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Sample records for physics astrophysics geophysics

  1. Direct Statistical Simulation of Astrophysical and Geophysical Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, B.; Tobias, S.

    2011-12-01

    Astrophysical and geophysical flows are amenable to direct statistical simulation (DSS), the calculation of statistical properties that does not rely upon accumulation by direct numerical simulation (DNS) (Tobias and Marston, 2011). Anisotropic and inhomogeneous flows, such as those found in the atmospheres of planets, in rotating stars, and in disks, provide the starting point for an expansion in fluctuations about the mean flow, leading to a hierarchy of equations of motion for the equal-time cumulants. The method is described for a general set of evolution equations, and then illustrated for two specific cases: (i) A barotropic jet on a rotating sphere (Marston, Conover, and Schneider, 2008); and (ii) A model of a stellar tachocline driven by relaxation to an underlying flow with shear (Cally 2001) for which a joint instability arises from the combination of shearing forces and magnetic stress. The reliability of DSS is assessed by comparing statistics so obtained against those accumulated from DNS, the traditional approach. The simplest non-trivial closure, CE2, sets the third and higher cumulants to zero yet yields qualitatively accurate low-order statistics for both systems. Physically CE2 retains only the eddy-mean flow interaction, and drops the eddy-eddy interaction. Quantitatively accurate zonal means are found for barotropic jet for long and short (but not intermediate) relaxation times, and for Cally problem in the case of strong shearing and large magnetic fields. Deficiencies in CE2 can be repaired at the CE3 level, that is by retaining the third cumulant (Marston 2011). We conclude by discussing possible extensions of the method both in terms of computational methods and the range of astrophysical and geophysical problems that are of interest.

  2. Astrophysics and cosmic physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siuniaev, R. A.

    Recent astrophysical studies undertaken in the Soviet Union are surveyed. Papers are presented on the role of observations of galactic clusters in cosmological studies; photometric observations of active nuclei; investigations of the fine structure of radio sources; and interstellar molecules. Also considered are Type I supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, the motion of the sun in the interstellar medium, and astrophysical observations on Mt. Maidanak in Central Asia.

  3. PREFACE: Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemmerer, D.; Grosse, E.; Junghans, A. R.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.

    2008-01-01

    The Europhysics Conference `Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics III' (NPA3) took place from 26 31 March 2007 in Dresden, Germany, hosted by Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. The present special issue of Journal of Physics G: Nuclear and Particle Physics contains all peer-reviewed contributions to the proceedings of this conference. NPA3 is the third conference in the Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics series of conferences devoted to the interplay between nuclear physics and astrophysics. The first and second editions of the series were held in 2002 and 2005 in Debrecen, Hungary. NPA3 has been organized under the auspices of the Nuclear Physics Board of the European Physical Society as its XXI Divisional Conference. The conference marks the 50th anniversary of the landmark paper B2FH published in 1957 by E M Burbidge, G R Burbidge, W A Fowler and F Hoyle. A public lecture by Claus Rolfs (Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany) commemorated the progress achieved since 1957. NPA3 aimed to bring together experimental and theoretical nuclear physicists, astrophysicists and astronomers to address the important part played by nuclear physics in current astrophysical problems. A total of 130 participants from 71 institutions in 26 countries attended the conference, presenting 33 invited and 38 contributed talks and 25 posters on six subject areas. The astrophysical motivation and the nuclear tools employed to address it are highlighted by the titles of the subject areas: Big Bang Nucleosynthesis Stellar Nucleosynthesis and Low Cross Section Measurement Explosive Nucleosynthesis and Nuclear Astrophysics with Photons Nuclei far from Stability and Radioactive Ion Beams Dense Matter in Neutron Stars and Relativistic Nuclear Collisions Neutrinos in Nuclear Astrophysics The presentations and discussions proved that Nuclear Astrophysics is a truly interdisciplinary subject. The remarkable progress in astronomical observations achieved in recent years is matched by advances in

  4. Homologies in Physics and Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, David F.; Cumalat, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    The genes of humans and chimpanzees are homologs. These genes are - in large measure - identical. From this detailed observation, we naturally suppose that both species evolved from a common ancestor. In particle physics the ordinary observed particles and their superymmetric partners are thought to be homologs, generated by a common "ancestor” , the Higgs particle. Experiments at CERN currently are testing this comfortable analogy of physics with biology. Neither the Higgs boson nor any supersymmetric particle has yet been found. We speculate that a variety of objects are homologs - evidence of an as yet undeveloped quantum theory of gravity to replace Dark Matter. A purely astronomical homology is the Vc - σ o relation which places nearly spherical elliptical galaxies just above well-formed spirals (SA & SB). Here the asymptotically- flat, circular velocity Vc is observed to be between 1 and 2 times the central bulge velocity dispersion σo over the range 60 km/s< σo <400 km/s (Ferrarese 2002, Fig 3). The Vc - σ o relation is difficult to explain with self-consistent equilibrium galaxy models (Courteau et al 2007). Here we give an explanation based on the Sinusoidal Potential, a non-Newtonian potential in which φ =-GM Cos[ko r]/r and ko=2 π /400 pc. We relate the lower limit of 60 km/s to the thermal velocity of protons at the” Broadhurst/Hirano & Hartnett” lookback redshift Z=105.6. This is the redshift where what was 400 pc then expands to 128 h-1 Mpc today. Further, at this Z the temperature of the universe was close to the Hartree Energy of 2 times 13.6 eV, an energy where protons have an rms speed of about 60 km/s.

  5. Plasma physics of extreme astrophysical environments.

    PubMed

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A; Rightley, Shane

    2014-03-01

    Among the incredibly diverse variety of astrophysical objects, there are some that are characterized by very extreme physical conditions not encountered anywhere else in the Universe. Of special interest are ultra-magnetized systems that possess magnetic fields exceeding the critical quantum field of about 44 TG. There are basically only two classes of such objects: magnetars, whose magnetic activity is manifested, e.g., via their very short but intense gamma-ray flares, and central engines of supernovae (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)--the most powerful explosions in the modern Universe. Figuring out how these complex systems work necessarily requires understanding various plasma processes, both small-scale kinetic and large-scale magnetohydrodynamic (MHD), that govern their behavior. However, the presence of an ultra-strong magnetic field modifies the underlying basic physics to such a great extent that relying on conventional, classical plasma physics is often not justified. Instead, plasma-physical problems relevant to these extreme astrophysical environments call for constructing relativistic quantum plasma (RQP) physics based on quantum electrodynamics (QED). In this review, after briefly describing the astrophysical systems of interest and identifying some of the key plasma-physical problems important to them, we survey the recent progress in the development of such a theory. We first discuss the ways in which the presence of a super-critical field modifies the properties of vacuum and matter and then outline the basic theoretical framework for describing both non-relativistic and RQPs. We then turn to some specific astrophysical applications of relativistic QED plasma physics relevant to magnetar magnetospheres and to central engines of core-collapse SNe and long GRBs. Specifically, we discuss the propagation of light through a magnetar magnetosphere; large-scale MHD processes driving magnetar activity and responsible for jet launching and propagation in

  6. Plasma physics of extreme astrophysical environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A.; Rightley, Shane

    2014-03-01

    Among the incredibly diverse variety of astrophysical objects, there are some that are characterized by very extreme physical conditions not encountered anywhere else in the Universe. Of special interest are ultra-magnetized systems that possess magnetic fields exceeding the critical quantum field of about 44 TG. There are basically only two classes of such objects: magnetars, whose magnetic activity is manifested, e.g., via their very short but intense gamma-ray flares, and central engines of supernovae (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)—the most powerful explosions in the modern Universe. Figuring out how these complex systems work necessarily requires understanding various plasma processes, both small-scale kinetic and large-scale magnetohydrodynamic (MHD), that govern their behavior. However, the presence of an ultra-strong magnetic field modifies the underlying basic physics to such a great extent that relying on conventional, classical plasma physics is often not justified. Instead, plasma-physical problems relevant to these extreme astrophysical environments call for constructing relativistic quantum plasma (RQP) physics based on quantum electrodynamics (QED). In this review, after briefly describing the astrophysical systems of interest and identifying some of the key plasma-physical problems important to them, we survey the recent progress in the development of such a theory. We first discuss the ways in which the presence of a super-critical field modifies the properties of vacuum and matter and then outline the basic theoretical framework for describing both non-relativistic and RQPs. We then turn to some specific astrophysical applications of relativistic QED plasma physics relevant to magnetar magnetospheres and to central engines of core-collapse SNe and long GRBs. Specifically, we discuss the propagation of light through a magnetar magnetosphere; large-scale MHD processes driving magnetar activity and responsible for jet launching and propagation in

  7. GeoPhysical Analysis Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-05-21

    GPAC is a code that integrates open source libraries for element formulations, linear algebra, and I/O with two main LLNL-Written components: (i) a set of standard finite elements physics solvers for rersolving Darcy fluid flow, explicit mechanics, implicit mechanics, and fluid-mediated fracturing, including resolution of contact both implicity and explicity, and (ii) a MPI-based parallelization implementation for use on generic HPC distributed memory architectures. The resultant code can be used alone for linearly elastic problemsmore » and problems involving hydraulic fracturing, where the mesh topology is dynamically changed. The key application domain is for low-rate stimulation and fracture control in subsurface reservoirs (e.g., enhanced geothermal sites and unconventional shale gas stimulation). GPAC also has interfaces to call external libraries for, e.g., material models and equations of state; however, LLNL-developed EOS and material models will not be part of the current release.« less

  8. GeoPhysical Analysis Code

    SciTech Connect

    2011-05-21

    GPAC is a code that integrates open source libraries for element formulations, linear algebra, and I/O with two main LLNL-Written components: (i) a set of standard finite elements physics solvers for rersolving Darcy fluid flow, explicit mechanics, implicit mechanics, and fluid-mediated fracturing, including resolution of contact both implicity and explicity, and (ii) a MPI-based parallelization implementation for use on generic HPC distributed memory architectures. The resultant code can be used alone for linearly elastic problems and problems involving hydraulic fracturing, where the mesh topology is dynamically changed. The key application domain is for low-rate stimulation and fracture control in subsurface reservoirs (e.g., enhanced geothermal sites and unconventional shale gas stimulation). GPAC also has interfaces to call external libraries for, e.g., material models and equations of state; however, LLNL-developed EOS and material models will not be part of the current release.

  9. GeoPhysical Analysis Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-12-21

    GPAC is a code that integrates open source libraries for element formulations, linear algebra, and I/O with two main LLNL-written components: (i) a set of standard finite, discrete, and discontinuous displacement element physics solvers for resolving Darcy fluid flow, explicit mechanics, implicit mechanics, fault rupture and earthquake nucleation, and fluid-mediated fracturing, including resolution of physcial behaviors both implicity and explicity, and (ii) a MPI-based parallelization implementation for use on generic HPC distributed memory architectures. Themore » resultant code can be used alone for linearly elastic problems; ploblems involving hydraulic fracturing, where the mesh topology is dynamically changed; fault rupture modeling and seismic risk assessment; and general granular materials behavior. The key application domain is for low-rate stimulation and fracture control in subsurface reservoirs (e.g., enhanced geothermal sites and unconventional shale gas stimulation). GPAC also has interfaces to call external libraries for , e.g., material models and equations of state; however, LLNL-developed EOS and material models will not be part of the current release. CPAC's secondary applications include modeling fault evolution for predicting the statistical distribution of earthquake events and to capture granular materials behavior under different load paths.« less

  10. GeoPhysical Analysis Code

    SciTech Connect

    2012-12-21

    GPAC is a code that integrates open source libraries for element formulations, linear algebra, and I/O with two main LLNL-written components: (i) a set of standard finite, discrete, and discontinuous displacement element physics solvers for resolving Darcy fluid flow, explicit mechanics, implicit mechanics, fault rupture and earthquake nucleation, and fluid-mediated fracturing, including resolution of physcial behaviors both implicity and explicity, and (ii) a MPI-based parallelization implementation for use on generic HPC distributed memory architectures. The resultant code can be used alone for linearly elastic problems; ploblems involving hydraulic fracturing, where the mesh topology is dynamically changed; fault rupture modeling and seismic risk assessment; and general granular materials behavior. The key application domain is for low-rate stimulation and fracture control in subsurface reservoirs (e.g., enhanced geothermal sites and unconventional shale gas stimulation). GPAC also has interfaces to call external libraries for , e.g., material models and equations of state; however, LLNL-developed EOS and material models will not be part of the current release. CPAC's secondary applications include modeling fault evolution for predicting the statistical distribution of earthquake events and to capture granular materials behavior under different load paths.

  11. Mathematical Methods for Geophysics and Space Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, William I.

    2016-05-01

    Graduate students in the natural sciences - including not only geophysics and space physics but also atmospheric and planetary physics, ocean sciences, and astronomy - need a broad-based mathematical toolbox to facilitate their research. In addition, they need to survey a wider array of mathematical methods that, while outside their particular areas of expertise, are important in related ones. While it is unrealistic to expect them to develop an encyclopedic knowledge of all the methods that are out there, they need to know how and where to obtain reliable and effective insights into these broader areas. Here at last is a graduate textbook that provides these students with the mathematical skills they need to succeed in today's highly interdisciplinary research environment. This authoritative and accessible book covers everything from the elements of vector and tensor analysis to ordinary differential equations, special functions, and chaos and fractals. Other topics include integral transforms, complex analysis, and inverse theory; partial differential equations of mathematical geophysics; probability, statistics, and computational methods; and much more. Proven in the classroom, Mathematical Methods for Geophysics and Space Physics features numerous exercises throughout as well as suggestions for further reading. * Provides an authoritative and accessible introduction to the subject * Covers vector and tensor analysis, ordinary differential equations, integrals and approximations, Fourier transforms, diffusion and dispersion, sound waves and perturbation theory, randomness in data, and a host of other topics * Features numerous exercises throughout * Ideal for students and researchers alike * An online illustration package is available to professors

  12. Cosmology, astrophysics and elementary particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayler, R. J.

    1980-03-01

    The physics of the early universe are studied and the role of new particles such as heavy leptons, neutrinos and quarks and possible relationship of the net baryon number of the universe to unified models of elementary particle physics are discussed. Consideration is given to the role of neutrinos in stellar evolution, particularly in the explosion of supernovae and in the cooling of neutron stars. Black holes are discussed in connection with Hawking's discovery that low-mass black holes can emit a thermal distribution of particles which could be of cosmological or astrophysical importance. Finally, the evidence that the laws of physics are unchanging is examined, and it is concluded that there is no clear case in favor of change.

  13. FOREWORD: Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, Naftali; Hass, Michael; Paul, Michael

    2012-02-01

    The fifth edition of the bi-annual 'Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics (NPA)' conference series was held in Eilat, Israel on April 3-8, 2011. This Conference is also designated as the 24th Nuclear Physics Divisional Conference of the EPS. The main purpose of this conference, as that of the four previous ones in this series, is to deal with those aspects of nuclear physics that are directly related to astrophysics. The concept of such a meeting was conceived by the Nuclear Physics Board of the European Physical Society in 1998. At that time, the idea of such a conference was quite new and it was decided that this meeting would be sponsored by the EPS. The first meeting, in January 2001, was planned and organized in Eilat, Israel. Due to international circumstances the conference was moved to Debrecen, Hungary. Subsequent conferences were held in Debrecen again, in Dresden, Germany, and in Frascati, Italy (moved from Gran Sasso due to the tragic earthquake that hit the L'Aquila region). After 10 years the conference finally returned to Eilat, the originally envisioned site. Eilat is a resort town located on the shore of the Gulf of Eilat, which connects Israel to the Red Sea and further south to the Indian Ocean. It commands spectacular views of the desert and mountains, offering unique touristic attractions. The local scientific backdrop of the conference is the fact that the Israeli scientific scene exhibits a wide variety of research activities in many areas of nuclear physics and astrophysics. A new accelerator, SARAF at Soreq Nuclear Research Center is presently undergoing final acceptance tests. SARAF will serve as a platform for production of radioactive ion beams and nuclear-astrophysics research in Israel. The meeting in Eilat was organized by four Israeli scientific institutions, Hebrew University, Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Tel Aviv University and the Weizmann Institute of Science. The welcome reception and lectures were held at the King Solomon hotel and

  14. BOOK REVIEW: Astrophysics (Advanced Physics Readers)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibble, Bob

    2000-07-01

    Here is a handy and attractive reader to support students on post-16 courses. It covers the astrophysics, astronomy and cosmology that are demanded at A-level and offers anyone interested in these fields an interesting and engaging reference book. The author and the production team deserve credit for producing such an attractive book. The content, in ten chapters, covers what one would expect at this level but it is how it is presented that struck me as the book's most powerful asset. Each chapter ends with a summary of key ideas. Line drawings are clear and convey enough information to make them more than illustrations - they are as valuable as the text in conveying information. Full colour is used throughout to enhance illustrations and tables and to lift key sections of the text. A number of colour photographs complement the material and serve to maintain interest and remind readers that astrophysics is about real observable phenomena. Included towards the end is a set of tables offering information on physical and astronomical data, mathematical techniques and constellation names and abbreviations. This last table puzzled me as to its value. There is a helpful bibliography which includes society contacts and a website related to the text. Perhaps my one regret is that there is no section where students are encouraged to actually do some real astronomy. Astrophysics is in danger of becoming an armchair and calculator interest. There are practical projects that students could undertake either for school assessment or for personal interest. Simple astrophotography to capture star trails, observe star colours and estimate apparent magnitudes is an example, as is a simple double-star search. There are dozens more. However, the author's style is friendly and collaborative. He befriends the reader as they journey together through the ideas. There are progress questions at the end of each chapter. Their style tends to be rather closed and they emphasize factual recall

  15. Computing Across the Physics and Astrophysics Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGioia Eastwood, Kathy; James, M.; Dolle, E.

    2012-01-01

    Computational skills are essential in today's marketplace. Bachelors entering the STEM workforce report that their undergraduate education does not adequately prepare them to use scientific software and to write programs. Computation can also increase student learning; not only are the students actively engaged, but computational problems allow them to explore physical problems that are more realistic than the few that can be solved analytically. We have received a grant from the NSF CCLI Phase I program to integrate computing into our upper division curriculum. Our language of choice is Matlab; this language had already been chosen for our required sophomore course in Computational Physics because of its prevalence in industry. For two summers we have held faculty workshops to help our professors develop the needed expertise, and we are now in the implementation and evaluation stage. The end product will be a set of learning materials in the form of computational modules that we will make freely available. These modules will include the assignment, pedagogical goals, Matlab code, samples of student work, and instructor comments. At this meeting we present an overview of the project as well as modules written for a course in upper division stellar astrophysics. We acknowledge the support of the NSF through DUE-0837368.

  16. Nonlinear modal analysis of penetrative convection. [in stratified fluids under astrophysical and geophysical conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahn, J.-P.; Toomre, J.; Latour, J.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that thermal convection in many astrophysical and geophysical settings occurs in an unstable layer bounded above and below by regions which are stably stratified. The convective motions may extend a substantial distance into the adjacent stable zones. If the motions have little direct effect upon the mean stratification of the stable zone, then they are usually referred to as convective overshooting. The primary objective of the present investigation is to study the dynamics of overshooting at very large Rayleigh numbers, mainly with stellar applications in mind. Numerically this is only feasible if severe simplifications are made in the description of what are likely to be turbulent motions. The approach employed in the investigation utilizes nonlinear modal equations in which the vertical and temporal structure of the convection is described accurately at the expense of the horizontal structure. A summary of the salient properties of penetrative convection is provided on the basis of the results of the conducted studies.

  17. Summary for astrophysics and non-accelerator physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kahana, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper summarizes the presentations at the astrophysics and non-accelerator physics conference. Discussed in this paper are: supernovae, neutrinos, x-rays, gamma rays, cosmic rays, monopoles and primordial nucleosynthesis. 15 refs. (LSP)

  18. SPACE PHYSICS: Developing resources for astrophysics at A-level: the TRUMP Astrophysics project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinbank, Elizabeth

    1997-01-01

    After outlining the astrophysical options now available in A-level physics syllabuses, this paper notes some of the particular challenges facing A-level teachers and students who chose these options and describes a project designed to support them. The paper highlights some key features of the project that could readily be incorporated into other areas of physics curriculum development.

  19. MFGA-IDT2 workshop: Astrophysical and geophysical fluid mechanics: the impact of data on turbulence theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schertzer, D.; Falgarone, E.

    1 Facts about the Workshop This workshop was convened on November 13-15 1995 by E. Falgarone and D. Schertzer within the framework of the Groupe de Recherche Mecanique des Fluides Geophysiques et Astrophysiques (GdR MFGA, Research Group of Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Mechanics) of Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS, (French) National Center for Scientific Research). This Research Group is chaired by A. Babiano and the meeting was held at Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris, by courtesy of its Director E. Guyon. More than sixty attendees participated to this workshop, they came from a large number of institutions and countries from Europe, Canada and USA. There were twenty-five oral presentations as well as a dozen posters. A copy of the corresponding book of abstracts can be requested to the conveners. The theme of this meeting is somewhat related to the series of Nonlinear Variability in Geophysics conferences (NVAG1, Montreal, Aug. 1986; NVAG2, Paris, June 1988; NVAG3, Cargese (Corsica), September, 1993), as well as seven consecutive annual sessions at EGS general assemblies and two consecutive spring AGU meeting sessions devoted to similar topics. One may note that NVAG3 was a joint American Geophysical Union Chapman and European Geophysical Society Richardson Memorial conference, the first topical conference jointly sponsored by the two organizations. The corresponding proceedings were published in a special NPG issue (Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics 1, 2/3, 1994). In comparison with these previous meetings, MFGA-IDT2 is at the same time specialized to fluid turbulence and its intermittency, and an extension to the fields of astrophysics. Let us add that Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics was readily chosen as the appropriate journal for publication of these proceedings since this journal was founded in order to develop interdisciplinary fundamental research and corresponding innovative nonlinear methodologies in Geophysics. It had an

  20. Cosmic rays: Physics and astrophysics. A research briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Some recent results in cosmic-ray physics are summarized, and how they raise new questions of interest for both physics and astrophysics is described. An important technical advance, the recently demonstrated capability of long-duration balloon flights of heavy payloads, will offer a great advantage for achieving some of these goals.

  1. PREFACE: Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics VI (NPA6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-01-01

    The Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics VI conference was the 6th event of the NPA biannual conference series. Previous events of this series were held at the Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen, Hungary, in 2002 and 2005; at the Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden, Germany, in 2007; at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS), L'Aquila, Italy, in 2009; and in Eilat, Israel, in 2011. This edition of the NPA conference series was organized by the European Physical Society (EPS) through its Nuclear Physics Division, corresponding to the 26th edition of the Topical Conferences of the EPS. As in previous editions, the goal of the NPA conference was to bring together the specialists in the fields of Nuclear Physics (theory and experiment) and Nuclear Astrophysics (theory and observation), providing the appropriate forum for review and discussion of the status and prospects of the field of Nuclear Astrophysics. During the discussions, special attention was given to the Nuclear Physics aspects that have an impact in Astrophysics.

  2. Nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology (NPAC) capability review

    SciTech Connect

    Redondo, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The present document represents a summary self-assessment of the status of the Nuclear and Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology (NPAC) capability across Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). For the purpose of this review, we have divided the capability into four theme areas: Nuclear Physics, Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology, and Applied Physics. For each theme area we have given a general but brief description of the activities under the area, a list of the Laboratory divisions involved in the work, connections to the goals and mission of the Laboratory, a brief description of progress over the last three years, our opinion of the overall status of the theme area, and challenges and issues.

  3. PREFACE: International Conference on Particle Physics and Astrophysics (ICPPA-2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-02-01

    The International Conference on Particle Physics and Astrophysics (ICPPA-2015) was held in Moscow, Russia, from October 5 to 10, 2015. The conference is organized by Center of Fundamental Research and Particle Physics of National Research Nuclear University ''MEPhI''. The aim of the Conference is to promote contacts between scientists and development of new ideas in fundamental research. We bring together experts and young scientists working on experimental and theoretical aspects of nuclear, particle, astroparticle physics and cosmology. The conference covers a wide range of topics such as accelerator physics, (astro) particle physics, cosmic rays, cosmology and methods of experimental physics - detectors and instruments. These directions are unified by development of the Standard Model (SM) which is evidently not complete. There are deviations from the Standard Model - neutrino oscillations, the dark matter existence. Together with strong interactions, they are main subjects of the Conference. New results from LHC collider as well as its future upgrade are discussed with the Higgs as the main point for discussion. Substantial development of experimental tools for astrophysical observations and new results from cosmic ray experiments is one of the main subjects of the conference. Various aspects of strong interaction are discussed. Among them: Charmonium and Bottomonium states, Flavor physics at Super B factories, Exotic Nuclei in Astrophysics. Another subject for discussion is the neutrino physics, promising and unique way to get new knowledge. In this content, several talks on BOREXINO experiment where new results in neutrino oscillations are presented. Special session is devoted to PAMELA experiment - 9 years in orbit and to the future GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope with following main scientific goals: indirect dark matter origin study by the gamma-ray astronomy methods, discrete astrophysical sources observations, diffuse background γ-emission analysis

  4. Nuclear physics reactions of astrophysical importance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, Patrick D.

    2012-05-01

    Understanding the origin of elements in the universe is one of the main goals of nuclear science and astrophysics today. Achieving this goal involves determining how the elements and their isotopes formed and being able to predict their abundances. At the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), an experimental program has been established to use transfer reactions (such as (p,d) or (d,p)) to study the properties of many nuclei important to understanding the origins of various elements. Three measurements were done to aid in the determination of the origins of different light isotopes. Big Bang Nucleosynthesis calculations, constrained by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe results, produce primordial 7Li abundances almost a factor of four larger than those extrapolated from observations. Since primordial 7Li is believed to be mostly produced by the beta decay of 7Be, one proposed solution to this discrepancy is a resonant enhancement of the 7Be(d, p)2α reaction rate through the 5/2+ 16.7-MeV state in 9B. The 2H(7Be,d) 7Be reaction was used to search for such a resonance; none was observed. An upper limit on the width of the proposed resonance was deduced. 19F is believed to have formed in Asymptotic Giant Branch stars, but current models cannot reproduce the observed abundances of this nucleus. One of the key reactions responsible for the creation of 19F is 15N(α,γ). Therefore, it is important to understand reactions that might destroy 15N, such as 15N(n,γ). The magnitude of the 15N( n,γ) reaction rate depends directly on the neutron spectroscopic factors of low-lying 16N levels. Currently the measured spectroscopic factors differ from those expected from theory by a factor of 2. A study has been done to resolve this discrepancy using the d( 15N,p) reaction. The spectroscopic factors were all found to be

  5. Basic Physics Questions Addressed by Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Dark matter, dark energy, the Big Bang, testing relativity -- all are physics questions accessible to astrophysicists -- but all require new equipment. As Harwit's "Cosmic Discovery" pointed out, almost all great surprises in astronomy came from new equipment or new uses of equipment designed for other purposes, and many of those had military applications. I will outline prospects for new equipment and discuss how that equipment can be developed and built. Bigger and lighter mirrors, wavefront sensing and control, new detector technology, cryogenics -- each has its own social network, its own special possibilities, and its own funding sources outside science. I will discuss some examples drawn from real-life experience with the James Webb Space Telescope, a telescope that was said to have a "giggle factor" when it was proposed in 1995. Now each of the 10 major technologies has been brought to maturity, flight hardware is being built, and launch is planned for 2014. As an instrument builder all my life, I will speculate a little on what may be within our reach over the next few decades.

  6. MFGA-IDT2 workshop: Astrophysical and geophysical fluid mechanics: the impact of data on turbulence theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schertzer, D.; Falgarone, E.

    1 Facts about the Workshop This workshop was convened on November 13-15 1995 by E. Falgarone and D. Schertzer within the framework of the Groupe de Recherche Mecanique des Fluides Geophysiques et Astrophysiques (GdR MFGA, Research Group of Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Mechanics) of Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS, (French) National Center for Scientific Research). This Research Group is chaired by A. Babiano and the meeting was held at Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris, by courtesy of its Director E. Guyon. More than sixty attendees participated to this workshop, they came from a large number of institutions and countries from Europe, Canada and USA. There were twenty-five oral presentations as well as a dozen posters. A copy of the corresponding book of abstracts can be requested to the conveners. The theme of this meeting is somewhat related to the series of Nonlinear Variability in Geophysics conferences (NVAG1, Montreal, Aug. 1986; NVAG2, Paris, June 1988; NVAG3, Cargese (Corsica), September, 1993), as well as seven consecutive annual sessions at EGS general assemblies and two consecutive spring AGU meeting sessions devoted to similar topics. One may note that NVAG3 was a joint American Geophysical Union Chapman and European Geophysical Society Richardson Memorial conference, the first topical conference jointly sponsored by the two organizations. The corresponding proceedings were published in a special NPG issue (Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics 1, 2/3, 1994). In comparison with these previous meetings, MFGA-IDT2 is at the same time specialized to fluid turbulence and its intermittency, and an extension to the fields of astrophysics. Let us add that Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics was readily chosen as the appropriate journal for publication of these proceedings since this journal was founded in order to develop interdisciplinary fundamental research and corresponding innovative nonlinear methodologies in Geophysics. It had an

  7. Implications of Ultrahigh Energy Air Showers for Physics and Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The primary ultrahigh energy particles which produce giant extensive air showers in the Earth atmosphere present an intriguing mystery from two points of view: (1) How are the base particles produced with such astounding energies, eight orders of magnitude higher than those produced by the best man-made terrestrial accelerators? (2) Since they are most likely extragalactic in origin, how do they reach us from extragalactic distances without suffering the severe losses expected from interactions with the 2.7 K thermal cosmic background photons, the so called GZK effect? The answers to these questions may involve new physics: violations of special relativity, grand unification theories, and quantum gravity theories involving large extra dimensions. They may involve new astrophysical sources, "zevatrons". Or some heretofore totally unknown physics or astrophysics may hold the answer. I will discuss here the mysteries involving the production and extragalactic propagation of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and some suggested possible solutions.

  8. Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 1996 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ryerson, F. J., Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics

    1998-03-23

    The Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) is a Multicampus Research Unit of the University of California (UC). IGPP was founded in 1946 at UC Los Angeles with a charter to further research in the earth and planetary sciences and in related fields. The Institute now has branches at UC campuses in Los Angeles, San Diego, and Riverside, and at Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore national laboratories. The University-wide IGPP has played an important role in establishing interdisciplinary research in the earth and planetary sciences. For example, IGPP was instrumental in founding the fields of physical oceanography and space physics, which at the time fell between the cracks of established university departments. Because of its multicampus orientation, IGPP has sponsored important interinstitutional consortia in the earth and planetary sciences. Each of the five branches has a somewhat different intellectual emphasis as a result of the interplay between strengths of campus departments and Laboratory programs. The IGPP branch at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was approved by the Regents of the University of California in 1982. IGPP-LLNL emphasizes research in seismology, geochemistry, cosmochemistry, and astrophysics. It provides a venue for studying the fundamental aspects of these fields, thereby complementing LLNL programs that pursue applications of these disciplines in national security and energy research. IGPP-LLNL is directed by Charles Alcock and was originally organized into three centers: Geosciences, stressing seismology; High-Pressure Physics, stressing experiments using the two-stage light-gas gun at LLNL; and Astrophysics, stressing theoretical and computational astrophysics. In 1994, the activities of the Center for High-Pressure Physics were merged with those of the Center for Geosciences. The Center for Geosciences, headed by Frederick Ryerson, focuses on research in geophysics and geochemistry. The Astrophysics Research

  9. Geophysical astrophysical spectral-element adaptive refinement (GASpAR): Object-oriented h-adaptive fluid dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Duane; Fournier, Aimé; Fischer, Paul; Pouquet, Annick

    2006-06-01

    An object-oriented geophysical and astrophysical spectral-element adaptive refinement (GASpAR) code is introduced. Like most spectral-element codes, GASpAR combines finite-element efficiency with spectral-method accuracy. It is also designed to be flexible enough for a range of geophysics and astrophysics applications where turbulence or other complex multiscale problems arise. The formalism accommodates both conforming and non-conforming elements. Several aspects of this code derive from existing methods, but here are synthesized into a new formulation of dynamic adaptive refinement (DARe) of non-conforming h-type. As a demonstration of the code, several new 2D test cases are introduced that have time-dependent analytic solutions and exhibit localized flow features, including the 2D Burgers equation with straight, curved-radial and oblique-colliding fronts. These are proposed as standard test problems for comparable DARe codes. Quantitative errors are reported for 2D spatial and temporal convergence of DARe.

  10. Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: 1986 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C.E.

    1987-07-01

    The purpose of the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) at LLNL is to enrich the opportunities of University of California campus researchers by making available to them some of the Laboratory's unique facilities and expertise, and to broaden the scientific horizon of LLNL researchers by encouraging collaborative or interdisciplinary work with other UC scientists. The IGPP continues to emphasize three fields of research - geoscience, astrophysics, and high-pressure physics - each administered by a corresponding IGPP Research Center. Each Research Center coordinates the mini-grant work in its field, and also works with the appropriate LLNL programs and departments, which frequently can provide supplementary funding and facilities for IGPP projects. 62 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Effect of New Physics in Astrophysical Neutrino Flavor.

    PubMed

    Argüelles, Carlos A; Katori, Teppei; Salvado, Jordi

    2015-10-16

    Astrophysical neutrinos are powerful tools for investigating the fundamental properties of particle physics through their flavor content. In this Letter, we perform the first general new physics study on ultrahigh energy neutrino flavor content by introducing effective operators. We find that, at the current limits on these operators, new physics terms cause maximal effects on the flavor content; however, the flavor content on the Earth is confined to a region related to the assumed initial flavor content. Furthermore, we conclude that a precise measure of the flavor content on the Earth will provide orders of magnitude improvement on new physics bounds. Finally, we discuss the current best fits of flavor content of the IceCube data and their interplay with new physics scenarios. PMID:26550862

  12. Radiative decay of massious neutrinos: Implications for physics and astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1981-01-01

    The radiative lifetime tau for the decay of massious neutrinos is calculated using various physical models for neutrino decay. The results are related to the astrophysical problem of the detectability of the decay photons from cosmic neutrinos. Conversely, the astrophysical data are used to place lower limits on tau. However, an observed feature at approximately 1700 A in the ultraviolet background radiation at high galactic latitudes may be from the decay of neutrinos with mass approximately 14 eV. This would require a decay rate much larger than the predictions of standard models but could be indicative of a decay rate possible in composite models. It is considered that this may be an important test for substructure in leptons and quarks.

  13. Liquid xenon detectors for particle physics and astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Aprile, E.; Doke, T.

    2010-07-15

    This article reviews the progress made over the last 20 years in the development and applications of liquid xenon detectors in particle physics, astrophysics, and medical imaging experiments. A summary of the fundamental properties of liquid xenon as radiation detection medium, in light of the most current theoretical and experimental information is first provided. After an introduction of the different type of liquid xenon detectors, a review of past, current, and future experiments using liquid xenon to search for rare processes and to image radiation in space and in medicine is given. Each application is introduced with a survey of the underlying scientific motivation and experimental requirements before reviewing the basic characteristics and expected performance of each experiment. Within this decade it appears likely that large volume liquid xenon detectors operated in different modes will contribute to answering some of the most fundamental questions in particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology, fulfilling the most demanding detection challenges. From detectors based solely on liquid xenon (LXe) scintillation, such as in the MEG experiment for the search of the rare ''{mu}{yields}e{gamma}'' decay, currently the largest liquid xenon detector in operation, and in the XMASS experiment for dark matter detection, to the class of time projection chambers which exploit both scintillation and ionization of LXe, such as in the XENON dark matter search experiment and in the Enriched Xenon Observatory for neutrinoless double beta decay, unrivaled performance and important contributions to physics in the next few years are anticipated.

  14. Geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, M. H.; Cassen, P.

    1976-01-01

    Four areas of investigation, each dealing with the measurement of a particular geophysical property, are discussed. These properties are the gravity field, seismicity, magnetism, and heat flow. All are strongly affected by conditions, past or present, in the planetary interior; their measurement is the primary source of information about planetary interiors.

  15. Cosmic polarization rotation: An astrophysical test of fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Serego Alighieri, Sperello

    2015-02-01

    Possible violations of fundamental physical principles, e.g. the Einstein equivalence principle on which all metric theories of gravity are based, including general relativity (GR), would lead to a rotation of the plane of polarization for linearly polarized radiation traveling over cosmological distances, the so-called cosmic polarization rotation (CPR). We review here the astrophysical tests which have been carried out so far to check if CPR exists. These are using the radio and ultraviolet polarization of radio galaxies and the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (both E-mode and B-mode). These tests so far have been negative, leading to upper limits of the order of one degree on any CPR angle, thereby increasing our confidence in those physical principles, including GR. We also discuss future prospects in detecting CPR or improving the constraints on it.

  16. Introduction of Special Physics Topics (Geophysics) Through the Use of Physics Laboratory Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, R. H.; Whittles, A. B. L.

    1970-01-01

    Describes the objectives and content of a physics laboratory program for freshman students at the British Columbia Institute of Technology. The first part of the program consists of basic physics experiments, while the second part emphasizes student work on projects in geophysics that have direct technical applications. (LC)

  17. PREFACE: NUBA Conference Series 1: Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boztosun, I.; Balantekin, A. B.; Kucuk, Y.

    2015-04-01

    The international conference series ''NUBA Conference Series 1: Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics'' was held on September 14-21 2014 in Antalya-Turkey. Akdeniz University hosted the conference and the Adrasan Training and Application Centre was chosen as a suitable venue to bring together scientists from all over the world as well as from different parts of Turkey. The conference was supported by the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TÜBìTAK) and Akdeniz University Nuclear Sciences Application and Research Center (NUBA). Based on the highly positive remarks received from the participants both during and after the conference, we believe that the event has proven to be a fulfilling experience for all those who took part. The conference provided an opportunity for the participants to share their ideas and experiences in addition to exploring possibilities for future collaborations. Participants of the conference focused on: • Nuclear Structure and Interactions • Nuclear Reactions, • Photonuclear Reactions and Spectroscopy • Nuclear and Particle Astrophysics • Nuclear Processes in Early Universe • Nuclear Applications • New Facilities and Instrumentation Participants included a number of distinguished invited speakers. There was significant interest from the international nuclear physics community and numerous abstracts and papers were submitted. The scientific committee conducted a careful and rigorous selection process, as a result of which 75 contributions were accepted. Of those, 65 of them were given as oral and 10 as poster presentations. The superb quality of the papers ensured fruitful discussion sessions. We thank all the participants for their efforts and also for promptly sending in their papers for publication. This issue of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series was peer-reviewed by expert referees and we also thank them for peer-reviewing the papers. The national and international advisory committee also deserve

  18. Multiple Discipline science assessment. [considering astronomy, astrophysics, cosmology, gravitation and geophysics when planning planetary missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    Various science disciplines were examined to determine where and when it is appropriate to include their objectives in the planning of planetary missions. The disciplines considered are solar astronomy, stellar and galactic astronomy, solar physics, cosmology and gravitational physics, the geosciences and the applied sciences. For each discipline, science objectives are identified which could provide a multiple discipline opportunity utilizing either a single spacecraft or two spacecraft delivered by a single launch vehicle. Opportunities using a common engineering system are also considered. The most promising opportunities identified include observations of solar images and relativistic effects using the Mercury orbiter; collection of samples exposed to solar radiation using the Mars surface sample return; studies of interstellar neutral H and He, magnetic fields, cosmic rays, and solar physics during Pluto or Neptune flybys; using the Mars orbiter to obtain solar images from 0.2 AU synchronous or from 90 deg orbit; and the study of the structure and composition of the atmosphere using atmospheric probes and remotely piloted vehicles.

  19. ASTRAL Code for Problems of Astrophysics and High Energy Density Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizhkova, N. E.; Ionov, G. V.; Karlykhanov, N. G.; Simonenko, V. A.

    2006-08-01

    The paper gives a brief description of ASTRAL code package for astrophysics simulations, including features in the implementation of basic physical processes and two tests. A sketch of the object code structure is provided.

  20. Geophysical and astrophysical turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffatt, H. K.

    Spiral structures in two-dimensional turbulence are studied and a theory (Moffatt, 1985, 1986) which regards fully three-dimensional turbulence as an agglomeration of 'random vortex sheets and coherent helical structures' is reviewed. Consideration is given to the process by which current-sheet discontinuities may appear during magnetic relaxation. Within the framework of dynamo theory, the determination of the generation coefficient and the turbulent diffusivity in mean-field electrodynamics for turbulence with helicity in the limit of a large magnetic Reynolds number is discussed. Certain features of 'chromospheric turbulence' (i.e., turbulence in the solar atmosphere outside the photosphere) are also examined.

  1. Geophysical, petrological and mineral physics constraints on Earth's surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerri, Mattia; Cammarano, Fabio; Tackley, Paul J.

    2015-04-01

    Earth's surface topography is controlled by isostatically compensated density variations within the lithosphere, but dynamic topography - i.e. the topography due to adjustment of surface to mantle convection - is an important component, specially at a global scale. In order to separate these two components it is fundamental to estimate crustal and mantle density structure and rheological properties. Usually, crustal density is constrained from interpretation of available seismic data (mostly VP profiles) based on empirical relationships such those in Brocher [2005]. Mantle density structure is inferred from seismic tomography models. Constant coefficients are used to interpret seismic velocity anomalies in density anomalies. These simplified methods are unable to model the effects that pressure and temperature variations have on mineralogical assemblage and physical properties. Our approach is based on a multidisciplinary method that involves geophysical observables, mineral physics constraints, and petrological data. Mantle density is based on the thermal interpretation of global seismic tomography models assuming various compositional structures, as in Cammarano et al. [2011]. We further constrain the top 150 km by including heat-flow data and considering the thermal evolution of the oceanic lithosphere. Crustal density is calculated as in Guerri and Cammarano [2015] performing thermodynamic modeling of various average chemical compositions proposed for the crust. The modeling, performed with the code PerpleX [Connolly, 2005], relies on the thermodynamic dataset from Holland and Powell [1998]. Compressional waves velocity and crustal layers thickness from the model CRUST 1.0 [Laske et al., 2013] offer additional constrains. The resulting lithospheric density models are tested against gravity (GOCE) data. Various crustal and mantle density models have been tested in order to ascertain the effects that uncertainties in the estimate of those features have on the

  2. Cosmological observations as a probe of fundamental physics and astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Simone

    The unifying theme of this dissertation is using cosmological observations as a tool to discover new physics and astrophysics. The first part focuses on the effects of primordial non-Gaussianity on the large-scale distribution of dark matter halos. The statistical properties of the primordial fluctuation contain a wealth of information about the Universe's early moments, and these properties are imprinted on the late-time distribution of matter. The first chapter serves as an introduction to the effects of non-Gaussianity on halo bias, summarizing previous work and extending it to the cubic local model (the gNL model). Chapter 2 generalizes some of the techniques of Chapter 1, allowing for the calculation of halo bias with arbitrary initial conditions, while Chapter 3 shows the relationship between the seemingly different techniques existing in the literature. Detailed forecasts for upcoming surveys are presented in Chapter 4, including the effect of marginalization over shot-noise and Gaussian part of the bias, photometric redshifts uncertainties and multi-tracer analysis to reduce the effect of cosmic variance. The second part contains work on two secondary anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation (CMB), namely the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect and the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect. The late-time ISW effect arises because of decay of the large-scale gravitational potential due to the accelerated expansion and is therefore a powerful probe of dark energy. Chapter 5 presents a new detection of the ISW effect, using WISE galaxies and AGN as tracers of the gravitational potential, whose bias is measured in cross-correlation with CMB lensing maps. An appendix discusses the contamination of this measurement due to the linear part of the kSZ effect, the Doppler shift of photon energy due to scattering off coherently moving electrons. The last chapter explores the prospects of detecting the kSZ signal from sources for which accurate

  3. Nuclear physics experiments for the astrophysical p process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauerwein, A.; Elvers, M.; Endres, J.; Hasper, J.; Hennig, A.; Netterdon, L.; Zilges, A.

    2011-04-01

    We studied the two astrophysically interesting reactions 141PrPm and 92MoTc with the activation method and with the in-beam method, respectively. The 141PrPm experiment was performed at the cyclotron of the ‘Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB)’ in Braunschweig, Germany, and the reaction was studied within and just above the so-called Gamow window. In this proceedings, we present the experimental details of this measurement. The proton-capture reaction on the neutron-magic nucleus 92Mo was studied at energies relevant for the astrophysical p process. The reaction was investigated by the in-beam technique using the γ-ray detector array HORUS (High efficient Observatory for γ-Ray Unique Spectroscopy) at the TANDEM ion accelerator at the University of Cologne. The preliminary experimental results are compared to data stemming from other measurements.

  4. Research in cosmic and gamma ray astrophysics: Cosmic physics portion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Edward C.; Mewaldt, Richard A.; Schindler, Stephen

    1993-01-01

    Research in particle astrophysics at the Space Radiation Laboratory (SRL) of the California Institute of Technology is supported under NASA Grant NAGW-1919. A three-year proposal for continuation of support was submitted a year ago and put into effect 1 October 1992. This report is the combined progress report and continuation application called for under the Federal Demonstration Project. Gamma-ray Astrophysics at SRL is separately supported under NAGW-1919 and will be separately summarized and proposed. This report will document progress and plans for our particle spectroscopy activities and for related data analysis, calibration, and community service activities. A bibliography and a budget will be attached as appendices. The Caltech SRL research program includes a heavy emphasis on elemental and isotopic spectroscopy of energetic particles in the cosmic radiation; in solar, interplanetary, and anomalous 'cosmic' radiation; and in planetary magnetospheres as discussed.

  5. The physics and theory of astrophysical neutrino sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    The origin of astrophysical neutrinos remains a mystery. Absence of detection of EeV neutrinos questions, among other properties, the mass composition and the pion production efficiency of highest energy sources in the Universe. Growing statistics from the IceCube Observatory at TeV-PeV energies starts to reveal important features of the sources, including their energy spectrum, spacial distribution, emission rates, and Galactic/extragalactic origin. At sub-TeV, tensions exist between the fluxes of neutrinos and isotropic diffusive gamma-ray background, challenging some of the existing astrophysical and dark matter scenarios. In light of these observational constraints and implications, I will review a wide range of potential neutrino sources, focusing on their neutrino production mechanism and multi-messenger signatures.

  6. Topics in the physics and astrophysics of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postnikov, Sergey

    In this dissertation, four topics related to the physics and astrophysics of neutron stars are studied. Two first topics deal with microscopical physics processes in the star outer crust and the last two with macroscopical properties of a star, such as mass and radius. In the first topic, the thermodynamical and transport properties of a dilute gas in which particles interact through a delta-shell potential are investigated. Through variations of a single parameter related to the strength and size of the delta-shell potential, the scattering length and effective range that determine the low-energy elastic scattering cross sections can be varied over wide ranges including the case of the unitary limit (infinite scattering length). It is found that the coefficients of shear viscosity, thermal conductivity and diffusion all decrease when the scattering length becomes very large and also when resonances occur as the temperature is increased. The calculated ratios of the shear viscosity to entropy density as a function of temperature for various interaction strengths (and therefore scattering lengths) were found to lie well above the recently suggested minimal value of (4pi)-1h/kB. A new result is the value of (4/5) for the dimensionless ratio of the energy density times the diffusion coefficient to viscosity for a dilute gas in the unitary limit. Whether or not this ratio changes upon the inclusion of more than two-body interactions is an interesting avenue for future investigations. These investigations shed pedagogical light on the issue of the thermal and transport properties of an interacting system in the unitary limit, of much current interest in both atomic physics and nuclear physics in which very long scattering lengths feature prominently at very low energies. In the second topic, the shear viscosity of a Yukawa liquid, a model for the outer crust of a neutron star, is calculated in both the classical and quantum regimes. Results of semi-analytic calculations

  7. (?) The Air Force Geophysics Laboratory: Aeronomy, aerospace instrumentation, space physics, meteorology, terrestrial sciences and optical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinty, A. B.

    1982-04-01

    Contents: The Air Force Geophysics Laboratory; Aeronomy Division--Upper Atmosphere Composition, Middle Atmosphere Effects, Atmospheric UV Radiation, Satellite Accelerometer Density Measurement, Theoretical Density Studies, Chemical Transport Models, Turbulence and Forcing Functions, Atmospheric Ion Chemistry, Energy Budget Campaign, Kwajalein Reference Atmospheres, 1979, Satellite Studies of the Neutral Atmosphere, Satellite Studies of the Ionosphere, Aerospace Instrumentation Division--Sounding Rocket Program, Satellite Support, Rocket and Satellite Instrumentation; Space Physics Division--Solar Research, Solar Radio Research, Environmental Effects on Space Systems, Solar Proton Event Studies, Defense Meteorological Satellite Program, Ionospheric Effects Research, Spacecraft Charging Technology; Meteorology Division--Cloud Physics, Ground-Based Remote-Sensing Techniques, Mesoscale Observing and Forecasting, Design Climatology, Aircraft Icing Program, Atmospheric Dynamics; Terrestrial Sciences Division--Geodesy and Gravity, Geokinetics; Optical Physics Division--Atmospheric Transmission, Remote Sensing, INfrared Background; and Appendices.

  8. Research and career opportunities in the geophysical sciences for physics students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyblade, Andrew

    2008-10-01

    The field of geophysics involves using most branches of physics to investigate the physical structure and process that characterize the solid and fluid parts of our planet. Major advances in geophysics have come about from physicists crossing disciplinary boundaries and using their skills and knowledge to address first-order problems about the nature and structure of our planet and how the planet has changed over time. Indeed, some of the largest scientific breakthroughs in geophysics have come from physicists. As a way to introduce students to the field of geophysics and to provide them with information about research and career opportunities in geophysics, this talk will focus on one area of geophysics, seismology. This is an area of geophysics that has not only been instrumental in advancing our understanding of solid Earth structure and processes, but one that also has an applied side used for oil, gas and mineral exploration, as well as for environmental work. Examples of research projects involving seismic wave propagation and tomographic imaging will be presented, along the short descriptions of career opportunities in industry, government and academic institutions. In collaboration with Solomon Bililign, North Carolina A&T State University.

  9. Visualization techniques and tools for large geo-physical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocke, Thomas; Buschmann, Stefan; Donges, Jonathan F.; Marwan, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    Network analysis is an important approach in studying complex phenomena within geophysical observation and simulation data. This field produces increasing numbers of large geo-referenced networks to be analyzed. Particular focus lies on the network analysis of the complex statistical interrelationship structure within climatological fields. The typical procedure for such network analyzes is the extraction of network measures in combination with static standard visualization methods. To analyze the visualization challenges within this field, we performed a questionnaire with climate and complex system scientists, and identified a strong requirement for solutions visualizing large and very large geo-referenced networks by providing alternative mappings for static plots and allowing for interactive visualization for networks with 100.000 or even millions of edges. In addition, the questionnaire revealed, that existing interactive visualization methods and tools for geo-referenced network exploration are often either not known to the analyst or their potential is not fully exploited. Within this presentation, we illustrate how interactive visual analytics methods in combination with geo-visualisation can be tailored for visual large climate network investigation (see as well Nocke et al. 2015). Therefore, we present a survey of requirements of network analysts and the related challenges and, as an overview for the interested practitioner, we review the state-of-the-art in climate network visualization techniques and tools, underpinned with concrete examples from climate network research and innovative solutions (e.g. alternative projections, 3D layered networks) implemented within the network visualization system GTX. References: Nocke, T., S. Buschmann, J. F. Donges, N. Marwan, H.-J. Schulz, and C. Tominski: Review: Visual analytics of climate networks, Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics, 22, 545-570, doi:10.5194/npg-22-545-2015, 2015

  10. Black hole bombs and explosions: from astrophysics to particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Vitor

    2013-11-01

    Black holes are the elementary particles of gravity, the final state of sufficiently massive stars and of energetic collisions. With a 40-year long history, black hole physics is a fully-blossomed field which promises to embrace several branches of theoretical physics. Here I review the main developments in highly dynamical black holes with an emphasis on high energy black hole collisions and probes of particle physics via superradiance. This write-up, rather than being a collection of well known results, is intended to highlight open issues and the most intriguing results.

  11. Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology: Cosmic Laboratories for New Physics (Summary of the Snowmass 2001 P4 Working Group)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akerib, Daniel S.; Carroll, Sean M.; Kaminokowski, Marc; Ritz, Steven; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The past few years have seen dramatic breakthroughs and spectacular and puzzling discoveries in astrophysics and cosmology. In many cases, the new observations can only be explained with the introduction of new fundamental physics. Here we summarize some of these recent advances. We then describe several problems in astrophysics and cosmology, ripe for major advances, the resolution of which will likely require new physics.

  12. Opportunities in cosmic-ray physics and astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Board on Physics and Astronomy of the National Research Council established the Committee on Cosmic-Ray Physics to prepare a review of the field that addresses both experimental and theoretical aspects of the origin of cosmic radiation from outside the heliosphere. The following recommendations are made: NASA should provide the opportunity to measure cosmic-ray electrons, positrons, ultraheavy nuclei, isotopes, and antiparticles in space; NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Department of Energy (DOE) should facilitate direct and indirect measurement of the elemental composition to as high an energy as possible, for which the support of long-duration ballooning and hybrid ground arrays will be needed; NSF and DOE should support the new Fly's Eye and provide for U.S. participation in the big projects on the horizon, which include giant arrays, ground-based gamma-ray astronomy, and neutrino telescopes; and NASA, NSF, and DOE should support a strong program of relevant theoretical investigations.

  13. Astrophysical tests for radiative decay of neutrinos and fundamental physics implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Brown, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    The radiative lifetime tau for the decay of massious neutrinos was calculated using various physical models for neutrino decay. The results were then related to the astrophysical problem of the detectability of the decay photons from cosmic neutrinos. Conversely, the astrophysical data were used to place lower limits on tau. These limits are all well below predicted values. However, an observed feature at approximately 1700 A in the ultraviolet background radiation at high galactic latitudes may be from the decay of neutrinos with mass approximately 14 eV. This would require a decay rate much larger than the predictions of standard models but could be indicative of a decay rate possible in composite models or other new physics. Thus an important test for substructure in leptons and quarks or other physics beyond the standard electroweak model may have been found.

  14. A method for comparing non-nested models with application to astrophysical searches for new physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algeri, Sara; Conrad, Jan; van Dyk, David A.

    2016-05-01

    Searches for unknown physics and decisions between competing astrophysical models to explain data both rely on statistical hypothesis testing. The usual approach in searches for new physical phenomena is based on the statistical likelihood ratio test and its asymptotic properties. In the common situation, when neither of the two models under comparison is a special case of the other i.e. when the hypotheses are non-nested, this test is not applicable. In astrophysics, this problem occurs when two models that reside in different parameter spaces are to be compared. An important example is the recently reported excess emission in astrophysical γ-rays and the question whether its origin is known astrophysics or dark matter. We develop and study a new, simple, generally applicable, frequentist method and validate its statistical properties using a suite of simulations studies. We exemplify it on realistic simulated data of the Fermi-Large Area Telescope γ-ray satellite, where non-nested hypotheses testing appears in the search for particle dark matter.

  15. The New Physics and Astronomy Education Portal of the Smithsonian/NASA Astrophysics Data System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, Michael J.; Eichhorn, G.; Accomazzi, A.; Grant, C.; Henneken, E.; Thompson, D.; Bohlen, E.; Murray, S. S.

    2006-12-01

    The ADS announces the beta release of a new portal into the technical literature for physics and astronomy education. This project is being done in collaboration with ComPADRE. Currently the collection contains about 30,000 articles covering the Science Education literature; key journals in the collection include Research in Science Education, Physical Review Special Topics Physics Education Research, The Physics Teacher, The American Journal of Physics, Physics Education, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, The International Journal of Science Education. Several other journals are also included, including some from nearby fields, such as computer science and chemistry education. The system easily has the ability to include any individual article from the research literature of physics and astronomy (such as from the Physical Review or the Astrophysical Journal) either from current or historical research. We encourage educators to suggest such articles to us. This is the beta release of a new system; we encourage comments, critisms and suggestions.

  16. Experimental Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics with the IMB-3 Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, David William

    1990-01-01

    Description of the universe on the smallest (elementary particle physics) and largest (cosmology) scales has become dependent on the properties of the most weakly interacting fundamental particle known, the neutrino. The IMB experiment, designed to study nucleon decay, is also the world's largest detector of neutrinos. The experiment uses 6800 tons (3300 tons fiducial) of water as both target and detecting medium. Relativistic charges particles traversing the water radiate Cerenkov light. The distinctive ring patterns are imaged by 2048 light collectors (each a photo-multiplier tube coupled with a wavelength-shifting plate) distributed over the surfaces of the tank. This dissertation describes the IMB-3 detector, a four-fold increase in sensitivity over the original apparatus. Neutrino interactions of both atmospheric and extragalactic origin were collected during a 3.4 kiloton-year exposure. A consequence of non-zero neutrino mass could be oscillation of neutrino flavor. The energies and long flight distances of atmospheric neutrinos offer a unique opportunity to explore this possibility. To study the composition of the atmospheric neutrinos, single-ring events are classified as showering or non-showering using the geometry of the Cerenkov pattern. A simulation of neutrino interactions and a model of atmospheric neutrino production are used to predict the composition of the sample. The showering/non-showering character of an event is strongly correlated with the flavor of its neutrino parent. In the lepton momentum range p < 1500 MeV/c, non-showering events comprise 41 +/- 3(stat.) +/- 2(syst.)% of the total. The fraction expected is 51 +/- 5(syst.)%. Although this is evidence for an anomaly in the composition of atmospheric neutrinos, the 2sigma deviation is not sufficient to require neutrino oscillations. Eight interactions recorded over a six second interval on February 23, 1987 are coincident with the discovery of Supernova 1987a. These data, together with

  17. The Physics of Magnetars and Its Astrophysical Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Qiuhe

    2015-08-01

    We present the microscopic origin of the super strong magnetic fields in magnetars.The ultra-strong magnetic field of the magnetars originates really from the induced paramagnetic moment of the 3P2 superfluid with significant mass more than 0.1m⊙ in a condition when their interior temperature here is the energy gap of the neutron 3P2 Cooper pairs. In the case, a phase transition from paramagnetism to ferromagnetism due to the induced paramagnetic moment of 3P2 Cooper pairs in the presence of background magnetic field. The upper limit of the magnetic field for the magnetars is .2 We find that the electron Fermi energy, , increases with the magnetic field strength and it is proportional to . We note that this result is exactly the opposite of the popular idea that the electron Fermi energy decreases with the magnetic field. The key reason for the dilemma is that an incorrect formulae of the microscopic number of states for the electrons in intense magnetic field from some internationally well known popular textbooks on statistical physics has been repeatedly quoted by many authors.3. We propose a new mechanism for the production of the high soft X-ray luminosities of magnetars. In particular, the Fermi energy of the electrons is higher than 60MeV in ultra-strong magnetic fields, B>> Bcr (=4.414´1013 gauss), which is much higher than the Fermi energy of the neutrons. In this case, the process of electron capture (EC) by protons around the proton Femi surface would dominate in magnetars. The outgoing high-energy neutrons due to EC process can easily destroy the Cooper pairs through the nuclear strong interaction. When one Cooper pair is destroyed, the orderly magnetic energy would be released and transformed into disorder thermal energy, then it may be radiated as soft X-rays. The Energy is in the X-ray - soft g-ray range. The total magnetic energy of Cooper pairs can be estimated as . This energy can maintain over yrs for of per magnetar. We have also calculated

  18. Trends in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schatz, Hendrik

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear astrophysics is a vibrant field at the intersection of nuclear physics and astrophysics that encompasses research in nuclear physics, astrophysics, astronomy, and computational science. This paper is not a review. It is intended to provide an incomplete personal perspective on current trends in nuclear astrophysics and the specific role of nuclear physics in this field.

  19. The physics of the earth's core: An introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Melchior, P.

    1986-01-01

    This book is a reference text providing information on physical topics of recent developments in internal geophysics. The text summarizes papers covering theoretical geophysics. Basic formulae, definitions and theorems are not explained in detail due to the limited space. The contents include applications to geodesy, geophysics, astronomy, astrophysics, geophysics and planetary physics. The formal contents include: The Earth's model; Thermodynamics; Hydrodynamics; Geomagnetism; Geophysical implications in the Earth's core.

  20. Studies of high energy density physics and laboratory astrophysics driven by intense lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Li, Y. T.; Chen, L. M.; Dong, Q. L.; Zhong, J. Y.; Wang, W. M.; Sheng, Z. M.; Zhao, G.

    2016-05-01

    Laser plasmas are capable of creating unique physical conditions with extreme high energy density, which are not only closely relevant to inertial fusion energy studies, but also to laboratory simulation of some astrophysical processes. In this paper, we highlight some recent progress made by our research teams. The first part is about directional hot electron beam generation and transport for fast ignition of inertial confinement fusion, as well as a new scheme of fast ignition by use of a strong external DC magnetic field. The second part concerns laboratory modeling of some astrophysical phenomena, including 1) studies of the topological structure of magnetic reconnection/annihilation that relates closely to geomagnetic substorms, loop-top X-ray source and mass ejection in solar flares, and 2) magnetic field generation and evolution in collisionless shock formation.

  1. Positron astrophysics and areas of relation to low-energy positron physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guessoum, Nidhal

    2014-05-01

    I briefly review our general knowledge of positron astrophysics, focusing mostly on the theoretical and modelling aspects. The experimental/observational aspects of the topic have recently been reviewed elsewhere [E. Churazov et al., Mon. Nat. R. Astron. Soc. 411, 1727 (2011); N. Prantazos et al., Rev. Mod. Phys. 83, 1001 (2011)]. In particular, I highlight the interactions and cross sections of the reactions that the positrons undergo in various cosmic media. Indeed, these must be of high interest to both the positron astrophysics community and the low-energy positron physics community in trying to find common areas of potential collaboration for the future or areas of research that will help the astrophysics community make further progress on the problem. The processes undergone by positrons from the moments of their birth to their annihilation (in the interstellar medium or other locations) are thus examined. The physics of the positron interactions with gases and solids (dust grains) and the physical conditions and characteristics of the environments where the processes of energy loss, positronium formation, and annihilation take place, are briefly reviewed. An explanation is given about how all the relevant physical information is taken into account in order to calculate annihilation rates and spectra of the 511 keV emission in the ISM; special attention is paid to positron interactions with dust and with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In particular, an attempt is made to show to what extent the interactions between positrons and interstellar dust grains are similar to laboratory experiments in which beams of low-energy positrons impinge upon solids and surfaces. Sample results are shown for the effect of dust grains on positron annihilation spectra in some phases of the ISM which, together with high resolution spectra measured by satellites, can be used to infer useful knowledge about the environment where the annihilation is predominantly taking place

  2. J-PAS: The Javalambre-Physics of the Accelerating Universe Astrophysical Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupke, Renato A.; Benitez, Narciso; Moles, Mariano; Sodre, Laerte; Irwin, Jimmy; J-PAS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Javalambre-Physics of the Accelerating Universe Astrophysical Survey (J-PAS) is a narrow band, very wide field Cosmological Survey to be carried out from the Javalambre Astrophysical Observatory in Spain with a dedicated 2.5m telescope and a 4.7deg^2 camera with 1.2Gpix. Starting in 2016, J-PAS will observe 8600 deg^2 of the Northern Sky and measure 0.003(1+z) precision photometric redshifts for nearly 1E08 LRG and ELG galaxies plus several million QSOs, sampling an effective volume of ~14 Gpc^3 up to z = 1.3. J-PAS will also detect and measure the mass of more than a hundred thousand galaxy clusters, setting constrains on Dark Energy which rival those obtained from BAO measurements.The key to the J-PAS potential is its innovative approach the combination of 54 145°A filters, placed 100°A apart, and a multi-degree field of view (FOV) which makes it a powerful "redshift machine", with the survey speed of a 4000 multiplexing low resolution spectrograph, but many times cheaper and much faster to build. Moreover, since the J-PAS camera is equivalent to a very large, 4.7deg^2 "IFU", it will produce a time-resolved, 3D image of the Northern Sky with a very wide range of Astrophysical applications in Galaxy Evolution, the nearby Universe and the study of resolved stellar populations. J-PAS will have a lasting legacy value in many areas of Astrophysics, serving as a fundamental dataset for future Cosmological projects.Here, we present the overall description, status and scientific potential of the survey.

  3. J-PAS: The Javalambre-Physics of the Accelerating Universe Astrophysical Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupke, Renato a.; Benitez, Narciso; Moles, Mariano; Sodre, Laerte; J-PAS Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    The Javalambre-Physics of the Accelerating Universe Astrophysical Survey (J-PAS) is a narrow band, very wide field Cosmological Survey to be carried out from the Javalambre Astrophysical Observatory in Spain with a dedicated 2.5m telescope and a 4.7deg^2 camera with 1.2Gpix. Starting in 2016, J-PAS will observe 8600 deg^2 of the Northern Sky and measure 0.003(1+z) precision photometric redshifts for nearly 1E08 LRG and ELG galaxies plus several million QSOs, sampling an effective volume of ~14 Gpc^3 up to z = 1.3. J-PAS will also detect and measure the mass of more than a hundred thousand galaxy clusters, setting constrains on Dark Energy which rival those obtained from BAO measurements.The key to the J-PAS potential is its innovative approach the combination of 54 145°A filters, placed 100°A apart, and a multi-degree field of view (FOV) which makes it a powerful “redshift machine”, with the survey speed of a 4000 multiplexing low resolution spectrograph, but many times cheaper and much faster to build. Moreover, since the J-PAS camera is equivalent to a very large, 4.7deg^2 “IFU”, it will produce a time-resolved, 3D image of the Northern Sky with a very wide range of Astrophysical applications in Galaxy Evolution, the nearby Universe and the study of resolved stellar populations. J-PAS will have a lasting legacy value in many areas of Astrophysics, serving as a fundamental dataset for future Cosmological projects.Here, we present the overall description, status and scientific potential of the survey.

  4. Physics and astrophysics from a lunar base; Proceedings of the 1st NASA Workshop, Stanford, CA, May 19, 20, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, A. E. (Editor); Wilson, T. L. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The present conference on physics and astrophysics from a lunar base encompasses space physics, cosmic ray physics, neutrino physics, experiments in gravitation and general relativity, gravitational radiation physics, cosmic background radiation, particle astrophysics, surface physics, and the physics of gamma rays and X-rays. Specific issues addressed include space-plasma physics research at a lunar base, prospects for neutral particle imaging, the atmosphere as particle detector, medium- and high-energy neutrino physics from a lunar base, muons on the moon, a search for relic supernovae antineutrinos, and the use of clocks in satellites orbiting the moon to test general relativity. Also addressed are large X-ray-detector arrays for physics experiments on the moon, and the measurement of proton decay, arcsec-source locations, halo dark matter and elemental abundances above 10 exp 15 eV at a lunar base.

  5. RNA as an Astrophysical or Geophysical Document?? Correlated issues in nebular and planetary astronomy, geology and biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, L. C.

    1999-12-01

    The emergence of the largely silicate earth from a presumably cosmically normal, H-rich solar nebula 4.5 eons ago is an obviously important issue relevant to many disciplines of the physical sciences. The emergence of terrestrial life is an equally important issue for biological sciences. Recent discoveries of isotopically light carbon (i.e. putative chemical fossils) in 3.85+ Ga Issua, Greenland sediments have reopened the issue of whether terrestrial life may have emerged prior to the earliest known rocks so that one might use biological records to deduce early terrestrial environments. In addition, recent advances in molecular genetics have suggested that all known ancestral life forms passed through an early hydrogen-rich environment which is more consistent with the now rejected Urey hypothesis of a early jovian atmosphere than with contemporary geological and planetological paradigms. In this essay, then, we examine possible limitations of contemporary paradigms of planetary science since a prima facie case will be made that life could not emerge in those environments which those paradigms now allow. Of necessity, the discussion will also address some hidden conflicts embedded in various disciplinary methodologies (e.g. astronomy, biology, geology).

  6. Probing new physics with long-lived charged particles produced by atmospheric and astrophysical neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, Shin'ichiro; Profumo, Stefano; Beacom, John F; Rainwater, David E-mail: beacom@mps.ohio-state.edu E-mail: rain@pas.rochester.edu

    2008-04-15

    As suggested by some extensions of the standard model of particle physics, dark matter may be a super-weakly-interacting lightest stable particle, while the next-to-lightest particle (NLP) is charged and metastable. One could test such a possibility with neutrino telescopes, by detecting the charged NLPs produced in high-energy neutrino collisions with Earth matter. We study the production of charged NLPs by both atmospheric and astrophysical neutrinos; only the latter, which is largely uncertain and has not been detected yet, was the focus of previous studies. We compute the resulting fluxes of the charged NLPs, compare those of different origins and analyze the dependence on the underlying particle physics set-up. We point out that, even if the astrophysical neutrino flux is very small, atmospheric neutrinos, especially those from the prompt decay of charmed mesons, may provide a detectable flux of NLP pairs at neutrino telescopes such as IceCube. We also comment on the flux of charged NLPs expected from proton-nucleon collisions and show that, for theoretically motivated and phenomenologically viable models, it is typically subdominant and below detectable rates.

  7. Probing new physics with long-lived charged particles produced by atmospheric and astrophysical neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Shin'ichiro; Beacom, John F.; Profumo, Stefano; Rainwater, David

    2008-04-01

    As suggested by some extensions of the standard model of particle physics, dark matter may be a super-weakly-interacting lightest stable particle, while the next-to-lightest particle (NLP) is charged and metastable. One could test such a possibility with neutrino telescopes, by detecting the charged NLPs produced in high-energy neutrino collisions with Earth matter. We study the production of charged NLPs by both atmospheric and astrophysical neutrinos; only the latter, which is largely uncertain and has not been detected yet, was the focus of previous studies. We compute the resulting fluxes of the charged NLPs, compare those of different origins and analyze the dependence on the underlying particle physics set-up. We point out that, even if the astrophysical neutrino flux is very small, atmospheric neutrinos, especially those from the prompt decay of charmed mesons, may provide a detectable flux of NLP pairs at neutrino telescopes such as IceCube. We also comment on the flux of charged NLPs expected from proton-nucleon collisions and show that, for theoretically motivated and phenomenologically viable models, it is typically subdominant and below detectable rates.

  8. Astrophysics today

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, A.G.W.

    1984-01-01

    Examining recent history, current trends, and future possibilities, the author reports the frontiers of research on the solar system, stars, galactic physics, and cosmological physics. The book discusses the great discoveries in astronomy and astrophysics and examines the circumstances in which they occurred. It discusses the physics of white dwarfs, the inflationary universe, the extinction of dinosaurs, black hole, cosmological models, and much more.

  9. Support for 26th International Conference on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Kearns, Edward; Feldman, Gary

    2014-06-08

    The XXVI International Conference on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics (Neutrino 2014) was held in Boston, U.S.A. from June 2 to 7, 2014. The Conference was co-­hosted by Boston University, Harvard University, M.I.T., and Tufts University. The Conference welcomed 549 registered participants from 33 countries. The Boston University Student Village offered an inexpensive housing option and was taken advantage of by 282 attendees. The lecture venue was the George Sherman Union at Boston University. There were 63 scientific presentations by speakers from 15 countries. The Conference held two poster sessions with a total of 287 posters. The Conference featured a reception at the M.I.T. Museum plus a multi-­week exhibition on neutrino physics capped by public presentations on the closing date of the conference. The banquet was a strolling buffet dinner held at the New England Aquarium.

  10. Spectral Modeling in Astrophysics - The Physics of Non-equilibrium Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferland, Gary; Williams, Robin

    2016-02-01

    Collisional-radiative spectral modeling plays a central role in astrophysics, probing phenomena ranging from the chemical evolution of the Universe to the energy production near supermassive black holes in distant quasars. The observed emission lines form in non-equilibrium clouds that have very low densities by laboratory standards, and are powered by energy sources which themselves are not in equilibrium. The spectrum is the result of a large number of microphysical processes, thermal statistics often do not apply, and analytical theory cannot be used. Numerical simulations are used to understand the physical state and the resulting spectrum. The greatest distinction between astrophysical modeling and conventional plasma simulations lies in the range of phenomena that must be considered. A single astronomical object will often have gas with kinetic temperatures of T˜10^6 K, 10^4 K, and T≤ 10^3 K, with the physical state ranging from molecular to fully ionized, and emitting over all wavelengths between the radio and x-ray. Besides atomic, plasma, and chemical physics, condensed matter physics is important because of the presence of small solid `grains' which affect the gas through catalytic reactions and the infrared emission they produce. The ionization, level populations, chemistry, and grain properties must be determined self-consistently, along with the radiation transport, to predict the observed spectrum. Although the challenge is great, so are the rewards. Numerical spectral simulations allow us to read the message contained in the spectrum emitted by objects far from the Earth that existed long ago.

  11. Physics with gamma-beams and charged particle detectors: I) Nuclear structure II) Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, Moshe

    2015-02-24

    The Charged Particle Working Group (CPWG) is proposing to construct large area Silicon Strip Detector (SSD), a gas Time Projection Chamber detector read by an electronic readout system (eTPC) and a Bubble Chamber (BC) containing superheated high purity water to be used in measurements utilizing intense gamma-ray beams from the newly constructed ELI-NP facility at Magurele, Bucharest in Romania. We intend to use the SSD and eTPC detectors to address essential problems in nuclear structure physics, such as clustering and the many alpha-decay of light nuclei such as {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O. All three detectors (SSD, eTPC and BC) will be used to address central problems in nuclear astrophysics such as the astrophysical cross section factor of the {sup 12}C(α,γ) reaction and other processes central to stellar evolution. The CPWG intends to submit to the ELI-NP facility a Technical Design Report (TDR) for the proposed detectors.

  12. Physics with gamma-beams and charged particle detectors: I) Nuclear structure II) Nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Moshe

    2015-02-01

    The Charged Particle Working Group (CPWG) is proposing to construct large area Silicon Strip Detector (SSD), a gas Time Projection Chamber detector read by an electronic readout system (eTPC) and a Bubble Chamber (BC) containing superheated high purity water to be used in measurements utilizing intense gamma-ray beams from the newly constructed ELI-NP facility at Magurele, Bucharest in Romania. We intend to use the SSD and eTPC detectors to address essential problems in nuclear structure physics, such as clustering and the many alpha-decay of light nuclei such as 12C and 16O . All three detectors (SSD, eTPC and BC) will be used to address central problems in nuclear astrophysics such as the astrophysical cross section factor of the 12C (α,γ) reaction and other processes central to stellar evolution. The CPWG intends to submit to the ELI-NP facility a Technical Design Report (TDR) for the proposed detectors.

  13. Particle Physics in the Sky and Astrophysics Underground: Connecting the Universe's Largest and Smallest Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Molly E. C.

    2008-08-01

    Particles have tremendous potential as astronomical messengers, and conversely, studying the universe as a whole also teaches us about particle physics. This thesis encompasses both of these research directions. Many models predict a diffuse flux of high energy neutrinos from active galactic nuclei and other astrophysical sources. The "Astrophysics Underground" portion of this thesis describes a search for this neutrino flux performed by looking for very high energy upward-going muons using the Super-K detector. In addition to using particles to do astronomy, we can also use the universe itself as a particle physics lab. The "Particle Physics in the Sky" portion of this thesis focuses on extracting cosmological information from galaxy surveys. To overcome technical challenges faced by the latest galaxy surveys, we produced a comprehensive upgrade to mangle, a software package that processes the angular masks defining the survey area on the sky. We added dramatically faster algorithms and new useful features that are necessary for managing complex masks of current and next-generation galaxy surveys. With this software in hand, we utilized SDSS data to investigate the relation between galaxies and dark matter by studying relative bias, i.e., the relation between different types of galaxies. Separating galaxies by their luminosities and colors reveals a complicated picture: red galaxies are clustered more strongly than blue galaxies, with both the brightest and the faintest red galaxies showing the strongest clustering. Furthermore, red and blue galaxies tend to occupy different regions of space. In order to make precise measurements from the next generation of galaxy surveys, it will be essential to account for this complexity.

  14. Impact on Astrophysics and Elementary Particle Physics of recent and future Solar Neutrino data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, V.; Miramonti, L.

    2014-06-01

    The study of neutrinos is fundamental to connect astrophysics and elementary particle physics. In this last decade solar neutrino experiments and Kam-LAND confirmed the LMA solution and further clarified the oscillation pattern. Borexino attacked also the study of the low energy neutrino spectrum. However, important points still need clarification, like the apparent anomaly in the vacuum to matter transition region. Besides, a more detailed study of the low energy components of the pp cycle, combined with a measurement of CNO fluxes, is compulsory, also to discriminate between the low and the high Z versions of the Solar Standard Models and solve the metallicity problem. We discuss the main recent advancements and the possibilities of studying these open problems with Borexino, SNO+ and the future experiments, like the next generation of scintillators.

  15. Lecture Notes and Essays in Astrophysics.III. 3rd Symposium of the Astrophysics Group of the Spanish Royal Physical Society (RSEF).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulla, A.; Manteiga, M.

    2008-12-01

    The Third volume of "Lecture Notes and Essays in Astrophysics" highlights some important contributions of Spanish astrophysicists to Planetology, Solar and Stellar Physics, Extragalactic Astronomy, Cosmology and astronomical instrumentation. After decades without a dedicated mission, Venus is again in fashion. On the one hand, Ricardo Hueso and collaborators, and on the other Miguel Angel Lopez-Valverde, review ESA Venus Express contribution to the understanding of the atmosphere of the neighbouring planet. Carme Jordi describes in a comprehensive essay the main observational calibration techniques and methods for the determination of mass, radius, temperature, chemical composition and luminosity of a star. Dying stars are fundamental to understand the nature of dark energy, probably the most fundamental problem in Physics today. Type Ia supernovae have played a fundamental role showing the acceleration of the expansion rate of the Universe a decade ago. Inma Dominguez and collaborators go into detail on how the knowledge of the fundamental physics of thermonuclear supernovae explotions condition their role as astrophysical candles.

  16. Hans A. Bethe Prize: Astrophysical, observational and nuclear-physics aspects of r-process nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratz, Karl-Ludwig

    2014-03-01

    Guided by the Solar System (S.S.) abundance peaks at A ~= 130 and A ~= 195, the basic mechanisms for the rapid neutron-capture process (the r-process) have been known for over 50 years. However, even today, all proposed scenarios and sites face problems with astrophysical conditions as well as with the necessary nuclear-physics input. In my talk, I will describe efforts in experimental and theoretical nuclear-structure data for modeling today's three groups of r-process ``observables'', i.e. the bulk S.S. isotopic abundances, the elemental abundances in metal-poor halo stars, and peculiar isotopic patterns measured in certain cosmic stardust grains. To set a historical basis, I will briefly recall our site-independent ``waiting-point'' model, with superpositions of neutron-density components and the use of the first global, unified nuclear input based on the mass model FRDM(1992). This approach provided a considerable leap forward in the basic understanding of the required astrophysical conditions, as well as of specific shell-structure properties far from stability. Starting in the early millenium, the above simple model has been replaced by more realistic, dynamical parameter studies within the high-entropy wind scenario of core-collapse supernovae, now with superpositions of entropy (S) and electron-fraction (Ye) components. Furthermore, an improved, global set of nuclear-physics data is used today, based on the new mass model FRDM(2012). With this nuclear and astrophysics parameter combination, a new fit to the S.S. r-abundances will be shown, and its improvements and remaining deficiencies in terms of underlying shell structure will be discussed. Concerning the abundance patterns in metal-poor halo stars, an interpretation of the production of ``r-rich'' (e.g. CS 22892-052) and ``r-poor'' (e.g. HD 122563) stars in terms of different (Ye), S combinations will be presented. Finally, for the third group of ``r-observables'', a possible origin of the anomalous Xe

  17. 5th International conference on Physics and Astrophysics of Quark Gluon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Bikash; Alam, Jan-E.; Nayak, Tapan K.

    2006-11-01

    The 5th International Conference on Physics and Astrophysics of Quark Gluon Plasma (ICPAQGP 2005) was held on 8 - 12 February 2005 at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre and Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics campus, Kolkata, India. The conference was enriched by the august presence of about 300 participants representing 18 countries across the globe. It had plenary talks and oral presentations, which form a part of these proceedings. Besides invited and contributed talks there were also a large number of poster presentations. The conference was energized by discussions of fresh experimental data from RHIC on strong elliptic flow, jet quenching, single photon spectra etc. Moreover, new theoretical results were brought to the discussion forum during this conference. Colour glass condensates, hydrodynamical flow, jet quenching and sQGP were intensely debated by the participants. The highlight of ICPAQGP 2005 was the presentation of fresh experimental results from the RHIC-IV run. The ICPAQGP series, since its inception in 1988, has placed emphasis on the role of quark matter in the fields of astrophysics and cosmology. The subsequent conferences held in 1993, 1997, 2001 and 2005 had also retained this focus. The conference was preceded by a Fest Colloquium in honour of Professor Bikash Sinha. Professor Sinha, regarded as the pioneer in establishing quark gluon plasma research in India, has successfully encouraged a group of young Indian researchers to devote themselves wholeheartedly to QGP research - both theoretical and experimental. Members of the International Advisory Committee played a pivotal role mainly in the selection of speakers. The contributions of the Organizing Committee in all aspects, from selecting the contributory talks posters down to arranging local hospitality, were much appreciated. We thank the members of both committees for making ICPAQGP 2005 an interesting platform for scientific deliberation. The ICPAQGP 2005 was supported financially by

  18. Electron-positron pairs in physics and astrophysics: From heavy nuclei to black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffini, Remo; Vereshchagin, Gregory; Xue, She-Sheng

    2010-02-01

    Due to the interaction of physics and astrophysics we are witnessing in these years a splendid synthesis of theoretical, experimental and observational results originating from three fundamental physical processes. They were originally proposed by Dirac, by Breit and Wheeler and by Sauter, Heisenberg, Euler and Schwinger. For almost seventy years they have all three been followed by a continued effort of experimental verification on Earth-based experiments. The Dirac process, e+e-→2γ, has been by far the most successful. It has obtained extremely accurate experimental verification and has led as well to an enormous number of new physics in possibly one of the most fruitful experimental avenues by introduction of storage rings in Frascati and followed by the largest accelerators worldwide: DESY, SLAC etc. The Breit-Wheeler process, 2γ→e+e-, although conceptually simple, being the inverse process of the Dirac one, has been by far one of the most difficult to be verified experimentally. Only recently, through the technology based on free electron X-ray laser and its numerous applications in Earth-based experiments, some first indications of its possible verification have been reached. The vacuum polarization process in strong electromagnetic field, pioneered by Sauter, Heisenberg, Euler and Schwinger, introduced the concept of critical electric field Ec=me2c3/(eħ). It has been searched without success for more than forty years by heavy-ion collisions in many of the leading particle accelerators worldwide. The novel situation today is that these same processes can be studied on a much more grandiose scale during the gravitational collapse leading to the formation of a black hole being observed in Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). This report is dedicated to the scientific race. The theoretical and experimental work developed in Earth-based laboratories is confronted with the theoretical interpretation of space-based observations of phenomena originating on cosmological

  19. High Energy Astrophysics and Cosmology from Space: NASA's Physics of the Cosmos Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornschemeier, Ann

    2016-03-01

    We summarize currently-funded NASA activities in high energy astrophysics and cosmology, embodied in the NASA Physics of the Cosmos program, including updates on technology development and mission studies. The portfolio includes development of a space mission for measuring gravitational waves from merging supermassive black holes, currently envisioned as a collaboration with the European Space Agency (ESA) on its L3 mission and development of an X-ray observatory that will measure X-ray emission from the final stages of accretion onto black holes, currently envisioned as a NASA collaboration on ESA's Athena observatory. The portfolio also includes the study of cosmic rays and gamma ray photons resulting from a range of processes, of the physical process of inflation associated with the birth of the universe and of the nature of the dark energy that dominates the mass-energy of the modern universe. The program is supported by an analysis group called the PhysPAG that serves as a forum for community input and analysis and the talk will include a description of activities of this group.

  20. Nuclear physics and astrophysics. Progress report for period June 15, 1992--June 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N.; Olinto, A.V.

    1993-06-01

    The authors report on recent progress of research at the interface of nuclear physics and astrophysics. During the past year, the authors continued to work on Big Bang and stellar nucleosynthesis, the solar neutrino problem, the equation of state for dense matter, the quark-hadron phase transition, and the origin of gamma-ray bursts; and began studying the consequences of nuclear reaction rates in the presence of strong magnetic fields. They have shown that the primordial production of B and Be cannot explain recent detections of these elements in halo stars and have looked at spallation as the likely source of these elements. By looking at nucleosynthesis with inhomogeneous initial conditions, they concluded that the Universe must have been very smooth before nucleosynthesis. They have also constrained neutrino oscillations and primordial magnetic fields by Big Bang nucleosynthesis. On the solar neutrino problem, they have analyzed the implications of the SAGE and GALLEX experiments. They also showed that the presence of dibaryons in neutron stars depends weakly on uncertainties of nuclear equations of state. They have started to investigate the consequences of strong magnetic fields on nuclear reactions and implications for neutron star cooling and supernova nucleosynthesis.

  1. Reconciliation of statistical mechanics and astro-physical statistics: The errors of conventional canonical thermostatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Dieter H. E.

    2006-04-01

    Conventional thermo-statistics address infinite homogeneous systems within the canonical ensemble. (Only in this case, this is equivalent to the fundamental microcanonical ensemble.) However, some 170 years ago the original motivation of thermodynamics was the description of steam engines, i.e., boiling water. Its essential physics is the separation of the gas phase from the liquid. Of course, boiling water is inhomogeneous and as such cannot be treated by conventional thermo-statistics. Then it is not astonishing that a phase transition of first order is signaled canonically by a Yang Lee singularity. Thus it is only treated correctly by microcanonical Boltzmann Planck statistics. It turns out that the Boltzmann Planck statistics are much richer and give fundamental insight into statistical mechanics and especially into entropy. This can be done to a far extend rigorously and analytically. As no extensivity, no thermodynamic limit, no concavity, no homogeneity is needed, it also applies to astro-physical systems. The deep and essential difference between ‘extensive’ and ‘intensive’ control parameters, i.e., microcanonical and canonical statistics, is exemplified by rotating, self-gravitating systems. In the present article, the necessary appearance of a convex entropy S(E) and negative heat capacity at phase separation in small as well macroscopic systems independently of the range of the force is pointed out. Thus the old puzzle of stellar statistics is finally solved, the appearance of negative heat capacity which is forbidden and cannot appear in the canonical formalism. To cite this article: D.H.E. Gross, C. R. Physique 7 (2006).

  2. Astrophysics, cosmology, and fundamental physics with compact binary coalescence and the Einstein Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Den Broeck, C.

    2014-03-01

    The second-generation interferometric gravitational wave detectors, currently under construction are expected to make their first detections within this decade. This will firmly establish gravitational wave physics as an empirical science, and will open up a new era in astrophysics, cosmology, and fundamental physics. Already with the first detections, we will be able to, among other things, establish the nature of short-hard gamma ray bursts, definitively confirm the existence of black holes, measure the Hubble constant in a completely independent way, and for the first time gain access to the genuinely strong-field dynamics of gravity. Hence, it is time to consider the longer-term future of this new field. The Einstein Telescope (ET) is a concrete conceptual proposal for a third-generation gravitational wave observatory, which will be ~ 10 times more sensitive in strain than the second-generation detectors. This will give access to sources at cosmological distances, with a correspondingly higher detection rate. We have given an overview of the science case for ET, with a focus on what can be learned from signals emitted by coalescing compact binaries. Third-generation observatories will allow us to map the coalescence rate out to redshifts z ~ 3, determine the mass functions of neutron stars and black holes, and perform precision measurements of the neutron star equation of state. ET will enable us to study the large-scale structure and evolution of the Universe without recourse to a cosmic distance ladder. Finally, we have discussed how it will allow for high-precision measurements of strong-field, dynamical gravity.

  3. A physics-based emulator for the simulation of geophysical mass flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Asif

    Rare natural hazards such as large volcanic eruptions can cause loss of life and damage to property. With sufficient information, those charged with public safety may issue warnings of impending hazards, to mitigate the hazard impact. Recent developments in modeling and simulating large geophysical mass flows can provide useful information in assessing hazard risk. These computer simulations of a system of partial differential equations are expensive to run, but analysis based on a few simulations is not sufficiently accurate for hazard analysis. Computational costs can be reduced by constructing a statistical emulator—a regression surface for selected output variables derived from several full simulator runs. Whenever the result from a simulation is required in an analysis, the emulator can be queried quickly. A key feature of the emulator is that an estimate of the prediction uncertainty, or error, is defined together with the regression estimate. A popular emulator is the Gaussian Process emulator, or GaSP, which is constructed as the mean of a Bayesian posterior distribution over input parameters. In this work, we propose an alternative procedure for constructing emulators, one that uses knowledge about the model physics. We model the mass flow as an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (OU) process for sliding blocks along a surface, a stochastic extension of Newton's law of motion. We demonstrate how the OU results can be used to predict simulator results. A fit to the OU process is made, together with an error approximation, by classical statistical techniques.

  4. Particle astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Sadoulet, B. |

    1992-12-31

    In the last few years, particle astrophysics has emerged as a new field at the frontier between high energy astrophysics, cosmology, and particle physics. Two spectacular achievements of this new field in the last decade have been the establishment of neutrino astronomy with the detection of solar neutrinos by two independent experiments and the spectacular observation of the neutrinos from the supernova SN1987A. In addition, the field has produced tantalizing hints of new physics beyond the standard models of astrophysics and particle physics, generating enthusiastic attempts to confirm these potential effects. This new field involves some two hundred experimentalists and a similar number of theorists, most of them coming from particle and nuclear physics, and as scientist will see, their effort is to a large extent complementary to accelerator based high energy physics. This review attempts, at the beginning of this workshop, to capture the excitement of this new field. Summary talks will describe in more detail some of the topics discussed in the study groups.

  5. Parameterization of strombolian explosions: constraint from simultaneous physical and geophysical measurements (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    gurioli, L.; Harris, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Strombolian activity is the most common type of explosive eruption (by frequency) experienced by Earth's volcanoes. It is commonly viewed as consisting of a succession of short discrete explosions where fragments of incandescent magma are ejected a few tens to hundreds meters into the air. This kind of activity is generally restricted to basaltic or basaltic-andesitic magmas because these systems have the sufficiently low viscosities so as to allow gas coalescence and decoupled slug ascent. Mercalli (1907) proposed one of the first formal classifications of explosive activity based on the character of the erupted products and descriptions of case-type eruptions. Later, Walker (1973) devised a classification based on grain size and dispersion, within which strombolian explosions formed the low-to-middle end of the classification. Other classifications have categorized strombolian activity on the basis of erupted magnitude and/or intensity, such as Newhall and Self's (1982) Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI). Classification can also be made on the basis of explosion mechanism, where strombolian eruptions have become associated with bursting of large gas bubbles, as opposed to release of locked in bubble populations in rapidly ascending magma that feed sustained fountains. Finally, strombolian eruptions can be defined on the basis of geophysical metrics for the explosion source and plume ascent dynamics. Recently, the volcanology community has begun to discuss the difficulty of actually placing strombolian explosions within the compartments defined by each scheme. New sampling strategies in active strombolian volcanic fields have allowed us to parameterize these mildly explosive events both physically and geophysically. Our data show that individual 'normal' and "major" explosions at Stromboli are extremely small, meaning that the classical deposit-based classification thresholds need to be reduced, or a new category defined, if the 'strombolian' eruption style at

  6. Challenges in astrophysics (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 25 January 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-09-01

    On 25 January 2012, the scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), entitled as "Challenges in astrophysics", was held at the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS.The following reports were put on the session agenda posted on the website www.gpad.ac.ru of the RAS Physical Sciences Division: (1) Stepanov A V (Central (Pulkovo) Astronomical Observatory, RAS, St. Petersburg) "Coronal seismology";2) Yakovlev D G (Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St. Petersburg St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University, St. Petersburg) "Superfluid neutron stars".The papers written on the base of the oral reports are published below. • Coronal seismology, A V Stepanov, V V Zaitsev, V M Nakariakov Physics-Uspekhi, 2012, Volume 55, Number 9, Pages 929-935 • Superfluid neutron stars, P S Shternin, D G Yakovlev Physics-Uspekhi, 2012, Volume 55, Number 9, Pages 935-941

  7. Atomic and molecular physics and data activities for astrophysics at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffery, D.J.; Kristic, P.S.; Liu, W.; Schultz, D.R.; Stancil, P.C.

    1998-04-01

    The atomic astrophysics group at ORNL produces, collects, evaluates, and disseminates atomic and molecular data relevant to astrophysics and actively models various astrophysical environments utilizing this information. With the advent of the World Wide Web, these data are also being placed on-line to facilitate their use by end-users. In this brief report, the group`s recent activities in data production and in modeling are highlighted. For example, the authors describe recent calculations of elastic and transport cross sections relevant to ionospheric and heliospheric studies, charge transfer between metal ions and metal atoms and novel supernova nebular spectra modeling, ion-molecule collision data relevant to planetary atmospheres and comets, and data for early universe modeling.

  8. On the problems of relativistic laboratory astrophysics and fundamental physics with super powerful lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Koga, J.; Kondo, K.; Korn, G.

    2015-01-15

    The ways toward modeling of astrophysical processes and extreme field regimes with super-power lasers are discussed. The main attention is paid to the problem of limited similarity in using the dimensionless parameters characterizing the processes in the laser and astrophysical plasmas. As the most typical examples, we address the magnetic reconnection and collisionless shock waves relevant to the problem of ultrarelativistic particle acceleration. In the extreme field limits we consider the regimes of dominant radiation reaction, changing the electromagnetic wave-matter interaction. In these regimes it, in particular, results in a new powerful source of ultra high-brightness gamma-rays and will make possible electron-positron pair creation in vacuum in a multiphoton processes. This will allow modeling under terrestrial laboratory conditions the processes in astrophysical objects and paves the way to experimental verifications using ultra intense lasers as they are currently developed within the ELI project.

  9. Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL): Quinquennial report, November 14-15, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Tweed, J.

    1996-10-01

    This Quinquennial Review Report of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) branch of the Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) provides an overview of IGPP-LLNL, its mission, and research highlights of current scientific activities. This report also presents an overview of the University Collaborative Research Program (UCRP), a summary of the UCRP Fiscal Year 1997 proposal process and the project selection list, a funding summary for 1993-1996, seminars presented, and scientific publications. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Astrophysical symmetries

    PubMed Central

    Trimble, Virginia

    1996-01-01

    Astrophysical objects, ranging from meteorites to the entire universe, can be classified into about a dozen characteristic morphologies, at least as seen by a blurry eye. Some patterns exist over an enormously wide range of distance scales, apparently as a result of similar underlying physics. Bipolar ejection from protostars, binary systems, and active galaxies is perhaps the clearest example. The oral presentation included about 130 astronomical images which cannot be reproduced here. PMID:11607715

  11. Relativistic Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Bernard J. T.; Markovic, Dragoljub

    1997-06-01

    Preface; Prologue: Conference overview Bernard Carr; Part I. The Universe At Large and Very Large Redshifts: 2. The size and age of the Universe Gustav A. Tammann; 3. Active galaxies at large redshifts Malcolm S. Longair; 4. Observational cosmology with the cosmic microwave background George F. Smoot; 5. Future prospects in measuring the CMB power spectrum Philip M. Lubin; 6. Inflationary cosmology Michael S. Turner; 7. The signature of the Universe Bernard J. T. Jones; 8. Theory of large-scale structure Sergei F. Shandarin; 9. The origin of matter in the universe Lev A. Kofman; 10. New guises for cold-dark matter suspects Edward W. Kolb; Part II. Physics and Astrophysics Of Relativistic Compact Objects: 11. On the unification of gravitational and inertial forces Donald Lynden-Bell; 12. Internal structure of astrophysical black holes Werner Israel; 13. Black hole entropy: external facade and internal reality Valery Frolov; 14. Accretion disks around black holes Marek A. Abramowicz; 15. Black hole X-ray transients J. Craig Wheeler; 16. X-rays and gamma rays from active galactic nuclei Roland Svensson; 17. Gamma-ray bursts: a challenge to relativistic astrophysics Martin Rees; 18. Probing black holes and other exotic objects with gravitational waves Kip Thorne; Epilogue: the past and future of relativistic astrophysics Igor D. Novikov; I. D. Novikov's scientific papers and books.

  12. NASA Astrophysics Cosmic Origins (COR) and Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) Strategic Technology Development Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Thai; Seery, Bernard D.

    2015-01-01

    The COR and PCOS Program Offices (PO) reside at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), serving as the NASA Astrophysics Division's implementation arm for matters relating to the two programs. One aspect of the PO's activities is managing the COR and PCOS Strategic Astrophysics Technology (SAT) program, helping mature technologies to enable and enhance future astrophysics missions.The PO is guided by the National Research Council's 'New Worlds, New Horizons in Astronomy and Astrophysics' Decadal Survey report, and NASA's Astrophysics Implementation Plan. Strategic goals include dark energy; gravitational waves; X-ray observatories, e.g., US participation in ATHENA; Inflation probe; and a large UV/Visible telescope.To date, 51 COR and 65 PCOS SAT proposals have been received, of which 11 COR and 18 PCOS projects were funded. Notable successes include maturation of a new far-IR detector, later adopted by the SOFIA HAWC instrument; maturation of the H4RG near-IR detector, adopted by WFIRST; development of an antenna-coupled transition-edge superconducting bolometer, a technology deployed by BICEP2 that allowed measurement of B-mode polarization in the CMB signal, a possible signature of Inflation; and finally, the REXIS instrument on OSIRIS-REx is incorporating CCDs with directly deposited optical blocking filters developed by another SAT-funded project.We discuss our technology development process, with community input and strategic prioritization informing calls for SAT proposals and guiding investment decisions. We also present results of this year's technology gap prioritization and showcase our current portfolio of technology development projects. These include five newly selected projects, kicking off in FY 2015.For more information, visit the COR Program website at cor.gsfc.nasa.gov and the PCOS website at pcos.gsfc.nasa.gov.

  13. Data catalog series for space science and applications flight missions. Volume 5A: Descriptions of astronomy, astrophysics, and solar physics spacecraft and investigations. Volume 5B: Descriptions of data sets from astronomy, astrophysics, and solar physics spacecraft and investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sang J. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The main purpose of the data catalog series is to provide descriptive references to data generated by space science flight missions. The data sets described include all of the actual holdings of the Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), all data sets for which direct contact information is available, and some data collections held and serviced by foreign investigators, NASA and other U.S. government agencies. This volume contains narrative descriptions of data sets of astronomy, astrophysics, solar physics spacecraft and investigations. The following spacecraft series are included: Mariner, Pioneer, Pioneer Venus, Venera, Viking, Voyager, and Helios. Separate indexes to the planetary and interplanetary missions are also provided.

  14. Astrophysics and astronomy (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 26 January 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-10-01

    An Astrophysics and Astronomy scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) was held in the Conference Hall of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, on 26 January 2011. The following reports were put on the session's agenda posted on the web site www.gpad.ac.ru of the Physical Sciences Division, RAS: (1) Cherepashchuk A M (Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Moscow State University, Moscow) "Investigation of X-ray sources"; (2) Shustov B M (Institute of Astronomy, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow) "Asteroid and comet hazards: physical and other aspects"; (3) Sazhin M V (Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Moscow State University, Moscow) "Search for cosmic strings"; (4) Zakharov A F (Russian Federation State Scientific Center 'A I Alikhanov Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics', Moscow) "Exoplanet search using gravitational microlensing". Papers written on the basis of the reports are published below. • Optical investigations of X-ray binary systems, A M Cherepashchuk Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number 10, Pages 1061-1067 • Asteroid and comet hazards: the role of physical sciences in solving the problem, B M Shustov Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number 10, Pages 1068-1071 • Search for cosmic strings using optical and radio astronomy methods, O S Sazhina, M V Sazhin, M Capaccioli, G Longo Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number 10, Pages 1072-1077 • Search for exoplanets using gravitational microlensing, A F Zakharov Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number 10, Pages 1077-1084

  15. Preliminary Physical Stratigraphy and Geophysical Data From the USGS Dixon Core, Onslow County, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seefelt, Ellen L.; Gonzalez, Wilma Aleman B.; Self-Trail, Jean M.; Weems, Robert E.; Edwards, Lucy E.; Pierce, Herbert A.; Durand, Colleen T.

    2009-01-01

    In October through November 2006, scientists from the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) Eastern Region Earth Surface Processes Team (EESPT) and the Raleigh (N.C.) Water Science Center (WSC), in cooperation with the North Carolina Geological Survey (NCGS) and the Onslow County Water and Sewer Authority (ONWASA), drilled a stratigraphic test hole and well in Onslow County, N.C. The Dixon corehole was cored on ONWASA water utility property north of the town of Dixon, N.C., in the Sneads Ferry 7.5-minute quadrangle at latitude 34deg33'35' N, longitude 77deg26'54' W (decimal degrees 34.559722 and -77.448333). The site elevation is 66.0 feet (ft) above mean sea level as determined using a Paulin precision altimeter. The corehole attained a total depth of 1,010 ft and was continuously cored by the USGS EESPT drilling crew. A groundwater monitoring well was installed in the screened interval between 234 and 254 ft below land surface. The section cored at this site includes Upper Cretaceous, Paleogene, and Neogene sediments. The Dixon core is stored at the NCGS Coastal Plain core storage facility in Raleigh. The Dixon corehole is the fourth and last in a series of planned North Carolina benchmark coreholes drilled by the USGS Coastal Carolina Project. These coreholes explore the physical stratigraphy, facies, and thickness of Cretaceous, Paleogene, and Neogene Coastal Plain sediments in North Carolina. Correlations of lithologies, facies, and sequence stratigraphy can be made with the Hope Plantation corehole, N.C., near Windsor in Bertie County (Weems and others, 2007); the Elizabethtown corehole, near Elizabethtown, N.C., in Bladen County (Self-Trail and others, 2004b); the Smith Elementary School corehole, near Cove City, N.C., in Craven County (Harris and Self-Trail, 2006; Crocetti, 2007); the Kure Beach corehole, near Wilmington, N.C., in New Hanover County (Self-Trail and others, 2004a); the Esso#1, Esso #2, Mobil #1, and Mobil #2 cores in Albermarle and Pamlico Sounds

  16. Particle astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Cronin, James; Aprile, Elena; Barish, Barry C.; Beier, Eugene W.; Brandenberger, Robert; Cabrera, Blas; Caldwell, David; Cassiday, George; Cline, David B.

    The following scientific areas are reviewed: (1) cosmology and particle physics (particle physics and the early universe, dark matter, and other relics); (2) stellar physics and particles (solar neutrinos, supernovae, and unconventional particle physics); (3) high energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy; (4) cosmic rays (space and ground observations). Highest scientific priorities for the next decade include implementation of the current program, new initiatives, and longer-term programs. Essential technological developments, such as cryogenic detectors of particles, new solar neutrino techniques, and new extensive air shower detectors, are discussed. Also a certain number of institutional issues (the funding of particle astrophysics, recommended funding mechanisms, recommended facilities, international collaborations, and education and technology) which will become critical in the coming decade are presented.

  17. Particle astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Cronin, James; Aprile, Elena; Barish, Barry C.; Beier, Eugene W.; Brandenberger, Robert; Cabrera, Blas; Caldwell, David; Cassiday, George; Cline, David B.

    1991-01-01

    The following scientific areas are reviewed: (1) cosmology and particle physics (particle physics and the early universe, dark matter, and other relics); (2) stellar physics and particles (solar neutrinos, supernovae, and unconventional particle physics); (3) high energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy; (4) cosmic rays (space and ground observations). Highest scientific priorities for the next decade include implementation of the current program, new initiatives, and longer-term programs. Essential technological developments, such as cryogenic detectors of particles, new solar neutrino techniques, and new extensive air shower detectors, are discussed. Also a certain number of institutional issues (the funding of particle astrophysics, recommended funding mechanisms, recommended facilities, international collaborations, and education and technology) which will become critical in the coming decade are presented.

  18. Theory and laboratory astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, David N.; Mckee, Christopher F.; Alcock, Charles; Allamandola, Lou; Chevalier, Roger A.; Cline, David B.; Dalgarno, Alexander; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Fall, S. Michael; Ferland, Gary J.

    1991-01-01

    Science opportunities in the 1990's are discussed. Topics covered include the large scale structure of the universe, galaxies, stars, star formation and the interstellar medium, high energy astrophysics, and the solar system. Laboratory astrophysics in the 1990's is briefly surveyed, covering such topics as molecular, atomic, optical, nuclear and optical physics. Funding recommendations are given for the National Science Foundation, NASA, and the Department of Energy. Recommendations for laboratory astrophysics research are given.

  19. Astrophysical cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The last several years have seen a tremendous ferment of activity in astrophysical cosmology. Much of the theoretical impetus has come from particle physics theories of the early universe and candidates for dark matter, but what promise to be even more significant are improved direct observations of high z galaxies and intergalactic matter, deeper and more comprehensive redshift surveys, and the increasing power of computer simulations of the dynamical evolution of large scale structure. Upper limits on the anisotropy of the microwave background radiation are gradually getting tighter and constraining more severely theoretical scenarios for the evolution of the universe. 47 refs.

  20. Narratives of the double bind: Intersectionality in life stories of women of color in physics, astrophysics and astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Lily T.; Kachchaf, Rachel R.; Ong, Maria; Hodari, Apriel K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents themes on the life stories of women of color in physics, astrophysics and astronomy. Drawing from our NSF-sponsored project, Beyond the Double Bind: Women of Color in STEM, we share findings from 10 interviews and 41 extant texts (about 23 women in varied life stages). Employing intersectionality theory and narrative analysis, our study contributes a critical analysis of how the intersection of gender and race affects performance, identity, persistence and overall career and education experiences in the physical sciences. Our findings both support existing literature on women of color in STEM, as well as bring to light two major, emergent issues: the importance of activism, and school/work-life balance. This research will add to the knowledge base about strategies for retaining women of color--widely considered an untapped source of domestic talent that could fill the country's scientific workforce needs.

  1. Program report for FY 1984 and 1985 Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division of the Physics Department

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, J.B.; MacCracken, M.C.; Dickerson, M.H.; Gresho, P.M.; Luther, F.M.

    1986-08-01

    This annual report for the Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division (G-Division) summarizes the activities and highlights of the past three years, with emphasis on significant research findings in two major program areas: the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC), with its recent involvement in assessing the effects of the Chernobyl reactor accident, and new findings on the environmental consequences of nuclear war. The technical highlights of the many other research projects are also briefly reported, along with the Division's organization, budget, and publications.

  2. Relevance of β-delayed neutron data for reactor, nuclear physics and astrophysics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratz, Karl-Ludwig

    2015-02-01

    Initially, yields (or abundances) and branching ratios of β-delayed neutrons (βdn) from fission products (Pn-values) have had their main importance in nuclear reactor control. At that time, the six-group mathematical approximation of the time-dependence of βdn-data in terms of the so-called "Keepin groups" was generally accepted. Later, with the development of high-resolution neutron spectroscopy, βdn data have provided important information on nuclear-structure properties at intermediate excitation energy in nuclei far from stability, as well as in nuclear astrophysics. In this paper, I will present some examples of the βdn-studies performed by the Kernchemie Mainz group during the past three decades. This work has been recognized as an example of "broad scientific diversity" which has led to my nomination for the 2014 Hans A. Bethe prize.

  3. Relevance of β-delayed neutron data for reactor, nuclear physics and astrophysics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kratz, Karl-Ludwig

    2015-02-24

    Initially, yields (or abundances) and branching ratios of β-delayed neutrons (βdn) from fission products (P{sub n}-values) have had their main importance in nuclear reactor control. At that time, the six-group mathematical approximation of the time-dependence of βdn-data in terms of the so-called 'Keepin groups' was generally accepted. Later, with the development of high-resolution neutron spectroscopy, βdn data have provided important information on nuclear-structure properties at intermediate excitation energy in nuclei far from stability, as well as in nuclear astrophysics. In this paper, I will present some examples of the βdn-studies performed by the Kernchemie Mainz group during the past three decades. This work has been recognized as an example of 'broad scientific diversity' which has led to my nomination for the 2014 Hans A. Bethe prize.

  4. Constraining the astrophysical origin of the p-nuclei through nuclear physics and meteoritic data.

    PubMed

    Rauscher, T; Dauphas, N; Dillmann, I; Fröhlich, C; Fülöp, Zs; Gyürky, Gy

    2013-06-01

    A small number of naturally occurring, proton-rich nuclides (the p-nuclei) cannot be made in the s- and r-processes. Their origin is not well understood. Massive stars can produce p-nuclei through photodisintegration of pre-existing intermediate and heavy nuclei. This so-called γ-process requires high stellar plasma temperatures and occurs mainly in explosive O/Ne burning during a core-collapse supernova. Although the γ-process in massive stars has been successful in producing a large range of p-nuclei, significant deficiencies remain. An increasing number of processes and sites has been studied in recent years in search of viable alternatives replacing or supplementing the massive star models. A large number of unstable nuclei, however, with only theoretically predicted reaction rates are included in the reaction network and thus the nuclear input may also bear considerable uncertainties. The current status of astrophysical models, nuclear input and observational constraints is reviewed. After an overview of currently discussed models, the focus is on the possibility to better constrain those models through different means. Meteoritic data not only provide the actual isotopic abundances of the p-nuclei but can also put constraints on the possible contribution of proton-rich nucleosynthesis. The main part of the review focuses on the nuclear uncertainties involved in the determination of the astrophysical reaction rates required for the extended reaction networks used in nucleosynthesis studies. Experimental approaches are discussed together with their necessary connection to theory, which is especially pronounced for reactions with intermediate and heavy nuclei in explosive nuclear burning, even close to stability. PMID:23660558

  5. Workshop Summary: Fundamental Neutron Physics in the United States: An Opportunity in Nuclear, Particle, and Astrophysics for the Next Decade

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.

    2001-08-24

    Low-energy neutrons from reactor and spallation neutron sources have been employed in a wide variety of investigations that shed light on important issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics; in the elucidation of quantum mechanics; in the determination of fundamental constants; and in the study of fundamental symmetry violation (Appendix A, Glossary). In many cases, these experiments provide important information that is not otherwise available from accelerator-based nuclear physics facilities or high energy accelerators. An energetic research community in the United States is engaged in ''fundamental'' neutron physics. With exciting recent results, the possibility of new and upgraded sources, and a number of new experimental ideas, there is an important opportunity for outstanding science in the next decade. ''Fundamental'' neutron physics experiments are usually intensity limited. Researchers require the highest flux neutron sources available, which are either high-flux reactors (continuous sources) or spallation neutron sources (pulsed sources). The primary mission of these major facilities is neutron scattering for materials science research. Notwithstanding this condensed matter focus, essentially all neutron scattering facilities have accepted the value of an on-site fundamental physics program and have typically allocated 5 to 10% of their capabilities (i.e., beam lines) toward nuclear and particle physics research activities.

  6. Gravitational Radiation of a Vibrating Physical String as a Model for the Gravitational Emission of an Astrophysical Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Ray A.; Modanese, Giovanni

    Vibrating media offer an important testing ground for reconciling conflicts between General Relativity, Quantum Mechanics and other branches of physics. For sources like a Weber bar, the standard covariant formalism for elastic bodies can be applied. The vibrating string, however, is a source of gravitational waves which requires novel computational techniques, based on the explicit construction of a conserved and renormalized energy-momentum tensor. Renormalization (in a classical sense) is necessary to take into account the effect of external constraints, which affect the emission considerably. Our computation also relaxes usual simplifying assumptions like far-field approximation, spherical or plane wave symmetry, TT gauge and absence of internal interference. In a further step towards unification, the method is then adapted to give the radiation field of a transversal Alfven wave in a rarefied astrophysical plasma, where the tension is produced by an external static magnetic field.

  7. The Type Ia Supernova Pipeline for the Javalambre Physics of the Accelerating Universe Astrophysical Survey (J-PAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siffert, B. B.; Reis, R. R. R.; Calvão, M. O.

    2014-10-01

    The Javalambre Physics of the Accelerating Universe Astrophysical Survey (J-PAS) is an astronomical facility being built in Sierra de Javalambre, Spain. The main goal is to study the expansion of the Universe through different cosmological observables such as baryonic acoustic oscillations, type Ia supernovae and galaxy clusters. The main instrument will be a 2.5 m telescope equipped with a system of 56 narrow band filters in the optical. Here we present a sketch of the pipeline we are developing to detect type Ia supernovae with J-PAS. First we describe each individual step of the pipeline, such as image subtraction and source selection. Then we show some results we obtained when applying our pipeline to images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the ALHAMBRA survey, which had a set of narrow band filters similar to the ones that will be used by J-PAS.

  8. Black Hole Physics and Astrophysics: The GRB-Supernova Connection and URCA-1 - URCA-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffini, R.; Bernardini, M. G.; Bianco, C. L.; Vitagliano, L.; Xue, S.-S.; Chardonnet, P.; Fraschetti, F.; Gurzadyan, V.

    2006-02-01

    We outline the confluence of three novel theoretical fields in our modeling of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs): 1) the ultrarelativistic regime of a shock front expanding with a Lorentz gamma factor ~ 300; 2) the quantum vacuum polarization process leading to an electron-positron plasma originating the shock front; and 3) the general relativistic process of energy extraction from a black hole originating the vacuum polarization process. There are two different classes of GRBs: the long GRBs and the short GRBs. We here address the issue of the long GRBs. The theoretical understanding of the long GRBs has led to the detailed description of their luminosities in fixed energy bands, of their spectral features and made also possible to probe the astrophysical scenario in which they originate. We are specially interested, in this report, to a subclass of long GRBs which appear to be accompanied by a supernova explosion. We are considering two specific examples: GRB980425/SN1998bw and GRB030329/SN2003dh. While these supernovae appear to have a standard energetics of 1049 ergs, the GRBs are highly variable and can have energetics 104 - 105 times larger than the ones of the supernovae. Moreover, many long GRBs occurs without the presence of a supernova. It is concluded that in no way a GRB can originate from a supernova. The precise theoretical understanding of the GRB luminosity we present evidence, in both these systems, the existence of an independent component in the X-ray emission, usually interpreted in the current literature as part of the GRB afterglow. This component has been observed by Chandra and XMM to have a strong decay on scale of months. We have named here these two sources respectively URCA-1 and URCA-2, in honor of the work that George Gamow and Mario Shoenberg did in 1939 in this town of Urca identifying the basic mechanism, the Urca processes, leading to the process of gravitational collapse and the formation of a neutron star and a supernova. The further

  9. Dust grains in a hot gas. I - Basic physics. II - Astrophysical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, J. R.; Silk, J.

    1974-01-01

    The interaction of graphite grains with a hot gas is investigated. Detailed computations, based on experimental data and simple theoretical models are presented of the energy transfer by gas particle collisions and of the sputtering rates and grain lifetimes, as functions of gas temperature and grain radius. The electric charge on the grains is calculated, and the effect of electric forces on mechanical stability is discussed. The rate at which the gas cools by this mechanism is evaluated. The results of the work on gas-grain cooling and sputtering rates are applied to various astrophysical environments where dust and hot gas may coexist. The effect is studied of swept-up interstellar grains on the evolution of young supernova remnants, and the infrared luminosity is computed as a function of the age of the remnant. An interpretation is proposed of far-infrared sources embedded in compact H II regions or dense clouds, in terms of the supernova phenomenon, with specific application to eta Carinae. The question of the existence of dust in intergalactic matter in galaxy clusters is also reexamined.

  10. Atomic effects of beta decay in astrophysics and in elementary particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zonghua

    The bound-state beta decay of Re-187 and its application in Astrophysics is studied. There existed an uncertainty in the ratio of rhop of bound-state to continuum beta decay of Re-187 in both theory and experiment. A more definite theoretical result of rhop of approximately 1 percent is obtained by using single-configuration and multi-configuration Hartree-Fock-Dirac approximations. The results obtained are close to those obtained by Williams, Fowler, and Koonin by a modified Thomas-Fermi model. The bound-state beta decay of Re-187 at high temperatures is also studied. A generalization of the Thomas-Fermi results of various energy contributions to the ground-state energy of a neutral atom is also presented. An analytical expression for the ratio of the electron-electron to electron-nuclear interaction is obtained by the corrected Thomas-Fermi result, the ratio obtained gives a better agreement with the Hartree-Fock numerical results.

  11. Astrophysics and Space Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mould, Jeremy; Brinks, Elias; Khanna, Ramon

    2015-08-01

    Astrophysics and Space Science publishes original contributions and invited reviews covering the entire range of astronomy, astrophysics, astrophysical cosmology, planetary and space science, and the astrophysical aspects of astrobiology. This includes both observational and theoretical research, the techniques of astronomical instrumentation and data analysis, and astronomical space instrumentation. We particularly welcome papers in the general fields of high-energy astrophysics, astrophysical and astrochemical studies of the interstellar medium including star formation, planetary astrophysics, the formation and evolution of galaxies and the evolution of large scale structure in the Universe. Papers in mathematical physics or in general relativity which do not establish clear astrophysical applications will not longer be considered.The journal also publishes topical collections consisting of invited reviews and original research papers selected special issues in research fields of particular scientific interest. These consist of both invited reviews and original research papers.Conference proceedings will not be considered. All papers published in the journal are subject to thorough and strict peer-reviewing.Astrophysics and Space Science has an Impact Factor of 2.4 and features short editorial turnaround times as well as short publication times after acceptance, and colour printing free of charge. Published by Springer the journal has a very wide online dissemination and can be accessed by researchers at a very large number of institutes worldwide.

  12. Theoretical Astrophysics - Volume 1, Astrophysical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, T.

    2000-12-01

    Preface; 1. Order-of-magnitude astrophysics; 2. Dynamics; 3. Special relativity, electrodynamics and optics; 4. Basics of electromagnetic radiation; 5. Statistical mechanics; 6. Radiative processes; 7. Spectra; 8. Neutral fluids; 9. Plasma physics; 10. Gravitational dynamics; 11. General theory of relativity; 12. Basics of nuclear physics; Notes and References; Index.

  13. Computational Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Astsatryan, H. V.

    2015-07-01

    Present astronomical archives that contain billions of objects, both Galactic and extragalactic, and the vast amount of data on them allow new studies and discoveries. Astrophysical Virtual Observatories (VO) use available databases and current observing material as a collection of interoperating data archives and software tools to form a research environment in which complex research programs can be conducted. Most of the modern databases give at present VO access to the stored information, which makes possible also a fast analysis and managing of these data. Cross-correlations result in revealing new objects and new samples. Very often dozens of thousands of sources hide a few very interesting ones that are needed to be discovered by comparison of various physical characteristics. VO is a prototype of Grid technologies that allows distributed data computation, analysis and imaging. Particularly important are data reduction and analysis systems: spectral analysis, SED building and fitting, modelling, variability studies, cross correlations, etc. Computational astrophysics has become an indissoluble part of astronomy and most of modern research is being done by means of it.

  14. Advances in Small Pixel TES-Based X-Ray Microcalorimeter Arrays for Solar Physics and Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandler, S. R.; Adams, J. S.; Bailey, C. N.; Busch, S. E.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckart, M. E.; Ewin, A. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kelly, D. P.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porst, J.-P.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Wassell, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    We are developing small-pixel transition-edge-sensor (TES) for solar physics and astrophysics applications. These large format close-packed arrays are fabricated on solid silicon substrates and are designed to accommodate count-rates of up to a few hundred counts/pixel/second at a FWHM energy resolution approximately 2 eV at 6 keV. We have fabricated versions that utilize narrow-line planar and stripline wiring. We present measurements of the performance and uniformity of kilo-pixel arrays, incorporating TESs with single 65-micron absorbers on a 7s-micron pitch, as well as versions with more than one absorber attached to the TES, 4-absorber and 9-absorber "Hydras". We have also fabricated a version of this detector optimized for lower energies and lower count-rate applications. These devices have a lower superconducting transition temperature and are operated just above the 40mK heat sink temperature. This results in a lower heat capacity and low thermal conductance to the heat sink. With individual single pixels of this type we have achieved a FWHM energy resolution of 0.9 eV with 1.5 keV Al K x-rays, to our knowledge the first x-ray microcalorimeter with sub-eV energy resolution. The 4-absorber and 9-absorber versions of this type achieved FWHM energy resolutions of 1.4 eV and 2.1 eV at 1.5 keV respectively. We will discuss the application of these devices for new astrophysics mission concepts.

  15. The s-process in meteoritic interstellar grains, a continuos interaction between Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallino, R.; Kaeppeler, F.; Reifarth, R.; Straniero, O.; Cristallo, S.; Davis, A. M.; Dominguez, I.

    2003-04-01

    The results of s-process nucleosynthesis calculations for Asymptotic Giant Branch stars (AGB) of different initial mass and different metallicity are discussed in the framework of stellar evolutionary models using an updated network of neutron capture cross sections. They are applied to the astrophysical interpretation of the stellar origin of meteoritic interstellar SiC grains of different populations. The neutron production is driven by the 13C(α,n)16O reaction taking place in radiative conditions during the interpulse periods in a tiny layer (13C pocket) at the top of the He- and C-rich region. A second neutron exposure is released by the reaction 22Ne(α,n)25Mg during recurrent convective thermal pulses. This neutron source is marginal in low mass AGB stars. However, it affects the final distribution of isotopes involved in branching in the s-flow. The s-enriched material is subsequently mixed with the envelope according to the efficiency of the third dredge up, and then ejected in the interstellar medium by stellar winds. Noble gases are most likely implanted in the already formed SiC grains in the protoplanetary phase. We provide strong constraints for the Ne-E(H), Kr-S and Xe-S meteoritic components as compared with stellar models. With decreasing the initial metallicity, from solar to around 1/10 solar, the s-process abundance distribution in AGB stars first feeds the Zr-peak, then the Zr-peak is partly bypassed in favor of the Ba-peak (at metallicities around one third solar), eventually the s-process distribution is peaked at the double-magic nucleus 208Pb, at the termination point of the s-path. The predicted s-process isotopic composition of all elements is strongly dependent on the metallicity, especially for isotopes involved in branchings in the s-flow. This has important impacts in discriminating the origin of subclasses Y and Z SiC grains with future NANOSIMS OR CHARISMA measurements.

  16. Resources for Computational Geophysics Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keers, Henk; Rondenay, Stéphane; Harlap, Yaël.; Nordmo, Ivar

    2014-09-01

    An important skill that students in solid Earth physics need to acquire is the ability to write computer programs that can be used for the processing, analysis, and modeling of geophysical data and phenomena. Therefore, this skill (which we call "computational geophysics") is a core part of any undergraduate geophysics curriculum. In this Forum, we share our personal experience in teaching such a course.

  17. Study of Seismic Activity Using Geophysical and Radio Physical Equipment for Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvavadze, N.; Tsereteli, N. S.

    2015-12-01

    One of the most dangerous and destructive natural hazards are earthquakes, which is confirmed by recent earthquakes such as Nepal 2015, Japan and Turkey 2011. Because of this, study of seismic activity is important. Studying any process, it is necessary to use different methods of observation, which allows us to increase accuracy of obtained data. Seismic activity is a complex problem and its study needs different types of observation methods. Two main problems of seismic activity study are: reliable instrumental observations and earthquake short-term predictions. In case of seismic risks it is necessary to have reliable accelerometer data. One of the most promising field in earthquake short-term prediction is very low frequency (VLF) electromagnetic wave propagation in ionosphere observation. To study Seismic activity of Caucasus region, was created observation complex using Accelerometer, Velocimeter and VLF electromagnetic waves received from communication stations (located in different area of the world) reflected from low ionosphere. System is created and operates at Tbilisi State University Ionosphere Observatory, near Tbilisi in Tabakhmela 42.41'70 N, 44.80'92 E, Georgia. Data obtained is sent to a local server located at M. Nodia Institute of Geophysics, TSU, for storage and processing. Diagram for complex is presented. Also data analysis methods were created and preliminary processing was done. In this paper we present some of the results: Earthquake data from ionosphere observations as well as local earthquakes recorded with accelerometer and velocimeter. Complex is first in 6 that will be placed around Georgia this year. We plan on widening network every year.

  18. Baryon isocurvature scenario in inflationary cosmology - A particle physics model and its astrophysical implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yokoyama, Jun'ichi; Suto, Yasushi

    1991-01-01

    A phenomenological model to produce isocurvature baryon-number fluctuations is proposed in the framework of inflationary cosmology. The resulting spectrum of density fluctuation is very different from the conventional Harrison-Zel'dovich shape. The model, with the parameters satisfying several requirements from particle physics and cosmology, provides an appropriate initial condition for the minimal baryon isocurvature scenario of galaxy formation discussed by Peebles.

  19. SPAN: Astronomy and astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Valerie L.; Green, James L.; Warren, Wayne H., Jr.; Lopez-Swafford, Brian

    1987-01-01

    The Space Physics Analysis Network (SPAN) is a multi-mission, correlative data comparison network which links science research and data analysis computers in the U.S., Canada, and Europe. The purpose of this document is to provide Astronomy and Astrophysics scientists, currently reachable on SPAN, with basic information and contacts for access to correlative data bases, star catalogs, and other astrophysic facilities accessible over SPAN.

  20. Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory, a government research institute founded in 1972, is located close to the villa where Galileo spent the last 11 years of his life. Under the directorship of Giorgio Abetti (1921-53) it became the growth point of Italian astrophysics with emphasis on solar physics; a tradition continued by his successor Guglielmo Righini (1953-78). Since 1978 the activities ha...

  1. News Particle Physics: ATLAS unveils mural at CERN Prize: Corti Trust invites essay entries Astrophysics: CERN holds cosmic-ray conference Researchers in Residence: Lord Winston returns to school Music: ATLAS scientists record physics music Conference: Champagne flows at Reims event Competition: Students triumph at physics olympiad Teaching: Physics proves popular in Japanese schools Forthcoming Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    Particle Physics: ATLAS unveils mural at CERN Prize: Corti Trust invites essay entries Astrophysics: CERN holds cosmic-ray conference Researchers in Residence: Lord Winston returns to school Music: ATLAS scientists record physics music Conference: Champagne flows at Reims event Competition: Students triumph at physics olympiad Teaching: Physics proves popular in Japanese schools Forthcoming Events

  2. Integrated geophysical surveys on waste dumps: evaluation of physical parameters to characterize an urban waste dump (four case studies in Italy).

    PubMed

    Cardarelli, Ettore; Di Filippo, Gerardina

    2004-10-01

    Geophysical surveys were carried out on different waste dumps to evaluate key geometric and physical parameters. Depending on the dump dimensions and physical characteristics different geophysical techniques were used. Vertical electrical sounding, electrical resistivity tomography, induced polarization and seismic refraction techniques were integrated to eliminate the non-uniqueness of solutions and for a better understanding of the results. Physical parameters inside and outside the dumps were compared. The change of physical parameters such as resistivity, chargeability, and P-wave velocity allowed evaluation of waste dump geometry, leachate saturation levels, and thickness of waste. Furthermore, in illegal dumps, the size and waste type disposed could be evaluated. Calculated results were compared with plans and book-keeping from the dumps investigated. PMID:15560444

  3. The physical and infrared spectral properties of CO2 in astrophysical ice analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, S. A.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1990-01-01

    Results of measurements of the infrared spectroscopic and condensation-vaporization properties of CO2 in pure and mixed ices are presented. Detailed examination of five infrared CO2 bands, 2.20, 2.78, 4.27, 15.2, and 4.39 microns, shows that the peak position, FWHM, and profile of the bands provide important information about the composition, formation, and subsequent thermal history of the ices. Absorption coefficients and their temperature dependence for all five CO2 bands are determined. The temperature dependence variation is found to be less than 15 percent from 10 to 150 K, i.e., the temperature at which H2O ice sublimes. The number of parameters associated with the physical behavior of CO2 in CO2- and H2O-rich ices, including surface binding energies, and condensation and sublimation temperatures, are determined under experimental conditions. The implications of the data obtained for cometary models are considered.

  4. Role of magnetic fields in physics and astrophysics; Proceedings of the Conference, Copenhagen, Denmark, June 5-7, 1974

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.

    1975-01-01

    The papers deal with the role of magnetism in astrophysics and the properties of matter in the presence of unusually large magnetic fields. Topics include a quantum-mechanical treatment of high-energy charged particles radiating in a homogeneous magnetic field, the solution and properties of the Dirac equation for magnetic fields of any strength up to 10 to the 13th power gauss, experimental difficulties encountered and overcome in generating megagauss fields, the effect of strong radiation damping for an ultrarelativistic charge in an external electromagnetic field, magnetic susceptibilities of nuclei and elementary particles, and Compton scattering in strong external electromagnetic fields. Other papers examine static uniform electric and magnetic polarizabilities of the vacuum in arbitrarily strong magnetic fields, quantum-mechanical processes in neutron stars, basic ideas of mean-field magnetohydrodynamics, helical MHD turbulence, relations between cosmic and laboratory plasma physics, and insights into the nature of magnetism provided by relativity and cosmology. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  5. PREFACE: 2nd International Workshop on Theoretical and Computational Physics (IWTCP-2): Modern Methods and Latest Results in Particle Physics, Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics and the 39th National Conference on Theoretical Physics (NCTP-39)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Trinh Xuan; Ky, Nguyen Anh; Lan, Nguyen Tri; Viet, Nguyen Ai

    2015-06-01

    This volume contains selected papers presented at the 2nd International Workshop on Theoretical and Computational Physics (IWTCP-2): Modern Methods and Latest Results in Particle Physics, Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics and the 39th National Conference on Theoretical Physics (NCTP-39). Both the workshop and the conference were held from 28th - 31st July 2014 in Dakruco Hotel, Buon Ma Thuot, Dak Lak, Vietnam. The NCTP-39 and the IWTCP-2 were organized under the support of the Vietnamese Theoretical Physics Society, with a motivation to foster scientific exchanges between the theoretical and computational physicists in Vietnam and worldwide, as well as to promote high-standard level of research and education activities for young physicists in the country. The IWTCP-2 was also an External Activity of the Asia Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics (APCTP). About 100 participants coming from nine countries participated in the workshop and the conference. At the IWTCP-2 workshop, we had 16 invited talks presented by international experts, together with eight oral and ten poster contributions. At the NCTP-39, three invited talks, 15 oral contributions and 39 posters were presented. We would like to thank all invited speakers, participants and sponsors for making the workshop and the conference successful. Trinh Xuan Hoang, Nguyen Anh Ky, Nguyen Tri Lan and Nguyen Ai Viet

  6. The physical and infrared spectral properties of CO2 in astrophysical ice analogs.

    PubMed

    Sandford, S A; Allamandola, L J

    1990-05-20

    Both laboratory measurements and theory indicate that CO2 should be a common component in interstellar ices. We show that the exact band position, width, and profile of the solid-state 12CO2 infrared bands near 3705, 3600, 2340, and 660 cm-1 (2.70, 2.78, 4.27, and 15.2 micrometers) and the 13CO2 band near 2280 cm-1 (4.39 micrometers) are dependent on the matrix in which the CO2 is frozen. Measurements of these bands in astronomical spectra can be used to determine column densities of solid-state CO2 and provide important information on the physical conditions present in the ice grains of which the CO2 is a part. Depending on the composition of the ice, the CO2 asymmetric stretching band was observed to vary from 2328.7 to 2346.0 cm-1 and have full widths at half-maxima (FWHMs) ranging from 4.7 to 29.9 cm-1. The other CO2 bands showed similar variations. Both position and width are also concentration dependent. Absorption coefficients were determined for the five CO2 bands. These were found to be temperature independent for CO2 in CO and CO2 matrices but varied slightly with temperature for CO2 in H2O-rich ices. For all five bands this variation was found to be less than 15% from 10 to 150 K, the temperature at which H2O ice sublimes. A number of parameters associated with the physical behavior of CO2 in CO2- and H2O-rich ices were also determined. The CO2-CO2 surface binding energy in pure CO2 ices is found to be (delta Hs/k) = 2690 +/- 50 K. CO2-H2O and CO-H2O surface binding energies were determined to be (delta Hs/k) = 2860 +/- 200 K and 1740 +/- 100 K, respectively. Under our experimental conditions, CO2 condenses in measurable quantities into H2O-rich ices at temperatures up to 100 K, only slightly higher than the temperature at which pure CO2 condenses. Once frozen into an H2O-rich ice, the subsequent loss of CO2 upon warming is highly dependent on concentration. For ices with H2O/CO2 > 20, the CO is physically trapped within the H2O lattice, and little CO2

  7. J-PAS: The Javalambre-Physics of the Accelerated Universe Astrophysical Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benítez, N.; Dupke, R.; Moles, M.; Sodré, L.; Cenarro, A. J.; Marín Franch, A.; Taylor, K.; Cristóbal, D.; Fernández-Soto, A.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.; Cepa-Nogué, J.; Abramo, L. R.; Alcaniz, J. S.; Overzier, R.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Alfaro, E. J.; Kanaan, A.; Carvano, M.; Reis, R. R. R.; J-PAS Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    J-PAS is a Spanish-Brazilian 8500 deg^2 Cosmological Survey which will be carried out from the Javalambre Observatory with a purpose-built, dedicated 2.5 m telescope and a 4.7 deg^2 camera with 1.2 Gpix. Starting in 2015, J-PAS will use 59 filters to measure high precision 0.003(1+z) photometric redshifts for 90M galaxies plus several million QSOs, about 50 times more than the largest current spectroscopic survey, sampling an effective volume of ˜ 14 Gpc^3 up to z=1.3. J-PAS will not only be first radial BAO experiment to reach Stage IV; it will also detect and measure the mass of 7× 10^5 galaxy clusters and groups, setting constrains on Dark Energy which rival those obtained from BAO measurements. The combination of a set of 145 Å NB filters, placed 100 Å apart, and a multi-degree field of view is a powerful ``redshift machine'', equivalent to a 4000 multiplexing spectrograph, but many times cheaper to build. The J-PAS camera is equivalent to a very large, 4.7 deg^2 ``IFU'', which will produce a time-resolved, 3D image of the Northern Sky with a very wide range of scientific applications in Galaxy Evolution, Stellar Physics and the Solar System.

  8. The use and misuse of statistical analyses. [in geophysics and space physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiff, P. H.

    1983-01-01

    The statistical techniques most often used in space physics include Fourier analysis, linear correlation, auto- and cross-correlation, power spectral density, and superposed epoch analysis. Tests are presented which can evaluate the significance of the results obtained through each of these. Data presented without some form of error analysis are frequently useless, since they offer no way of assessing whether a bump on a spectrum or on a superposed epoch analysis is real or merely a statistical fluctuation. Among many of the published linear correlations, for instance, the uncertainty in the intercept and slope is not given, so that the significance of the fitted parameters cannot be assessed.

  9. Simultaneous physical retrieval of Martian geophysical parameters using Thermal Emission Spectrometer spectra: the φ-MARS algorithm.

    PubMed

    Liuzzi, Giuliano; Masiello, Guido; Serio, Carmine; Fonti, Sergio; Mancarella, Francesca; Roush, Ted L

    2015-03-20

    In this paper, we present a new methodology for the simultaneous retrieval of surface and atmospheric parameters of Mars. The methodology is essentially based on similar codes implemented for high-resolution instruments looking at Earth, supported by a statistical retrieval procedure used to initialize the physical retrieval algorithm with a reliable first guess of the atmospheric parameters. The methodology has been customized for the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES), which is a low-resolution interferometer. However, with minor changes to the forward and inverse modules, it is applicable to any instrument looking at Mars, and with particular effectiveness to high-resolution instruments. The forward module is a monochromatic radiative transfer model with the capability to calculate analytical Jacobians of any desired geophysical parameter. In the present work, we describe the general methodology and its application to a large sample of TES spectra. Results are drawn for the case of surface temperature and emissivity, atmospheric temperature profile, water vapor, and dust and ice mixing ratios. Comparison with climate models and other TES data analyses show very good agreement and consistency. PMID:25968519

  10. ON THE PHYSICS OF GALVANIC SOURCE ELECTROMAGNETIC GEOPHYSICAL METHODS FOR TERRESTRIAL AND MARINE EXPLORATION

    SciTech Connect

    David Alumbaugh and Evan Um

    2007-06-27

    A numerical study was conducted to investigate the governing physics of galvanic source electromagnetic (EM) methods for terrestrial and marine exploration scenarios. The terrestrial exploration scenario involves the grounded electric dipole source EM (GESTEM) method and the examination of how the GESTEM method can resolve a thin resistive layer representing underground gas and/or hydrocarbon storage. Numerical modeling studies demonstrate that the loop transient EM (TEM) and magnetotelluric (MT) methods are insensitive to a thin horizontal resistor at depth because they utilize horizontal currents. In contrast to these standard EM methods, the GESTEM method generates both vertical and horizontal transient currents. The vertical transient current interacts with a thin horizontal resistor and causes charge buildup on its surface. These charges produce a measurable perturbation in the surface electric field at early time. The degree of perturbation depends on source waveform. When the GESTEM method is energized with step-off waveform, the perturbation due to a thin horizontal resistor is small. This is because the step-off waveform mainly consists of low frequency signals. An alternative is taking the time-derivative of the step-off responses to approximate the impulse response which includes higher frequency signals. In order to improve degree of perturbation especially due to a localized small 3-D resistor, the diffusion angle of the vertical transient current, 45 should be considered to make vertical currents coupled to a resistive target efficiently. The major drawback of the GESTEM method lies in the fact that GESTEM sounding can not be interpreted using 1-D inversion schemes if there is near-surface inhomogeneity. The marine exploration scenario investigates the physics of marine frequency-domain controlled source EM (FDCSEM) and time-domain controlled source EM (TDCSEM) methods to explore resistive hydrocarbon reservoirs in marine environments. Unlike the

  11. Experimental Investigations of the Physical and Optical Properties of Individual Micron/Submicron-Size Dust Grains in Astrophysical Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.

    2014-01-01

    Dust grains constitute a significant component of matter in the universe, and play an important and crucial role in the formation and evolution of the stellar/planetary systems in interstellar dust clouds. Knowledge of physical and optical properties of dust grains is required for understanding of a variety of processes in astrophysical and planetary environments. The currently available and generally employed data on the properties of dust grains is based on bulk materials, with analytical models employed to deduce the corresponding values for individual small micron/submicron-size dust grains. However, it has been well-recognized over a long period, that the properties of individual smallsize dust grains may be very different from those deduced from bulk materials. This has been validated by a series of experimental investigations carried out over the last few years, on a laboratory facility based on an Electrodynamic Balance at NASA, which permits levitation of single small-size dust grains of desired composition and size, in vacuum, in simulated space environments. In this paper, we present a brief review of the results of a series of selected investigations carried out on the analogs of interstellar and planetary dust grains, as well as dust grains obtained by Apollo-l1-17 lunar missions. The selected investigations, with analytical results and discussions, include: (a) Direct measurements of radiation on individual dust grains (b) Rotation and alignments of dust grains by radiative torque (c) Charging properties of dust grains by: (i) UV Photo-electric emissions (ii) Electron Impact. The results from these experiments are examined in the light of the current theories of the processes involved.

  12. Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.C.

    1992-12-31

    The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized.

  13. Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized.

  14. VINE-A NUMERICAL CODE FOR SIMULATING ASTROPHYSICAL SYSTEMS USING PARTICLES. I. DESCRIPTION OF THE PHYSICS AND THE NUMERICAL METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzstein, M.; Nelson, Andrew F.; Naab, T.; Burkert, A.

    2009-10-01

    We present a numerical code for simulating the evolution of astrophysical systems using particles to represent the underlying fluid flow. The code is written in Fortran 95 and is designed to be versatile, flexible, and extensible, with modular options that can be selected either at the time the code is compiled or at run time through a text input file. We include a number of general purpose modules describing a variety of physical processes commonly required in the astrophysical community and we expect that the effort required to integrate additional or alternate modules into the code will be small. In its simplest form the code can evolve the dynamical trajectories of a set of particles in two or three dimensions using a module which implements either a Leapfrog or Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg integrator, selected by the user at compile time. The user may choose to allow the integrator to evolve the system using individual time steps for each particle or with a single, global time step for all. Particles may interact gravitationally as N-body particles, and all or any subset may also interact hydrodynamically, using the smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) method by selecting the SPH module. A third particle species can be included with a module to model massive point particles which may accrete nearby SPH or N-body particles. Such particles may be used to model, e.g., stars in a molecular cloud. Free boundary conditions are implemented by default, and a module may be selected to include periodic boundary conditions. We use a binary 'Press' tree to organize particles for rapid access in gravity and SPH calculations. Modules implementing an interface with special purpose 'GRAPE' hardware may also be selected to accelerate the gravity calculations. If available, forces obtained from the GRAPE coprocessors may be transparently substituted for those obtained from the tree, or both tree and GRAPE may be used as a combination GRAPE/tree code. The code may be run without

  15. Laboratory Astrophysics White Paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickhouse, Nancy; Federman, Steve; Kwong, Victor; Salama, Farid; Savin, Daniel; Stancil, Phillip; Weingartner, Joe; Ziurys, Lucy

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory astrophysics and complementary theoretical calculations are the foundations of astronomical and planetary research and will remain so for many generations to come. From the level of scientific conception to that of the scientific return, it is our understanding of the underlying processes that allows us to address fundamental questions regarding the origins and evolution of galaxies, stars, planetary systems, and life in the cosmos. In this regard, laboratory astrophysics is much like detector and instrument development at NASA and NSF; these efforts are necessary for the astronomical research being funded by the agencies. The NASA Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop met at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) from 14-16 February, 2006 to identify the current laboratory data needed to support existing and future NASA missions and programs in the Astrophysics Division of the Science Mission Directorate (SMD). Here we refer to both laboratory and theoretical work as laboratory astrophysics unless a distinction is necessary. The format for the Workshop involved invited talks by users of laboratory data, shorter contributed talks and poster presentations by both users and providers that highlighted exciting developments in laboratory astrophysics, and breakout sessions where users and providers discussed each others' needs and limitations. We also note that the members of the Scientific Organizing Committee are users as well as providers of laboratory data. As in previous workshops, the focus was on atomic, molecular, and solid state physics.

  16. Recognition of compact astrophysical objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogelman, H. (Editor); Rothschild, R. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    NASA's Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics and the Dept. of Physics and Astrophysics at the Univ. of Md. collaberated on a graduate level course with this title. This publication is an edited version of notes used as the course text. Topics include stellar evolution, pulsars, binary stars, X-ray signatures, gamma ray sources, and temporal analysis of X-ray data.

  17. Geophysical and physical measurements applied to characterize an area prone to quick clay landslides in SW Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas-Romero, Silvia; Malehmir, Alireza; Snowball, Ian; Lougheed, Bryan C.; Hellqvist, Magnus

    2014-05-01

    The study of quick clay landslides in Nordic countries, such as Sweden and Norway, is wide and varied. However, the occurrence of catastrophes like those in Munkedal, Sweden, in 2006, demands a more complete characterization of these materials and their extensiveness. The objectives of this research are mainly focused on obtaining information about the properties and behavior of quick clays in an area prone to landslides in southwestern Sweden. Two fieldwork campaigns were carried out in 2011 and 2013, using methods such as 2D and 3D P-wave and S-wave seismic, geoelectrics, controlled-source and radio-magnetotellurics, ground gravity, as well as downhole geophysics (measuring fluid temperature and conductivity, gamma radiation, sonic velocity and resistivity) performed in three boreholes located in the study area. Drill cores recovered using the SONIC technique provided samples for paleontological information, as well as laboratory measurements of physical properties of the subsurface materials to a maximum subsurface depth of about 60 m. The laboratory measurements included grain size analysis, mineral magnetic properties, electric conductivity, pH, salinity, total dissolved solids, x-ray fluorescence (XRF), and a reconnaissance study of the fossil content. A correlation study of the downhole geophysical measurements, 2D seismic sections located at the intersection with the boreholes and the sample observations indicated that the presence of quick clays is associated with contacts with coarse-grained materials. Although the PVC casing of the boreholes interferes with the sonic and resistivity measurements, the perforated parts of the PVC casing show significant changes. The most important variations in magnetic susceptibility and conductivity mostly coincide with these coarse-grained layers, supporting the seismic data. Coarse-grained layers are characterized by enhanced magnetic susceptibility and conductivity. Grain size analysis results on subsamples from the

  18. Astrophysics: An Integrative Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutsche, Graham D.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a one semester course in introductory stellar astrophysics at the advanced undergraduate level. The course aims to integrate all previously learned physics by applying it to the study of stars. After a brief introductory section on basic astronomical measurements, the main topics covered are stellar atmospheres, stellar structure, and…

  19. Agricultural Geophysics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The four geophysical methods predominantly used for agricultural purposes are resistivity, electromagnetic induction, ground penetrating radar (GPR), and time domain reflectometry (TDR). Resistivity and electromagnetic induction methods are typically employed to map lateral variations of apparent so...

  20. Exploration Geophysics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savit, Carl H.

    1978-01-01

    Expansion of activity and confirmation of new technological directions characterized several fields of exploration geophysics in 1977. Advances in seismic-reflection exploration have been especially important. (Author/MA)

  1. Exploration Geophysics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espey, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    Describes geophysical techniques such as seismic, gravity, and magnetic surveys of offshare acreage, and land-data gathering from a three-dimensional representation made from closely spaced seismic lines. (MLH)

  2. Preliminary Physical Stratigraphy and Geophysical Data of the USGS Hope Plantation Core (BE-110), Bertie County, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weems, Robert E.; Seefelt, Ellen L.; Wrege, Beth M.; Self-Trail, Jean M.; Prowell, David C.; Durand, Colleen; Cobbs, Eugene F., III; McKinney, Kevin C.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction In March and April, 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the North Carolina Geological Survey (NCGS) and the Raleigh Water Resources Discipline (WRD), drilled a stratigraphic test hole and well in Bertie County, North Carolina (fig. 1). The Hope Plantation test hole (BE-110-2004) was cored on the property of Hope Plantation near Windsor, North Carolina. The drill site is located on the Republican 7.5 minute quadradrangle at lat 36?01'58'N., long 78?01'09'W. (decimal degrees 36.0329 and 77.0192) (fig. 2). The altitude of the site is 48 ft above mean sea level as determined by Paulin Precise altimeter. This test hole was continuously cored by Eugene F. Cobbs, III and Kevin C. McKinney (USGS) to a total depth of 1094.5 ft. Later, a ground water observation well was installed with a screened interval between 315-329 feet below land surface (fig. 3). Upper Triassic, Lower Cretaceous, Upper Cretaceous, Tertiary, and Quaternary sediments were recovered from the site. The core is stored at the NCGS Coastal Plain core storage facility in Raleigh, North Carolina. In this report, we provide the initial lithostratigraphic summary recorded at the drill site along with site core photographs, data from the geophysical logger, calcareous nannofossil biostratigraphic correlations (Table 1) and initial hydrogeologic interpretations. The lithostratigraphy from this core can be compared to previous investigations of the Elizabethtown corehole, near Elizabethtown, North Carolina in Bladen County (Self-Trail, Wrege, and others, 2004), the Kure Beach corehole, near Wilmington, North Carolina in New Hanover County (Self-Trail, Prowell, and Christopher, 2004), the Esso #1, Esso #2, Mobil #1 and Mobil #2 cores in the Albermarle and Pamlico Sounds (Zarra, 1989), and the Cape Fear River outcrops in Bladen County (Farrell, 1998; Farrell and others, 2001). This core is the third in a series of planned benchmark coreholes that will be used to elucidate the

  3. Geophysical Institute. Biennial report, 1993-1994

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    The 1993-1994 Geophysical Institute Biennial Report was published in November 1995 by the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. It contains an overview of the Geophysical Institute, the Director`s Note, and research presentations concerning the following subjects: scientific predictions, space physics, atmospheric sciences, snow, ice and permafrost, tectonics and sedimentation, seismology, volcanology, remote sensing, and other projects.

  4. Geophysical Institute. Biennial report, 1993-1994

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    The 1993-1994 Geophysical Institute Biennial Report was published in November 1995 by the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. It contains an overview of the Geophysical Institute, the Director`s Note, and research presentations concerning the following subjects: Scientific Predictions, Space Physics, Atmospheric Sciences, Snow, Ice and Permafrost, Tectonics and Sedimentation, Seismology, Volcanology, Remote Sensing, and other projects.

  5. Extreme Scale Computational Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, Deirdre

    2009-11-01

    We live in extraordinary times. With increasingly sophisticated observatories opening up new vistas on the universe, astrophysics is becoming more complex and data-driven. The success in understanding astrophysical systems that are inherently multi-physical, nonlinear systems demands realism in our models of the phenomena. We cannot hope to advance the realism of these models to match the expected sophistication of future observations without extreme-scale computation. Just one example is the advent of gravitational wave astronomy. Detectors like LIGO are about to make the first ever detection of gravitational waves. The gravitational waves are produced during violent events such as the merger of two black holes. The detection of these waves or ripples in the fabric of spacetime is a formidable undertaking, requiring innovative engineering, powerful data analysis tools and careful theoretical modeling. I will discuss the computational and theoretical challenges ahead in our new understanding of physics and astronomy where gravity exhibits its strongest grip on our spacetime.

  6. Augmented Reality in astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Frédéric P. A.; Shingles, Luke J.

    2013-09-01

    Augmented Reality consists of merging live images with virtual layers of information. The rapid growth in the popularity of smartphones and tablets over recent years has provided a large base of potential users of Augmented Reality technology, and virtual layers of information can now be attached to a wide variety of physical objects. In this article, we explore the potential of Augmented Reality for astrophysical research with two distinct experiments: (1) Augmented Posters and (2) Augmented Articles. We demonstrate that the emerging technology of Augmented Reality can already be used and implemented without expert knowledge using currently available apps. Our experiments highlight the potential of Augmented Reality to improve the communication of scientific results in the field of astrophysics. We also present feedback gathered from the Australian astrophysics community that reveals evidence of some interest in this technology by astronomers who experimented with Augmented Posters. In addition, we discuss possible future trends for Augmented Reality applications in astrophysics, and explore the current limitations associated with the technology. This Augmented Article, the first of its kind, is designed to allow the reader to directly experiment with this technology.

  7. Laboratory astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, P.T.; Goldstein, W.H.; Iglesias, C.A.; Wilson, B.G.; Rogers, F.J.; Stewart, R.E.

    1995-05-01

    We propose an experiment to test opacity models for stellar atmospheres. Particularly important is to perform experiments at very low density and temperature where line shape treatments give large differences in Rosseland mean opacities for astrophysical mixtures, and to test the range of validity for the unresolved transition array treatments. Experimental requirements are ultra high spectral resolution combined with large homogenous plasma sources lasting tens of nanoseconds, and with Planckian radiation fields. These requirements dovetail nicely with emerging pulsed power capabilities. We propose a high resolution measurement of the frequency dependent opacity, for ultra low density iron plasmas in radiatively driven equilibrium plasmas.

  8. Highlights of Spanish Astrophysics VII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guirado, J. C.; Lara, L. M.; Quilis, V.; Gorgas, J.

    2013-05-01

    "Highlights of Astronomy and Astrophysics VII" contains the Proceedings of the biannual meeting of the Spanish Astronomical Society held in Valencia from July 9 to 13, 2012. Over 300 astronomer, both national and international researchers, attended to the conference covering a wide variety of astrophysical topics: Galaxies and Cosmology, The Milky Way and Its Components, Planetary Sciences, Solar Physics, Instrumentation and Computation, and Teaching and Outreach of Astronomy.

  9. 16th Young Scientists' Conference on Astronomy and Space Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choliy, V. Ya.; Ivashchenko, G.

    2009-12-01

    The present Proceedings of Contributed Papers include 23 papers presented during 16th Young Scientists' Conference on Astronomy and Space Physics which was held at the Faculty of Physics of National Taras Shevchenko University of Kyiv, from April 27 till May, 2, 2009. The aim of the annual Open Young Scientists' Conference on Astronomy and Space Physics is to provide young scientists a possibility to communicate and present their scientific work. The conference is intended for participation of students, PhD students and young researches who are involved in research in one of the following fields: positional astronomy and astronomical equipment, atmospheric studies and geophysics, plasma physics and physics of the near space, planetary systems and small bodies, solar physics and physics of heliosphere, stellar astrophysics, interstellar and intergalactic medium, extragalactic astrophysics, high-energy astrophysics, cosmology, computers in astronomy and related to the mentioned above.

  10. 15th Young Scientists' Conference on Astronomy and Space Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choliy, V. Ya.; Ivashchenko, G.

    2008-12-01

    The present Proceedings of Contributed Papers include 19 papers presented during 15th Young Scientists' Conference on Astronomy and Space Physics which was held in Kyiv, at Kyiv National Taras Shevchenko University, Faculty of Physics, from April, 14 till April, 19, 2008. The aim of the annual Open Young Scientists' Conference on Astronomy and Space Physics is to provide young scientists a possibility to communicate and present their scientific work. The conference is intended for participation of students, PhD students and young researches who are involved in research in one of the following fields: astrometry and geophysics, plasma physics and physics of the near space, planetary systems, small bodies of the solar system, solar physics and physics of heliosphere, stellar astrophysics, interstellar medium, extragalactic astrophysics, high-energy astrophysics, cosmology, and related to the mentioned above.

  11. 14th Young Scientists Conference on Astronomy and Space Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashchenko, G.; Golovin, A.

    2007-12-01

    The present Proceedings of Contributed Papers include 21 papers presented during 14th Young Scientists Conference on Astronomy and Space Physics which was held in Kyiv, at Kyiv National Taras Shevchenko University, Faculty of Physics, from April, 23 to April 28, 2007. The aim of the annual Open Young Scientists Conference on Astronomy and Space Physics is to provide young scientists a possibility to communicate and present their scientific work. The conference is intended for participation of students, PhD students and young researches who are involved in research in one of the following fields: astrometry and geophysics, plasma physics and physics of the near space, planetary systems, small bodies of the solar system, solar physics and physics of heliosphere, stellar astrophysics, interstellar medium, extragalactic astrophysics, high-energy astrophysics, cosmology, history of astronomy and related to the mentioned above.

  12. Frontier Research in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovanelli, Franco; Sabau-Graziati, Lola

    We want to join about 90 colleagues from the whole world involved in various topics of modern Astrophysics and Particle Physics in order to discuss the most recent experimental and theoretical results for an advance in the comprehension of the Physics governing our Universe. For reaching the aim of the workshop the idea is to use ground- and space-based experimental developments, theoretical developments AND the coming out science results which have already resulted OR WILL result into high impact science papers. The following items will be reviewed: Cosmology: Cosmic Background, Dark Matter, Dark Energy, Clusters of Galaxies. Physics of the Diffuse Cosmic Sources. Physics of Cosmic Rays. Physics of Discrete Cosmic Sources. Extragalactic Sources: Active Galaxies, Normal Galaxies, Gamma-Ray Bursts. Galactic Sources: Star Formation, Pre-Main-Sequence and Main-Sequence Stars, Cataclysmic Variables and Novae, Supernovae and SNRs, X-Ray Binary Systems, Pulsars, Black Holes, Gamma-Ray Sources, Nucleosynthesis. Future Physics and Astrophysics: Ongoing and Planned Ground- and Space-based Experiments. The workshop will include few 40-minute general review talks to introduce the current problems, and typically 20-minute talks discussing new experimental and theoretical results. A series of 15-minute talks will discuss the ongoing and planned ground- and space-based experiments. The cadence of the workshop will be biennial. The participation will be only by invitation. Editors: Franco Giovannelli and Lola Sabau-Graziati

  13. Nucleosynthesis and its implications on nuclear and particle physics; Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop (Fifth Moriond Astrophysics Meeting), Les Arcs, France, March 17-23, 1985

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audouze, J.; Mathieu, N.

    The chemical composition of the universe is discussed in detail as a function of evolutionary and nucleosynthetic processes and astrophysical and laboratory observations. Consideration is given to recent theoretical work on primordial nucleosynthesis and the events occurring at atomic levels in explosive objects such as supernovae, WR stars and pancake stars. Attempts to understand s-process nucleosynthetic species production and production rates on the bases of observational data, theoretical models and laboratory studies are reported. The relative values of various nucleocosmochronometric isotopic pairs for assessing the age of the Galaxy are assessed, noting the role of WR stars in the production of short-lived isotopes such as Al-26. Various nuclear physics problems which are relevant to nucleosynthesis and cosmology are discussed and current attempts to detect neutrinos and monopoles are described.

  14. Astrophysics at the Highest Energy Frontiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    I discuss recent advances being made in the physics and astrophysics of cosmic rays and cosmic gamma-rays at the highest observed energies as well as the related physics and astrophysics of very high energy cosmic neutrinos. I also discuss the connections between these topics.

  15. Astrophysical fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvie, Gordon I.

    2016-06-01

    These lecture notes and example problems are based on a course given at the University of Cambridge in Part III of the Mathematical Tripos. Fluid dynamics is involved in a very wide range of astrophysical phenomena, such as the formation and internal dynamics of stars and giant planets, the workings of jets and accretion discs around stars and black holes and the dynamics of the expanding Universe. Effects that can be important in astrophysical fluids include compressibility, self-gravitation and the dynamical influence of the magnetic field that is `frozen in' to a highly conducting plasma. The basic models introduced and applied in this course are Newtonian gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) for an ideal compressible fluid. The mathematical structure of the governing equations and the associated conservation laws are explored in some detail because of their importance for both analytical and numerical methods of solution, as well as for physical interpretation. Linear and nonlinear waves, including shocks and other discontinuities, are discussed. The spherical blast wave resulting from a supernova, and involving a strong shock, is a classic problem that can be solved analytically. Steady solutions with spherical or axial symmetry reveal the physics of winds and jets from stars and discs. The linearized equations determine the oscillation modes of astrophysical bodies, as well as their stability and their response to tidal forcing.

  16. Astrophysical fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvie, Gordon I.

    2016-06-01

    > These lecture notes and example problems are based on a course given at the University of Cambridge in Part III of the Mathematical Tripos. Fluid dynamics is involved in a very wide range of astrophysical phenomena, such as the formation and internal dynamics of stars and giant planets, the workings of jets and accretion discs around stars and black holes and the dynamics of the expanding Universe. Effects that can be important in astrophysical fluids include compressibility, self-gravitation and the dynamical influence of the magnetic field that is `frozen in' to a highly conducting plasma. The basic models introduced and applied in this course are Newtonian gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) for an ideal compressible fluid. The mathematical structure of the governing equations and the associated conservation laws are explored in some detail because of their importance for both analytical and numerical methods of solution, as well as for physical interpretation. Linear and nonlinear waves, including shocks and other discontinuities, are discussed. The spherical blast wave resulting from a supernova, and involving a strong shock, is a classic problem that can be solved analytically. Steady solutions with spherical or axial symmetry reveal the physics of winds and jets from stars and discs. The linearized equations determine the oscillation modes of astrophysical bodies, as well as their stability and their response to tidal forcing.

  17. Physical bases of the generation of short-term earthquake precursors: A complex model of ionization-induced geophysical processes in the lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere-magnetosphere system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulinets, S. A.; Ouzounov, D. P.; Karelin, A. V.; Davidenko, D. V.

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the current understanding of the interaction between geospheres from a complex set of physical and chemical processes under the influence of ionization. The sources of ionization involve the Earth's natural radioactivity and its intensification before earthquakes in seismically active regions, anthropogenic radioactivity caused by nuclear weapon testing and accidents in nuclear power plants and radioactive waste storage, the impact of galactic and solar cosmic rays, and active geophysical experiments using artificial ionization equipment. This approach treats the environment as an open complex system with dissipation, where inherent processes can be considered in the framework of the synergistic approach. We demonstrate the synergy between the evolution of thermal and electromagnetic anomalies in the Earth's atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere. This makes it possible to determine the direction of the interaction process, which is especially important in applications related to short-term earthquake prediction. That is why the emphasis in this study is on the processes proceeding the final stage of earthquake preparation; the effects of other ionization sources are used to demonstrate that the model is versatile and broadly applicable in geophysics.

  18. Molecular astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzberg, G.

    1989-01-01

    A brief history of Molecular Astrophysics is presented. The first molecules in space were identified in the 1920s in comets followed soon after by those in planetary atmospheres. The recent identification by MCKELLAR of the dimer of H 2, that is, (H 2) 2 in the atmosphere of Jupiter as well as the discovery, by DROSSART, MAILLARD, WATSON and others, of the H 3+ ion in the auroral zone of Jupiter are described. In this laboratory there is a continuing interest in interstellar molecules. Several molecules and molecular ions were observed by collaboration of laboratory spectroscopists and astronomers. Only the most recent ones are discussed. Also a few of the molecules not yet observed but likely to be observed are mentioned.

  19. Computational astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Richard H.

    1987-01-01

    Astronomy is an area of applied physics in which unusually beautiful objects challenge the imagination to explain observed phenomena in terms of known laws of physics. It is a field that has stimulated the development of physical laws and of mathematical and computational methods. Current computational applications are discussed in terms of stellar and galactic evolution, galactic dynamics, and particle motions.

  20. Molecular Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartquist, T. W.

    2005-07-01

    Part I. Molecular Clouds and the Distribution of Molecules in the Milky Way and Other Galaxies: 1. Molecular clouds in the Milky Way P. Friberg and A. Hjalmarson; 2. Molecules in galaxies L. Blitz; Part II. Diffuse Molecular Clouds: 3. Diffuse cloud chemistry E. F. Van Dishoeck; 4. Observations of velocity and density structure in diffuse clouds W. D. Langer; 5. Shock chemistry in diffuse clouds T. W. Hartquist, D. R. Flower and G. Pineau des Forets; Part III. Quiescent Dense Clouds: 6. Chemical modelling of quiescent dense interstellar clouds T. J. Millar; 7. Interstellar grain chemistry V. Buch; 8. Large molecules and small grains in astrophysics S. H. Lepp; Part IV. Studies of Molecular Processes: 9. Molecular photoabsorption processes K. P. Kirby; 10. Interstellar ion chemistry: laboratory studies D. Smith, N. G. Adams and E. E. Ferguson; 11. Theoretical considerations on some collisional processes D. R. Bates; 12. Collisional excitation processes E. Roueff; 13. Neutral reactions at Low and High Temperatures M. M. Graff; Part V. Atomic Species in Dense Clouds: 14. Observations of atomic species in dense clouds G. J. Melnick; 15. Ultraviolet radiation in molecular clouds W. G. Roberge; 16. Cosmic ray induced photodissociation and photoionization of interstellar molecules R. Gredel; 17. Chemistry in the molecular cloud Barnard 5 S. B. Charnley and D. A. Williams; 18. Molecular cloud structure, motions, and evolution P. C. Myers; Part VI. H in Regions of Massive Star Formation: 19. Infrared observations of line emission from molecular hydrogen T. R. Geballe; 20. Shocks in dense molecular clouds D. F. Chernoff and C. F. McKee; 21. Dissociative shocks D. A. Neufeld; 22. Infrared molecular hydrogen emission from interstellar photodissociation regions A. Sternberg; Part VII. Molecules Near Stars and in Stellar Ejecta: 23. Masers J. M. Moran; 24. Chemistry in the circumstellar envelopes around mass-losing red giants M. Jura; 25. Atoms and molecules in supernova 1987a R

  1. The Tapestry of Modern Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shore, Steven N.

    2002-10-01

    The scope of modern astrophysics is the entire cosmos and everything in it. As and substantial as its subject, The Tapestry of Modern Astrophysics provides advanced undergraduates or graduate-level students with a comprehensive introduction to the subject. Avoiding axiomatic presentations, the author combines extensive qualitative discussions with analytical treatments so that students develop physical intuition the combination of observations and theoretical "horse sense" that is necessary for research in the field. The text is particularly distinguished by its deep and broad coverage, showing the way apparently different parts of astrophysics are intimately connected. Emphasizing the physical basis of the astrophysical phenomena along with the interpretation of data, Shore covers: The physical processes common to all cosmic bodies gravitation, thermal physics, and the gas laws. Special topics include statistical mechanics of stellar systems, rate equations, and General Relativity

  2. Overview of instrumentation and data analysis methods including calibration, instrumentation, and image formation and reconstruction Radiative transfer and physical processes in stellar and planetary atmospheres. Special topics include spectral classification and techniques for treating scattering Stellar structure and evolution, energy sources, and nucleosynthesis The interstellar medium with a general introduction to radiative and hydrodynamical processes The Milky Way as a galaxy, emphasizing the connection between locally observed phenomena and broader properties of extragalactic systems, active galaxies, and clusters of galaxies Cosmology and structure formation STEVEN N. SHORE is Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Indiana University South Bend. He is a scientific editor of the Astrophysical Journal and a visiting professor at Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, University of Pisa, University of Notre Dame, and Arizona State University. He is

  3. Astrophysical Magnetic Fields and Topics in Galaxy Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Field, George B.

    1997-01-01

    The grant was used to support theoretical research on a variety of astro-physical topics falling broadly into those described by the proposal: galaxy formation, astrophysical magnetic fields, magnetized accretion disks in AGN, new physics, and other astrophysical problems. Work accomplished; references are to work authored by project personel.

  4. The Nuclear Astrophysics Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matteson, J. L.; Teegarden, B. J.; Gehrels, N.; Mahoney, W. A.

    1989-01-01

    The Nuclear Astrophysics Explorer was proposed in 1986 for NASA's Explorer Concept Study Program by an international collaboration of 25 scientists from nine institutions. The one-year feasibility study began in June 1988. The Nuclear Astrophysics Explorer would obtain high resolution observations of gamma-ray lines, E/Delta E about 1000, at a sensitivity of about 0.000003 ph/sq cm s, in order to study fundamental problems in astrophysics such as nucleosynthesis, supernovae, neutron star and black-hole physics, and particle acceleration and interactions. The instrument would operate from 15 keV to 10 Mev and use a heavily shielded array of nine cooled Ge spectrometers in a very low background configuration. Its 10 deg FWHM field of view would contain a versatile coded mask system which would provide two-dimensional imaging with 4 deg resolution, one-dimensional imaging with 2 deg resolution, and efficiendt measurements of diffuse emission. An unshielded Ge spectrometer would obtain wide-field measurements of transient gamma-ray sources. The earliest possible mission would begin in 1995.

  5. Turbulent mixing and beyond: non-equilibrium processes from atomistic to astrophysical scales

    PubMed Central

    Abarzhi, S. I.; Gauthier, S.; Sreenivasan, K. R.

    2013-01-01

    Turbulent mixing is a source of paradigm problems in physics, engineering and mathematics. Beyond this important interdisciplinary role, it has immense consequences for a broad range of applications in astrophysics, geophysics, climate and large-scale energy systems. In two volumes, we summarize and provide a perspective on the topic through some 20 articles focusing on turbulent mixing and beyond. The volumes are grouped, somewhat loosely, into those associated with fundamental aspects of turbulence and those specific to Rayleigh–Taylor turbulent mixing. PMID:23185062

  6. Texas Symposium on Relativistic Astrophysics, 11th, Austin, TX, December 12-17, 1982, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. S. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Various papers on relativistic astrophysics are presented. The general subjects addressed include: particle physics and astrophysics, general relativity, large-scale structure, big bang cosmology, new-generation telescopes, pulsars, supernovae, high-energy astrophysics, and active galaxies.

  7. Fundamentals of Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frohlich, Cliff

    Choosing an intermediate-level geophysics text is always problematic: What should we teach students after they have had introductory courses in geology, math, and physics, but little else? Fundamentals of Geophysics is aimed specifically at these intermediate-level students, and the author's stated approach is to construct a text “using abundant diagrams, a simplified mathematical treatment, and equations in which the student can follow each derivation step-by-step.” Moreover, for Lowrie, the Earth is round, not flat—the “fundamentals of geophysics” here are the essential properties of our Earth the planet, rather than useful techniques for finding oil and minerals. Thus this book is comparable in both level and approach to C. M. R. Fowler's The Solid Earth (Cambridge University Press, 1990).

  8. Structure Formation in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabrier, Gilles

    2009-01-01

    Part I. Physical Processes and Numerical Methods Common to Structure Formations in Astrophysics: 1. The physics of turbulence E. Levêque; 2. The numerical simulation of turbulence W. Schmidt; 3. Numerical methods for radiation magnetohydrodynamics in astrophysics R. Klein and J. Stone; 4. The role of jets in the formation of planets, stars, and galaxies R. Banerjee, R. Pudritz and R. Ouyed; 5. Advanced numerical methods in astrophysical fluid dynamics A. Hujeirat and F. Heitsch; Part II. Structure and Star Formation in the Primordial Universe: 6. New frontiers in cosmology and galaxy formation challenges for the future R. Ellis and J. Silk; 7. Galaxy formation physics T. Abel, G. Bryan and R. Teyssier; 8. First stars formation, evolution, feedback effects V. Bromm, A. Ferrara and A. Heger; Part III. Contemporary Star and Brown Dwarf Formation: a) Cloud Formation and Fragmentation: 9. Diffuse interstellar medium and the formation of molecular clouds P. Hennebelle, M. Mac Low and E. Vazquez-Semadeni; 10. The formation of distributed and clustered stars in molecular clouds T. Megeath, Z. -Y. Li and A. Nordlund; b) Core Fragmentation and Star Formation: 11. The formation and evolution of prestellar cores P. André, S. Basu and S. Inutsuka; 12. Models for the formation of massive stars; Part IV. Protoplanetary Disks and Planet Formation M. Krumholz and I. Bonnell: 13. Observational properties of disks and young stellar objects G. Duchêne, F. Ménard, J. Muzzerolle and S. Mohanty; 14. Structure and dynamics of protoplanetary disks C. Dullemond, R. Durisen and J. Papaloizou; 15. Planet formation and evolution theory and observation Y. Alibert, I. Baraffe, W. Benz, G. Laughlin and S. Udry; 16. Planet formation assembling the puzzle G. Wurm and T. Guillot; Part V. Summary: 17. Open issues in small- and large-scale structure formation R. Klessen and M. Mac Low; 18. Final word E. Salpeter.

  9. Structure Formation in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabrier, Gilles

    2011-02-01

    Part I. Physical Processes and Numerical Methods Common to Structure Formations in Astrophysics: 1. The physics of turbulence E. Levêque; 2. The numerical simulation of turbulence W. Schmidt; 3. Numerical methods for radiation magnetohydrodynamics in astrophysics R. Klein and J. Stone; 4. The role of jets in the formation of planets, stars, and galaxies R. Banerjee, R. Pudritz and R. Ouyed; 5. Advanced numerical methods in astrophysical fluid dynamics A. Hujeirat and F. Heitsch; Part II. Structure and Star Formation in the Primordial Universe: 6. New frontiers in cosmology and galaxy formation challenges for the future R. Ellis and J. Silk; 7. Galaxy formation physics T. Abel, G. Bryan and R. Teyssier; 8. First stars formation, evolution, feedback effects V. Bromm, A. Ferrara and A. Heger; Part III. Contemporary Star and Brown Dwarf Formation: a) Cloud Formation and Fragmentation: 9. Diffuse interstellar medium and the formation of molecular clouds P. Hennebelle, M. Mac Low and E. Vazquez-Semadeni; 10. The formation of distributed and clustered stars in molecular clouds T. Megeath, Z. -Y. Li and A. Nordlund; b) Core Fragmentation and Star Formation: 11. The formation and evolution of prestellar cores P. André, S. Basu and S. Inutsuka; 12. Models for the formation of massive stars; Part IV. Protoplanetary Disks and Planet Formation M. Krumholz and I. Bonnell: 13. Observational properties of disks and young stellar objects G. Duchêne, F. Ménard, J. Muzzerolle and S. Mohanty; 14. Structure and dynamics of protoplanetary disks C. Dullemond, R. Durisen and J. Papaloizou; 15. Planet formation and evolution theory and observation Y. Alibert, I. Baraffe, W. Benz, G. Laughlin and S. Udry; 16. Planet formation assembling the puzzle G. Wurm and T. Guillot; Part V. Summary: 17. Open issues in small- and large-scale structure formation R. Klessen and M. Mac Low; 18. Final word E. Salpeter.

  10. Nuclear theory with applications to astrophysics and particle physics. Final report, 15 January 1994--14 January 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    Many of the topics discussed here are takeoff points for projects proposed later. Brief summaries are given for the following projects: (1) time-reversal violation; (2) the rare-earth r-process bump; (3) structure of weakly bound pairs; (4) neutron-proton pairing and isospin symmetry; (5) detection of galactic dark matter; (6) iodine as a solar neutrino detector; and (7) neutrino physics at LSND.

  11. Sustainable urban development and geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lanbo; Chan, L. S.

    2007-09-01

    The new millennium has seen a fresh wave of world economic development especially in the Asian-Pacific region. This has contributed to further rapid urban expansion, creating shortages of energy and resources, degradation of the environment, and changes to climatic patterns. Large-scale, new urbanization is mostly seen in developing countries but urban sprawl is also a major social problem for developed nations. Urbanization has been accelerating at a tremendous rate. According to data collected by the United Nations [1], 50 years ago less than 30% of the world population lived in cities. Now, more than 50% are living in urban settings which occupy only about 1% of the Earth's surface. During the period from 1950 to 1995, the number of cities with a population higher than one million increased from 83 to 325. By 2025 it is estimated that more than 60% of 8.3 billion people (the projected world population [1]) will be city dwellers. Urbanization and urban sprawl can affect our living quality both positively and negatively. In recent years geophysics has found significant and new applications in highly urbanized settings. Such applications are conducive to the understanding of the changes and impacts on the physical environment and play a role in developing sustainable urban infrastructure systems. We would like to refer to this field of study as 'urban geophysics'. Urban geophysics is not simply the application of geophysical exploration in the cities. Urbanization has brought about major changes to the geophysical fields of cities, including those associated with electricity, magnetism, electromagnetism and heat. An example is the increased use of electromagnetic waves in wireless communication, transportation, office automation, and computer equipment. How such an increased intensity of electromagnetic radiation affects the behaviour of charged particles in the atmosphere, the equilibrium of ecological systems, or human health, are new research frontiers to be

  12. Preliminary physical stratigraphy, biostratigraphy, and geophysical data of the USGS South Dover Bridge Core, Talbot County, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alemán González, Wilma B.; Powars, David S.; Seefelt, Ellen L.; Edwards, Lucy E.; Self-Trail, Jean M.; Durand, Colleen T.; Schultz, Arthur P.; McLaughlin, Peter P.

    2012-01-01

    The South Dover Bridge (SDB) corehole was drilled in October 2007 in Talbot County, Maryland. The main purpose for drilling this corehole was to characterize the Upper Cretaceous and Paleogene lithostratigraphy and biostratigraphy of the aquifers and confining units of this region. The data obtained from this core also will be used as a guide to geologic mapping and to help interpret well data from the eastern part of the Washington East 1:100,000-scale map near the town of Easton, Md. Core drilling was conducted to a depth of 700 feet (ft). The Cretaceous section was not penetrated due to technical problems during drilling. This project was funded by the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) Eastern Geology and Paleoclimate Science Center (EGPSC) as part of the Geology of the Atlantic Watersheds Project; this project was carried out in cooperation with the Maryland Geological Survey (MGS) through partnerships with the Aquifer Characterization Program of the USGS’s Maryland-Delaware-District of Columbia Water Science Center and the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program. The SDB corehole was drilled by the USGS drilling crew in the northeastern corner of the Trappe 7.5-minute quadrangle, near the type locality of the Boston Cliffs member of the Choptank Formation. Geophysical logs (gamma ray, single point resistance, and 16-inch and 64-inch normal resistivity) were run to a depth of 527.5 ft; the total depth of 700.0 ft could not be reached because of the collapse of the lower part of the hole. Of the 700.0 ft drilled, 531.8 ft of core were recovered, representing a 76 percent core recovery. The elevation of the top of the corehole is approximately 12 ft above mean sea level; its coordinates are lat 38°44′49.34″N. and long 76°00′25.09″W. (38.74704N., 76.00697W. in decimal degrees). A groundwater monitoring well was not installed at this site. The South Dover Bridge corehole was the first corehole that will be used to better understand the geology and

  13. IGI (the Italian Grid initiative) and its impact on the Astrophysics community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasian, F.; Vuerli, C.; Taffoni, G.

    IGI - the Association for the Italian Grid Infrastructure - has been established as a consortium of 14 different national institutions to provide long term sustainability to the Italian Grid. Its formal predecessor, the Grid.it project, has come to a close in 2006; to extend the benefits of this project, IGI has taken over and acts as the national coordinator for the different sectors of the Italian e-Infrastructure present in EGEE. IGI plans to support activities in a vast range of scientificdisciplines - e.g. Physics, Astrophysics, Biology, Health, Chemistry, Geophysics, Economy, Finance - and any possible extensions to other sectors such as Civil Protection, e-Learning, dissemination in Universities and secondary schools. Among these, the Astrophysics community is active as a user, by porting applications of various kinds, but also as a resource provider in terms of computing power and storage, and as middleware developer.

  14. High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A

    2004-11-11

    High-energy-density (HED) physics refers broadly to the study of macroscopic collections of matter under extreme conditions of temperature and density. The experimental facilities most widely used for these studies are high-power lasers and magnetic-pinch generators. The HED physics pursued on these facilities is still in its infancy, yet new regimes of experimental science are emerging. Examples from astrophysics include work relevant to planetary interiors, supernovae, astrophysical jets, and accreting compact objects (such as neutron stars and black holes). In this paper, we will review a selection of recent results in this new field of HED laboratory astrophysics and provide a brief look ahead to the coming decade.

  15. Astrophysical implications of periodicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Richard A.

    1988-01-01

    Two remarkable discoveries of the last decade have profound implications for astrophysics and for geophysics. These are the discovery by Alvarez et al., that certain mass extinctions are caused by the impact on the earth of a large asteroid or comet, and the discovery by Raup and Sepkoski that such extinctions are periodic, with a cycle time of 26 to 30 million years. The validity of both of these discoveries is assumed and the implications are examined. Most of the phenomena described depend not on periodicity, but just on the weaker assumption that the impacts on the earth take place primarily in showers. Proposed explanations for the periodicity include galactic oscillations, the Planet X model, and the possibility of Nemesis, a solar companion star. These hypotheses are critically examined. Results of the search for the solar companion are reported. The Deccan flood basalts of India have been proposed as the impact site for the Cretaceous impact, but this hypotheisis is in contradiction with the conclusion of Courtillot et al., that the magma flow began during a period of normal magnetic field. A possible resolution of this contradiction is proposed.

  16. Flexible, Mastery-Oriented Astrophysics Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeilik, Michael, II

    1981-01-01

    Describes the implementation and impact of a two-semester mastery-oriented astrophysics sequence for upper-level physics/astrophysics majors designed to handle flexibly a wide range of student backgrounds. A Personalized System of Instruction (PSI) format was used fostering frequent student-instructor interaction and role-modeling behavior in…

  17. Astrophysics on the Lab Bench

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    In this article some basic laboratory bench experiments are described that are useful for teaching high school students some of the basic principles of stellar astrophysics. For example, in one experiment, students slam a plastic water-filled bottle down onto a bench, ejecting water towards the ceiling, illustrating the physics associated with a…

  18. Astrophysical Bounds on Particle Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffelt, G.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Ever since NEWTON proposed that the Moon on its orbit follows the same laws of motion as an apple falling from a tree, the heavens have been a favorite laboratory for testing the fundamental laws of physics, notably Newton's and EINSTEIN's theories of gravity. More recently, astrophysics and cosmology have become crucial testing grounds for the microcosm of elementary particles. This area of scie...

  19. Non-Gaussianity as a Probe of the Physics of the Primordial Universe and the Astrophysics of the Low Redshift Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Komatsu, E.; Afshordi, N.; Bartolo, N.; Baumann, D.; Bond, J.R.; Buchbinder, E.I.; Byrnes, C.T.; Chen, Xingang; Chung, D.J.H.; Cooray, A.; Creminelli, P.; Dalal, N.; Dore, O.; Easther, R.; Frolov, A.V.; Gorski, K.M.; Khoury, J.; Kinney, W.H.; Kofman, L.; Koyama, K.; Leblond, L.; /Texas A-M /Princeton U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Cambridge U., DAMTP /Columbia U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Lancaster U. /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Cornell U., Phys. Dept. /Toronto U. /Tokyo U. /Pennsylvania U. /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study /Cambridge U. /INFN, Padua /CERN /Antonio Narino U. /Santander Industrial U. /Kyoto U. /New York U. /Cambridge U., DAMTP /Saclay, SPhT /LBL, Berkeley /Zurich U. /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study /Queen Mary, U. of London /Cambridge U., DAMTP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /UC, Berkeley /Cambridge U. /Landau Inst. /Princeton U. /Tokyo U. /MIT /Perimeter Inst. Theor. Phys. /Barcelona, IEEC /Illinois U., Urbana /Portsmouth U. /Texas U. /Perimeter Inst. Theor. Phys. /Harvard U. /Harvard U.

    2011-11-14

    A new and powerful probe of the origin and evolution of structures in the Universe has emerged and been actively developed over the last decade. In the coming decade, non-Gaussianity, i.e., the study of non-Gaussian contributions to the correlations of cosmological fluctuations, will become an important probe of both the early and the late Universe. Specifically, it will play a leading role in furthering our understanding of two fundamental aspects of cosmology and astrophysics: (1) The physics of the very early universe that created the primordial seeds for large-scale structures, and (2) The subsequent growth of structures via gravitational instability and gas physics at later times. To date, observations of fluctuations in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and the Large-Scale Structure of the Universe (LSS) have focused largely on the Gaussian contribution as measured by the two-point correlations (or the power spectrum) of density fluctuations. However, an even greater amount of information is contained in non-Gaussianity and a large discovery space therefore still remains to be explored. Many observational probes can be used to measure non-Gaussianity, including CMB, LSS, gravitational lensing, Lyman-{alpha} forest, 21-cm fluctuations, and the abundance of rare objects such as clusters of galaxies and high-redshift galaxies. Not only does the study of non-Gaussianity maximize the science return from a plethora of present and future cosmological experiments and observations, but it also carries great potential for important discoveries in the coming decade.

  20. Optimization and geophysical inverse problems

    SciTech Connect

    Barhen, J.; Berryman, J.G.; Borcea, L.; Dennis, J.; de Groot-Hedlin, C.; Gilbert, F.; Gill, P.; Heinkenschloss, M.; Johnson, L.; McEvilly, T.; More, J.; Newman, G.; Oldenburg, D.; Parker, P.; Porto, B.; Sen, M.; Torczon, V.; Vasco, D.; Woodward, N.B.

    2000-10-01

    A fundamental part of geophysics is to make inferences about the interior of the earth on the basis of data collected at or near the surface of the earth. In almost all cases these measured data are only indirectly related to the properties of the earth that are of interest, so an inverse problem must be solved in order to obtain estimates of the physical properties within the earth. In February of 1999 the U.S. Department of Energy sponsored a workshop that was intended to examine the methods currently being used to solve geophysical inverse problems and to consider what new approaches should be explored in the future. The interdisciplinary area between inverse problems in geophysics and optimization methods in mathematics was specifically targeted as one where an interchange of ideas was likely to be fruitful. Thus about half of the participants were actively involved in solving geophysical inverse problems and about half were actively involved in research on general optimization methods. This report presents some of the topics that were explored at the workshop and the conclusions that were reached. In general, the objective of a geophysical inverse problem is to find an earth model, described by a set of physical parameters, that is consistent with the observational data. It is usually assumed that the forward problem, that of calculating simulated data for an earth model, is well enough understood so that reasonably accurate synthetic data can be generated for an arbitrary model. The inverse problem is then posed as an optimization problem, where the function to be optimized is variously called the objective function, misfit function, or fitness function. The objective function is typically some measure of the difference between observational data and synthetic data calculated for a trial model. However, because of incomplete and inaccurate data, the objective function often incorporates some additional form of regularization, such as a measure of smoothness

  21. Heavy elements in astrophysical nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bao-Hua; Niu, Zhong-Ming

    With the many successes of covariant density functional theory (CDFT) as seen in the previous chapters, there has been growing interest over the last years to examine directly their applicability in astrophysical nucleosynthesis simulations. This chapter thus concentrates on the very recent applications of CDFT in astrophysics nucleosynthesis, ranging from the calculations of nuclear physics inputs -- masses and beta-decay half-lives -- for rapid-neutron (r-) and rapid-proton (rp-) capture processes, to the nucleosynthesis studies that employed these inputs and to nuclear cosmochronology. The concepts of nucleosynthesis process and formulas on beta-decays are sketched briefly.

  1. Planetary rings and astrophysical discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latter, Henrik

    2016-05-01

    Disks are ubiquitous in astrophysics and participate in some of its most important processes. Of special interest is their role in star, planet and moon formation, the growth of supermassive black holes, and the launching of jets. Although astrophysical disks can be up to ten orders of magnitude larger than planetary rings and differ hugely in composition, all disks share to some extent the same basic dynamics and many physical phenomena. This review explores these areas of overlap. Topics covered include disk formation, accretion, collisions, instabilities, and satellite-disk interactions.

  2. Astrophysics. A primer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundt, Wolfgang

    For a quantitative understanding of the physics of the universe - from the solar system through the Milky Way to clusters of galaxies all the way to cosmology - these edited lecture notes are perhaps among the most concise and also among the most critical ones: Astrophysics has not yet stood the redundancy test of laboratory physics, hence should be aware of early interpretations. Special chapters are devoted to magnetic and radiation processes, supernovae, disks, black-hole candidacy, bipolar flows, cosmic rays, gamma-ray bursts, image distortions, and special sources. At the same time, planet earth is viewed as the arena for life, with plants and animals having evolved to homo sapiens during cosmic time. This text is unique in covering the basic qualitative and quantitative tools, formulae as well as numbers, needed for the precise interpretation of frontline phenomena. The author compares mainstream interpretations with new and even controversial ones he wishes to emphasize.

  3. Geophysical Sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, E.

    1998-01-01

    Of the many geophysical remote-sensing techniques available today, a few are suitable for the water ice-rich, layered material expected at the north martian ice cap. Radio echo sounding has been used for several decades to determine ice thickness and internal structure. Selection of operating frequency is a tradeoff between signal attenuation (which typically increases with frequency and ice temperature) and resolution (which is proportional to wavelength). Antenna configuration and size will be additional considerations for a mission to Mars. Several configurations for ice-penetrating radar systems are discussed: these include orbiter-borne sounders, sounding antennas trailed by balloons and penetrators, and lander-borne systems. Lander-borne systems could include short-wave systems capable of resolving fine structure and layering in the upper meters beneath the lander. Spread-spectrum and deconvolution techniques can be used to increase the depth capability of a radar system. If soundings over several locations are available (e.g., with balloons, rovers, or panning short-wave systems), then it will be easier to resolve internal layering, variations in basal reflection coefficient (from which material properties may be inferred), and the geometry of nonhorizontal features. Sonic sounding has a long history in oil and gas exploration. It is, however, unlikely that large explosive charges, or even swept-frequency techniques such as Vibroseis, would be suitable for a Polar lander -- these systems are capable of penetrating several kilometers of material at frequencies of 10-200 Hz, but the energy required to generate the sound waves is large and potentially destructive. The use of audio-frequency and ultrasonic sound generated by piezoelectric crystals is discussed as a possible method to explore layering and fine features in the upper meters of the ice cap. Appropriate choice of transducer(s) will permit operation over a range of fixed or modulated frequencies

  4. Nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.

    2010-08-01

    The International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009) was declared by the 62nd General Assembly of the United Nations and was also endorsed by UNESCO. Investigations in the realms of particle and nuclear physicsmake a large contribution in the development of our ideas of the properties of the Universe. The present article discusses some problems of the evolution of the Universe, nucleosyntheses, and cosmochronology from the point of view of nuclear and particle physics. Processes occurring in the Universe are compared with the mechanisms of the production and decay of nuclei, as well as with the mechanisms of their interaction at high energies. Examples that demonstrate the potential of nuclearphysics methods for studying cosmic objects and the properties of the Universe are given. The results that come from investigations into nuclear reactions induced by beams of radioactive nuclei and which make it possible to take a fresh look at the nucleosynthesis scenario in the range at light nuclei are presented.

  5. Scaling Extreme Astrophysical Phenomena to the Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A

    2007-11-01

    High-energy-density (HED) physics refers broadly to the study of macroscopic collections of matter under extreme conditions of temperature and density. The experimental facilities most widely used for these studies are high-power lasers and magnetic-pinch generators. The HED physics pursued on these facilities is still in its infancy, yet new regimes of experimental science are emerging. Examples from astrophysics include work relevant to planetary interiors, supernovae, astrophysical jets, and accreting compact objects (such as neutron stars and black holes). In this paper, we review a selection of recent results in this new field of HED laboratory astrophysics and provide a brief look ahead to the coming decade.

  6. Handbook of Space Astronomy and Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zombeck, Martin V.

    2006-11-01

    Foreword; Preface; 1. General data; 2. Astronomy and astrophysics; 3. Radio astronomy; 4. Infrared and submillimeter astronomy; 5. Ultraviolet astronomy; 6. X-ray astronomy; 7. Gamma-ray astronomy; 8. Cosmic rays; 9. Earth's atmosphere and environment; 10. Relativity and cosmology; 11. Atomic physics; 12. Electromagnetic radiation; 13. Plamsa physics; 14. Experimental astronomy and astrophysics; 15. Astronautics; 16. Mathematics; 17. Probability and statistics; 18. Radiation safety; 19. Astronomical catalogs; 20. Computer science; 21. Glossary of abbreviations and symbols; Appendices; Index.

  7. Demonstrations in Introductory Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, K. A.; Stein, S.; van der Lee, S.; Swafford, L.; Klosko, E.; Delaughter, J.; Wysession, M.

    2005-12-01

    Geophysical concepts are challenging to teach at introductory levels, because students need to understand both the underlying physics and its geological application. To address this, our introductory courses include class demonstrations and experiments to demonstrate underlying physical principles and their geological applications. Demonstrations and experiments have several advantages over computer simulations. First, computer simulations "work" even if the basic principle is wrong. In contrast, simple demonstrations show that a principle is physically correct, rather than a product of computer graphics. Second, many students are unfamiliar with once-standard experiments demonstrating ideas of classical physics used in geophysics. Demonstrations are chosen that we consider stimulating, relevant, inexpensive, and easy to conduct in a non-lab classroom. These come in several groups. Many deal with aspects of seismic waves, using springs, light beams, and other methods such as talking from outside the room to illustrate the frequency dependence of diffraction (hearing but not seeing around a corner). Others deal with heat and mass transfer, such as illustrating fractional crystallization with apple juice and the surface/volume effect in planetary evolution with ice. Plate motions are illustrated with paper cutouts showing effects like motion on transform faults and how the Euler vector geometry changes a plate boundary from spreading, to strike-slip, to convergence along the Pacific-North America boundary from the Gulf of California to Alaska. Radioactive decay is simulated by having the class rise and sit down as a result of coin flips (one tail versus two gives different decay rates and hence half lives). This sessions' goal of exchanging information about demonstrations is an excellent idea: some of ours are described on http://www.earth.nwu.edu/people/seth/202.

  8. Relativistic astrophysics explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaaret, P.

    2004-01-01

    The great success of the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) has shown that X-ray timing is an excellent tool for the study of strong gravitational fields and the measurement of fundamental physical properties of black holes and neutron stars. Here, we describe a next-generation X-ray timing mission, the Relativistic Astrophysics Explorer (RAE), designed to fit within the envelope of a medium-sized mission. The instruments will be a narrow-field X-ray detector array with an area of 6 m 2 equal to 10 times that of RXTE and a wide-field X-ray monitor. We describe the science made possible with this mission, the design of the instruments, and results on prototype large-area X-ray detectors.

  9. The Relativistic Astrophysics Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaaret, P.

    The great success of the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) has shown that X-ray timing is an excellent tool for the study of strong gravitational fields and the measurement of fundamental physical properties of black holes and neutron stars. Here, we describe a next-generation X-ray timing mission, the Relativistic Astrophysics Explorer (RAE), designed to fit within the envelope of a medium-sized mission. The instruments will be a narrow-field X-ray detector array with an area of 60,000 cm2 equal to ten times that of RXTE and a wide-field X-ray monitor. We describe the science made possible with this mission, the design of the instruments, and results on prototype large-area X-ray detectors.

  10. Theoretical Astrophysics at Fermilab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Theoretical Astrophysics Group works on a broad range of topics ranging from string theory to data analysis in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The group is motivated by the belief that a deep understanding of fundamental physics is necessary to explain a wide variety of phenomena in the universe. During the three years 2001-2003 of our previous NASA grant, over 120 papers were written; ten of our postdocs went on to faculty positions; and we hosted or organized many workshops and conferences. Kolb and collaborators focused on the early universe, in particular and models and ramifications of the theory of inflation. They also studied models with extra dimensions, new types of dark matter, and the second order effects of super-horizon perturbations. S tebbins, Frieman, Hui, and Dodelson worked on phenomenological cosmology, extracting cosmological constraints from surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. They also worked on theoretical topics such as weak lensing, reionization, and dark energy. This work has proved important to a number of experimental groups [including those at Fermilab] planning future observations. In general, the work of the Theoretical Astrophysics Group has served as a catalyst for experimental projects at Fennilab. An example of this is the Joint Dark Energy Mission. Fennilab is now a member of SNAP, and much of the work done here is by people formerly working on the accelerator. We have created an environment where many of these people made transition from physics to astronomy. We also worked on many other topics related to NASA s focus: cosmic rays, dark matter, the Sunyaev-Zel dovich effect, the galaxy distribution in the universe, and the Lyman alpha forest. The group organized and hosted a number of conferences and workshop over the years covered by the grant. Among them were:

  11. Overview of the Astrophysics Data System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, John C.; Pomphrey, Richard B.

    1990-01-01

    The Astrophysics Division of NASA has built a geographically- and logically-distributed heterogeneous information system for the dissemination and coordinated multispectral analysis of data from astrophysics missions. The Astrophysics Data System (ADS) is a truly distributed system in which the data and the required processing are physically distributed. To accommodate the anticipated growth and changes in both requirements and technology, the ADS employs a server/client architecture which allows services and data to be added or replaced without having to change the basic architecture or interfaces. Current datasets accessible through the system include all the tabular astronomical data available at each of six existing astrophysics data centers. Additional data nodes, at both NASA data centers and academic institutions, will be added shortly. The future evolution of the system will be driven in large part by user services mounted both by the ADS project itself and by members of the astrophysics community.

  12. Overview of the Astrophysics Data System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, John C.; Pomphrey, Richard B.

    1991-01-01

    The Astrophysics Division of NASA has built a geographically and logically distributed heterogeneous information system for the dissemination and coordinated multispectral analysis of data from astrophysics missions. The Astrophysics Data System (ADS) is a truly distributed system in which the data and the required processing are physically distributed. To accommodate the anticipated growth and changes in both requirements and technology, the ADS employs a server/client architecture which allows services and data to be added or replaced without having to change the basic architecture or interfaces. Current datasets accessible through the system include all the tabular astronomical data available at each of six existing astrophysics data centers. Additional data nodes, at both NASA data centers and academic institutions, will be added shortly. The future evolution of the system will be driven in large part by user services mounted both by the ADS project itself and by members of the astrophysics community.

  13. Sustainable urban development and geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lanbo; Chan, L. S.

    2007-09-01

    The new millennium has seen a fresh wave of world economic development especially in the Asian-Pacific region. This has contributed to further rapid urban expansion, creating shortages of energy and resources, degradation of the environment, and changes to climatic patterns. Large-scale, new urbanization is mostly seen in developing countries but urban sprawl is also a major social problem for developed nations. Urbanization has been accelerating at a tremendous rate. According to data collected by the United Nations [1], 50 years ago less than 30% of the world population lived in cities. Now, more than 50% are living in urban settings which occupy only about 1% of the Earth's surface. During the period from 1950 to 1995, the number of cities with a population higher than one million increased from 83 to 325. By 2025 it is estimated that more than 60% of 8.3 billion people (the projected world population [1]) will be city dwellers. Urbanization and urban sprawl can affect our living quality both positively and negatively. In recent years geophysics has found significant and new applications in highly urbanized settings. Such applications are conducive to the understanding of the changes and impacts on the physical environment and play a role in developing sustainable urban infrastructure systems. We would like to refer to this field of study as 'urban geophysics'. Urban geophysics is not simply the application of geophysical exploration in the cities. Urbanization has brought about major changes to the geophysical fields of cities, including those associated with electricity, magnetism, electromagnetism and heat. An example is the increased use of electromagnetic waves in wireless communication, transportation, office automation, and computer equipment. How such an increased intensity of electromagnetic radiation affects the behaviour of charged particles in the atmosphere, the equilibrium of ecological systems, or human health, are new research frontiers to be

  14. Current trends in non-accelerator particle physics: 1, Neutrino mass and oscillation. 2, High energy neutrino astrophysics. 3, Detection of dark matter. 4, Search for strange quark matter. 5, Magnetic monopole searches

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yudong |

    1995-07-01

    This report is a compilation of papers reflecting current trends in non-accelerator particle physics, corresponding to talks that its author was invited to present at the Workshop on Tibet Cosmic Ray Experiment and Related Physics Topics held in Beijing, China, April 4--13, 1995. The papers are entitled `Neutrino Mass and Oscillation`, `High Energy Neutrino Astrophysics`, `Detection of Dark Matter`, `Search for Strange Quark Matter`, and `Magnetic Monopole Searches`. The report is introduced by a survey of the field and a brief description of each of the author`s papers.

  15. Overview of NASA Astrophysics Program Analysis Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Wilton T.; Sambruna, Rita M.; Perez, Mario R.; Hudgins, Douglas M.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Astrophysics Program Analysis Groups (PAGs) are responsible for facilitating and coordinating community input into the development and execution of NASAs three astrophysics science themes: Cosmic Origins (COPAG), Exoplanet Exploration (ExoPAG), and Physics of the Cosmos (PhysPAG). The PAGs provide a community-based, interdisciplinary forum for analyses that support and inform planning and prioritization of activities within the Astrophysics Division programs. Operations and structure of the PAGs are described in their Terms of Reference (TOR), which can be found on the three science theme Program Office web pages. The Astrophysics PAGs report their input and findings to NASA through the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council, of which all the PAG Chairs are members. In this presentation, we will provide an overview of the ongoing activities of NASAs Astrophysics PAGs in the context of the opportunities and challenges currently facing the Astrophysics Division. NASA Headquarters representatives for the COPAG, ExoPAG, and PhysPAG will all be present and available to answer questions about the programmatic role of the Astrophysics PAGs.

  16. Overview of NASA Astrophysics Program Analysis Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Michael R.; Hudgins, D. M.; Sambruna, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    NASA Astrophysics Program Analysis Groups (PAGs) are responsible for facilitating and coordinating community input into the developmentand execution of NASAs three astrophysics science themes: Cosmic Origins (COPAG), Exoplanet Exploration (ExoPAG), and Physics of the Cosmos (PhysPAG). The PAGs provide a community-based, interdisciplinary forum for analyses that support and inform planning and prioritization of activities within the Astrophysics Division programs. Operations and structure of the PAGs are described in the Terms of Reference (TOR) which can be found on the three science theme Program Office web pages. The Astrophysics PAGs report their input and findings to NASA through the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council, of which all the PAG Chairs are members. In this presentation, we will provide an overview of the ongoing activities of NASAs Astrophysics PAGs in the context of the opportunities and challenges currently facing the Astrophysics Division. NASA Headquarters representatives for the COPAG, ExoPAG, and PhysPAG will all be present and available to answer questions about the programmatic role of the Astrophysics PAGs.

  17. Radiative Magnetic Reconnection in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzdensky, D. A.

    In this chapter we review a new and rapidly growing area of research in high-energy plasma astrophysics—radiative magnetic reconnection, defined here as a regime of reconnection where radiation reaction has an important influence on the reconnection dynamics, energetics, and/or nonthermal particle acceleration. This influence be may be manifested via a variety of radiative effects that are critical in many high-energy astrophysical applications. The most notable radiative effects in astrophysical reconnection include radiation-reaction limits on particle acceleration, radiative cooling, radiative resistivity, braking of reconnection outflows by radiation drag, radiation pressure, viscosity, and even pair creation at highest energy densities. The self-consistent inclusion of these effects into magnetic reconnection theory and modeling sometimes calls for serious modifications to our overall theoretical approach to the problem. In addition, prompt reconnection-powered radiation often represents our only observational diagnostic tool available for studying remote astrophysical systems; this underscores the importance of developing predictive modeling capabilities to connect the underlying physical conditions in a reconnecting system to observable radiative signatures. This chapter presents an overview of our recent theoretical progress in developing basic physical understanding of radiative magnetic reconnection, with a special emphasis on astrophysically most important radiation mechanisms like synchrotron, curvature, and inverse-Compton. The chapter also offers a broad review of key high-energy astrophysical applications of radiative reconnection, illustrated by multiple examples such as: pulsar wind nebulae, pulsar magnetospheres, black-hole accretion-disk coronae and hot accretion flows in X-ray Binaries and Active Galactic Nuclei and their relativistic jets, magnetospheres of magnetars, and Gamma-Ray Bursts. Finally, this chapter discusses the most critical

  18. Computational Infrastructure for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. S.; Lingerfelt, E. J.; Scott, J. P.; Nesaraja, C. D.; Hix, W. R.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Chae, K.; Guidry, M. W.; Hard, C. C.; Sharp, J. E.; Kozub, R. L.; Meyer, R. A.

    2004-12-01

    The Computational Infrastructure for Nuclear Astrophysics is a platform-independent, online suite of computer codes developed by the ORNL Nuclear Data Project that makes a rapid connection between laboratory nuclear physics results and astrophysical models. It enables users to evaluate cross sections, process them into thermonuclear reaction rates, and parameterize (with a few percent accuracy) these rates that vary by up to 30 orders of magnitude over the temperatures of interest. Users can then properly format these rates for input into astrophysical computer simulations, create and manipulate libraries of rates, as well as run and visualize sample post-processing nucleosynthesis calculations. For example, we have developed animated nuclide charts that show how predicted abundances (represented by a user-defined color scale) change in time. With this unique suite, users can within a very short time quantify the astrophysical impact of a newly measured or calculated cross section, or a newly created customized reaction rate library, and then document and share their results with the scientific community. The suite has a straightforward interface with a "Windows Wizard" motif whereby users progress through complicated calculations in a step-by-step fashion. Users can upload their own files for processing and save their work on our server, as well as work with files that other users wish to share. These tools are currently being used to investigate novae and X-ray bursts. The suite is available through nucastrodata.org, a website that also hyperlinks available nuclear data sets relevant for nuclear astrophysics research. New features are continually being added to this software, which is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Low Energy Nuclear Physics and Nuclear Data Programs. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  19. Handbook of Agricultural Geophysics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Geophysical methods continue to show great promise for use in agriculture. The term “agricultural geophysics” denotes a subdiscipline of geophysics that is focused only on agricultural applications. The Handbook of Agricultural Geophysics was compiled to include a comprehensive overview of the geoph...

  20. Nuclear and particle astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1990-10-31

    We discuss the physics of matter that is relevant to the structure of compact stars. This includes nuclear, neutron star matter and quark matter and phase transitions between them. Many aspects of neutron star structure and its dependance on a number of physical assumptions about nuclear matter properties and hyperon couplings are investigated. We also discuss the prospects for obtaining constraints on the equation of state from astrophysical sources. Neuron star masses although few are known at present, provide a very direct constraint in as much as the connection to the equation of state involves only the assumption that Einstein's general of theory of relativity is correct at the macroscopic scale. Supernovae simulations involve such a plethora of physical processes including those involved in the evolution of the precollapse configuration, not all of them known or understood, that they provide no constraint at the present time. Indeed the prompt explosion, from which a constraint had been thought to follow, is now believed not to be mechanism by which most, if any stars, explode. In any case the nuclear equation of state is but one of a multitude on uncertain factors, and possibly one of the least important. The rapid rotation of pulsars is also discussed. It is shown that for periods below a certain limit it becomes increasingly difficult to reconcile them with neutron stars. Strange stars are possible if strange matter is the absolute ground state. We discuss such stars and their compatibility with observation. 112 refs., 37 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Astrophysical processes on the Sun

    PubMed Central

    Parnell, Clare E.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, there have been a series of major solar space missions, namely Yohkoh, SOHO, TRACE, and in the past 5 years, STEREO, Hinode and SDO, studying various aspects of the Sun and providing images and spectroscopic data with amazing temporal, spatial and spectral resolution. Over the same period, the type and nature of numerical models in solar physics have been completely revolutionized as a result of widespread accessibility to parallel computers. These unprecedented advances on both observational and theoretical fronts have led to significant improvements in our understanding of many aspects of the Sun's behaviour and furthered our knowledge of plasma physics processes that govern solar and other astrophysical phenomena. In this Theme Issue, the current perspectives on the main astrophysical processes that shape our Sun are reviewed. In this Introduction, they are discussed briefly to help set the scene. PMID:22665891

  2. Geophysics of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    A physical model of Mars is presented on the basis of light-scattering observations of the Martian atmosphere and surface and interior data obtained from observations of the geopotential field. A general description of the atmosphere is presented, with attention given to the circulation and the various cloud types, and data and questions on the blue haze-clearing effect and the seasonal darkening wave are summarized and the Mie scattering model developed to explain these observations is presented. The appearance of the planet from earth and spacecraft through Mariner 9 is considered, and attention is given to the preparation of topographical contour maps, the canal problem and large-scale lineaments observed from Mariner 9, the gravity field and shape of the planet and the application of Runcorn's geoid/convection theory to Mars. Finally, a summary of Viking results is presented and their application to the understanding of Martian geophysics is discussed.

  3. Future Experiments in Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krizmanic, John F.

    2002-01-01

    The measurement methodologies of astrophysics experiments reflect the enormous variation of the astrophysical radiation itself. The diverse nature of the astrophysical radiation, e.g. cosmic rays, electromagnetic radiation, and neutrinos, is further complicated by the enormous span in energy, from the 1.95 Kappa relic neutrino background to cosmic rays with energy greater than 10(exp 20)eV. The measurement of gravity waves and search for dark matter constituents are also of astrophysical interest. Thus, the experimental techniques employed to determine the energy of the incident particles are strongly dependent upon the specific particles and energy range to be measured. This paper summarizes some of the calorimetric methodologies and measurements planned by future astrophysics experiments. A focus will be placed on the measurement of higher energy astrophysical radiation. Specifically, future cosmic ray, gamma ray, and neutrino experiments will be discussed.

  4. Serious games for Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Valerio; Rubbia, Giuliana

    2015-04-01

    Childhood stage is indispensable in the education of human beings and especially critical to arise scientific interest in children. We discuss the participatory design of a didactic videogame, i.e. a "serious" game to teach geophysics and Earth sciences to high and low-school students. Geophysics is the application of the laws and techniques of physics to uncover knowledge about the earth's dynamic processes and subsurface structure. It explores phenomena such as earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunamis to improve our understanding of the earth's physical processes and our ability to predict reoccurrences. Effective mitigation of risks from catastrophic geologic hazards requires knowledge and understanding of local geology and geologic processes. Scientific outreach can be defined as discourse activity, whose main objective is to communicate some knowledge previously produced in scientific contexts to a non-expert massive audience. One of the difficulties science educators need to overcome is to explain specific concepts from a given discipline in a language simple and understandable for their audience. Digital games today play a large role in young people's lives. Games are directly connected to the life of today's adolescents. Therefore, digital games should be included and broached as a subject in the classroom. The ardor and enthusiasm that digital games evoke in teenagers has indeed brought many researchers, school leaders and teachers to the question "how video games" can be used to engage young people and support their learning inside the classroom. Additionally, studies have shown that digital games can enhance various skills such as the ability to concentrate, stamina, tactical aptness, anticipatory thinking, orientation in virtual spaces, and deductive reasoning. Thus, videogames become an effective didactic mechanism and should have a place in the classroom. The project aims to explore the potentials of entertainment technologies in educational processes

  5. GEOPHYSICS, ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS: Refractivity estimation from radar sea clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Si-Xun; Zhao, Xiao-Feng; Sheng, Zheng

    2009-11-01

    This paper addresses the problem of estimating lower atmospheric refractivity under the nonstandard propagation conditions frequently encountered in low altitude maritime radar applications. The vertical structure of the refractive environment is modeled by using a five-parameter model, and the horizontal structure is modeled as range-independent. The electromagnetic propagation in the troposphere is simulated by using a split-step fast Fourier transform based on parabolic approximation to the wave equation. A global search marked as a modified genetic algorithm (MGA) for the 5 environmental parameters is performed by using a genetic algorithm (GA) integrated with a simulated annealing technique. The retrieved results from simulated runs demonstrate the ability of this method to make atmospheric refractivity estimations. A comparison with the classical GA and the Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (Bayesian-MCMC) technique shows that the MGA can not only shorten the inverse time but also improve the inverse precision. For real data cases, the inversion values do not match the reference data very well. The inverted profile, however, can be used to synoptically describe the real refractive structure.

  6. Astrophysical, Geochemical, Geophysical and Biological Limits on Planet Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lineweaver, C.

    2014-03-01

    For life forms like us, the most important feature of the Earth is its habitability. Understanding habitability and using that knowledge to locate the nearest habitable planet may be crucial for our survival as a species. Over the past decade, expectations that the universe could be filled with habitable planets have been bolstered by the increasingly large overlap between terrestrial environments known to harbor life and the variety of environments on newly detected rocky exoplanets. The inhabited and uninhabited regions on Earth tell us that temperature and the presence of water are the main constraints that can be used in a habitability classification scheme for rocky planets. Our compilation and review of recent exoplanet detections suggests that the fraction of stars with planets is ~ 100%, and that the fraction with rocky planets may be comparably large. We review extensions to the circumstellar habitable zone including an abiogenesis habitable zone and the galactic habitable zone.

  7. High Energy Astrophysics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by members of the USRA (Universities Space Research Association) contract team during the six months during the reporting period (10/95 - 3/96) and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics. Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science, Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  8. High Energy Astrophysics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed-by members of the USRA contract team during the six months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, visiting the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics. Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA); X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE); X-ray Spectrometer (XRS); Astro-E; High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  9. Revised physical elements of the astrophysically important O9.5+O9.5V eclipsing binary system Y Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmanec, P.; Holmgren, D. E.; Wolf, M.; Božić, H.; Guinan, E. F.; Kang, Y. W.; Mayer, P.; McCook, G. P.; Nemravová, J.; Yang, S.; Šlechta, M.; Ruždjak, D.; Sudar, D.; Svoboda, P.

    2014-03-01

    Context. Rapid advancements in light-curve and radial-velocity curve modelling, as well as improvements in the accuracy of observations, allow more stringent tests of the theory of stellar evolution. Binaries with rapid apsidal advance are particularly useful in this respect since the internal structure of the stars can also be tested. Aims: Thanks to its long and rich observational history and rapid apsidal motion, the massive eclipsing binary Y Cygrepresents one of the cornerstones of critical tests of stellar evolutionary theory for massive stars. Nevertheless, the determination of the basic physical properties is less accurate than it could be given the existing number of spectral and photometric observations. Our goal is to analyse all these data simultaneously with the new dedicated series of our own spectral and photometric observations from observatories widely separated in longitude. Methods: We obtained new series of UBV observations at three observatories separated in local time to obtain complete light curves of Y Cygfor its orbital period close to 3 days. This new photometry was reduced and carefully transformed to the standard UBV system using the HEC22 program. We also obtained new series of red spectra secured at two observatories and re-analysed earlier obtained blue electronic spectra. Reduction of the new spectra was carried out in the IRAF and SPEFO programs. Orbital elements were derived independently with the FOTEL and PHOEBE programs and via disentangling with the program KOREL . The final combined solution was obtained with the program PHOEBE . Results: Our analyses provide the most accurate value of the apsidal period of (47.805 ± 0.030) yr published so far and the following physical elements: M1 = 17.72 ± 0.35 M⊙, M2 = 17.73 ± 0.30 M⊙, R1 = 5.785 ± 0.091 R⊙, and R2 = 5.816 ± 0.063 R⊙. The disentangling thus resulted in the masses, which are somewhat higher than all previous determinations and virtually the same for both stars

  10. Relativistic jets in astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derishev, E. V.; Zheleznyakov, V. V.; Koryagin, S. A.; Kocharovsky, Vl. V.

    The properties of the plasma state of matter are determined by the motion and the electromagnetic emission of the non-bound electrically charged particles --- electrons, positrons, protons and ions. It is not easy to create plasma in a laboratory. However this state is typical for the cosmic conditions --- at the stars and in the interstellar space. The properties of the laboratory as well as the space plasma are investigated at the Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The research is focused on the mechanisms of generation and propagation of the electromagnetic radiation --- from the radio waves to the gamma-rays --- in the planetary and stellar atmospheres and at the other astrophysical objects. The extreme physical conditions for a plasma are realized near the compact objects like black holes, neutron stars and collapsing nuclei of the massive stars. The plasma could be strongly non-equlibrium and can produce strong electromagnetic fields. Its bulk motion as well as the chaotic motion of the constituting particles can be relativistic, i. e. the motion can achieve velocities close to the speed of light. The relativistic plasma is frequently observed in the form of jets.

  11. Neutron reactions in astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reifarth, R.; Lederer, C.; Käppeler, F.

    2014-05-01

    The quest for the origin of matter in the Universe had been the subject of philosophical and theological debates over the history of mankind, but quantitative answers could be found only by the scientific achievements of the last century. A first important step on this way was the development of spectral analysis by Kirchhoff and Bunsen in the middle of the 19th century, which provided first insight in the chemical composition of the sun and the stars. The energy source of the stars and the related processes of nucleosynthesis, however, could be revealed only with the discoveries of nuclear physics. A final break-through came eventually with the compilation of elemental and isotopic abundances in the solar system, which reflect the various nucleosynthetic processes in detail. This review focuses on the mass region above iron, where the formation of the elements is dominated by neutron capture, mainly in the slow (s) and rapid (r) processes. Following a brief historic account and a sketch of the relevant astrophysical models, emphasis is put on the nuclear physics input, where status and perspectives of experimental approaches are presented in some detail, complemented by the indispensable role of theory.

  12. Turbulence and Magnetic Fields in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.

    2004-10-01

    The juxtaposition of ``magnetic fields'' and ``turbulence'' arises in plasma dynamics in various contexts-such as the solar corona, the magnetosphere, space physics in general, cosmic ray propagation, and laboratory plasmas of both fusion and nonfusion types. In astrophysics, the impact of turbulence has arrived relatively recently but is rapidly finding importance. The present volume is a written record of topics presented at a conference, Simulations of Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence in Astrophysics: Recent Achievements and Perspectives, held at the Institut Henri Poincare, in Paris, in July 2001. The international audience that attended this meeting heard talks on a broad range of astrophysical, space physics, and purely theoretical subjects. A wide range of physical scenarios was discussed, with many different observational data presented. However, true to the conference banner, the emphasis was on the physics of low-frequency plasma turbulence, described by magnetohydrodyamics (MHD), and investigated using numerical simulation.

  13. The Blackholic energy: long and short Gamma-Ray Bursts (New perspectives in physics and astrophysics from the theoretical understanding of Gamma-Ray Bursts, II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffini, Remo; Bernardini, Maria Grazia; Bianco, Carlo Luciano; Chardonnet, Pascal; Fraschetti, Federico; Gurzadyan, Vahe; Vitagliano, Luca; Xue, She-Sheng

    2005-08-01

    hypothesis is considered to relate this X-ray source to a neutron star, newly born in the Supernova. This hypothesis should be submitted to further theoretical and observational investigation. Some theoretical developments to clarify the astrophysical origin of this new scenario are outlined. We turn then to the theoretical developments in the short GRBs: we first report some progress in the understanding the dynamical phase of collapse, the mass-energy formula and the extraction of blackholic energy which have been motivated by the analysis of the short GRBs. In this context progress has also been accomplished on establishing an absolute lower limit to the irreducible mass of the black hole as well as on some critical considerations about the relations of general relativity and the second law of thermodynamics. We recall how this last issue has been one of the most debated in theoretical physics in the past thirty years due to the work of Bekenstein and Hawking. Following these conceptual progresses we analyze the vacuum polarization process around an overcritical collapsing shell. We evidence the existence of a separatrix and a dyadosphere trapping surface in the dynamics of the electron-positron plasma generated during the process of gravitational collapse. We then analyze, using recent progress in the solution of the Vlasov-Boltzmann-Maxwell system, the oscillation regime in the created electron-positron plasma and their rapid convergence to a thermalized spectrum. We conclude by making precise predictions for the spectra, the energy fluxes and characteristic time-scales of the radiation for short-bursts. If the precise luminosity variation and spectral hardening of the radiation we have predicted will be confirmed by observations of short-bursts, these systems will play a major role as standard candles in cosmology. These considerations will also be relevant for the analysis of the long-bursts when the baryonic matter contribution will be taken into account.

  14. Strategic Plans for the Future of Solar Physics: a community discussion of the NASA Sun-Earth Connection Program Roadmap and the NAS Decadal Survey of Astronomy and Astrophysics (Solar Astronomy section)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrijver, K.; Knoelker, M.

    1999-05-01

    The NASA Sun-Earth Connections Program is currently revising its Roadmap, the long-range plan for science goals, technology development, and missions between 2000 and 2040. From the interior dynamics of the Sun, to the interactions of plasma, fields, and radiation in the photosphere and solar atmosphere, to the heating and structure of the corona, to the acceleration, structure, and evolution of the solar wind, to the interactions of the heliosphere with the interstellar medium, to the processes of solar, stellar, and solar system evolution - progress in each of these domains will help us understand how the Sun impacts our home in space. The Roadmap Committee is seeking to refine and extend the SEC's vision and identify the milestone missions for the future. During this session, an outline of the current draft Roadmap will be presented, and further community involvement will be solicited to ensure the strongest possible concensus on the revised Roadmap. The National Academy of Sciences' Space Science Board has appointed a committee to perform a Decadal Survey of Astronomy and Astrophysics, which is surveying the field of space- and ground-based astronomy and astrophysics, recommending priorities for the most important new initiatives of the decade 2000-2010. The prioritization delivered by the earlier Decadal Surveys has played an important role in guiding the funding agencies in setting their priorities for astronomy and astrophysics. Therefore it will be of crucial importance for solar physics to contribute a strong case for its own set of future projects to be incorpoprated into the survey. The solar physics of the next decade will be characterized by its increasing societal relevance in the context of the National Space Weather Program and related issues, as well as its classical importance as a ``base" for many astrophysical questions. The presentation and subsequent discussion at the Chicago meeting is intended to solicit further community input, to achieve

  15. Handbook of space astronomy and astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zombeck, Martin V.

    Tables, graphs, maps, diagrams, and formulas summarizing data and illustrating relationships of interest to space astronomers and astrophysicists are complied in handbook form. General data such as physical and solar-system constants, cosmological parameters, unit conversions, numerical constants, mathematical formulas, and symbols are given in a preliminary section. Individual chapters are devoted to astronomy (A) and astrophysics, radio A, IR A, UV A, X-ray A, gamma-ray A, cosmic rays, earth atmosphere and environment, relativity, atomic physics, electromagnetic radiation, plasma physics, experimental astrophysics, aeronautics and astronautics, mathematics, statistics, radiation safety, and astronomical catalogs.

  16. Astrophysical Institute, Potsdam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Built upon a tradition of almost 300 years, the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam (AIP) is in an historical sense the successor of one of the oldest astronomical observatories in Germany. It is the first institute in the world which incorporated the term `astrophysical' in its name, and is connected with distinguished scientists such as Karl Schwarzschild and Albert Einstein. The AIP constitutes on...

  17. Physics through the 1990s: Plasmas and fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The volume contains recommendations for programs in, and government support of, plasma and fluid physics. Four broad areas are covered: the physics of fluids, general plasma physics, fusion, and space and astrophysical plasmas. In the first section, the accomplishments of fluid physics and a detailed review of its sub-fields, such as combustion, non-Newtonian fluids, turbulence, aerodynamics, and geophysical fluid dynamics, are described. The general plasma physics section deals with the wide scope of the theoretical concepts involved in plasma research, and with the machines; intense beam systems, collective and laser-driven accelerators, and the associated diagnostics. The section on the fusion plasma research program examines confinement and heating systems, such as Tokamaks, magnetic mirrors, and inertial-confinement systems, and several others. Finally, theory and experiment in space and astrophysical plasma research is detailed, ranging from the laboratory to the solar system and beyond. A glossary is included.

  18. Physics through the 1990s: plasmas and fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The volume contains recommendations for programs in, and government support of, plasma and fluid physics. Four broad areas are covered: the physics of fluids, general plasma physics, fusion, and space and astrophysical plasmas. In the first section, the accomplishments of fluid physics and a detailed review of its sub-fields, such as combustion, non-Newtonian fluids, turbulence, aerodynamics, and geophysical fluid dynamics, are described. The general plasma physics section deals with the wide scope of the theoretical concepts involved in plasma research, and with the machines: intense beam systems, collective and laser-driven accelerators, and the associated diagnostics. The section on the fusion plasma research program examines confinement and heating systems, such as Tokamaks, magnetic mirrors, and inertial-confinement systems, and several others. Finally, theory and experiment in space and astrophysical plasma research is detailed, ranging from the laboratory to the solar system and beyond. A glossary is included.

  19. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Homuth, Emil F.

    1991-01-01

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects.

  20. Sessions on history of space and geophysics spark interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Wilfried

    Three sessions at international conferences were held in 1997 to discuss the history of space and geophysics and its different disciplines. The first session was held during the Assembly of the German Geophysical Society in March in Potsdam, Germany. Topics included the theory of relativity and gravitation in geophysics; work by Albert Abraham Michelson, Leon Foucault, and Ernst Mach; work by Hermann von Helmholtz; and the physical application and geophysical evidence of Werner Heisenberg's research. Also included were discussions relevant to the history of geophysics, aeronomy, meteor astronomy, and geodetical research, including developments in instrumentation during the last few decades.

  1. Advances in instrumentation for nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Pain, S. D.

    2014-04-15

    The study of the nuclear physics properties which govern energy generation and nucleosynthesis in the astrophysical phenomena we observe in the universe is crucial to understanding how these objects behave and how the chemical history of the universe evolved to its present state. The low cross sections and short nuclear lifetimes involved in many of these reactions make their experimental determination challenging, requiring developments in beams and instrumentation. A selection of developments in nuclear astrophysics instrumentation is discussed, using as examples projects involving the nuclear astrophysics group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These developments will be key to the instrumentation necessary to fully exploit nuclear astrophysics opportunities at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams which is currently under construction.

  2. Underground nuclear astrophysics: Why and how

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, A.; Caciolli, A.; Fülöp, Zs.; Gyürky, Gy.; Laubenstein, M.; Napolitani, E.; Rigato, V.; Roca, V.; Szücs, T.

    2016-04-01

    The goal of nuclear astrophysics is to measure cross-sections of nuclear physics reactions of interest in astrophysics. At stars temperatures, these cross-sections are very low due to the suppression of the Coulomb barrier. Cosmic-ray-induced background can seriously limit the determination of reaction cross-sections at energies relevant to astrophysical processes and experimental setups should be arranged in order to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Placing experiments in underground sites, however, reduces this background opening the way towards ultra low cross-section determination. LUNA (Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics) was pioneer in this sense. Two accelerators were mounted at the INFN National Laboratories of Gran Sasso (LNGS) allowing to study nuclear reactions close to stellar energies. A summary of the relevant technology used, including accelerators, target production and characterisation, and background treatment is given.

  3. Particle Astrophysics Using Balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, E. S.

    Cosmic rays, energetic particles coming from outer space, bring us information about the physical processes that accelerate particles to relativistic energies, about the effects of those particles in driving dynamical processes in our Galaxy, and about the distribution of matter and fields in interstellar space. Cosmic rays were discovered in the early twentieth century using a balloon-borne electroscope. Balloons are currently being used for answering fundamental questions about the cosmos: (1) Is the Universe symmetric, and if so where is the antimatter? (2) What is the dark matter? (3) How do cosmic rays get their enormous energies? (4) Can the entire energy spectrum of cosmic rays result from a single acceleration mechanism? (5) Are supernovae really the sources of cosmic rays? (6) What is the history of cosmic rays in the Galaxy? (7) What is the origin of the "knee" in the cosmic ray energy spectrum? etc. The status of results from past balloon-borne measurements and expected results from ongoing and planned future balloon-borne particle astrophysics experiments will be reviewed.

  4. High Energy Astrophysics Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E.; Ormes, Jonathan F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The nature of gravity and its relationship to the other three forces and to quantum theory is one of the major challenges facing us as we begin the new century. In order to make progress we must challenge the current theories by observing the effects of gravity under the most extreme conditions possible. Black holes represent one extreme, where the laws of physics as we understand them break down. The Universe as whole is another extreme, where its evolution and fate is dominated by the gravitational influence of dark matter and the nature of the Cosmological constant. The early universe represents a third extreme, where it is thought that gravity may somehow be unified with the other forces. NASA's "Cosmic Journeys" program is part of a NASA/NSF/DoE tri-agency initiative designed to observe the extremes of gravity throughout the universe. This program will probe the nature of black holes, ultimately obtaining a direct image of the event horizon. It will investigate the large scale structure of the Universe to constrain the location and nature of dark matter and the nature of the cosmological constant. Finally it will search for and study the highest energy processes, that approach those found in the early universe. I will outline the High Energy Astrophysics part of this program.

  5. The Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, J. E.; Ohlsen, D.; Kittleman, S.; Borhani, N.; Leslie, F.; Miller, T.

    1999-01-01

    The Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) experiment performed visualizations of thermal convection in a rotating differentially heated spherical shell of fluid. In these experiments dielectric polarization forces are used to generate a radially directed buoyancy force. This enables the laboratory simulation of a number of geophysically and astrophysically important situations in which sphericity and rotation both impose strong constraints on global scale fluid motions. During USML-2 a large set of experiments with spherically symmetric heating were carried out. These enabled the determination of critical points for the transition to various forms of nonaxisymmetric convection and, for highly turbulent flows, the transition latitudes separating the different modes of motion. This paper presents a first analysis of these experiments as well as data on the general performance of the instrument during the USML-2 flight.

  6. Exotic nuclei in astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.

    2012-07-01

    Recently the academic community has marked several anniversaries connected with discoveries that played a significant role in the development of astrophysical investigations. The year 2009 was proclaimed by the United Nations the International Year of Astronomy. This was associated with the 400th anniversary of Galileo Galilei's discovery of the optical telescope, which marked the beginning of regular research in the field of astronomy. An important contribution to not only the development of physics of the microcosm, but also to the understanding of processes occurring in the Universe, was the discovery of the atomic nucleus made by E. Rutherford 100 years ago. Since then the investigations in the fields of physics of particles and atomic nuclei have helped to understand many processes in the microcosm. Exactly 80 years ago, K. Yanski used a radio-telescope in order to receive the radiation from cosmic objects for the first time, and at the present time this research area of physics is the most efficient method for studying the properties of the Universe. Finally, the April 12, 1961 (50 years ago) launching of the first sputnik into space with a human being onboard, the Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin, marked the beginning of exploration of the Universe with the direct participation of man. All these achievements considerably extended our ideas about the Universe. This work is an attempt to present some problems on the evolution of the Universe: the nucleosynthesis and cosmochronology from the standpoint of physics of particles and nuclei, in particular with the use of the latest results, obtained by means of radioactive nuclear beams. The comparison is made between the processes taking place in the Universe and the mechanisms of formation and decay of nuclei, as well as of their interaction at different energies. Examples are given to show the capabilities of nuclear-physics methods for studying cosmic objects and properties of the Universe. The results of

  7. News and Views: Challenges of Relativistic Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opher, Reuven

    2013-12-01

    I discuss some of the most outstanding challenges in relativistic astrophysics in the subjects of compact objects (black holes and neutron stars), dark sector (dark matter and dark energy), plasma astrophysics (origin of jets, cosmic rays, and magnetic fields), and the primordial universe (physics at the beginning of the Universe). In these four subjects, I discuss 12 of the most important challenges. These challenges give us insight into new physics that can only be studied in the large scale universe. The near-future possibilities, in observations and theory, for addressing these challenges are also discussed.

  8. Geophysical monitoring using 3D joint inversion of multi-modal geophysical data with Gramian constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, M. S.; Gribenko, A.; Wilson, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    Geophysical monitoring of reservoir fluids and rock properties is relevant to oil and gas production, carbon sequestration, and enhanced geothermal systems. Different geophysical fields provide information about different physical properties of the earth. Multiple geophysical surveys spanning gravity, magnetic, electromagnetic, seismic, and thermal methods are often interpreted to infer geology from models of different physical properties. In many cases, the various geophysical data are complimentary, making it natural to consider a formal mathematical framework for their joint inversion to a shared earth model. We introduce a new approach to the 3D joint inversion of multiple geophysical datasets using Gramian spaces of model parameters and Gramian constraints, computed as determinants of the corresponding Gram matrices of the multimodal model parameters and/or their attributes. The basic underlying idea of this approach is that the Gramian provides a measure of correlation between the model parameters. By imposing an additional requirement of the minimum of the Gramian, we arrive at the solution of the joint multimodal inverse problem with the enhanced correlation between the different model parameters and/or their attributes. We demonstrate that this new approach is a generalized technique that can be applied to the simultaneous joint inversion of any number and combination of geophysical datasets. Our approach includes as special cases those extant methods based on correlations and/or structural constraints of different physical properties. We illustrate this approach by a model study of reservoir monitoring using different geophysical data.

  9. The NASA Astrophysics Data System: Free Access to the Astronomical Literature On-line and through Email

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhorn, Guenther; Accomazzi, Alberto; Grant, Carolyn S.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Murray, Stephen S.

    2002-10-01

    The Astrophysics Data System (ADS) provides access to the astronomical literature through the World Wide Web. It is a NASA funded project and access to all the ADS services is free to everybody world-wide. The ADS Abstract Service allows the searching of four databases with abstracts in Astronomy, Instrumentation, Physics/Geophysics, and the LANL Preprints with a total of over 2.2 million references. The system also provides access to reference and citation information, links to on-line data, electronic journal articles, and other on-line information. The ADS Article Service contains the full articles for most of the astronomical literature back to volume 1. It contains the scanned pages of all the major journals (Astrophysical Journal, Astronomical Journal, Astronomy & Astrophysics, Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, and Solar Physics), as well as most smaller journals back to volume 1. The ADS can be accessed through any web browser without signup or login. Alternatively an email interface is available that allows our users to execute queries via email and to retrieve scanned articles via email. This might be interesting for users on slow or unreliable links, since the email system will retry sending information automatically until the transfer is complete. There are now 9 mirror sites of the ADS available in different parts of the world to improve access. The ADS is available at: http://ads.harvard.edu

  10. Compressible Astrophysics Simulation Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-07-18

    This is an astrophysics simulation code involving a radiation diffusion module developed at LLNL coupled to compressible hydrodynamics and adaptive mesh infrastructure developed at LBNL. One intended application is to neutrino diffusion in core collapse supernovae.

  11. EDITORIAL: The interface between geophysics and engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    Journal of Geophysics and Engineering (JGE) aims to publicize and promote research and developments in geophysics and in related areas of engineering. As stated in the journal scope, JGE is positioned to bridge the gap between earth physics and geo-engineering, where it reflects a growing trend in both industry and academia. JGE covers those aspects of engineering that bear closely on geophysics or on the targets and problems that geophysics addresses. Typically this will be engineering focused on the subsurface, particularly petroleum engineering, rock mechanics, geophysical software engineering, drilling technology, remote sensing, instrumentation and sensor design. There is a trend, visible throughout academia, for rapid expansion in cross-disciplinary, multi-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary working. Many of the most important and exciting problems and advances are being made at the boundaries between traditional subject areas and, increasingly, techniques from one discipline are finding applications in others. There is a corresponding increasing requirement for researchers to be aware of developments in adjacent areas and for papers published in one area to be readily accessible, both in terms of location and language, to those in others. One such area that is expanding rapidly is that at the interface between geophysics and engineering. There are three principal developments. Geophysics, and especially applied geophysics, is increasingly constrained by the limits of technology, particularly computing technology. Consequently, major advances in geophysics are often predicated upon major developments in engineering and many research geophysicists are working in multi-disciplinary teams with engineers. Engineering problems relevant to the sub-surface are increasingly looking to advances in geophysics to provide part of the solution. Engineering systems, for example, for tunnel boring or petroleum reservoir management, are using high-resolution geophysical

  12. Astrophysics on the lab bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Stephen W.

    2010-05-01

    In this article some basic laboratory bench experiments are described that are useful for teaching high school students some of the basic principles of stellar astrophysics. For example, in one experiment, students slam a plastic water-filled bottle down onto a bench, ejecting water towards the ceiling, illustrating the physics associated with a type II supernova explosion. In another experiment, students roll marbles up and down a double ramp in an attempt to get a marble to enter a tube halfway up the slope, which illustrates quantum tunnelling in stellar cores. The experiments are reasonably low cost to either purchase or manufacture.

  13. High-energy spectroscopic astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güdel, Manuel; Walter, Roland

    After three decades of intense research in X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, the time was ripe to summarize basic knowledge on X-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy for interested students and researchers ready to become involved in new high-energy missions. This volume exposes both the scientific basics and modern methods of high-energy spectroscopic astrophysics. The emphasis is on physical principles and observing methods rather than a discussion of particular classes of high-energy objects, but many examples and new results are included in the three chapters as well.

  14. SAGE (Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience): Learning Geophysics by Doing Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiracek, G. R.; Baldridge, W. S.; Biehler, S.; Braile, L. W.; Ferguson, J. F.; Gilpin, B. E.; Pellerin, L.

    2005-12-01

    geophysics, geology, engineering, physics, and mathematics. SAGE is sponsored by the Los Alamos National Laboratory Branch of the University of California's Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics. More information is available on the SAGE web site at http://www.sage.lanl.gov/.

  15. Geophysics in INSPIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sőrés, László

    2013-04-01

    INSPIRE is a European directive to harmonize spatial data in Europe. Its' aim is to establish a transparent, multidisciplinary network of environmental information by using international standards and OGC web services. Spatial data themes defined in the annex of the directive cover 34 domains that are closely bundled to environment and spatial information. According to the INSPIRE roadmap all data providers must setup discovery, viewing and download services and restructure data stores to provide spatial data as defined by the underlying specifications by 2014 December 1. More than 3000 institutions are going to be involved in the progress. During the data specification process geophysics as an inevitable source of geo information was introduced to Annex II Geology. Within the Geology theme Geophysics is divided into core and extended model. The core model contains specifications for legally binding data provisioning and is going to be part of the Implementation Rules of the INSPIRE directives. To minimize the work load of obligatory data transformations the scope of the core model is very limited and simple. It covers the most essential geophysical feature types that are relevant in economic and environmental context. To fully support the use cases identified by the stake holders the extended model was developed. It contains a wide range of spatial object types for geophysical measurements, processed and interpreted results, and wrapper classes to help data providers in using the Observation and Measurements (O&M) standard for geophysical data exchange. Instead of introducing the traditional concept of "geophysical methods" at a high structural level the data model classifies measurements and geophysical models based on their spatial characteristics. Measurements are classified as geophysical station (point), geophysical profile (curve) and geophysical swath (surface). Generic classes for processing results and interpretation models are curve model (1D), surface

  16. Astrophysics teaching at Assam University, Silchar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Himadri Sekhar

    The Department of Physics is established in 1996 and since, then, thirteen batches of students have completed their Master’s programmes in the subject. The Department introduced in the year 2001 Astrophysics as one special paper in PG level (in the second year). The syllabus of Astrophysics is designed to include courses from observational Astronomy to Theoretical Astrophysics and Cosmology. There are two theory papers (in third and fourth semesters), one practical paper (in third semester) and one project or dissertation paper (in fourth semester), each one carries 100 marks. The major instruments available in the department for carrying out the experimental work are Meade-16 inch telescope, Celestron-8 inch inches Telescope, Meade refracting telescopes (4 inches, 2 number), SSP-5, SSP-3 photometer, Sivo Fibre-fed Spectrometer, CCD (Meade 416 XT, ST-6), Goniometer, Limb darkening apparatus etc. The practical paper includes study of the variation of sunspots; measurement of the parallax of distant objects, on moon and on planets like Jupiter and Saturn, measurement of the magnitude of different stars, study of the light scattering properties of rough surfaces, analysis of the image by image processing software (IRAF) etc. The project papers are based on research oriented topics which covers latest trends in Astrophysics including solar system studies, Interstellar medium and star formation studies and some problems in gravito-optics. There are altogether 6 scholars who have been awarded PhD and 10 are registered for PhD in Astrophysics. Besides these, 8 scholars have been awarded M. Phil. in Astrophysics. The broad research area of Astrophysics includes light scattering properties of cosmic dust, star formation, gravito optics, polarization study of comets etc. The Astrophysics group is currently doing research in different fields and have very good publications in several peer reviewed journals of international status.

  17. Astrophysical observations: lensing and eclipsing Einstein's theories.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Charles L

    2005-02-11

    Albert Einstein postulated the equivalence of energy and mass, developed the theory of special relativity, explained the photoelectric effect, and described Brownian motion in five papers, all published in 1905, 100 years ago. With these papers, Einstein provided the framework for understanding modern astrophysical phenomena. Conversely, astrophysical observations provide one of the most effective means for testing Einstein's theories. Here, I review astrophysical advances precipitated by Einstein's insights, including gravitational redshifts, gravitational lensing, gravitational waves, the Lense-Thirring effect, and modern cosmology. A complete understanding of cosmology, from the earliest moments to the ultimate fate of the universe, will require developments in physics beyond Einstein, to a unified theory of gravity and quantum physics. PMID:15705841

  18. Neutrino astrophysics with Hyper-Kamiokande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Takatomi; Hyper-Kamiokande proto Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    Hyper-Kamiokande (Hyper-K) is a proposed next generation underground large water Cherenkov detector. The detector consists of 1 Mt pure water tank with surrounding 99,000 newly developed photo sensors, providing fiducial volume of 0.56 Mt. The energies, positions and directions of charged particles produced by neutrino interactions are detected using its Cherenkov light in water. Our detector will be located at deep underground to reduce the cosmic muon flux and its spallation products, which is a dominant background at the low energy analysis. Hyper-K will play a considerable role in the next neutrino physics frontier, even in the neutrino astrophysics. The detection with large statistics of astrophysical neutrons, i.e., solar neutrino, supernova burst neutrino and supernova relic neutrino, will be remarkable information for both of particle physics and astrophysics.

  19. 22nd Texas Symposium on Relativistic Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott Bloom

    2005-04-01

    The XXII Texas Symposium on Relativistic Astrophysics, jointly organized by the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology (KIPAC), the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, and the Physics Department of Stanford University, was held on December 13-17, 2004. Following the tradition of past Texas Symposia the presentations emphasized recent developments in Cosmology, High Energy Astrophysics and the frontiers between these and Gravitation and Particle Physics. This Symposium was attended by more than 500 colleagues from a spectrum of disciplines mentioned above. There were 9 Plenary Sessions, 3 Parallel Sessions and 2 Poster Sessions held during the five-day program, with 76 oral and 240 poster presentations. These are now documented on CD and in the eConf proceedings archive. Funding of $15,000 received from the DOE under award DE-FG02-05ER41362 was used for expenses related to facility, local transportation and administrative expenses.

  20. Transfer reactions in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardayan, D. W.

    2016-08-01

    To a high degree many aspects of the large-scale behavior of objects in the Universe are governed by the underlying nuclear physics. In fact the shell structure of nuclear physics is directly imprinted into the chemical abundances of the elements. The tranquility of the night sky is a direct result of the relatively slow rate of nuclear reactions that control and determines a star’s fate. Understanding the nuclear structure and reaction rates between nuclei is vital to understanding our Universe. Nuclear-transfer reactions make accessible a wealth of knowledge from which we can extract much of the required nuclear physics information. A review of transfer reactions for nuclear astrophysics is presented with an emphasis on the experimental challenges and opportunities for future development.

  1. Geophysical Institute biennial report 1995--1996

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    The mission of the Geophysical Institute is to understand the basic physical processes governing Earth, especially as they occur in, or are relevant to the Arctic; to train graduate and undergraduate students to play leading roles in tomorrow`s society; to solve applied geophysical problems and develop resource-oriented technology of importance to the state and the nation; and to satisfy the intellectual and technological needs of fellow Alaskans through public service. The variety of subjects studied by the faculty, research staff members, and graduate students at the Geophysical Institute include auroral physics and chemistry, arctic haze, ice fog, atmospheric dynamics, ozone, Alaska weather patterns, regional meteorology and climatology, global climate change, cloud physics and radiation, permafrost, glaciers, sea ice, remote sensing, geothermal energy, tectonics, volcanoes and earthquakes. Summaries are presented of the projects undertaken by the Institute in these fields.

  2. Nuclear interactions in high energy heavy ions and applications in astrophysics. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State Univ. , Baton Rouge

    SciTech Connect

    Wefel, J.P.; Guzik, T.G.

    1993-01-11

    The overall objective is to study the mechanisms and the energy dependence of heavy ion fragmentation by studying the reactions of heavy ion projectiles (e.g. [sup 4]He, [sup 16]O, [sup 20]Ne, [sup 28]Si, [sup 56]Fe) in a variety of targets (H, He, C, Si, Cu, Pb) and at a number of beam energies exceeding 0.1 GeV/nucleon. The results have application to questions in high-energy nuclear astrophysics. Most of the discussion is on low-energy [sup 16]O,[sup 28]Si data analysis. The description includes analysis procedures and techniques, detector calibrations, data selections and normalizations. Cross section results for the analysis are also presented. 83 figs., 6 tabs., 73 refs.

  3. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Homuth, E.F.

    1991-03-19

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor is described in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figures.

  4. Nuclear Data for Astrophysics Research: A New Online Paradigm

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Michael Scott

    2011-01-01

    Our knowledge of a wide range of astrophysical processes depends crucially on nuclear physics data. While new nuclear information is being generated at an ever-increasing rate, the methods to process this information into astrophysical simulations have changed little over the decades and cannot keep pace. Working online, 'cloud computing', may be the methodology breakthrough needed to ensure that the latest nuclear data quickly gets into astrophysics codes. The successes of the first utilization of cloud computing for nuclear astrophysics will be described. The advantages of cloud computing for the broader nuclear data community are also discussed.

  5. The golden age of multifrequency astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannelli, Franco; Sabau-Graziati, Lola

    In occasion of the Silver Jubilee of the Frascati Workshop about Multifrequency Behaviour of High Energy Cosmic Sources we want to discuss some aspects of the Multifrequency Astrophysics. Multifrequency Astrophysics can be considered as a `new field' of astrophysics born just around the end of 1970-ies - beginning of 1980-ies to which we strongly contributed not only with our own measurements and studies of physical processes spread along the whole electromagnetic spectrum, but mostly with the organization of the Frascati Workshop Series. In this paper we discuss the methodology used in astrophysics for collecting data coming from multifrequency observations of cosmic sources - obtained in different ways - and the relative models developed through theoretical study of physical processes governing their behaviour. Several examples about X-ray binaries, cataclysmic variables, T Tauri stars, relativistic jets from different classes of sources, gamma-ray bursts, and few words about Standard Big Bang Cosmology and experimental proofs fitting the theory will be discussed. We will briefly discuss also the prospects of the multifrequency astrophysics which is now in its golden age without any pretension of completness.

  6. Archaeological geophysics in Israel: past, present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppelbaum, L. V.

    2010-04-01

    In Israel occur a giant number of archaeological objects of various age, origin and size. Different kinds of noise complicate geophysical methods employment at archaeological sites. Geodynamical active, multi-layered, and geologically variable surrounding media in many cases damages ancient objects and disturbs their physical properties. This calls to application of different geophysical methods armed by the modern interpretation technology. The main attention is focused on the geophysical methods most frequently applying in Israeli archaeological sites: GPR and high-precise magnetic survey. Other methods (paleomagnetic, resistivity, near-surface seismics, piezoelectric, etc.) are briefly described and reviewed. The number of employed geophysical methodologies is constantly increasing, and now Israeli territory may be considered as a peculiar polygon for various geophysical methods testing. Several examples illustrate effective application of geophysical methods over some typical archaeological remains. The geophysical investigations at archaeological sites in Israel could be tentatively divided on three stages: (1) past (1990), (2) present (1990-2009), and (3) future (2010). The past stage with several archaeoseismic reviews and very limited application of geophysical methods was replaced by the present stage with the violent employment of numerous geophysical techniques. It is supposed that the future stage will be characterized by extensive development of multidiscipline physical-archaeological databases, employment of all possible indicators for 4-D monitoring and ancient sites reconstruction, as well as application of combined geophysical multilevel surveys using remote operated vehicles at low altitudes.

  7. Nonlinear, relativistic Langmuir waves in astrophysical magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chian, Abraham C.-L.

    1987-01-01

    Large amplitude, electrostatic plasma waves are relevant to physical processes occurring in the astrophysical magnetospheres wherein charged particles are accelerated to relativistic energies by strong waves emitted by pulsars, quasars, or radio galaxies. The nonlinear, relativistic theory of traveling Langmuir waves in a cold plasma is reviewed. The cases of streaming electron plasma, electronic plasma, and two-streams are discussed.

  8. Progress in geophysical fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Allan R.

    Geophysical fluid dynamics deals with the motions and physics of the atmosphere, oceans and interior of the earth and other planets: the winds, the swirls, the currents that occur on myriads of scales from millimeter to climatological. Explanations of natural phenomena, basic processes and abstractions are sought. The rotation of the earth, the buoyancy of its fluids and the tendency towards large-scale turbulence characterize these flows. But geophysical fluid dynamics is importantly a part of modern fluid dynamics which is contributing to the development of nonlinear mechanics generally. Some general insights are emerging for nonlinear systems which must be regarded as partly deterministic and partly random or which are complex and aperiodic. Contributions from geophysical fluid dynamics come from its methodology, from the experience of examples, and from the perspective provided by its unique scale. Contributions have been made to turbulent, chaotic and coherently structured nonlinear process research. Turbulent vortices larger than man himself naturally invite detailed investigation and deterministic physical studies. Examples are storms in the atmosphere and large ring vortices spun off by the Gulf Stream current in mid-ocean. The statistics of these events determine critical aspects of the general circulations. Fluid dynamicists generally now know that it is often relevant or necessary to study local dynamical processes of typical eddies even though only the average properties of the flow are of interest; progress in understanding the turbulent boundary layer in pipes involves the study of millimeter-scale vortices. Weather-related studies were seminal to the construction of the new scientific field of chaos. Coherent vortices abound of which the Great Red Spot of Jupiter is a spectacular example. Geophysical fluid dynamicists have been among forefront researchers in exploiting the steadily increasing speed and capacity of modern computers. Supercomputers

  9. 15 CFR 950.5 - National Geophysical and Solar-Terrestrial Data Center (NGSDC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...-A (Solid-Earth Geophysics, Solar Terrestrial Physics, and Glaciology). (a) Geophysical and solar... geological data, including data on heat flow, cores, samples, and sediments. (2) Solar-Terrestrial...

  10. 15 CFR 950.5 - National Geophysical and Solar-Terrestrial Data Center (NGSDC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...-A (Solid-Earth Geophysics, Solar Terrestrial Physics, and Glaciology). (a) Geophysical and solar... geological data, including data on heat flow, cores, samples, and sediments. (2) Solar-Terrestrial...

  11. Astrophysics Source Code Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, A.; DuPrie, K.; Berriman, B.; Hanisch, R. J.; Mink, J.; Teuben, P. J.

    2013-10-01

    The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL), founded in 1999, is a free on-line registry for source codes of interest to astronomers and astrophysicists. The library is housed on the discussion forum for Astronomy Picture of the Day (APOD) and can be accessed at http://ascl.net. The ASCL has a comprehensive listing that covers a significant number of the astrophysics source codes used to generate results published in or submitted to refereed journals and continues to grow. The ASCL currently has entries for over 500 codes; its records are citable and are indexed by ADS. The editors of the ASCL and members of its Advisory Committee were on hand at a demonstration table in the ADASS poster room to present the ASCL, accept code submissions, show how the ASCL is starting to be used by the astrophysics community, and take questions on and suggestions for improving the resource.

  12. Strategies for joint geophysical survey design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakas, Alexis; Maurer, Hansruedi

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, the use of multiple geophysical techniques to image the subsurface has become a popular option. Joint inversions of geophysical datasets are based on the assumption that the spatial variations of the different physical subsurface parameters exhibit structural similarities. In this work, we combine the benefits of joint inversions of geophysical datasets with recent innovations in optimized experimental design. These techniques maximize the data information content while minimizing the data acquisition costs. Experimental design has been used in geophysics over the last twenty years, but it has never been attempted to combine various geophysical imaging methods. We combine direct current geoelectrics, magnetotellurics and seismic refraction travel time tomography data to resolve synthetic 1D layered Earth models. An initial model for the subsurface structure can be taken from a priori geological information and an optimal joint geophysical survey can be designed around the initial model. Another typical scenario includes an existing data set from a past survey and a subsequent survey that is planned to optimally complement the existing data. Our results demonstrate that the joint design methodology provides optimized combinations of data sets that include only a few data points. Nevertheless, they allow constraining the subsurface models equally well as data from a densely sampled survey. Furthermore, we examine the dependency of optimized survey design on the a priori model assumptions. Finally, we apply the methodology to geoelectric and seismic field data collected along 2D profiles.

  13. Astrophysical and cosmological constraints to neutrino properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Edward W.; Schramm, David N.; Turner, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    The astrophysical and cosmological constraints on neutrino properties (masses, lifetimes, numbers of flavors, etc.) are reviewed. The freeze out of neutrinos in the early Universe are discussed and then the cosmological limits on masses for stable neutrinos are derived. The freeze out argument coupled with observational limits is then used to constrain decaying neutrinos as well. The limits to neutrino properties which follow from SN1987A are then reviewed. The constraint from the big bang nucleosynthesis on the number of neutrino flavors is also considered. Astrophysical constraints on neutrino-mixing as well as future observations of relevance to neutrino physics are briefly discussed.

  14. The Astrophysical Multimessenger Observatory Network (AMON)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith. M. W. E.; Fox, D. B.; Cowen, D. F.; Meszaros, P.; Tesic, G.; Fixelle, J.; Bartos, I.; Sommers, P.; Ashtekar, Abhay; Babu, G. Jogesh; Barthelmy, S. D.; Coutu, S.; DeYoung, T.; Falcone, A. D.; Gao, Shan; Hashemi, B.; Homeier, A.; Marka, S.; Owen, B. J.; Taboada, I.

    2013-01-01

    We summarize the science opportunity, design elements, current and projected partner observatories, and anticipated science returns of the Astrophysical Multimessenger Observatory Network (AMON). AMON will link multiple current and future high-energy, multimessenger, and follow-up observatories together into a single network, enabling near real-time coincidence searches for multimessenger astrophysical transients and their electromagnetic counterparts. Candidate and high-confidence multimessenger transient events will be identified, characterized, and distributed as AMON alerts within the network and to interested external observers, leading to follow-up observations across the electromagnetic spectrum. In this way, AMON aims to evoke the discovery of multimessenger transients from within observatory subthreshold data streams and facilitate the exploitation of these transients for purposes of astronomy and fundamental physics. As a central hub of global multimessenger science, AMON will also enable cross-collaboration analyses of archival datasets in search of rare or exotic astrophysical phenomena.

  15. The Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegerle, William; Reddy, Francis; Tyler, Pat

    2009-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division (ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radio wavelengths as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for three orbiting astrophysics missions WMAP, RXTE, and Swift, as well as the Science Support Center for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. This report includes the Division's activities during 2008.

  16. GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR GEOPHYSICAL METHODS APPLIED TO AGRICULTURE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Geophysics is the application of physical quantity measurement techniques to provide information on conditions or features beneath the earth’s surface. With the exception of borehole geophysical methods and soil probes like a cone penetrometer, these techniques are generally noninvasive with physica...

  17. Stellar Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Michael J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2003-05-01

    Preface; 1. A selective overview Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard and Michael J. Thompson; Part I. Stellar Convection and Oscillations: 2. On the diversity of stellar pulsations Wojciech A. Dziembowski; 3. Acoustic radiation and mode excitation by turbulent convection Günter Houdek; 4. Understanding roAp stars Margarida S. Cunha; 5. Waves in the magnetised solar atmosphere Colin S. Rosenthal; Part II. Stellar Rotation and Magnetic Fields: 6. Stellar rotation: a historical survey Leon Mestel; 7. The oscillations of rapidly rotating stars Michel Rieutord; 8. Solar tachocline dynamics: eddy viscosity, anti-friction, or something in between? Michael E. McIntyre; 9. Dynamics of the solar tachocline Pascale Garaud; 10. Dynamo processes: the interaction of turbulence and magnetic fields Michael Proctor; 11. Dynamos in planets Chris Jones; Part III. Physics and Structure of Stellar Interiors: 12. Solar constraints on the equation of state Werner Däppen; 13. 3He transport and the solar neutrino problem Chris Jordinson; 14. Mixing in stellar radiation zones Jean-Paul Zahn; 15. Element settling and rotation-induced mixing in slowly rotating stars Sylvie Vauclair; Part IV. Helio- and Asteroseismology: 16. Solar structure and the neutrino problem Hiromoto Shibahashi; 17. Helioseismic data analysis Jesper Schou; 18. Seismology of solar rotation Takashi Sekii; 19. Telechronohelioseismology Alexander Kosovichev; Part V. Large-Scale Numerical Experiments: 20. Bridges between helioseismology and models of convection zone dynamics Juri Toomre; 21. Numerical simulations of the solar convection zone Julian R. Elliott; 22. Modelling solar and stellar magnetoconvection Nigel Weiss; 23. Nonlinear magnetoconvection in the presence of a strong oblique field Keith Julien, Edgar Knobloch and Steven M. Tobias; 24. Simulations of astrophysical fluids Marcus Brüggen; Part VI. Dynamics: 25. A magic electromagnetic field Donald Lynden-Bell; 26. Continuum equations for stellar dynamics Edward A

  18. Stellar Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Michael J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2008-02-01

    Preface; 1. A selective overview Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard and Michael J. Thompson; Part I. Stellar Convection and Oscillations: 2. On the diversity of stellar pulsations Wojciech A. Dziembowski; 3. Acoustic radiation and mode excitation by turbulent convection Günter Houdek; 4. Understanding roAp stars Margarida S. Cunha; 5. Waves in the magnetised solar atmosphere Colin S. Rosenthal; Part II. Stellar Rotation and Magnetic Fields: 6. Stellar rotation: a historical survey Leon Mestel; 7. The oscillations of rapidly rotating stars Michel Rieutord; 8. Solar tachocline dynamics: eddy viscosity, anti-friction, or something in between? Michael E. McIntyre; 9. Dynamics of the solar tachocline Pascale Garaud; 10. Dynamo processes: the interaction of turbulence and magnetic fields Michael Proctor; 11. Dynamos in planets Chris Jones; Part III. Physics and Structure of Stellar Interiors: 12. Solar constraints on the equation of state Werner Däppen; 13. 3He transport and the solar neutrino problem Chris Jordinson; 14. Mixing in stellar radiation zones Jean-Paul Zahn; 15. Element settling and rotation-induced mixing in slowly rotating stars Sylvie Vauclair; Part IV. Helio- and Asteroseismology: 16. Solar structure and the neutrino problem Hiromoto Shibahashi; 17. Helioseismic data analysis Jesper Schou; 18. Seismology of solar rotation Takashi Sekii; 19. Telechronohelioseismology Alexander Kosovichev; Part V. Large-Scale Numerical Experiments: 20. Bridges between helioseismology and models of convection zone dynamics Juri Toomre; 21. Numerical simulations of the solar convection zone Julian R. Elliott; 22. Modelling solar and stellar magnetoconvection Nigel Weiss; 23. Nonlinear magnetoconvection in the presence of a strong oblique field Keith Julien, Edgar Knobloch and Steven M. Tobias; 24. Simulations of astrophysical fluids Marcus Brüggen; Part VI. Dynamics: 25. A magic electromagnetic field Donald Lynden-Bell; 26. Continuum equations for stellar dynamics Edward A

  19. The NASA Astrophysics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebulum, Ricardo S.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's scientists are enjoying unprecedented access to astronomy data from space, both from missions launched and operated only by NASA, as well as missions led by other space agencies to which NASA contributed instruments or technology. This paper describes the NASA astrophysics program for the next decade, including NASA's response to the ASTRO2010 Decadal Survey.

  20. Surprises in astrophysical gasdynamics.

    PubMed

    Balbus, Steven A; Potter, William J

    2016-06-01

    Much of astrophysics consists of the study of ionized gas under the influence of gravitational and magnetic fields. Thus, it is not possible to understand the astrophysical universe without a detailed knowledge of the dynamics of magnetized fluids. Fluid dynamics is, however, a notoriously tricky subject, in which it is all too easy for one's a priori intuition to go astray. In this review, we seek to guide the reader through a series of illuminating yet deceptive problems, all with an enlightening twist. We cover a broad range of topics including the instabilities acting in accretion discs, the hydrodynamics governing the convective zone of the Sun, the magnetic shielding of a cooling galaxy cluster, and the behaviour of thermal instabilities and evaporating clouds. The aim of this review is to surprise and intrigue even veteran astrophysical theorists with an idiosyncratic choice of problems and counterintuitive results. At the same time, we endeavour to bring forth the fundamental ideas, to set out important assumptions, and to describe carefully whatever novel techniques may be appropriate to the problem at hand. By beginning at the beginning, and analysing a wide variety of astrophysical settings, we seek not only to make this review suitable for fluid dynamic veterans, but to engage novice recruits as well with what we hope will be an unusual and instructive introduction to the subject. PMID:27116247

  1. Gamma-ray astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W. (Editor); Trombka, J. I. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    Conference papers on gamma ray astrophysics are summarized. Data cover the energy region from about 0.3 MeV to a few hundred GeV and theoretical models of production mechanisms that give rise to both galactic and extragalactic gamma rays.

  2. Surprises in astrophysical gasdynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balbus, Steven A.; Potter, William J.

    2016-06-01

    Much of astrophysics consists of the study of ionized gas under the influence of gravitational and magnetic fields. Thus, it is not possible to understand the astrophysical universe without a detailed knowledge of the dynamics of magnetized fluids. Fluid dynamics is, however, a notoriously tricky subject, in which it is all too easy for one’s a priori intuition to go astray. In this review, we seek to guide the reader through a series of illuminating yet deceptive problems, all with an enlightening twist. We cover a broad range of topics including the instabilities acting in accretion discs, the hydrodynamics governing the convective zone of the Sun, the magnetic shielding of a cooling galaxy cluster, and the behaviour of thermal instabilities and evaporating clouds. The aim of this review is to surprise and intrigue even veteran astrophysical theorists with an idiosyncratic choice of problems and counterintuitive results. At the same time, we endeavour to bring forth the fundamental ideas, to set out important assumptions, and to describe carefully whatever novel techniques may be appropriate to the problem at hand. By beginning at the beginning, and analysing a wide variety of astrophysical settings, we seek not only to make this review suitable for fluid dynamic veterans, but to engage novice recruits as well with what we hope will be an unusual and instructive introduction to the subject.

  3. A Plan for Astrophysical Constraints of Dark Matter Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Michelle; Yeonchi Kim, Stacy; Abel, Tom; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2016-01-01

    We present conclusions and challenges for a coordinated approach in how the astrophysics and physics communities describe the properties of dark matter, and enable meaningful comparisons of observational and experimental insights.

  4. Geophysical investigation at Fort Detrick Maryland. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Llopis, J.L.; Simms, J.E.

    1993-07-01

    Results of a comprehensive, integrated geophysical investigation of 15 suspected disposal areas at Area B, Fort Detrick, Maryland, are presented. Between 1943 and 1969, Fort Detrick served as the nation's center for military offensive and defensive biological research. As a result of this activity, chemically and biologically contaminated materials were generated and disposed in burial pits at Site B. Based on historical and visual information, 15 sites suspected of containing burial pits were selected to be examined in greater detail using geophysical methods. The geophysical investigations were designed to detect anomalous conditions indicative of past disposal activities. The geophysical program included electromagnetic (EM), magnetic, ground penetrating radar (GPR), and seismic refraction methods. Anomalous conditions were found at several of the sites tested and noted. The anomalous conditions may have resulted from the presence of buried material or from physical and/or chemical soil changes caused by disposal activities.... Geophysics, Electromagnetics ground penetrating radar, Geophysical surveys, Magnetics, Seismic refraction.

  5. Lectures on Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samelson, Roger M.

    The fluid kaleidoscope of the Earth's ocean and atmosphere churns and sparkles with jets, gyres, eddies, waves, streams, and cyclones. These vast circulations, essential elements of the physical environment that support human life, are given a special character by the Earth's rotation and by their confinement to a shallow surficial layer, thin relative to the solid Earth in roughly the same proportion as an apple skin is to an apple. Geophysical fluid dynamics exploits this special character to develop a unified theoretical approach to the physics of the ocean and atmosphere.With Lectures on Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Rick Salmon has added an insightful and provocative volume to the handful of authoritative texts currently available on the subject. The book is intended for first-year graduate students, but advanced students and researchers also will find it useful. It is divided into seven chapters, the first four of these adapted from course lectures. The book is well written and presents a fresh and stimulating perspective that complements existing texts. It would serve equally well either as the main text for a core graduate curriculum or as a supplementary resource for students and teachers seeking new approaches to both classical and contemporary problems. A lively set of footnotes contains many references to very recent work. The printing is attractive, the binding is of high quality, and typographical errors are few.

  6. Enhanced predictability in chaotic geophysical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brindley, J.; Kapitaniak, T.

    1996-06-01

    Using the Lorenz equations as an example we show that one chaotic system can be controlled by synchronizing its behavior with the chaotic behavior of another system. We particularly discuss the implications of this phenomenon in geophysical systems. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Nuclear astrophysics in the laboratory and in the universe

    SciTech Connect

    Champagne, A. E. Iliadis, C.; Longland, R.

    2014-04-15

    Nuclear processes drive stellar evolution and so nuclear physics, stellar models and observations together allow us to describe the inner workings of stars and their life stories. This Information on nuclear reaction rates and nuclear properties are critical ingredients in addressing most questions in astrophysics and often the nuclear database is incomplete or lacking the needed precision. Direct measurements of astrophysically-interesting reactions are necessary and the experimental focus is on improving both sensitivity and precision. In the following, we review recent results and approaches taken at the Laboratory for Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics (LENA, http://research.physics.unc.edu/project/nuclearastro/Welcome.html )

  8. Geophysical Methods: an Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, A.; Goldstein, N. E.; Lee, K. H.; Majer, E. L.; Morrison, H. F.; Myer, L.

    1992-01-01

    Geophysics is expected to have a major role in lunar resource assessment when manned systems return to the Moon. Geophysical measurements made from a lunar rover will contribute to a number of key studies: estimating regolith thickness, detection of possible large-diameter lava tubes within maria basalts, detection of possible subsurface ice in polar regions, detection of conductive minerals that formed directly from a melt (orthomagmatic sulfides of Cu, Ni, Co), and mapping lunar geology beneath the regolith. The techniques that can be used are dictated both by objectives and by our abilities to adapt current technology to lunar conditions. Instrument size, weight, power requirements, and freedom from orientation errors are factors we have considered. Among the geophysical methods we believe to be appropriate for a lunar resource assessment are magnetics, including gradiometry, time-domain magnetic induction, ground-penetrating radar, seismic reflection, and gravimetry.

  9. Sensitivity analysis and application in exploration geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, R.

    2013-12-01

    local anomalies of various physical property of a geological formation. Through a large number of modeling on the varied parameter choosing in each geophysical method, a common survey layout of different methods in a specified area is then optimized. As can be seen from the sensitivity analysis of assorted models of each method, we also found that different geophysical methods are sensitive to different underground structure, which suggests each method may provide complementary information on the same geological structure. In conclusion, we have shown that sensitivity analysis can be used in the assessment of inverse solution and design strategies of joint geophysical prospecting.

  10. Atoms and molecules in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Lepp, S.

    1993-05-01

    In 1987 supernova was observed in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The supernova, the explosion of a massive star following core collapse, releases a expanding cloud of gas called the ejecta. Because this supernova occured so close to our own galaxy it was the first chance to get high resolution spectra from a supernova ejecta. There have been a few molecular species (CO and SiO) and many more atomic species observed in the ejecta of Supernova 1987a. The ejecta represents an evolving laboratory for atomic and molecular physics. This paper will review models of the ejecta of Supernova 1987a and some other astrophysical objects with a particular emphasis on the atomic and molecular processes involved.

  11. Hard X-ray astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Past hard X-ray and lower energy satellite instruments are reviewed and it is shown that observation above 20 keV and up to hundreds of keV can provide much valuable information on the astrophysics of cosmic sources. To calculate possible sensitivities of future arrays, the efficiencies of a one-atmosphere inch gas counter (the HEAO-1 A-2 xenon filled HED3) and a 3 mm phoswich scintillator (the HEAO-1 A-4 Na1 LED1) were compared. Above 15 keV, the scintillator was more efficient. In a similar comparison, the sensitivity of germanium detectors did not differ much from that of the scintillators, except at high energies where the sensitivity would remain flat and not rise with loss of efficiency. Questions to be addressed concerning the physics of active galaxies and the diffuse radiation background, black holes, radio pulsars, X-ray pulsars, and galactic clusters are examined.

  12. Underground Nuclear Astrophysics at LUNA

    SciTech Connect

    Junker, Matthias

    2008-01-24

    Nuclear cross sections play a key role in understanding stellar evolution and elemental synthesis. Also in the field of astroparticle physics precise knowledge on thermonuclear cross sections is needed to extract the particle properties from the experimental data. While it is desirable to directly measure the relevant cross sections in the energy range of interest for the specific stellar environment this proves to be difficult, if not impossible, due to the effect of the Coulomb barrier, which causes an exponential drop of the cross sections at stellar energies. Consequently direct measurements are hampered by low counting rates and background caused by cosmic rays and environmental radioactivity. In addition background induced by the beam or the target itself can disturb the measurements.In this contribution I will discuss some of the reactions studied by LUNA in the past years to illustrate important aspects underground nuclear astrophysics.

  13. LUNA: Nuclear astrophysics underground

    SciTech Connect

    Best, A.

    2015-02-24

    Underground nuclear astrophysics with LUNA at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso spans a history of 20 years. By using the rock overburden of the Gran Sasso mountain chain as a natural cosmic-ray shield very low signal rates compared to an experiment on the surface can be tolerated. The cross sectons of important astrophysical reactions directly in the stellar energy range have been successfully measured. In this proceeding we give an overview over the key accomplishments of the experiment and an outlook on its future with the expected addition of an additional accelerator to the underground facilities, enabling the coverage of a wider energy range and the measurement of previously inaccessible reactions.

  14. Astrophysical terms in Armenian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeghikian, A. G.

    2015-07-01

    There are quite a few astrophysical textbooks (to say nothing about monographs) in Armenian, which are, however out of date and miss all the modern terms concerning space sciences. Many terms have been earlier adopted from English and, especially, from Russian. On the other hand, teachers and lecturers in Armenia need scientific terms in Armenian adequately reproducing either their means when translating from other languages or (why not) creating new ones. In short, a permanently updated astrophysical glossary is needed to serve as explanation of such terms. I am not going here to present the ready-made glossary (which should be a task for a joint efforts of many professionals) but instead just would like to describe some ambiguous examples with comments where possible coming from my long-year teaching, lecturing and professional experience. A probable connection between "iron" in Armenian as concerned to its origin is also discussed.

  15. Nuclear Astrophysics with LUNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broggini, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    One of the main ingredients of nuclear astrophysics is the knowledge of the thermonuclear reactions which power the stars and synthesize the chemical elements. Deep underground in the Gran Sasso Laboratory the cross section of the key reactions of the proton-proton chain and of the Carbon-Nitrogen-Oxygen (CNO) cycle have been measured right down to the energies of astrophysical interest. The main results obtained during the 'solar' phase of LUNA are reviewed and their influence on our understanding of the properties of the neutrino and of the Sun is discussed. We then describe the current LUNA program mainly devoted to the study of the nucleosynthesis of the light elements in AGB stars and Classical Novae. Finally, the future of LUNA towards the study of helium and carbon burning with a new 3.5 MV accelerator is outlined.

  16. Nuclear astrophysics at DRAGON

    SciTech Connect

    Hager, U.

    2014-05-02

    The DRAGON recoil separator is located at the ISAC facility at TRIUMF, Vancouver. It is designed to measure radiative alpha and proton capture reactions of astrophysical importance. Over the last years, the DRAGON collaboration has measured several reactions using both radioactive and high-intensity stable beams. For example, the 160(a, g) cross section was recently measured. The reaction plays a role in steady-state helium burning in massive stars, where it follows the 12C(a, g) reaction. At astrophysically relevant energies, the reaction proceeds exclusively via direct capture, resulting in a low rate. In this measurement, the unique capabilities of DRAGON enabled determination not only of the total reaction rates, but also of decay branching ratios. In addition, results from other recent measurements will be presented.

  17. CASPAR - Nuclear Astrophysics Underground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strieder, Frank; Robertson, Daniel; Couder, Manoel; Greife, Uwe; Wells, Doug; Wiescher, Michael

    2015-10-01

    The work of the LUNA Collaboration at the Laboratori Nationali del Gran Sasso demonstrated the research potential of an underground accelerator for the field of nuclear astrophysics. Several key reactions could be studied at LUNA, some directly at the Gamow peak for solar hydrogen burning. The CASPAR (Compact Accelerator System for Performing Astrophysical Research) Collaboration will implement a high intensity 1 MV accelerator at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) and overcome the current limitation at LUNA. The installation of the accelerator in the recently rehabilitated underground cavity at SURF started in Summer 2015 and first beam should be delivered by the end of the year. This project will primarily focus on the neutron sources for the s-process, e.g. 13C(α , n) 16O and 22Ne(α , n) 25Mg , and lead to unprecedented measurements compared to previous studies. A detailed overview of the science goals of CASPAR will be presented.

  18. Birth of Neutrino Astrophysics

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Based mainly on the results of two experiments, KamiokaNDE and Super-KamiokaNDE, the birth of neutrino astrophysics will be described. At the end, the result of the third generation Kamioka experiment, KamLAND, will be discussed together with the future possibilities.Organiser(s): Daniel Treille / EP DivisionNote: * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00 hrs. Please note unusual day.

  19. Birth of Neutrino Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    2010-05-07

    Based mainly on the results of two experiments, KamiokaNDE and Super-KamiokaNDE, the birth of neutrino astrophysics will be described. At the end, the result of the third generation Kamioka experiment, KamLAND, will be discussed together with the future possibilities.Organiser(s): Daniel Treille / EP DivisionNote: * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00 hrs. Please note unusual day.

  20. Geophysical applications of squids

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, J.

    1983-05-01

    Present and potential geophysical applications of Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) include remote reference magnetotellurics, controlledsource electromagnetic sounding, airborne gradiometry, gravity gradiometers, rock magnetism, paleomagnetism, piezomagnetism, tectonomagnetism, the location of hydrofractures for hot dry rock geothermal energy and enhanced oil and gas recovery, the detection of internal ocean waves, and underwater magnetotellurics.

  1. Looking Forward to the electronic Geophysical Year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamide, Y.; Baker, D. N.; Thompson, B.; Barton, C.; Kihn, E.

    2004-12-01

    During the International Geophysical Year (1957-1958), member countries established many new capabilities pursuing the major IGY objectives of collecting geophysical data as widely as possible and providing free access to these data for all scientists around the globe. A key achievement of the IGY was the establishment of a worldwide system of data centers and physical observatories. The worldwide scientific community has now endorsed and is promoting an electronic Geophysical Year (eGY) initiative. The proposed eGY concept would both commemorate the 50th anniversary of the IGY in 2007-2008 and would provide a forward impetus to geophysics in the 21st century, similar to that provide by the IGY fifty years ago. The eGY concept advocates the establishment of a series of virtual geophysical observatories now being deployed in cyberspace. We discuss plans to aggregate measurements into a readily accessible database along with analysis, visualization, and display tools that will make information available and useful to the scientific community, to the user community, and to the general public. We are examining the possibilities for near-realtime acquisition of data and utilization of forecast tools in order to provide users with advanced space weather capabilities. This program will provide powerful tools for education and public outreach concerning the connected Sun-Earth System.

  2. Call to Adopt a Nominal Set of Astrophysical Parameters and Constants to Improve the Accuracy of Fundamental Physical Properties of Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmanec, Petr; Prša, Andrej

    2011-08-01

    The increasing precision of astronomical observations of stars and stellar systems is gradually getting to a level where the use of slightly different values of the solar mass, radius, and luminosity, as well as different values of fundamental physical constants, can lead to measurable systematic differences in the determination of basic physical properties. An equivalent issue with an inconsistent value of the speed of light was resolved by adopting a nominal value that is constant and has no error associated with it. Analogously, we suggest that the systematic error in stellar parameters may be eliminated by (1) replacing the solar radius Rsolar and luminosity Lsolar by the nominal values that are by definition exact and expressed in SI units: 1 R⊙^N =6.95508 × 108 m and 1 L⊙^N =3.846 × 1026 W (2) computing stellar masses in terms of Msolar by noting that the measurement error of the product GMsolar is 5 orders of magnitude smaller than the error in G; (3) computing stellar masses and temperatures in SI units by using the derived values M⊙2010 =1.988547 × 1030 kg and T⊙2010 =5779.57 K and (4) clearly stating the reference for the values of the fundamental physical constants used. We discuss the need and demonstrate the advantages of such a paradigm shift.

  3. Terrestrial Planet Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    Terrestrial planet geophysics beyond our home sphere had its start arguably in the early 1960s, with Keith Runcorn contending that the second-degree shape of the Moon is due to convection and Mariner 2 flying past Venus and detecting no planetary magnetic field. Within a decade, in situ surface geophysical measurements were carried out on the Moon with the Apollo program, portions of the lunar magnetic and gravity fields were mapped, and Jack Lorell and his colleagues at JPL were producing spherical harmonic gravity field models for Mars using tracking data from Mariner 9, the first spacecraft to orbit another planet. Moreover, Mariner 10 discovered a planetary magnetic field at Mercury, and a young Sean Solomon was using geological evidence of surface contraction to constrain the thermal evolution of the innermost planet. In situ geophysical experiments (such as seismic networks) were essentially never carried out after Apollo, although they were sometimes planned just beyond the believability horizon in planetary mission queues. Over the last three decades, the discipline of terrestrial planet geophysics has matured, making the most out of orbital magnetic and gravity field data, altimetric measurements of surface topography, and the integration of geochemical information. Powerful constraints are provided by tectonic and volcanic information gleaned from surface images, and the engagement of geologists in geophysical exercises is actually quite useful. Accompanying these endeavors, modeling techniques, largely adopted from the Earth Science community, have become increasingly sophisticated and have been greatly enhanced by the dramatic increase in computing power over the last two decades. The future looks bright with exciting new data sets emerging from the MESSENGER mission to Mercury, the promise of the GRAIL gravity mission to the Moon, and the re-emergence of Venus as a worthy target for exploration. Who knows? With the unflagging optimism and persistence

  4. Geophysical characterization of subsurface barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Borns, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    An option for controlling contaminant migration from plumes and buried waste sites is to construct a subsurface barrier of a low-permeability material. The successful application of subsurface barriers requires processes to verify the emplacement and effectiveness of barrier and to monitor the performance of a barrier after emplacement. Non destructive and remote sensing techniques, such as geophysical methods, are possible technologies to address these needs. The changes in mechanical, hydrologic and chemical properties associated with the emplacement of an engineered barrier will affect geophysical properties such a seismic velocity, electrical conductivity, and dielectric constant. Also, the barrier, once emplaced and interacting with the in situ geologic system, may affect the paths along which electrical current flows in the subsurface. These changes in properties and processes facilitate the detection and monitoring of the barrier. The approaches to characterizing and monitoring engineered barriers can be divided between (1) methods that directly image the barrier using the contrasts in physical properties between the barrier and the host soil or rock and (2) methods that reflect flow processes around or through the barrier. For example, seismic methods that delineate the changes in density and stiffness associated with the barrier represents a direct imaging method. Electrical self potential methods and flow probes based on heat flow methods represent techniques that can delineate the flow path or flow processes around and through a barrier.

  5. Astrophysical Constraints of Dark Matter Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Abel, Tom; Brooks, Alyson; Buckley, Matthew; Bullock, James; Collins, Michelle; Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; Dawson, William; Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Gaskins, Jennifer; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Keeton, Charles R.; Kim, Stacy; Peter, Annika; Read, Justin; Simon, Joshua D.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Tollerud, Erik Jon; Treu, Tommaso; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2016-01-01

    The nature of the dark matter that fills the universe remains a profound puzzle in physics and astrophysics. Modern astronomical observations have the potential to produce constraints or measurements on properties of dark matter that may have real power for insights into its particle nature. The key lies with understanding what those constraints may be in a way that is interpretable for both the astronomical and particle physics communities, and establishing a community consensus of how diverse astronomical paths can use a common language. The AAS Special Session on the "Astrophysical constraints of dark matter properties" focuses on framing these questions with concrete proposals for astronomical dark matter metrics and potentially figures of merit, and through a series of presentations that serve as points of departure for discussion, ultimately to reach a community consensus that will be useful for current and future pursuits on this topic.

  6. Fully covariant cosmology and its astrophysical implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesson, Paul S.; Liu, Hongya

    1995-01-01

    We present a cosmological model with good physical properties which is invariant not only under changes of the space and time coordinates but also under changes of an extra (Kaluza-Klein) coordinate related to rest mass. In frames where the latter is chosen to be constant we recover standard cosmology. In frames where it is chosen to be variable we obtain new astrophysical effects and gain insight into the nature of the big bang.

  7. Nuclear Data on Unstable Nuclei for Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael; Bardayan, Daniel; Blackmon, Jeffery; Nesaraja, Caroline; Lingerfelt, Eric; Scott, Jason; Hix, W. Raphael; Chae, Kyungyuk; Ma, Zhanwen; Guidry, Michael; Kozub, Raymond; Sharp, Jacob; Meyer, Richard

    2004-10-01

    The sequence of nuclear reactions occurring in supernova explosions is believed to involve thousands of neutron-rich nuclei, and a knowledge of the properties of these nuclei is essential to calculating the element synthesis in these cataclysmic events. Similarly, information on proton-rich nuclei is needed to understand nova explosions occurring on the surfaces of white dwarf stars and X-ray bursts occurring on the surfaces of neutron stars. Recent measurements with radioactive beams at ORNL's Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) and elsewhere have prompted the evaluation of a number of reactions involving unstable nuclei needed for stellar explosion studies. Recent evaluation efforts will be presented. To ensure that the latest relevant experimental and theoretical nuclear physics results are rapidly incorporated into astrophysical models, we have created a new computational infrastructure for nuclear astrophysics data. Available on-line at www.nucastrodata.org, a simple point-and-click interface guides users to convert evaluated nuclear reaction and structure information as input into thermonuclear reaction rates in a variety of output formats. It also enables users to combine a new reaction rate with an existing library, as well as to create, merge, store, document, and share custom libraries. Future capabilities will include tools to carry out data evaluations and to calculate and visualize the synthesis of elements in astrophysical environments. The site www.nucastrodata.org also features a comprehensive set of links (over 60 so far) to nuclear datasets around the world which are important for nuclear astrophysics studies.

  8. Physics Based University Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeby, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Two physics courses which serve as alternatives to general college courses in physics are outlined: physics with astrophysics and physics with electronics. Details are given of the structure of the courses and third year options are specified. (DT)

  9. Geophysical investigations in Jordan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kovach, R.L.; Andreasen, G.E.; Gettings, M.E.; El-Kaysi, K.

    1990-01-01

    A number of geophysical investigations have been undertaken in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan to provide data for understanding the tectonic framework, the pattern of seismicity, earthquake hazards and geothermal resources of the country. Both the historical seismic record and the observed recent seismicity point to the dominance of the Dead Sea Rift as the main locus of seismic activity but significant branching trends and gaps in the seismicity pattern are also seen. A wide variety of focal plane solutions are observed emphasizing the complex pattern of fault activity in the vicinity of the rift zone. Geophysical investigations directed towards the geothermal assessment of the prominent thermal springs of Zerga Ma'in and Zara are not supportive of the presence of a crustal magmatic source. ?? 1990.

  10. Geophysical fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowlis, W. W.

    1981-01-01

    Systematic scaling or dimensional analysis reveals that certain scales of geophysical fluid flows (such as stellar, ocean, and planetary atmosphere circulations) can be accurately modeled in the laboratory using a procedure which differs from conventional engineering modeling. Rather than building a model to obtain numbers for a specific design problem, the relative effects of the significant forces are systematically varied in an attempt to deepen understanding of the effects of these forces. Topics covered include: (1) modeling a large-scale planetary atmospheric flow in a rotating cylindrical annulus; (2) achieving a radial dielectric body force; (3) spherical geophysical fluid dynamics experiments for Spacelab flights; (4) measuring flow and temperature; and (5) the possible effect of rotational or precessional disturbances on the flow in the rotating spherical containers.

  11. Particles in astrophysics and cosmology: a dark connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornengo, Nicolao

    2010-11-01

    The particle physics interpretation of the missing-mass, or dark-matter, problem of cosmological and astrophysical nature is going to be posed under deep scrutiny in the next years. From the particle physics side, accelerators will deeply test theoretical ideas of new physics beyond the Standard Model, where particle candidates of dark matter are predicted. From the astrophysical side, many probes are already providing a great deal of independent information on the foreseen signals which can be produced by the galactic or extra-galactic dark matter. The ultimate hope is in fact the emergence of dark matter signals from the various sources of backgrounds and the rise of a coherent picture of new physics from the accelerator physics, astrophysics and cosmology sides. A very ambitious and far-reaching project, which will bring to a deeper level our understanding of the fundamental laws which rule the Universe.

  12. Recent Nuclear Astrophysics Data Activities in the US

    SciTech Connect

    Bardayan, D.W.; Blackmon, J.C.; Browne, E.; Firestone, R.B.; Hale, G.M.; Hoffman, R.D.; Ma, Z.; McLane, V.; Norman, E.B.; Shu, N.; Smith, D.L.; Smith, M.S.; Van Wormer, L.A.; Woosley, S.E.; Wu, S.-C.

    1999-08-30

    Measurements in nuclear physics laboratories form the empirical foundation for new, realistic, sophisticated theoretical models of a wide variety of astrophysical systems. The predictive power of these models has, in many instances, a strong dependence on the input nuclear data, and more extensive and accurate nuclear data is required for these models than ever before. Progress in astrophysics can be aided by providing scientists with more usable, accurate, and significant amounts of nuclear data in a timely fashion in formats that can be easily incorporated into their models. A number of recent data compilations, evaluations, calculations, and disseminations that address nuclear astrophysics data needs will be described.

  13. Nuclear Astrophysics Animations from the Nuclear Astrophysics Group at Clemson University

    DOE Data Explorer

    Meyer, Bradley; The, Lih-Sin

    The nuclear astrophysics group at Clemson University in South Carolina develops on-line tools and computer programs for astronomy, nuclear physics, and nuclear astrophysics. They have also done short animations that illustrate results from research with some of their tools. The animations are organized into three sections. The r-Process Movies demonstrate r-Process network calculations from the paper "Neutrino Capture and the R-Process" Meyer, McLaughlin, and Fuller, Phys. Rev. C, 58, 3696-3710 (1998). The Alpha-Rich Freezeout Movies are related to the reference: Standard alpha-rich freezeout calculation from The, Clayton, Jin, and Meyer 1998, Astrophysical Journal, "Reaction Rates Governing the Synthesis of 44Ti" At the current writing, the category for Low Metallicity s-Process Movies has only one item called n, p, 13C, 14N, 54Fe, and 88Sr Time evolution in convective zone.

  14. Perspectives in astrophysical databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frailis, Marco; de Angelis, Alessandro; Roberto, Vito

    2004-07-01

    Astrophysics has become a domain extremely rich of scientific data. Data mining tools are needed for information extraction from such large data sets. This asks for an approach to data management emphasizing the efficiency and simplicity of data access; efficiency is obtained using multidimensional access methods and simplicity is achieved by properly handling metadata. Moreover, clustering and classification techniques on large data sets pose additional requirements in terms of computation and memory scalability and interpretability of results. In this study we review some possible solutions.

  15. Astrophysical blast wave data

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Nathan; Geissel, Matthias; Lewis, Sean M; Porter, John L.

    2015-03-01

    The data described in this document consist of image files of shadowgraphs of astrophysically relevant laser driven blast waves. Supporting files include Mathematica notebooks containing design calculations, tabulated experimental data and notes, and relevant publications from the open research literature. The data was obtained on the Z-Beamlet laser from July to September 2014. Selected images and calculations will be published as part of a PhD dissertation and in associated publications in the open research literature, with Sandia credited as appropriate. The authors are not aware of any restrictions that could affect the release of the data.

  16. Asteroid Surface Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdoch, N.; Sánchez, P.; Schwartz, S. R.; Miyamoto, H.

    The regolith-covered surfaces of asteroids preserve records of geophysical processes that have occurred both at their surfaces and sometimes also in their interiors. As a result of the unique microgravity environment that these bodies possess, a complex and varied geophysics has given birth to fascinating features that we are just now beginning to understand. The processes that formed such features were first hypothesized through detailed spacecraft observations and have been further studied using theoretical, numerical, and experimental methods that often combine several scientific disciplines. These multiple approaches are now merging toward a further understanding of the geophysical states of the surfaces of asteroids. In this chapter we provide a concise summary of what the scientific community has learned so far about the surfaces of these small planetary bodies and the processes that have shaped them. We also discuss the state of the art in terms of experimental techniques and numerical simulations that are currently being used to investigate regolith processes occurring on small-body surfaces and that are contributing to the interpretation of observations and the design of future space missions.

  17. Geophysical Models for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M E; Walter, W R; Flanagan, M

    2003-07-16

    Geophysical models are increasingly recognized as an important component of regional calibrations for seismic monitoring. The models can be used to predict geophysical measurements, such as body wave travel times, and can be derived from direct regional studies or even by geophysical analogy. While empirical measurements of these geophysical parameters might be preferred, in aseismic regions or regions without seismic stations, this data might not exist. In these cases, models represent a 'best guess' of the seismic properties in a region, which improves on global models such as the PREM (Preliminary Reference Earth Model) or the IASPEI (International Association of Seismology and Physics of the Earth's Interior) models. The model-based predictions can also serve as a useful background for the empirical measurements by removing trends in the data. To this end, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed the WENA model for Western Eurasia and North Africa. This model is constructed using a regionalization of several dozen lithospheric (crust and uppermost mantle) models, combined with the Laske sediment model and 3SMAC upper mantle. We have evaluated this model using a number of data sets, including travel times, surface waves, receiver functions, and waveform analysis. Similarly, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has developed a geophysical model for East Asia, allowing LLNL/LANL to construct a model for all of Eurasia and North Africa. These models continue to evolve as new and updated datasets are used to critically assess the predictive powers of the model. Research results from this meeting and other reports and papers can be used to update and refine the regional boundaries and regional models. A number of other groups involved in monitoring have also developed geophysical models. As these become available, we will be assessing the models and their constitutive components for their suitability for inclusion in the National Nuclear Security

  18. Improved Simulations of Astrophysical Plasmas: Computation of New Atomic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorczyca, Thomas W.; Korista, Kirk T.

    2005-01-01

    Our research program is designed to carry out state-of-the-art atomic physics calculations crucial to advancing our understanding of fundamental astrophysical problems. We redress the present inadequacies in the atomic data base along two important areas: dielectronic recombination and inner-shell photoionization and multiple electron ejection/Auger fluorescence therefrom. All of these data are disseminated to the astrophysical community in the proper format for implementation in spectral simulation code.

  19. Gravitational Wave Science: Challenges for Numerical Relativistic Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cenrella, Joan

    2005-01-01

    Gravitational wave detectors on earth and in space will open up a new observational window on the universe. The new information about astrophysics and fundamental physics these observations will bring is expected to pose exciting challenges. This talk will provide an overview of this emerging area of gravitational wave science, with a focus on the challenges it will bring for numerical relativistic astrophysics and a look at some recent results.

  20. The Fermilab Particle Astrophysics Center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-11-01

    The Particle Astrophysics Center was established in fall of 2004. Fermilab director Michael S. Witherell has named Fermilab cosmologist Edward ''Rocky'' Kolb as its first director. The Center will function as an intellectual focus for particle astrophysics at Fermilab, bringing together the Theoretical and Experimental Astrophysics Groups. It also encompasses existing astrophysics projects, including the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search, and the Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory, as well as proposed projects, including the SuperNova Acceleration Probe to study dark energy as part of the Joint Dark Energy Mission, and the ground-based Dark Energy Survey aimed at measuring the dark energy equation of state.

  1. High Energy Astrophysics Program (HEAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, Lorella; Corcoran, Michael; Drake, Stephen; McGlynn, Thomas A.; Snowden, Stephen; Mukai, Koji; Cannizzo, John; Lochner, James; Rots, Arnold; Christian, Eric; Barthelmy, Scott; Palmer, David; Mitchell, John; Esposito, Joseph; Sreekumar, P.; Hua, Xin-Min; Mandzhavidze, Natalie; Chan, Kai-Wing; Soong, Yang; Barrett, Paul

    1998-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by the members of the USRA contract team during the 6 months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming 6 months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in astrophysics. Supported missions include advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-Ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) and others.

  2. High Energy Astrophysics Program (HEAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, L.; Holdridge, David V.; Norris, J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by members of the USRA contract team during the six months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  3. Mini-conference and Related Sessions on Laboratory Plasma Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Hantao Ji

    2004-02-27

    This paper provides a summary of some major physics issues and future perspectives discussed in the Mini-Conference on Laboratory Plasma Astrophysics. This Mini-conference, sponsored by the Topical Group on Plasma Astrophysics, was held as part of the American Physical Society's Division of Plasma Physics 2003 Annual Meeting (October 27-31, 2003). Also included are brief summaries of selected talks on the same topic presented at two invited paper sessions (including a tutorial) and two contributed focus oral sessions, which were organized in coordination with the Mini-Conference by the same organizers.

  4. Rapid geophysical surveyor

    SciTech Connect

    Roybal, L.G.; Carpenter, G.S.; Josten, N.E.

    1993-01-01

    The Rapid Geophysical Surveyor (RGS) is a system designed to rapidly and economically collect closely-spaced geophysical data used for characterization of Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. Geophysical surveys of waste sites are an important first step in the remediation and closure of these sites; especially older sties where historical records are inaccurate and survey benchmarks have changed due to refinements in coordinate controls and datum changes. Closely-spaced data are required to adequately differentiate pits, trenches, and soil vault rows whose edges may be only a few feet from each other. A prototype vehicle designed to collect magnetic field data was built at the Idaho national Engineering Laboratory (INEL) during the summer of 1992. The RGS was one of several projects funded by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program. This vehicle was demonstrated at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) within the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) on the INEL in September of 1992. Magnetic data were collected over two areas in the SDA, with a total survey area of about 1.7 acres. Data were collected at a nominal density of 2 1/2 inches along survey lines spaced 1 foot apart. Over 350,000 data points were collected over a 6 day period corresponding to about 185 man-days using conventional ground survey techniques. This report documents the design and demonstration of the RGS concept including the presentation of magnetic data collected at the SDA. The surveys were able to show pit and trench boundaries and determine details of their spatial orientation never before achieved.

  5. Rapid geophysical surveyor

    SciTech Connect

    Roybal, L.G.; Carpenter, G.S.; Josten, N.E.

    1993-07-01

    The Rapid Geophysical Surveyor (RGS) is a system designed to rapidly and economically collect closely-spaced geophysical data used for characterization of Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. Geophysical surveys of waste sites are an important first step in the remediation and closure of these sites; especially older sties where historical records are inaccurate and survey benchmarks have changed due to refinements in coordinate controls and datum changes. Closely-spaced data are required to adequately differentiate pits, trenches, and soil vault rows whose edges may be only a few feet from each other. A prototype vehicle designed to collect magnetic field data was built at the Idaho national Engineering Laboratory (INEL) during the summer of 1992. The RGS was one of several projects funded by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program. This vehicle was demonstrated at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) within the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) on the INEL in September of 1992. Magnetic data were collected over two areas in the SDA, with a total survey area of about 1.7 acres. Data were collected at a nominal density of 2 1/2 inches along survey lines spaced 1 foot apart. Over 350,000 data points were collected over a 6 day period corresponding to about 185 man-days using conventional ground survey techniques. This report documents the design and demonstration of the RGS concept including the presentation of magnetic data collected at the SDA. The surveys were able to show pit and trench boundaries and determine details of their spatial orientation never before achieved.

  6. Learning Astrophysics through Mobile Gaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massimino, P.; Costa, A.; Becciani, U.; Krokos, M.; Bandieramonte, M.; Petta, C.; Pistagna, C.; Riggi, S.; Sciacca, E.; Vitello, F.

    2013-10-01

    SpaceMission is a mobile application (iOS) offering hands-on experience of astrophysical concepts using scientific simulations. The application is based on VisIVO which is a suite of software tools for visual discovery through 3D views generated from astrophysical datasets.

  7. Important plasma problems in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Kulsrud, R.M.

    1995-01-01

    In astrophysics, plasmas occur under very extreme conditions. For example there are ultra strong magnetic fields in neutron stars) relativistic plasmas around black holes and in jets, extremely energetic particles such as cosmic rays in the interstellar medium, extremely dense plasmas in accretion disks, and extremely large magnetic Reynold`s numbers in the interstellar medium. These extreme limits for astrophysical plasmas make plasma phenomena much simpler to analyze in astrophysics than in the laboratory. An understanding of such phenomena often results in an interesting way, by simply taking the extreme limiting case of a known plasma theory. I will describe one of the more exciting examples. I will attempt to convey the excitement I felt when I was first exposed to it. However, not all plasma astrophysical phenomena are so simple. There are certain important plasma phenomena in astrophysics, which have not been so easily resolved. In fact a resolution of them is blocking significant progress in astrophysical research. They have not yet yielded to attacks by theoretical astrophysicists nor to extensive numerical simulation. I will attempt to describe one of the more important of these plasma-astrophysical problems, and discuss why its resolution is so important to astrophysics. This significant example is fast, magnetic reconnection. Another significant example is the large-magnetic-Reynold`s-number MHD dynamos.

  8. Nuclear Astrophysics with the Trojan Horse Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitaleri, Claudio

    2015-04-01

    In stars nuclear reactions take place at physical conditions that make very hard their measurements in terrestrial laboratories. Indeed in astrophysical environments nuclear reactions between charged nuclei occur at energies much lower than the Coulomb barrier and the corresponding cross section values lie in the nano or picobarn regime, that makes their experimental determination extremely difficult. This is due to the very small barrier Coulomb penetration factor, which produces an exponential fall off of the cross section as a function of energy. Additionally, the presence of the electron screening needs to be properly taken into account when dealing with cross section measurements at low-energies. The Trojan Horse Method (THM) represents an independent experimental technique, allowing one to measure astrophysical S(E)-factor bared from both Coulomb penetration and electron screening effects. The main advantages and the most recent results are here shown and discussed.

  9. New developments for high-energy astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, J.

    2000-03-01

    Unlike nearly all branches of physics, founded on the elaboration and analysis of experiments, astronomy is, above all, a science of observation, based mainly on the detection and study of the electromagnetic radiation emitted by celestial bodies. If one excepts devices operating in the radio bands, nearly all instruments used in astrophysics are based on the detection of photons. This review intends to highlight recent developments in high-energy astronomy and astrophysics studies from ground and space observations (from the X-ray band up to high-energy γ-rays and neutrinos). Particular attention will be given not only to recent technologies of photodetection now at work in the field of high-energy astronomy and to emerging photodetection studies in progress for future missions, but also to advanced imaging techniques used in the high-energy domain, which beyond any doubt, constitutes the most arduous of new astronomical disciplines.

  10. Theoretical Particle Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Kamionkowski, Marc

    2013-08-07

    Abstract: Theoretical Particle Astrophysics The research carried out under this grant encompassed work on the early Universe, dark matter, and dark energy. We developed CMB probes for primordial baryon inhomogeneities, primordial non-Gaussianity, cosmic birefringence, gravitational lensing by density perturbations and gravitational waves, and departures from statistical isotropy. We studied the detectability of wiggles in the inflation potential in string-inspired inflation models. We studied novel dark-matter candidates and their phenomenology. This work helped advance the DoE's Cosmic Frontier (and also Energy and Intensity Frontiers) by finding synergies between a variety of different experimental efforts, by developing new searches, science targets, and analyses for existing/forthcoming experiments, and by generating ideas for new next-generation experiments.

  11. Astrophysics with MILAGRO

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes how data from a new type of air shower detector, MILAGRO can shed light on a variety of interesting problems in astrophysics. MILAGRO has the capability to make observations of VHE/UHE emission from the recently discovered TeV gamma-ray source Markarian 421, an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN). An observation of the attenuation of this signal in the range of 1--20 TeV can be used to make the first measurement of the intergalactic infrared radiation. We will also describe how MILAGRO can improve the existing limits on the density of Primordial Black Holes (PBH) by three orders of magnitude. Finally, we will discuss how this instrument can be used to measure the diffuse galactic emission of gamma-rays which must come from the disk.

  12. Black-hole astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, P.; Bloom, E.; Cominsky, L.

    1995-07-01

    Black-hole astrophysics is not just the investigation of yet another, even if extremely remarkable type of celestial body, but a test of the correctness of the understanding of the very properties of space and time in very strong gravitational fields. Physicists` excitement at this new prospect for testing theories of fundamental processes is matched by that of astronomers at the possibility to discover and study a new and dramatically different kind of astronomical object. Here the authors review the currently known ways that black holes can be identified by their effects on their neighborhood--since, of course, the hole itself does not yield any direct evidence of its existence or information about its properties. The two most important empirical considerations are determination of masses, or lower limits thereof, of unseen companions in binary star systems, and measurement of luminosity fluctuations on very short time scales.

  13. Astrophysics with MILAGRO

    SciTech Connect

    The MILAGRO Collaboration

    1993-05-01

    This paper describes how data from a new type of air shower detector, MILAGRO can shed light on a variety of interesting problems in astrophysics. MILAGRO has the capability to make observations of VHE/UHE emission from the recently discovered TeV gamma-ray source Markarian 421, an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN). An observation of the attenuation of this signal in the range of 1--20 TeV can be used to make the first measurement of the intergalactic infrared radiation. We will also describe how MILAGRO can improve the existing limits on the density of Primordial Black Holes (PBH) by three orders of magnitude. Finally, we will discuss how this instrument can be used to measure the diffuse galactic emission of gamma-rays which must come from the disk.

  14. Photoneutron reactions in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Varlamov, V. V. Ishkhanov, B. S.; Orlin, V. N.; Peskov, N. N.; Stopani, K. A.

    2014-12-15

    Among key problems in nuclear astrophysics, that of obtaining deeper insight into the mechanism of synthesis of chemical elements is of paramount importance. The majority of heavy elements existing in nature are produced in stars via radiative neutron capture in so-called s- and r processes, which are, respectively, slow and fast, in relation to competing β{sup −}-decay processes. At the same time, we know 35 neutron-deficient so-called bypassed p-nuclei that lie between {sup 74}Se and {sup 196}Hg and which cannot originate from the aforementioned s- and r-processes. Their production is possible in (γ, n), (γ, p), or (γ, α) photonuclear reactions. In view of this, data on photoneutron reactions play an important role in predicting and describing processes leading to the production of p-nuclei. Interest in determining cross sections for photoneutron reactions in the threshold energy region, which is of particular importance for astrophysics, has grown substantially in recent years. The use of modern sources of quasimonoenergetic photons obtained in processes of inverse Compton laser-radiation scattering on relativistic electronsmakes it possible to reveal rather interesting special features of respective cross sections, manifestations of pygmy E1 and M1 resonances, or the production of nuclei in isomeric states, on one hand, and to revisit the problem of systematic discrepancies between data on reaction cross sections from experiments of different types, on the other hand. Data obtained on the basis of our new experimental-theoretical approach to evaluating cross sections for partial photoneutron reactions are invoked in considering these problems.

  15. Preliminary geological investigation of the Bir Hayzan diatomite deposit, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, with a section on selected physical properties and implications for future geophysical exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, J.W.; Gettings, M.E.

    1982-01-01

    diatom association and further laboratory testing of physical properties of the diatomite also should be made. Further exploration in the Nafud is recommended to locate other possible diatomite deposits.

  16. International Symposium on Airborne Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogi, Toru; Ito, Hisatoshi; Kaieda, Hideshi; Kusunoki, Kenichiro; Saltus, Richard W.; Fitterman, David V.; Okuma, Shigeo; Nakatsuka, Tadashi

    2006-05-01

    Airborne geophysics can be defined as the measurement of Earth properties from sensors in the sky. The airborne measurement platform is usually a traditional fixed-wing airplane or helicopter, but could also include lighter-than-air craft, unmanned drones, or other specialty craft. The earliest history of airborne geophysics includes kite and hot-air balloon experiments. However, modern airborne geophysics dates from the mid-1940s when military submarine-hunting magnetometers were first used to map variations in the Earth's magnetic field. The current gamut of airborne geophysical techniques spans a broad range, including potential fields (both gravity and magnetics), electromagnetics (EM), radiometrics, spectral imaging, and thermal imaging.

  17. Historical Upper Atmosphere Geophysics Reports Now Available Online

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, J. H.; Clark, C. A.; Denig, William F.; Wilkinson, D. C.

    2012-05-01

    On 29 November 2011, NOAA’s National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) published the 1968-1996 series of the Upper Atmosphere Geophysics (UAG) reports online at http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/stp/solar/onlinepubl.html. This 105-volume series contains reports on unusual occurrences in the near-Earth space environment, on specialized data collections, and on other records and materials of interest to the solar-terrestrial physics community.

  18. Geophone design evolution related to non-geophysical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, P.

    1996-04-01

    Acoustic velocity sensors, {open_quote}{open_quote}geophones,{close_quote}{close_quote} are used for geophysical exploration in large numbers worldwide. Information is presented to aid potential users in other fields to evaluate the geophone as a viable sensor. Past history and present design are covered in a series of slides and drawings. Intrinsic noise, frequency bandwidth, and dynamic range of typical production geophones are characterized. Some successful non-geophysical applications are described. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Fundamentals of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, James C.

    2006-07-01

    Earth's atmosphere and oceans exhibit complex patterns of fluid motion over a vast range of space and time scales. These patterns combine to establish the climate in response to solar radiation that is inhomogeneously absorbed by the materials comprising air, water, and land. Spontaneous, energetic variability arises from instabilities in the planetary-scale circulations, appearing in many different forms such as waves, jets, vortices, boundary layers, and turbulence. Geophysical fluid dynamics (GFD) is the science of all these types of fluid motion. This textbook is a concise and accessible introduction to GFD for intermediate to advanced students of the physics, chemistry, and/or biology of Earth's fluid environment. The book was developed from the author's many years of teaching a first-year graduate course at the University of California, Los Angeles. Readers are expected to be familiar with physics and mathematics at the level of general dynamics (mechanics) and partial differential equations. Covers the essential GFD required for atmospheric science and oceanography courses Mathematically rigorous, concise coverage of basic theory and applications to both oceans and atmospheres Author is a world expert; this book is based on the course he has taught for many years Exercises are included, with solutions available to instructors from solutions@cambridge.org

  20. Resonant Compton Physics for Magnetar Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ickes, Jesse; Gonthier, Peter L.; Eiles, Matthew; Baring, Matthew G.

    2016-01-01

    Various telescopes including RXTE, INTEGRAL, Suzaku, and Fermi have detected steady non-thermal X-ray emission in the 10 - 200 keV band from strongly magnetic neutron stars known as magnetars. Magnetic inverse Compton scattering is believed to be the leading candidate for the production of this intense X-ray radiation. Scattering at ultra-relativistic energies leads to attractive simplifications in the analytics of the magnetic Compton cross section. We have recently addressed such a case by developing compact analytic expressions using correct spin-dependent widths acquired through the implementation of Sokolov & Ternov basis states, focusing specifically on ground-state-ground-state scattering. Compton scattering in magnetar magnetospheres can cool electrons down to mildly relativistic energies. Moreover, soft gamma-ray flaring in magnetars may involve strong Comptonization in expanding clouds of mildly relativistic pairs. Such environs necessitate the development of more general magnetic scattering cross sections, in which the incoming photons acquire substantial incident angles relative to the field in the rest frame of the electron leading to arbitrary Landau excitations of the intermediate and final states. Due to the rapid transitions of the excited-state to the ground-state, the initial electron is still assumed to be in the ground state. The cross sections treat the plethora of harmonic resonances associated with various cyclotron transitions between Landau states. Polarization and spin dependence of the cross section for the four scattering modes is compared to the cross section obtained with spin-averaged widths. We present numerical results to show the comparisons to highlight the role of the spin-dependent widths of the resonances. The findings presented here will have applications to various neutron star problems, including computation of Eddington luminosities and polarization mode-switching rates in transient magnetar fireballs.

  1. Geophysical Signitures From Hydrocarbon Contaminated Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, M.; Jardani, A.

    2015-12-01

    The task of delineating the contamination plumes as well as studying their impact on the soil and groundwater biogeochemical properties is needed to support the remediation efforts and plans. Geophysical methods including electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), induced polarization (IP), ground penetrating radar (GPR), and self-potential (SP) have been previously used to characterize contaminant plumes and investigate their impact on soil and groundwater properties (Atekwana et al., 2002, 2004; Benson et al., 1997; Campbell et al., 1996; Cassidy et al., 2001; Revil et al., 2003; Werkema et al., 2000). Our objective was to: estimate the hydrocarbon contamination extent in a contaminated site in northern France, and to adverse the effects of the oil spill on the groundwater properties. We aim to find a good combination of non-intrusive and low cost methods which we can use to follow the bio-remediation process, which is planned to proceed next year. We used four geophysical methods including electrical resistivity tomography, IP, GPR, and SP. The geophysical data was compared to geochemical ones obtained from 30 boreholes installed in the site during the geophysical surveys. Our results have shown: low electrical resistivity values; high chargeability values; negative SP anomalies; and attenuated GPR reflections coincident with groundwater contamination. Laboratory and field geochemical measurements have demonstrated increased groundwater electrical conductivity and increased microbial activity associated with hydrocarbon contamination of groundwater. Our study results support the conductive model suggested by studies such as Sauck (2000) and Atekwana et al., (2004), who suggest that biological alterations of hydrocarbon contamination can substantially modify the chemical and physical properties of the subsurface, producing a dramatic shift in the geo-electrical signature from resistive to conductive. The next stage of the research will include time lapse borehole

  2. Quantum gravity at astrophysical distances?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, M.; Weyer, H.

    2004-12-01

    Assuming that quantum Einstein gravity (QEG) is the correct theory of gravity on all length scales, we use analytical results from nonperturbative renormalization group (RG) equations as well as experimental input in order to characterize the special RG trajectory of QEG which is realized in Nature and to determine its parameters. On this trajectory, we identify a regime of scales where gravitational physics is well described by classical general relativity. Strong renormalization effects occur at both larger and smaller momentum scales. The latter lead to a growth of Newton's constant at large distances. We argue that this effect becomes visible at the scale of galaxies and could provide a solution to the astrophysical missing mass problem which does not require any dark matter. We show that an extremely weak power law running of Newton's constant leads to flat galaxy rotation curves similar to those observed in Nature. Furthermore, a possible resolution of the cosmological constant problem is proposed by noting that all RG trajectories admitting a long classical regime automatically give rise to a small cosmological constant.

  3. Two LANL laboratory astrophysics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Intrator, Thomas P.

    2014-01-24

    Two laboratory experiments are described that have been built at Los Alamos (LANL) to gain access to a wide range of fundamental plasma physics issues germane to astro, space, and fusion plasmas. The overarching theme is magnetized plasma dynamics which includes significant currents, MHD forces and instabilities, magnetic field creation and annihilation, sheared flows and shocks. The Relaxation Scaling Experiment (RSX) creates current sheets and flux ropes that exhibit fully 3D dynamics, and can kink, bounce, merge and reconnect, shred, and reform in complicated ways. Recent movies from a large data set describe the 3D magnetic structure of a driven and dissipative single flux rope that spontaneously self-saturates a kink instability. Examples of a coherent shear flow dynamo driven by colliding flux ropes will also be shown. The Magnetized Shock Experiment (MSX) uses Field reversed configuration (FRC) experimental hardware that forms and ejects FRCs at 150km/sec. This is sufficient to drive a collision less magnetized shock when stagnated into a mirror stopping field region with Alfven Mach number MA=3 so that super critical shocks can be studied. We are building a plasmoid accelerator to drive Mach numbers MA >> 3 to access solar wind and more exotic astrophysical regimes. Unique features of this experiment include access to parallel, oblique and perpendicular shocks, shock region much larger than ion gyro radii and ion inertial length, room for turbulence, and large magnetic and fluid Reynolds numbers.

  4. Relativistic opacities for astrophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, C. J.; Fryer, C. L.; Hungerford, A. L.; Hakel, P.; Colgan, J.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Sherrill, M. E.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the use of the Los Alamos suite of relativistic atomic physics codes to generate radiative opacities for the modeling of astrophysically relevant plasmas under local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions. The atomic structure calculations are carried out in fine-structure detail, including full configuration interaction. Three example applications are considered: iron opacities at conditions relevant to the base of the solar convection zone, nickel opacities for the modeling of stellar envelopes, and samarium opacities for the modeling of light curves produced by neutron star mergers. In the first two examples, comparisons are made between opacities that are generated with the fully and semi-relativistic capabilities in the Los Alamos suite of codes. As expected for these highly charged, iron-peak ions, the two methods produce reasonably similar results, providing confidence that the numerical methods have been correctly implemented. However, discrepancies greater than 10% are observed for nickel and investigated in detail. In the final application, the relativistic capability is used in a preliminary investigation of the complicated absorption spectrum associated with cold lanthanide elements.

  5. Studying Nuclear Astrophysics at NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, R; Bernstein, L; Brune, C

    2009-07-01

    measurements of some of the nuclear reaction probabilities that are important to nuclear astrophysics, the field that relates energy production and nucleosynthesis from nuclear reactions in stars and in the Big Bang to the environments in which those nuclear reactions occur. NIF, unlike previous nuclear-physics facilities, will enable measurements of nuclear reactions at the temperatures, densities, and ionization states similar to those that occur in stars.

  6. Theoretically Palatable Flavor Combinations of Astrophysical Neutrinos.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Mauricio; Beacom, John F; Winter, Walter

    2015-10-16

    The flavor composition of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos can reveal the physics governing their production, propagation, and interaction. The IceCube Collaboration has published the first experimental determination of the ratio of the flux in each flavor to the total. We present, as a theoretical counterpart, new results for the allowed ranges of flavor ratios at Earth for arbitrary flavor ratios in the sources. Our results will allow IceCube to more quickly identify when their data imply standard physics, a general class of new physics with arbitrary (incoherent) combinations of mass eigenstates, or new physics that goes beyond that, e.g., with terms that dominate the Hamiltonian at high energy. PMID:26550861

  7. Geophysical fluid dynamics: whence, whither and why?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the role of geophysical fluid dynamics (GFD) in understanding the natural environment, and in particular the dynamics of atmospheres and oceans on Earth and elsewhere. GFD, as usually understood, is a branch of the geosciences that deals with fluid dynamics and that, by tradition, seeks to extract the bare essence of a phenomenon, omitting detail where possible. The geosciences in general deal with complex interacting systems and in some ways resemble condensed matter physics or aspects of biology, where we seek explanations of phenomena at a higher level than simply directly calculating the interactions of all the constituent parts. That is, we try to develop theories or make simple models of the behaviour of the system as a whole. However, these days in many geophysical systems of interest, we can also obtain information for how the system behaves by almost direct numerical simulation from the governing equations. The numerical model itself then explicitly predicts the emergent phenomena—the Gulf Stream, for example—something that is still usually impossible in biology or condensed matter physics. Such simulations, as manifested, for example, in complicated general circulation models, have in some ways been extremely successful and one may reasonably now ask whether understanding a complex geophysical system is necessary for predicting it. In what follows we discuss such issues and the roles that GFD has played in the past and will play in the future. PMID:27616918

  8. Atomic processes for astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badnell, N. R.; Del Zanna, G.; Fernández-Menchero, L.; Giunta, A. S.; Liang, G. Y.; Mason, H. E.; Storey, P. J.

    2016-05-01

    In this review we summarize the recent calculations and improvements of atomic data that we have carried out for the analysis of astrophysical spectroscopy within the atomic processes for astrophysical plasmas network. We briefly discuss the various methods used for the calculations, and highlight several issues that we have uncovered during such extensive work. We discuss the completeness and accuracy of the cross sections for ionic excitation by electron impact for the main isoelectronic sequences, which we have obtained with large-scale calculations. Given its astrophysical importance, we emphasize the work on iron. Some examples on the significant improvement that has been achieved over previous calculations are provided.

  9. Geophysics on Wikipedia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    A priority for both NSF and AGU is the communication of scientific knowledge to the public. One way of determining where the public is looking for information is to search for geophysical terms on Google. Often the first hit is a Wikipedia site. Wikipedia is often the first place that high school students look. Yet there are few geophysicists who contribute to Wikipedia pages. This is particularly true of paleomagnetism and related subjects. In this project, efforts to improve the extent and quality of paleomagnetism coverage are described. The state of the Wikipedia articles at the beginning of this project is compared with their current state. The process of organizing the large number of articles and prioritizing them is described, along with ways to form collaborations on Wikipedia between geophysicists.

  10. Sampling functions for geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacaglia, G. E. O.; Lunquist, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    A set of spherical sampling functions is defined such that they are related to spherical-harmonic functions in the same way that the sampling functions of information theory are related to sine and cosine functions. An orderly distribution of (N + 1) squared sampling points on a sphere is given, for which the (N + 1) squared spherical sampling functions span the same linear manifold as do the spherical-harmonic functions through degree N. The transformations between the spherical sampling functions and the spherical-harmonic functions are given by recurrence relations. The spherical sampling functions of two arguments are extended to three arguments and to nonspherical reference surfaces. Typical applications of this formalism to geophysical topics are sketched.

  11. Astrophysics for Early Elementary Students and Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, R.

    2004-12-01

    How can very young students be taught astrophysics? What can we offer to teachers of K-4 students? Whether you deal directly with youngsters in classrooms, work with your School of Education to develop science inquiry training, or offer occasional general outreach, we discuss activities your program can adopt from the University of Oregon's Electronic Universe outreach program. This collaboration through NASA's Oregon Space Grant plus citizen amateur astronomers has been successfully delivering astrophysics to students in all grades throughout Oregon for over a decade. Students in grades K-4 are generally very enthusiastic learners who have a lot of interest in content and technology about space. Unfortunately typical curricula, state learning requirements, and typical training of their teachers is usually very simplistic and often contains erroneous and outdated materials. We'll work through a series of explorations designed for elementary level that use digital data and virtual reality simulations in conjunction with kinesthetic activities to connect observations such as brightness, shadows, motions, shapes, and colors to basic physical characteristics and properties. This is the starting place where we can grab already curious students and inspire teachers, particularly new teachers, to use space science content to develop science inquiry based curricula. Young students and their teachers can handle astrophysics if the topics are presented in familiar terms and with use of sufficient first hand modeling. Don't be afraid to start them early on these topics, this could dispel myths, generate future interest, and promote careers in science.

  12. Goddard's Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Kimberly A. (Editor); Reddy, Francis J. (Editor); Tyler, Patricia A. (Editor)

    2014-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division (ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radio wavelengths as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for two orbiting astrophysics missions Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and Swift as well as the Science Support Center for Fermi. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, space-based interferometry, high contrast imaging techniques to search for exoplanets, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. The overriding goals of ASD are to carry out cutting-edge scientific research, provide Project Scientist support for spaceflight missions, implement the goals of the NASA Strategic Plan, serve and support the astronomical community, and enable future missions by conceiving new concepts and inventing new technologies.

  13. Goddard's Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan; Reddy, Francis; Tyler, Pat

    2012-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division(ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center(GSFC)is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radiowavelengths as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for three orbiting astrophysics missions WMAP, RXTE, and Swift, as well as the Science Support Center for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, space-based interferometry, high contract imaging techniques to serch for exoplanets, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. The overriding goals of ASD are to carry out cutting-edge scientific research, and provide Project Scientist support for spaceflight missions, implement the goals of the NASA Strategic Plan, serve and suppport the astronomical community, and enable future missions by conceiving new conepts and inventing new technologies.

  14. Molecular hydrogen and thermal phases in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Lepp, S.H.

    1984-01-01

    The general theme of this thesis is to stress the importance of hydrogen molecules (H/sub 2/) in astrophysics and to illustrate the connection of atomic and molecular physics with radiative, thermal, and dynamical processes in space. Detailed models of the thermal structure and spectral emission of interstellar gas in a variety of astrophysical environments were constructed: x-ray sources in molecular clouds; quasars; and the early universe. The thesis consists of four research papers. In the first, new dissociation rates for H/sub 2/ at low (astrophysical) densities are calculated. The second paper analyzes the thermal structure and characteristic spectral emission of a molecular cloud with an embedded x-ray source. The third paper, extends these results, and x-ray illuminated gas in interstellar space and quasars is studied. It is possible that broad emission line clouds in quasars could have warm (T < 2000 K) molecular cores. In the last paper, the author computes the trace abundance of H/sub 2/, HD, and LiH produced following the recombination epoch in a homogeneous Big Bang model and in the collapse of primordial gas clouds.

  15. Simple analytic model for astrophysical S factors

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, D. G.; Beard, M.; Gasques, L. R.; Wiescher, M.

    2010-10-15

    We propose a physically transparent analytic model of astrophysical S factors as a function of a center-of-mass energy E of colliding nuclei (below and above the Coulomb barrier) for nonresonant fusion reactions. For any given reaction, the S(E) model contains four parameters [two of which approximate the barrier potential, U(r)]. They are easily interpolated along many reactions involving isotopes of the same elements; they give accurate practical expressions for S(E) with only several input parameters for many reactions. The model reproduces the suppression of S(E) at low energies (of astrophysical importance) due to the shape of the low-r wing of U(r). The model can be used to reconstruct U(r) from computed or measured S(E). For illustration, we parametrize our recent calculations of S(E) (using the Sao Paulo potential and the barrier penetration formalism) for 946 reactions involving stable and unstable isotopes of C, O, Ne, and Mg (with nine parameters for all reactions involving many isotopes of the same elements, e.g., C+O). In addition, we analyze astrophysically important {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C reaction, compare theoretical models with experimental data, and discuss the problem of interpolating reliably known S(E) values to low energies (E < or approx. 2-3 MeV).

  16. Gravitational microlensing I: A unique astrophysical tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahvar, Sohrab

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we review the astrophysical application of gravitational microlensing. After introducing the history of gravitational lensing, we present the key equations and concept of microlensing. The most frequent microlensing events are single-lens events and historically it has been used for searching dark matter in the form of compact astrophysical halo objects in the Galactic halo. We discuss about the degeneracy problem in the parameters of lens and perturbation effects that can partially break the degeneracy between the lens parameters. The rest of paper is about the astrophysical applications of microlensing. One of the important applications is in the stellar physics by probing the surface of source stars in the high magnification microlensing events. The astrometric and polarimetric observations will be complimentary for probing the atmosphere and stellar spots on the surface of source stars. Finally we discuss about the future projects as space-based telescopes for parallax and astrometry observations of microlensing events. With this project, we would expect to produce a complete stellar and remnant mass function and study the structure of Galaxy in term of distribution of stars along our line of sight towards the center of galaxy.

  17. The Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegerle, William (Editor); Reddy, Francis (Editor); Tyler, Pat (Editor)

    2010-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division (ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum - from gamma rays to radio wavelengths - as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for three orbiting astrophysics missions - WMAP, RXTE, and Swift, as well as the Science Support Center for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, space-based interferometry, high contrast imaging techniques to search for exoplanets, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. The overriding goals of ASD are to carry out cutting-edge scientific research, provide Project Scientist support for spaceflight missions, implement the goals of the NASA Strategic Plan, serve and support the astronomical community, and enable future missions by conceiving new concepts and inventing new technologies.

  18. Future Chances and Challenges for Near Surface Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noell, U.; Meyer, U.

    2011-12-01

    Near surface geophysics provides information from global to local scale: a) Standardized geophysical observations are utilized e.g. in risk management frameworks beyond the national level a) Specific tasks in local or regional frameworks as mine flooding or ground water recharge monitoring are required. Either way, near surface geophysics is connected more than ever to technical problems and thus is vastly adopted by engineering. This is a chance and challenge at the same time. The chance is to make near surface geophysics more useful in applied and practical issues, the challenge is to develop new profiles and research directions. Recent satellite earth observation missions have much enhanced capabilities to observe near surface features and changes but generally very limited penetration. Near surface geophysics can bridge the gap between surface characterization and subsurface structures. Subsurface structures as aquifer systems, layering, deposits and mineralization can be determined by non-invasive near surface geophysics. A special challenge here is the enhanced interpretation of the physical data combined with an improved understanding of complex subsurface processes. Moreover, the limits of the interpretation and the measurements need to be quantified. Another future challenge is to gain a better and reliable understanding of soil - water cycles and gaseous flows via near surface geophysics. New methods and techniques that did not seem feasible in the past must reviewed whilst technology developed. This includes squids for magnetics and electromagnetics applications, nuclear magnetic resonance methods etc.

  19. Numerical Relativity and Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, Luis; Pretorius, Frans

    2014-08-01

    Throughout the Universe many powerful events are driven by strong gravitational effects that require general relativity to fully describe them. These include compact binary mergers, black hole accretion, and stellar collapse, where velocities can approach the speed of light and extreme gravitational fields (ΦNewt/c2≃1) mediate the interactions. Many of these processes trigger emission across a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Compact binaries further source strong gravitational wave emission that could directly be detected in the near future. This feat will open up a gravitational wave window into our Universe and revolutionize our understanding of it. Describing these phenomena requires general relativity, and—where dynamical effects strongly modify gravitational fields—the full Einstein equations coupled to matter sources. Numerical relativity is a field within general relativity concerned with studying such scenarios that cannot be accurately modeled via perturbative or analytical calculations. In this review, we examine results obtained within this discipline, with a focus on its impact in astrophysics.

  20. Women in Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Laura M.; O'Fallon, Nancy M.

    This booklet presents information about career opportunities for women in physics. Included are summaries of research areas in physics (optical physics, solid-state physics, materials science, nuclear physics, high-energy physics, astrophysics, cryogenics, plasma physics, biophysics, atmospheric physics) and differences between theory and…

  1. Radiative capture reactions in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, Carl R.; Davids, Barry

    2015-08-07

    Here, the radiative capture reactions of greatest importance in nuclear astrophysics are identified and placed in their stellar contexts. Recent experimental efforts to estimate their thermally averaged rates are surveyed.

  2. Neutrinos in astrophysics and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balantekin, A. B.

    2016-06-01

    Neutrinos play a crucial role in many aspects of astrophysics and cosmology. Since they control the electron fraction, or equivalently neutron-to-proton ratio, neutrino properties impact yields of r-process nucleosynthesis. Similarly the weak decoupling temperature in the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis epoch is exponentially dependent on the neutron-to-proton ratio. In these conference proceedings, I briefly summarize some of the recent work exploring the role of neutrinos in astrophysics and cosmology.

  3. Data Integration for Interpretation of Near-Surface Geophysical Tomograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day-Lewis, F. D.; Singha, K.

    2007-12-01

    Traditionally, interpretation of geophysical tomograms for geologic structure or engineering properties has been either qualitative, or based on petrophysical or statistical mapping to convert tomograms of the geophysical parameter (e.g., seismic velocity, radar velocity, or electrical conductivity) to some hydraulic parameter or engineering property of interest (e.g., hydraulic conductivity, porosity, or shear strength). Standard approaches to petrophysical and statistical mapping do not account for variable geophysical resolution, and thus it is difficult to obtain reliable, quantitative estimates of hydrologic properties or to characterize hydrologic processes in situ. Recent research to understand the limitations of tomograms for quantitative estimation points to the need for data integration. We divide near-surface geophysical data integration into two categories: 'inversion-based' and 'post- inversion' approaches. The first category includes 'informed-inversion' strategies that integrate complementary information in the form of prior information; constraints; physically-based regularization or parameterization; or coupled inversion. Post-inversion approaches include probabilistic frameworks to map tomograms to models of engineering properties, while accounting for geophysical resolution, survey design, heterogeneity, and physical models for hydrologic processes. Here, we review recent research demonstrating the need for, and advantages of, data integration. We present examples of both inversion-based and post-inversion data integration to reduce uncertainty, improve interpretation of near-surface geophysical results, and produce more reliable predictive models.

  4. Application of surface geophysics to ground-water investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zohdy, Adel A.R.; Eaton, Gordon P.; Mabey, Don R.

    1974-01-01

    This manual reviews the standard methods of surface geophysics applicable to ground-water investigations. It covers electrical methods, seismic and gravity methods, and magnetic methods. The general physical principles underlying each method and its capabilities and limitations are described. Possibilities for non-uniqueness of interpretation of geophysical results are noted. Examples of actual use of the methods are given to illustrate applications and interpretation in selected geohydrologic environments. The objective of the manual is to provide the hydrogeologist with a sufficient understanding of the capabilities, imitations, and relative cost of geophysical methods to make sound decisions as to when to use of these methods is desirable. The manual also provides enough information for the hydrogeologist to work with a geophysicist in designing geophysical surveys that differentiate significant hydrogeologic changes.

  5. High energy particles and quanta in astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, F. B. (Editor); Fichtel, C. E.

    1974-01-01

    The various subdisciplines of high-energy astrophysics are surveyed in a series of articles which attempt to give an overall view of the subject as a whole by emphasizing the basic physics common to all fields in which high-energy particles and quanta play a role. Successive chapters cover cosmic ray experimental observations, the abundances of nuclei in the cosmic radiation, cosmic electrons, solar modulation, solar particles (observation, relationship to the sun acceleration, interplanetary medium), radio astronomy, galactic X-ray sources, the cosmic X-ray background, and gamma ray astronomy. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  6. Emission lines from hot astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, John C.

    The spectral lines which dominate the X-ray emission of hot, optically thin astrophysical plasmas reflect the elemental abundances, temperature distribution, and other physical parameters of the emitting gas. The accuracy and level of detail with which these parameters can be inferred are limited by the measurement uncertainties and uncertainties in atomic rates used to compute the model spectrum. This paper discusses the relative importance and the likely uncertainties in the various atomic rates and the likely uncertainties in the overall ionization balance and spectral line emissivities predicted by the computer codes currently used to fit X-ray spectral data.

  7. Nuclear data on unstable nuclei for astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael S.; Meyer, Richard A.; Bardayan, Daniel W.; Blackmon, Jeffery C.; Chae, Kyungyuk; Guidry, Michael W.; Hix, W. Raphael; Kozub, R. L.; Lingerfelt, Eric J.; Ma, Zhanwen; Scott, Jason P.

    2004-12-01

    Recent measurements with radioactive beams at ORNL's Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) have prompted the evaluation of a number of reactions involving unstable nuclei needed for stellar explosion studies. We discuss these evaluations, as well as the development of a new computational infrastructure to enable the rapid incorporation of the latest nuclear physics results in astrophysics models. This infrastructure includes programs that simplify the generation of reaction rates, manage rate databases, and visualize reaction rates, all hosted at a new website http://www.nucastrodata.org.

  8. Recent Nuclear Astrophysics Data Activities at ORNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael S.; Bardayan, Daniel W.; Blackmon, Jeffery C.; Meyer, Richard A.; Chae, Kyungyuk; Guidry, Michael W.; Hix, W. Raphael; Lingerfelt, Eric J.; Ma, Zhanwen; Scott, Jason P.; Kozub, Raymond L.

    2005-12-01

    Recent measurements with radioactive beams at ORNL's Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) have prompted the evaluation of a number of reactions involving unstable nuclei needed for stellar explosion studies. We discuss these evaluations, as well as the development of a new computational infrastructure to enable the rapid incorporation of the latest nuclear physics results in astrophysics models. This infrastructure includes programs that simplify the generation of reaction rates, manage rate databases, and visualize reaction rates, all hosted at a new website .

  9. Minicourses in Astrophysics, Modular Approach, Vol. I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Univ., Chicago.

    This is the first volume of a two-volume minicourse in astrophysics. It contains chapters on the following topics: planetary atmospheres; X-ray astronomy; radio astrophysics; molecular astrophysics; and gamma-ray astrophysics. Each chapter gives much technical discussion, mathematical treatment, diagrams, and examples. References are included with…

  10. Acceleration in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.

    1993-12-31

    The origin of cosmic rays and applicable laboratory experiments are discussed. Some of the problems of shock acceleration for the production of cosmic rays are discussed in the context of astrophysical conditions. These are: The presumed unique explanation of the power law spectrum is shown instead to be a universal property of all lossy accelerators; the extraordinary isotropy of cosmic rays and the limited diffusion distances implied by supernova induced shock acceleration requires a more frequent and space-filling source than supernovae; the near perfect adiabaticity of strong hydromagnetic turbulence necessary for reflecting the accelerated particles each doubling in energy roughly 10{sup 5} to {sup 6} scatterings with negligible energy loss seems most unlikely; the evidence for acceleration due to quasi-parallel heliosphere shocks is weak. There is small evidence for the expected strong hydromagnetic turbulence, and instead, only a small number of particles accelerate after only a few shock traversals; the acceleration of electrons in the same collisionless shock that accelerates ions is difficult to reconcile with the theoretical picture of strong hydromagnetic turbulence that reflects the ions. The hydromagnetic turbulence will appear adiabatic to the electrons at their much higher Larmor frequency and so the electrons should not be scattered incoherently as they must be for acceleration. Therefore the electrons must be accelerated by a different mechanism. This is unsatisfactory, because wherever electrons are accelerated these sites, observed in radio emission, may accelerate ions more favorably. The acceleration is coherent provided the reconnection is coherent, in which case the total flux, as for example of collimated radio sources, predicts single charge accelerated energies much greater than observed.

  11. Solar astrophysical fundamental parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, M.; Irbah, A.; Hauchecorne, A.

    2014-08-01

    The accurate determination of the solar photospheric radius has been an important problem in astronomy for many centuries. From the measurements made by the PICARD spacecraft during the transit of Venus in 2012, we obtained a solar radius of 696,156±145 kilometres. This value is consistent with recent measurements carried out atmosphere. This observation leads us to propose a change of the canonical value obtained by Arthur Auwers in 1891. An accurate value for total solar irradiance (TSI) is crucial for the Sun-Earth connection, and represents another solar astrophysical fundamental parameter. Based on measurements collected from different space instruments over the past 35 years, the absolute value of the TSI, representative of a quiet Sun, has gradually decreased from 1,371W.m-2 in 1978 to around 1,362W.m-2 in 2013, mainly due to the radiometers calibration differences. Based on the PICARD data and in agreement with Total Irradiance Monitor measurements, we predicted the TSI input at the top of the Earth's atmosphere at a distance of one astronomical unit (149,597,870 kilometres) from the Sun to be 1,362±2.4W.m-2, which may be proposed as a reference value. To conclude, from the measurements made by the PICARD spacecraft, we obtained a solar photospheric equator-to-pole radius difference value of 5.9±0.5 kilometres. This value is consistent with measurements made by different space instruments, and can be given as a reference value.

  12. Nuclear and High-Energy Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Fridolin

    2003-10-01

    There has never been a more exciting time in the overlapping areas of nuclear physics, particle physics and relativistic astrophysics than today. Orbiting observatories such as the Hubble Space Telescope, Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), Chandra X-ray satellite, and the X-ray Multi Mirror Mission (XMM) have extended our vision tremendously, allowing us to see vistas with an unprecedented clarity and angular resolution that previously were only imagined, enabling astrophysicists for the first time ever to perform detailed studies of large samples of galactic and extragalactic objects. On the Earth, radio telescopes (e.g., Arecibo, Green Bank, Parkes, VLA) and instruments using adaptive optics and other revolutionary techniques have exceeded previous expectations of what can be accomplished from the ground. The gravitational wave detectors LIGO, LISA VIRGO, and Geo-600 are opening up a window for the detection of gravitational waves emitted from compact stellar objects such as neutron stars and black holes. Together with new experimental forefront facilities like ISAC, ORLAND and RIA, these detectors provide direct, quantitative physical insight into nucleosynthesis, supernova dynamics, accreting compact objects, cosmic-ray acceleration, and pairproduction in high energy sources which reinforce the urgent need for a strong and continuous feedback from nuclear and particle theory and theoretical astrophysics. In my lectures, I shall concentrate on three selected topics, which range from the behavior of superdense stellar matter, to general relativistic stellar models, to strange quark stars and possible signals of quark matter in neutron stars.

  13. Nuclear Astrophysics in the Laboratory and In the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champagne, Arthur E.

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear processes drive stellar evolution and so nuclear physics, stellar models and observations together allow us to describe the inner workings of stars and their life stories. This information on nuclear reaction rates and nuclear properties are critical ingredients in addressing most questions in astrophysics and often the nuclear database is incomplete or lacking the needed precision. Direct measurements of astrophysically interesting reactions are necessary and the experimental focus is on improving both sensitivity and precision. In this talk, I will review recent results and approaches taken at the Laboratory for Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics (LENA, http://research.physics.unc.edu/project/nuclearastro/Welcome.html). [Supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and by the National Science Foundation.

  14. Astrophysics of Reference Frame Tie Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Kenneth J.; Boboltz, David; Fey, Alan Lee; Gaume, Ralph A.; Zacharias, Norbert

    2004-01-01

    The Astrophysics of Reference Frame Tie Objects Key Science program will investigate the underlying physics of SIM grid objects. Extragalactic objects in the SIM grid will be used to tie the SIM reference frame to the quasi-inertial reference frame defined by extragalactic objects and to remove any residual frame rotation with respect to the extragalactic frame. The current realization of the extragalactic frame is the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF). The ICRF is defined by the radio positions of 212 extragalactic objects and is the IAU sanctioned fundamental astronomical reference frame. This key project will advance our knowledge of the physics of the objects which will make up the SIM grid, such as quasars and chromospherically active stars, and relates directly to the stability of the SIM reference frame. The following questions concerning the physics of reference frame tie objects will be investigated.

  15. Ninety Years of International Cooperation in Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail-Zadeh, A.; Beer, T.

    2009-05-01

    Because applicable physical, chemical, and mathematical studies of the Earth system must be both interdisciplinary and international, the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG) was formed in 1919 as an non-governmental, non-profit organization dedicated to advancing, promoting, and communicating knowledge of the Earth system, its space environment, and the dynamical processes causing change. The Union brings together eight International Associations that address different disciplines of Earth sciences. Through these Associations, IUGG promotes and enables studies in the geosciences by providing a framework for collaborative research and information exchange, by organizing international scientific assemblies worldwide, and via research publications. Resolutions passed by assemblies of IUGG and its International Associations set geophysical standards and promote issues of science policy on which national members agree. IUGG has initiated and/or vigorously supported collaborative international efforts that have led to highly productive worldwide interdisciplinary research programs, such as the International Geophysical Year and subsequent International Years (IPY, IYPE, eGY, and IHY), International Lithosphere Programme, World Climate Research Programme, Geosphere-Biosphere Programme, and Integrated Research on Risk Disaster. IUGG is inherently involved in the projects and programs related to climate change, global warming, and related environmental impacts. One major contribution has been the creation, through the International Council for Science (ICSU), of the World Data Centers and the Federation of Astronomical and Geophysical Data Analysis Services. These are being transformed to the ICSU World Data System, from which the data gathered during the major programs and data products will be available to researchers everywhere. IUGG cooperates with UNESCO, WMO, and some other U.N. and non-governmental organizations in the study of natural catastrophes

  16. Geophysical characterization of shallow karst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelzbach, Cedric; Jordi, Claudio; Sollberger, David; Doetsch, Joseph; Kaufmann, Manuela; Robertsson, Johan; Maurer, Hansruedi; Greenhalgh, Stewart

    2015-04-01

    In seismic exploration, karstified areas are known to be notoriously difficult ground for subsurface imaging. Apart from problems of effective source and receiver coupling to the ground, karst can cause strong near-surface scattering effects, which interfere with the signals of interest. A detailed understanding of the geometry and geophysical properties of karstified near-surface layers and the impact of karst structures on seismic-wave propagation are therefore critical to mitigate imaging problems related to karst. Most geophysical investigations of karst phenomena focus on the most prominent karst features such as sinkholes (dolines) and caves because these are spectacular and/or may represent hazards. However, understanding karst evolution and the interaction of weathering, lithology, and tectonic history of a karstified area requires a thorough understanding of the entire near-surface zone between the surface and the intact carbonate rock at depth. Motivated by the need to study karstification at two field locations and to understand its impact on seismic wave propagation at these sites, we conducted a multi-method geophysical field campaign in the Swiss Jura Mountains (Western Switzerland). The area is covered by a thin soil layer (thickness generally < 1m), which is underlain by karstified Malm limestones. We conducted single-component and multi-component seismic reflection and refraction experiments to image the subsurface at scales of 10's to 100's of meters. In addition, we acquired electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) data to resolve resistivity variations in the topmost several 10's of meters. The ERT data were complemented at the meter to 10-meter scale by depth soundings with two different electromagnetic systems (EM31 and EM34). Finally, ground-penetrating radar (GPR) measurements were conducted to image the uppermost few meters of the subsurface in great detail. Overall, data of high quality were obtained with all methods. The final P

  17. A ``model`` geophysics program

    SciTech Connect

    Nyquist, J.E.

    1994-03-01

    In 1993, I tested a radio-controlled airplane designed by Jim Walker of Brigham Young University for low-elevation aerial photography. Model-air photography retains most of the advantages of standard aerial photography --- the photographs can be used to detect lineaments, to map roads and buildings, and to construct stereo pairs to measure topography --- and it is far less expensive. Proven applications on the Oak Ridge Reservation include: updating older aerial records to document new construction; using repeated overflights of the same area to capture seasonal changes in vegetation and the effects of major storms; and detecting waste trench boundaries from the color and character of the overlying grass. Aerial photography is only one of many possible applications of radio-controlled aircraft. Currently, I am funded by the Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development to review the state of the art in microavionics, both military and civilian, to determine ways this emerging technology can be used for environmental site characterization. Being particularly interested in geophysical applications, I am also collaborating with electrical engineers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to design a model plane that will carry a 3-component flux-gate magnetometer and a global positioning system, which I hope to test in the spring of 1994.

  18. Jesuit Geophysical Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udias, Agustin; Stauder, William

    Jesuits have had ah interest in observing and explaining geophysical phenomena since this religious order, the Society of Jesus, was founded by Ignatius of Loyola in 1540. Three principal factors contributed to this interest: their educational work in colleges and universities, their missionary endeavors to remote lands where they observed interesting and often as yet undocumented natural phenomena, and a network of communication that brought research of other Jesuits readily to their awareness.One of the first and most important Jesuit colleges was the Roman College (today the Gregorian University) founded in 1551 in Rome, which served as a model for many other universities throughout the world. By 1572, Christopher Clavius (1537-1612), professor of mathematics at the Roman College, had already initiated an important tradition of Jesuit research by emphasizing applied mathematics and insisting on the need of serious study of mathematics in the program of studies in the humanities. In 1547 he directed a publication of Euclid's work with commentaries, and published several treatises on mathematics, including Arithmetica Practica [1585], Gnomonicae [1581], and Geometrica Practica [1606]. Clavius was also a Copernican and supported his friend Galileo when he announced the discovery of the satellites of Jupiter.

  19. Geophysical mapping of solution and collapse dolines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Georg

    2014-05-01

    Karst rocks such as limestone, dolomite, anhydrite, gypsum, or salt can be dissolved physically by water or chemically by water enriched with carbon dioxide. The dissolution driven by water flowing through the karst aquifer either occurs along fractures and bedding partings in telogenetic rocks, or within the primary interconnected pore space in eogenetic rocks. The enlargement of either fractures or pores by dissolution creates a large secondary porosity typical for karst rocks, which is often very heterogenously distributed and results in preferential flow pathes in the sub-surface, with cavities as large-scale end members of the sub-surface voids. Once the sub-surface voids enlarged by dissolution grow to a certain size, the overburden rock can become instable and voids and caves can collapse. Depending of the type of overburden, the collapse initiated at depth propagates towards the surface and finally results in a collapse structure, such as collapse dolines, sinkholes, and tiangkengs on the very large scale. We present results from geophysical surveys over existing karst structures based on gravimetric, electrical, and geomagnetical methods. We have chosen two types of dolines, solution and collapse dolines, to capture and compare the geophysical signals resulting from these karst structures. We compare and discuss our geophysical survey results with simplified theoretical models describing the evolution of the karst structure and three-dimensional structural models for the current situation derived for the different locations.

  20. Geophysical mapping of solution and collapse sinkholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Georg

    2014-12-01

    Karst rocks such as limestone, dolomite, anhydrite, gypsum, or salt can be dissolved physically by water or chemically by water enriched with carbon dioxide. The dissolution is driven by water flowing through the karst aquifer and either occurs along fractures and bedding partings in telogenetic rocks, or within the primary interconnected pore space in eogenetic rocks. The enlargement of either fractures or pores by dissolution creates a large secondary porosity typical of soluble rocks, which is often very heterogenously distributed and results in preferential flow paths in the sub-surface, with cavities as large-scale end members of the sub-surface voids. Once the sub-surface voids enlarged by dissolution grow to a certain size, the overburden rock can become unstable and voids and caves can collapse. Depending on the type of overburden, the collapse initiated at depth may propagate towards the surface and finally results at the surface as collapse sinkholes and tiangkengs on the very large scale. We present results from geophysical surveys over existing karst structures based on gravimetric, electrical, and geomagnetical methods. We have chosen two types of sinkholes, solution and collapse sinkholes, to capture and compare the geophysical signals resulting from these karst structures. We compare and discuss our geophysical survey results with simplified theoretical models describing the evolution of the karst structure, and we derive three-dimensional structural models of the current situation for the different locations with our numerical tool PREDICTOR.

  1. Using geophysics to characterize levee stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, Laura M.

    Shallow slough slides have occurred along the river side slope of Mississippi River Levees for over sixty years. Shallow slough slides also occur along smaller levees that protect tributaries of the Mississippi River. This investigation takes place along a section of the Coldwater River Levee, a tributary levee of the Mississippi River. Field observation, soil samples, and geophysical data were collected at two field sites located on the border of Tate and Tunica County, MS. The first site consists of a developed shallow slough slide that had occurred that has not yet been repaired and the second site is a potential slide area. Electromagnetic induction and electrical resistivity tomography were the geophysical methods used to define subsurface conditions that make a levee vulnerable to failure. These electrical methods are sensitive to the electrical conductivity of the soil and therefore depend upon: soil moisture, clay content, pore size distribution as well as larger scale structures at depth such as cracks and fissures. These same physical properties of the soil are also important to assessing the vulnerability of a levee to slough slides. Soil tests and field observations were also implemented in this investigation to describe and classify the soil composition of the levee material. The problem of slough slide occurrence can potentially be reduced if vulnerabilities are located with the help of geophysical techniques.

  2. Unscreened cross-sections for nuclear astrophysics via the Trojan Horse Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumino, A.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Sergi, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    The bare nucleus astrophysical S(E) factor is the Nuclear Physics parameter to determine the reaction rates in stellar plasmas. Whilst not being accessed in direct measurements, it can be easily determined using the Trojan Horse Method, successful indirect technique for nuclear astrophysics. The basic features of the method will be discussed and some recent results will be presented.

  3. New Advances in the Trojan Horse Method as an Indirect Approach to Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumino, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Spartà, R.

    2013-05-01

    With the introduction of the Trojan Horse Method, nuclear cross sections between charged particles at astrophysical energies can now be measured. Here the basic features of the method are recalled together with recent results relevant for Nuclear Astrophysics. New applications in connection with plasma physics and industrial energy production are discussed.

  4. Superdiffusive transport in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimbardo, G.; Amato, E.; Bovet, A.; Effenberger, F.; Fasoli, A.; Fichtner, H.; Furno, I.; Gustafson, K.; Ricci, P.; Perri, S.

    2015-12-01

    > In the last few years it has been demonstrated, both by data analysis and by numerical simulations, that the transport of energetic particles in the presence of magnetic turbulence can be superdiffusive rather than normal diffusive (Gaussian). The term `superdiffusive' refers to the mean square displacement of particle positions growing superlinearly with time, as compared to the normal linear growth. The so-called anomalous transport, which in general comprises both subdiffusion and superdiffusion, has gained growing attention during the last two decades in many fields including laboratory plasma physics, and recently in astrophysics and space physics. Here we show a number of examples, both from laboratory and from astrophysical plasmas, where superdiffusive transport has been identified, with a focus on what could be the main influence of superdiffusion on fundamental processes like diffusive shock acceleration and heliospheric energetic particle propagation. For laboratory plasmas, superdiffusion appears to be due to the presence of electrostatic turbulence which creates long-range correlations and convoluted structures in perpendicular transport: this corresponds to a similar phenomenon in the propagation of solar energetic particles (SEPs) which leads to SEP dropouts. For the propagation of energetic particles accelerated at interplanetary shocks in the solar wind, parallel superdiffusion seems to be prevailing; this is based on a pitch-angle scattering process different from that envisaged by quasi-linear theory, and this emphasizes the importance of nonlinear interactions and trapping effects. In the case of supernova remnant shocks, parallel superdiffusion is possible at quasi-parallel shocks, as occurring in the interplanetary space, and perpendicular superdiffusion is possible at quasi-perpendicular shocks, as corresponding to Richardson diffusion: therefore, cosmic ray acceleration at supernova remnant shocks should be formulated in terms of

  5. BOOK REVIEW: Particle Astrophysics (Second Edition)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Nicole

    2009-07-01

    Particle astrophysics, the interface of elementary particle physics with astrophysics and cosmology, is a rapidly evolving field. Perkins' book provides a nice introduction to this field, at a level appropriate for senior undergraduate students. Perkins develops the foundations underlying both the particle and astrophysics areas, and also covers some of the most recent developments in this field. The latter is an appealing feature, as students rarely encounter topics of current research in their undergraduate textbooks. Part 1 of the text introduces the elementary particle content, and interactions, of the standard model of particle physics. Relativity is addressed at the level of special relativistic kinematics, the equivalence principle and the Robertson-Walker metric. Part 2 covers cosmology, starting with the expansion of the Universe and basic thermodynamics. It then moves on to primordial nucleosynthesis, baryogenesis, dark matter, dark energy, structure formation and the cosmic microwave background. Part 3 covers cosmic rays, stellar evolution, and related topics. Cutting edge topics include the use of the cosmological large scale structure power spectrum to constrain neutrino mass, the creation of the baryon asymmetry via leptogenesis, and the equation of state for dark energy. While the treatment of many topics is quite brief, the level of depth is about right for undergraduates who are being exposed to these topics for the first time. The breadth of topics spanned is excellent. Perkins does a good job connecting theory with the experimental underpinnings, and of simplifying the theoretical presentation of complex subjects to a level that senior undergraduate students should find accessible. Each chapter includes a number of exercises. Brief solutions are provided for all the exercises, while fully worked solutions are provided for a smaller subset.

  6. Experiences and prospects of nuclear astrophysics in underground laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Junker, M.

    2014-05-09

    Impressive progress has been made in the course the last decades in understanding astrophysical objects. Increasing precision of nuclear physics data has contributed significantly to this success, but now a better understanding of several important findings is frequently limited by uncertainties related to the available nuclear physics data. Consequently it is desirable to improve significantly the quality of these data. An important step towards higher precision is an excellent signal to background ratio of the data. Placing an accelerator facility inside an underground laboratory reducing the cosmic ray induced background by six orders of magnitude is a powerful method to reach this goal, even though careful reduction of environmental and beam induced background must still be considered. Experience in the field of underground nuclear astrophysics has been gained since 20 years due to the pioneering work of the LUNA Collaboration (Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics) operating inside the underground laboratories of the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) in Italy. Based on the success of this work presently also several other projects for underground laboratories dedicated to nuclear astrophysics are being pursued worldwide. This contribution will give a survey of the past experience in underground nuclear astrophysics as well as an outlook on future developments.

  7. Experiences and prospects of nuclear astrophysics in underground laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junker, M.

    2014-05-01

    Impressive progress has been made in the course the last decades in understanding astrophysical objects. Increasing precision of nuclear physics data has contributed significantly to this success, but now a better understanding of several important findings is frequently limited by uncertainties related to the available nuclear physics data. Consequently it is desirable to improve significantly the quality of these data. An important step towards higher precision is an excellent signal to background ratio of the data. Placing an accelerator facility inside an underground laboratory reducing the cosmic ray induced background by six orders of magnitude is a powerful method to reach this goal, even though careful reduction of environmental and beam induced background must still be considered. Experience in the field of underground nuclear astrophysics has been gained since 20 years due to the pioneering work of the LUNA Collaboration (Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics) operating inside the underground laboratories of the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) in Italy. Based on the success of this work presently also several other projects for underground laboratories dedicated to nuclear astrophysics are being pursued worldwide. This contribution will give a survey of the past experience in underground nuclear astrophysics as well as an outlook on future developments.

  8. Experiences and Prospects of Nuclear Astrophysics in Underground Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junker, M.

    2016-01-01

    Impressive progress has been made in the course the last decades in understanding astrophysical objects. Increasing precision of nuclear physics data has contributed significantly to this success, but now a better understanding of several important findings is frequently limited by uncertainties related to the available nuclear physics data. Consequently it is desirable to improve significantly the quality of these data. An important step towards higher precision is an excellent signal to background ratio of the data. Placing an accelerator facility inside an underground laboratory reducing the cosmic ray induced background by six orders of magnitude is a powerful method to reach this goal, even though careful reduction of environmental and beam induced background must still be considered. Experience in the field of underground nuclear astrophysics has been gained since 20 years due to the pioneering work of the LUNA Collaboration (Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics) operating inside the underground laboratories of the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) in Italy. Based on the success of this work presently also several other projects for underground laboratories dedicated to nuclear astrophysics are being pursued worldwide. This contribution will give a survey of the past experience in underground nuclear astrophysics as well as an outlook on future developments.

  9. Goddard's Astrophysics Science Divsion Annual Report 2014

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Kimberly (Editor); Reddy, Francis (Editor); Tyler, Pat (Editor)

    2015-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division (ASD, Code 660) is one of the world's largest and most diverse astronomical organizations. Space flight missions are conceived, built and launched to observe the entire range of the electromagnetic spectrum, from gamma rays to centimeter waves. In addition, experiments are flown to gather data on high-energy cosmic rays, and plans are being made to detect gravitational radiation from space-borne missions. To enable these missions, we have vigorous programs of instrument and detector development. Division scientists also carry out preparatory theoretical work and subsequent data analysis and modeling. In addition to space flight missions, we have a vibrant suborbital program with numerous sounding rocket and balloon payloads in development or operation. The ASD is organized into five labs: the Astroparticle Physics Lab, the X-ray Astrophysics Lab, the Gravitational Astrophysics Lab, the Observational Cosmology Lab, and the Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Lab. The High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) is an Office at the Division level. Approximately 400 scientists and engineers work in ASD. Of these, 80 are civil servant scientists, while the rest are resident university-based scientists, contractors, postdoctoral fellows, graduate students, and administrative staff. We currently operate the Swift Explorer mission and the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. In addition, we provide data archiving and operational support for the XMM mission (jointly with ESA) and the Suzaku mission (with JAXA). We are also a partner with Caltech on the NuSTAR mission. The Hubble Space Telescope Project is headquartered at Goddard, and ASD provides Project Scientists to oversee operations at the Space Telescope Science Institute. Projects in development include the Neutron Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) mission, an X-ray timing experiment for the International Space Station; the Transiting Exoplanet Sky Survey (TESS

  10. Astrophysical jet experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, C. D.; Loupias, B.; Waugh, J.; Barroso, P.; Bouquet, S.; Brambrink, E.; Dono, S.; Falize, E.; Howe, J.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Kodama, R.; Koenig, M.; Michaut, C.; Myers, S.; Nazarov, W.; Notley, M. M.; Oya, A.; Pikuz, S.; Rabec le Gloahec, M.; Sakawa, Y.; Spindloe, C.; Streeter, M.; Wilson, L. A.; Woolsey, N. C.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, three different experimental configurations designed to study jet propagation physics are presented. Each configuration uses a different target design: conical dimples in solid surfaces, hollow cones filled with foam and angled thin foils. When irradiated with a laser, these targets result in the launching of a plasma jet, the properties of which can be controlled by judicious choices of the target and laser parameters. Experimental results from these targets are shown, and the physics which may be studied with each of these targets is briefly discussed.

  11. Magnetic Reconnection in Extreme Astrophysical Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental plasma physics process of breaking ideal-MHD's frozen-in constraints on magnetic field connectivity and of dramatic rearranging of the magnetic topol-ogy, which often leads to a violent release of the free magnetic energy. Reconnection has long been acknowledged to be of great importance in laboratory plasma physics (magnetic fusion) and in space and solar physics (responsible for solar flares and magnetospheric substorms). In addition, its importance in Astrophysics has been increasingly recognized in recent years. However, due to a great diversity of astrophysical environments, the fundamental physics of astrophysical magnetic reconnection can be quite different from that of the traditional recon-nection encountered in the solar system. In particular, environments like the solar corona and the magnetosphere are characterized by relatively low energy densities, where the plasma is ad-equately described as a mixture of electrons and ions whose numbers are conserved and where the dissipated magnetic energy basically stays with the plasma. In contrast, in many high-energy astrophysical phenomena the energy density is so large that photons play as important a role as electrons and ions and, in particular, radiation pressure and radiative cooling become dominant. In this talk I focus on the most extreme case of high-energy-density astrophysical reconnec-tion — reconnection of magnetar-strength (1014 - 1015 Gauss) magnetic fields, important for giant flares in soft-gamma repeaters (SGRs), and for rapid magnetic energy release in either the central engines or in the relativistic jets of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). I outline the key relevant physical processes and present a new theoretical picture of magnetic reconnection in these environments. The corresponding magnetic energy density is so enormous that, when suddenly released, it inevitably heats the plasma to relativistic temperatures, resulting in co-pious production of electron

  12. Magnetic airborne survey - geophysical flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Barros Camara, Erick; Nei Pereira Guimarães, Suze

    2016-06-01

    This paper provides a technical review process in the area of airborne acquisition of geophysical data, with emphasis for magnetometry. In summary, it addresses the calibration processes of geophysical equipment as well as the aircraft to minimize possible errors in measurements. The corrections used in data processing and filtering are demonstrated with the same results as well as the evolution of these techniques in Brazil and worldwide.

  13. Nuclear astrophysics studies by SAMURAI spectrometer in RIKEN RIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Yoneda, K.

    2012-11-12

    SAMURAI is a spectrometer which is now being constructed at RIKEN RI Beam Factory. This spectrometer is characterized by a large angular-and momentum-acceptance enabling, for example, multi-particle coincidence measurements. Here brief descriptions of SAMURAI spectrometer and physics topics relevant to nuclear astrophysics are presented.

  14. Influences of the astrophysical environment on nuclear decay rates

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, E.B.

    1987-09-01

    In many astronomical environments, physical conditions are so extreme that nuclear decay rates can be significantly altered from their laboratory values. Such effects are relevant to a number of current problems in nuclear astrophysics. Experiments related to these problems are now being pursued, and will be described in this talk. 19 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Planetary Geophysics and Tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuber, Maria

    2005-01-01

    The broad objective of this work is to improve understanding of the internal structures and thermal and stress histories of the solid planets by combining results from analytical and computational modeling, and geophysical data analysis of gravity, topography and tectonic surface structures. During the past year we performed two quite independent studies in the attempt to explain the Mariner 10 magnetic observations of Mercury. In the first we revisited the possibility of crustal remanence by studying the conditions under which one could break symmetry inherent in Runcorn's model of a uniformly magnetized shell to produce a remanent signal with a dipolar form. In the second we applied a thin shell dynamo model to evaluate the range of intensity/structure for which such a planetary configuration can produce a dipole field consistent with Mariner 10 results. In the next full proposal cycle we will: (1) develop numerical and analytical and models of thin shell dynamos to address the possible nature of Mercury s present-day magnetic field and the demise of Mars magnetic field; (2) study the effect of degree-1 mantle convection on a core dynamo as relevant to the early magnetic field of Mars; (3) develop models of how the deep mantles of terrestrial planets are perturbed by large impacts and address the consequences for mantle evolution; (4) study the structure, compensation, state of stress, and viscous relaxation of lunar basins, and address implications for the Moon s state of stress and thermal history by modeling and gravity/topography analysis; and (5) use a three-dimensional viscous relaxation model for a planet with generalized vertical viscosity distribution to study the degree-two components of the Moon's topography and gravity fields to constrain the primordial stress state and spatial heterogeneity of the crust and mantle.

  16. Art as a Vehicle for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilburn, Micha

    2013-04-01

    One aim of the The Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA) is to teach K-12 students concepts and ideas related to nuclear astrophysics. For students who have not yet seen the periodic table, this can be daunting, and we often begin with astronomy concepts. The field of astronomy naturally lends itself to an art connection through its beautiful images. Our Art 2 Science programming adopts a hands-on approach by teaching astronomy through student created art projects. This approach engages the students, through tactile means, visually and spatially. For younger students, we also include physics based craft projects that facilitate the assimilation of problem solving skills. The arts can be useful for aural and kinetic learners as well. Our program also includes singing and dancing to songs with lyrics that teach physics and astronomy concepts. The Art 2 Science programming has been successfully used in after-school programs at schools, community centers, and art studios. We have even expanded the program into a popular week long summer camp. I will discuss our methods, projects, specific goals, and survey results for JINA's Art 2 Science programs.

  17. Resources for History of Geophysics at AIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    The history programs of the American Institute of Physics -- the Center for History of Physics and the Niels Bohr Library & Archives -- maintain a wide variety of research resources for the history of physics generally, and for the history of geophysics in particular. AIP has over 20,000 photographs online, nearly 1000 oral history interview transcripts, and much more. The International Catalog of Sources provides an online union catalog of manuscript collections held worldwide. An important collection of IUGG records is available onsite, as also is the recently accessioned collection of AGU papers. As the 2019 centenary of AGU approaches, these resources will be of interest to both AGU members and historians of science.;

  18. The Next Century Astrophysics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Paul N.

    1991-01-01

    The Astrophysics Division within the NASA Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA) has defined a set of major and moderate missions that are presently under study for flight sometime within the next 20 years. These programs include the: Advanced X Ray Astrophysics Facility; X Ray Schmidt Telescope; Nuclear Astrophysics Experiment; Hard X Ray Imaging Facility; Very High Throughput Facility; Gamma Ray Spectroscopy Observatory; Hubble Space Telescope; Lunar Transit Telescope; Astrometric Interferometer Mission; Next Generation Space Telescope; Imaging Optical Interferometer; Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer; Gravity Probe B; Laser Gravity Wave Observatory in Space; Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy; Space Infrared Telescope Facility; Submillimeter Intermediate Mission; Large Deployable Reflector; Submillimeter Interferometer; and Next Generation Orbiting Very Long Baseline Interferometer.

  19. Notes on the history of geophysics in the Ottoman Empire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcep, F.; Ozcep, T.

    2014-09-01

    In Anatolia, the history of geophysical sciences may go back to antiquity (600 BC), namely the period when Thales lived in Magnesia (Asia Minor). In the modern sense, geophysics started with geomagnetic works in the 1600s. The period between 1600 and 1800 includes the measurement of magnetic declination, inclination and magnetic field strength. Before these years, there is a little information, such as how to use a compass, in the Kitab-i Bahriye (the Book of Navigation) of Piri Reis, who is one of the most important mariners of the Ottoman Empire. However, this may not mean that magnetic declination was generally understood. The first scientific book relating to geophysics is the book Fuyuzat-i Miknatissiye that was translated by Ibrahim Müteferrika and printed in 1731. The subject of this book is earth's magnetism. There is also information concerning geophysics in the book Cihannuma (Universal Geography) that was written by Katip Celebi and in the book Marifetname written by Ibrahim Hakki Erzurumlu, but these books are only partly geophysical books. In Istanbul the year 1868 is one of the most important for geophysical sciences because an observatory called Rasathane-i Amire was installed in the Pera region of this city. At this observatory the first systematic geophysical observations such as meteorological, seismological and even gravimetrical were made. There have been meteorological records in Anatolia since 1839. These are records of atmospheric temperature, pressure and humidity. In the Ottoman Empire, the science of geophysics is considered as one of the natural sciences along with astronomy, mineralogy, geology, etc., and these sciences are included as a part of physics and chemistry.

  20. Development of Geophysical Ideas and Institutions in Ottoman Empire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcep, Ferhat; Ozcep, Tazegul

    2015-04-01

    In Anatolia, the history of geophysical sciences may go back to antiquity (600 BC), namely the period when Thales lived in Magnesia (Asia Minor). In the modern sense, geophysics started with geomagnetic works in the 1600s. The period between 1600 and 1800 includes the measurement of magnetic declination, inclination and magnetic field strength. Before these years, there is a little information, such as how to use a compass, in the Kitab-i Bahriye (the Book of Navigation) of Piri Reis, who is one of the most important mariners of the Ottoman Empire. However, this may not mean that magnetic declination was generally understood. The first scientific book relating to geophysics is the book Fuyuzat-i Miknatissiye that was translated by Ibrahim Müteferrika and printed in 1731. The subject of this book is earth's magnetism. There is also information concerning geophysics in the book Cihannuma (Universal Geography) that was written by Katip Celebi and in the book Marifetname written by Ibrahim Hakki Erzurumlu, but these books are only partly geophysical books. In Istanbul the year 1868 is one of the most important for geophysical sciences because an observatory called Rasathane-i Amire was installed in the Pera region of this city. At this observatory the first systematic geophysical observations such as meteorological, seismological and even gravimetrical were made. There have been meteorological records in Anatolia since 1839. These are records of atmospheric temperature, pressure and humidity. In the Ottoman Empire, the science of geophysics is considered as one of the natural sciences along with astronomy, mineralogy, geology, etc., and these sciences are included as a part of physics and chemistry.

  1. Storage ring mass spectrometry for nuclear structure and astrophysics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. H.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Uesaka, T.; Xu, H. S.

    2016-07-01

    In the last two and a half decades ion storage rings have proven to be powerful tools for precision experiments with unstable nuclides in the realm of nuclear structure and astrophysics. There are presently three storage ring facilities in the world at which experiments with stored radioactive ions are possible. These are the ESR in GSI, Darmstadt/Germany, the CSRe in IMP, Lanzhou/China, and the R3 storage ring in RIKEN, Saitama/Japan. In this work, an introduction to the facilities is given. Selected characteristic experimental results and their impact in nuclear physics and astrophysics are presented. Planned technical developments and the envisioned future experiments are outlined.

  2. AXAF: The Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellerin, Charles J.; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Neal, Valerie

    2005-01-01

    X-rays are produced by violent, energetic, and explosive phenomena in the universe. The Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) is an orbiting observatory designed to view these X-rays. The National Academy of Sciences Survey Committee on Astronomy and Astrophysics has recommended AXAF as the #1 priority among all major new astronomy programs. The scientific importance of AXAF was also highlighted by the Academy's Survey Committee on Physics. Why has AXAF earned such enthusiastic support, not only among astronomers, but also broadly within the nation's scientific community?

  3. Experimental High Energy Neutrino Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Distefano, Carla

    2005-10-12

    Neutrinos are considered promising probes for high energy astrophysics. More than four decades after deep water Cerenkov technique was proposed to detect high energy neutrinos. Two detectors of this type are successfully taking data: BAIKAL and AMANDA. They have demonstrated the feasibility of the high energy neutrino detection and have set first constraints on TeV neutrino production astrophysical models. The quest for the construction of km3 size detectors have already started: in the South Pole, the IceCube neutrino telescope is under construction; the ANTARES, NEMO and NESTOR Collaborations are working towards the installation of a neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea.

  4. The Astrophysics of the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirin, H.

    1998-06-01

    This is an entirely new edition of Harold Zirin's classic text on the solar atmosphere. Combining an introductory course in astrophysics with a comprehensive treatment of the theoretical and observational aspects of our present knowledge of the sun, the book has been completely updated. It includes a large number of spectacular new photographs, including many of the best solar pictures from the world's observatories. Professor Zirin is one of the leading scientists in his field. His lucid writing style, combined with considerable teaching experience, has resulted in a valuable and important textbook of astrophysics.

  5. Geophysics of Small Planetary Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asphaug, Erik I.

    1998-01-01

    As a SETI Institute PI from 1996-1998, Erik Asphaug studied impact and tidal physics and other geophysical processes associated with small (low-gravity) planetary bodies. This work included: a numerical impact simulation linking basaltic achondrite meteorites to asteroid 4 Vesta (Asphaug 1997), which laid the groundwork for an ongoing study of Martian meteorite ejection; cratering and catastrophic evolution of small bodies (with implications for their internal structure; Asphaug et al. 1996); genesis of grooved and degraded terrains in response to impact; maturation of regolith (Asphaug et al. 1997a); and the variation of crater outcome with impact angle, speed, and target structure. Research of impacts into porous, layered and prefractured targets (Asphaug et al. 1997b, 1998a) showed how shape, rheology and structure dramatically affects sizes and velocities of ejecta, and the survivability and impact-modification of comets and asteroids (Asphaug et al. 1998a). As an affiliate of the Galileo SSI Team, the PI studied problems related to cratering, tectonics, and regolith evolution, including an estimate of the impactor flux around Jupiter and the effect of impact on local and regional tectonics (Asphaug et al. 1998b). Other research included tidal breakup modeling (Asphaug and Benz 1996; Schenk et al. 1996), which is leading to a general understanding of the role of tides in planetesimal evolution. As a Guest Computational Investigator for NASA's BPCC/ESS supercomputer testbed, helped graft SPH3D onto an existing tree code tuned for the massively parallel Cray T3E (Olson and Asphaug, in preparation), obtaining a factor xIO00 speedup in code execution time (on 512 cpus). Runs which once took months are now completed in hours.

  6. Distance Measurement Solves Astrophysical Mysteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-08-01

    distance. "Our measurements showed that the pulsar is about 950 light-years from Earth, essentially the same distance as the supernova remnant," said Steve Thorsett, of the University of California, Santa Cruz. "That means that the two almost certainly were created by the same supernova blast," he added. With that problem solved. the astronomers then turned to studying the pulsar's neutron star itself. Using a variety of data from different telescopes and armed with the new distance measurement, they determined that the neutron star is between 16 and 25 miles in diameter. In such a small size, it packs a mass roughly equal to that of the Sun. The next result of learning the pulsar's actual distance was to provide a possible answer to a longstanding question about cosmic rays. Cosmic rays are subatomic particles or atomic nuclei accelerated to nearly the speed of light. Shock waves in supernova remnants are thought to be responsible for accelerating many of these particles. Scientists can measure the energy of cosmic rays, and had noted an excess of such rays in a specific energy range. Some researchers had suggested that the excess could come from a single supernova remnant about 1000 light-years away whose supernova explosion was about 100,000 years ago. The principal difficulty with this suggestion was that there was no accepted candidate for such a source. "Our measurement now puts PSR B0656+14 and the Monogem Ring at exactly the right place and at exactly the right age to be the source of this excess of cosmic rays," Brisken said. With the ability of the VLBA, one of the telescopes of the NRAO, to make extremely precise position measurements, the astronomers expect to improve the accuracy of their distance determination even more. "This pulsar is becoming a fascinating laboratory for studying astrophysics and nuclear physics," Thorsett said. In addition to Brisken and Thorsett, the team of astronomers includes Aaron Golden of the National University of Ireland, Robert

  7. Nuclear Astrophysics at DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Reifarth, R.; Bredeweg, T.A.; Esch, E.-I.; Haight, R.C.; Kronenberg, A.; O'Donnell, J.M.; Rundberg, R.S.; Schwantes, J.M.; Ullmann, J.L.; Vieira, D.J.; Wouters, J.M.; Alpizar-Vicente, A.; Hatarik, R.; Greife, U.

    2005-05-24

    One of the most interesting nuclear physics challenges is obtaining a detailed understanding of the nucleosynthesis processes of the elements. Knowledge about the stellar sites, and how they are governed by stellar evolution and cosmology are crucial in understanding the overall picture. Information on reaction rates for neutron- and charged-particle-induced reactions have a direct impact on existing stellar models. Except for the stable isotopes, very few neutron-induced reactions in the energy range of interest have been measured to date. DANCE measurements on stable and unstable isotopes will provide many of the missing key reactions that are needed to understand the nucleosynthesis of the heavy elements.

  8. Nuclear Astrophysics at DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reifarth, R.; Alpizar-Vicente, A.; Hatarik, R.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Esch, E.-I.; Greife, U.; Haight, R. C.; Kronenberg, A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Schwantes, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.

    2005-05-01

    One of the most interesting nuclear physics challenges is obtaining a detailed understanding of the nucleosynthesis processes of the elements. Knowledge about the stellar sites, and how they are governed by stellar evolution and cosmology are crucial in understanding the overall picture. Information on reaction rates for neutron- and charged-particle-induced reactions have a direct impact on existing stellar models. Except for the stable isotopes, very few neutron-induced reactions in the energy range of interest have been measured to date. DANCE measurements on stable and unstable isotopes will provide many of the missing key reactions that are needed to understand the nucleosynthesis of the heavy elements.

  9. Geophysics: The Earth in Space. A Guide for High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Geophysical Union, Washington, DC.

    Geophysics is the application of physics, chemistry, and mathematics to the problems and processes of the earth, from its innermost core to its outermost environs in space. Fields within geophysics include the atmospheric sciences; geodesy; geomagnetism and paleomagnetism; hydrology; oceanography; planetology; seismology; solar-planetary…

  10. New geophysical models related to heat sources in the geysers-clear lake region, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, W.D.; Blakely, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    We present an updated view of the geological and geophysical complexities of the upper crust in The Geysers-Clear Lake region in order to provide additional information regarding local structures and possible heat sources. New models and ideal-body analysis of the gravity data, new electromagnetic sounding models, and arguments made from other geophysical data sets suggest that many of the geophysical anomalies may be significantly affected by rock-property and physical-state variations in the upper 7 km, and not just to 'magma' at greater depths. We developed the new geophysical models in order to better understand constraints on the location of magma bodies.

  11. SAGE celebrates 25 years of learning geophysics by doing geophysics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jiracek, G.R.; Baldridge, W.S.; Sussman, A.J.; Biehler, S.; Braile, L.W.; Ferguson, J.F.; Gilpin, B.E.; McPhee, D.K.; Pellerin, L.

    2008-01-01

    The increasing world demand and record-high costs for energy and mineral resources, along with the attendant environmental and climate concerns, have escalated the need for trained geophysicists to unprecedented levels. This is not only a national need; it's a critical global need. As Earth scientists and educators we must seriously ask if our geophysics pipeline can adequately address this crisis. One program that has helped to answer this question in the affirmative for 25 years is SAGE (Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience). SAGE continues to develop with new faculty, new collaborations, and additional ways to support student participation during and after SAGE. ?? 2008 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  12. Condensation Processes in Astrophysical Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.; Hill, Hugh G. M.

    2002-01-01

    Astrophysical systems present an intriguing set of challenges for laboratory chemists. Chemistry occurs in regions considered an excellent vacuum by laboratory standards and at temperatures that would vaporize laboratory equipment. Outflows around Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars have timescales ranging from seconds to weeks depending on the distance of the region of interest from the star and, on the way significant changes in the state variables are defined. The atmospheres in normal stars may only change significantly on several billion-year timescales. Most laboratory experiments carried out to understand astrophysical processes are not done at conditions that perfectly match the natural suite of state variables or timescales appropriate for natural conditions. Experimenters must make use of simple analog experiments that place limits on the behavior of natural systems, often extrapolating to lower-pressure and/or higher-temperature environments. Nevertheless, we argue that well-conceived experiments will often provide insights into astrophysical processes that are impossible to obtain through models or observations. This is especially true for complex chemical phenomena such as the formation and metamorphism of refractory grains under a range of astrophysical conditions. Data obtained in our laboratory has been surprising in numerous ways, ranging from the composition of the condensates to the thermal evolution of their spectral properties. None of this information could have been predicted from first principals and would not have been credible even if it had.

  13. The Wisconsin Plasma Astrophysics Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forest, C. B.; Flanagan, K.; Brookhart, M.; Clark, M.; Cooper, C. M.; Désangles, V.; Egedal, J.; Endrizzi, D.; Khalzov, I. V.; Li, H.; Miesch, M.; Milhone, J.; Nornberg, M.; Olson, J.; Peterson, E.; Roesler, F.; Schekochihin, A.; Schmitz, O.; Siller, R.; Spitkovsky, A.; Stemo, A.; Wallace, J.; Weisberg, D.; Zweibel, E.

    2015-10-01

    > provide an ideal testbed for a range of astrophysical experiments, including self-exciting dynamos, collisionless magnetic reconnection, jet stability, stellar winds and more. This article describes the capabilities of WiPAL, along with several experiments, in both operating and planning stages, that illustrate the range of possibilities for future users.

  14. Astronomy & Astrophysics: an international journal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertout, C.

    2011-07-01

    After a brief historical introduction, we review the scope, editorial process, and production organization of A&A, one of the leading journals worldwide dedicated to publishing the results of astrophysical research. We then briefly discuss the economic model of the Journal and some current issues in scientific publishing.

  15. Astronomy and Astrophysics in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narlikar, J.; Murdin, P.

    2001-07-01

    The growth in astronomy and astrophysics (A&A) in India has been mostly since the country achieved independence in 1947. The present work is carried out in a few select research institutes and in some university departments. The Astronomical Society of India has around 300 working A&A scientists as members, with another 50-60 graduate students....

  16. Indirect methods in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertulani, C. A.; Shubhchintak; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Kruppa, A.; Pang, D. Y.

    2016-04-01

    We discuss recent developments in indirect methods used in nuclear astrophysics to determine the capture cross sections and subsequent rates of various stellar burning processes, when it is difficult to perform the corresponding direct measurements. We discuss in brief, the basic concepts of Asymptotic Normalization Coefficients, the Trojan Horse Method, the Coulomb Dissociation Method, (d,p), and charge-exchange reactions.

  17. Time Ordered Astrophysics Scalable Tools

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-12-14

    This software package provides tools for astrophysical experiments which record data in the form of individual time streams from discrete detectors. TOAST provides tools from meta-data manipulation and job set up, I/O operation, telescope pointing reconstruction, and map-making. It also provides tools for constructing simulated observations.

  18. Nuclei in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.

    2016-06-01

    This work is an attempt to present some problems on the evolution of the Universe: the nucleosynthesis and cosmochronology from the standpoint of physics of particles and nuclei, in particular with the use of the latest results, obtained by means of radioactive nuclear beams. The comparison is made between the processes taking place in the Universe and the mechanisms of formation and decay of nuclei, as well as of their interaction at different energies. Examples are given to show the capabilities of nuclearphysics methods for studying cosmic objects and properties of the Universe. The results of investigations in nuclear reactions, induced by radioactive nuclear beams, make it possible to analyze the nucleosynthesis scenario in the region of light elements in a new manner.

  19. Symposium on Recent Results in Infrared Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyal, P. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    Abstracts of papers presented at a symposium titled Recent Results in Infrared Astrophysics are set forth. The abstracts emphasize photometric, spectroscopic, polarization, and theoretical results on a broad range of current topics in infrared astrophysics.

  20. Introducing Astrophysics Research to High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etkina, Eugenia; Lawrence, Michael; Charney, Jeff

    1999-01-01

    Presents an analysis of an astrophysics institute designed for high school students. Investigates how students respond cognitively in an active science-learning environment in which they serve as apprentices to university astrophysics professors. (Author/CCM)

  1. International Olympiad on Astronomy and Astrophysics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soonthornthum, B.; Kunjaya, C.

    2011-01-01

    The International Olympiad on Astronomy and Astrophysics, an annual astronomy and astrophysics competition for high school students, is described. Examples of problems and solutions from the competition are also given. (Contains 3 figures.)

  2. NASA's Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop: Opening Remarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, Hashima

    2002-01-01

    The Astronomy and Physics Division at NASA Headquarters has an active and vibrant program in Laboratory Astrophysics. The objective of the program is to provide the spectroscopic data required by observers to analyze data from NASA space astronomy missions. The program also supports theoretical investigations to provide those spectroscopic parameters that cannot be obtained in the laboratory; simulate space environment to understand formation of certain molecules, dust grains and ices; and production of critically compiled databases of spectroscopic parameters. NASA annually solicits proposals, and utilizes the peer review process to select meritorious investigations for funding. As the mission of NASA evolves, new missions are launched, and old ones are terminated, the Laboratory Astrophysics program needs to evolve accordingly. Consequently, it is advantageous for NASA and the astronomical community to periodically conduct a dialog to assess the status of the program. This Workshop provides a forum for producers and users of laboratory data to get together and understand each others needs and limitations. A multi-wavelength approach enables a cross fertilization of ideas across wavelength bands.

  3. Final Report: SciDAC Computational Astrophysics Consortium (at Princeton University)

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, Adam

    2012-12-03

    Supernova explosions are the central events in astrophysics. They are the major agencies of change in the interstellar medium, driving star formation and the evolution of galaxies. Their gas remnants are the birthplaces of the cosmic rays. Such is their brightness that they can be used as standard candles to measure the size and geometry of the universe and their investigation draws on particle and nuclear physics, radiative transfer, kinetic theory, gravitational physics, thermodynamics, and the numerical arts. Hence, supernovae are unrivaled astrophysical laboratories. We will develop new state-of-the-art multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic codes to address this and other related astrophysical phenomena.

  4. Object Storage for Geophysical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habermann, T.; Readey, J.

    2015-12-01

    Object storage systems (such as Amazon S3 or Ceph) have been shown to be cost-effective and highly scalable for data repositories in the Petabyte range and larger. However traditionally data storage used for geophysical software systems has centered on file-based systems and libraries such as NetCDF and HDF5. In this session we'll discuss the advantages and challenges of moving to an object store-based model for geophysical data. We'll review a proposed model for a geophysical data service that provides an API-compatible library for traditional NetCDF and HDF5 applications while providing high scalability and performance. One further advantage of this approach is that any dataset or dataset selection can be referenced as a URI. By using versioning, the data the URI references can be guaranteed to be unmodified, thus enabling reproducibility of referenced data.

  5. Continental crust: a geophysical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, R.

    1986-01-01

    This book develops an integrated and balanced picture of present knowledge of the continental crust. Crust and lithosphere are first defined, and the formation of crusts as a general planetary phenomenon is described. The background and methods of geophysical studies of the earth's crust and the collection of related geophysical parameters are examined. Creep and friction experiments and the various methods of radiometric age dating are addressed, and geophysical and geological investigations of the crustal structure in various age provinces of the continents are studied. Specific tectonic structures such as rifts, continental margins, and geothermal areas are discussed. Finally, an attempt is made to give a comprehensive view of the evolution of the continental crust and to collect and develop arguments for crustal accretion and recycling. 647 references.

  6. Investigating High Field Gravity using Astrophysical Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, Elliott D.; /SLAC

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of these lectures is to introduce particle physicists to astrophysical techniques. These techniques can help us understand certain phenomena important to particle physics that are currently impossible to address using standard particle physics experimental techniques. As the subject matter is vast, compromises are necessary in order to convey the central ideas to the reader. Many general references are included for those who want to learn more. The paragraphs below elaborate on the structure of these lectures. I hope this discussion will clarify my motivation and make the lectures easier to follow. The lectures begin with a brief review of more theoretical ideas. First, elements of general relativity are reviewed, concentrating on those aspects that are needed to understand compact stellar objects (white dwarf stars, neutron stars, and black holes). I then review the equations of state of these objects, concentrating on the simplest standard models from astrophysics. After these mathematical preliminaries, Sec. 2(c) discusses 'The End State of Stars'. Most of this section also uses the simplest standard models. However, as these lectures are for particle physicists, I also discuss some of the more recent approaches to the equation of state of very dense compact objects. These particle-physics-motivated equations of state can dramatically change how we view the formation of black holes. Section 3 focuses on the properties of the objects that we want to characterize and measure. X-ray binary systems and Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are stressed because the lectures center on understanding very dense stellar objects, black hole candidates (BHCs), and their accompanying high gravitational fields. The use of x-ray timing and gamma-ray experiments is also introduced in this section. Sections 4 and 5 review information from x-ray and gamma-ray experiments. These sections also discuss the current state of the art in x-ray and gamma-ray satellite experiments and

  7. Frontiers in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertulani, C. A.; Kajino, T.

    2016-07-01

    The synthesis of nuclei in diverse cosmic scenarios is reviewed, with a summary of the basic concepts involved before a discussion of the current status in each case is made. We review the physics of the early universe, the proton to neutron ratio influence in the observed helium abundance, reaction networks, the formation of elements up to beryllium, the inhomogeneous Big Bang model, and the Big Bang nucleosynthesis constraints on cosmological models. Attention is paid to element production in stars, together with the details of the pp chain, the pp reaction, 3He formation and destruction, electron capture on 7Be, the importance of 8B formation and its relation to solar neutrinos, and neutrino oscillations. Nucleosynthesis in massive stars is also reviewed, with focus on the CNO cycle and its hot companion cycle, the rp-process, triple- α capture, and red giants and AGB stars. The stellar burning of carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon is presented in a separate section, as well as the slow and rapid nucleon capture processes and the importance of medium modifications due to electrons also for pycnonuclear reactions. The nucleosynthesis in cataclysmic events such as in novae, X-ray bursters and in core-collapse supernovae, the role of neutrinos, and the supernova radioactivity and light-curve is further discussed, as well as the structure of neutron stars and its equation of state. A brief review of the element composition found in cosmic rays is made in the end.

  8. Astrophysics of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettori, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    As the nodes of the cosmic web, clusters of galaxies trace the large-scale distribution of matter in the Universe. They are thus privileged sites in which to investigate the complex physics of structure formation. However, the complete story of how these structures grow, and how they dissipate the gravitational and non-thermal components of their energy budget over cosmic time, is still beyond our grasp. Most of the baryons gravitationally bound to the cluster's halo is in the form of a diffuse, hot, metal-enriched plasma that radiates primarily in the X-ray band. X-ray observations of the evolving cluster population provide a unique opportunity to address such fundamental open questions as: How do hot diffuse baryons accrete and dynamically evolve in dark matter potentials? How and when was the energy that we observe in the ICM generated and distributed? Where and when are heavy elements produced and how are they circulated? We will present the ongoing activities to define the strategy on how an X-ray observatory with large collecting area and an unprecedented combination of high spectral and angular resolution, such as Athena, can address these questions.

  9. (n,γ) measurements on radioactive isotopes for astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reifarth, Rene; Herwig, Falk

    2004-10-01

    Almost all of the heavy elements are produced via neutron capture reactions in a multitude of stellar production sites. Stellar models yield the element production during the quiescent phase as well as the initial configuration for supernova simulations. Their predictive power is currently limited because they contain poorly constrained physics components such as convection, rotation or magnetic fields. With a neutron facility at RIA and a calorimetric γ-ray detector similar to DANCE at LANL we could largely improve these physics components. Neutron captures on heavy radioactive isotopes provide a unique opportunity to largely improve these physics components. The analysis of branch-points of the s-process path in combination with isotopic abundance information from pre-solar meteoritic grains offer a very powerful tool to address important questions of nuclear astrophysics. The astrophysical implications of recent measurements at DANCE and possibilities for future (n,γ) experiments at RIA will be presented during the talk.

  10. Laboratory Astrophysics White Paper: Summary of Laboratory Astrophysics Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop (NASA LAW) met at NASA Ames Research Center from 1-3 May 2002 to assess the role that laboratory astrophysics plays in the optimization of NASA missions, both at the science conception level and at the science return level. Space missions provide understanding of fundamental questions regarding the origin and evolution of galaxies, stars, and planetary systems. In all of these areas the interpretation of results from NASA's space missions relies crucially upon data obtained from the laboratory. We stress that Laboratory Astrophysics is important not only in the interpretation of data, but also in the design and planning of future missions. We recognize a symbiosis between missions to explore the universe and the underlying basic data needed to interpret the data from those missions. In the following we provide a summary of the consensus results from our Workshop, starting with general programmatic findings and followed by a list of more specific scientific areas that need attention. We stress that this is a 'living document' and that these lists are subject to change as new missions or new areas of research rise to the fore.

  11. Validating Prior Geological Scenario Uncertainty with Geophysical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidt, C.; Jeong, C.; Mukerji, T.; Caers, J.

    2014-12-01

    Subsurface reservoir modelling, whether for groundwater, storage or oil/gas production relies on geophysical data for determining structure, rocks and fluid variations. The traditional approach depends on stochastic inversion of the geophysical image into subsurface models. However, in addition to geophysical data a wealth of geological information is available from analog or previous studies. Most of this information is ignored, and inversions resort to more mathematically-inspired priors often based on covariance models. In this presentation, using a real field application, we propose a method to validate a rich geological prior with geophysical data without the need for costly inversions. The result of this work is a wide, but geologically-realistic prior that can then be used in subsequent stochastic inversions. To achieve this, we propose to validate plausible geological models (from analog studies) with the observed geophysical data through a global, pattern-based measure of dissimilarity. This global dissimilarity measure is defined between the forward simulated geophysical response of a large variety of geologically plausible models and the observed field data. The proposed dissimilarity measure relies on a comparison of the wavelet decompositions between observed and forward simulated geophysical responses. The difference in frequency distribution of the wavelet coefficients is used via a JS-divergence measure to define the dissimilarity between all the subsurface models and the observed data. The proposed approach is applied to a real field offshore reservoir in West Africa, where a 3D seismic cube is available. The uncertain geological parameters defined for this case are the rock physic model, the infill channels size, depth, sinuosity, the proportion of sand/shale and the stacking patterns.

  12. Building a visionary astrophysics program from the ground up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Geoffrey S.; Barnes, Joshua Edward; Coleman, Paul; Gal, Roy R.; Meech, Karen J.; Mendez, Roberto Hugo; Nassir, Michael A.; Sanders, David B.

    2015-08-01

    The University of Hawaii’s Institute for Astronomy is in the process of implementing a new Bachelor of Science in Astrophysics at UH Manoa. This requires a significant adjustment in the role of the IfA, which has long been at the forefront of modern astronomy in Hawaii and is now broadening its educational mission. The IfA’s history of excellence in research and access to observational resources are expected to draw students from around the nation and the world. These factors have inspired our programmatic focus culminating in a senior year research experience. We expect that the program will produce many undergraduate astrophysics majors, making it an ideal testbed to apply modern theories of learning to the teaching of astrophysics. We have explicitly designed the major around three pillars: physical theory, the application of physics to astrophysical phenomena, and the development of core observational astronomy skills. We describe our cooperative approach to developing a program-level curriculum map of key concepts and skills, as well as descriptors of student success throughout the program. These are central tools for course design, program assessment, and professional development.

  13. Fundamental Interactions, Nuclear Masses, Astrophysics, and QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliardi, C. A.

    2008-01-01

    During his long and varied career, Robert Tribble has made important contributions in many areas of nuclear physics. He has set new limits on the existence of second-class currents, lepton-flavor violation, and right-handed interactions. He optimized the use of the (4He,8He) reaction to determine nuclear masses and study charge-dependent effects in nuclei. He has developed a new indirect procedure to determine astrophysical reaction rates and applied it to study important nuclear reactions that occur in our sun, in massive stars, and in novae. He has explored anti-quark distributions in nucleons and nuclei, and the polarization of gluons in the nucleon. A brief overview of Bob Tribble's many accomplishments is presented.

  14. A laser application to nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Barbui, M.; Hagel, K.; Schmidt, K.; Zheng, H.; Burch, R.; Barbarino, M.; Natowitz, J. B.; Bang, W.; Dyer, G.; Quevedo, H. J.; Gaul, E.; Bernstein, A. C.; Donovan, M.; Bonasera, A.; Kimura, S.; Mazzocco, M.; Consoli, F.; De Angelis, R.; Andreoli, P.; Ditmire, T.

    2014-05-09

    In the last decade, the availability in high-intensity laser beams capable of producing plasmas with ion energies large enough to induce nuclear reactions has opened new research paths in nuclear physics. We studied the reactions {sup 3}He(d,p){sup 4}He and d(d,n){sup 3}He at temperatures of few keV in a plasma, generated by the interaction of intense ultrafast laser pulses with molecular deuterium or deuterated-methane clusters mixed with {sup 3}He atoms. The yield of 14.7 MeV protons from the {sup 3}He(d,p){sup 4}He reaction was used to extract the astrophysical S factor. Results of the experiment performed at the Center for High Energy Density Science at The University of Texas at Austin will be presented.

  15. Prospects of High Energy Laboratory Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, J.S.T.; Chen, P.; /SLAC

    2006-09-21

    Ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) have been observed but their sources and production mechanisms are yet to be understood. We envision a laboratory astrophysics program that will contribute to the understanding of cosmic accelerators with efforts to: (1) test and calibrate UHECR observational techniques, and (2) elucidate the underlying physics of cosmic acceleration through laboratory experiments and computer simulations. Innovative experiments belonging to the first category have already been done at the SLAC FFTB. Results on air fluorescence yields from the FLASH experiment are reviewed. Proposed future accelerator facilities can provided unprecedented high-energy-densities in a regime relevant to cosmic acceleration studies and accessible in a terrestrial environment for the first time. We review recent simulation studies of nonlinear plasma dynamics that could give rise to cosmic acceleration, and discuss prospects for experimental investigation of the underlying mechanisms.

  16. Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmond, Jay; Kodak, Charles

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the technical parameters and the technical staff of the Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) system at the fundamental station Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory (GGAO). It also gives an overview about the VLBI activities during the previous year. The outlook lists the outstanding tasks to improve the performance of GGAO.

  17. Geophysical applications of satellite altimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sandwell, D.T. )

    1991-01-01

    Publications related to geophysical applications of Seasat and Geosat altimetry are reviewed for the period 1987-1990. Problems discussed include geoid and gravity errors, regional geoid heights and gravity anomalies, local gravity field/flexure, plate tectonics, and gridded geoid heights/gravity anomalies. 99 refs.

  18. BROADBAND DIGITAL GEOPHYSICAL TELEMETRY SYSTEM.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seeley, Robert L.; Daniels, Jeffrey J.

    1984-01-01

    A system has been developed to simultaneously sample and transmit digital data from five remote geophysical data receiver stations to a control station that processes, displays, and stores the data. A microprocessor in each remote station receives commands from the control station over a single telemetry channel.

  19. The teaching of geophysics in Latin America: An updated assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valencio, Daniel A.; Schneider, Otto

    The situation of geophysics in developing countries has been the subject of discussions and analysis by diverse international organizations. It was also discussed in some articles in Eos [e.g., Lomnitz, 1982; Urrutia Fucugauchi, 1982; Bolt, 1982]. We have been requested to contribute a current evaluation of the problem, with particular reference to geophysical education in Latin America.In the following report on specialized training of geophysicists in Latin American countries, we consider the “exact earth sciences” in the broader sense, i.e., the mathematical and physical (and, to a certain extent, chemical) aspects of the planet earth as a whole, including its fluid portions, as opposed to the more restricted concept of just solid earth geophysics. In other words, our inquiry follows the scope of both AGU and the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG), so geodesy, although not explicitly covered, will still be mentioned occasionally. We will also consider the applied branches, especially exploration geophysics, since these areas furnish powerful motivation for fostering our sciences, both in the governmental circles of developing countries and among the young people looking for a promising professional future.

  20. Scientists of tomorrow - Geophysics School Lab for Secondary School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottschämmer, Ellen; Bohlen, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Starting in 2012, the Geophysical Institute (GPI) at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) developed several geophysical experiments for secondary school students which are now part of the Geophysics School Lab at the GPI. Usually, the students visit the School Lab as a class together with their teacher (Physics, Geography, Science), but the School Lab can also be used for extracurricular learning of individual students. The experiments carried out deal with the topics Seismology, Geoelectrics, and Fluid Dynamics: A horizontal seismometer is decoupled from its registration unit for the time of the visit of the students. With this setup, the students can measure the natural period of the pendulum, and adjust the seismometer accordingly. At different experimental stations, students can analyse seismic data registered with this unit, locate earthquakes, or get to know and understand an accelerometer. The accelerometer is attached to a registration unit and data can be visualized in real time. In another experimental setup, the students can measure the viscosity of a fluid as a function of temperature in order to get a better understanding of different magma types and their viscosity. Furthermore, a geoelectric experiment is carried out in a sandbox: The students experience with non-destructive testing, and try to reveal the subsurface structure. For our experiments, secondary school teachers can receive free supportive materials for the preparation of the visit. The aim of the Geophysics School Lab is to encourage and acquaint secondary school students to the concepts of Geophysics, and to enthuse them with the applied issues of Geosciences.

  1. Astrophysical Applications of Fractional Calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanislavsky, Aleksander A.

    The paradigm of fractional calculus occupies an important place for the macroscopic description of subdiffusion. Its advance in theoretical astrophysics is expected to be very attractive too. In this report we discuss a recent development of the idea to some astrophysical problems. One of them is connected with a random migration of bright points associated with magnetic fields at the solar photosphere. The transport of the bright points has subdiffusive features that require the fractional generalization of the Leighton's model. Another problem is related to the angular distribution of radio beams, being propagated through a medium with random inhomogeneities. The peculiarity of this medium is that radio beams are trapped because of random wave localization. This idea can be useful for the diagnostics of interplanetary and interstellar turbulent media.

  2. Novel laboratory simulations of astrophysical jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Parrish Clawson

    This thesis was motivated by the promise that some physical aspects of astrophysical jets and collimation processes can be scaled to laboratory parameters through hydrodynamic scaling laws. The simulation of astrophysical jet phenomena with laser-produced plasmas was attractive because the laser- target interaction can inject energetic, repeatable plasma into an external environment. Novel laboratory simulations of astrophysical jets involved constructing and using the YOGA laser, giving a 1064 nm, 8 ns pulse laser with energies up to 3.7 + 0.2 J . Laser-produced plasmas were characterized using Schlieren, interferometry and ICCD photography for their use in simulating jet and magnetosphere physics. The evolution of the laser-produced plasma in various conditions was compared with self-similar solutions and HYADES computer simulations. Millimeter-scale magnetized collimated outflows were produced by a centimeter scale cylindrically symmetric electrode configuration triggered by a laser-produced plasma. A cavity with a flared nozzle surrounded the center electrode and the electrode ablation created supersonic uncollimated flows. This flow became collimated when the center electrode changed from an anodeto a cathode. The plasma jets were in axially directed permanent magnetic fields with strengths up to 5000 Gauss. The collimated magnetized jets were 0.1-0. 3 cm wide, up to 2.0 cm long, and had velocities of ~4.0 × 10 6 cm/s. The dynamics of the evolution of the jet were compared qualitatively and quantitatively with fluxtube simulations from Bellan's formulation [6] giving a calculated estimate of ~2.6 × 10 6 cm/s for jet evolution velocity and evidence for jet rotation. The density measured with interferometry was 1.9 ± 0.2 × 10 17 cm -3 compared with 2.1 × 10 16 cm -3 calculated with Bellan's pressure balance formulation. Kinks in the jet column were produced consistent with the Kruskal-Shafranov condition which allowed stable and symmetric jets to form with

  3. Neutron capture measurements for nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reifarth, Rene

    2005-04-01

    Almost all of the heavy elements are produced via neutron capture reactions in a multitude of stellar production sites. The predictive power of the underlying stellar models is currently limited because they contain poorly constrained physics components such as convection, rotation or magnetic fields. Neutron captures measurements on heavy radioactive isotopes provide a unique opportunity to largely improve these physics components, and thereby address important questions of nuclear astrophysics. Such species are branch-points in the otherwise uniquely defined path of subsequent n-captures along the s-process path in the valley of stability. These branch points reveal themselves through unmistakable signatures recovered from pre-solar meteoritic grains that originate in individual element producing stars. Measurements on radioactive isotopes for neutron energies in the keV region represent a stringent challenge for further improvements of experimental techniques. This holds true for the neutron sources, the detection systems and the technology to handle radioactive material. Though the activation method or accelerator mass spectroscopy of the reaction products could be applied in a limited number of cases, Experimental facilities like DANCE at LANL, USA and n-TOF at CERN, Switzerland are addressing the need for such measurements on the basis of the more universal method of detecting the prompt capture gamma-rays, which is required for the application of neutron time-of-flight (TOF) techniques. With a strongly optimized neutron facility at the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) isotopes with half-lives down to tens of days could be investigated, while present facilities require half-lives of a few hundred days. Recent neutron capture experiments on radioactive isotopes with relevance for nuclear astrophysics and possibilities for future experimental setups will be discussed during the talk.

  4. Physics News in 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F., Ed.

    Information is provided on some of the interesting and newsworthy developments in physics and its related fields during 1983. Areas considered include: (1) acoustics; (2) astrophysics; (3) condensed matter physics; (4) crystallography; (5) physics education; (6) electron and atomic physics; (7) elementary particle physics; (8) fluid dynamics; (9)…

  5. Astrophysics with Microarcsecond Accuracy Astrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unwin, Stephen C.

    2008-01-01

    Space-based astrometry promises to provide a powerful new tool for astrophysics. At a precision level of a few microarcsonds, a wide range of phenomena are opened up for study. In this paper we discuss the capabilities of the SIM Lite mission, the first space-based long-baseline optical interferometer, which will deliver parallaxes to 4 microarcsec. A companion paper in this volume will cover the development and operation of this instrument. At the level that SIM Lite will reach, better than 1 microarcsec in a single measurement, planets as small as one Earth can be detected around many dozen of the nearest stars. Not only can planet masses be definitely measured, but also the full orbital parameters determined, allowing study of system stability in multiple planet systems. This capability to survey our nearby stellar neighbors for terrestrial planets will be a unique contribution to our understanding of the local universe. SIM Lite will be able to tackle a wide range of interesting problems in stellar and Galactic astrophysics. By tracing the motions of stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies orbiting our Milky Way, SIM Lite will probe the shape of the galactic potential history of the formation of the galaxy, and the nature of dark matter. Because it is flexibly scheduled, the instrument can dwell on faint targets, maintaining its full accuracy on objects as faint as V=19. This paper is a brief survey of the diverse problems in modern astrophysics that SIM Lite will be able to address.

  6. Optical Quantum Entanglement in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, J.; Peimbert, A.; Echevarría, J.

    2009-10-01

    The theories of quantum entanglement between two distant particles, which clearly confirm the non-local nature of Quantum Mechanics, are applied to naturally produced particles in astrophysical objects. We study the production and reception of the cases of optical quantum entanglement most feasible to be observed: the two-photon spontaneous transition of the hydrogen 2 ^{2}S_{1/2} metastable level, which is known to be one of the components of the continuous spectra of ionized regions. We obtain the two-photon emission rate for four astrophysical objects: the Orion Nebula, two nearby planetary nebulae IC 2149 and NGC 7293, and the solar corona. The production of entangled pairs per second is 5.80×10^48, 9.39×10^45, 9.77×10^44, and 1.46×10^16 respectively. The distribution of the propagation directions of both emitted photons does not vanish at any angle; therefore it is possible to observe the entangled pair at an angles θ ≈ 0°. Because the number of two-photon coincidences goes as the fourth power of the ratio between the detector size and the distance from the astrophysical object, coincidences are scarce; for its detection we require receivers much larger than those currently available.

  7. Astrophysical Probes of Dark Matter Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reece, Matthew

    The majority of matter in the universe is dark matter, made up of some particle beyond those in the Standard Model of particle physics. So far we have very little information about what dark matter is and how it interacts, except through gravity. Constraints from halo shapes and the Bullet Cluster give upper bounds on the self-interaction strength of dark matter, but these bounds are very weak: roughly the same size as nuclear physics cross sections, which are very large by the standards of particle physics. Given how little we know about dark matter, it is important to search for it in as broad a context as possible. Existing direct and indirect detection analyses are typically motivated by simple particle physics models like WIMP dark matter. This research will aim to widen the scope of searches for dark matter by considering a more complete range of particle physics models, working out their implications for astrophysical data, and interpreting existing data in terms of these new models. New models of dark matter can affect searches in a variety of ways. Signals may show up in conventional indirect detection searches, e.g. in gamma rays detected by Fermi-LAT or in antiprotons detected by AMS-02. The new particle physics content of the models could be reflected in surprising spectral shapes or other features of such signals, or in gamma rays with a different profile on the sky than expected in typical models. The PI has worked, for example, on a model in which signals may arise from a dark disk, which is just one of many possibilities. Signals of new dark matter models might also arise in more subtle ways. Structure in the dark sector could influence the development of structure in the visible sector, indirectly. For instance, a dark matter disk or other dark structures could alter the orbits of stars in the galaxy and may be detectable through detailed studies of the kinematics of stellar populations. Dark accretion disks could exist around astrophysical objects

  8. Digital Underground (Shh. It's really Applied Geophysics!)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdoo, B. G.

    2003-12-01

    Digital Underground (Geology/Physics 241) at Vassar College is an applied geophysics course designed for a liberal arts curriculum, and has nothing to do with Shock G and Tupac Shakur. Applied geophysics courses have a history of using geophysical methods on environmental contamination-type applications (underground storage tanks, leach fields, etc.). Inspired in large part by the Keck Geology Consortium project run by Franklin and Marshall College geophysicist (Robert Sternberg) and archaeologist (James Delle) in an old slave village in Jamaica in 1999, this class examines the history of slavery in New York's Hudson Valley region by way of its forgotten African-American graveyards. This multidisciplinary approach to an issue draws students from across the curriculum- we have had our compliments of geologists and physicists, along with students from sociology, environmental studies, history, and Africana studies. The name of the class and content are designed to attract a non-traditional student of geophysics.- The project-based nature of the class appeals to student yearning for an out-of-classroom experience. The uncontrolled nature of the class demonstrates the complications that occur in real-word situations. The class has in the past broken itself into two teams- a surveying team and an archival research team. Archival research is done (usually by the social scientists in the class) to add a human dimension to the geophysical. The surveying equipment used in delineating these forgotten graveyards includes a Total Station surveyor, an electrical resistivity meter, a magnetometer, and a ground penetrating radar. All students must have a rudimentary understanding of the physics behind the equipment (to the level of where they can explain it to the general public), and the methods used by those studying the archives. This is a project-based class, where the instructor acts as a project manager, and the students make the decisions regarding the survey itself. Every

  9. Nuclear Theory for Astrophysics, Stockpile Stewardship, and Homeland Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Anna

    2004-10-01

    A large number of problems key to astrophysics, stockpile stewardship, and homeland defense rely on knowledge of nuclear physics in regimes inaccessible to experiment. In stellar and nuclear explosions unstable nuclei and nuclear isomers are produced in copious quantities and are used to diagnose the explosion. Similarly, analysis of the unstable nuclei from the debris will be key to attribution in the event of a terrorist domestic nuclear attack. In the case of nuclear non-proliferation a number of new schemes are being considered by the IAEA to address the ever greater needs, including neutrino monitoring of the plutonium content of reactors. For all of these problems detailed nuclear theory is required. In this talk I discuss the theoretical physics needs for the type of problems of overlapping interest to astrophysics and national security.

  10. Time-lapse Geophysical Data from a Stressed Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milkereit, B.; Tibbo, M.; Kassam, A.; Carey, A.; Schmitt, D. R.; Mohammed, T. E.; Malehmir, R.; Guo, K.

    2015-12-01

    A complication in geophysical monitoring of deep mines is the high-stress dependency of the physical properties of hard rocks. This project is part of a comprehensive, exploration geophysical study in a deep, highly stressed mine located in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. Data from in situ monitoring of the mining induced seismicity, conductivity, and stress dependent physical properties have been obtained from two boreholes located in this mine. These borehole are approximately 400 m long with NQ diameters and depths of about 1300 - 1600 m and 1700 - 2000 m. Two borehole logging surveys were performed on both boreholes, October 2013 and July 2015, in order to perform a time-lapse analysis of the geophysical changes in the mine. These multi-parameter surveys include caliper, full waveform sonic, televiewer, chargeability (IP), and resistivity. Multi-electrode array DC/IP borehole and borehole-to-borehole surveys were also conducted in 2014, showing an increase in resistivity only in the 1300 m borehole near the active mining area, possibly due to stress induced closing of fractures. There is only exploration activity near the 1700 m borehole over this time period, and it therefore shows no changes in resistivity. Laboratory experiments have been performed on borehole core samples from each borehole. These experiments have measured the geophysical properties including elastic modulus, bulk modulus, P- and S-wave velocities, and density.

  11. 3D stochastic geophysical inversion for contact surface geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelièvre, Peter; Farquharson, Colin; Bijani, Rodrigo

    2015-04-01

    Geologists' interpretations about the Earth typically involve distinct rock units with contacts (interfaces) between them. As such, 3D geological Earth models typically comprise wireframe contact surfaces of tessellated triangles or other polygonal planar facets. In contrast, standard minimum-structure geophysical inversions are performed on meshes of space-filling cells (typically prisms or tetrahedra) and recover smoothly varying physical property distributions that are inconsistent with typical geological interpretations. There are several approaches through which mesh-based geophysical inversion can help recover models with some of the desired characteristics. However, a more effective strategy is to consider a fundamentally different type of inversion that works directly with models that comprise surfaces representing contacts between rock units. We are researching such an approach, our goal being to perform geophysical forward and inverse modelling directly with 3D geological models of any complexity. Geological and geophysical models should be specified using the same parameterization such that they are, in essence, the same Earth model. We parameterize the wireframe contact surfaces in a 3D model as the coordinates of the nodes (facet vertices). The physical properties of each rock unit in a model remain fixed while the geophysical inversion controls the position of the contact surfaces via the control nodes, perturbing the surfaces as required to fit the geophysical data responses. This is essentially a "geometry inversion", which can be used to recover the unknown geometry of a target body or to investigate the viability of a proposed Earth model. We apply global optimization strategies to solve the inverse problem, including stochastic sampling to obtain statistical information regarding the likelihood of particular features in the model, helping to assess the viability of a proposed model. Jointly inverting multiple types of geophysical data is simple

  12. Physics in the Twentieth Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisskopf, Victor F.

    1970-01-01

    Provides a review of the great discoveries, theoretical concepts and development of physics in the 20th century. The growth and significance of diverse fields such as quantum theory, relativity theory, atomic physics, molecular physics, the physics of the solid state, nuclear physics, astrophysics, plasma physics, and particle physics are…

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic Particle Acceleration Processes: SSX Experiments, Theory, and Astrophysical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Michael R.

    2006-11-16

    Project Title: Magnetohydrodynamic Particle Acceleration Processes: SSX Experiments, Theory, and Astrophysical Applications PI: Michael R. Brown, Swarthmore College The purpose of the project was to provide theoretical and modeling support to the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX). Accordingly, the theoretical effort was tightly integrated into the SSX experimental effort. During the grant period, Michael Brown and his experimental collaborators at Swarthmore, with assistance from W. Matthaeus as appropriate, made substantial progress in understanding the physics SSX plasmas.

  14. New Geophysical Observatory in Uruguay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez Bettucci, L.; Nuñez, P.; Caraballo, R. R.; Ogando, R.

    2013-05-01

    In 2011 began the installation of the first geophysical observatory in Uruguay, with the aim of developing the Geosciences. The Astronomical and Geophysical Observatory Aiguá (OAGA) is located within the Cerro Catedral Tourist Farm (-34 ° 20 '0 .89 "S/-54 ° 42 '44.72" W, h: 270m). This has the distinction of being located in the center of the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly. Geologically is emplaced in a Neoproterozoic basement, in a region with scarce anthropogenic interference. The OAGA has, since 2012, with a GSM-90FD dIdD v7.0 and GSM-90F Overhauser, both of GEM Systems. In addition has a super-SID receiver provided by the Stanford University SOLAR Center, as a complement for educational purposes. Likewise the installation of a seismograph REF TEK-151-120A and VLF antenna is being done since the beginning of 2013.

  15. More on South American geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomnitz, Cinna

    As an addendum to J. Urrutia Fucugauchi's (Eos, 63, June 8, 1982, p. 529) excellent analysis of why things go wrong in Latin American geophysics, I submit that funds in whatever form are not the only answer. In Mexico over the past decade there has been a reasonable availability of funds, yet no dramatic increase in the quality or quantity of geophysical research was detected. Graduate scholarships have even gone begging for applicants in the earth sciences!Leadership is the big problem. National plans and forecasts for science and technology continue to ignore this central fact. They want to generate hundreds, nay thousands, of middle-level scientists while providing no incentive for excellence. As others have found out long before us, this approach is doomed from the start.

  16. Environmental geophysics - fad or future?

    SciTech Connect

    Romig, P.R.

    1994-12-31

    For ten years, the oil industry has suffered cycles of downsizing, out-sourcing, and reorganization. As layoffs and early retirement have become widespread, an increasing number of geophysicists have seen the environmental business as an opportunity to stay in their chosen professions. There have been predictions that the use of geophysics for environmental mapping and characterization could spawn an industry larger than oil exploration. These predictions have come from serious financial analysts as well as from hopeful geophysicists, so they cannot be ignored. There also are reputable professionals who believe that environmentalism is a fad which will die out as soon as the next oil shortage occurs. They point to recent publicity about excessive expenditures for waste remediation as a signal of the beginning of the end. These conflicting views raise serious questions about the form and function of, and the future for, environmental geophysics. This paper reviews these views.

  17. Smith heads Reviews of Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    On January 1, Jim Smith began his term as editor-in-chief of Reviews of Geophysics. As editor-in-chief, he leads the board of editors in enhancing the journal's role as an integrating force in the geophysical sciences by providing timely overviews of current research and its trends. Smith is already beginning to fulfill the journal's role of providing review papers on topics of broad interest to Union members as well as the occasional definitive review paper on selected topics of narrower focus. Smith will lead the editorial board until December 31, 2000. Michael Coffey, Tommy Dickey, James Horwitz, Roelof Snieder, and Thomas Torgersen have been appointed as editors to serve with Smith. At least one more editor will be named to round out the disciplinary expertise on the board.

  18. Geophysical investigations at Momotombo, Nicaragua

    SciTech Connect

    Cordon, U.J.; Zurflueh, E.G.

    1980-09-01

    The Momotombo geothermal field in Nicaragua was investigated in three exploration stages, using a number of geophysical techniques. Stage 1 of the investigations by Texas Instruments, Inc., (1970) located and delineated a potential geothermal field, with the dipole mapping surveys and electromagnetic soundings being most effective. Stage 2 of the investigations, performed in 1973 by the United Nations Development Program (UNDP), outlined the resistivity anomalies in the area west of the previously selected field; Schlumberger VES soundings and constant depth profiling (SCDP) proved most useful. During Stage 3 of the investigations, Electroconsult (ELC) performed 20 additional Schlumberger VES soundings as part of the 1975 plant feasibility studies. Results of these geophysical techniques are summarized and their effectiveness briefly discussed.

  19. Trojan horse particle invariance: The impact on nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.; Bertulani, C. A.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Blokhintsev, L. D.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Spartá, R.; Tumino, A.

    2014-05-01

    In the current picture of nuclear astrophysics indirect methods and, in particular, the Trojan Horse Method cover a crucial role for the measurement of charged particle induced reactions cross sections of astrophysical interest, in the energy range required by the astrophysical scenarios. To better understand its cornerstones and its applications to physical cases many tests were performed to verify all its properties and the possible future perspectives. The key to the method is the quasi-free break-up and some of its properties will be investigated in the present work. In particular, the Trojan Horse nucleus invariance will be studied and previous studies will be extended to the cases of the binary d(d, p)t and 6Li(d,α)4He reactions, which were tested using different quasi-free break-up's, namely 6Li and 3He. The astrophysical S(E)-factor were then extracted with the Trojan Horse formalism applied to the two different break-up schemes and compared with direct data as well as with previous indirect investigations. The very good agreement confirms the independence of binary indirect cross section on the chosen spectator particle also for these reactions.

  20. Trojan horse particle invariance: The impact on nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Pizzone, R. G.; La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Bertulani, C. A.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Blokhintsev, L. D.; Lamia, L.; Spartá, R.; Tumino, A.

    2014-05-02

    In the current picture of nuclear astrophysics indirect methods and, in particular, the Trojan Horse Method cover a crucial role for the measurement of charged particle induced reactions cross sections of astrophysical interest, in the energy range required by the astrophysical scenarios. To better understand its cornerstones and its applications to physical cases many tests were performed to verify all its properties and the possible future perspectives. The key to the method is the quasi-free break-up and some of its properties will be investigated in the present work. In particular, the Trojan Horse nucleus invariance will be studied and previous studies will be extended to the cases of the binary d(d, p)t and {sup 6}Li(d,α){sup 4}He reactions, which were tested using different quasi-free break-up's, namely {sup 6}Li and {sup 3}He. The astrophysical S(E)-factor were then extracted with the Trojan Horse formalism applied to the two different break-up schemes and compared with direct data as well as with previous indirect investigations. The very good agreement confirms the independence of binary indirect cross section on the chosen spectator particle also for these reactions.

  1. Geophysics of Ceres from Dawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.; Park, R. S.; Konopliv, A. S.; Asmar, S. W.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Hughson, K.; Jaumann, R.; McCord, T.; Presuker, F.; Schenck, P.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2015-10-01

    Dawn's 16-month investigation of Ceres will return comprehensive data elucidating its geology and morphology, composition, and gravity field. One of the objectives of the investigation is to understand Ceres' interior structure and the possibility of communication between the subsurface ocean, thought to have existed during the first half of Ceres' evolution, and the surface. Geophysical data collected to date provide a preliminary assessment of the structure and composition of the ice shell and implications for past mobility.

  2. Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Computer simulation of atmospheric flow corresponds well to imges taken during the second Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (BFFC) mission. The top shows a view from the pole, while the bottom shows a view from the equator. Red corresponds to hot fluid rising while blue shows cold fluid falling. This simulation was developed by Anil Deane of the University of Maryland, College Park and Paul Fischer of Argorne National Laboratory. Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

  3. Geophysical subsurface imaging and interface identification.

    SciTech Connect

    Pendley, Kevin; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Day, David Minot; Robinson, Allen Conrad; Weiss, Chester Joseph

    2005-09-01

    Electromagnetic induction is a classic geophysical exploration method designed for subsurface characterization--in particular, sensing the presence of geologic heterogeneities and fluids such as groundwater and hydrocarbons. Several approaches to the computational problems associated with predicting and interpreting electromagnetic phenomena in and around the earth are addressed herein. Publications resulting from the project include [31]. To obtain accurate and physically meaningful numerical simulations of natural phenomena, computational algorithms should operate in discrete settings that reflect the structure of governing mathematical models. In section 2, the extension of algebraic multigrid methods for the time domain eddy current equations to the frequency domain problem is discussed. Software was developed and is available in Trilinos ML package. In section 3 we consider finite element approximations of De Rham's complex. We describe how to develop a family of finite element spaces that forms an exact sequence on hexahedral grids. The ensuing family of non-affine finite elements is called a van Welij complex, after the work [37] of van Welij who first proposed a general method for developing tangentially and normally continuous vector fields on hexahedral elements. The use of this complex is illustrated for the eddy current equations and a conservation law problem. Software was developed and is available in the Ptenos finite element package. The more popular methods of geophysical inversion seek solutions to an unconstrained optimization problem by imposing stabilizing constraints in the form of smoothing operators on some enormous set of model parameters (i.e. ''over-parametrize and regularize''). In contrast we investigate an alternative approach whereby sharp jumps in material properties are preserved in the solution by choosing as model parameters a modest set of variables which describe an interface between adjacent regions in physical space. While

  4. Historians probe geophysics in Seattle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, James R.

    The history of geophysics is becoming a “hot topic” among historians of science and technology. While previous annual meetings of the History of Science Society had few papers on the topic, the latest meeting of the society on October 25-28, 1990, in Seattle featured three sessions with a total of 11 papers. Two “works in progress” papers were also on geophysical topics.The first session on the history of geophysics was Climate Change in Historical Perspective. In spite of all the recent attention given to global warming, it is important to remember that climatic change is not a new issue. Indeed, measured over the course of centuries, approaches to the study of climate and ideas about climatic change have been changing more rapidly than the climate itself. In addition to being interesting in its own right, the history of climatic change is beginning to play a crucial role in global change education, research, and policy decisions. Papers in this session spanned 200 years of the history of climatology as a science and climatic change as an issue.

  5. Air-depolyable geophysics package

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, S.L.; Harben, P.E.

    1993-11-01

    We are using Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) diverse expertise to develop a geophysical monitoring system that can survive being dropped into place by a helicopter or airplane. Such an air-deployable system could significantly decrease the time and effort needed to set up such instruments in remote locations following a major earthquake or volcanic eruption. Most currently available geophysical monitoring and survey systems, such as seismic monitoring stations, use sensitive, fragile instrumentation that requires personnel trained and experienced in data acquisition and field setup. Rapid deployment of such equipment can be difficult or impossible. Recent developments in low-power electronics, new materials, and sensors that are resistant to severe impacts have made it possible to develop low-cost geophysical monitoring packages for rapid deployment missions. Our strategy was to focus on low-cost battery-powered systems that would have a relatively long (several months) operational lifetime. We concentrated on the conceptual design and engineering of a single-component seismic system that could survive an air-deployment into an earth material, such as alluvium. Actual implementation of such a system is a goal of future work on this concept. For this project, we drew on LLNL`s Earth Sciences Department, Radio Shop, Plastics Shop, and Weapons Program. The military has had several programs to develop air-deployed and cannon-deployed seismometers. Recently, a sonobuoy manufacturer has offered an air-deployable geophone designed to make relatively soft landings.

  6. Enhanced Subsurface Fluid Characterization Using Joint Hydrological and Geophysical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commer, M.; Kowalsky, M. B.; Finsterle, S.; Newman, G. A.

    2010-12-01

    Quantitatively assessing and predicting physical and chemical processes that control subsurface flow systems requires highly parameterized process models, which in turn require high-resolution characterization data on multiple scales. In this study, we explore the value of adding geophysical surface and surface-to-borehole electrical resistivity data within a hydrogeophysical joint inversion framework. The resistivity data are inverted by a geophysical imaging method to obtain a three-dimensional electrical resistivity distribution. This resistivity map is then considered to be a set of “measured” geophysical data, to be used along with sets of hydrological measurements, in our case time-dependent borehole brine concentration measurements, in a joint inversion for the estimation of the subsurface permeability distribution. Within the hydrogeophysical joint inversion, a flow and transport simulator calculates an electrical resistivity field from the distribution of the two state variables fluid saturation and concentration, using a petrophysical model. We use the inverse modeling version of TOUGH2, a simulator for multiphase, multi-component, non-isothermal flows in porous media. The geophysical resistivity map enters as an additional input data set, and the objective function to be minimized contains the sum of weighted differences between hydrogeological and geophysical residuals. This inversion scheme uses nonlinear least-squares optimization, a modified Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, and geostatistical simulations together with the pilot point method to reduce the dimension of the parameter space. We are able to demonstrate that, provided the different data types are weighted properly, the geophysical image adds value in terms of improving the subsurface permeability image. Percentage difference between true permeability field and the field obtained from inverting hydrological data. Percentage difference between true permeability field and the field obtained

  7. Geophysical monitoring technology for CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jin-Feng; Li, Lin; Wang, Hao-Fan; Tan, Ming-You; Cui, Shi-Ling; Zhang, Yun-Yin; Qu, Zhi-Peng; Jia, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Shu-Hai

    2016-06-01

    Geophysical techniques play key roles in the measuring, monitoring, and verifying the safety of CO2 sequestration and in identifying the efficiency of CO2-enhanced oil recovery. Although geophysical monitoring techniques for CO2 sequestration have grown out of conventional oil and gas geophysical exploration techniques, it takes a long time to conduct geophysical monitoring, and there are many barriers and challenges. In this paper, with the initial objective of performing CO2 sequestration, we studied the geophysical tasks associated with evaluating geological storage sites and monitoring CO2 sequestration. Based on our review of the scope of geophysical monitoring techniques and our experience in domestic and international carbon capture and sequestration projects, we analyzed the inherent difficulties and our experiences in geophysical monitoring techniques, especially, with respect to 4D seismic acquisition, processing, and interpretation.

  8. Atomic Data in X-Ray Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickhouse, N. S.

    2000-01-01

    With the launches of the Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) and the X-ray Multimirror Mission (XMM) and the upcoming launch of the Japanese mission ASTRO-E, high resolution X-ray spectroscopy of cosmic sources has begun. Early, deep observations of three stellar coronal sources will provide not only invaluable calibration data, but will also give us benchmarks for the atomic data under collisional equilibrium conditions. Analysis of the Chandra X-ray Observatory data, and data from other telescopes taken simultaneously, for these stars is ongoing as part of the Emission Line Project. Goals of the Emission Line Project are: (1) to determine and verify accurate and robust diagnostics and (2) to identify and prioritize issues in fundamental spectroscopy which will require further theoretical and/or laboratory work. The Astrophysical Plasma Emission Database will be described in some detail, as it is introducing standardization and flexibility into X-ray spectral modeling. Spectral models of X-ray astrophysical plasmas can be generally classified as dominated by either collisional ionization or by X-ray photoionization. While the atomic data needs for spectral models under these two types of ionization are significantly different, there axe overlapping data needs, as I will describe. Early results from the Emission Line Project benchmarks are providing an invaluable starting place, but continuing work to improve the accuracy and completeness of atomic data is needed. Additionally, we consider the possibility that some sources will require that both collisional ionization and photoionization be taken into account, or that time-dependent ionization be considered. Thus plasma spectral models of general use need to be computed over a wide range of physical conditions.

  9. Einstein Toolkit for Relativistic Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collaborative Effort

    2011-02-01

    The Einstein Toolkit is a collection of software components and tools for simulating and analyzing general relativistic astrophysical systems. Such systems include gravitational wave space-times, collisions of compact objects such as black holes or neutron stars, accretion onto compact objects, core collapse supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts. The Einstein Toolkit builds on numerous software efforts in the numerical relativity community including CactusEinstein, Whisky, and Carpet. The Einstein Toolkit currently uses the Cactus Framework as the underlying computational infrastructure that provides large-scale parallelization, general computational components, and a model for collaborative, portable code development.

  10. Astrophysics Source Code Library Enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanisch, R. J.; Allen, A.; Berriman, G. B.; DuPrie, K.; Mink, J.; Nemiroff, R. J.; Schmidt, J.; Shamir, L.; Shortridge, K.; Taylor, M.; Teuben, P. J.; Wallin, J.

    2015-09-01

    The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL)1 is a free online registry of codes used in astronomy research; it currently contains over 900 codes and is indexed by ADS. The ASCL has recently moved a new infrastructure into production. The new site provides a true database for the code entries and integrates the WordPress news and information pages and the discussion forum into one site. Previous capabilities are retained and permalinks to ascl.net continue to work. This improvement offers more functionality and flexibility than the previous site, is easier to maintain, and offers new possibilities for collaboration. This paper covers these recent changes to the ASCL.

  11. Astrophysics and Cosmology: International Partnerships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blandford, Roger

    2015-04-01

    Most large projects in astrophysics and cosmology are international. This raises many challenges including: • Aligning the sequence of: proposal, planning, selection, funding, construction, deployment, operation, data mining in different countries • Managing to minimize cost growth through reconciling different practices • Communicating at all levels to ensure a successful outcome • Stabilizing long term career opportunities. There has been considerable progress in confronting these challenges. Lessons learned from past collaborations are influencing current facilities but much remains to be done if we are to optimize the scientific and public return on the expenditure of financial and human resources.

  12. Astrophysical constraints on dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Chiu Man; Hsu, Stephen D. H.

    2016-02-01

    Dark energy (i.e., a cosmological constant) leads, in the Newtonian approximation, to a repulsive force which grows linearly with distance and which can have astrophysical consequences. For example, the dark energy force overcomes the gravitational attraction from an isolated object (e.g., dwarf galaxy) of mass 107M⊙ at a distance of 23 kpc. Observable velocities of bound satellites (rotation curves) could be significantly affected, and therefore used to measure or constrain the dark energy density. Here, isolated means that the gravitational effect of large nearby galaxies (specifically, of their dark matter halos) is negligible; examples of isolated dwarf galaxies include Antlia or DDO 190.

  13. Astrophysics and Cosmology: International Partnerships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blandford, Roger

    2016-03-01

    Most large projects in astrophysics and cosmology are international. This raises many challenges including: --Aligning the sequence of: proposal, planning, selection, funding, construction, deployment, operation, data mining in different countries --Managing to minimize cost growth through reconciling different practices --Communicating at all levels to ensure a successful outcome --Stabilizing long term career opportunities. There has been considerable progress in confronting these challenges. Lessons learned from past collaborations are influencing current facilities but much remains to be done if we are to optimize the scientific and public return on the expenditure of financial and human resources.

  14. GEOPHYSICS, ASTRONOMY, AND ASTROPHYSICS: Assessment of Primordial Radionuclides in Pakistani Red Bricks and Associated Radiation Doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, K.; Jabbar, A.; Akhter, P.; Tufail, M.; Khan M., H.

    2010-03-01

    Specific activity of primordial radionuclides and associated radiation hazards due to 40K, 226Ra, and 232Th have been measured in backed red brick samples, collected from five highly populated areas of the North West Frontier Province of Pakistan. For the detection, analysis and data acquisition, a high purity germanium detector was used. Associated external doses were calculated using a Monte Carlo neutron photon transport code. A theoretical model to determine the gamma dose rate at 1 m height from the floor, made of bricks, was employed for the calculation of mass attenuation coefficient and self-absorption in the floor for the gamma energies of these radionuclides and their progeny. Monte Carlo simulation shows that in this study the floor, having more than an effective thickness of 15 cm, contributes very little to the external gamma dose rate. The values of the external dose rate and annual effective dose are found to be much lower than the world average as well as from other countries of the world.

  15. GEOPHYSICS, ASTRONOMY, AND ASTROPHYSICS: Nonlinear Local Lyapunov Exponent and Quantification of Local Predictability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Rui-Qiang; Li, Jian-Ping; Ha, Kyung-Ja

    2008-05-01

    Nonlinear local Lyapunov exponent (NLLE) is applied to quantitatively determine the local predictability limit of chaotic systems. As an example, we find that the local predictability limit of Henon attractor varies considerably with time, and some underlying phase-spatial structure does not appear. The local predictability limit of initially adjacent points in phase space may be completely different. This will cause difficulties in making the long-time analogue forecast.

  16. GEOPHYSICS, ASTRONOMY, AND ASTROPHYSICS: Reconstructing Quintom from WMAP 5-year Observations: Generalized Ghost Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing-Fei; Gui, Yuan-Xing

    2010-08-01

    In the 5-year WMAP data analysis, a new parametrization form for dark energy equation-of-state was used, and it has been shown that the equation-of-state, w(z), crosses the cosmological-constant boundary w = -1. Based on this observation, in this paper, we investigate the reconstruction of quintom dark energy model. As a single-real-scalarfield model of dark energy, the generalized ghost condensate model provides us with a successful mechanism for realizing the quintom-like behavior. Therefore, we reconstruct this scalar-field quintom dark energy model from the WMAP 5-year observational results. As a comparison, we also discuss the quintom reconstruction based on other specific dark energy ansatzs, such as the CPL parametrization and the holographic dark energy scenarios.

  17. GEOPHYSICS, ASTRONOMY, AND ASTROPHYSICS: Viscoelastic BISQ Model for Low-Permeability Sandstone with Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Jian-Xin; Yang, Ding-Hui

    2008-08-01

    A modified BISQ (Biot/Squirt) model for wave propagation in low-permeability sandstone is developed by introducing the viscoelastic mechanism of a porous skeleton into Dvorkin's model. The linear viscoelasticity of the Kelvin Voigt constitutive law is employed to describe the stress-strain relation of a solid frame with clay while the ultrasonic waves propagate through the fluid-saturated sandstone. The phase velocity and attenuation of two p-waves are given based on the present BISQ model. The comparisons between numerical results and experimental data indicate that our viscoelastic model is more realistic and feasible for wave propagation in the low-permeability sandstone, especially with clay, than traditional BISQ models.

  18. Geophysical Model Research and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M; Walter, W; Tkalcic, H; Franz, G; Flanagan, M

    2004-07-07

    Geophysical models constitute an important component of calibration for nuclear explosion monitoring. We will focus on four major topics: (1) a priori geophysical models, (2) surface wave models, (3) receiver function derived profiles, and (4) stochastic geophysical models. The first, a priori models, can be used to predict a host of geophysical measurements, such as body wave travel times, and can be derived from direct regional studies or even by geophysical analogy. Use of these models is particularly important in aseismic regions or regions without seismic stations, where data of direct measurements might not exist. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed the Western Eurasia and North Africa (WENA) model which has been evaluated using a number of data sets, including travel times, surface waves, receiver functions, and waveform analysis (Pasyanos et al., 2004). We have joined this model with our Yellow Sea - Korean Peninsula (YSKP) model and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) East Asia model to construct a model for all of Eurasia and North Africa. Secondly, we continue to improve upon our surface wave model by adding more paths. This has allowed us to expand the region to all of Eurasia and into Africa, increase the resolution of our model, and extend results to even shorter periods (7 sec). High-resolution models exist for the Middle East and the YSKP region. The surface wave results can be inverted either alone, or in conjunction with other data, to derive models of the crust and upper mantle structure. We are also using receiver functions, in joint inversions with the surface waves, to produce profiles directly under seismic stations throughout the region. In a collaborative project with Ammon, et al., they have been focusing on stations throughout western Eurasia and North Africa, while we have been focusing on LLNL deployments in the Middle East, including Kuwait, Jordan, and the United Arab Emirates. Finally, we have been

  19. Magnetic Reconnection in Extreme Astrophysical Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A.

    2011-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental plasma physics process in which ideal-MHD's frozen-in constraints are broken and the magnetic field topology is dramatically re-arranged, which often leads to a violent release of the free magnetic energy. Most of the magnetic reconnection research done to date has been motivated by the applications to systems such as the solar corona, Earth's magnetosphere, and magnetic confinement devices for thermonuclear fusion. These environments have relatively low energy densities and the plasma is adequately described as a mixture of equal numbers of electrons and ions and where the dissipated magnetic energy always stays with the plasma. In contrast, in this paper I would like to introduce a different, new direction of research—reconnection in high energy density radiative plasmas, in which photons play as important a role as electrons and ions; in particular, in which radiation pressure and radiative cooling become dominant factors in the pressure and energy balance. This research is motivated in part by rapid theoretical and experimental advances in High Energy Density Physics, and in part by several important problems in modern high-energy astrophysics. I first discuss some astrophysical examples of high-energy-density reconnection and then identify the key physical processes that distinguish them from traditional reconnection. Among the most important of these processes are: special-relativistic effects; radiative effects (radiative cooling, radiation pressure, and radiative resistivity); and, at the most extreme end—QED effects, including pair creation. The most notable among the astrophysical applications are situations involving magnetar-strength fields (1014-1015 G, exceeding the quantum critical field B ∗≃4×1013 G). The most important examples are giant flares in soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) and magnetic models of the central engines and relativistic jets of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). The magnetic energy density in

  20. High-Energy Astrophysics: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy astrophysics is the study of objects and phenomena in space with energy densities much greater than that found in normal stars and galaxies. These include black holes, neutron stars, cosmic rays, hypernovae and gamma-ray bursts. A history and an overview of high-energy astrophysics will be presented, including a description of the objects that are observed. Observing techniques, space-borne missions in high-energy astrophysics and some recent discoveries will also be described. Several entirely new types of astronomy are being employed in high-energy astrophysics. These will be briefly described, along with some NASA missions currently under development.

  1. High Energy Astrophysics Research and Programmatic Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, Lorella

    1998-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by members of the USRA contract team during the six months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics. Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  2. High Energy Astrophysics Research and Programmatic Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, L. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by members of the USRA contract team during the six months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics. Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  3. Working Papers: Astronomy and Astrophysics Panel Reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, John N.; Beichman, Charles A.; Canizares, Claude; Cronin, James; Heeschen, David; Houck, James; Hunten, Donald; Mckee, Christopher F.; Noyes, Robert; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1991-01-01

    The papers of the panels appointed by the Astronomy and Astrophysics survey Committee are compiled. These papers were advisory to the survey committee and represent the opinions of the members of each panel in the context of their individual charges. The following subject areas are covered: radio astronomy, infrared astronomy, optical/IR from ground, UV-optical from space, interferometry, high energy from space, particle astrophysics, theory and laboratory astrophysics, solar astronomy, planetary astronomy, computing and data processing, policy opportunities, benefits to the nation from astronomy and astrophysics, status of the profession, and science opportunities.

  4. The next century astrophysics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Paul N.

    1992-01-01

    The Astrophysics Division within the NASA Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA) has defined a set of flagship and intermediate missions that are presently under study for possible launch during the next 20 years. These missions and tentative schedules, referred to as the Astrotech 21 Mission Set, are summarized. The missions are in three groups corresponding to the cognizant science branch within the Astrophysics Division. Phase C/D refers to the pre-launch construction and delivery of the spacecraft, and the Operations Phase refers to the period when the mission is active in space. Approximately 1.5 years before the start of Phase C/D, a non-advocate review (NAR) is held to ensure that the mission/system concept and the requisite technology are at an appropriate stage of readiness for full scale development to begin. Therefore, technology development is frozen (usually) as of the date of a successful NAR. An overview of the technology advances required for each of the three wavelength groups is provided in the following paragraphs, along with a brief description of the individual missions.

  5. Libstatmech and applications to astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tianhong

    In this work an introduction to Libstatmech is presented and applications especially to astrophysics are discussed. Libstatmech is a C toolkit for computing the statistical mechanics of fermions and bosons, written on top of libxml and gsl (GNU Scientific Library). Calculations of Thomas-Fermi Screening model and Bose-Einstein Condensate based on libstatmech demonstrate the expected results. For astrophysics application, a simple Type Ia Supernovae model is established to run the network calculation with weak reactions, in which libstatmech contributes to compute the electron chemical potential and allows the weak reverse rates to be calculated from detailed balance. Starting with pure 12C and T9=1.8, we find that at high initial density (rho~ 9x 109 g/cm3) there are relatively large abundances of neutron-rich iron-group isotopes (e.g. 66Ni, 50Ti, 48Ca) produced during the explosion, and Y e can drop to ~0.4, which indicates that the rare, high density Type Ia supernovae may help to explain the 48Ca and 50Ti effect in FUN CAIs.

  6. Analytic studies in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzochero, Pierre

    Five studies are presented in nuclear astrophysics, which deal with different stages of stellar evolution and which use analytic techniques as opposed to numerical ones. Two problems are described in neutrino astrophysics: the solar-neutrino puzzle is analyzed in the framework of the MSW mechanism for the enhancement of neutrino oscillations in matter; and the cooling of neutron stars is studied by calculating the neutrino emissivity from strangeness condensation. Radiative transfer is then examined as applied to SN1987A: its early spectrum and bolometric corrections are calculated by developing an analytic model which can describe both the extended nature of the envelope and the non-LTE state of the radiation field in the scattering-dominated early atmosphere; and a model-independent relation is derived between mass and kinetic energy for the hydrogen envelope of SN1987A, using only direct observations of its luminosity and photospheric velocity. Finally, an analytic approach is presented to relate the softness of the EOS of dense nuclear matter in the core of a supernova, the hydrostatic structure of such core and the initial strength of the shock wave.

  7. Contemporary Aspects of Atomic Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knott, R. G. A.

    1972-01-01

    The approach generally used in writing undergraduate textbooks on Atomic and Nuclear Physics presents this branch as historical in nature. Describes the concepts of astrophysics, plasma physics and spectroscopy as contemporary and intriguing for modern scientists. (PS)

  8. NASA Astrophysics E/PO Impact: The Astrophysics Educator Ambassador Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cominsky, Lynn R.; McLin, Kevin M.; SSU E/PO Team

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Astrophysics Educator Ambassador (EA) Program began in 2001 as part of the GLAST (now Fermi) E/PO effort at Sonoma State University. The program currently supports 15 EAs, sponsored by either Fermi, Swift, XMM-Newton or NuSTAR. This group of master educators work with mission scientists and E/PO personnel to develop curricula and train teachers; they also do workshops for students and outreach events with the general public. We have held six bi-annual weeklong trainings at SSU: each has had a different focus. Special topics of study have included the Dark Universe, Particle Physics and Gravitation. Additionally, time is given for the EAs to share ideas from their own workshops. In the 14 years of the program, the total number of teachers attending EA-run workshops is over 65,000. Over 1500 workshops have been evaluated by participants, and these evaluation scores and comments have been further analyzed by external experts at WestEd. The WestEd report summarizes the results: "Almost universally high ratings are obtained even though a wide range of participants by grade level, teaching experience or interest typically attends EA conference sessions, and they can bring quite different needs or perspectives." In this talk, I will report details of the impacts of the Astrophysics EA program.

  9. MPI-AMRVAC FOR SOLAR AND ASTROPHYSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Porth, O.; Xia, C.; Hendrix, T.; Moschou, S. P.; Keppens, R.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present an update to the open source MPI-AMRVAC simulation toolkit where we focus on solar and non-relativistic astrophysical magnetofluid dynamics. We highlight recent developments in terms of physics modules, such as hydrodynamics with dust coupling and the conservative implementation of Hall magnetohydrodynamics. A simple conservative high-order finite difference scheme that works in combination with all available physics modules is introduced and demonstrated with the example of monotonicity-preserving fifth-order reconstruction. Strong stability-preserving high-order Runge-Kutta time steppers are used to obtain stable evolutions in multi-dimensional applications, realizing up to fourth-order accuracy in space and time. With the new distinction between active and passive grid cells, MPI-AMRVAC is ideally suited to simulate evolutions where parts of the solution are controlled analytically or have a tendency to progress into or out of a stationary state. Typical test problems and representative applications are discussed with an outlook toward follow-up research. Finally, we discuss the parallel scaling of the code and demonstrate excellent weak scaling up to 30, 000 processors, allowing us to exploit modern peta-scale infrastructure.

  10. Fusion/Astrophysics Teacher Research Academy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correll, Donald

    2005-10-01

    In order to engage California high school science teachers in the area of plasma physics and fusion research, LLNL's Fusion Energy Program has partnered with the UC Davis Edward Teller Education Center, ETEC (http://etec.ucdavis.edu), the Stanford University Solar Center (http://solar-center.stanford.edu) and LLNL's Science / Technology Education Program, STEP (http://education.llnl.gov). A four-level ``Fusion & Astrophysics Research Academy'' has been designed to give teachers experience in conducting research using spectroscopy with their students. Spectroscopy, and its relationship to atomic physics and electromagnetism, provides for an ideal plasma `bridge' to the CA Science Education Standards (http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/scphysics.asp). Teachers attend multiple-day professional development workshops to explore new research activities for use in the high school science classroom. A Level I, 3-day program consists of two days where teachers learn how plasma researchers use spectrometers followed by instructions on how to use a research grade spectrometer for their own investigations. A 3rd day includes touring LLNL's SSPX (http://www.mfescience.org/sspx/) facility to see spectrometry being used to measure plasma properties. Spectrometry classroom kits are made available for loaning to participating teachers. Level I workshop results (http://education.llnl.gov/fusion&_slash;astro/) will be presented along with plans being developed for Level II (one week advanced SKA's), Level III (pre-internship), and Level IV (summer internship) research academies.

  11. Structure-coupled multiphysics imaging in geophysical sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo, Luis A.; Meju, Max A.

    2011-03-01

    Multiphysics imaging or data inversion is of growing importance in many branches of science and engineering. In geophysical sciences, there is a need for combining information from multiple images acquired using different imaging devices and/or modalities because of the potential for accurate predictions. The major challenges are how to combine disparate data from unrelated physical phenomena, taking into account the different spatial scales of the measurement devices, model complexities, and how to quantify the associated uncertainties. This review paper summarizes the role played by the structural gradients-based approach for coupling fundamentally different physical fields in (mainly) geophysical inversion, develops further understanding of this approach to guide newcomers to the field, and defines the main challenges and directions for future research that may be useful in other fields of science and engineering.

  12. Recent astrophysical applications of the Trojan Horse Method to nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Tumino, A.; Fu, C.; Tribble, R.; Banu, A.; Al-Abdullah, T.; Goldberg, V.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Tabacaru, G.; Trache, L.

    2008-05-21

    The Trojan Horse Method (THM) is an unique indirect technique allowing to measure astrophysical rearrangement reactions down to astrophysical relevant energies. The basic principle and a review of the recent applications of the Trojan Horse Method are presented. The applications aiming to the extraction of the bare astrophysical S{sub b}(E) for some two-body processes are discussed.

  13. Concluding Remarks on the Physics at CSSP07

    SciTech Connect

    Trache, Livius

    2008-01-24

    A brief summary of the activities and of the nuclear astrophysics subjects presented in the two weeks of the Carpathian Summer shool of Physics 2007 [1] are presented. Emphasis is on the talks on nuclear astrophysics.

  14. Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromley, D. Allan

    1980-01-01

    The author presents the argument that the past few years, in terms of new discoveries, insights, and questions raised, have been among the most productive in the history of physics. Selected for discussion are some of the most important new developments in physics research. (Author/SA)

  15. A tool for Exploring Geophysical Data: The VGEE-IDV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, R. E.; Murray, D.

    2002-12-01

    The Visual Geophysical Exploration Environment (VGEE) is a suite of computer tools and accompanying online curricular units that enable students to develop physical insight from geophysical data sets. The VGEE curriculum is inquiry and visualization based. The curriculum begins by asking students to compare visualizations they construct from authentic geosciences data to their own conception of the geophysical phenomenon. This comparison encourages students to identify and challenge their own prior conceptions of the phenomenon, a necessary prerequisite to successful learning. Students then begin building correct understandings by identifying patterns and relationships within their visualizations. Students use idealized concept models that highlight physical principles to explain these patterns and relationships. Research, however, has shown that the physical insight gained from these idealized models isn't often applied to either the real world or to the data visualized. To address this, students can easily embed these idealized concept models into their visualizations; there the idealized models respond to the real physical conditions of the geophysical data. The entire inquiry process is built around multi-dimensional and multi-variable visualizations of real geophysical data. Advantages of visualization include its using a natural human talent and its removing mathematics as a barrier to insight. Multi-dimensional and multi-variable visualizations offer the additional advantage of integrated perspectives; rather than asking learners to mentally combine two-dimensional representations of different variables, the learners can navigate through a three-dimensional time-varying representation and get a holistic view. Finally, learner constructed visualizations offer the students a experience with scientific tools, a chance to tailor their investigation to their own misconceptions, and the potential for more robust understanding than prepared visualizations. The

  16. Educational Geophysics at INGV, Rome (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dida Working Group Ingv,.

    2002-12-01

    Italy is a country prone to Earth phenomena such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, floods and landslides that left a trace in the memory of people. About 60% of the Italian territory is classified in the current seismic hazard maps, and large cities as Neaples and Catania are located close to the two largest active volcanoes of Europe (Mt. Vesuvius and Mt. Etna, respectively). Nevertheless, school programs are often inadequate about the natural hazards of the country. For this reason there are many requests from schoolteachers to visit with their classes the academic Institutions and to attend geophysical talks. The working group for educational activities of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica and Vulcanologia promotes and realizes Earth science outreach programs devoted to increase the knowledge of geophysical topics. The educational activity is one of the most important tasks of our Institution together with the research activities and the 24-hours survey of the Italian Seismic Network. The INGV hosts in its headquarter of Rome many visits of primary, secondary and high schools with an increasing demand year by year. Every year about 3,000 students visit our Institute over more than 60 open-days, and we participate to exhibitions and outreach projects organized by several Institutions. We show here what has been done at INGV for the geophysical education, underlining the problems and the successes of these activities. We describe also an educational project developed together with a teacher's team of secondary-school. Aim of this experience was to stimulate the interest of 12-year-old kids to unfamiliar arguments like seismology. The class was introduced to physical topics as waves and wave propagation by means of simple experiments. Then they visited the INGV were the research activities were shown, with emphasis on seismological studies; they were also thought how the Italian Seismic Network monitors earthquakes and how to use the P and S waves for their

  17. Multiparametric Geophysical Signature of Vulcanian Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottsmann, J.; de Angelis, S.; Fournier, N.; van Camp, M. J.; Sacks, S. I.; Linde, A. T.; Ripepe, M.

    2010-12-01

    Extrusion of viscous magma leading to lava dome-formation is a common phenomenon at arc volcanoes recently demonstrated at Mount St. Helens (USA), Chaiten (Chile), and SoufriËre Hills Volcano (British West Indies). The growth of lava domes is frequently accompanied by vigorous eruptions, commonly referred to as Vulcanian-style, characterized by sequences of short-lived (tens of seconds to tens of minutes) explosive pulses, reflecting the violent explosive nature of arc volcanism. Vulcanian eruptions represent a significant hazard, and an understanding of their dynamics is vital for risk mitigation. While eruption parameters have been mostly constrained from observational evidence, as well as from petrological, theoretical, and experimental studies, our understanding on the physics of the subsurface processes leading to Vulcanian eruptions is incomplete. We present and interpret a unique set of multi-parameter geophysical data gathered during two Vulcanian eruptions in July and December, 2008 at SoufriËre Hills Volcano from seismic, geodetic, infrasound, barometric, and gravimetric instrumentation. These events document the spectrum of Vulcanian eruptions in terms of their explosivity and nature of erupted products. Our analysis documents a pronounced difference in the geophysical signature of the two events associated with priming timescales and eruption triggering suggesting distinct differences in the mechanics involved. The July eruption has a signature related to shallow conduit dynamics including gradual system destabilisation, syn-eruptive decompression of the conduit by magma fragmentation, conduit emptying and expulsion of juvenile pumice. In contrast, sudden pressurisation of the entire plumbing system including the magma chambers resulted in dome carapace failure, a violent cannon-like explosion, propagation of a shock wave and pronounced ballistic ejection of dome fragments. We demonstrate that with lead times of between one and six minutes to the

  18. Addressing the difficulty of changing fields in geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civilini, F.; Savage, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    Geophysics is a wonderfully diverse field of study, encompassing a variety of disciplines greatly different from one other. Even within the same discipline, various branches of study can have drastically different vocabulary and methodologies. The difficulty of breaking this "jargon" barrier is also an important reminder for scientists of how critical it is to clearly and concisely convey information. This presentation will focus on strategies that students can focus on to ease a transition between fields in geophysics. I believe that a student changing disciplines should proceed in the following steps: [1] Do a cursory literature review to find a review paper of the desired topic and work backwards through the details until a level of understanding or recognition is reached, [2] Obtain a clear physical understanding of the data and methods of the proposed study, and [3] Establish a support network through the research group or elsewhere which will recognize the areas in which the student is behind and offer remedies in a supportive and productive manner. These strategies are based on my own personal experience changing from music to geophysics in my undergrad and working on projects spanning various subdisciplines of geophysics during my Masters and PhD. It is worthwhile for research groups to spend the time to mentor students switching from other disciplines because those students will in time be able to observe the research in a different way than their peers, and easily adapt to changes of direction within the research.

  19. Hydro-biogeochemical Controls on Geophysical Signatures (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atekwana, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    Geophysical techniques such as seismic, magnetic and electrical techniques have historically played a major role in oil exploration. Their main use has been for delineation basin geometry, structures and hydrocarbon traps and for understanding the subsurface stratigraphy. Their use for investigating microbial processes has only recently been recognized over the last decade resulting in the development of biogeophysics as a frontier research area which bridges the fields of environmental microbiology, biogeochemistry, geomicrobiology. Recent biogeophysical studies have demonstrated the potential of geophysical technologies to (1) probe the presence of microbial cells and biofilms in subsurface geologic media, (2) investigate the interactions between microorganisms and subsurface geologic media, (3) assess biogeochemical transformations, biomineralization, and biogeochemical reaction rates, and (4) investigate the alteration of physical properties of subsurface geologic media induced by microorganisms. The unique properties of geophysical datasets (e.g. non-invasive data acquisition, spatially continuous properties retrieved) make them attractive for probing microbial processes affecting fate and transport of contaminants. This presentation will provide an updated understanding of major controls on geophysical signatures by highlighting some of the important advancements in biogeophysical studies at hydrocarbon contaminated environments. Important challenges that provide an opportunity for further research in this new field will also be examined.

  20. Calculations of effective recombination coefficients for nebular astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xuan; Liu, Xiaowei; Storey, Pete J.

    2015-08-01

    In the seemingly well established field of nebular astrophysics, there has been a long-standing dichotomy in plasma diagnostics and heavy elemental abundance determinations using the traditional method based on collisionally excited lines on the one hand, and optical recombination lines/continua, on the other. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain this fundamental problem. Deep spectroscopy and recombination line analysis of emission line nebulae (planetary nebulae and H II regions) in the past decade have pointed to the existence of another previously unknown component of cold, H-deficient material as the culprit. Better constraints are needed on the physical conditions (electron temperature and density), chemical composition, mass, and spatial distribution of the postulated H-deficient inclusions in order to unravel their astrophysical origins. This requires knowledge of the relevant atomic parameters, most importantly the effective recombination coefficients of abundant heavy element ions, such as C II, O II, N II, and Ne II, appropriate for the physical conditions prevailing in those cold inclusions (e.g., electron temperature Te < 1000 K).In this contribution, I will introduce the creation of new effective recombination coefficients for the heavy element optical recombination lines, and review the recent progress in nebular astrophysics since the availability of new and high-quality atomic data. I will also present our new calculations of the effective recombination coefficients for the Ne II recombination line spectrum.

  1. Computational Relativistic Astrophysics Using the Flowfield-Dependent Variation Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, G. A.; Chung, T. J.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Theoretical models, observations and measurements have preoccupied astrophysicists for many centuries. Only in recent years, has the theory of relativity as applied to astrophysical flows met the challenges of how the governing equations can be solved numerically with accuracy and efficiency. Even without the effects of relativity, the physics of magnetohydrodynamic flow instability, turbulence, radiation, and enhanced transport in accretion disks has not been completely resolved. Relativistic effects become pronounced in such cases as jet formation from black hole magnetized accretion disks and also in the study of Gamma-Ray bursts (GRB). Thus, our concern in this paper is to reexamine existing numerical simulation tools as to the accuracy and efficiency of computations and introduce a new approach known as the flowfield-dependent variation (FDV) method. The main feature of the FDV method consists of accommodating discontinuities of shock waves and high gradients of flow variables such as occur in turbulence and unstable motions. In this paper, the physics involved in the solution of relativistic hydrodynamics and solution strategies of the FDV theory are elaborated. The general relativistic astrophysical flow and shock solver (GRAFSS) is introduced, and some simple example problems for Computational Relativistic Astrophysics (CRA) are demonstrated.

  2. Studies in geophysics: Active tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Active tectonics is defined within the study as tectonic movements that are expected to occur within a future time span of concern to society. Such movements and their associated hazards include earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and land subsidence and emergence. The entire range of geology, geophysics, and geodesy is, to some extent, pertinent to this topic. The needs for useful forecasts of tectonic activity, so that actions may be taken to mitigate hazards, call for special attention to ongoing tectonic activity. Further progress in understanding active tectonics depends on continued research. Particularly important is improvement in the accuracy of dating techniques for recent geologic materials.

  3. Geophysical Model Applications for Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M; Walter, W; Tkalcic, H; Franz, G; Gok, R; Rodgers, A

    2005-07-11

    Geophysical models constitute an important component of calibration for nuclear explosion monitoring. We will focus on four major topics and their applications: (1) surface wave models, (2) receiver function profiles, (3) regional tomography models, and (4) stochastic geophysical models. First, we continue to improve upon our surface wave model by adding more paths. This has allowed us to expand the region to all of Eurasia and into Africa, increase the resolution of our model, and extend results to even shorter periods (7 sec). High-resolution models exist for the Middle East and the YSKP region. The surface wave results can be inverted either alone, or in conjunction with other data, to derive models of the crust and upper mantle structure. One application of the group velocities is to construct phase-matched filters in combination with regional surface-wave magnitude formulas to improve the mb:Ms discriminant and extend it to smaller magnitude events. Next, we are using receiver functions, in joint inversions with the surface waves, to produce profiles directly under seismic stations throughout the region. In the past year, we have been focusing on deployments throughout the Middle East, including the Arabian Peninsula and Turkey. By assembling the results from many stations, we can see how regional seismic phases are affected by complicated upper mantle structure, including lithospheric thickness and anisotropy. The next geophysical model item, regional tomography models, can be used to predict regional travel times such as Pn and Sn. The times derived by the models can be used as a background model for empirical measurements or, where these don't exist, simply used as is. Finally, we have been exploring methodologies such as Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) to generate data-driven stochastic models. We have applied this technique to the YSKP region using surface wave dispersion data, body wave travel time data, receiver functions, and gravity data. The models

  4. Role of Fractals in Solid Earth Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimri, V. P.

    2007-12-01

    Various studies carried out across the globe reveal that many of the Earth's processes satisfy fractal statistics, where examples range from the frequency-size statistics of earthquakes to the time series of the Earth's magnetic field. The scaling property of fractal signal is very much appealing for descriptions of many geological features. It is observed from the German Continental Deep Drilling Programme (KTB) and many other deep bore wells around the world that the source distribution of density, magnetic susceptibility, electrical conductivity, acoustic impedance etc. follows power-law, hence they are fractal in nature. This finding has been incorporated in various geophysical techniques to better understand the non-linear processes in Earth systems. Theoretical relation between source and potential fields is established and based on that techniques for gravity and magnetic interpretation methods have been reformulated. A new scaling power spectral method is developed to understand source behaviour and parameters of the Earth's interior. Further, fractal concept of tessellation has been used to model the complex geometrical object, which was hitherto unaddressed. An entirely new technique has been proposed to generate the complex geometrical structures with desired physical property variation for forward and inverse modeling of the geophysical data. Further, the concept of fractal distribution of frequency and magnitude of earthquakes is exploited in aftershock study of the major earthquakes such as, Uttarkashi (1991), Latur (1993), Jabalpur (1997), Chamoli (1999), Bhuj (2001) and Muzzafarabad (2005). This study revealed that the Himalayan earthquakes follow multifractal distribution however, shield earthquakes follow monofractal distribution. This finding has been used to explain the earthquake mechanism in Himalayan and shield areas. The fractal study was extended to sea earthquakes and wave propagation modeling is done to understand the effect of Tsunami

  5. Geological realism in hydrogeological and geophysical inverse modeling: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linde, Niklas; Renard, Philippe; Mukerji, Tapan; Caers, Jef

    2015-12-01

    Scientific curiosity, exploration of georesources and environmental concerns are pushing the geoscientific research community toward subsurface investigations of ever-increasing complexity. This review explores various approaches to formulate and solve inverse problems in ways that effectively integrate geological concepts with geophysical and hydrogeological data. Modern geostatistical simulation algorithms can produce multiple subsurface realizations that are in agreement with conceptual geological models and statistical rock physics can be used to map these realizations into physical properties that are sensed by the geophysical or hydrogeological data. The inverse problem consists of finding one or an ensemble of such subsurface realizations that are in agreement with the data. The most general inversion frameworks are presently often computationally intractable when applied to large-scale problems and it is necessary to better understand the implications of simplifying (1) the conceptual geological model (e.g., using model compression); (2) the physical forward problem (e.g., using proxy models); and (3) the algorithm used to solve the inverse problem (e.g., Markov chain Monte Carlo or local optimization methods) to reach practical and robust solutions given today's computer resources and knowledge. We also highlight the need to not only use geophysical and hydrogeological data for parameter estimation purposes, but also to use them to falsify or corroborate alternative geological scenarios.

  6. Proceedings of the NASA Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weck, Phillippe F. (Editor); Kwong, Victor H. S. (Editor); Salama, Farid (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    This report is a collection of papers presented at the 2006 NASA Workshop on Laboratory Astrophysics held in the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) from February 14 to 16, 2006. This workshop brings together producers and users of laboratory astrophysics data so that they can understand each other's needs and limitations in the context of the needs for NASA's missions. The last NASA-sponsored workshop was held in 2002 at Ames Research Center. Recent related meetings include the Topical Session at the AAS meeting and the European workshop at Pillnitz, Germany, both of which were held in June 2005. The former showcased the importance of laboratory astrophysics to the community at large, while the European workshop highlighted a multi-laboratory approach to providing the needed data. The 2006 NASA Workshop on Laboratory Astrophysics, sponsored by the NASA Astrophysics Division, focused on the current status of the field and its relevance to NASA. This workshop attracted 105 participants and 82 papers of which 19 were invited. A White Paper identifying the key issues in laboratory astrophysics during the break-out sessions was prepared by the Scientific Organizing Committee, and has been forwarded to the Universe Working Group (UWG) at NASA Headquarters. This White Paper, which represented the collective inputs and opinions from experts and stakeholders in the field of astrophysics, should serve as the working document for the future development of NASA's R&A program in laboratory astrophysics.

  7. Nuclear Astrophysics with the Trojan Horse Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumino, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Spartá, R.

    2016-01-01

    The Trojan Horse Method (THM) represents the indirect path to determine the bare nucleus astrophysical S(E) factor for reactions between charged particles at astrophysical energies. This is done by measuring the quasi free cross section of a suitable three body process. The basic features of the THM will be presented together with some applications to demonstrate its practical use.

  8. The Iron Project:. Radiative Atomic Processes in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.

    2011-06-01

    Astronomical objects, such as, stars, galaxies, blackhole environments, etc are studied through their spectra produced by various atomic processes in their plasmas. The positions, shifts, and strengths of the spectral lines provide information on physical processes with elements in all ionization states, and various diagnostics for temperature, density, distance, etc of these objects. With presence of a radiative source, such as a star, the astrophysical plasma is dominated by radiative atomic processes such as photoionization, electron-ion recombination, bound-bound transitions or photo-excitations and de-excitations. The relevant atomic parameters, such as photoionization cross sections, electron-ion recombination rate coefficients, oscillator strengths, radiative transition rates, rates for dielectronic satellite lines etc are needed to be highly accurate for precise diagnostics of physical conditions as well as accurate modeling, such as, for opacities of astrophysical plasmas. for opacities of astrophysical plasmas. This report illustrates detailed features of radiative atomic processes obtained from accurate ab initio methods of the latest developments in theoretical quantum mechanical calculations, especially under the international collaborations known as the Iron Project (IP) and the Opacity Project (OP). These projects aim in accurate study of radiative and collsional atomic processes of all astrophysically abundant atoms and ions, from hydrogen to nickel, and calculate stellar opacities and have resulted in a large number of atomic parameters for photoionization and radiative transition probabilities. The unified method, which is an extension of the OP and the IP, is a self-consistent treatment for the total electron-ion recombination and photoionization. It incorporates both the radiative and the dielectronic recombination processes and provides total recombination rates and level-specific recombination rates for hundreds of levels for a wide range of

  9. Trojan Horse Method: recent results in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitaleri, C.; Lamia, L.; Gimenez Del Santo, M.; Burjan, V.; Carlin, N.; Li, Chengbo; Cherubini, S.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; Hons, Z.; Kroha, V.; Irgaziev, B.; La Cognata, M.; Mrazek, J.; Mukhamedzhanov, M.; Munhoz, M. G.; Palmerini, S.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, L.; Zhou, Shu-Hua; Somorjai, E.; Souza, F. A.; Tabacaru, G.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Tumino, A.; Wen, Qungang; Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2015-07-01

    The accurate knowledge of thermonuclear reaction rates is important in understanding the energy generation, the neutrinos luminosity and the synthesis of elements in stars. The physical conditions under which the majority of astrophysical reactions proceed in stellar environments make it difficult or impossible to measure them under the same conditions in the laboratory. That is why different indirect techniques are being used along with direct measurements. The Trojan Horse Method (THM) is introduced as an independent technique to obtain the bare nucleus astrophysical S(E)-factor. As examples the results of recent the application of THM to the 2H(11B, σ08Be)n and 2H(10B, σ07Be)n reactions are presented.

  10. CoffeeShop Astrophysics: An Adventure in Public Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlin, Sydney; Decesar, Megan; Caudill, Sarah; Sadeghian, Laleh; Nuttall, Laura; Urban, Alex; McGrath, Casey

    2016-03-01

    Engaging non-scientists in scientific discussions is inarguably important, both for researchers and society. Public lectures have long been utilized as a method for performing such outreach, but due to their format and location often reach a limited audience. More recently, events such as science cafés (events pairing a scientist with the public in a casual venue) have emerged as a potential tool for connecting with general audiences. The success of these events depends on multiple variables. In this talk, we describe an example of such an event entitled CoffeeShop Astrophysics, that uses multiple speakers, demonstrations and humor to successfully engage members of the public. We discuss the key elements that make CoffeeShop Astrophysics effective, and the viability of grassroots, coffeeshop-style outreach. The authors gratefully acknowledge support from the American Physical Society for this work.

  11. Magnetic fields in astrophysics /Helen B. Warner Prize Lecture/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blandford, R. D.

    1983-03-01

    Magnetic fields play many important roles in interpretative models of astronomical phenomena. They can provide diagnostics of the physical conditions within active objects. They may mediate and collimate the energy release from a deep gravitational potential well. On a microscopic level, they may control the transport properties of astrophysical plasmas with large-scale thermal and dynamical consequences. Some of these facets of the behavior of magnetic fields are illustrated with examples drawn mainly from contemporary high-energy astrophysics. In particular, attention is given to the case that most double radio sources are powered by the electromagnetic or hydromagnetic extraction of energy from a spinning massive black hole and accretion disk and subsequently collimated by the pinching action of toroidal field wrapped around the jet. The origin of neutron star magnetic field is also discussed and it is argued that the magnetization can be generated thermoelectrically by the heat flux escaping from the interior of the star.

  12. Astrophysical bags - A new paradigm for active galactic nuclei?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thomas L.

    1992-01-01

    Active galaxies are believed to consist of a compact nucleus, the standard model for which is a massive black hole or a cluster of black holes. A different paradigm is considered here, deriving from quark confinement theory in QCD. It is an 'astrophysical bag', modelled after the 'hadron bags' of particle physics which have already been studied in astrophysics as quark stars. Another interpretation of the cosmological constant in general relativity, and possibly a new quasar redshift formula, are introduced. As a highly-energetic object, this model may resolve the baryonic matter problem for fuelling AGN accretion processes which black hole paradigms cannot account for. Here, baryons, cosmic rays, and neutrinos are free.

  13. Astrophysically Interesting Resonances; Another Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Roby; Jenkins, David

    2008-10-01

    R.A.E. Austin, R. Kanungo, A. Campbell, S. Colosimo, S. Reeve Saint Mary's University; D.G. Jenkins, C.Aa.Diget, A. Robinson, University of York, UK; P.J. Woods T. Davinson University of Edinburgh; C.-Y. Wu A. Hurst J.A. Becker Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; G.C. Ball M. Djongolov G. Hackman A.C. Morton, C. Pearson, S.J. Williams TRIUMF; A.A. Phillips, M. Schumaker, University of Guelph H.Boston, A. Grint, D. Oxley, University of Liverpool; D. Cline, A. Hayes, University of Rochester; We describe a prototype experiment to measure resonances of interest in astrophysical reactions. We use the TIGRESS to detect gamma rays in coincidence with charged particles, inelastically scattered in inverse kinematics. The particles are detected with the Bambino detector modified to a δE-E silicon telescope spanning 15-40 degrees in the lab.

  14. Axions in astrophysics and cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Sikivie, P.

    1984-07-01

    Axion models often have a spontaneously broken exact discrete symmetry. In that case, they have discretely degenerate vacua and hence domain walls. The properties of the domain walls, the cosmological catastrophe they produce and the ways in which this catastrophe may be avoided are explained. Cosmology and astrophysics provide arguments that imply the axion decay constant should lie in the range 10/sup 8/ GeV less than or equal to f/sub a/ less than or equal to 10/sup 12/ GeV. Reasons are given why axions are an excellent candidate to constitute the dark matter of galactic halos. Using the coupling of the axions to the electromagnetic field, detectors are described to look for axions floating about in the halo of our galaxy and for axions emitted by the sun. (LEW)

  15. Reaction models in nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descouvemont, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    We present different reaction models commonly used in nuclear astrophysics, in particular for the nucleosynthesis of light elements. Pioneering works were performed within the potential model, where the internal structure of the colliding nuclei is completely ignored. Significant advances in microscopic cluster models provided the first microscopic description of the 3He(α,&gamma)7 Be reaction more than thirty years ago. In this approach, the calculations are based on an effective nucleon-nucleon interaction, but the cluster approximation should be made to simplify the calculations. Nowadays, modern microscopic calculations are able to go beyond the cluster approximation, and aim at finding exact solutions of the Schrödinger equation with realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions. We discuss recent examples on the d+d reactions at low energies.

  16. Large-Scale Astrophysical Visualization on Smartphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becciani, U.; Massimino, P.; Costa, A.; Gheller, C.; Grillo, A.; Krokos, M.; Petta, C.

    2011-07-01

    Nowadays digital sky surveys and long-duration, high-resolution numerical simulations using high performance computing and grid systems produce multidimensional astrophysical datasets in the order of several Petabytes. Sharing visualizations of such datasets within communities and collaborating research groups is of paramount importance for disseminating results and advancing astrophysical research. Moreover educational and public outreach programs can benefit greatly from novel ways of presenting these datasets by promoting understanding of complex astrophysical processes, e.g., formation of stars and galaxies. We have previously developed VisIVO Server, a grid-enabled platform for high-performance large-scale astrophysical visualization. This article reviews the latest developments on VisIVO Web, a custom designed web portal wrapped around VisIVO Server, then introduces VisIVO Smartphone, a gateway connecting VisIVO Web and data repositories for mobile astrophysical visualization. We discuss current work and summarize future developments.

  17. Current Legislative Initiatives and Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, S. G.

    2002-05-01

    Geophysical research will be most effective in the fight against terrorism if it is done in cooperation with the expectations of local, state and federal policy makers. New tools to prevent, prepare for, and respond to acts of terrorism are coming from all fields, including geoscience. Globally, monitoring the land, oceans, atmosphere, and space for unusual and suspicious activities can help prevent terrorist acts. Closer to home, geoscience research is used to plan emergency transportation routes and identify infrastructure vulnerabilities. As important as it is for Congress and other policy makers to appreciate the promises and limitations of geophysical research, scientists need to be aware of legislative priorities and expectations. What does Congress expect from the geoscience community in the fight against terrorism and how well does reality meet these expectations? What tools do the 44 different federal agencies with stated Homeland Security missions need from geoscientists? I will address these questions with an overview of current legislative antiterrorism initiatives and policies that relate to the geoscience community.

  18. SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION - COMPENDIUM DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect

    RUCKER DF; MYERS DA

    2011-10-04

    This report documents the evolution of the surface geophysical exploration (SGE) program and highlights some of the most recent successes in imaging conductive targets related to past leaks within and around Hanford's tank farms. While it is noted that the SGE program consists of multiple geophysical techniques designed to (1) locate near surface infrastructure that may interfere with (2) subsurface plume mapping, the report will focus primarily on electrical resistivity acquisition and processing for plume mapping. Due to the interferences from the near surface piping network, tanks, fences, wells, etc., the results of the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of electrical resistivity was more representative of metal than the high ionic strength plumes. Since the first deployment, the focus of the SGE program has been to acquire and model the best electrical resistivity data that minimizes the influence of buried metal objects. Toward that goal, two significant advances have occurred: (1) using the infrastructure directly in the acquisition campaign and (2) placement of electrodes beneath the infrastructure. The direct use of infrastructure was successfully demonstrated at T farm by using wells as long electrodes (Rucker et al., 2010, 'Electrical-Resistivity Characterization of an Industrial Site Using Long Electrodes'). While the method was capable of finding targets related to past releases, a loss of vertical resolution was the trade-off. The burying of electrodes below the infrastructure helped to increase the vertical resolution, as long as a sufficient number of electrodes are available for the acquisition campaign.

  19. News and Views: Missing the boat; Wanted: geophysics for teachers; Government seeks geo-engineering information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-08-01

    The Institute of Physics is seeking short summaries of geophysics topics to support school teachers, in a move aimed at boosting the teaching and awareness of geophysics in schools. The UK government Department of Innovation, Universities, Science and Skills is seeking information on geo-engineering as a case study within its major enquiry into engineering. The field described by the DUISS is broad and covers areas in which geophysicists may be working and in a position to supply useful information.

  20. Environmental and Engineering Geophysical University at SAGEEP 2008: Geophysical Instruction for Non-Geophysicists

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey G. Paine

    2009-03-13

    The Environmental and Engineering Geophysical Society (EEGS), a nonprofit professional organization, conducted an educational series of seminars at the Symposium on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems (SAGEEP) in Philadelphia in April 2008. The purpose of these seminars, conducted under the name Environmental and Engineering Geophysical University (EEGU) over three days in parallel with the regular SAGEEP technical sessions, was to introduce nontraditional geophysical conference attendees to the appropriate use of geophysics in environmental and engineering projects. Five half-day, classroom-style sessions were led by recognized experts in the application of seismic, electrical, gravity, magnetics, and ground-penetrating radar methods. Classroom sessions were intended to educate regulators, environmental program managers, consultants, and students who are new to near-surface geophysics or are interested in learning how to incorporate appropriate geophysical approaches into characterization or remediation programs or evaluate the suitability of geophysical methods for general classes of environmental or engineering problems.