arcones; A. Keli?; K. Langanke; G. Martínez-Pinedo; K. -H. Schmidt; W. R. Hix; I. Panov; T. Rauscher; F. -K. Thielemann; N. Zinner

    2008-12-04

    The r-process constitutes one of the major challenges in nuclear astrophysics. Its astrophysical site has not yet been identified but there is observational evidence suggesting that at least two possible sites should contribute to the solar system abundance of r-process elements and that the r-process responsible for the production of elements heavier than Z=56 operates quite robustly producing always the same relative abundances. From the nuclear-physics point of view the r-process requires the knowledge of a large number of reaction rates involving exotic nuclei. These include neutron capture rates, beta-decays and fission rates, the latter for the heavier nuclei produced in the r-process. We have developed for the first time a complete database of reaction rates that in addition to neutron-capture rates and beta-decay half-lives includes all possible reactions that can induce fission (neutron-capture, beta-decay and spontaneous fission) and the corresponding fission yields. In addition, we have implemented these reaction rates in a fully implicit reaction network. We have performed r-process calculations for the neutrino-driven wind scenario to explore whether or not fission can contribute to provide a robust r-process pattern.

  4. Physical process first law for bifurcate Killing horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amsel, Aaron J.; Marolf, Donald; Virmani, Amitabh

    2008-01-01

    The physical process version of the first law for black holes states that the passage of energy and angular momentum through the horizon results in a change in area (?)/(8?)?A=?E-??J, so long as this passage is quasistationary. A similar physical process first law can be derived for any bifurcate Killing horizon in any spacetime dimension d?3 using much the same argument. However, to make this law nontrivial, one must show that sufficiently quasistationary processes do in fact occur. In particular, one must show that processes exist for which the shear and expansion remain small, and in which no new generators are added to the horizon. Thorne, MacDonald, and Price considered related issues when an object falls across a d=4 black hole horizon. By generalizing their argument to arbitrary d?3 and to any bifurcate Killing horizon, we derive a condition under which these effects are controlled and the first law applies. In particular, by providing a nontrivial first law for Rindler horizons, our work completes the parallel between the mechanics of such horizons and those of black holes for d?3. We also comment on the situation for d=2.

  5. Physical process first law for bifurcate Killing horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Amsel, Aaron J.; Marolf, Donald; Virmani, Amitabh [Department of Physics, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2008-01-15

    The physical process version of the first law for black holes states that the passage of energy and angular momentum through the horizon results in a change in area ({kappa}/8{pi}){delta}A={delta}E-{omega}{delta}J, so long as this passage is quasistationary. A similar physical process first law can be derived for any bifurcate Killing horizon in any spacetime dimension d{>=}3 using much the same argument. However, to make this law nontrivial, one must show that sufficiently quasistationary processes do in fact occur. In particular, one must show that processes exist for which the shear and expansion remain small, and in which no new generators are added to the horizon. Thorne, MacDonald, and Price considered related issues when an object falls across a d=4 black hole horizon. By generalizing their argument to arbitrary d{>=}3 and to any bifurcate Killing horizon, we derive a condition under which these effects are controlled and the first law applies. In particular, by providing a nontrivial first law for Rindler horizons, our work completes the parallel between the mechanics of such horizons and those of black holes for d{>=}3. We also comment on the situation for d=2.

  6. Process evaluation results from the HEALTHY physical education intervention.

    PubMed

    Hall, William J; Zeveloff, Abigail; Steckler, Allan; Schneider, Margaret; Thompson, Deborah; Pham, Trang; Volpe, Stella L; Hindes, Katie; Sleigh, Adriana; McMurray, Robert G

    2012-04-01

    Process evaluation is an assessment of the implementation of an intervention. A process evaluation component was embedded in the HEALTHY study, a primary prevention trial for Type 2 diabetes implemented over 3 years in 21 middle schools across the United States. The HEALTHY physical education (PE) intervention aimed at maximizing student engagement in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity through delivery of structured lesson plans by PE teachers. Process evaluation data collected via class observations and interventionist interviews assessed fidelity, dose delivered, implementor participation, dose received and barriers. Process evaluation results indicate a high level of fidelity in implementing HEALTHY PE activities and offering 225 min of PE every 10 school days. Concerning dose delivered, students were active for approximately 33 min of class, representing an average of 61% of the class time. Results also indicate that PE teachers were generally engaged in implementing the HEALTHY PE curriculum. Data on dose received showed that students were highly engaged with the PE intervention; however, student misbehavior was the most common barrier observed during classes. Other barriers included teacher disengagement, large classes, limited gym space and poor classroom management. Findings suggest that the PE intervention was generally implemented and received as intended despite several barriers. PMID:22156231

  7. Process evaluation results from the HEALTHY physical education intervention

    PubMed Central

    Hall, William J.; Zeveloff, Abigail; Steckler, Allan; Schneider, Margaret; Thompson, Deborah; Pham, Trang; Volpe, Stella L.; Hindes, Katie; Sleigh, Adriana; McMurray, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    Process evaluation is an assessment of the implementation of an intervention. A process evaluation component was embedded in the HEALTHY study, a primary prevention trial for Type 2 diabetes implemented over 3 years in 21 middle schools across the United States. The HEALTHY physical education (PE) intervention aimed at maximizing student engagement in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity through delivery of structured lesson plans by PE teachers. Process evaluation data collected via class observations and interventionist interviews assessed fidelity, dose delivered, implementor participation, dose received and barriers. Process evaluation results indicate a high level of fidelity in implementing HEALTHY PE activities and offering 225 min of PE every 10 school days. Concerning dose delivered, students were active for approximately 33 min of class, representing an average of 61% of the class time. Results also indicate that PE teachers were generally engaged in implementing the HEALTHY PE curriculum. Data on dose received showed that students were highly engaged with the PE intervention; however, student misbehavior was the most common barrier observed during classes. Other barriers included teacher disengagement, large classes, limited gym space and poor classroom management. Findings suggest that the PE intervention was generally implemented and received as intended despite several barriers. PMID:22156231

  8. The Physical Process First Law for Bifurcate Killing Horizons

    E-print Network

    Aaron J. Amsel; Donald Marolf; Amitabh Virmani

    2007-10-16

    The physical process version of the first law for black holes states that the passage of energy and angular momentum through the horizon results in a change in area $\\frac{\\kappa}{8 \\pi} \\Delta A = \\Delta E - \\Omega \\Delta J$, so long as this passage is quasi-stationary. A similar physical process first law can be derived for any bifurcate Killing horizon in any spacetime dimension $d \\ge 3$ using much the same argument. However, to make this law non-trivial, one must show that sufficiently quasi-stationary processes do in fact occur. In particular, one must show that processes exist for which the shear and expansion remain small, and in which no new generators are added to the horizon. Thorne, MacDonald, and Price considered related issues when an object falls across a d=4 black hole horizon. By generalizing their argument to arbitrary $d \\ge 3$ and to any bifurcate Killing horizon, we derive a condition under which these effects are controlled and the first law applies. In particular, by providing a non-trivial first law for Rindler horizons, our work completes the parallel between the mechanics of such horizons and those of black holes for $d \\ge 3$. We also comment on the situation for d=2.

  9. Absolute Calibration of Electromagnetic Calorimeter at Lhc with Physics Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Tao; Xia, Lei; Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2002-01-01

    Physics processes Z0 ? e+e-, W ? e±?e, J/? ? e+e- and ?(1s) ? e+e- were investigated for calibration of the electromagnetic calorimeter in site at LHC. The production cross sections of these processes, including high order corrections, were calculated by using PYTHIA 6.136 as well as CDF data. As an example, the Level 1 trigger efficiency was calculated by using events simulated with CMSIM 121 and ORCA_4_4_0_optimized. The result of this investigation indicates that although the process of J/? ? e+e- has a factor of 16,000 larger cross section as compared to that of Z0 ? e+e-, about 1 or 0.5 year data taking at relatively low luminosity of 1032cm-2s-1 or 1033cm-2s-1 respectively is still required to reach a sub percent calibration precision by using electron pairs from J/?. A combination of all physics processes thus may be needed at the beginning of the data taking.

  10. Weathering, Water, and Slope Aspect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, S. P.; Blum, A.; Lee, J.; Cowie, R. M.; Williams, M. W.; Frederick, Z. A.

    2009-12-01

    Aspect controls solar radiation to hillslopes: north facing slopes are more shaded (in the northern hemisphere), while south facing slopes are not. Here we explore how this simple topographic control on energy balance plays out in the architecture of the Critical Zone of a subwatershed in the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory. Gordon Gulch catchment is within the upper montane forest of the Colorado Front Range, with mixed lodgepole-ponderosa pine forest cover. Because the valley trends E-W, hillslopes are either N-facing or S-facing. The annual snowpack is deeper and longer lasting on the lodgepole pine dominated N-facing slopes. Snow is thin or patchy on the open ponderosa pine dominated S-facing slopes. These shading and snowpack differences can be seen in soil temperatures and soil moisture. In a series of soil pits, we found mobile regolith was nearly twice as deep on the moist, N-facing slopes, and saprolite was more weathered in these locations. Saprolite was found at shallower depths on south-facing slopes, and was less weathered, and more competent. We entertain two hypotheses. The depth of mobile layer and degree of weathering of saprolite reflect either differences in material transport rates or differences in chemical weathering rates. In the case of material transport rate control, creep and bioturbation remove highly weathered saprolite, keeping fresher rock closer to the surface on the S-facing slopes. In the case of chemical weathering control, soil moisture maintains greater rates of chemical alteration of saprolite, and physical disruption by creep and bioturbation is minimal on N-facing slopes. The differences in weathering profile development in association with slope aspect provide a natural experiment to unravel competing effects of weathering and erosion on landscape development.

  11. Detectors and signal processing for high-energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P.

    1981-01-01

    Basic principles of the particle detection and signal processing for high-energy physics experiments are presented. It is shown that the optimum performance of a properly designed detector system is not limited by incidental imperfections, but solely by more fundamental limitations imposed by the quantum nature and statistical behavior of matter. The noise sources connected with the detection and signal processing are studied. The concepts of optimal filtering and optimal detector/amplifying device matching are introduced. Signal processing for a liquid argon calorimeter is analyzed in some detail. The position detection in gas counters is studied. Resolution in drift chambers for the drift coordinate measurement as well as the second coordinate measurement is discussed.

  12. Health physics aspects of processing EBR-I coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, L.L.; Thalgott, J.O.; Poston, J.W. Jr.

    1998-12-31

    The sodium-potassium reactor coolant removed from the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One after a partial reactor core meltdown had been stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory for 40 years. The State of Idaho considered this waste the most hazardous waste stored in the state and required its processing. The reactor coolant was processed in three phases. The first phase converted the alkali metal into a liquid sodium-potassium hydroxide. The second phase converted this caustic to a liquid sodium-potassium carbonate. The third phase solidified the sodium-potassium carbonate into a form acceptable for land disposal. Health physics aspects and dose received during each phase of the processing are discussed.

  13. Solar variability, weather, and climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Advances in the understanding of possible effects of solar variations on weather and climate are most likely to emerge by addressing the subject in terms of fundamental physical principles of atmospheric sciences and solar-terrestrial physis. The limits of variability of solar inputs to the atmosphere and the depth in the atmosphere to which these variations have significant effects are determined.

  14. Weather Modification—a Scenario for the Future.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    List, Roland

    2004-01-01

    The ever-increasing severe economic damage imposed on national and world wide economies by severe weather, the need for sufficient and safe water resources for an increasing world population, and the threat of adverse climate change led to this critical assessment of the state-of-the-art of weather modification (WM) and to a proposal of a road map for the future.Special attention is given to rain enhancement because it is further developed than snowpack augmentation, hail suppression, tornado and hurricane modification, and other weather-related disaster control ideas. The question of what makes a rain enhancement experiment acceptable to the scientific community is answered by the World Meteorological Organization's (WMO) criteria, which address statistical evaluation, the measurement of rain, the understanding of nature's precipitation processes with the underlying physics and dynamics of clouds and cloud systems, and the transferability of experiment design. These criteria are no longer specific enough or satisfactory and will have to be reconsidered.An actual WM experiment also involves a variety of techniques and technologies, aspects that need to be complemented by numerical modeling of clouds and cloud responses to seeding. Modeling also allows assessment of the extra-area effects, that is, detrimental effects of precipitation on adjacent areas. Assimilation models may be giving better estimates of the rain at the ground because they can integrate restricted information from radar and rain gauges with mesoscale meteorological and remote sensing, as well as hydrological, data. However, massive improvements in computer capacity are required to handle these problems.Weather modification has been progressing very slowly in the past because of the enormity of the problem and the fact that the precipitation process is far from being understood. Considering that rain increases are attempted within a range of 10% 20%, the lack of knowledge at corresponding accuracy is particularly evident in the fields of cloud physics, cloud and cloud systems dynamics, weather forecasting, numerical modeling, and measuring technology.Benefits of new intensive studies of precipitation processes will not be limited to WM; they are also vital to improving weather forecasting and climate change modeling. There is one additional aspect of WM; WM can also be used to test newly developed precipitation physics and models by studying if the clouds react to seeding in the predicted manner.This article is a wake-up call to put more intellectual and financial resources into the exploration and modification of the precipitation processes in all their forms. All these points lead to the suggestion of an outline of a national precipitation research and weather modification program.

  15. Deciphering the weathering processes using environmental mineralogy and geochemistry: Towards an integrated model of laterite and podzol genesis in the Upper Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, Emmanuel; Balan, Etienne; Régina Do Nascimento, Nadia; Allard, Thierry; Bardy, Marion; Bueno, Guilherme; Derenne, Sylvie; Melfi, Adolpho José; Calas, Georges

    2011-02-01

    This article reports major results from collaborative research between France and Brazil on soil and water systems, carried out in the Upper Amazon Basin. It reveals the weathering processes acting in the partly inundated, low elevation plateaus of the Basin, mostly covered by evergreen forest. Our findings are based on geochemical data and mineral spectroscopy that probe the crystal chemistry of Fe and Al in mineral phases (mainly kaolinite, Al- and Fe-(hydr)oxides) of tropical soils (laterites). These techniques reveal crystal alterations in mineral populations of different ages and changes of metal speciation associated with mineral or organic phases. These results provide an integrated model of soil formation and changes (from laterites to podzols) in distinct hydrological compartments of the Amazon landscapes and under altered water regimes.

  16. Weather effects on returns: Evidence from the Korean stock market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seong-Min; Kang, Sang Hoon

    2009-03-01

    In this study, we attempted to determine whether a relationship exists between stock returns and the weather variables of temperature, humidity, and cloud cover in the Korean stock market. We delineated three key implications with regard to weather effects. First, after the 1997 financial crisis, the presence of a weather effect disappeared. Second, the inclusion of weather variables helps to model the GJR-GARCH process in the conditional variance. Third, the interaction effects of weather variables fully demonstrate the weather effect, but the interaction effects also vanished after the crisis. Overall, the findings of this study indicate that the weather effect was weakened as the result of heightened market efficiency.

  17. Backyard Weather Station

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-18

    Students use their senses to describe what the weather is doing and predict what it might do next. After gaining a basic understanding of weather patterns, students act as state park engineers and design/build "backyard weather stations" to gather data to make actual weather forecasts.

  18. Yaquina Bay Weather & Tides

    E-print Network

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    Yaquina Bay Weather & Tides Clay Creech Phil Barbour #12;HMSC Weather Station #12;Temp-Humidity Sensor at Library #12;http://weather.hmsc.oregonstate.edu #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;Archived Data is Available every 15 mins. #12;#12;A pyranometer measures solar radiation #12;#12;National Weather Service

  19. The Weather and Climate

    E-print Network

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    The Weather and Climate Emergent Laws and Multifractal Cascades Shaun LovEjoy and DaniEL SChErTzEr #12;2/15/12 DRAFT TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 DRAFT 1 The Weather And The Climate:2 Emergent Laws, weather, low frequency weather and the climate1 1.2.7 The scaling of the atmospheric boundary conditions2

  20. Compact effector optics for processing in limited physical access situations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Andreas; Fox, Mahlen D. T.; French, Paul W.; Hettrick, Simon; Hand, Duncan P.; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Watkins, Kenneth G.; Ireland, Clive L. M.; Jones, Julian D. C.

    2003-09-01

    A major advantage of fiber-optic beam delivery in laser materials processing is the ability to guide the laser power to the location where it is needed, leaving the laser itself remote and protected from the process. This is of special importance if the processing is to be performed in a hazardous environment. Particular problems are faced by the nuclear industry where weld repair and surface treatment work are required inside radioactive installations. By use of fiber beam delivery, only part of the delivery system and effector optics become contaminated, but the expensive laser system does not. However, in many cases the region where repair is required is not only radioactive but has only limited physical access, e.g., inside tubes or into corners, which prevents use of standard effector optics. We present a new design to deal with such constraints of a 2-mm outer diameter employing a hollow waveguide and gas shielding. This design is optically characterized and its performance assessed in welding and surface treatment applications. The potential of this compact effector optics in limited physical access situations is clearly demonstrated.

  1. Compact effector optics for processing in limited physical access situations.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Andreas; Fox, Mahlen D T; French, Paul W; Hettrick, Simon; Hand, Duncan P; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Watkins, Kenneth G; Ireland, Clive L M; Jones, Julian D C

    2003-09-01

    A major advantage of fiber-optic beam delivery in laser materials processing is the ability to guide the laser power to the location where it is needed, leaving the laser itself remote and protected from the process. This is of special importance if the processing is to be performed in a hazardous environment. Particular problems are faced by the nuclear industry where weld repair and surface treatment work are required inside radioactive installations. By use of fiber beam delivery, only part of the delivery system and effector optics become contaminated, but the expensive laser system does not. However, in many cases the region where repair is required is not only radioactive but has only limited physical access, e.g., inside tubes or into corners, which prevents use of standard effector optics. We present a new design to deal with such constraints of a 2-mm outer diameter employing a hollow waveguide and gas shielding. This design is optically characterized and its performance assessed in welding and surface treatment applications. The potential of this compact effector optics in limited physical access situations is clearly demonstrated. PMID:12962387

  2. Enhanced Weather Radar (EWxR) System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronfeld, Kevin M. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    An airborne weather radar system, the Enhanced Weather Radar (EWxR), with enhanced on-board weather radar data processing was developed and tested. The system features additional weather data that is uplinked from ground-based sources, specialized data processing, and limited automatic radar control to search for hazardous weather. National Weather Service (NWS) ground-based Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD) information is used by the EWxR system to augment the on-board weather radar information. The system will simultaneously display NEXRAD and on-board weather radar information in a split-view format. The on-board weather radar includes an automated or hands-free storm-finding feature that optimizes the radar returns by automatically adjusting the tilt and range settings for the current altitude above the terrain and searches for storm cells near the atmospheric 0-degree isotherm. A rule-based decision aid was developed to automatically characterize cells as hazardous, possibly-hazardous, or non-hazardous based upon attributes of that cell. Cell attributes are determined based on data from the on-board radar and from ground-based radars. A flight path impact prediction algorithm was developed to help pilots to avoid hazardous weather along their flight plan and their mission. During development the system was tested on the NASA B757 aircraft and final tests were conducted on the Rockwell Collins Sabreliner.

  3. Weather Derivative Valuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewson, Stephen; Brix, Anders

    2005-04-01

    Weather Derivative Valuation is the first book to cover all the meteorological, statistical, financial and mathematical issues that arise in the pricing and risk management of weather derivatives. There are chapters on meteorological data and data cleaning, the modelling and pricing of single weather derivatives, the modelling and valuation of portfolios, the use of weather and seasonal forecasts in the pricing of weather derivatives, arbitrage pricing for weather derivatives, risk management, and the modelling of temperature, wind and precipitation. Specific issues covered in detail include the analysis of uncertainty in weather derivative pricing, time-series modelling of daily temperatures, the creation and use of probabilistic meteorological forecasts and the derivation of the weather derivative version of the Black-Scholes equation of mathematical finance. Written by consultants who work within the weather derivative industry, this book is packed with practical information and theoretical insight into the world of weather derivative pricing.

  4. Guidelines for Automatic Data Processing Physical Security and Risk Management. Federal Information Processing Standards Publication 31.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    These guidelines provide a handbook for use by federal organizations in structuring physical security and risk management programs for their automatic data processing facilities. This publication discusses security analysis, natural disasters, supporting utilities, system reliability, procedural measures and controls, off-site facilities,…

  5. Physical Chemistry and Process Dynamics of Reactions in Ladle Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruehan, R. J.

    1985-03-01

    Ladle metallurgy practices have been developed that produce clean steels low in oxygen, sulfur, phosphorous and hydrogen. In addition, the remaining inclusions can be modified into less harmful forms. In this paper, the physical chemistry and process dynamics of the refining reactions are discussed. Optimum slag compositions for desulfurization and dephosphorization based on thermodynamic considerations are given. Reaction models have been developed to predict the rates of slag-metal reaction in stirred ladles. For inclusion removal, there is an optimum gas flow rate which is explained qualitatively. The rate equations for hydrogen and nitrogen removal under vacuum are also presented.

  6. Factors Affecting the Earth's Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Classroom Connectors lesson plan discusses factors affecting the weather on Earth. Students learn about solar radiation, wind circulation, precipitation, and biomes that result from weather patterns. The site provides goals, objectives, an outline, time required, materials, activities, and closure ideas for the lesson. The Classroom Connectors address content with an activity approach while incorporating themes necessary to raise the activity to a higher cognition level. The major motivation is to employ instructional strategies that bring the students physically and mentally into touch with the science they are studying.

  7. Weather data dissemination to aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, Richard H.; Parker, Craig B.

    1990-01-01

    Documentation exists that shows weather to be responsible for approximately 40 percent of all general aviation accidents with fatalities. Weather data products available on the ground are becoming more sophisticated and greater in number. Although many of these data are critical to aircraft safety, they currently must be transmitted verbally to the aircraft. This process is labor intensive and provides a low rate of information transfer. Consequently, the pilot is often forced to make life-critical decisions based on incomplete and outdated information. Automated transmission of weather data from the ground to the aircraft can provide the aircrew with accurate data in near-real time. The current National Airspace System Plan calls for such an uplink capability to be provided by the Mode S Beacon System data link. Although this system has a very advanced data link capability, it will not be capable of providing adequate weather data to all airspace users in its planned configuration. This paper delineates some of the important weather data uplink system requirements, and describes a system which is capable of meeting these requirements. The proposed system utilizes a run-length coding technique for image data compression and a hybrid phase and amplitude modulation technique for the transmission of both voice and weather data on existing aeronautical Very High Frequency (VHF) voice communication channels.

  8. To Photon Concept and to Physics of Quantum Absorption Process

    E-print Network

    Dmitri Yerchuck; Yauhen Yerchak; Alla Dovlatova; Vyacheslav Stelmakh; Felix Borovik

    2014-06-03

    The status of the photon in the modern physics was analysed. Within the frames of the Standard Model of particle physics the photon is considered to be the genuine elementary particle, being to be the messenger of the electromagnetic interaction to which are subject charged particles. In contrast, the experts in quantum electodynamics (in particular, in quantum optics) insist, that the description of an photon to be the particle is impossible. The given viewpoint was carefully analysed and its falseness was proved. The expression for a photon wave function is presented. So, the status of the photon in quantum electodynamics was restored. The physics of a quantum absorption process is analysed. It is argued in accordance with Dirac guess, that the photon revival takes place by its absorption. Being to be a soliton, it seems to be keeping safe after an energy absorption in a pinned state, possessing the only by spin. It is shown, that the time of the transfer of absorbing systems in an excited state is finite and moreover, that it can govern the stationary signal registered. The given result is significant for the all stationary spectroscopy, in which at present the transfer of absorbing systems in an excited state is considered to be instantaneous.

  9. Influence of wheat kernel physical properties on the pulverizing process.

    PubMed

    Dziki, Dariusz; Cacak-Pietrzak, Gra?yna; Mi?, Antoni; Jo?czyk, Krzysztof; Gawlik-Dziki, Urszula

    2014-10-01

    The physical properties of wheat kernel were determined and related to pulverizing performance by correlation analysis. Nineteen samples of wheat cultivars about similar level of protein content (11.2-12.8 % w.b.) and obtained from organic farming system were used for analysis. The kernel (moisture content 10 % w.b.) was pulverized by using the laboratory hammer mill equipped with round holes 1.0 mm screen. The specific grinding energy ranged from 120 kJkg(-1) to 159 kJkg(-1). On the basis of data obtained many of significant correlations (p?physical properties and pulverizing process of wheat kernel, especially wheat kernel hardness index (obtained on the basis of Single Kernel Characterization System) and vitreousness significantly and positively correlated with the grinding energy indices and the mass fraction of coarse particles (> 0.5 mm). Among the kernel mechanical properties determined on the basis of uniaxial compression test only the rapture force was correlated with the impact grinding results. The results showed also positive and significant relationships between kernel ash content and grinding energy requirements. On the basis of wheat physical properties the multiple linear regression was proposed for predicting the average particle size of pulverized kernel. PMID:25328207

  10. Weather Camp 2012 "Weather and Climate All Around Us"

    E-print Network

    Farritor, Shane

    Weather Camp 2012 "Weather and Climate All Around Us" Are you interested in the weather? Come to Weather Camp at UNL What is Weather Camp? For more information Weather camp is a week long day camp for students who will be 11-14 years old at the time of the camp Most of the activities at Weather Camp 2012

  11. Framework for Understanding Lenr Processes, Using Conventional Condensed Matter Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, Scott R.

    2006-02-01

    Conventional condensed matter physics provides a unifying framework for understanding low-energy nuclear reactions (LENRs) in solids. In the paper, standard many-body physics techniques are used to illustrate this fact. Specifically, the paper shows that formally the theories by Schwinger, Hagelstein, and Chubb and Chubb (C&C), all can be related to a common set of equations, associated with reaction rate and energy transfer, through a standard many-body physics procedure (R-matrix theory). In each case, particular forms of coherence are used that implicitly provide a mechanism for understanding how LENRs can proceed without the emission of high-energy particles. In addition, additional ideas, associated with Conventional Condensed Matter physics, are used to extend the earlier ion band state (IBS) model by C&C. The general model clarifies the origin of coherent processes that initiate LENRs, through the onset of ion conduction that can occur through ionic fluctuations in nanoscale crystals. In the case of PdDx, these fluctuations begin to occur as x ? 1 in sub-lattice structures with characteristic dimensions of 60 nm. The resulting LENRs are triggered by the polarization between injected d's and electrons (immediately above the Fermi energy) that takes place in finite-size PdD crystals. During the prolonged charging of PdDx, the applied, external electric field induces these fluctuations through a form of Zener tunneling that mimics the kind of tunneling, predicted by Zener, that is responsible for possible conduction (referred to as Zener-electric breakdown) in insulators. But because the fluctuations are ionic, and they occur in PdD, nano-scale structures, a more appropriate characterization is Zener-ionic breakdown in nano-crystalline PdD. Using the underlying dynamics, it is possible to relate triggering times that are required for the initiation of the effect, to crystal size and externally applied fields.

  12. CLARA: A Contemporary Approach to Physics Data Processing

    SciTech Connect

    V Gyurjyan, D Abbott, J Carbonneau, G Gilfoyle, D Heddle, G Heyes, S Paul, C Timmer, D Weygand, E Wolin

    2011-12-01

    In traditional physics data processing (PDP) systems, data location is static and is accessed by analysis applications. In comparison, CLARA (CLAS12 Reconstruction and Analysis framework) is an environment where data processing algorithms filter continuously flowing data. In CLARA's domain of loosely coupled services, data is not stored, but rather flows from one service to another, mutating constantly along the way. Agents, performing event processing, can then subscribe to particular data/events at any stage of the data transformation, and make intricate decisions (e.g. particle ID) by correlating events from multiple, parallel data streams and/or services. This paper presents a PDP application development framework based on service oriented and event driven architectures. This system allows users to design (Java, C++, and Python languages are supported) and deploy data processing services, as well as dynamically compose PDP applications using available services. The PDP service bus provides a layer on top of a distributed pub-sub middleware implementation, which allows complex service composition and integration without writing code. Examples of service creation and deployment, along with the CLAS12 track reconstruction application design will be presented.

  13. Some Physics Processes in the Nitrogen-Filled Photoluminescence Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D D

    2006-06-19

    The photoluminescence cell is a viable candidate for monitoring the total energy in the Linac Coherent Light Source [1]. In Ref. [1], most of the discussion was concentrated on the cell with argon as a working gas. In the present note I provide a discussion of some physics processes that may affect the performance of the photoluminescence cell with the nitrogen fill. In particular, I will consider the role of the space charge effects, ambipolar diffusion, and recombination processes. This group of phenomena determines the duration of the afterglow process that follows an initial short (<100 ns) burst of optical radiation. The presence of this afterglow can be of some significance for the detection system. The general template for this discussion follows a draft report where the argon-filled cell was considered. But some processes in nitrogen are different and require separate consideration. In what follows, I am not attempting to produce ''exact'' results, but rather to provide a quick order-of-magnitude scoping study.

  14. Distribution of colluvia and saprolites and their physical properties in a zero-order basin in Okinawa, southwestern Japan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yasuhiro Ohnuki; Ryuichi Terazono; Hitoshi Ikuzawa; Isao Hirata; Kensaku Kanna; Hirokatsu Utagawa

    1997-01-01

    The thickness and physical properties of colluvium and saprolite were investigated to clarify their role in the hydrological processes in a forested basin. We measured their thickness using a handy dynamic cone penetrometer, and surveyed soil profiles to obtain undisturbed cylindrical samples for measuring physical properties, i.e., effective porosity. Saprolite is divided into strongly weathered saprolite and weakly weathered saprolite

  15. IMPROVING THE SIMULATION OF EXTREME EVENTS BY STOCHASTIC WEATHER GENERATORS

    E-print Network

    Katz, Richard

    ") -- Poisson process for exceedance of high threshold -- Generalized Pareto (GP) distribution for excess over parameter of Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution in block maxima approach] -- Include covariates) Resampling Approach to Weather Generation (2) Parametric Approach to Weather Generation (3) Generalized

  16. Weather Modification A Theoretician's Viewpoint.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Kenneth C.

    1996-11-01

    Early progress in weather modification is attributed to a healthy interaction between theory and experiment. During the 1970s, a divergence of approaches took place. A "theoretical/experimental" approach, exemplified by the Cascade Project, focused on testing scientific hypotheses; an "observational/experimental" approach, exemplified by the Colorado River Basin Pilot Project, sought to enhance understanding of the seeding process through more detailed observations.The theoretical/experimental school soon came to focus almost exclusively on natural cloud processes, leaving the field of weather modification nearly devoid of a theoretical component. It is suggested that this theoretical component is necessary to revitalize the field of weather modification.Key questions are addressed. These include 1) identification of clouds that are amenable to seeding; 2) glaciogenic versus hygroscopic seeding; 3) optimizing critical seeding variables, such as seed particle concentration for glaciogenic seeding and seed particle size for hygroscopic seeding; and 4) seeding for hail suppression.

  17. Questa Baseline and Pre-mining Ground-Water Quality Investigation, 7. A Pictorial Record of Chemical Weathering, Erosional Processes, and Potential Debris-flow Hazards in Scar Areas Developed on Hydrothermally Altered Rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Ludington, Steve; Vincent, Kirk R.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Caine, Jonathan S.; Livo, K. Eric

    2009-01-01

    Erosional scar areas developed along the lower Red River basin, New Mexico, reveal a complex natural history of mineralizing processes, rapid chemical weathering, and intense physical erosion during periodic outbursts of destructive, storm-induced runoff events. The scar areas are prominent erosional features with craggy headwalls and steep, denuded slopes. The largest scar areas, including, from east to west, Hottentot Creek, Straight Creek, Hansen Creek, Lower Hansen Creek, Sulfur Gulch, and Goat Hill Gulch, head along high east-west trending ridges that form the northern and southern boundaries of the lower Red River basin. Smaller, topographically lower scar areas are developed on ridge noses in the inner Red River valley. Several of the natural scar areas have been modified substantially as a result of large-scale open-pit and underground mining at the Questa Mine; for example, much of the Sulfur Gulch scar was removed by open pit mining, and several scars are now partially or completely covered by mine waste dumps.

  18. The Weather Man

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Emma Grasser

    2012-09-27

    This project is designed to let you be "The Weather Man" and control the weather through simulation, and hands on experience, followed by guided questioning and resource exploration. Form groups of three. Explore the following simulation: Weather Maker Simulator Use the simulation to answer the following questions on paper. 1. How does humility play a role in weather? How does more or less change weather? 2. What is water vapor? Where does it come from? 3. What happens when the weather drops below zero degrees? ...

  19. Science Sampler: Weather RATS

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mary Taft

    2006-02-01

    Weather RATS, or Weather Research and Tracking Systems, is a collaborative effort among a national network of K-12 students, their teachers, wireless weather stations, internet data sharing, and professional engineers and meteorologists. Weather Rats is a new way to teach K-12 science and technology by tracking and comparing weather data from schools in Massachusetts, Arizona, Oklahoma, and Puerto Rico. In addition, it is hoped through this enriching project that Weather RATS will inspire many more students, especially girls and minorities, to pursue careers in science and engineering as a result of this project.

  20. Pilot weather advisor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, W. A.; Seth, S.; Crabill, N. L.; Shipley, S. T.; Graffman, I.; Oneill, J.

    1992-01-01

    The results of the work performed by ViGYAN, Inc., to demonstrate the Pilot Weather Advisor cockpit weather data system using a broadcast satellite communication system are presented. The Pilot Weather Advisor demonstrated that the technical problems involved with transmitting significant amount of weather data to an aircraft in-flight or on-the-ground via satellite are solvable with today's technology. The Pilot Weather Advisor appears to be a viable solution for providing accurate and timely weather information for general aviation aircraft.

  1. Interactive Weather Information Network

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Offered by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Interactive Weather Information Network (IWIN) is a collection of interactive weather maps and satellite images that is updated every five seconds. Visitors can see cloud cover animation loops, NEXRAD Radar images of precipitation, a map of all current weather fronts, and an interactive national map to see information about any particular state. Other information on the site includes a listing of any active weather warnings, a link for world weather data, and more, making this a must-see site for all those users interested in the most current weather happenings anywhere.

  2. Weather and Precipitation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Jones

    2012-04-12

    How are different types of weather common in our everyday life? How can we use what we know about weather to go about everyday activities? First, use the Weather Chart to write down what you learn from each website. Then, go to Weather Information Website #1 and click on "What's the Weather?" to dress the bear for the day. Make sure you write it down on your graphic organizer. Next, go to Weather Information Website #3 and explore at least 5(clouds, thunderstorms, winter storms, etc.) of ...

  3. Impact of physical permafrost processes on hydrological change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagemann, Stefan; Blome, Tanja; Beer, Christian; Ekici, Altug

    2015-04-01

    Permafrost or perennially frozen ground is an important part of the terrestrial cryosphere; roughly one quarter of Earth's land surface is underlain by permafrost. As it is a thermal phenomenon, its characteristics are highly dependent on climatic factors. The impact of the currently observed warming, which is projected to persist during the coming decades due to anthropogenic CO2 input, certainly has effects for the vast permafrost areas of the high northern latitudes. The quantification of these effects, however, is scientifically still an open question. This is partly due to the complexity of the system, where several feedbacks are interacting between land and atmosphere, sometimes counterbalancing each other. Moreover, until recently, many global circulation models (GCMs) and Earth system models (ESMs) lacked the sufficient representation of permafrost physics in their land surface schemes. Within the European Union FP7 project PAGE21, the land surface scheme JSBACH of the Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology ESM (MPI-ESM) has been equipped with the representation of relevant physical processes for permafrost studies. These processes include the effects of freezing and thawing of soil water for both energy and water cycles, thermal properties depending on soil water and ice contents, and soil moisture movement being influenced by the presence of soil ice. In the present study, it will be analysed how these permafrost relevant processes impact projected hydrological changes over northern hemisphere high latitude land areas. For this analysis, the atmosphere-land part of MPI-ESM, ECHAM6-JSBACH, is driven by prescribed SST and sea ice in an AMIP2-type setup with and without the newly implemented permafrost processes. Observed SST and sea ice for 1979-1999 are used to consider induced changes in the simulated hydrological cycle. In addition, simulated SST and sea ice are taken from a MPI-ESM simulation conducted for CMIP5 following the RCP8.5 scenario. The corresponding simulations with ECHAM6-JSBACH are used to assess differences in projected hydrological changes induced by the permafrost relevant processes.

  4. Internet Weather Links: Weather and Weather Related Lesson Plans

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Internet Weather Links is a collection of lesson plans provided by the Utah Education Network's Weather Report Web site. The activities are organized by grade level from kindergarten to fourth grade and include such topics as Sunny Colors, Weather in a Box, Changes Due to Freezing, and Geological Features. Each lesson is well organized with explanations of its objectives, intended learning outcomes, and instructional procedures. Downloadable documents, related links, extensions to the lesson, and even rating systems for teachers are also provided, making it a great resource especially for use with younger students.

  5. Weather Camp 2012: Weather and Climate All Around Us Are you interested in the weather?

    E-print Network

    Farritor, Shane

    Weather Camp 2012: Weather and Climate All Around Us Are you interested in the weather? Come to Weather Camp at UNL! What is Weather Camp? For more information Weather camp is a week-long day camp for students who will be 11-14 years old at the time of the camp. Most of the activities at Weather Camp 2012

  6. Weather Radar signals with Alpha Stable Distributions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M LAGHA

    This work, treats about a modeling of the weather precipitation echoes detected by a weather pulse Doppler radar. The methods used for the simulation of the Doppler spectrum, and I & Q signals representing the precipitations radar echoes, is based on a macroscopic models, i.e. random processes with assigned spectra. We propose global model, with a power spectrum having a

  7. Extreme compression of weather radar data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vishnu V. Makkapati; Pravas R. Mahapatra

    2007-01-01

    A method for achieving extreme levels of compression of high-volumeweather radar data is presented. Weather reflectivity contours, as per National Weather Service or custom thresholds, are processed by tracing their departure from a smoothed version to obtain the local extrema which serve as control points. The control points, which are transmitted inrelative coordinates for further compression, are interpolated using asecond-degree

  8. Diagnostic complex for investigations of laser fusion physical processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotin, V.A.; Burdonsky, I.N.; Gavrilov, V.V.; Yu. Gol'tzov, A.; Zhuzhukalo, E.V.; Zavyaletz, S.V.; Kondrashov, V.N.; Kovalsky, N.G.; Pergament, M.I. (I. V. Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy, Moscow D-182, 123182 (USSR))

    1990-10-01

    The key physical processes of the laser fusion are well known and include the laser beam absorption, the heat transfer from the absorption zone to the ablation surface, the shell ablation acceleration and fusion fuel compression, the initiation of an effective thermonuclear burn. The first and second issues are investigated in detail on the small and moderate size facilities and high level of understanding is achieved on both phenomena. On the other hand, to study the thermonuclear burn seriously the large scale experiments should be carried out on the facilities of the next generation. Thus the efficiency and stability of the shell acceleration are today the main objects of experimental investigations in the majority of the laser fusion research laboratories. This paper is devoted to the development of the diagnostic methods just for studies of these problems.

  9. Developing Tutorials for Advanced Physics Students: Processes and Lessons Learned

    E-print Network

    Baily, Charles; Pollock, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    When education researchers describe newly developed curricular materials, they typically concentrate on the research base behind their design, and the efficacy of the final products, but do not highlight the initial stages of creating the actual materials. With the aim of providing useful information for faculty engaged in similar projects, we describe here our development of a set of in-class tutorials for advanced undergraduate electrodynamics students, and discuss factors that influenced their initial design and refinement. Among the obstacles to be overcome was the investigation of student difficulties within the short time frame of our project, and devising ways for students to engage in meaningful activities on advanced-level topics within a single 50-minute class period. We argue for a process that leverages faculty experience and classroom observations, and present several guidelines for tutorial development and implementation in upper-division physics classrooms.

  10. Framework for Understanding LENR Processes, Using Ordinary Condensed Matter Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, Scott

    2005-03-01

    As I have emphasizedootnotetextS.R. Chubb, Proc. ICCF10 (in press). Also, http://www.lenr-canr.org/acrobat/ChubbSRnutsandbol.pdf http://www.lenr-canr.org/acrobat/ChubbSRnutsandbol.pdf, S.R. Chubb, Trans. Amer. Nuc. Soc. 88 , 618 (2003)., in discussions of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions(LENRs), mainstream many-body physics ideas have been largely ignored. A key point is that in condensed matter, delocalized, wave-like effects can allow large amounts of momentum to be transferred instantly to distant locations, without any particular particle (or particles) acquiring high velocity through a Broken Gauge Symmetry. Explicit features in the electronic structure explain how this can occur^1 in finite size PdD crystals, with real boundaries. The essential physics^1 can be related to standard many-body techniquesootnotetextBurke,P.G. and K.A. Berrington, Atomic and Molecular Processes:an R matrix Approach (Bristol: IOP Publishing, 1993).. In the paper, I examine this relationship, the relationship of the theory^1 to other LENR theories, and the importance of certain features (for example, boundaries^1) that are not included in the other LENR theories.

  11. Chemical weathering and CO? consumption in the Lower Mekong River.

    PubMed

    Li, Siyue; Lu, X X; Bush, Richard T

    2014-02-15

    Data on river water quality from 42 monitoring stations in the Lower Mekong Basin obtained during the period 1972-1996 was used to relate solute fluxes with controlling factors such as chemical weathering processes. The total dissolved solid (TDS) concentration of the Lower Mekong varied from 53 mg/L to 198 mg/L, and the median (114 mg/L) was compared to the world spatial median value (127 mg/L). Total cationic exchange capacity (Tz(+)) ranged from 729 to 2,607 ?molc/L, and the mean (1,572 ?molc/L) was 1.4 times higher than the world discharge-weighted average. Calcium and bicarbonate dominated the annual ionic composition, accounting for ~70% of the solute load that equalled 41.2×10(9)kg/y. TDS and major elements varied seasonally and in a predictable way with river runoff. The chemical weathering rate of 37.7t/(km(2)y), with respective carbonate and silicate weathering rates of 27.5t/(km(2) y) (13.8mm/ky) and 10.2t/(km(2) y) (3.8mm/ky), was 1.5 times higher than the global average. The CO2 consumption rate was estimated at 191×10(3)molCO2/(km(2)y) for silicate weathering, and 286×10(3)molCO2/(km(2)y) by carbonate weathering. In total, the Mekong basin consumed 228×10(9)molCO2/y and 152×10(9)molCO2/y by the combined weathering of carbonate and silicate, constituting 1.85% of the global CO2 consumption by carbonate weathering and 1.75% by silicates. This is marginally higher than its contribution to global water discharge ~1.3% and much higher than (more than three-fold) its contribution to world land surface area. Remarkable CO2 consumed by chemical weathering (380×10(9)mol/y) was similar in magnitude to dissolved inorganic carbon as HCO3(-) (370×10(9)mol/y) exported by the Mekong to the South China Sea. In this landscape, atmospheric CO2 consumption by rock chemical weathering represents an important carbon sink with runoff and physical erosion controlling chemical erosion. PMID:24291559

  12. Intelligent weather agent for aircraft severe weather avoidance

    E-print Network

    Bokadia, Sangeeta

    2002-01-01

    avoidance capability has increased. In this thesis, an intelligent weather agent is developed for general aviation aircraft. Using a radar image from an onboard weather radar, the intelligent weather agent determines the safest path around severe weather...

  13. Physical processes effecting the baryonic matter content of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panayotova, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    We have discussed physical processes effecting the generation of the matter content of the Universe. First we have studied the processes effecting Big Bang Nucleosynthesis during which the chemical content of the baryonic component of the Universe was produced. We have provided detail numerical analysis of the BBN production of ^4He, Y_p, in the presence of ?_e ? ?_s neutrino oscillations, effective after electron neutrino decoupling. We have accounted for all known effects of neutrino oscillations on cosmological nucleosyntesis. We have obtained cosmological bounds corresponding to ? Y_p/Y_p= 5.2 % in correspondance with the recently found higher uncertainty in ^4He. Iso-helium contours for ? Y_p/Y_p > 5% and population of the ?_s state ? N_s = 0; 0.5; 0.7; 0.9, both for resonant and non-resonant oscillations have been calculated. Next we have studied the processes effecting the formation of the baryon content of the Universe. We have investigated a baryogenesis model based on Affleck and Dine baryogenesis scenario, Scalar Field Condensate (SFC) baryogenesis model. We have provided precise numerical analysis of the SFC baryogenesis model numerically accounting for the particle creation processes by the time varying scalar field. We have numerically obtained the dependence of the field and baryon charge evolution and their final values on the model's parameters, namely: the gauge coupling constant ?, the Hubble constant during inflation H_I, the mass of the field m and the self coupling constants ?_i. We have found the range of the model parameters for which a baryon asymmetry value close to the observed one can be generated.

  14. On Observing the Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Peter Crane

    2004-05-01

    In this article, Mount Washington Observatory meteorologist Tim Markle shares the ins and outs of his daily weather-observing routine and offers insights on making weather observations at home or at school.

  15. Winter Weather: Hypothermia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health Matters What's New Preparation & Planning Disasters & Severe Weather Earthquakes Extreme Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis ... be successfully resuscitated. More Information: Frostbite Disasters & Severe Weather ... Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis ...

  16. Winter Weather: Indoor Safety

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health Matters What's New Preparation & Planning Disasters & Severe Weather Earthquakes Extreme Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis ... Outdoor Safety Winter PSAs and Podcasts Disasters & Severe Weather Earthquakes Extreme Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis ...

  17. In Depth Winter Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-01-01

    Winter Weather is an In-Depth Special Report form the National Center for Atmospheric Research. It contains articles, images, activities, video clips, and interactive graphs to inform learners about meteorology and weather in the colder seasons.

  18. Winter Weather: Outdoor Safety

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About CDC.gov . Natural Disasters and Severe Weather Earthquakes Being Prepared Emergency Supplies Home Hazards Indoor Safety ... What's New A - Z Index Disasters & Severe Weather Earthquakes Extreme Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis Volcanoes ...

  19. Winter Weather: Frostbite

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About CDC.gov . Natural Disasters and Severe Weather Earthquakes Being Prepared Emergency Supplies Home Hazards Indoor Safety ... What's New A - Z Index Disasters & Severe Weather Earthquakes Extreme Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis Volcanoes ...

  20. Understanding Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This lesson plan is part of the DiscoverySchool.com lesson plan library for grades 6-8. It focuses on the naturally-occurring greenhouse effect on Earth, and its connection to global warming. Students build model greenhouses to see how this process works. Included are objectives, materials, procedures, discussion questions, evaluation ideas, suggested readings, and vocabulary. There are videos available to order which complement this lesson, an audio-enhanced vocabulary list, and links to teaching tools for making custom quizzes, worksheets, puzzles and lesson plans.

  1. Process evaluation results from the HEALTHY physical education intervention

    E-print Network

    2011-01-01

    Physical education and physical activity: results from the School Healthhealth policies and practices, indicated that 78% of schools required that students take physical education (Physical Education [18]. Each lesson was struc- tured and included three activity components: instant activities (IAs), health-

  2. How's the Weather Today?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This lesson plan asks students to think about the weather in their area and introduces them to weather and temperature trends in different latitudes of the United States. They will look at the current weather map and record the high temperatures for a few cities. They will conclude by drawing pictures of themselves outdoors in their hometown and in another place that has different weather.

  3. Enviropedia: Introduction to Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2007-12-12

    This resource provides an overview of weather, the day-to-day changes in temperature, air pressure, moisture, wind, cloudiness, rainfall and sunshine. Links embedded in the text provide access to descriptions of cloud types and to information on weather hazards such as fog, hurricanes, thunderstorms, and tornadoes. Other topics include meteorology, weather measurements, and weather mapping. Materials are also provided on the water cycle and its elements, such as evaporation, uplift and cooling of air, dew point, condensation, and precipitation.

  4. Stormfax Weather Services

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2002-06-10

    This site offers links to a variety of weather information, including national, international and local weather maps and forecasts, satellite and radar imagery, and severe weather warnings. There are also links to diverse resources such as fire maps, glacier inventories, snow depths, storm surges and tropical storms. There are reports and advisories about El Nino and La Nina. The site also has a glossary of weather terms and conversion charts for temperature, wind speed and atmospheric pressure.

  5. Space Weathering Agent: Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, L. M. V.

    2009-08-01

    In the vacuum of space, the interactions of energetic particles with the surfaces of airless planetary bodies cause radiation damage, chemical changes, optical changes, erosional sputtering, and heat. This is an essential part of the process called space weathering. A group at the Laboratory for Atomic and Surface Physics at the University of Virginia specialize in experiments, among other things, where they bombard surfaces with charged particles to see what happens. Recent work by Mark Loeffler, Cathy Dukes, and Raul Baragiola focused on what happens to olivine mineral grains when they are irradiated by helium ions to better understand the effects of solar wind on the surface composition and, therefore, appearance of asteroids. Their experiments were the first to measure chemical and reflectance changes in olivine before and after irradiation while still under vacuum conditions. The resulting changes in the reflectance spectra of olivine slabs and powders are directly correlated with the formation of metallic iron in the very outer surface of the mineral grains.

  6. Space Weather Now

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Space Environment Center

    The Space Weather Now page is intended to give the non-technical user a "plain language" look at space weather. It includes information about relevant events and announcements, data from and about different instruments and satellites watching various aspects of space weather, alerts and advisories, daily themes of products and services, and links appropriate for the various groups of users.

  7. Aviation weather services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprinkle, C. H.

    1983-01-01

    The primary responsibilities of the National Weather Service (NWS) are to: provide warnings of severe weather and flooding for the protection of life and property; provide public forecasts for land and adjacent ocean areas for planning and operation; and provide weather support for: production of food and fiber; management of water resources; production, distribution and use of energy; and efficient and safe air operations.

  8. Weather Girl Goes Rogue

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Deep Rogue Ram

    This humorous video suggests what might happen if a weather forecaster reported the weather in the context of climate change. There is a sharp contrast between the anchor focusing on short-term local concerns and the weather forecaster describing what is happening on a long-term global basis.

  9. Climate and Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Geographic

    This video discusses the differences between climate and weather by defining and presenting examples of each. When presenting examples of weather, the video focuses on severe events and how meteorologists predict and study the weather using measurement, satellites, and radar. The climate focus is primarily on an overview of climate zones.

  10. Weather Fundamentals: Meteorology. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    The videos in this educational series, for grades 4-7, help students understand the science behind weather phenomena through dramatic live-action footage, vivid animated graphics, detailed weather maps, and hands-on experiments. This episode (23 minutes) looks at how meteorologists gather and interpret current weather data collected from sources…

  11. Weather Maps in Motion

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Charles Burrows

    In this activity, students learn to interpret current weather maps. They will observe weather map loop animations on the internet, learn the concept of Zulu time (Universal Time Coordinated, UTC) and visualize the movement of fronts and air masses. They will then analyze a specific weather station model, generate a meteogram from their observations, and answer a set of questions about their observations.

  12. METEOROLOGICAL Weather and Forecasting

    E-print Network

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Weather and Forecasting EARLY ONLINE RELEASE This is a preliminary School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology University of Hawaii at Manoa U.S.A. Yun-Ching Lin submitted to Weather and Forecasting July 05, 2010 Corresponding author: Dr. Mong-Ming Lu, Central Weather

  13. Spaceborne weather radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Meneghini; Toshiaki Kozu

    1990-01-01

    The present work on the development status of spaceborne weather radar systems and services discusses radar instrument complementarities, the current forms of equations for the characterization of such aspects of weather radar performance as surface and mirror-image returns, polarimetry, and Doppler considerations, and such essential factors in spaceborne weather radar design as frequency selection, scanning modes, and the application of

  14. Writing TAFS for Winter Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    COMET

    2009-09-22

    "Writing TAFs for Winter Weather" is the fourth unit in the Distance Learning Aviation Course 2 (DLAC2) series on producing TAFs that meet the needs of the aviation community. In addition to providing information about tools for diagnosing winter weather and its related impacts, the module extends the Practically Perfect TAF (PPTAF) process to address an airport’s operational thresholds. By understanding the thresholds at airports for which they produce TAFs, forecasters will be better able to produce a PPTAF. The unit also examines how to communicate effectively the logic and uncertainty using the aviation forecast discussion (AvnFD) and addresses maintaining an effective TAF weather watch and updating the TAF proactively.

  15. Physical Education Resources, Class Management, and Student Physical Activity Levels: A Structure-Process-Outcome Approach to Evaluating Physical Education Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bevans, Katherine B.; Fitzpatrick, Leslie-Anne; Sanchez, Betty M.; Riley, Anne W.; Forrest, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Background: This study was conducted to empirically evaluate specific human, curricular, and material resources that maximize student opportunities for physical activity during physical education (PE) class time. A structure-process-outcome model was proposed to identify the resources that influence the frequency of PE and intensity of physical

  16. Convective Weather Avoidance with Uncertain Weather Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karahan, Sinan; Windhorst, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    Convective weather events have a disruptive impact on air traffic both in terminal area and in en-route airspaces. In order to make sure that the national air transportation system is safe and efficient, it is essential to respond to convective weather events effectively. Traffic flow control initiatives in response to convective weather include ground delay, airborne delay, miles-in-trail restrictions as well as tactical and strategic rerouting. The rerouting initiatives can potentially increase traffic density and complexity in regions neighboring the convective weather activity. There is a need to perform rerouting in an intelligent and efficient way such that the disruptive effects of rerouting are minimized. An important area of research is to study the interaction of in-flight rerouting with traffic congestion or complexity and developing methods that quantitatively measure this interaction. Furthermore, it is necessary to find rerouting solutions that account for uncertainties in weather forecasts. These are important steps toward managing complexity during rerouting operations, and the paper is motivated by these research questions. An automated system is developed for rerouting air traffic in order to avoid convective weather regions during the 20- minute - 2-hour time horizon. Such a system is envisioned to work in concert with separation assurance (0 - 20-minute time horizon), and longer term air traffic management (2-hours and beyond) to provide a more comprehensive solution to complexity and safety management. In this study, weather is dynamic and uncertain; it is represented as regions of airspace that pilots are likely to avoid. Algorithms are implemented in an air traffic simulation environment to support the research study. The algorithms used are deterministic but periodically revise reroutes to account for weather forecast updates. In contrast to previous studies, in this study convective weather is represented as regions of airspace that pilots are likely to avoid. The automated system periodically updates forecasts and reassesses rerouting decisions in order to account for changing weather predictions. The main objectives are to reroute flights to avoid convective weather regions and determine the resulting complexity due to rerouting. The eventual goal is to control and reduce complexity while rerouting flights during the 20 minute - 2 hour planning period. A three-hour simulation is conducted using 4800 flights in the national airspace. The study compares several metrics against a baseline scenario using the same traffic and weather but with rerouting disabled. The results show that rerouting can have a negative impact on congestion in some sectors, as expected. The rerouting system provides accurate measurements of the resulting complexity in the congested sectors. Furthermore, although rerouting is performed only in the 20-minute - 2-hour range, it results in a 30% reduction in encounters with nowcast weather polygons (100% being the ideal for perfectly predictable and accurate weather). In the simulations, rerouting was performed for the 20-minute - 2-hour flight time horizon, and for the en-route segment of air traffic. The implementation uses CWAM, a set of polygons that represent probabilities of pilot deviation around weather. The algorithms were implemented in a software-based air traffic simulation system. Initial results of the system's performance and effectiveness were encouraging. Simulation results showed that when flights were rerouted in the 20-minute - 2-hour flight time horizon of air traffic, there were fewer weather encounters in the first 20 minutes than for flights that were not rerouted. Some preliminary results were also obtained that showed that rerouting will also increase complexity. More simulations will be conducted in order to report conclusive results on the effects of rerouting on complexity. Thus, the use of the 20-minute - 2-hour flight time horizon weather avoidance teniques performed in the simulation is expected to provide benefits for short-term weather avoidan

  17. The Rhetoric of Physics: AN Ethnography of the Research and Writing Processes in a Physics Laboratory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, Heather Ann Brodie

    1992-01-01

    This dissertation explores the extent to which rhetoric plays a role in the research and writing processes of physicists. It seeks to join the on-going conversation in the rhetoric of inquiry about the ways in which rhetorical forces shape all knowledge systems. Based on data collected during a six-month ethnography in a thin films laboratory, this study argues that these physicists use rhetoric in all stages of the knowledge creation process. After following the experimental process through all its stages from the inception of an experiment through to publication, this study maps out the types of heuristic devices employed by the physicists as they analyzed, interpreted, and presented their research data in a persuasive scientific article. In light of the insights gained from studying the dynamic interactions between physicists, this dissertation also comments on the theoretical and philosophical debates under discussion in the rhetoric of inquiry and the rhetoric of science. It examines current theories of language (as expressed by rhetoricians, critical theorists, and the physicists in this laboratory) to explore the relationship between reality and language, the role that rhetoric plays in knowledge creation in physics, and the ways in which reality and knowledge may be socially constructed. It concludes that these physicists use rhetorical invention strategies to interpret and present their data. It also argues that scientific knowledge is subject to rhetorical forces because it deals with contingent affairs--phenomena about which scientists advance propositions which appear to be true but about which there is no way to gain absolute certainty or truth. Finally, it concludes that rhetoric both is and is not epistemic in the physics research studied here, and it argues that instead of asking "Is rhetoric epistemic?" perhaps we might shift our attention to inquiring "When is rhetoric epistemic?".

  18. Bio-Optical Response and Coupling with Physical Processes in the Lombok Strait Region

    E-print Network

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    Bio-Optical Response and Coupling with Physical Processes in the Lombok Strait Region Burton H a variety of tools to investigate the bio-optical variability of the region, its response to the physical relatively little optical data exist. 2. The coupling of bio-optical properties with the physical processes

  19. Weather affects us

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kimmy

    2009-11-09

    2nd grade weather unit. The students will learn how weather affects us in our daily lives Read and view the video on meteorologists Kid Meteorologist Learn about clouds - watch S'cool Clouds All About Clouds Do scholastic: weather watch and game Weather Read winter storms Interactive Weather Web Pages Read a reason for the season A Reason for the Season Read about precipitation Precipitation Read and view video on flooding Flood: Farming and Erosion Read about air pressure It's a Breeze: How Air Pressure Affects You Read about Hurricanes Hurricanes Do the activities and read ...

  20. Physics as Quantum Information Processing: Quantum Fields as Quantum Automata 1

    E-print Network

    D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro

    Physics as Quantum Information Processing: Quantum Fields as Quantum Automata 1 Giacomo Mauro D) to a quantum computation? Can physics be simulated by a quantum computer? Do we believe that a quantum field on a quantum-digitalization of physics, with Quantum Theory as a special theory of information, and Physics

  1. The Process of Physics Teaching Assistants' Pedagogical Content Knowledge Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seung, Eulsun

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the process of physics teaching assistants' (TAs) PCK development in the context of teaching a new undergraduate introductory physics course. "Matter and Interactions" (M&I) has recently adopted a new introductory physics course that focuses on the application of a small number of fundamental physical

  2. CAWSES: climate and weather of the sun-earth system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Su.

    During 2004-2008, Climate and Weather of the Sun-Earth System (CAWSES), the new program developed by ICSU's interdisciplinary body Scientific Committee for Solar Terrestrial Physics (SCOSTEP), will link the world's scientists in a cooperative effort to study the entire interactive Sun-Earth system. SCOSTEP recognizes the very impressive past, present, and planned space missions; ground-based observations; and theory, modeling, and data analysis efforts aimed at understanding aspects of this coupled system. Its new program, CAWSES, seeks to mobilize the international solar-terrestrial science community to fully utilize such data archives, and future data streams; to produce improvements in space weather forecasting, design of space- and Earth-based technological systems, and understanding the role of solar-terrestrial influences on Global Change. The CAWSES Science Steering Group (SSG) has organized the program around five themes: Solar Influence on Climate, Space Weather: Science and Applications, Atmospheric Coupling Processes, Space Climatology, and Capacity Building and Education. The theme leaders in each area are engaged in developing initial science plans with the participation of the international science community in discipline areas that span the entire system from the sun to the Earth's troposphere. The aim of this talk is to provide information to the international science and applications community on the CAWSES goals, objectives and initial implementation plans and to solicit inputs for future updates of the science plan. Some results from the first Space Weather and Atmospheric Coupling Campaigns to be held during March-April, 2004 will also be discussed.

  3. Weathering-related Slope Instabilities of The Calabrian Arc (italy)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Calcaterra; M. Parise

    2002-01-01

    Weathered igneous and metamorphic rocks widely crop out in the Mediterranean area, where in recent years greater attention has been paid to weathering-related slope movements. Calabria, the southernmost region of the Italian peninsula, is one of the most challenging area where to study such topic. Many factors favoured during past times onset and development of the weathering processes in Calabria:

  4. Report on GIS in Weather, Climate and Impacts Community Workshop

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. Wilhelmi

    2009-01-01

    Society and climate are coevolving in a manner that could place more vulnerable populations at risk from exposure to weather and climate stresses. Understanding risks and vulnerabilities to weather hazards and climate change requires interdisciplinary approach, that includes information about weather, climate, natural and built environment and social processes and characteristics. In October 2008, NCAR hosted 3rd Community Workshop on

  5. National Weather Service- Severe Weather Awareness

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website provides access to information designed to protect and prepare individuals from severe weather. Materials presented here include forecasts for aviation and marine interests and the general public, maps, statistical data, educational materials, publications, and links to related sites.

  6. Seasonal changes in physical processes controlling evaporation over inland water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qianyu; Liu, Heping

    2014-08-01

    While previous studies have shown the distinct characteristics of water surface energy fluxes in different seasons, much less analysis is conducted about how seasonal changes in physical processes and environmental variables in the atmospheric surface layer (ASL) cause variations in flux exchange. Here we analyzed and compared eddy covariance fluxes of sensible heat (H) and latent heat (LE) and other microclimate variables that were measured over a large inland water surface in the winter season (January, February, and March) and the summer season (June, July, and August) of 2008. Our analysis was primarily focused on LE using half-hour time series data on a short-term basis. Our results show that an increase in wind speeds (U) or vapor pressure difference in the ASL (?e) or ASL instability did not necessarily cause an increase in LE, and the opposite changes in LE with changes in these variables were observed. Relative regulations of LE by different environmental variables depended largely on ?e magnitudes. Under low ?e conditions, diurnal LE variations were not sensitive to changes in ?e and U but were controlled primarily by changes in the ASL stability. Under high ?e conditions, diurnal LE variations were mainly determined by changes in ?e, though alternate controls by U and ?e were observed, whereas ASL stability played minor roles in affecting LE variations. Whether these highly nonlinear responses of LE to environmental variables are adequately reflected in the bulk transfer relations requires further studies.

  7. Phosphorus Cycling in an Extreme Environment: Grain-scale Investigation of Apatite Weathering in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heindel, R. C.; Spickard, A. M.; Virginia, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    Phosphorus (P) availability varies considerably throughout Taylor Valley, Antarctica. As an essential nutrient, P content and weathering have significant implications for the diversity and functioning of biota in soils, streams, and lakes. In upper Taylor Valley (Bonney Basin), soils have much lower total P content than in lower Taylor Valley (Fryxell Basin), 0.4 versus 1.5 g/kg soil. We hypothesize that this striking contrast is related to differences in glacial drift source and weathering rates. We investigated the primary source of mineral P (apatite) and the grain-scale weathering processes resulting in the release of P into streams and adjacent soils in the Bonney and Fryxell Basins. Physical erosion, chemical weathering, and biological weathering all leave distinctive patterns on the surface of individual apatite grains. By inspecting these surfaces, we determined the relative importance of weathering processes for P cycling. Apatite grains were separated from loose glacial drift using heavy-liquid and magnetic techniques. Individual grains were analyzed using SEM-EDS. We observe significant differences between the grains collected from the two basins. Grains from the Bonney Basin are more elongated and have a higher proportion of crystal faces. These results suggest that rates of physical weathering have been lower in the Bonney Basin than in the Fryxell Basin. In addition, we will present results on grain surface morphologies, indicative of chemical and biological weathering. As the climate warms, more liquid water is expected to be available within the Taylor Valley system. This increase in water will likely lead to higher rates of P weathering, potentially altering nutrient limitation in this environment. Understanding how the P cycle will respond to a changing climate is contingent on understanding the current weathering processes and controls on P availability.

  8. The Development and Validation of a Process Instrument for a Unit of the Physical Science Study Committee Physics Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penny, Maria Bramtot

    The purpose of this study was to prepare a valid and reliable instrument to evaluate the objectives dealing with the behaviors expected in Part 1 of the Physical Science Study Committee (PSSC) physics course. There were six phases to the study: (1) identification of the processes, (2) selection thereof, (3) construction of instrument, (4) pilot…

  9. Basalt weathering in an Arctic Mars-analog site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesavage, Tiffany; Thompson, Aaron; Hausrath, Elisabeth M.; Brantley, Susan L.

    2015-07-01

    The martian surface has undergone chemical and physical weathering in the past, and these processes may continue intermittently today. To explore whether martian rocks are likely to retain features indicative of weathering, we investigated how basaltic material weathers on Earth. Specifically, we investigated weathering of a Quaternary-aged basaltic flow at the Sverrefjell volcano in Svalbard, above the Arctic Circle. This flow weathered since deglaciation under cold, dry (<400 mm/yr) conditions. We analyzed a ?75-cm core of regolith for chemical loss and then characterized the mineralogical and morphological properties using electron microscopy (EM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared (IR) spectroscopy and selective chemical dissolution. In addition, we ran colloidal dispersion, wetting/drying, and freeze/thaw experiments. In the regolith, we observed concentrations of short-range ordered (SRO) phases similar to those observed in warmer, wetter volcanic ash soils. IR and EM analyses of the clay-sized fraction were consistent with allophane as the predominant secondary phase. Selective chemical extractions targeting SRO phases indicated lower Al/Si ratios than those observed in volcanic soils reported in warmer localities, which we attribute to Si-rich allophane and/or abundant Si-rich rock coatings. The oxic circumneutral-pH colloidal dispersion experiments mobilized Al, Fe and Ti primarily as 260-415 nm particles and Ca, Mg and Na as solutes. Si was lost both in the colloidal and dissolved forms. Dispersed colloids likely contain allophane and ferrihydrite. Under anoxic conditions, dissolution of Fe oxide cements also released fines. The experiments help to explain elemental loss from the clay-sized regolith fraction at Svalbard: observed depletions in Ca, K, Mg and Na were likely due to solute loss, while particle-reactive Al, Fe, Si and Ti were mostly retained. Wetting/drying was observed to be as effective as freeze/thaw in driving material loss. It is thus possible that cyclic adsorption of water onto basaltic rocks in this dry climate may result in high physical spalling rates that in turn promote chemical leaching. Many observations at Sverrefjell are similar to inferences from Mars: the presence of SRO phases, Si-rich coatings, and/or Si-rich allophane, as well as the persistence of olivine. Given these similarities, it is inferred that Sverrefjell volcano is a good analog for martian weathering and that other processes operating at Sverrefjell may also have occurred on Mars, including Na leaching, surface spalling, and precipitation of Si-rich layers. Such processes could have occurred on Mars wherever basalts were exposed to water at circumneutral pH for thousands to tens of thousands of years.

  10. Observing Space Weather towards building Predictive Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothmer, Volker

    2012-07-01

    Simultaneous data from multi-point space missions operating in the Sun-Earth system in conjunction with dedicated ground- based networks have facilitated major steps towards the quantification of space weather processes, better understandings of their impacts on the various high level systems of modern societal infrastructure and fundamental developments in space weather forecasting. Through the EU FP7 program and the ESA Space Situational Awareness (SSA) program several dedicated space weather projects and studies have currently been initiated, such as the AFFECTS (Advanced Forecast For Ensuring Communications Through Space), aiming in establishing prototype space weather services, instruments and missions as precursors of a future space weather operational system. This presentation provides an overview of the ongoing European activities, upcoming challenges and opportunities for international collaborations.

  11. Weather: You Like It or Not - Learning about the Importance of and Flaws in Weather Prediction

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Rachel McClain Klein

    2001-03-07

    In this lesson, students explore the importance of weather prediction and learn about some of the flaws inherent in the process. By researching specific storm types, they are able to prepare and deliver their own weather reports. The material includes links to additional information and resources.

  12. NOAA Daily Weather Maps

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Hydrometeorological Prediction Center

    2011-01-01

    The charts on this website are the principal charts of the former Weather Bureau publication, "Daily Weather Map." They are the Surface Weather Map, the 500-Millibar Height Contours chart, the Highest and Lowest Temperatures chart, and the Precipitation Areas and Amounts chart. For each day, simple charts are arranged on a single page. These charts are the surface analysis of pressure and fronts, color shading, in ten degree intervals,of maximum and minimum temperature, 500-Millibar height contours, and color shaded 24-hour total precipitation. These charts act as links to their respective Daily Weather Map charts. All charts are derived from the operational weather maps prepared at the National Centers for Environmental Prediction, Hydrometeorological Prediction Center, National Weather Service.

  13. Russian space weather resources: the overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitzev, A.; Petrukovich, A.; Dmitriev, A.

    During past few years the Russian Space Weather Resources develop extensively and displayed in Internet. The scientific and public interest to the space weather motivated by programs of further space exploration and possible applications for technological systems both on ground level and in outer space. In this paper we overview the Internet resources which used for space weather programs in Russia. The leading institutes as Institute of Space Research ( www.iki.rssi.ru), Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (www.izmiran.ru), Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics (www.iszf.irk.ru), Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (www.npi.msu.su) and others create the data bases and services for space weather. They propose a new satellite programs as VULKAN, KOMPAS, RESONANS which lead to develop a new scientific results in magnetosphere physics. The Russian ground-based geophysical network of observatories is survive and a new instruments as digital ionosondes and magnetometers operate in real-time. Scientists from academic institutes are working toward applications with institutes responsible for monitoring of spacecraft anomalies, ionospheric propagation, geomagnetically induced currents and bio-medical aspects of space weather. In addition to the research of space weather issues we are working to improve the forecasting of space weather based on the solar, interplanetary and ground-based data. The successful samples of such services also displayed in Internet and presented in our paper. The further development of Russian Space Weather Resources coordinated with international programs as IHY/IPY, ILWS, CAWSES, etc.

  14. Framework for Understanding LENR Processes, Using Conventional Condensed Matter Physics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott R. Chubb

    Conventional Condensed Matter physics provides a unifying framework for understanding Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR's) in solids. In the paper, standard many-body physics techniques are used to illustrate this fact. Specifically, the paper shows that formally the theories by Schwinger, Hagelstein, and Chubb and Chubb (C&C), all can be related to a common set of equations, associated with reaction rate

  15. The Victim Blame Process in Survivors of Physical Child Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Robert T.; And Others

    A considerable literature has developed on the tendency to ascribe the "blame" for unfortunate life events on the victims of the misfortune. Previous research has not explored fully the victim blame tendency in the case of child physical abuse. This study investigated the relationship between the experience of physically abusive parenting and the…

  16. Space Weather Media Viewer

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2011-01-01

    This is version 3 of the space Weather Media Viewer, created to work with the space Weather Action Center to see near-real time data and to provide additional images and resources available for educational use. It features easy downloads that can also be added to news reports and space weather reports. It was designed for ease in adding any media (videos, images) data.

  17. Everything Weather- Archived Data

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2001-01-01

    Users can obtain current weather forecasts for their own areas by entering a ZIP code, or they can access a large archive of historic data on severe weather (tornadoes, hail, high winds, hurricanes). Materials presented in the archive include dates, times, and intensities of storms, a photo gallery, maps, radar and other satellite data, storm chaser reports, and links to other weather sites. Raw data can be found in several forms for teachers wishing to have unprocessed data to work with.

  18. Weather and climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Recommendations for using space observations of weather and climate to aid in solving earth based problems are given. Special attention was given to: (1) extending useful forecasting capability of space systems, (2) reducing social, economic, and human losses caused by weather, (3) development of space system capability to manage and control air pollutant concentrations, and (4) establish mechanisms for the national examination of deliberate and inadvertent means for modifying weather and climate.

  19. Weather and Climate Data

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Weather and Climate Data site for the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies (COLA) contains analyses of current conditions and the state of the atmosphere; weather forecasts; metropolitan quick-look weather summaries and meteograms; short-term climate outlooks for temperature, precipitation and soil moisture; El Nino forecasts for understanding the ocean-atmosphere system; and maximum potential hurricane intensity maps showing potential minimum pressure and potential maximum winds for the oceans.

  20. Winter weather activity

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Whitney Frankovic

    2009-09-28

    This project explores factors that help create severe winter weather. An interactive simulation provides hands-on experience, followed by guiding questions and resource exploration. Weather Maker Simulator Use the weather simulation above to answer the following questions in complete sentences on paper. 1. In general, when are winds formed? 2. When winds are blowing, how can you get them to stop? 3. What usually happens when there is a large difference between the temperatures? 4. What happens when there is high ...

  1. Weather assessment and forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Data management program activities centered around the analyses of selected far-term Office of Applications (OA) objectives, with the intent of determining if significant data-related problems would be encountered and if so what alternative solutions would be possible. Three far-term (1985 and beyond) OA objectives selected for analyses as having potential significant data problems were large-scale weather forecasting, local weather and severe storms forecasting, and global marine weather forecasting. An overview of general weather forecasting activities and their implications upon the ground based data system is provided. Selected topics were specifically oriented to the use of satellites.

  2. Net-Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Net-Weather presents a host of meteorological information for the UK at this website. Users can find out seasonal, monthly, 10-day, and additional relevant weather forecasts. The Charts and Data link offers live satellite images, links to numerous forecast models, and data on sea temperatures and anomalies. For people who like winter and snow, the website offers interesting stories about famous British winters as well as snow reports. The Net-Weather Forum is a great place to discuss any weather-related topic.

  3. Pilot Weather Advisor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindamood, Glenn; Martzaklis, Konstantinos Gus; Hoffler, Keith; Hill, Damon; Mehrotra, Sudhir C.; White, E. Richard; Fisher, Bruce D.; Crabill, Norman L.; Tucholski, Allen D.

    2006-01-01

    The Pilot Weather Advisor (PWA) system is an automated satellite radio-broadcasting system that provides nearly real-time weather data to pilots of aircraft in flight anywhere in the continental United States. The system was designed to enhance safety in two distinct ways: First, the automated receipt of information would relieve the pilot of the time-consuming and distracting task of obtaining weather information via voice communication with ground stations. Second, the presentation of the information would be centered around a map format, thereby making the spatial and temporal relationships in the surrounding weather situation much easier to understand

  4. Winter Storm (weather)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Aubree Miller

    2009-09-28

    This project explores factors that help create severe winter weather. An interactive simulation provides hands-on experience, followed by guiding questions and resource exploration. First think about these questions: 1. What is your favorite aspect of winter weather? 2. How does the weather effect your everyday life? Form groups of THREE. Explore the following simulation: Weather Maker Simulator Use the simulation to answer the following questions on paper... 1. In general, when are winds formed? 2. When winds are blowing, how can you ...

  5. Washington Post Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Washington Post makes a bid for the already crowded Internet weather market with WeatherPost. Coverage includes current conditions and four-day forecasts for 3,600 cities worldwide, as well as snapshot and time-lapse satellite maps (provided by Accu Weather). For US cities, users may also access UV and air quality maps and data, as well as seasonal maps (snow cover, tanning index, heat index, and BeachCast) and other radar images such as precipitation. Users may enter a city name into the homepage search box, or may browse by country or state/province. The historical weather database offers compiled monthly average weather data for nearly 1,000 cities worldwide; the database is searchable. An aspect of the site that sets it apart from many other weather pages is the weather reference desk, which includes a weather glossary, weather calculators (JavaScript converters for temperature, wind chill, heat index, etc.) and a page devoted to storm chasers.

  6. Towards a National Space Weather Predictive Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, N. J.; Lindstrom, K. L.; Ryschkewitsch, M. G.; Anderson, B. J.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Merkin, V. G.; Kelly, M. A.; Miller, E. S.; Sitnov, M. I.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Erlandson, R. E.; Barnes, R. J.; Paxton, L. J.; Sotirelis, T.; Stephens, G.; Comberiate, J.

    2014-12-01

    National needs in the area of space weather informational and predictive tools are growing rapidly. Adverse conditions in the space environment can cause disruption of satellite operations, communications, navigation, and electric power distribution grids, leading to a variety of socio-economic losses and impacts on our security. Future space exploration and most modern human endeavors will require major advances in physical understanding and improved transition of space research to operations. At present, only a small fraction of the latest research and development results from NASA, NOAA, NSF and DoD investments are being used to improve space weather forecasting and to develop operational tools. The power of modern research and space weather model development needs to be better utilized to enable comprehensive, timely, and accurate operational space weather tools. The mere production of space weather information is not sufficient to address the needs of those who are affected by space weather. A coordinated effort is required to support research-to-applications transition efforts and to develop the tools required those who rely on this information. In this presentation we will review datasets, tools and models that have resulted from research by scientists at JHU/APL, and examine how they could be applied to support space weather applications in coordination with other community assets and capabilities.

  7. Effect of Microbial Weathering on Carbonate Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIAN, Bin; CHEN, Ye; ZHU, Lijun; YANG, Ruidong

    The interaction between microorganisms and minerals can facilitate the process of exogenic biogeochemical reaction, which is one of the important research contents in exogenic geochemistry. Microbes and their geological effects were summarized, and a variety of microbial weathering phenomena toward carbonate rocks, especially on different microcosmic scales, were analyzed. Weathering products and mechanisms of carbonate rocks by microbes were also expounded. The authors put forward four microbial weathering mechanisms of carbonate rocks: (1) microorganisms grow on rock surface or in crevices, resulting in bio-corrosion, bio-erosion, and boring, and accelerate rock decomposition and weathering; (2) boring meshes produced by microbial colony could increase the efficient superficial area of chemical denudation of rocks and could lead to the intensification of rock surface weathering to promote mechanical erosion, and the microbial destruction and loosing of cementation structure of rock particles would also accelerate the decomposition of mineral particles; (3) rock weathering can be intensified by the effects of microbial water-keeping, acidification of organic acids secreted by microorganisms, and the release of CO 2 induced by microbial respiration onto rock surface; (4) microorganisms obtain nutrition from rock surface to produce complicated organic ligands and promote the release of mineral elements in the growing process of microorganisms. Finally, how to carry out studies on the microbial weathering of carbonate rocks was proposed. The authors suggest to comprehensively exploit local low-grade mineral resources, which contain potassium and phosphate, and accelerate soil formation and evolution in karst regions by using microbial technology.

  8. Physical Sciences and Processes of Inquiry: A Critique of CHEM, CBA and PSSC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diederich, Mary E.

    1969-01-01

    The author sees the physical sciences as processes of inquiry and proceeds to analyze and criticize CHEM Study, CBA, and PSSC physics in terms of their views of inquiry and of the sciences. A discussion of some desirable features for a high school program in physical science is included. Bibliography. (LC)

  9. Multilingual Weather Forecast Generation System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tianfang Yao; Dongmo Zhang; Qian Wang

    The MLWFA (Multilingual Weather Forecasts Assistant) system will be demonstrated. It is developed to generate the multilingual text of the weather forecasts automatically. The raw data from the weather observation can be used to generate the weather element chart. According to the weather change trend, the forecasters can directly modify the value Of the element on the chart, such as

  10. Framework for Understanding Lenr Processes, Using Conventional Condensed Matter Physics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott R. Chubb

    2006-01-01

    Conventional condensed matter physics provides a unifying framework for understanding low-energy nuclear reactions (LENRs) in solids. In the paper, standard many-body physics techniques are used to illustrate this fact. Specifically, the paper shows that formally the theories by Schwinger, Hagelstein, and Chubb and Chubb (C&C), all can be related to a common set of equations, associated with reaction rate and

  11. Studies of Fe\\/sup 2 +\\/. -->. Fe\\/sup 3 +\\/ transitions during the process of rock weathering by nuclear gamma-resonance spectroscopy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. P. Vasilev; V. F. Babanin; A. A. Solovev

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents a method for the mineral and weathering assessment of rocks and carbonaceous matter based in gamma spectroscopy and transitions between iron ions. The method is applied to rocks collected near the Teberda preserve. Four latitudinal bands of rocks parallel to the Greater Caucasus Ridge are identified in this territory. Isomer shift and hyperfine parameters of the Moessbauer

  12. 2007 Weather and Aeolian Sand-Transport Data from the Colorado River Corridor, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Andrews, Timothy; Fairley, Helen C.; Brown, Christopher R.

    2009-01-01

    Weather data constitute an integral part of ecosystem monitoring in the Colorado River corridor and are particularly valuable for understanding processes of landscape change that contribute to the stability of archeological sites. Data collected in 2007 are reported from nine weather stations in the Colorado River corridor through Grand Canyon, Ariz. The stations were deployed in February and March 2007 to measure wind speed and direction, rainfall, air temperature, relative humidity, and barometric pressure. Sand traps near each weather station collect windblown sand, from which daily aeolian sand-transport rates are calculated. The data reported here were collected as part of an ongoing study to test and evaluate methods for quantifying processes that affect the physical integrity of archeological sites along the river corridor; as such, these data can be used to identify rainfall events capable of causing gully incision and to predict likely transport pathways for aeolian sand, two landscape processes integral to the preservation of archeological sites. Weather data also have widespread applications to other studies of physical, cultural, and biological resources in Grand Canyon. Aeolian sand-transport data reported here, collected in the year before the March 2008 High-Flow Experiment (HFE) at Glen Canyon Dam, represent baseline data against which the effects of the 2008 HFE on windblown sand will be compared in future reports.

  13. Recent progress in global, medium range numerical weather prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Källén, Erland

    2015-04-01

    Future improvements in global, medium-range weather forecasts will come from a combination of initial state and model error reductions. Data assimilation advances are crucial, we have to utilise all the available observations efficiently by optimising the assimilation algorithms. Model error reductions will come from improved resolution in space as well as more accurate parameterisations of subgridscale, physical processes. Some examples from recent work at ECMWF will be presented. Ensemble methods are used both to assess the prediction errors in the medium range as well as estimating error correlations for use in variational data assimilation. Examples of this work will also be given

  14. Development of Mathematical Models and Computational Framework for Multi-physics Interaction Processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karan S. Surana; Yongting Ma; Albert Romkes; J. N. Reddy

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents development of mathematical models for multi-physics interaction processes in which the physics of solids, liquids and gases are described using conservation laws, appropriate constitutive equations and equations of state in Eulerian description. The use of conservation laws in Eulerian description for all media of an interaction process and the choice of the same dependent variables in the

  15. A Analysis of the Development of Weather Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Paul John

    Weather information in all forms is poorly understood and often misinterpreted by the general public. Weather literacy is necessary for everyone if critical weather messages, designed to save lives and protect property, are to be effective. The purpose of this study was to seek content and causal evidence for a developmental concept of Weather Information Processing that was consistent with Piagetian Cognitive Stages of Development. Three ordinal Content Stages Of Weather Information Processing (phenomena, process and mechanism) and three ordinal Causal Explanation Stages Of Weather Information Processing (non-real, natural, and scientifically valid abstract ideas) were explored for their relationship with Piaget's Pre-Operational, Concrete and Formal Stages of Development. One hundred and fifty -five elementary and secondary school students from two school districts were administered a written Piagetian exam. Commonly available television weather programs were categorized, randomly assigned and viewed by 42 randomly selected students who were administered three Piagetian tasks. Students were clinically interviewed for the level of content information and causal explanations (reasoning). Results indicated that content information and causal reasoning of students to televised weather information is significantly related (p <.01) to age, and Piagetian Cognitive Stages of Development. Two Piagetian logic operations (seriation and correlation) were established as significantly different (p <.05) when related to age. These findings support a developmental concept of Weather Information Processing and have implications for teaching and presenting weather information to the public.

  16. People and Weather.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NatureScope, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Provides: (1) background information on ways weather influences human lives; (2) activities related to this topic; and (3) a ready-to-copy page with weather trivia. Each activity includes an objective, list of materials needed, recommended age level(s), subject area(s), and instructional strategies. (JN)

  17. Weather Fundamentals: Clouds. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    The videos in this educational series, for grades 4-7, help students understand the science behind weather phenomena through dramatic live-action footage, vivid animated graphics, detailed weather maps, and hands-on experiments. This episode (23 minutes) discusses how clouds form, the different types of clouds, and the important role they play in…

  18. Tracking Weather Satellites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Helen E.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the use of weather satellites in providing an exciting, cohesive framework for students learning Earth and space science and in providing a hands-on approach to technology in the classroom. Discusses the history of weather satellites and classroom satellite tracking. (JRH)

  19. Weather Fundamentals: Wind. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    The videos in this educational series, for grades 4-7, help students understand the science behind weather phenomena through dramatic live-action footage, vivid animated graphics, detailed weather maps, and hands-on experiments. This episode (23 minutes) describes the roles of the sun, temperature, and air pressure in creating the incredible power…

  20. Designing a Weather Station

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    The collection and analysis of weather data is crucial to the location of alternate energy systems like solar and wind. This article presents a design challenge that gives students a chance to design a weather station to collect data in advance of a large wind turbine installation. Data analysis is a crucial part of any science or engineering…

  1. Weather Vane and Anemometer

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Watsonville Environmental Science Workshop

    2011-01-01

    In this meteorology activity, learners construct simple devices to measure the direction and speed of wind. Learners will explore wind and air resistance as well as how weather vanes and generators work to analyze weather patterns. Note: a drill and other specialty tools are required for this activity, but are not included in the cost of materials.

  2. Northwest Weather Watch

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sue Palewicz

    This educational module is designed to teach students about predicting weather. This includes a series of activites about clouds, moisture, air and rain for students to complete. There are curriculum connections to art, writing and math as well as links for more resources and live weather data.

  3. Teacher's Weather Sourcebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konvicka, Tom

    This book is a teaching resource for the study of weather-related phenomena. A "weather unit" is often incorporated into school study because of its importance to our daily lives and because of its potential to cut across disciplinary content. This book consists of two parts. Part I covers the major topics of atmospheric science such as the modern…

  4. Weather and radar interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. P. Booth

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the effects of weather on radar system performance. This discussion were based on computer simulations and climatological data. The relationships between frequency and range were explored as they interact with the weather. This effort is being conducted in the RF Technology Division of the Applied Sensors, Guidance, and Electronics Directorate, US Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development,

  5. Advanced Aviation Weather Forecasts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marilyn M. Wolfson; David A. Clark

    2006-01-01

    n The U.S. air transportation system faces a continuously growing gap between the demand for air transportation and the capacity to meet that demand. Two key obstacles to bridging this gap are traffic delays due to en route severe- weather conditions and airport weather conditions. Lincoln Laboratory has been addressing these traffic delays and related safety problems under the Federal

  6. Subsurface Evolution: Weathering and Mechanical Strength Reduction in Bedrock of Lower Gordon Gulch, Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, P. J.; Anderson, S. P.; Anderson, R. S.; Blum, A.; Foster, M. A.; Langston, A. L.

    2011-12-01

    Weathering processes drive mobile regolith production at the surface of the earth. Chemical and physical weathering weakens rock by creating porosity, opening fractures, and transforming minerals. Increased porosity provides habitat for living organisms, which aid in further breakdown of the rock, leaving it more susceptible to displacement and transport. In this study, we test mechanical and chemical characteristics of weathered profiles to better understand weathering processes. We collect shallow bedrock cores from tors and isovolumetrically weathered bedrock in lower Gordon Gulch to characterize the mechanical strength, mineralogy, and bulk chemistry of samples to track changes in the subsurface as bedrock weathers to mobile regolith. Gordon Gulch is a small (2.7 km2), E-W trending catchment within the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory underlain by Pre-Cambrian gneiss and granitic bedrock. The basin is typical of the "Rocky Mountain Surface" of the Front Range, characterized by low relief, a lack of glacial or fluvial incision, and deep weathering. Although the low-curvature, low-relief Rocky Mountain Surface would appear to indicate a landscape roughly in steady-state, shallow seismic surveys (Befus et al., 2011, Vadose Zone Journal) indicate depth to bedrock is highly variable. Block style release of saprolite into mobile regolith could explain this high variability and should be observable in geotechnical testing. Gordon Gulch also displays a systematic slope-aspect dependent control on weathering, with N-facing hillslopes exhibiting deeper weathering profiles than the S-facing hillslope. We believe comparisons of paired geotechnical-testing, XRD, and XRF analyses may explain this hillslope anisotropy. Rock quality designation (RQD) values, a commonly used indicator of rock mass quality (ASTM D6032), from both N- and S- facing aspects in Gordon Gulch indicate that granitic bedrock in both outcrop and saprolitic rock masses is poor to very poor. Brazilian tensile testing of outcrop core samples show relatively low tensile failure forces, and exhibit a roughly logarithmic increase in failure force, and hence tensile strength, with depth. For many of the granitic strength profiles, the point of greatest curvature is around 0.5 m depth. Tests reveal small-scale variation in the tensile strength, suggesting that the tight fracture-spacing bounding blocks of saprolite plays an important role in regolith production. The origin of the micro- and macro-fractures is unclear. Preliminary results do not correlate clear depth-trends in mineralogy or bulk chemistry with mechanical strength. The lack of a strong signature from chemical or mineralogical weathering suggests that mechanical processes, such as frost cracking or biotite hydration, may dominate.

  7. Reviews Book: Marie Curie and Her Daughters Resource: Cumulus Equipment: Alpha Particle Scattering Apparatus Equipment: 3D Magnetic Tube Equipment: National Grid Transmission Model Book: Einstein's Physics Equipment: Barton's Pendulums Equipment: Weather Station Web Watch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-09-01

    WE RECOMMEND Marie Curie and Her Daughters An insightful study of a resilient and ingenious family and their achievements Cumulus Simple to install and operate and with obvious teaching applications, this weather station 'donationware' is as easy to recommend as it is to use Alpha Particle Scattering Apparatus Good design and construction make for good results National Grid Transmission Model Despite its expense, this resource offers excellent value Einstein's Physics A vivid, accurate, compelling and rigorous treatment, but requiring an investment of time and thought WORTH A LOOK 3D Magnetic Tube Magnetic fields in three dimensions at a low cost Barton's Pendulums A neat, well-made and handy variant, but not a replacement for the more traditional version Weather Station Though not as robust or substantial as hoped for, this can be put to good use with the right software WEB WATCH An online experiment and worksheet are useful for teaching motor efficiency, a glance at CERN, and NASA's interesting information on the alpha-magnetic spectrometer and climate change

  8. Simulation of Forming Process as an Educational Tool Using Physical Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdullah, A. B.; Muda, M. R.; Samad, Z.

    2008-01-01

    Metal forming process simulation requires a very high cost including the cost for dies, machine and material and tight process control since the process involve very huge pressure. A physical modeling technique is developed and initiates a new era of educational tool of simulating the process effectively. Several publications and findings have…

  9. s-process nucleosynthesis-nuclear physics and the classical model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Kappeler; H. Beer; K. Wisshak

    1989-01-01

    Among the various processes responsible for the formation of the heavy elements in stars, the slow neutron capture process (s-process) is distinguished by the fact that it involves mostly stable isotopes. Therefore, the relevant nuclear physics data can be determined by experiments. With this rather reliable data basis, s-process nucleosynthesis offers an important testground of models for the late stages

  10. Process dominance shift in solute chemistry as revealed by long-term high-frequency water chemistry observations of groundwater flowing through weathered argillite underlying a steep forested hillslope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyojin; Bishop, James K. B.; Dietrich, William E.; Fung, Inez Y.

    2014-09-01

    Significant solute flux from the weathered bedrock zone - which underlies soils and saprolite - has been suggested by many studies. However, controlling processes for the hydrochemistry dynamics in this zone are poorly understood. This work reports the first results from a four-year (2009-2012) high-frequency (1-3 day) monitoring of major solutes (Ca, Mg, Na, K and Si) in the perched, dynamic groundwater in a 4000 m2 zero-order basin located at the Angelo Coast Range Reserve, Northern California. Groundwater samples were autonomously collected at three wells (downslope, mid-slope, and upslope) aligned with the axis of the drainage. Rain and throughfall samples, profiles of well headspace pCO2, vertical profiles and time series of groundwater temperature, and contemporaneous data from an extensive hydrologic and climate sensor network provided the framework for data analysis. All runoff at this soil-mantled site occurs by vertical unsaturated flow through a 5-25 m thick weathered argillite and then by lateral flows to the adjacent channel as groundwater perched over fresher bedrock. Driven by strongly seasonal rainfall, over each of the four years of observations, the hydrochemistry of the groundwater at each well repeats an annual cycle, which can be explained by two end-member processes. The first end-member process, which dominates during the winter high-flow season in mid- and upslope areas, is CO2 enhanced cation exchange reaction in the vadose zone in the more shallow conductive weathered bedrock. This process rapidly increases the cation concentrations of the infiltrated rainwater, which is responsible for the lowest cation concentration of groundwater. The second-end member process occurs in the deeper perched groundwater and either dominates year-round (at the downslope well) or becomes progressively dominant during low flow season at the two upper slope wells. This process is the equilibrium reaction with minerals such as calcite and clay minerals, but not with primary minerals, suggesting the critical role of the residence time of the water. Collectively, our measurements reveal that the hydrochemistry dynamics of the groundwater in the weathered bedrock zone is governed by two end-member processes whose dominance varies with critical zone structure, the relative importance of vadose versus groundwater zone processes, and thus with the seasonal variation of the chemistry of recharge and runoff.

  11. Predicting the Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Topic in Depth explores the science behind predicting the weather. First, the United States Search and Rescue Task Force describe the basic tools and knowledge used to create weather forecasts (1). Students can find concise, clear explanations of weather, fronts and air masses, high and low pressure, precipitation, and water vapor and humidity as well. By performing the activities presented in the second website, fourth grade students can learn about weather instruments and data collection (2). This website, produced by the Government of Saskatchewan, also explores how the weather can impact local communities. Third, Edheads offers a Macromedia Flash Player enhanced interactive module allowing students to predict the weather by examining weather maps (3 ). Through this website, users can become familiar with the concepts of warm and cold fronts, wind direction and speed, air pressure, and humidity. The fourth website, supplied by Annenberg / CPB, discusses weather satellites, Doppler radar, and additional tools forecasters use to predict the weather (4). Students can find a wind chill calculator along with a brief discussion of the history of forecasting and weather lore. Next, NOAA provides graphics for five forecast models: the ETA, the Global Forecast System (GFS), the Wave Watch III (WW3), the Nested Grid model (NGM), and the Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) (5). Outputs are available for North America, North Pacific, Western North Atlantic, and the Polar Ice Drift. Users can find links to detailed descriptions of the inputs and history of each model. Sixth, the British government's Met Office describes numerical modeling and its components (6). Students and educators can learn about the future in forecasting as well as educational opportunities with the Cooperative Program for Meteorology, Education, and Training (COMET).

  12. Winter Weather Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health Matters What's New Preparation & Planning Disasters & Severe Weather Earthquakes Extreme Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis ... Weather Information on Specific Types of Emergencies Winter Weather Frequently Asked Questions Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ...

  13. Weather Event Simulator Weather Event Simulator

    E-print Network

    Training Branch National Weather Service Norman, OK John Ferree Warning Decision Training Branch National for Applied Behavioral Science D iscus Audio/ Teac Le #12;Learn By DoingLearn By Doing #12;Simulations Improve ­ All Major Airlines ­ Flight Schools #12;Simulations Improve Job Performance Simulations Improve Job

  14. Health Issues and Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, N.

    2009-04-01

    The possibility that solar activity and variations in the Earth's magnetic field may affect human health has been debated for many decades but is still a "scientific topic" in its infancy. By learning whether and, if so, how much the Earth's space weather can influence the daily health of people will be of practical importance. Knowing whether human genetics, include regulating factors that take into account fluctuations of the Earth's magnetic field and solar disturbances, indeed exist will also benefit future interplanetary space travelers. Because the atmospheres on other planets are different from ours, as well as their interaction with the space environment, one may ask whether we are equipped with the genetics necessary to take this variability into account. The goal of this presentation is to define what is meant by space weather as a health risk and identify the long-term socio-economic effects on society that such health risks would have. Identifying the physical links between space weather sources and different effects on human health, as well as the parameters (direct and indirect) to be monitored, the potential for such a cross-disciplinary study will be invaluable, for scientists and medical doctors, as well as for engineers.

  15. A status report on weather modification research in the Dakotas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Paul L.; Orville, Harold D.; Boe, Bruce A.; Stith, Jeffrey L.

    An overview of the status of weather modification research in North and South Dakota (USA) is presented. The operational North Dakota Cloud Modification Projects has, since 1976, been seeding summer convective clouds for the dual objectives of hail suppression and rainfall enhancement. Research being carried out as part of a Federal/State cooperative program, in coordination with the operational activities, has included physical and statistical evaluation studies as well as numerical cloud modeling investigations. The statistical analyses provide some indications that the intended seeding effects are being obtained. The physical studies involve aircraft and radar observations and emphasize tracer experiments to study the transport and dispersion of seeding agents and the activation of ice nuclei. The modeling studies simulate the experiments and aid in investigation of the process involved and the effects of seeding. The 1989 North Dakota Thunderstorm Project, a major field study emphasizing physical and numerical modeling studies, is described briefly.

  16. Processes Underlying Children's Adjustment in Families Characterized by Physical Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onyskiw, Judee; Hayduk, Leslie A.

    2001-01-01

    The hypothesis that physical aggression in the family affects children's adjustment through both observational learning/modeling and through its impact on parenting was tested, via LISREL, using data from a sample of Canadian children (N=11,221). Results showed observational learning and disrupted parenting provide reasonable explanations of…

  17. Educating Emergency Managers About Weather -Related Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, T. C.; Johnson, V.

    2006-12-01

    The most common crises that emergency managers face are those related to hazardous weather - snowstorms, floods, hurricanes, heat waves, tornadoes, etc. However, man-made disasters, such as accidental releases of hazardous substances or terrorist acts, also often have a weather component. For example, after the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, emergency managers were concerned that thunderstorms in the area might cause the building to collapse, putting rescuers in further danger. Training emergency managers to recognize the importance of weather in disaster planning and response has been a small but important focus of the COMET Program's educational development effort. Topics addressed in COMET training modules that are pertinent to emergency management include fire weather, hurricanes, flood events, and air contaminant dispersion. Additionally, the module entitled Anticipating Hazardous Weather and Community Risk provides an overview of basic meteorological processes, describes a broad range of weather phenomenon, and then addresses what forecast products are available to emergency managers to assess a threat to their community. In many of the modules, learners are presented with scenarios that give them the opportunity to practice decision-making in hazardous weather situations. We will demonstrate some of those scenarios and discuss how training can be used to model good emergency management skills. We will discuss ways to communicate with the emergency management community and provide examples of how distance learning can be used to educate and train emergency managers.

  18. Space Weather CD

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2013-04-10

    This is a software package about space weather: what it is and what it does in space and here on Earth. The disc includes software that displays movies and images of the aurora and of the Sun in various wavelengths from the ground and from orbiting NASA spacecraft; a tutorial about what space weather is and how the aurora is formed; and more. Users will also find real-time space weather conditions from current satellite missions and can download the latest data without leaving the Space Weather application. A TicTacToe game is also included that tests space weather knowledge. The disc contains many other Space Weather resources, programs, sounds, and games for use at home or school, and there are several educational websites included in full on the disc for offline viewing. In addition there is an exhaustive list of links to a variety of space weather resources available online. The disc is available for free from a number of sites if downloaded.

  19. Trae dents distribution in the Ande= sub-basins of the Madeira 14ver : role of the weathering processes in the freshwaters geochemisQy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Matauricehurgain; E. Elbaz

    The distributioii of kace elements was investigated in surfwe waters in two upper Amazonian basins. Three main factors of the geochemical characterisation of the rivers explained mainly by weathering and dilution pmcesses. are : substrate lithology. mining activities, and organic matter _content. The disiolved elements. reflects the lithd~gí~il diffwais hmen the Mamors and Beni basins. hx&sìn t&utaries of the Mamore

  20. Rb–Sr and K–Ar systems of biotite in surface environments regulated by weathering processes with implications for isotopic dating and hydrological cycles of Sr isotopes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gi Young Jeong; Chang-Sik Cheong; Jeongmin Kim

    2006-01-01

    Biotite is widely used for Rb–Sr and K–Ar isotopic dating and influences Sr isotope geochemistry of hydrological regimes. The isotopic system of biotite behaves diversely in response to surface weathering; i.e. the complete preservation of original Rb–Sr and K–Ar isotopic ages or dramatic reduction. In this study, we have explored the relation between the behavior of isotopic systems and complex

  1. A Model for Formation of Dust, Soil and Rock Coatings on Mars: Physical and Chemical Processes on the Martian Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Janice; Murchie, Scott L.; Pieters, Carle M.; Zent, Aaron P.

    2001-01-01

    This model is one of many possible scenarios to explain the generation of the current surface material on Mars using chemical, magnetic and spectroscopic data From Mars and geologic analogs from terrestrial sites. One basic premise of this model is that the dust/soil units are not derived exclusively from local rocks, but are rather a product of global, and possibly remote, weathering processes. Another assumption in this model is that there are physical and chemical interactions of the atmospheric dust particles and that these two processes create distinctly different results on the surface. Physical processes distribute dust particles on rocks and drift units, forming physically-aggregated layers; these are reversible processes. Chemical reactions of the dust/soil particles create alteration rinds on rock surfaces and cohesive, crusted surface units between rocks, both of which are relatively permanent materials. According to this model the dominant components of the dust/soil particles are derived from alteration of volcanic ash and tephra, and contain primarily nanophase and poorly crystalline ferric oxides/oxyhydroxide phases as well as silicates. These phases are the alteration products that formed in a low moisture environment. These dust/soil particles also contain a smaller amount of material that was exposed to more water and contains crystalline ferric oxides/oxyhydroxides, sulfates and clay silicates. These components could have formed through hydrothermal alteration at steam vents or fumeroles, thermal fluids, or through evaporite deposits. Wet/dry cycling experiments are presented here on mixtures containing poorly crystalline and crystalline ferric oxides/oxyhydroxides, sulfates and silicates that range in size from nanophase to 1-2 pm diameter particles. Cemented products of these soil mixtures are formed in these experiments and variation in the surface texture was observed for samples containing smectites, non-hydrated silicates or sulfates. Reflectance spectra were measured of the initial particulate mixtures, the cemented products and ground versions of the cemented material. The spectral contrast in the visible/near-infrared and mid-infrared regions is significantly reduced for the cemented material compared to the initial soil, and somewhat reduced for the ground, cemented soil compared to the initial soil. The results of this study suggest that diurnal and seasonal cycling on Mars will have a profound effect on the texture and spectral properties of the dust/soil particles on the surface. The model developed in this study provides an explanation for the generation of cemented or crusted soil units and rock coatings on Mars and may explain albedo variations on the surface observed near large rocks or crater rims.

  2. Adaptive, maladaptive, mediational, and bidirectional processes of relational and physical aggression, relational and physical victimization, and peer liking.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Yoshito; Tseng, Wan-Ling; Crick, Nicki R

    2014-01-01

    A three-wave longitudinal study among ethnically diverse preadolescents (N?=?597 at Time 1, ages 9-11) was conducted to examine adaptive, maladaptive, mediational, and bidirectional processes of relational and physical aggression, victimization, and peer liking indexed by peer acceptance and friendships. A series of nested structural equation models tested the hypothesized links among these peer-domain factors. It was hypothesized that (1) relational aggression trails both adaptive and maladaptive processes, linking to more peer victimization and more peer liking, whereas physical aggression is maladaptive, resulting in more peer victimization and less peer liking; (2) physical and relational victimization is maladaptive, relating to more aggression and less peer liking; (3) peer liking may be the social context that promotes relational aggression (not physical aggression), whereas peer liking may protect against peer victimization, regardless of its type; and (4) peer liking mediates the link between forms of aggression and forms of peer victimization. Results showed that higher levels of peer liking predicted relative increases in relational aggression (not physical aggression), which in turn led to more peer liking. On the other hand, more peer liking was predictive of relative decreases in relational aggression and relational victimization in transition to the next grade (i.e., fifth grade). In addition, relational victimization predicted relative increases in relational aggression and relative decreases in peer liking. Similarly, physical aggression was consistently and concurrently associated more physical victimization and was marginally predictive of relative increases in physical victimization in transition to the next grade. More peer liking predicted relative decreases in physical victimization, which resulted in lower levels of peer liking. The directionality and magnitude of these paths did not differ between boys and girls. PMID:24318459

  3. Dimension of physical systems, information processing, and thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Nicolas; Kaplan, Marc; Leverrier, Anthony; Skrzypczyk, Paul

    2014-12-01

    We ask how quantum theory compares to more general physical theories from the point of view of dimension. To do so, we first give two model-independent definitions of the dimension of physical systems, based on measurements and the capacity of storing information. While both definitions are equivalent in classical and quantum mechanics, they are different in generalized probabilistic theories. We discuss in detail the case of a theory known as ‘boxworld’, and show that such a theory features systems with dimension mismatch. This dimension mismatch can be made arbitrarily large using an amplification procedure. Furthermore, we show that the dimension mismatch of boxworld has strong consequences on its power for performing information-theoretic tasks, leading to the collapse of communication complexity and to the violation of information causality. Finally, we discuss the consequences of a dimension mismatch from the perspective of thermodynamics, and ask whether this effect could break Landauer?s erasure principle and thus the second law.

  4. Solar and Space Physics PhD Production and Job Availability: Implications for the Future of the Space Weather Research Workforce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldwin, M.; Morrow, C. A.; Moldwin, L. A.; Torrence, J.

    2012-12-01

    To assess the state-of-health of the field of Solar and Space Physics an analysis of the number of Ph.D.s produced and number of Job Postings each year was done for the decade 2001-2010. To determine the number of Ph.D's produced in the field, the University of Michigan Ph.D. Dissertation Archive (Proquest) was queried for Solar and Space Physics dissertations produced in North America. The field generated about 30 Ph.D. per year from 2001 to 2006, but then saw the number increase to 50 to 70 per year for the rest of the decade. Only 14 institutions account for the majority of Solar and Space Physics PhDs. To estimate the number of jobs available each year in the field, a compilation of the job advertisements listed in the American Astronomical Society's Solar Physics Division (SPD) and the American Geophysical Union's Space Physics and Aeronomy (SPA) electronic newsletters was done. The positions were sorted into four types (Faculty, Post-doctoral Researcher, and Scientist/Researcher or Staff), institution type (academic, government lab, or industry) and if the position was located inside or outside the United States. Overall worldwide, 943 Solar and Space Physics positions were advertised over the decade. Of this total, 52% were for positions outside the US. Within Solar Physics, 44% of the positions were in the US, while in Space Physics 57% of the positions were for US institutions. The annual average for positions in the US were 26.9 for Solar Physics and 31.5 for Space Physics though there is much variability year-to-year particularly in Solar Physics positions outside the US. A disconcerting trend is a decline in job advertisements in the last two years for Solar Physics positions and between 2009 and 2010 for Space Physics positions. For both communities within the US in 2010, the total job ads reached their lowest levels in the decade (14), approximately half the decadal average number of job advertisements.

  5. Weather satellite launched

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2006-06-01

    NASA launched on 24 May the weather satellite GOES-N, the first of the new N series of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites. The satellite, which becomes GOES-13 once it reaches its final orbit, joins the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration collection of weather satellites that provide the agency with data for weather forecasts and warnings. The GOES-N series has several improvements over previous GOES satellites. A highly stable pointing platform will allow improved performance from the satellite's sounder-which gathers atmospheric data- and its imager. In addition, the satellite will enable NOAA to improve forecasts and warnings of solar disturbances.

  6. Weather and Climate

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Medina, Philip

    This unit introduces younger students to the concepts of weather and climate. Topics include the structure of the atmosphere, the definitions of weather and climate, and temperature and how it is measured. There are also discussions of heat transfers (radiation, conduction, convection), air pressure, wind, and the Coriolis effect. Other topics include types of storms, larger-scale weather systems such as pressure systems and fronts, and factors (insolation, land-sea breezes, orographic effect) that influence the climate in a given region. A vocabulary list and downloadable, printable student worksheets are provided.

  7. Wonderful World of Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2006-01-01

    This website uses real time data for many activities for learning about the weather. It can be modified to fit virtually any grade level. The project is broken up into 3 sets of lessons; Introductory Activities, Real Time Data Activities, and Language Arts Activities. Each lesson gives a recommended time for completion, to help keep students and teachers on track. There is a helpful teachers guide section with background information about real time data, curriculum standards, and assessment suggestions. Th students gallery has many examples of real projects other students have already created. There is also a helpful reference guide, with information on real time weather, projects, and weather lesson plans.

  8. Weather Observing Fundamentals

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    COMET

    2014-03-11

    "Weather Observing Fundamentals" provides guidance for U.S. Navy Aerographer's Mates, Quartermasters, and civilian observers tasked with taking and reporting routine, special, and synoptic observations. Although the focus of this lesson is on shipboard observations, much of the content applies to land-based observing and reporting as well. The lesson details standard procedures for taking accurate weather observations and for encoding those observations on COMNAVMETOCCOM Report 3141/3. Exercises throughout the lesson and four weather identification drills at the end provide learners with opportunities to practice and build their skills. The lesson covers a large amount of content. You may wish to work through the material in multiple sessions.

  9. World Weather Information Service

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The World Meteorological Organization Web site offers the World Weather Information Service page. Here, visitors will find official weather forecasts and climatological information for selected cities worldwide. Users choose a particular continent and country, and are then presented with a list of various cities they can get information on. This includes the date and time of the current forecast, minimum and maximum temperatures for that day, a general cloud description, and a monthly review of various data for that city. If for nothing else, the site does a good job of providing a very straightforward and easy way to find weather information from hundreds of cities around the globe.

  10. Weather and Climate

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site features visual resources and supporting data that illustrate the relationship between weather and climate. Resources are divided by topic including climate resources, weather forecasting, warnings and data, and evidence for global warming. Visualizations and data sets include GIS-based animated maps, static maps, simple animations, and links to real-time stream gauge data. This site provides an array of visual resources that help demonstrate the difference between weather and climate and may be incorporated into lectures, labs, or other activities.

  11. Lithium isotope history of Cenozoic seawater: changes in silicate weathering and reverse weathering.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sambuddha; Froelich, Philip N

    2012-02-17

    Weathering of uplifted continental rocks consumes carbon dioxide and transports cations to the oceans, thereby playing a critical role in controlling both seawater chemistry and climate. However, there are few archives of seawater chemical change that reveal shifts in global tectonic forces connecting Earth ocean-climate processes. We present a 68-million-year record of lithium isotopes in seawater (?(7)Li(SW)) reconstructed from planktonic foraminifera. From the Paleocene (60 million years ago) to the present, ?(7)Li(SW) rose by 9 per mil (‰), requiring large changes in continental weathering and seafloor reverse weathering that are consistent with increased tectonic uplift, more rapid continental denudation, increasingly incongruent continental weathering (lower chemical weathering intensity), and more rapid CO(2) drawdown. A 5‰ drop in ?(7)Li(SW) across the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary cannot be produced by an impactor or by Deccan trap volcanism, suggesting large-scale continental denudation. PMID:22282473

  12. Effect of weathering on properties of coarsely fragmented residual rock

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. B. Shvets; Yu. A. Gaiduk

    1976-01-01

    Conclusions 1. Atmospheric weathering of residual, coarsely fragmented rock formations causes mainly a change in their physical properties, and in this connection it is recommended that the weathering intensity should be determined from the change in the grain-size distribution.

  13. ELABORATION OF A NEW TOOL FOR WEATHER DATA SEQUENCES GENERATION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laetitia Adelard; Mara Thierry; Harry Boyer; Jean Claude Gatina

    This paper deals about the presentation of a new software RUNEOLE used to provide weather data in buildings physics. RUNEOLE associates three modules leading to the description, the modelling and the generation of weather data. The first module is dedicated to the description of each climatic variable included in the database. Graphic representation is possible (with histograms for example). Mathematical

  14. The Joint Agricultural Weather Facility's Operational Assessment Program.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motha, Raymond P.; Heddinghaus, Thomas R.

    1986-09-01

    The Joint Agricultural Weather Facility (JAWF), a cooperative effort between the Climate Analysis Center, NMC/NWS/NOAA (National Meteorological Center/National Weather Service/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) and the World Agricultural Outlook Board, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), focuses on weather anomalies and their effects on the crop-yield potential in major international crop areas. The basic mission is to provide an objective procedure for translating the flow of global weather information into timely and accurate assessments of growing-season conditions which ultimately impact on global agricultural production and trade. Daily monitoring of satellite weather images and meteorological data provides the framework for agricultural weather analysis. Daily. weekly, and seasonal summaries are processed and merged with historical weather and crop data for evaluation of the crop-yield potential. Information is disseminated at routine briefings, in written summaries, and through informal discussions.

  15. NLO parton shower for LHC physics - hard processes and beyond

    E-print Network

    S. Jadach; A. Kusina; M. Skrzypek; M. Slawinska

    2012-10-29

    The new methodology of adding QCD NLO corrections in the initial state Monte Carlo parton shower (hard process part) is presented using process of the heavy boson production at the LHC as an example. Despite the simplified model of the process, presented numerical results prove that the basic concept of the new methodology works correctly in the numerical environment of the Monte Carlo parton shower event generator. The presented method is an alternative to the well established methods, MC@NLO and POWHEG. Refinements of the new method with better computer CPU time efficiency are also discussed.

  16. Operational Space Weather in USAF Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithtro, C.; Quigley, S.

    2006-12-01

    Most education programs offering space weather courses are understandably and traditionally heavily weighted with theoretical space physics that is the basis for most of what is researched and modeled. While understanding the theory is a good and necessary grounding for anyone working the field of space weather, few military or commercial jobs employ such theory in real-time operations. The operations sites/centers are much more geared toward use of applied theory-resultant models, tools and products. To ensure its operations centers personnel, commanders, real-time system operators and other customers affected by the space environment are educated on available and soon-to-be operational space weather models and products, the USAF has developed applicable course/lecture material taught at various institutions to include the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) and the Joint Weather Training Complex (335th/TRS/OUA). Less frequent training of operational space weather is available via other venues that will be discussed, and associated course material is also being developed for potential use at the National Security Space Institute (NSSI). This presentation provides an overview of the programs, locations, courses and material developed and/or taught by or for USAF personnel dealing with operational space weather. It also provides general information on student research project results that may be used in operational support, along with observations regarding logistical and professional benefits of teaching such non-theoretical/non-traditional material.

  17. Physical Review Letters (at press) Edge-mediated dislocation processes in carbon nano-onions?

    E-print Network

    Dumitrica,Traian

    Physical Review Letters (at press) Edge-mediated dislocation processes in carbon nano-onions? E processes in individual nanometer-sized carbon onions. Essential for these processes is the counter] in nested multi-shell car- bon onions [5, 6], a complex system that was not consid- ered before

  18. Validity and Reliability of Self Report Measures of Physical Activity: An Information-Processing Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baranowski, Tom

    1988-01-01

    Self-report measures of physical activity have attractive features for epidemiologists and behavior change specialists. An information processing model is proposed to understand the encoding, storage, and retrieval processes, and to identify necessary skills for accurate self-reporting identified at each step in the process. (JD)

  19. A Model of the Creative Process Based on Quantum Physics and Vedic Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Laura Hall

    1988-01-01

    Using tenets from Vedic science and quantum physics, this model of the creative process suggests that the unified field of creation is pure consciousness, and that the development of the creative process within individuals mirrors the creative process within the universe. Rational and supra-rational creative thinking techniques are also described.…

  20. Framework for Understanding LENR Processes, Using Ordinary Condensed Matter Physics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott Chubb

    2005-01-01

    As I have emphasized ootnotetextS.R. Chubb, Proc. ICCF10 (in press). Also, http:\\/\\/www.lenr-canr.org\\/acrobat\\/ChubbSRnutsandbol.pdf http:\\/\\/www.lenr-canr.org\\/acrobat\\/ChubbSRnutsandbol.pdf, S.R. Chubb, Trans. Amer. Nuc. Soc. 88 , 618 (2003)., in discussions of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions(LENRs), mainstream many-body physics ideas have been largely ignored. A key point is that in condensed matter, delocalized, wave-like effects can allow large amounts of momentum to be transferred instantly to

  1. Seafloor weathering buffering climate: numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahat, N. X.; Archer, D. E.; Abbot, D. S.

    2013-12-01

    Continental silicate weathering is widely held to consume atmospheric CO2 at a rate controlled in part by temperature, resulting in a climate-weathering feedback [Walker et al., 1981]. It has been suggested that weathering of oceanic crust of warm mid-ocean ridge flanks also has a CO2 uptake rate that is controlled by climate [Sleep and Zahnle, 2001; Brady and Gislason, 1997]. Although this effect might not be significant on present-day Earth [Caldeira, 1995], seafloor weathering may be more pronounced during snowball states [Le Hir et al., 2008], during the Archean when seafloor spreading rates were faster [Sleep and Zahnle, 2001], and on waterworld planets [Abbot et al., 2012]. Previous studies of seafloor weathering have made significant contributions using qualitative, generally one-box, models, and the logical next step is to extend this work using a spatially resolved model. For example, experiments demonstrate that seafloor weathering reactions are temperature dependent, but it is not clear whether the deep ocean temperature affects the temperature at which the reactions occur, or if instead this temperature is set only by geothermal processes. Our goal is to develop a 2-D numerical model that can simulate hydrothermal circulation and resulting alteration of oceanic basalts, and can therefore address such questions. A model of diffusive and convective heat transfer in fluid-saturated porous media simulates hydrothermal circulation through porous oceanic basalt. Unsteady natural convection is solved for using a Darcy model of porous media flow that has been extensively benchmarked. Background hydrothermal circulation is coupled to mineral reaction kinetics of basaltic alteration and hydrothermal mineral precipitation. In order to quantify seafloor weathering as a climate-weathering feedback process, this model focuses on hydrothermal reactions that influence carbon uptake as well as ocean alkalinity: silicate rock dissolution, calcium and magnesium leaching reactions, carbonate precipitation, and clay formation.

  2. Comparison of characteristics of aerosol during rainy weather and cold air-dust weather in Guangzhou in late March 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huizhong; Wu, Dui; Yu, Jianzhen

    2015-03-01

    Using the data on aerosol observed hourly by Marga ADI 2080 and Grimm 180, we compared the characteristics of aerosol during rainy weather and cold air-dust weather in Guangzhou in late March 2012. The mass concentration of aerosol appeared distinct between the two weather processes. During rainy weather, the mass concentration of PM and total water-soluble components decreased obviously. During cold air-dust weather, the cleaning effect of cold air occurred much more suddenly and about a half day earlier than the dust effect. As a result, the mass concentration of PM and total water-soluble components first dropped dramatically to a below-normal level and then rose gradually to an above-normal level. The ratio of PM2.5/PM10 and PM1/PM10 decreased, suggesting that dust-storm weather mainly brought in coarse particles. The proportion of Ca2+ in the total water-soluble components significantly increased to as high as 50 % because of the effect of dust weather. We further analysed the ionic equilibrium during rainy and cold air-dust weather, and compared it with that during hazy weather during the same period. The aerosol during rainy weather was slightly acidic, whereas that during hazy weather and cold air-dust weather was obviously alkaline, with that during cold air-dust weather being significantly more alkaline. Most of the anions, including SO4 2- and NO3 -, were neutralised by NH4 + during rainy and hazy weather, and by Ca2+ during cold air-dust weather.

  3. Sun, weather, and climate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. Herman; R. A. Goldberg

    1985-01-01

    The general field of sun-weather\\/climate relationships that is, apparent weather and climate responses to solar activity is introduced and theoretical and experimental suggestions for further research to identify and investigate the unknown casual mechanisms are provided. Topics of discussion include: (1) solar-related correlation factors and energy sources; (2) long-term climate trends; (3) short-term meteorological correlations; (4) miscellaneous obscuring influences; (5)

  4. Wonderful World of Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2011-01-01

    This standards-based unit has been created for use by students in the elementary grades to investigate weather phenomena both locally as well as in other places around the world. By using hands-on activities and real-time data investigations, students develop a basic understanding of how weather can be described in measurable quantities. The lesson plans have been designed to allow teachers to select the ones which fit into their curriculum, and to allow for flexibility in implementation.

  5. Weather Radar Network Design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francesc Junyent; V. Chandrasekar

    2008-01-01

    The Engineering Research Center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) is investigating the use of dense networks of short-range radars for weather sensing. A first test-bed of this new paradigm is currently deployed in southwest Oklahoma. The potential benefits of closely deployed, overlapping, short-range weather radars are easy to see intuitively amounting to a greater ability to measure

  6. An Ocean of Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this lesson, students will investigate the close relationship between the ocean and the atmosphere to determine the extent the ocean affects the Earth's weather in the South Atlantic Bight region. As they study this relationship, students will learn that the ocean and atmosphere work together as a system. They will experiment to find out that heat transfer from the ocean is a cause of much of Earth's weather and will make and explain an ocean water cycle.

  7. Optimizing numerical weather forecasting models for the CRAY-1 and cyber 205 computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, A.

    1982-06-01

    The Meteorological Office has recently acquired a Cyber 205 computer system which will be used to run large numerical models of the atmosphere and weather forecasting models. In particular a new operational forecast model has been developed for this computer and this is being coded to take full advantage of the vector capabilities of this machine. Development versions of this model have also been run on a Cray-1 at the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts. This has presented the opportunity to compare some of the features of these two computers. It is shown that in general numerical weather prediction models can be split into two sections, the dynamical and physical processes. In the dynamical processes the same operations are applied at every point in the integration domain and so these processes are readily vectorizable. However, the physical processes are conditional and intermittent in nature and use must be made of the mask/merge, compress/expand and gather/scatter class of instructions in order to vectorize these processes.

  8. Perceptual and processing differences between physical and dichorhinic odor mixtures.

    PubMed

    Schütze, M; Negoias, S; Olsson, M J; Hummel, T

    2014-01-31

    Perceptual integration of sensory input from our two nostrils has received little attention in comparison to lateralized inputs for vision and hearing. Here, we investigated whether a binary odor mixture of eugenol and l-carvone (smells of cloves and caraway) would be perceived differently if presented as a mixture in one nostril (physical mixture), vs. the same two odorants in separate nostrils (dichorhinic mixture). In parallel, we investigated whether the different types of presentation resulted in differences in olfactory event-related potentials (OERP). Psychophysical ratings showed that the dichorhinic mixtures were perceived as more intense than the physical mixtures. A tendency for shift in perceived quality was also observed. In line with these perceptual changes, the OERP showed a shift in latencies and amplitudes for early (more "sensory") peaks P1 and N1 whereas no significant differences were observed for the later (more "cognitive") peak P2. The results altogether suggest that the peripheral level is a site of interaction between odorants. Both psychophysical ratings and, for the first time, electrophysiological measurements converge on this conclusion. PMID:24240030

  9. Processes in karst systems, physics, chemistry, and geology

    SciTech Connect

    Dreybrodt, W.

    1988-01-01

    Dreybrodt deals quantitatively with many of the chemical and hydrological processes involved in the formation of karst systems. The book is divided into 3 major parts. The first part develops the basic chemical and fluid-flow principles needed in modeling karst systems. The second part investigates the experimental kinetics of calcite dissolution and precipitation and applies the resulting kinetic laws to the modeling of these processes in systems both open and closed to carbon dioxide. The last part of the book includes a qualitative examination of karst systems, quantitative modeling of the development of karst features, and an examination and modeling of the growth of spelotherms in caves.

  10. 2012 Severe Weather Awareness Guide

    E-print Network

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Florida's 2012 Severe Weather Awareness Guide 2012 Severe Weather Awareness Guide F L O R I D A D I of Emergency Management #12;Florida's Severe Weather Awareness Guide 2 Florida is affected by many natural. That is why I am proud to present the 2012 Severe Weather Awareness Guide. By reading this guide you can learn

  11. Recall of Television Weather Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyatt, David; And Others

    1978-01-01

    A Minneapolis/St. Paul telephone survey revealed that most people interviewed relied on radio weather reports for weather information, that the amount of weather information retained from radio and television forecasts was minimal, and that most people were satisfied with television weather reports. (GW)

  12. LINEAR REPETITIVE PROCESS CONTROL THEORY APPLIED TO A PHYSICAL EXAMPLE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KRZYSZTOF GAËKOWSKI; ERIC ROGERS; WOJCIECH PASZKE; DAVID H. OWENS

    2003-01-01

    In the case of linear dynamics, repetitive processes are a distinct class of 2D linear systems with uses in areas ranging from long-wall coal cutting and metal rolling operations to iterative learning control schemes. The main feature which makes them distinct from other classes of 2D linear systems is that information propagation in one of the two independent directions only

  13. Physics as quantum information processing1 Giacomo Mauro D'Ariano

    E-print Network

    D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro

    Physics as quantum information processing1 Giacomo Mauro D'Ariano QUIT Group, Dipartimento di at the foundations of Physics has been then considered, with space-time, Relativity, quantization rules and Quantum IV, Sezione di Pavia Abstract. The experience from Quantum Information has lead us to look at Quantum

  14. THE PHYSICS OF ARC WELDING PROCESSES Department of Materials Science and Engineering,

    E-print Network

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    ) THE PHYSICS OF ARC WELDING PROCESSES T.W.EAGAR Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Abstract Welding is an extremely complex proce ss; however, due to its Wor ds: Arc Welding, Arc Physics, Shielding Gases, Gas Metal Arc Welding. 1. Introduction Langmuir

  15. Driving Object Deformations from Internal Physical Processes Department of Computer Science

    E-print Network

    Keyser, John

    paper. In these cases, the small-scale changes in a chemical process result in large-scale deformations-life experience, users are often familiar with the physical phenomena being simulated, and different simulations any sense of presence. Many complex physical simulations require modeling of a number of different

  16. Programmer's Guide for FFORM. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Computer Programs and Graphics Capabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Lougenia; Gales, Larry

    This module is part of a series designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. FFORM is a portable format-free input subroutine package written in ANSI Fortran IV…

  17. Physical modeling and analysis of rain and clouds by anisotropic scaling multiplicative processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel Schertzer; Shaun Lovejoy

    1987-01-01

    We argue that the basic properties of rain and cloud fields (particularly their scaling and intermittency) are best understood in terms of coupled (anisotropic and scaling) cascade processes. We show how such cascades provide a framework not only for theoretically and empirically investigating these fields, but also for constructing physically based stochastic models. This physical basis is provided by cascade

  18. Applications of the First Law to Ecological Systems. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Thermodynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, R. D.

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. This report describes concepts presented in another module called "The First Law of…

  19. Physics-based airborne GMTI radar signal processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George R. Legters; Joseph R. Guerci

    2004-01-01

    The Knowledge-Aided Sensor Signal Processing and Expert Reasoning (KASSPER) program aims to improve airborne ground moving target indicator (GMTI) radar performance by taking into account all available prior knowledge. One powerful piece of information is that the radar return signal is a superposition of near-ideal plane-waves. A plane-wave signal and clutter model or sampled GMTI radar data can be used

  20. Analysis of physical-chemical processes governing SSME internal fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, A. K.; Owens, S. F.; Mukerjee, T.; Prakash, C.; Przekwas, A. J.; Kannapel, M.

    1985-01-01

    The basic issues concerning the physical chemical processes of the Space Shuttle Main Engine are discussed. The objectives being to supply the general purpose CFD code PHOENICS and the associated interactive graphics package - GRAFFIC; to demonstrate code usage on SSME related problems; to perform computations and analyses of problems relevant to current and future SSME's; and to participate in the development of new physical models of various processes present in SSME components. These objectives are discussed in detail.

  1. Analogy between electrochemical oscillations and quantum physical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzanna, J.; Lewerenz, H. J.

    2014-03-01

    In (photo) electrochemical oscillations, the discretization of phase oscillators leads to a sequence of time dependent oscillator density functions which describe the passing of the oscillators through their minimum at each cycle. Two consecutive oscillator density functions are connected by a Markov process represented by a linear integral equation of second order which is homogeneous in the case of sustained oscillations. The kernel of the integral equation is a normalized Greens Function and represents the probability density for the periods of the oscillators. Both together, the oscillator density function and the two-dimensional probability density for the periods of the oscillators define a random walk. The relation of the model to the holographic principle is discussed briefly. Further, a detailed analysis of a kernel of the integral equation leads to a frequency distribution g for the period length. Additionally, it is possible to determine the energy E in dependence on the period length from the electrochemical process. The product g E shows qualitatively the same behaviour as the radiation of a black body, indicating that the discretization of phase oscillators, when represented by phase space analysis, show an analogy to quantum processes.

  2. Physical abrasion of mafic minerals and basalt grains: Application to martian aeolian deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornwall, C.; Bandfield, J. L.; Titus, T. N.; Schreiber, B. C.; Montgomery, D. R.

    2015-08-01

    Sediment maturity, or the mineralogical and physical characterization of sedimentary deposits, has been used to identify sediment sources, transport medium and distance, weathering processes, and paleoenvironments on Earth. Mature terrestrial sands are dominated by quartz, which is abundant in source lithologies on Earth and is physically and chemically stable under a wide range of conditions. Immature sands, such as those rich in feldspars or mafic minerals, are composed of grains that are easily physically weathered and highly susceptible to chemical weathering. On Mars, which is predominately mafic in composition, terrestrial standards of sediment maturity are not applicable. In addition, the martian climate today is cold and dry and sediments are likely to be heavily influenced by physical weathering rather than chemical weathering. Due to these large differences in weathering processes and composition, martian sediments require an alternate maturity index. This paper reports the results of abrasion tests conducted on a variety of mafic materials and results suggest that mature martian sediments may be composed of well sorted, well rounded, spherical polycrystalline materials, such as basalt. Volcanic glass is also likely to persist in a mechanical weathering environment while more fragile and chemically altered products are likely to be winnowed away. A modified sediment maturity index is proposed that can be used in future studies to constrain sediment source, paleoclimate, mechanisms for sediment production, and surface evolution. This maturity index may also provide insights into erosional and sediment transport systems and preservation processes of layered deposits.

  3. Weather and The Water Cycle

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Merritt

    2005-10-15

    Students will be able to do activities dealing with weather and water cycles. Learn what makes weather wet and wild, forcast and predict weather. Webweather For Kids Learn about tornadoes and hurricanes. Kidstorm Learn about the water cycles. water Cycles Now click on the following link: Interactive weather maker 1. How much change in temperature is needed to make it snow? On the right side of the page click on Weather Detective Web Quest. Follow the ...

  4. Effect of weathering transformations of coal combustion residuals on trace element mobility in view of the environmental safety and sustainability of their disposal and use. I. Hydrogeochemical processes controlling pH and phase stability.

    PubMed

    Stefaniak, Sebastian; Miszczak, Ewa; Szczepa?ska-Plewa, Jadwiga; Twardowska, Irena

    2015-06-01

    Coal combustion residuals (CCRs) are one of the most abundant high-volume waste materials disposed in impoundments worldwide. Some methods of CCR recycling, e.g. their use as structural fill for low lying areas or as soil amendment, also expose this material to atmospheric conditions. Combustion processes result in concentration of trace elements in CCRs at about an order of magnitude compared to coal. In order to assess an effect of long-term weathering transformations of CCRs on trace element binding/release, a study has been carried out. It is based on the chemical composition of real pore solutions extracted from the most abundant primary alkaline Class F bituminous CCRs, 0 to >40 years old, sampled from the surface layer and vertical profiles at four different impoundments. In this part of the study, results of a hydrogeochemical simulation of the saturation state of real pore solutions with respect to mineral phases of CCRs with use of the PHREEQC program, related to actual pH values reflecting the full cycle of weathering transformations, have been discussed. This study is the first geochemical proof of the general trend towards a progressive acidification up to pH < 4 of primary alkaline CCRs due to release of protons during internal processes of formation of gibbsite and aluminosilicate minerals, buffered by carbonates at the alkaline - near-neutral stages, and followed by parallel dissolution and buffering by aluminosilicates at pH < 7 after carbonate depletion, to the level up to pH?3.5-4.0. The intrinsic geochemical changes have resulted in the different susceptibility of trace elements to release and associated changes in risk to the environment at consecutive stages of weathering. PMID:25841194

  5. Summary of the NASA/MSFC FY-79 Severe Storm and Local Weather research review. [cloud physics, atmospheric electricity, and mesoscale/storm dynamics reserach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Significant acomplishments, current focus of work, plans for FY-80, and recommendations for new research are outlined for 36 research projects proposed for technical monitoring by the Atmospheric Sciences Division at Marshall Space Flight Center. Topics of the investigations, which were reviewed at a two-day meeting, relate to cloud physics, atmospheric electricity, and mesoscale/storm dynamics.

  6. Entropy Shows that Global Warming Should Cause Increased Variability in the Weather

    E-print Network

    John Michael Williams

    2001-02-21

    Elementary physical reasoning seems to leave it inevitable that global warming would increase the variability of the weather. The first two terms in an approximation to the global entropy are used to show that global warming has increased the free energy available to drive the weather, and that the variance of the weather should increase correspondingly.

  7. Physical modulation of intracellular signaling processes by locational regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Haugh, J M; Lauffenburger, D A

    1997-01-01

    Recent observations in the field of signal transduction suggest that where a protein is located within a cell can be as important as its activity measured in solution for activation of its downstream pathway. The physical organization of the cell can provide an additional layer of control upon the chemical reaction networks that govern ultimately perceived signals. Using the cytosol and plasma membrane as relevant compartmental distinctions, we analyze the effect of relocation on the rate of association with a membrane-associated target. We quantify this effect as an enhancement factor E in terms of measurable parameters such as the number of available targets, molecular diffusivities, and intrinsic reaction rate constants. We then employ two simple yet relevant example models to illustrate how relocation can affect the dynamics of signal transduction pathways. The temporal profiles and phase behavior of these models are investigated. We also relate experimentally observable aspects of signal transduction such as peak activation and the relative time scales of stimulus and response to quantitative aspects of the relocation mechanisms in our models. In our example schemes, nearly complete relocation of the cytosolic species in the signaling pair is required to generate meaningful activation of the model pathways when the association rate enhancement factor E is as low as 10; when E is 100 or greater, only a small fraction of the protein must be relocated. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 PMID:9129805

  8. Physical-chemical treatment of tar-sand processing wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    King, P.H.

    1982-07-01

    This final report for Phase I summarizes work done to determine the ability of several coagulants to contribute significantly in the treatment of selected tar sand wastewaters. The coagulation process must be considered as one possible step in a treatment scheme to reduce pollutants in these wastewaters and lead to a water quality acceptable for reuse or disposal. Two wastewaters were provided by the Laramie Energy Technology Center (LETC). The primary emphasis in this study was focused on a representative steam flooding wastewater designated in the report as TARSAND 1S. The coagulation study in which treatment of this wastewater was the prime goal is described in full detail in the thesis entitled Chemical Coagulation of Steam Flooding Tar Sand Wastewaters. This thesis, written by Mr. Omar Akad, is included as Appendix A in this report. A representative combustion wastewater, designated as TARSAND 2C, was also provided by LETC. This wastewater was characteristically low in suspended solids and after initial screening experiments were conducted, it was concluded that coagulation was relatively ineffective in the treatment of TARSAND 2C. Hence, efforts were concentrated on the parametric evaluation of coagulation of TARSAND 1S. The objectives for the research conducted under Phase I were: (1) to compare the effectiveness of lime, alum, ferric chloride and representative synthetic organic polymers in reducing suspended solids and total organic carbon (TOC) from TARSAND 1S wastewater; (2) to determine the effects of pH, coagulant aids, and mixing conditions on the coagulation process; (3) to determine the relative volume of sludge produced from each selected coagulation process.

  9. Electron transfer and physical and chemical processes at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Strongin, M.; Xia, B.; Jacobsen, F.M.

    1995-10-01

    We summarize some phenomena that occur at temperatures of the order of 15K, and are dominated by quantum mechanical tunneling. Although electron tunneling dominates many conduction processes at low temperatures, we discuss evidence that phenomena like oxidation, as well as the solution of alkali metals in ammonia, can also be dominated by electron tunneling. Both phenomena demonstrate that the chemical potential of a metastable system can equilibrate at low temperatures by electron tunneling. The case of alkali metal clusters covered with ammonia is contrasted to covering the clusters with Xe. In this case changes in the activated conduction are observed which are consistent with the dielectric constant of the rare gas.

  10. Searching for deep understanding : implementing a mechanical engineering design process in K9-K12 physics classrooms to identify and improve levels of physics intuition and content

    E-print Network

    Williams, John Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    This experiment tested the level of Physics content knowledge of various K9-K12 Physics students in a local Boston high school by having them implement a mechanical engineering design process to solve open-ended design ...

  11. Processing of Speech Signals for Physical and Sensory Disabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitt, Harry

    1995-10-01

    Assistive technology involving voice communication is used primarily by people who are deaf, hard of hearing, or who have speech and/or language disabilities. It is also used to a lesser extent by people with visual or motor disabilities. A very wide range of devices has been developed for people with hearing loss. These devices can be categorized not only by the modality of stimulation [i.e., auditory, visual, tactile, or direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve (auditory-neural)] but also in terms of the degree of speech processing that is used. At least four such categories can be distinguished: assistive devices (a) that are not designed specifically for speech, (b) that take the average characteristics of speech into account, (c) that process articulatory or phonetic characteristics of speech, and (d) that embody some degree of automatic speech recognition. Assistive devices for people with speech and/or language disabilities typically involve some form of speech synthesis or symbol generation for severe forms of language disability. Speech synthesis is also used in text-to-speech systems for sightless persons. Other applications of assistive technology involving voice communication include voice control of wheelchairs and other devices for people with mobility disabilities.

  12. Physical Processes for Driving Ionospheric Outflows in Global Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas Earle; Strangeway, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    We review and assess the importance of processes thought to drive ionospheric outflows, linking them as appropriate to the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field, and to the spatial and temporal distribution of their magnetospheric internal responses. These begin with the diffuse effects of photoionization and thermal equilibrium of the ionospheric topside, enhancing Jeans' escape, with ambipolar diffusion and acceleration. Auroral outflows begin with dayside reconnexion and resultant field-aligned currents and driven convection. These produce plasmaspheric plumes, collisional heating and wave-particle interactions, centrifugal acceleration, and auroral acceleration by parallel electric fields, including enhanced ambipolar fields from electron heating by precipitating particles. Observations and simulations show that solar wind energy dissipation into the atmosphere is concentrated by the geomagnetic field into auroral regions with an amplification factor of 10-100, enhancing heavy species plasma and gas escape from gravity, and providing more current carrying capacity. Internal plasmas thus enable electromagnetic driving via coupling to the plasma, neutral gas and by extension, the entire body " We assess the Importance of each of these processes in terms of local escape flux production as well as global outflow, and suggest methods for their implementation within multispecies global simulation codes. We complete 'he survey with an assessment of outstanding obstacles to this objective.

  13. Recent progress in cloud physics research in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianzhong; Guo, Xueliang; Zhao, Chunsheng; Zhang, Yijun; Hu, Zhijin

    2007-11-01

    A review of China cloud physics research during 2003 2006 is made in this paper. The studies on cloud field experiments and observation, cloud physics and precipitation, including its theoretical applications in hail suppression and artificial rain enhancement, cloud physics and lightning, and clouds and climate change are included. Due primarily to the demand from weather modification activities, the issue of cloud physics and weather modification has been addressed in China with many field experiments and model studies. While cloud physics and weather modification is still an important research field, the interaction between aerosol, cloud and radiation processes, which is the key issue of current climate change research, has become a new research direction in China over the past four years.

  14. Valid Physical Processes from Numerical Discontinuities in Computational Fluid Dynamics

    E-print Network

    Kun Xu; Quanhua Sun; Pubing Yu

    2010-09-22

    Due to the limited cell resolution in the representation of flow variables, a piecewise continuous initial reconstruction with discontinuous jump at a cell interface is usually used in modern computational fluid dynamics methods. Starting from the discontinuity, a Riemann problem in the Godunov method is solved for the flux evaluation across the cell interface in a finite volume scheme. With the increasing of Mach number in the CFD simulations, the adaptation of the Riemann solver seems introduce intrinsically a mechanism to develop instabilities in strong shock regions. Theoretically, the Riemann solution of the Euler equations are based on the equilibrium assumption, which may not be valid in the non-equilibrium shock layer. In order to clarify the flow physics from a discontinuity, the unsteady flow behavior of one-dimensional contact and shock wave is studied on a time scale of (0~10000) times of the particle collision time. In the study of the non-equilibrium flow behavior from a discontinuity, the collision-less Boltzmann equation is first used for the time scale within one particle collision time, then the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method will be adapted to get the further evolution solution. The transition from the free particle transport to the dissipative Navier-Stokes (NS) solutions are obtained as an increasing of time. The exact Riemann solution becomes a limiting solution with infinite number of particle collisions. For the high Mach number flow simulations, the points in the shock transition region, even though the region is enlarged numerically to the mesh size, should be considered as the points inside a highly non-equilibrium shock layer.

  15. The effects of sediment transport, weathering, and aeolian mechanisms on soil evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Sagy; Willgoose, Garry; Svoray, Tal; Hancock, Greg; Sela, Shai

    2015-02-01

    Aeolian-derived soils are found throughout the world. Soil evolution processes in aeolian-dominated landscapes differ from processes in bedrock-weathering landscapes by a number of key aspects including the lack of (1) soil production depth dependency, (2) surface armoring, and (3) grain size self-organization in the soil profile. We use here a soil evolution model (mARM5D) to study the differences between aeolian and bedrock-weathering-dominated landscapes by analyzing soil evolution on a hillslope under various aeolian and bedrock-soil supply settings subject to fluvial and diffusive sediment transport. The model simulates spatial and temporal variation in soil particle size distribution (PSD) and profile depth for each grid cell on the landscape, as a function of physical weathering, aeolian deposition, and diffusive and fluvial sediment transport. Our results indicate that surface armoring plays a major role in soil evolution. Under bedrock-weathering-dominated conditions, armoring reduces soil erosion and in conjunction with depth-dependent soil production, leads to steady state soil grading and depth and a relatively uniform soil distribution. In contrast, aeolian-dominated landscapes tend to have considerable spatial variability in soil depth and PSD. Our results also indicate that in contrast with diffusive transport, which is assumed to be PSD independent, fluvial sediment transport is strongly influenced by the soil production mechanism (aeolian or bedrock weathering). Based on the results presented here, we propose that aeolian-dominated landscapes are more responsive to environmental changes (e.g., climatic and anthropogenic) compared with bedrock-weathering landscapes. We further propose that this sensitivity may help explain the patchy soil distribution that is often observed in aeolian-dominated regions.

  16. Oceans, Climate and Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kimberly Lightle

    2006-01-01

    What is the difference between weather and climate? What do the oceans have to do with them? Weather is the day-to-day state of the atmosphere and its short-term (minutes to weeks) variation. Climate is typically described by the regional patterns of seasonal temperature and precipitation over 30 years. The averages of annual temperature, rainfall, cloud cover, and depth of frost penetration are all typical climate-related statistics. The oceans influence the worlds climate by storing solar energy and distributing it around the planet through currents and atmospheric winds.This publication is all about developing your students understandings of earths oceans and the major effect they have on climate. Understanding and interpreting local weather data and understanding the relationship between weather and climate are important first steps to understanding larger-scale global climate changes. Activities that ask students to collect and analyze local weather data as well as analyze global data can be found in the Lessons and Activities section. Analyzing and interpreting data is a major focus of this publication. Numerous data sets can be found in the Sources for Real Data section. The Background Information section and the article Tomorrows Forecast will help reinforce your own content knowledge.

  17. Physical damping processes in Co-Cr granular films.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalarickal, Sangita; Krivosik, Pavol; Mo, Nan; Patton, Carl; Wu, Stella

    2009-03-01

    Recent ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) results on metallic ferromagnetic alloy films have shown that a simple one parameter Gilbert damping description is inadequate for most systems. New FMR results have been obtained on Co-Cr granular films with the columnar microstructure amenable to perpendicular media applications. The nominal 17.3 GHz FMR field and linewidth vs. the out-of-plane field angle was measured and analyzed for a 16 nm thick granular film with a relatively low effective anisotropy field of 1 kOe and a nominal grain size of 8 nm or so. The analysis reveals a three component linewidth comprised of a small Gilbert term with an ?-value of 0.003 that is consistent with intrinsic processes, a large two magnon term that derives from the grain-to-grain anisotropy variations, and an inhomogeneity broadening term due to anisotropy dispersion and grain size variations.

  18. Probability for Weather and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last 60 years, the availability of large-scale electronic computers has stimulated rapid and significant advances both in meteorology and in our understanding of the Earth System as a whole. The speed of these advances was due, in large part, to the sudden ability to explore nonlinear systems of equations. The computer allows the meteorologist to carry a physical argument to its conclusion; the time scales of weather phenomena then allow the refinement of physical theory, numerical approximation or both in light of new observations. Prior to this extension, as Charney noted, the practicing meteorologist could ignore the results of theory with good conscience. Today, neither the practicing meteorologist nor the practicing climatologist can do so, but to what extent, and in what contexts, should they place the insights of theory above quantitative simulation? And in what circumstances can one confidently estimate the probability of events in the world from model-based simulations? Despite solid advances of theory and insight made possible by the computer, the fidelity of our models of climate differs in kind from the fidelity of models of weather. While all prediction is extrapolation in time, weather resembles interpolation in state space, while climate change is fundamentally an extrapolation. The trichotomy of simulation, observation and theory which has proven essential in meteorology will remain incomplete in climate science. Operationally, the roles of probability, indeed the kinds of probability one has access too, are different in operational weather forecasting and climate services. Significant barriers to forming probability forecasts (which can be used rationally as probabilities) are identified. Monte Carlo ensembles can explore sensitivity, diversity, and (sometimes) the likely impact of measurement uncertainty and structural model error. The aims of different ensemble strategies, and fundamental differences in ensemble design to support of decision making versus advance science, are noted. It is argued that, just as no point forecast is complete without an estimate of its accuracy, no model-based probability forecast is complete without an estimate of its own irrelevance. The same nonlinearities that made the electronic computer so valuable links the selection and assimilation of observations, the formation of ensembles, the evolution of models, the casting of model simulations back into observables, and the presentation of this information to those who use it to take action or to advance science. Timescales of interest exceed the lifetime of a climate model and the career of a climate scientist, disarming the trichotomy that lead to swift advances in weather forecasting. Providing credible, informative climate services is a more difficult task. In this context, the value of comparing the forecasts of simulation models not only with each other but also with the performance of simple empirical models, whenever possible, is stressed. The credibility of meteorology is based on its ability to forecast and explain the weather. The credibility of climatology will always be based on flimsier stuff. Solid insights of climate science may be obscured if the severe limits on our ability to see the details of the future even probabilistically are not communicated clearly.

  19. A study of the effect of weathering, silt content, and depth of burial on physical properties of shales from North-Central Texas 

    E-print Network

    Wilson, Edmon Doak

    1958-01-01

    of shale density analysis in solving subsurface geological problems. The above discussion is not complete; a mors complete reviev of the literature vill be presented later in this thesis. The discussion was given to show that there have been several... studies of porosity and density, vhereas other physical properties have been negleoted, such as resistivity and plastance. After these other physioal properties have been studied further it may be that they vill be recognised as being as important...

  20. CO2-ECBM related coupled physical and mechanical transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gensterblum, Y.; Sartorius, M.; Busch, A.; Krooss, B. M.; Littke, R.

    2012-12-01

    The interrelation of cleat transport processes and mechanical properties was investigated by permeability tests at different stress levels (60% to 130% of in-situ stress) with sorbing (CH4, CO2) and inert gases (N2, Ar, He) on a subbituminous A coal from the Surat Basin, Queensland Australia (figure). From the flow tests under controlled triaxial stress conditions the Klinkenberg-corrected "true" permeability coefficients and the Klinkenberg slip factors were derived. The "true"-, absolute or Klinkenberg-corrected permeability depends on gas type. Following the approach of Seidle et al. (1992) the cleat volume compressibility (cf) was calculated from observed changes in apparent permeability upon variation of external stress (at equal mean gas pressures). The observed effects also show a clear dependence on gas type. Due to pore or cleat compressibility the cleat aperture decreases with increasing effective stress. Vice versa, with increasing mean pore pressure at lower confining pressure an increase in permeability is observed, which is attributed to a widening of cleat aperture. Non-sorbing gases like helium and argon show higher apparent permeabilities than sorbing gases like methane and CO2. Permeability coefficients measured with successively increasing mean gas pressures were consistently lower than those determined at decreasing mean gas pressures. The kinetics of matrix transport processes were studied by sorption tests on different particle sizes at various moisture contents and temperatures (cf. Busch et al., 2006). Methane uptake rates were determined from the pressure decline curves recorded for each particle-size fraction, and "diffusion coefficients" were calculated using several unipore and bidisperse diffusion models. While the CH4 sorption capacity of moisture-equilibrated coals was significantly lower (by 50%) than that of dry coals, no hysteresis was observed between sorption and desorption on dry and moisture-equilibrated samples and the sorption isotherms recorded for different particle sizes were essentially identical. The CH4 uptake rates were lower by a factor of two for moist coals than for dry coals. Busch, A., Gensterblum, Y., Krooss, B.M. and Siemons, N., 2006. Investigation of high-pressure selective adsorption/desorption behaviour of CO2 and CH4 on coals: An experimental study. International Journal of Coal Geology, 66(1-2): 53-68. Seidle, J.P., Jeansonne, M.W. and Erickson, D.J., 1992. Application of Matchstick Geometry to Stress-Dependent Permeability in Coals, SPE Rocky Mountain Regional Meeting, Casper, Wyoming.

  1. Influences of physical processes on the ecosystem in Jiaozhou Bay: A coupled physical and biological model experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changsheng; Ji, Rubao; Zheng, Lianyuan; Zhu, Mingyuan; Rawson, Mac

    1999-12-01

    In this paper we have used a three-dimensional coupled physical and biological model to examine the marine ecosystem of Jiaozhou Bay. Physical processes included (1) the M2 tide, (2) river discharges, and (3) winds. The biological model described a simple, phosphorous-based, lower trophic food web system. The model results showed that tidal mixing had a direct impact on temporal and spatial distributions of nutrients and phytoplankton as well as on shellfish aquaculture. Nutrients and phytoplankton were well mixed vertically by tidal motion. Their concentrations were highest around northwestern and northern regions of the bay near river sources and decreased with water depth from the inner bay to the outer bay. A phytoplankton bloom can occur around the northwestern coast due to the "accumulation" of nutrients under southeasterly wind conditions. The flux analysis suggests that in summer the nutrients in Jiaozhou Bay was directly supplied and maintained by physical processes, but the temporal variation of phytoplankton was controlled dominantly by biological processes associated with nutrient uptake, grazing by zooplankton, and consumption by shellfish. Shellfish aquaculture can modify the bay-scale balance of the ecosystem in Jiaozhou Bay. The loss of phytoplankton in shellfish aquaculture sites tended to be compensated by advection and diffusion from the surrounding waters. A large consumption of phytoplankton by shellfish can cause a net flux of phytoplankton from the Yellow Sea to Jiaozhou Bay, although there was a net nutrient flux flowing out of the bay. The physical mechanism for the water exchange between Jiaozhou Bay and the Yellow Sea was controlled mainly by a chaotic process associated with nonlinear interactions between oscillating tidal currents and double residual eddies.

  2. New weather radar coming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    What would you call the next generation of radar for severe weather prediction? NEXRAD, of course. A prototype for the new system was recently completed in Norman, Okla., and by the early 1990s up to 195 stations around the United States will be tracking dangerous weather and sending faster, more accurate, and more detailed warnings to the public.NEXRAD is being built for the Departments of Commerce, Transportation, and Defense by the Unisys Corporation under a $450 million contract signed in December 1987. Th e system will be used by the National Weather Service, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the U.S. Air Force and Navy. The NEXRAD radar tower in Norman is expected to be operational in October.

  3. Spaceborne weather radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghini, Robert; Kozu, Toshiaki

    1990-01-01

    The present work on the development status of spaceborne weather radar systems and services discusses radar instrument complementarities, the current forms of equations for the characterization of such aspects of weather radar performance as surface and mirror-image returns, polarimetry, and Doppler considerations, and such essential factors in spaceborne weather radar design as frequency selection, scanning modes, and the application of SAR to rain detection. Attention is then given to radar signal absorption by the various atmospheric gases, rain drop size distribution and wind velocity determinations, and the characteristics of clouds, as well as the range of available estimation methods for backscattering, single- and dual-wavelength attenuation, and polarimetric and climatological characteristics.

  4. Overland erosion of uranium-mill-tailings impoundments: physical processes and computational methods

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, M.H.

    1983-03-01

    The surface runoff and erosional processes of watersheds caused by rainfall-runoff are reviewed. Soil properties, topography, and rainstorm distribution are discussed with respect to their effects on soil erosion. The effects of climate and vegetation are briefly presented. Regression models and physical process simulation models are reviewed.

  5. A physical process for recycling and reusing waste printed circuit boards

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mou Peng; Wa Layiding; Xiang Dong; Gao Jiangang; Duan Guanghong

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a practical physical process for recycling waste printed circuit boards (PCBs) as well as the reusing process for epoxy resin recovered from PCBs. A special crusher with extra extruding, impacting and shearing forces was developed. With this crusher, the glass-reinforced PCBs could be readily crushed to proper granularity. In order to reduce the toxic gases and dusts

  6. Effect of a novel physical pretreatment process on the drying kinetics of seedless grapes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marisa Di Matteo; Luciano Cinquanta; Gianni Galiero; Silvestro Crescitelli

    2000-01-01

    In this paper an alternative physical method for enhancing the drying rate of seedless grapes is proposed. It consists of the superficial abrasion of the grape peel using an inert abrasive material. The effectiveness of this novel process was compared to that of the traditional ethyl oleate dipping process by analysing not only their respective drying times, but also the

  7. Efficient Physical Embedding of Topologically Complex Information Processing Networks in Brains and Computer Circuits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Danielle S. Bassett; Daniel L. Greenfield; Andreas Meyer-Lindenberg; Daniel R. Weinberger; Simon W. Moore; Edward T. Bullmore

    2010-01-01

    Nervous systems are information processing networks that evolved by natural selection, whereas very large scale integrated (VLSI) computer circuits have evolved by commercially driven technology development. Here we follow historic intuition that all physical information processing systems will share key organizational properties, such as modularity, that generally confer adaptivity of function. It has long been observed that modular VLSI circuits

  8. The Inclusion of Science Process Skills in Yemeni Secondary School Physics Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aziz, Majed S.; Zain, Ahmad Nurulazam Md

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare and contrast the science process skills (SPS) included in the 10th-12th grade physics textbooks content utilized in Yemeni schools. The study revealed weaknesses and strengths in the textbooks' content. For instance, a number of science process skills (SPS), such as measuring, predicting and hypothesizing, have…

  9. Application of green IT for physics data processing at INCDTIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farcas, Felix; Trusca, Radu; Albert, Stefan; Szabo, Izabella; Popeneciu, Gabriel

    2012-02-01

    Green IT is the next generation technology used in all datacenter around the world. Its benefit is of economic and financial interest. The new technologies are energy efficient, reduce cost and avoid potential disruptions to the existing infrastructure. The most important problem appears at the cooling systems which are the most important in the functionality of a datacenter. Green IT used in Grid Network will benefit the environment and is the next phase in computer infrastructure that will fundamentally change the way we think about and use computing power. At the National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies Cluj-Napoca (INCDTIM) we have implemented such kind of technology and its support helped us in processing multiple data in different domains, which brought INCDTIM on the major Grid domain with the RO-14-ITIM Grid site. In this paper we present benefits that the new technology brought us and the result obtained in the last year after the implementation of the new green technology.

  10. What will be the weather like tomorrow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christelle, Guilloux

    2014-05-01

    Since June 2010, our school is part of the network '"météo à l'école'": it hosts an autonomous weather station, approved by Météo France , which measures continuously the temperature and precipitation. The data is transmitted by a GSM module to a computer server. After its validation by Météo France, it is send online every day on a public accessible website : http://www.edumeteo.org/ The MPS Education ( Scientific Methods and Practices) in junior high school classes (one hour and half per week throughout the school year ) makes full use of data from the networks '"météo à l'école'" data and Météo France. Three scientific disciplines :; Mathematics, Life and Earth Sciences, Physical Sciences and Chemistry are part of a schedule defined after consultation and educational coherence to enable students to: - Discovering and understanding the operation of the sensors station, weather satellites ... - Operating satellite images, studying of the atmosphere and weather phenomena (formation of a storm, for example) - Operating collected data (networks 'météo à l'école' and Météo France) to identify climatic differences between regions, seasons, and their effects on living beings (study of the greenhouse effect and climate warming among others). The ultimate goal is to discover used tools and data to produce a weather forecast. We work for these purposes with the Cité de l'Espace in Toulouse (weather Pole) and the head forecaster Meteo France Merignac.

  11. Scheme of splitting with respect to physical processes for a model of heat and moisture transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirkhanov, I. V.; Pavluš, M.; Puzynina, T. P.; Puzynin, I. V.; Sarhadov, I.; Vabishchevich, P. N.

    2015-05-01

    A difference scheme of splitting with respect to physical processes for a model of heat and moisture transfer is proposed. The model involves three physical processes—heat, liquid and saturated vapor transfer in the porous material. The density of saturated vapor and the transfer coefficients of liquid and vapor moistures depend on the temperature. At the same time, the heat capacity and conductivity of the porous material depend on moisture. On the basis of the proposed scheme of the model, a numerical simulation of the heat and moisture transfer for a drying process has been performed.

  12. PREFACE: First International Workshop on Nonequilibrium Processes in Plasma Physics and Studies of Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovi?, Z. Lj; Malovi?, G.; Tasi?, M.; Nikitovi?, Ž.

    2007-06-01

    This volume is a collection of papers associated with a series of invited lectures presented at the First Workshop on Nonequilibrium processes in Plasma Physics and studies of Environment that was held at Mt Kopaonik in August 2006. The workshop originated as a part of the FP6 COE 026328 which had the basic aim of promoting centers of excellence in Western Balkan countries, to facilitate dissemination of their results and to help them establish themselves in the broader arena of European and international science. So the best way to achieve all those goals was to prepare a workshop associated with the local conference SPIG (Symposium on Physics of Ionized Gases) where the participants could attend sessions in which the host Laboratory presented progress reports and papers and thereby gain a full perspective of our results. At the same time this allowed participants in the COE the opportunity to compare their results with the results of external speakers and to gain new perspectives and knowledge. The program of the workshop was augmented by inviting some of our colleagues who visited the COE in recent years or have an active collaboration with a participating member. In that respect this volume is not only a proceedings of the workshop but a collection of papers related to the topic of the workshop: Non-equilibrium phenomena in plasmas and in the science of our environment. The idea is to offer review articles either summarizing a broader area of published or about to be published work or to give overviews showing preliminary results of the works in progress. The refereeing of the papers consisted of two parts, first in selection of the invitees and second in checking the submitted manuscripts. The papers were refereed to the standard of the Journal. As the program of the COE covers a wide area of topics from application of plasmas in nano- electronics to monitoring and removal of pollutants in the atmosphere, so the program of the workshop covered an even broader range of topics with the common thread of non- equilibrium phenomena playing a major part in the basic physics and also in the technological applications. The universal symbol of non-equilibrium phenomena is Maxwell's demon and it was selected, as designed by Professor Rastko ?iri? (of Belgrade's University for Fine Arts), to be the symbol of the conference. In plasma physics, the field is usually divided between equilibrium and non-equilibrium plasmas. The advantage of studying plasmas in thermal equilibrium is that they may be described by universal laws, such as Saha and Boltzmann equations. The only problem is that, apart from the very early stages in the development of the universe, such plasmas do not exist, although there are plasmas that come very close and at least satisfy the thermal laws locally. Non-equilibrium plasmas have laws unique to each situation and studies of their idiosyncrasies continue to provide a lot of food for thought for scientists, possibilities for applications and job opportunities. Or as Tolstoy wrote, `Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way?'. So, while making analogy of the non-equilibrium with the lack of happiness may sound discouraging, the scientists who try to observe these phenomena (like psychologists in the case of families) have plenty to study and are, therefore, likely to be happy. At the same time non-equilibrium phenomena in plasmas and in the atmosphere are extremely important. A fact we should be aware of every time we use an integrated circuit manufactured after the late 1970s or whenever weather changes, wind blows and pollution is carried in from some distant locations. This volume starts with a paper by D Batani (Milano, Italy) on shock waves, an example of plasmas that may be locally thermal but display very strong gradients, M Pinheiro (Lisboa, Portugal) contributed an article on anomalous diffusion in magnetized plasmas, a problem that has been addressed in the literature from many different standpoints. A special case of non-equilibrium is that of non-neutral plasm

  13. CO2-ECBM related coupled physical and mechanical transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gensterblum, Y.; Sartorius, M.; Busch, A.; Cumming, D.; Krooss, B. M.

    2012-04-01

    The interrelation of cleat transport processes and mechanical properties was investigated by permeability tests at different stress levels (60% to 130% of in-situ stress) with sorbing (CH4, CO2) and inert gases (N2, Ar, He) on a sub bituminous A coal from the Surat Basin, Queensland Australia. From the flow tests under controlled triaxial stress conditions the Klinkenberg-corrected "true" permeability coefficients and the Klinkenberg slip factors were derived. The "true"-, absolute or Klinkenberg corrected permeability shows a gas type dependence. Following the approach of Seidle et al. (1992) the cleat volume compressibility (cf) was calculated from observed changes in apparent permeability upon variation of external stress (at equal mean gas pressures). The observed effects also show a clear dependence on gas type. Due to pore or cleat compressibility the cleat aperture decreases with increasing effective stress. Vice versa we observe with increasing mean pressure at lower confining pressure an increase in permeability which we attribute to a cleat aperture widening. The cleat volume compressibility (cf) also shows a dependence on the mean pore pressure. Non-sorbing gases like helium and argon show higher apparent permeabilities than sorbing gases like methane. Permeability coefficients measured with successively increasing mean gas pressures were consistently lower than those determined at decreasing mean gas pressures. This permeability hysteresis is in accordance with results reported by Harpalani and McPherson (1985). The kinetics of matrix transport processes were studied by sorption tests on different particle sizes at various moisture contents and temperatures (cf. Busch et al., 2006). Methane uptake rates were determined from the pressure decline curves recorded for each particle-size fraction, and "diffusion coefficients" were calculated using several unipore and bidisperse diffusion models. While the CH4 sorption capacity of moisture-equilibrated coals was significantly lower (by 50%) than of dry coals, no hysteresis was observed between sorption and desorption on dry and moisture-equilibrated samples and the sorption isotherms recorded for different particle sizes were essentially identical. The CH4 uptake rates were lower by a factor of two for moist coals than for dry coals. Busch, A., Gensterblum, Y., Krooss, B.M. and Siemons, N., 2006. Investigation of high-pressure selective adsorption/desorption behaviour of CO2 and CH4 on coals: An experimental study. International Journal of Coal Geology, 66(1-2): 53-68. Harpalani, S. and McPherson, M.J., 1985. Effect of stress on permeability of coal. Quarterly Review of methane from coal seams technology, 3(2): 23-29. Seidle, J.P., Jeansonne, M.W. and Erickson, D.J., 1992. Application of Matchstick Geometry to Stress-Dependent Permeability in Coals, SPE Rocky Mountain Regional Meeting, Casper, Wyoming.

  14. CO2-ECBM related coupled physical and mechanical transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gensterblum, Yves; Satorius, Michael; Busch, Andreas; Krooß, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    The interrelation of cleat transport processes and mechanical properties was investigated by permeability tests at different stress levels (60% to 130% of in-situ stress) with sorbing (CH4, CO2) and inert gases (N2, Ar, He) on a sub bituminous A coal from the Surat Basin, Queensland Australia. From the flow tests under controlled triaxial stress conditions the Klinkenberg-corrected "true" permeability coefficients and the Klinkenberg slip factors were derived. The "true"-, absolute or Klinkenberg corrected permeability shows a gas type dependence. Following the approach of Seidle et al. (1992) the cleat volume compressibility (cf) was calculated from observed changes in apparent permeability upon variation of external stress (at equal mean gas pressures). The observed effects also show a clear dependence on gas type. Due to pore or cleat compressibility the cleat aperture decreases with increasing effective stress. Vice versa we observe with increasing mean pressure at lower confining pressure an increase in permeability which we attribute to a cleat aperture widening. The cleat volume compressibility (cf) also shows a dependence on the mean pore pressure. Non-sorbing gases like helium and argon show higher apparent permeabilities than sorbing gases like methane. Permeability coefficients measured with successively increasing mean gas pressures were consistently lower than those determined at decreasing mean gas pressures. This permeability hysteresis is in accordance with results reported by Harpalani and McPherson (1985). The kinetics of matrix transport processes were studied by sorption tests on different particle sizes at various moisture contents and temperatures (cf. Busch et al., 2006). Methane uptake rates were determined from the pressure decline curves recorded for each particle-size fraction, and "diffusion coefficients" were calculated using several unipore and bidisperse diffusion models. While the CH4 sorption capacity of moisture-equilibrated coals was significantly lower (by 50%) than of dry coals, no hysteresis was observed between sorption and desorption on dry and moisture-equilibrated samples and the sorption isotherms recorded for different particle sizes were essentially identical. The CH4 uptake rates were lower by a factor of two for moist coals than for dry coals. Busch, A., Gensterblum, Y., Krooss, B.M. and Siemons, N., 2006. Investigation of high-pressure selective adsorption/desorption behaviour of CO2 and CH4 on coals: An experimental study. International Journal of Coal Geology, 66(1-2): 53-68. Harpalani, S. and McPherson, M.J., 1985. Effect of stress on permeability of coal. Quarterly Review of methane from coal seams technology, 3(2): 23-29. Seidle, J.P., Jeansonne, M.W. and Erickson, D.J., 1992. Application of Matchstick Geometry to Stress-Dependent Permeability in Coals, SPE Rocky Mountain Regional Meeting, Casper, Wyoming.

  15. Weather and Climate

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    This background chapter reviews the basic principles of meteorology that educators need to guide inquiry activities in the classroom. Topics include structure of the atmosphere, Coriolis effect, water cycle, greenhouse effect, cyclones, anticyclones, and jet streams. This is chapter 2 of Meteorology: An Educator's Resource for Inquiry-Based Learning for Grades 5-9. The guide includes a discussion of learning science, the use of inquiry in the classroom, instructions for making simple weather instruments, and more than 20 weather investigations ranging from teacher-centered to guided and open inquiry investigations.

  16. Wonderful World of Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2003-01-01

    This standards-based module uses hands-on activities and real-time data investigations to allow students in the elementary grades to investigate weather phenomena both locally as well as in other places around the world. By using hands-on activities and real-time data investigations, the students will develop a basic understanding of how weather can be described in measurable quantities, such as temperature, wind and precipitation. The lesson plans which make up this module have been designed to allow teachers to select the ones which fit into their curriculum to allow for flexibility in implementation

  17. Wisconsin Weather Stories

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    University of Wisconsin meteorologists and folklorists along with Wisconsin teachers created this website to offer classroom materials "that integrate earth science, social studies, language arts, and math." Students can learn about severe weather and the importance of forecasting by listening to and reading people's accounts. Each lesson contains benchmarks and standards for grades four, eight, and twelve; as well as many fun activities. The website features a concise glossary and many links where teachers can discover more resources. Visitors who remember the weather discussed, such as the Ice Bowl of 1967, can find out how to submit their accounts to the website.

  18. Indigenous Weather Knowledge

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Produced by the Commonwealth Bureau of Meteorology, this Web site exhibits seasonal weather calendars created by Indigenous people thousands of years ago. The site first discusses the Aboriginal people in Australia and their methods for dealing with past climate changes. Studying the calendars, users will notice that Indigenous people dealt with climate on a local scale and recognized a varying number of seasons. For comparison, the site presents the Bureau of Meteorology's Temperature and Rainfall Graphs and climate group classification maps. Because it is still in the early stages of development, users should revisit this site to learn more about Aboriginal knowledge of weather and climate.

  19. Weather and Health

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    COMET

    2008-11-25

    This course will help meteorologists and others broaden their understanding of the impacts of weather and climate on public health, including the impacts of heat waves and cold temperatures, winter storms and thunderstorms, flooding, drought, poor air quality, tornadoes, hurricanes, wildfire, UV radiation, and others. This course is directed to broadcast meteorologists, in particular, who play a critical role in the community by helping the public to protect against weather-related health threats and by promoting good health. The course also describes the public health communication system, providing information about reliable public health services, tools, and resources.

  20. Integrating remote sensing data with WRF for improved simulations of oasis effects on local weather processes over an arid region in northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, X.; Dong, W.; Liao, X.; Lu, S.; Jin, J.

    2012-12-01

    Land use/cover types derived by satellite remote sensing data from the Earth Observing System Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) were used to replace the U.S. Survey (USGS) data in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Simulations in this study were further improved by modifying the initial fields of WRF with soil temperature and moisture observations, because these two variables are important to producing "cold-wet island" effects. These improvements enabled the WRF model to reproduce the observed "cold and wet island" effects of the oasis.; Location and landscape map of the Jinta oasis. Jinta oasis is an inverse triangle situated between 98°39?E and 99°08?E and 39°56?N and 40°17?N in the north-central Heihe River Basin in northwestern China (Fig. 1). The average annual total precipitation is about 59.5 mm and the annual potential evapotranspiration is about 2538.6 mm (Meng et al. 2009). The total area is about 1652 km2. Jinta oasis is a typical irrigated area in arid northwestern China. It has an undulating topography and varies in elevation by only 80 m. ; In the field, there were 4 automatic weather stations (AWSs) and 1 oasis meteorological tower station in the vegetated areas, and 1 Gobi meteorological tower station was located in the nonvegetated area. The four AWSs were at 2 m height, and the two tower stations were at 4 heights (1.8, 5.8, 13, and 18.9 m). This figure shows the comparison of land use/vegetation maps between the default (USGS) and modified MODIS data for the 1 km-resolution domain. Most of the oasis is irrigated cropland, with grassland decreasing rapidly in the interior and outer edges of the Jinta oasis and degrading to desert (Fig. 2b). With population growth, more and more grassland is used to plant crops, which results in the reduction of shrubland and grassland.

  1. The effects of physical environments in medical wards on medication communication processes affecting patient safety.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Manias, Elizabeth; Gerdtz, Marie

    2014-03-01

    Physical environments of clinical settings play an important role in health communication processes. Effective medication management requires seamless communication among health professionals of different disciplines. This paper explores how physical environments affect communication processes for managing medications and patient safety in acute care hospital settings. Findings highlighted the impact of environmental interruptions on communication processes about medications. In response to frequent interruptions and limited space within working environments, nurses, doctors and pharmacists developed adaptive practices in the local clinical context. Communication difficulties were associated with the ward physical layout, the controlled drug key and the medication retrieving device. Health professionals should be provided with opportunities to discuss the effects of ward environments on medication communication processes and how this impacts medication safety. Hospital administrators and architects need to consider health professionals' views and experiences when designing hospital spaces. PMID:24486620

  2. NASA's Sentinels Monitoring Weather and Climate: Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall; Herring, David; Gutro, Rob; Huffman, George; Halverson, Jeff

    2002-01-01

    Weatherwise is probably the most popular newstand magazine focusing on the subject of weather. It is published six times per year and includes features on weather, climate, and technology. This article (to appear in the January/February Issue) provides a comprehensive review of NASA s past, present, and future contributions in satellite remote sensing for weather and climate processes. The article spans the historical strides of the TIROS program through the scientific and technological innovation of Earth Observer-3 and Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM). It is one of the most thorough reviews of NASA s weather and climate satellite efforts to appear in the popular literature.

  3. Weather Depot 1.21

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    As a quote commonly misattributed to Mark Twain goes, "Everyone talks about the weather, but no one does a thing about it." This little program from the folks at Weather Depot won't allow users to modify weather conditions, but it will let users customize their own weather planner (with hourly and daily updates), view regional radar, and view a map of current temperatures around the United States. Additionally, users may look up current road conditions, and view weather Web cams. Weather Depot 1.21 is compatible with all systems running Windows 98 and higher.

  4. Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program (WIPP): Technical Assistance Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Hollander, A.

    2014-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs Office (WIPO) launched the Weatherization Innovation Pilot Program (WIPP) to accelerate innovations in whole-house weatherization and advance DOE's goal of increasing the energy efficiency and health and safety of low-income residences without the utilization of additional taxpayer funding. Sixteen WIPP grantees were awarded a total of $30 million in Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) funds in September 2010. These projects focused on: including nontraditional partners in weatherization service delivery; leveraging significant non-federal funding; and improving the effectiveness of low-income weatherization through the use of new materials, technologies, behavior-change models, and processes.

  5. Weatherization Works!: Weatherization Assistance Program Close-Up Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    D& R International

    2001-10-10

    The United States demonstrates its commitment to technology and efficiency through the Weatherization Program. Weatherization uses advanced technologies and techniques to reduce energy costs for low-income families by increasing the energy efficiency of their homes.

  6. Space Weather Forecasting at NASA GSFC Space Weather Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Pulkkinen, A.; Maddox, M. M.; Taktakishvili, A.; Mays, M. L.; Chulaki, A.; Lee, H.; Hesse, M.; Evans, R. M.; Berrios, D.; Mullinix, R.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA GSFC Space Weather Research Center (http://swrc.gsfc.nasa.gov) is committed to providing research forecasts and notifications to address NASA's space weather needs - in addition to its critical role in space weather education. We provide a host of services including spacecraft anomaly resolution, historical impact analysis, real-time monitoring and forecasting, tailored space weather alerts and products, weekly summaries and reports, and most recently - video casts. In this presentation, we will focus on how near real-time data (both in space and on ground), in combination with modeling capabilities and an innovative dissemination system called the Integrated Space Weather Analysis System (iSWA http://iswa.gsfc.nasa.gov), enable space weather forecasting and quality space weather products provided by our Center. A few critical near real-time data streams for space weather forecasting will be identified and discussed.

  7. Plutonium weathering on Johnston Atoll

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, S.E.; Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Johnston Atoll was contaminated with transuranic elements, particularly plutonium, by atmospheric nuclear weapons tests and aborted nuclear devices. Initial cleanup operations and and an extensive soil remediation program were performed. However, many areas contained a low-level continuum of activity, and subsurface contamination has been detected. Discrete hot particles and contaminated soil were characterized to determine whether the spread of activity was caused by weathering. Analytical techniques included gamma spectrometry, alpha spectrometry, and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to determine transuranic elemental and isotopic composition. Ultrafiltration and small-particle handling techniques were employed to isolate individual particles. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, analytical transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and electron energy loss spectroscopy were used to characterize individual particles. Analyses of the hot particles showed that they are aborted nuclear warhead fragments that been melted and weathered in the presence of water and CaCO{sub 3}. It was concluded that the formation of aqueous ionic (Pu/Am)-CO{sub 3} coordinated complexes, during environmental exposure to large volumes of rainwater and carbonate-satured seawater, enhanced the solubility of transuranic elements. The (Pu/Am)-CO{sub 3} complexes sorbed onto colloidal CaCO{sub 3} and coral soil surfaces as they were exposed to rain and seawater. This mechanism led to greater dispersal of plutonium and americium than would be expected by physical transport of discrete hot particles alone.

  8. Weatherization Works: An interim report of the National Weatherization Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.A.; Berry, L.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinney, L.F. [Synertech Systems Corp., Syracuse, NY (United States)

    1993-11-01

    The National Weatherization Evaluation is the first comprehensive evaluation of the Weatherization Assistance Program since 1984. The evaluation was designed to accomplish the following goals: Estimate energy savings and cost effectiveness; Assess nonenergy impacts; Describe the weatherization network; Characterize the eligible population and resources; and Identify factors influencing outcomes and opportunities for the future. As a national program, weatherization incorporates considerable diversity due to regional differences. Therefore, evaluation results are presented both in aggregate and for three climate regions: cold, moderate and hot.

  9. Weather automation studies at the Otis Weather Test Facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. A. Chisholm

    1978-01-01

    A description of the Otis Weather Test Facility (WTF) is presented, taking into account the distribution of surface-based and tower-mounted instrumentation at the WTF, the automation of the rotating beam ceilometer, the present weather decision tree, and slant visual range techniques. A demonstration model of a Modular Automated Weather System (MAWS) is also considered. The versatility of MAWS results from

  10. Worldwide Marine Weather Broadcasts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Navy, Washington, DC.

    This publication is a source of marine weather broadcast information in all areas of the world where such service is provided. This publication was designed for the use of U.S. naval and merchant ships. Sections 1 through 4 contain details of radio telegraph, radio telephone, radio facsimile, and radio teleprinter transmissions, respectively. The…

  11. Winter Storms Weather Quizzes

    E-print Network

    and report more exact measurements. As it comes closer to land, special weather radars track the hurricane, the sea may rise as high as 25 feet above normal high tide! That is taller than six kids standing on each up all the small things laying around your yard, like toys, tools and flower pots and bring them

  12. Weather and Flight Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, Scott

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews some of the weather hazards involved with flight testing. Some of the hazards reviewed are: turbulence, icing, thunderstorms and winds and windshear. Maps, pictures, satellite pictures of the meteorological phenomena and graphs are included. Also included are pictures of damaged aircraft.

  13. Weather, Climate, and You.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blai, Boris, Jr.

    Information from the American Institute of Medical Climatologists on human responses to weather and climatic conditions, including clouds, winds, humidity, barometric pressure, heat, cold, and other variables that may exert a pervasive impact on health, behavior, disposition, and the level of efficiency with which individuals function is reviewed.…

  14. Winds, Weather, and Deserts

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Timothy Heaton

    This site contains 17 questions on the topic of wind and weathering, which covers the Coriolis Effect and wind characteristics. This is part of the Principles of Earth Science course at the University of South Dakota. Users submit an answer and are provided immediate verification.

  15. Weather in Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The ATS-111 weather satellite, launched on November 18, 1967, in a synchronous earth orbit 22,000 miles above the equator, is described in this folder. The description is divided into these topics: the satellite, the camera, the display, the picture information, and the beneficial use of the satellite. Photographs from the satellite are included.…

  16. Satellite Weather Watch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, R. Joe

    1982-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive (about $1,500) direct-readout ground station for use in secondary school science/mathematics programs. Includes suggested activities including, among others, developing map overlays, operating station equipment, interpreting satellite data, developing weather forecasts, and using microcomputers for data storage, orbit…

  17. Sunspots and Space Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This activity is part of Planet Diary and is an online investigation for students in how sunspots impact space weather between the Sun and Earth. Students research solar maximum and minimum as well as recent sunspot numbers to determine a connection between the numbers and solar activity. This page is accompanied by a page of websites for further resources.

  18. METEOROLOGICAL Monthly Weather Review

    E-print Network

    Rutledge, Steven

    Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado Submitted to Monthly Weather Review 9 September 2010 Corresponding Author Address: Angela K. Rowe Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State subsequent freezing to produce graupel. Similar features were also observed in an isolated cell over

  19. Blogging About the Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kyle Evans

    2010-04-01

    Since the majority of the content standards related to weather focus on forecasting, elementary students often spend a lot of time studying cloud types, fronts, storms, and using a barometer to read air pressure. Although this allows students to "do" scie

  20. Brazilian Space Weather Program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antonio Padilha; Hisao Takahashi; Eurico de Paula; Hanumant Sawant; Haroldo de Campos Velho; Icaro Vitorello; Joaquim Costa; Jonas Souza; José Cecatto; Odim Mendes; Walter Demétrio Gonzalez Alarcon

    2008-01-01

    A space weather program is being initiated at the Brazilian National Institute for Space Research (INPE) to study events from their initiation on the sun to their impacts on the earth, including their effects on space-based and ground-based technological systems. The program is built on existing capabilities at INPE, which include scientists with a long tradition and excellence in the