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Sample records for phytoestrogen genistein induce

  1. Potential Effects of Phytoestrogen Genistein in Modulating Acute Methotrexate Chemotherapy-Induced Osteoclastogenesis and Bone Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    King, Tristan J.; Shandala, Tetyana; Lee, Alice M.; Foster, Bruce K.; Chen, Ke-Ming; Howe, Peter R.; Xian, Cory J.

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced bone damage is a frequent side effect which causes diminished bone mineral density and fracture in childhood cancer sufferers and survivors. The intensified use of anti-metabolite methotrexate (MTX) and other cytotoxic drugs has led to the need for a mechanistic understanding of chemotherapy-induced bone loss and for the development of protective treatments. Using a young rat MTX-induced bone loss model, we investigated potential bone protective effects of phytoestrogen genistein. Oral gavages of genistein (20 mg/kg) were administered daily, for seven days before, five days during, and three days after five once-daily injections (sc) of MTX (0.75 mg/kg). MTX treatment reduced body weight gain and tibial metaphyseal trabecular bone volume (p < 0.001), increased osteoclast density on the trabecular bone surface (p < 0.05), and increased the bone marrow adipocyte number in lower metaphyseal bone (p < 0.001). Genistein supplementation preserved body weight gain (p < 0.05) and inhibited ex vivo osteoclast formation of bone marrow cells from MTX-treated rats (p < 0.001). However, MTX-induced changes in bone volume, trabecular architecture, metaphyseal mRNA expression of pro-osteoclastogenic cytokines, and marrow adiposity were not significantly affected by the co-administration of genistein. This study suggests that genistein may suppress MTX-induced osteoclastogenesis; however, further studies are required to examine its potential in protecting against MTX chemotherapy-induced bone damage. PMID:26258775

  2. [Cytoprotective Effects of Phytoestrogen Genistein against Cancer Cells].

    PubMed

    Fedotcheva, T A; Shirokih, K E; Matyushin, A I; Rzheznikov, V M; Kovtun, V Y; Shimanovskii, N L

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study the effect of synthetic isoflavonoid genistein against cancer HeLa cells, which contain estrogen receptors alpha but not beta, with the aim to determine the cytotoxic or cytoprotective effect of genistein. It is shown that the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of genistein (0.2 mM) for the growth inhibition of HeLa cells is at least ten times higher than that one of tamoxifen and cisplatin--drugs, used in cervical cancer treatment. In micromolar concentrations (0.1-10 μM) genistein decreased the cytotoxic effects of cisplatin and tamoxifen. The decreased Bax mRNA expression and increased Bcl-2 mRNA expression after incubation .of the cells with genistein also demonstrate the cytoprotective, anti-apoptotic effect of genistein. Genistein, even in high concentrations, had no effect on membrane potential and calcium capacity of isolated mitochondria, without activating the opening of Ca(2+)-induced mitochondrial pore. Thus, these data demonstrate a cytoprotective effect of isoflavonoid genistein against this type of cancer cells. PMID:26841510

  3. The phytoestrogen genistein enhances osteogenesis and represses adipogenic differentiation of human primary bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Heim, M; Frank, O; Kampmann, G; Sochocky, N; Pennimpede, T; Fuchs, P; Hunziker, W; Weber, P; Martin, I; Bendik, I

    2004-02-01

    In the present study, we investigated the role of the phytoestrogen genistein and 17beta-estradiol in human bone marrow stromal cells, undergoing induced osteogenic or adipogenic differentiation. Profiling of estrogen receptors (ERs)-alpha, -beta1, -beta2, -beta3, -beta4, -beta5, and aromatase mRNAs revealed lineage-dependent expression patterns. During osteogenic differentiation, the osteoblast-determining core binding factor-alpha1 showed a progressive increase, whereas the adipogenic regulator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) was sequentially decreased. This temporal regulation of lineage-determining marker genes was strongly enhanced by genistein during the early osteogenic phase. Moreover, genistein increased alkaline phosphatase mRNA levels and activity, the osteoprotegerin:receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand gene expression ratio, and the expression of TGFbeta1. During adipogenic differentiation, down-regulation in the mRNA levels of PPARgamma and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-alpha at d 3 and decreased lipoprotein lipase and adipsin mRNA levels at d 21 were observed after genistein treatment. This led to a lower number of adipocytes and a reduction in the size of their lipid droplets. At d 3 of adipogenesis, TGFbeta1 was strongly up-regulated by genistein in an ER-dependent manner. Blocking the TGFbeta1 pathway abolished the effects of genistein on PPARgamma protein levels and led to a reduction in the proliferation rate of precursor cells. Overall, genistein enhanced the commitment and differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells to the osteoblast lineage but did not influence the late osteogenic maturation markers. Adipogenic differentiation and maturation, on the other hand, were reduced by genistein (and 17beta-estradiol) via an ER-dependent mechanism involving autocrine or paracrine TGFbeta1 signaling. PMID:14605006

  4. The Effects of Phytoestrogen Genistein on Steroidogenesis and Estrogen Receptor Expression in Porcine Granulosa Cells of Large Follicles.

    PubMed

    Nynca, Anna; Sadowska, Agnieszka; Orlowska, Karina; Jablonska, Monika; Ciereszko, Renata E

    2015-01-01

    Genistein is a biologically active isoflavone with estrogenic or antiestrogenic activity which can be found in a variety of soy products. Since in pigs' diet soy is the main source of protein, genistein may affect the reproductive/endocrine systems in these animals. Genistein has been shown to alter porcine ovarian and adrenal steroidogenesis but the mechanism of this action is still not clear. It is known that genistein binds to both estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and estrogen receptor beta (ERβ), although it has a higher affinity to ERβ. Moreover, this phytoestrogen was demonstrated to posses the activity of protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor. The aim of the study was to examine the in vitro effects of genistein on: (1) progesterone (P4) and estradiol (E2) secretion by porcine luteinized granulosa cells harvested from large follicles, and (2) the mRNA and protein expression of ERa and ERβ in these cells. In addition, to verify the role of PTK-dependent mechanisms possibly involved in genistein biological action, we tested the effects of lavendustin C, the nonsteroidal PTK inhibitor, on granulosa cell steroidogenesis. Genistein significantly inhibited P4 and did not affect E2 secretion by porcine luteinized granulosa cells isolated from large follicles. Lavendustin C did not affect basal steroids secretion by examined cells. Genistein did not alter ERa but increased ERβ mRNA levels in the cultured porcine granulosa cells. In contrast to medium follicles, the expression of ERβ protein was unaffected by genistein in granulosa cells of large follicles. To conclude, the soy phytoestrogen genistein acts directly on the porcine ovary to decrease progesterone production and to increase the expression of ERβ mRNA. Moreover, genistein-induced changes in follicular steroidogenesis and granulosal sensitivity to estrogens in pigs may depend on maturity of the follicles. PMID:26255463

  5. A diet containing the soy phytoestrogen genistein causes infertility in female rats partially deficient in UDP glucuronyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Seppen, Jurgen

    2012-11-01

    Soy beans contain genistein, a natural compound that has estrogenic effects because it binds the estrogen receptor with relatively high affinity. Genistein is therefore the most important environmental estrogen in the human diet. Detoxification of genistein is mediated through conjugation by UDP-glucuronyltransferase 1 and 2 (UGT1 and UGT2) isoenzymes. Gunn rats have a genetic deficiency in UGT1 activity, UGT2 activities are not affected. Because our Gunn rats stopped breeding after the animal chow was changed to a type with much higher soy content, we examined the mechanism behind this soy diet induced infertility. Gunn and control rats were fed diets with and without genistein. In these rats, plasma levels of genistein and metabolites, fertility and reproductive parameters were determined. Enzyme assays showed reduced genistein UGT activity in Gunn rats, as compared to wild type rats. Female Gunn rats were completely infertile on a genistein diet, wild type rats were fertile. Genistein diet caused a persistent estrus, lowered serum progesterone and inhibited development of corpora lutea in Gunn rats. Concentrations of total genistein in Gunn and control rat plasma were identical and within the range observed in humans after soy consumption. However, Gunn rat plasma contained 25% unconjugated genistein, compared to 3.6% in control rats. This study shows that, under conditions of reduced glucuronidation, dietary genistein exhibits a strongly increased estrogenic effect. Because polymorphisms that reduce UGT1 expression are prevalent in the human population, these results suggest a cautionary attitude towards the consumption of large amounts of soy or soy supplements. -- Highlights: ► Gunn rats are partially deficient in detoxification by UDP glucuronyltransferases. ► Female Gunn rats are infertile on a soy containing diet. ► Soy contains genistein, a potent phytoestrogen. ► Inefficient glucuronidation of genistein causes female infertility.

  6. The soy phytoestrogens genistein and daidzein as neuroprotective agents against anoxia-glucopenia and reperfusion damage in rat urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Valeri, A; Fiorenzani, P; Rossi, R; Aloisi, A M; Valoti, M; Pessina, F

    2012-10-01

    Some bladder disorders, such as obstructive bladder and hyperactivity, may be caused partly by ischemia/reperfusion injury (I/R). The neuroprotective effects of estrogens were demonstrated in in vitro studies and a great interest in soy isoflavones (genistein and daidzein) as alternative to the synthetic estrogen receptor modulators for therapeutic use has been pointed out. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of genistein and daidzein, on rat detrusor smooth muscle contractility and their possible neuroprotective role against I/R-like condition. Whole rat urinary bladders were subjected to in vitro anoxia-glucopenia (A-G) and reperfusion (R) in the absence or presence of drugs and response to electrical field stimulation (EFS) of intrinsic nerves evaluated. Furthermore rats were treated in vivo for 1 week with the phytoestrogens and the same in vitro protocol was applied to the ex vivo bladders. Antioxidant activity of genistein and daidzein on the A-G/R model was determined by measuring malonyldialdehyde (MDA). Moreover, hormones plasma levels were determined by radioimmunoassay. Genistein and daidzein administered either in vitro or in vivo showed significant neuroprotective effect and antioxidant activity. Testosterone and 17β-estradiol plasma levels were not modified by daidzein, while a significant decrease of testosterone in genistein treated rats was evident. Moreover both phytoestrogens significantly decreased detrusor contractions induced by EFS in a concentration-dependent manner. For being either neuroprotective and myorelaxant, genistein and daidzein could be considered a good lead for new therapeutic agents to protect the urinary bladder from hyperactivity and nerve damage. PMID:22743170

  7. The phytoestrogen genistein promotes wound healing by multiple independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Emmerson, Elaine; Campbell, Laura; Ashcroft, Gillian S; Hardman, Matthew J

    2010-06-10

    Genistein has been implicated in the beneficial effects of soy on human health, particularly in the context of ageing. In post-menopausal women reduced systemic estrogen leads to a range of age-associated pathologies, including delayed cutaneous wound healing. We have previously shown that this can be reversed by estrogen replacement. However, the effect of genistein on the skin is poorly understood and crucially the influence of genistein on wound healing has not been assessed. 10-week-old ovariectomised mice were systemically treated with 17beta-estradiol or genistein. Genistein substantially accelerated wound repair, associated with a dampened inflammatory response. Unexpectedly, co-treatment with the ER antagonist ICI had little impact on the anti-inflammatory, healing promoting effects of genistein. Thus genistein's actions are only partially mediated via classical estrogen receptor-dependent signalling pathways. Indeed, we report that alternative (cell-type specific) signalling mechanisms are activated in the skin in response to genistein treatment. PMID:20193736

  8. Phytoestrogens β-Sitosterol and Genistein Have Limited Effects on Reproductive Endpoints in a Female Fish, Betta splendens

    PubMed Central

    Brown, A. C.; Stevenson, L. M.; Leonard, H. M.; Nieves-Puigdoller, K.; Clotfelter, E. D.

    2014-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are produced by plants and may cause endocrine disruption in vertebrates. The present study hypothesizes that phytoestrogen exposure of female Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens) may disrupt endogenous steroid levels, change agonistic behavior expression, and potentially also disrupt oocyte development. However, only the pharmacologic dose of β-sitosterol had a significant effect on opercular flaring behavior, while we did not find significant effects of β-sitosterol or genistein on steroids or gonads. These findings are in direct contrast with previous studies on the effects of phytoestrogens in female fish. Results of the current study support previous work showing that the effects of phytoestrogen exposure may be less acute in mature female B. splendens than in other fish. PMID:24707495

  9. Phytoestrogens β -sitosterol and genistein have limited effects on reproductive endpoints in a female fish, Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Brown, A C; Stevenson, L M; Leonard, H M; Nieves-Puigdoller, K; Clotfelter, E D

    2014-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are produced by plants and may cause endocrine disruption in vertebrates. The present study hypothesizes that phytoestrogen exposure of female Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens) may disrupt endogenous steroid levels, change agonistic behavior expression, and potentially also disrupt oocyte development. However, only the pharmacologic dose of β-sitosterol had a significant effect on opercular flaring behavior, while we did not find significant effects of β-sitosterol or genistein on steroids or gonads. These findings are in direct contrast with previous studies on the effects of phytoestrogens in female fish. Results of the current study support previous work showing that the effects of phytoestrogen exposure may be less acute in mature female B. splendens than in other fish. PMID:24707495

  10. Phytoestrogens and carcinogenesis-differential effects of genistein in experimental models of normal and malignant rat endometrium.

    PubMed

    Diel, P; Smolnikar, K; Schulz, T; Laudenbach-Leschowski, U; Michna, H; Vollmer, G

    2001-05-01

    The phytoestrogen genistein was studied in normal and malignant experimental uterine models in vivo. The action of genistein on the uterus and vagina of ovariectomized DA/Han rats after 3 day oral administration (25, 50 or 100 mg/kg/BW/d) was compared to ethinyl oestradiol (0.1 mg/kg/BW/d). Effects on uterine and vaginal morphology, uterine growth and uterine gene expression were studied. A dose dependent increase of the uterine wet weight and the uterine and vaginal epithelial height, a dose dependent up-regulation of complement C3, down-regulation of clusterin mRNA expression and a stimulation of the vaginal cornification was observed after administration of genistein. Uterine gene expression and vaginal epithelium respond to genistein at doses where no significant effects on uterine wet weight were detectable. In general the vagina was more sensitive to genistein than the uterus. To analyse the action of genistein in malignant uterine tissue, the impact of a 28 d treatment with 50 mg/kg/d of genistein on the in-vivo tumour growth of RUCA I endometrial adenocarcinoma cells, following subcutaneous inoculation into syngeneic DA/Han rats, was assessed. In contrast to ethinyl oestradiol (0.1 mg/kg/BW/d), a dose of 50 mg/kg/BW/d of genistein did not affect tumour growth. Nevertheless C3 and TRPM2 mRNA expression in the tumour were both significantly stimulated by ethinyl oestradiol and genistein. In comparison to ovariectomized animals genistein up-regulated uterine wet weight and uterine dependent gene expression in tumour bearing animals. In conclusion, four independent uterine and vaginal parameters indicate genistein is a weak oestrogen receptor agonist in the uterus and vagina of female DA/Han rats, and evidence is provided for a selective oestrogen receptor modulator (SERM)-like action of genistein in normal and malignant uterine tissue. PMID:11331651

  11. Genistein targets the cancerous inhibitor of PP2A to induce growth inhibition and apoptosis in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qingxia; Zhao, Ming; Parris, Amanda B.; Xing, Ying; Yang, Xiaohe

    2016-01-01

    Genistein is a soy isoflavone with phytoestrogen and tyrosine kinase inhibitory properties. High intake of soy/genistein has been associated with reduced breast cancer risk. Despite the advances in genistein-mediated antitumor studies, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated genistein-induced regulation of the cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A), a novel oncogene frequently overexpressed in breast cancer, and its functional impact on genistein-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis. We demonstrated that genistein induced downregulation of CIP2A in MCF-7-C3 and T47D breast cancer cells, which was correlated with its growth inhibition and apoptotic activities. Overexpression of CIP2A attenuated, whereas CIP2A knockdown sensitized, genistein-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis. We further showed that genistein-induced downregulation of CIP2A involved both transcriptional suppression and proteasomal degradation. In particular, genistein at higher concentrations induced concurrent downregulation of E2F1 and CIP2A. Overexpression of E2F1 attenuated genistein-induced downregulation of CIP2A mRNA, indicating the role of E2F1 in genistein-induced transcriptional suppression of CIP2A. Taken together, our results identified CIP2A as a functional target of genistein and demonstrated that modulation of E2F1-mediated transcriptional regulation of CIP2A contributes to its downregulation. These data advance our understanding of genistein-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis, and support further investigation on CIP2A as a therapeutic target of relevant anticancer agents.

  12. Genistein targets the cancerous inhibitor of PP2A to induce growth inhibition and apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qingxia; Zhao, Ming; Parris, Amanda B; Xing, Ying; Yang, Xiaohe

    2016-09-01

    Genistein is a soy isoflavone with phytoestrogen and tyrosine kinase inhibitory properties. High intake of soy/genistein has been associated with reduced breast cancer risk. Despite the advances in genistein-mediated antitumor studies, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated genistein-induced regulation of the cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A), a novel oncogene frequently overexpressed in breast cancer, and its functional impact on genistein-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis. We demonstrated that genistein induced downregulation of CIP2A in MCF-7-C3 and T47D breast cancer cells, which was correlated with its growth inhibition and apoptotic activities. Overexpression of CIP2A attenuated, whereas CIP2A knockdown sensitized, genistein-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis. We further showed that genistein-induced downregulation of CIP2A involved both transcriptional suppression and proteasomal degradation. In particular, genistein at higher concentrations induced concurrent downregulation of E2F1 and CIP2A. Overexpression of E2F1 attenuated genistein-induced downregulation of CIP2A mRNA, indicating the role of E2F1 in genistein-induced transcriptional suppression of CIP2A. Taken together, our results identified CIP2A as a functional target of genistein and demonstrated that modulation of E2F1-mediated transcriptional regulation of CIP2A contributes to its downregulation. These data advance our understanding of genistein-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis, and support further investigation on CIP2A as a therapeutic target of relevant anticancer agents. PMID:27574003

  13. Genistein mitigates radiation-induced testicular injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong-Sun; Heo, Kyu; Yi, Joo-Mi; Gong, Eun Ji; Yang, Kwangmo; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Sung-Ho

    2012-08-01

    The present study investigated the radioprotective effect of a multifunctional soy isoflavone, genistein, with the testicular system. Genistein was administered (200 mg/kg body weight) to male C3H/HeN mice by subcutaneous injection 24 h prior to pelvic irradiation (5 Gy). Histopathological parameters were evaluated 12 h and 21 days post-irradiation. Genistein protected the germ cells from radiation-induced apoptosis (p < 0.05 vs vehicle-treated irradiated mice at 12 h post-irradiation). Genistein significantly attenuated radiation-induced reduction in testis weight, seminiferous tubular diameter, seminiferous epithelial depth and sperm head count in the testes (p < 0.05 vs vehicle-treated irradiated mice at 21 days post-irradiation). Repopulation and stem cell survival indices of the seminiferous tubules were increased in the genistein-treated group compared with the vehicle-treated irradiation group at 21 days post-irradiation (p < 0.01). The irradiation-mediated decrease in the sperm count and sperm mobility in the epididymis was counteracted by genistein (p < 0.01), but no effect on the frequency of abnormal sperm was evident. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were evaluated using DCFDA method and exposure to irradiation elevated ROS levels in the testis and genistein treatment resulted in a significant attenuation of radiation-induced ROS production. The results indicate that genistein protects from testicular dysfunction induced by gamma-irradiation by an antiapoptotic effect and recovery of spermatogenesis. PMID:22162311

  14. Soya phytoestrogens, genistein and daidzein, decrease apolipoprotein B secretion from HepG2 cells through multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Borradaile, Nica M; de Dreu, Linda E; Wilcox, Lisa J; Edwards, Jane Y; Huff, Murray W

    2002-09-01

    Diets containing the soya-derived phytoestrogens, genistein and daidzein, decrease plasma cholesterol in humans and experimental animals. The mechanisms responsible for the hypocholesterolaemic effects of these isoflavones are unknown. The present study was conducted to determine if genistein and daidzein regulate hepatocyte cholesterol metabolism and apolipoprotein (apo) B secretion in cultured human hepatoma (HepG2) cells. ApoB secretion was decreased dose-dependently by up to 63% and 71% by genistein and daidzein (100 microM; P<0.0001) respectively. In contrast, no effect on apoAI secretion was observed. Cellular cholesterol synthesis was inhibited 41% by genistein (100 microM; P<0.005) and 18% by daidzein (100 microM; P<0.05), which was associated with significant increases in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase mRNA. Cellular cholesterol esterification was decreased 56% by genistein (100 microM; P<0.04) and 29% by daidzein (100 microM; P<0.04); however, mRNA levels for acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) 1 and ACAT2 were unaffected. At 100 microM, both isoflavones equally inhibited the activities of both forms of ACAT in cells transfected with either ACAT1 or ACAT2. Genistein (100 microM) and daidzein (100 microM) significantly decreased the activity of microsomal triacylglycerol transfer protein (MTP) by 30% and 24% respectively, and significantly decreased MTP mRNA levels by 35% and 55%. Both isoflavones increased low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-receptor mRNA levels by 3- to 6-fold (100 microM; P<0.03) and significantly increased the binding, uptake and degradation of (125)I-labelled LDL, suggesting that enhanced reuptake of newly secreted apoB-containing lipoproteins contributed to the net decrease in apoB secretion. These results indicate that genistein and daidzein inhibit hepatocyte apoB secretion through several mechanisms, including inhibition of cholesterol synthesis and esterification, inhibition of MTP activity and expression and

  15. Disruption of the developing female reproductive system by phytoestrogens: genistein as an example.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, Wendy N; Padilla-Banks, Elizabeth; Newbold, Retha R

    2007-07-01

    Studies in our laboratory have shown that exposure to genistein causes deleterious effects on the developing female reproductive system. Mice treated neonatally on days 1-5 by subcutaneous injection of genistein (0.5-50 mg/kg) exhibited altered ovarian differentiation leading to multioocyte follicles (MOFs) at 2 months of age. Ovarian function and estrous cyclicity were also disrupted by neonatal exposure to genistein with increasing severity observed over time. Reduced fertility was observed in mice treated with genistein (0.5, 5, or 25 mg/kg) and infertility was observed at 50 mg/kg. Mammary gland and behavioral endpoints were also affected by neonatal genistein treatment. Further, transgenerational effects were observed; female offspring obtained from breeding genistein treated females (25 mg/kg) to control males had increased MOFs. Thus, neonatal treatment with genistein at environmentally relevant doses caused adverse consequences on female development which is manifested in adulthood. Whether adverse effects occur in human infants exposed to soy-based products such as soy infant formulas is unknown but the neonatal murine model may help address some of the current uncertainties since we have shown that many effects obtained from feeding genistin, the glycosolated form of genistein found in soy formula, are similar to those obtained from injecting genistein. PMID:17604387

  16. Disruption of rat testis development following combined in utero exposure to the phytoestrogen genistein and antiandrogenic plasticizer di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate.

    PubMed

    Jones, Steven; Boisvert, Annie; Duong, Tam B; Francois, Sade; Thrane, Peter; Culty, Martine

    2014-09-01

    Fetal exposure to environmental endocrine disruptors (EDs) is thought to contribute to reported idiopathic increases in adult male reproductive abnormalities. Although humans are exposed to myriad EDs from conception to adulthood, few studies have evaluated the effects of combined EDs on male reproduction. In the present study, we demonstrate that simultaneous gestational exposure to the phytoestrogen genistein and the antiandrogenic plasticizer di-(2-ethyhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) induces long-term alterations in testis development and function. Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were gavaged from Gestational Day 14 to birth with corn oil, genistein, DEHP, or their mixture at 10 mg/kg/day, a dose selected from previous dose-response studies using single chemicals for its lack of long-term testicular effects. Hormonal and testicular end points were examined in adult male offspring. Serum testosterone levels were unchanged. However, significant increases were observed in testis weight and in the expression of mast cell markers in testes from adult rats exposed gestationally to combined compounds. The ED mixture also altered the mRNA expression of Sertoli cell makers Wt1 and Amh and germ cell markers cKit and Sox17, measured by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), suggesting long-term disruption in testis function and spermatogenesis. Alterations in germ cell markers might reflect direct effects on fetal gonocytes or indirect effects via primary targeting of somatic cells, as suggested by differentially regulated Leydig cell associated genes (Hsd3b, Anxa1, Foxa3, and Pdgfra), determined by gene expression array, qPCR, and protein analyses. The two chemicals, when given in combination, induced long-term reproductive toxicity at doses not previously reported to produce any conspicuous long-term effects. Our study therefore highlights a need for a more comprehensive evaluation of the effects of ED mixtures. PMID:25031359

  17. The phytoestrogen genistein enhances multidrug resistance in breast cancer cell lines by translational regulation of ABC transporters.

    PubMed

    Rigalli, Juan Pablo; Tocchetti, Guillermo Nicolás; Arana, Maite Rocío; Villanueva, Silvina Stella Maris; Catania, Viviana Alicia; Theile, Dirk; Ruiz, María Laura; Weiss, Johanna

    2016-06-28

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy in women. Multidrug resistance due to overexpression of ABC drug transporters is a common cause of chemotherapy failure and disease recurrence. Genistein (GNT) is a phytoestrogen present in soybeans and hormone supplements. We investigated the effect of GNT on the expression and function of ABC transporters in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. Results demonstrated an induction at the protein level of ABCC1 and ABCG2 and of ABCC1 in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, respectively. MCF-7 cells showed a concomitant increase in doxorubicin and mitoxantrone efflux and resistance, dependent on ABCG2 activity. ABCC1 induction by GNT in MDA-MB-231 cells modified neither drug efflux nor chemoresistance due to simultaneous acute inhibition of the transporter activity by GNT. All inductions took place at the translational level, as no increment in mRNA was observed and protein increase was prevented by cycloheximide. miR-181a, already demonstrated to inhibit ABCG2 translation, was down-regulated by GNT, explaining translational induction. Effects were independent of classical estrogen receptors. Results suggest potential nutrient-drug interactions that could threaten chemotherapy efficacy, especially in ABCG2-expressing tumors treated with substrates of this transporter. PMID:27033456

  18. Genistein selectively inhibits estrogen-induced cell proliferation and other responses to hormone stimulation in the prepubertal rat uterus.

    PubMed

    Gaete, Leonardo; Tchernitchin, Andrei N; Bustamante, Rodrigo; Villena, Joan; Lemus, Igor; Gidekel, Manuel; Cabrera, Gustavo; Carrillo, Omar

    2011-12-01

    Sex hormone replacement therapy helps improve quality of life in climacteric women. However, estrogen-induced cell proliferation in the uterus and mammary gland increases the risk for cancer in these organs. The lower incidence of mammary cancer in Asian women than in western women has been attributed to high intake of soy isoflavones, including genistein. Our previous work in the prepubertal rat uterus model showed that genistein (0.5 mg/kg body weight subcutaneously) caused an estradiol-like hypertrophy in myometrial and uterine luminal epithelial cells and an increase in RNA content in luminal epithelium; however, it did not induce cell proliferation, uterine eosinophilia, or endometrial edema. The present study investigated, in the same animal model, the effect of genistein administration (0.5 mg/kg body weight subcutaneously) before treatment with estradiol-17β (0.33 mg/kg body weight subcutaneously) on uterine responses that were not induced by genistein. Pretreatment with this phytoestrogen completely inhibited estradiol-induced mitoses in uterine luminal epithelium, endometrial stroma, and myometrium and partially inhibited estradiol-induced uterine eosinophilia and endometrial edema. These findings indicate that genistein protects against estrogen-induced cell proliferation in the uterus and suggest that future studies should investigate the possibility of using this agent to decrease the risk for uterine cancer after hormone replacement therapy in climacteric women. PMID:21612459

  19. Combination of 5-fluorouracil and genistein induces apoptosis synergistically in chemo-resistant cancer cells through the modulation of AMPK and COX-2 signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Jin-Taek; Ha, Joohun; Park, Ock Jin . E-mail: ojpark@hannam.ac.kr

    2005-07-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is one of the widely used chemotherapeutic drugs targeting various cancers, but its chemo-resistance remains as a major obstacle in clinical settings. In the present study, HT-29 colon cancer cells were markedly sensitized to apoptosis by both 5-FU and genistein compared to the 5-FU treatment alone. There is an emerging evidence that genistein, soy-derived phytoestrogen, may have potential as a chemotherapeutic agent capable of inducing apoptosis or suppressing tumor promoting proteins such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). However, the precise mechanism of cellular cytotoxicity of genistein is not known. The present study focused on the correlation of AMPK and COX-2 in combined cytotoxicity of 5-FU and genistein, since AMPK is known as a primary cellular homeostasis regulator and a possible target molecule of cancer treatment, and COX-2 as cell proliferation and anti-apoptotic molecule. Our results demonstrated that the combination of 5-FU and genistein abolished the up-regulated state of COX-2 and prostaglandin secretion caused by 5-FU treatment in HT-29 colon cancer cells. These appear to be followed by the specific activation of AMPK and the up-regulation of p53, p21, and Bax by genistein. Under same conditions, the induction of Glut-1 by 5-FU was diminished by the combination treatment with 5-FU and genistein. Furthermore, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) was found as an upstream signal for AMPK activation by genistein. These results suggested that the combination of 5-FU and genistein exert a novel chemotherapeutic effect in colon cancers, and AMPK may be a novel regulatory molecule of COX-2 expression, further implying its involvement in cytotoxicity caused by genistein.

  20. Enhanced Expression of Sodium Hydrogen Exchanger (NHE)-1, 2 and 4 in the Cervix of Ovariectomised Rats by Phytoestrogen Genistein

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Nurain; Giribabu, Nelli; Muniandy, Sekaran; Salleh, Naguib

    2015-01-01

    Restoring the pH of cervicovaginal fluid is important for the cervicovaginal health after menopause. Genistein, which is a widely consumed dietary health supplement to overcome the post-menopausal complications could help to restore the cervicovaginal fluid pH. We hypothesized that genistien effect involves changes in expression of NHE-1, 2 and 4 proteins and mRNAs in the cervix. This study investigated effect of genistein on NHE-1, 2 and 4 protein and mRNA expression in the cervix in order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying possible effect of this compound on cervicovaginal fluid pH after menopause. Methods: Ovariectomised adult female rats received 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg/day genistein for seven consecutive days. At the end of the treatment, animals were sacrificed and cervix was harvested. Expression of Nhe-1, 2 and 4 mRNA were analyzed by Real-time PCR while distribution of NHE-1, 2 and 4 protein were observed by immunohistochemistry. Results: Treatment with 50 and 100 mg/kg/day genistein caused marked increase in the levels of expression and distribution of NHE-1, 2 and 4 proteins in the endocervical epithelia. Levels of Nhe-1, 2 and 4 mRNA in the cervix were also increased. Coadministration of ICI 182 780 and genistein reduced the expression levels of NHE-1, 2 and 4 proteins and mRNAs in the cervix. Conclusions: Enhanced expression of NHE-1, 2 and 4 proteins and mRNAs expression in cervix under genistein influence could help to restore the cervicovaginal fluid pH that might help to prevent cervicovaginal complications related to menopause. PMID:26078707

  1. Withdrawal of dietary phytoestrogens in adult male rats affects hypothalamic regulation of food intake, induces obesity and alters glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, María Florencia; Stoker, Cora; Rossetti, María Florencia; Alzamendi, Ana; Castrogiovanni, Daniel; Luque, Enrique H; Ramos, Jorge Guillermo

    2015-02-01

    The absence of phytoestrogens in the diet during pregnancy has been reported to result in obesity later in adulthood. We investigated whether phytoestrogen withdrawal in adult life could alter the hypothalamic signals that regulate food intake and affect body weight and glucose homeostasis. Male Wistar rats fed from conception to adulthood with a high phytoestrogen diet were submitted to phytoestrogen withdrawal by feeding a low phytoestrogen diet, or a high phytoestrogen-high fat diet. Withdrawal of dietary phytoestrogens increased body weight, adiposity and energy intake through an orexigenic hypothalamic response characterized by upregulation of AGRP and downregulation of POMC. This was associated with elevated leptin and T4, reduced TSH, testosterone and estradiol, and diminished hypothalamic ERα expression, concomitant with alterations in glucose tolerance. Removing dietary phytoestrogens caused manifestations of obesity and diabetes that were more pronounced than those induced by the high phytoestrogen-high fat diet intake. PMID:25486512

  2. Genistein modulation of streptozotocin diabetes in male B6C3F1 mice can be induced by diet

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Tai L.; Wang, Yunbiao; Xiong, Tao; Ling, Xiao; Zheng, Jianfeng

    2014-11-01

    Diet and phytoestrogens affect the development and progression of diabetes. The objective of the present study was to determine if oral exposure to phytoestrogen genistein (GE) by gavage changed blood glucose levels (BGL) through immunomodulation in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic male B6C3F1 mice fed with three different diets. These three diets were: NTP-2000 diet (NTP), soy- and alfalfa-free 5K96 diet (SOF) and high fat diet (HFD) with 60% of kcal from fat, primarily rendered fat of swine. The dosing regimen for STZ consisted of three 100 mg/kg doses (i.p.): the first dose was administered at approximately 2 weeks following the initiation of daily GE (20 mg/kg) gavage, and the second dose was on day 19 following the first dose, and the third dose was on day 57 following the first dose. In mice on the NTP diet, GE treatment decreased BGL with statistical significances observed on days 33 and 82 following the first STZ injection. In mice fed the HFD diet, GE treatment produced a significant decrease and a significant increase in BGL on days 15 and 89 following the first STZ injection, respectively. In mice fed the SOF diet, GE treatment had no significant effects on BGL. Although GE treatment affected phenotypic distributions of both splenocytes (T cells, B cells, natural killer cells and neutrophils) and thymocytes (CD4/CD8 and CD44/CD25), and their mitochondrial transmembrane potential and generation of reactive oxygen species, indicators of cell death (possibly apoptosis), GE modulation of neutrophils was more consistent with its diabetogenic or anti-diabetic potentials. The differential effects of GE on BGL in male B6C3F1 mice fed with three different diets with varied phytoestrogen contents suggest that the estrogenic properties of this compound may contribute to its modulation of diabetes. - Highlights: • Diets affected streptozotocin-induced diabetes in male B6C3F1 mice. • Genistein modulation of streptozotocin diabetes can be induced by diet.

  3. Genistein from Vigna angularis Extends Lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Byeol; Ahn, Dalrae; Kim, Ban Ji; Lee, So Yeon; Seo, Hyun Won; Cha, Youn-Soo; Jeon, Hoon; Eun, Jae Soon; Cha, Dong Seok; Kim, Dae Keun

    2015-01-01

    The seed of Vigna angularis has long been cultivated as a food or a folk medicine in East Asia. Genistein (4′,5,7-trihydroxyisoflavone), a dietary phytoestrogen present in this plant, has been known to possess various biological properties. In this study, we investigated the possible lifespan-extending effects of genistein using Caenorhabditis elegans model system. We found that the lifespan of nematode was significantly prolonged in the presence of genistein under normal culture condition. In addition, genistein elevated the survival rate of nematode against stressful environment including heat and oxidative conditions. Further studies demonstrated that genistein-mediated increased stress tolerance of nematode could be attributed to enhanced expressions of stress resistance proteins such as superoxide dismutase (SOD-3) and heat shock protein (HSP-16.2). Moreover, we failed to find genistein-induced significant change in aging-related factors including reproduction, food intake, and growth, indicating genistein exerts longevity activity independent of affecting these factors. Genistein treatment also led to an up-regulation of locomotory ability of aged nematode, suggesting genistein affects healthspan as well as lifespan of nematode. Our results represent that genistein has beneficial effects on the lifespan of C. elegans under both of normal and stress condition via elevating expressions of stress resistance proteins. PMID:25593647

  4. Phytoestrogens in menopausal supplements induce ER-dependent cell proliferation and overcome breast cancer treatment in an in vitro breast cancer model

    SciTech Connect

    Duursen, Majorie B.M. van; Smeets, Evelien E.J.W.; Rijk, Jeroen C.W.; Nijmeijer, Sandra M.; Berg, Martin van den

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer treatment by the aromatase inhibitor Letrozole (LET) or Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Tamoxifen (TAM) can result in the onset of menopausal symptoms. Women often try to relieve these symptoms by taking menopausal supplements containing high levels of phytoestrogens. However, little is known about the potential interaction between these supplements and breast cancer treatment, especially aromatase inhibitors. In this study, interaction of phytoestrogens with the estrogen receptor alpha and TAM action was determined in an ER-reporter gene assay (BG1Luc4E2 cells) and human breast epithelial tumor cells (MCF-7). Potential interactions with aromatase activity and LET were determined in human adrenocorticocarcinoma H295R cells. We also used the previously described H295R/MCF-7 co-culture model to study interactions with steroidogenesis and tumor cell proliferation. In this model, genistein (GEN), 8-prenylnaringenin (8PN) and four commercially available menopausal supplements all induced ER-dependent tumor cell proliferation, which could not be prevented by physiologically relevant LET and 4OH-TAM concentrations. Differences in relative effect potencies between the H295R/MCF-7 co-culture model and ER-activation in BG1Luc4E2 cells, were due to the effects of the phytoestrogens on steroidogenesis. All tested supplements and GEN induced aromatase activity, while 8PN was a strong aromatase inhibitor. Steroidogenic profiles upon GEN and 8PN exposure indicated a strong inhibitory effect on steroidogenesis in H295R cells and H295R/MCF-7 co-cultures. Based on our in vitro data we suggest that menopausal supplement intake during breast cancer treatment should better be avoided, at least until more certainty regarding the safety of supplemental use in breast cancer patients can be provided. - Highlights: • Supplements containing phytoestrogens are commonly used by women with breast cancer. • Phytoestrogens alter steroidogenesis in a co-culture breast

  5. Global gene expression profiles induced by phytoestrogens in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dip, Ramiro; Lenz, Sarah; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Le Bizec, Bruno; Gmuender, Hans; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2008-03-01

    The nutritional intake of phytoestrogens seems to reduce the risk of breast cancer or other neoplastic diseases. However, these epidemiological findings remain controversial because low doses of phytoestrogens, achievable through soy-rich diets, stimulate the proliferation of estrogen-sensitive tumor cells. The question of whether such phytochemicals prevent cancer or rather pose additional health hazards prompted us to examine global gene expression programs induced by a typical soy product. After extraction from soymilk, phytoestrogens were deconjugated and processed through reverse- and normal-phase cartridges. The resulting mixture was used to treat human target cells that represent a common model system for mammary tumorigenesis. Analysis of mRNA on high-density microarrays revealed that soy phytoestrogens induce a genomic fingerprint that is indistinguishable from the transcriptional effects of the endogenous hormone 17beta-estradiol. Highly congruent responses were also observed by comparing the physiologic estradiol with daidzein, coumestrol, enterolactone, or resveratrol, each representing distinct phytoestrogen structures. More diverging transcriptional profiles were generated when an inducible promoter was used to reconstitute the expression of estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta). Therefore, phytoestrogens appear to mitigate estrogenic signaling in the presence of both ER subtypes but, in late-stage cancer cells lacking ERbeta, these phytochemicals contribute to a tumor-promoting transcriptional signature. PMID:18310284

  6. Genistein modulation of streptozotocin diabetes in male B6C3F1 mice can be induced by diet

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tai L.; Wang, Yunbiao; Xiong, Tao; Ling, Xiao; Zheng, Jianfeng

    2014-01-01

    Diet and phytoestrogens affect the development and progression of diabetes. The objective of the present study was to determine if oral exposure to phytoestrogen genistein (GE) by gavage changed blood glucose levels (BGL) through immunomodulation in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic male B6C3F1 mice fed three different diets. These three diets were: NTP-2000 diet (NTP), soy- and alfalfa-free 5K96 diet (SOF) and high fat diet (HFD) with 60% of kcal from fat, primarily rendered fat of swine. The dosing regimen for STZ consisted of three 100 mg/kg doses (i.p.): the first dose was administered at approximately 2 weeks following the initiation of daily GE (20 mg/kg) gavage, and the second dose was on day 19 following the first dose, and the third dose was on day 57 following the first dose. In mice on the NTP diet, GE treatment decreased BGL with statistical significances observed on days 33 and 82 following the first STZ injection. In mice fed the HFD diet, GE treatment produced a significant decrease and a significant increase in BGL on days 15 and 89 following the first STZ injection, respectively. In mice fed the SOF diet, GE treatment had no significant effects on BGL. Although GE treatment affected phenotypic distributions of both splenocytes (T cells, B cells, natural killer cells and neutrophils) and thymocytes (CD4/CD8 and CD44/CD25), and their mitochondrial transmembrane potential and generation of reactive oxygen species, indicators of cell death (possibly apoptosis), GE modulation of neutrophils was more consistent with its diabetogenic or anti-diabetic potentials. The differential effects of GE on BGL in male B6C3F1 mice fed three different diets with varied phytoestrogen contents suggest that the estrogenic properties of this compound may contribute to its modulation of diabetes. PMID:25178718

  7. Genistein modulation of streptozotocin diabetes in male B6C3F1 mice can be induced by diet.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tai L; Wang, Yunbiao; Xiong, Tao; Ling, Xiao; Zheng, Jianfeng

    2014-11-01

    Diet and phytoestrogens affect the development and progression of diabetes. The objective of the present study was to determine if oral exposure to phytoestrogen genistein (GE) by gavage changed blood glucose levels (BGL) through immunomodulation in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic male B6C3F1 mice fed with three different diets. These three diets were: NTP-2000 diet (NTP), soy- and alfalfa-free 5K96 diet (SOF) and high fat diet (HFD) with 60% of kcal from fat, primarily rendered fat of swine. The dosing regimen for STZ consisted of three 100mg/kg doses (i.p.): the first dose was administered at approximately 2weeks following the initiation of daily GE (20mg/kg) gavage, and the second dose was on day 19 following the first dose, and the third dose was on day 57 following the first dose. In mice on the NTP diet, GE treatment decreased BGL with statistical significances observed on days 33 and 82 following the first STZ injection. In mice fed the HFD diet, GE treatment produced a significant decrease and a significant increase in BGL on days 15 and 89 following the first STZ injection, respectively. In mice fed the SOF diet, GE treatment had no significant effects on BGL. Although GE treatment affected phenotypic distributions of both splenocytes (T cells, B cells, natural killer cells and neutrophils) and thymocytes (CD4/CD8 and CD44/CD25), and their mitochondrial transmembrane potential and generation of reactive oxygen species, indicators of cell death (possibly apoptosis), GE modulation of neutrophils was more consistent with its diabetogenic or anti-diabetic potentials. The differential effects of GE on BGL in male B6C3F1 mice fed with three different diets with varied phytoestrogen contents suggest that the estrogenic properties of this compound may contribute to its modulation of diabetes. PMID:25178718

  8. Genistein attenuates brain damage induced by transient cerebral ischemia through up-regulation of ERK activity in ovariectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiquan; Wei, Haidong; Cai, Min; Lu, Yan; Hou, Wugang; Yang, Qianzi; Dong, Hailong; Xiong, Lize

    2014-01-01

    Stroke has severe consequences in postmenopausal women. As replacement therapy of estrogen have various adverse effects and the undermined outcomes. Genistein, a natural phytoestrogen, has been suggested to be a potential neuroprotective agent for such stroke patients. However, the role of genistein and its underlying mechanism in ovariectomized mice has not yet been evaluated. In the present study, ovariectomized mice were treated with genistein (10 mg/kg) or vehicle daily for two weeks before developing transient cerebral ischemia (middle cerebral artery occlusion). The neurological manifestation was evaluated, and infarct volumes were demonstrated by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining at 24 h after reperfusion. In addition, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was detected by Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining, and cellular apoptosis was evaluated in the ischemic penumbra. We found that treatment with genistein reduced infarct volumes, improved neurological outcomes and attenuated cellular apoptosis at 24 h after reperfusion. ERK1/2 showed increased phosphorylation by genistein treatment after reperfusion, and an ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 abolished this protective effect of genistein in terms of infarct volumes, neurological scores and cellular apoptosis. Our findings indicate that treatment with genistein can reduce the severity of subsequent stroke episodes, and that this beneficial function is associated with ERK activation. PMID:24719563

  9. Genistein as antioxidant and antibrowning agents in in vivo and in vitro: A review.

    PubMed

    Rahman Mazumder, Md Anisur; Hongsprabhas, Parichat

    2016-08-01

    Genistein is a phytoestrogen with diverse biological activities. It is a potent antioxidant and antibrowning agent in in vivo and in vitro. Genistein acts as a preventative and therapeutic effects for cancers, postmenopausal syndrome, osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases in animals and humans. Gensitein possesses cancer related enzyme-inhibitory effect and substantially inhibits skin carcinogenesis and cutaneous aging induced by ultraviolet (UV) light in mice and photodamage in humans. Two-stage skin carcinogenesis showed genistein exhibited a moderate inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase activity through blockage of DNA adducts formation. The anticancer, anti-inflammatory, cardio-protective and enzyme-inhibitory effects of genistein might be related to their antioxidant activities. Genistein also altered the Maillard reaction pathway by trapping the advanced glycation end products (AGEs) both in biological and protein-lactose suspensions. As a result, soy isoflavone can be used to enrich or fortify different types of food products. PMID:27470376

  10. Phytoestrogens in menopausal supplements induce ER-dependent cell proliferation and overcome breast cancer treatment in an in vitro breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    van Duursen, Majorie B M; Smeets, Evelien E J W; Rijk, Jeroen C W; Nijmeijer, Sandra M; van den Berg, Martin

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer treatment by the aromatase inhibitor Letrozole (LET) or Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Tamoxifen (TAM) can result in the onset of menopausal symptoms. Women often try to relieve these symptoms by taking menopausal supplements containing high levels of phytoestrogens. However, little is known about the potential interaction between these supplements and breast cancer treatment, especially aromatase inhibitors. In this study, interaction of phytoestrogens with the estrogen receptor alpha and TAM action was determined in an ER-reporter gene assay (BG1Luc4E2 cells) and human breast epithelial tumor cells (MCF-7). Potential interactions with aromatase activity and LET were determined in human adrenocorticocarcinoma H295R cells. We also used the previously described H295R/MCF-7 co-culture model to study interactions with steroidogenesis and tumor cell proliferation. In this model, genistein (GEN), 8-prenylnaringenin (8PN) and four commercially available menopausal supplements all induced ER-dependent tumor cell proliferation, which could not be prevented by physiologically relevant LET and 4OH-TAM concentrations. Differences in relative effect potencies between the H295R/MCF-7 co-culture model and ER-activation in BG1Luc4E2 cells, were due to the effects of the phytoestrogens on steroidogenesis. All tested supplements and GEN induced aromatase activity, while 8PN was a strong aromatase inhibitor. Steroidogenic profiles upon GEN and 8PN exposure indicated a strong inhibitory effect on steroidogenesis in H295R cells and H295R/MCF-7 co-cultures. Based on our in vitro data we suggest that menopausal supplement intake during breast cancer treatment should better be avoided, at least until more certainty regarding the safety of supplemental use in breast cancer patients can be provided. PMID:23541764

  11. Enhanced expression of sodium hydrogen exchanger (NHE)-1, 2 and 4 in the uteri of rat model for post-menopause under phytoestrogen genistein influence.

    PubMed

    Chinigarzadeh, Asma; Muniandy, Sekaran; Salleh, Naguib

    2015-07-01

    Maintaining near normal uterine fluid pH is important for restoring uterine function after menopause. We hypothesized that genistein could restore uterine fluid pH via its effect on NHE expression. This study therefore investigated changes in uterine NHE-1, 2 and 4 expression under genistein influence. Ovariectomized female rats received genistein (25, 50 or 100mg/kg/day) for seven consecutive days. Uteri were harvested and NHE-1, 2 and 4 mRNA expression were analyzed by Real-time PCR while distribution of these transporters' protein was observed by immunohistochemistry. Expression of NHE-1, 2 and 4 mRNA increased with increasing doses of genistein which was antagonized by ICI 182780. Under genistein influence, NHE-1, 2 and 4 proteins were found to be distributed at apical membrane of endometrial luminal epithelia. Enhanced expression of NHE-1, 2 and 4 in ovariectomised rat uteri by genistein might help to restore pH of uterine fluid which could be useful for women after menopause. PMID:26068551

  12. Trichostatin A potentiates genistein-induced apoptosis and reverses EMT in HEp2 cells

    PubMed Central

    DU, RUIXIA; LIU, ZHE; HOU, XUEDONG; FU, GONGBI; AN, NING; WANG, LIPING

    2016-01-01

    Genistein and trichostatin A (TSA) are two chemotherapeutic compounds with antitumor effects in different types of cancer cell. However, the effects of genistein and TSA on the HEp-2 laryngeal cancer cell line remain to be fully elucidated. In the present study, it was found that genistein and TSA inhibited cell growth and cell migration, and promoted apoptosis in the HEp-2 laryngeal cancer cell line. The HEp-2 cells were treated with genistein, TSA or the two compounds in combination. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were measured using an MTT assay, Annexin V/propidium iodide staining and a TUNEL assay. Cell invasion was determined using a Matrigel-based Transwell assay. Western blotting was used to examine the activation of the Akt pathway and the expression levels of pro-or anti-apoptotic proteins. Treatment with either genistein or TSA alone mildly inhibited cell viability, growth and invasion, and induced the apoptosis of the laryngeal cancer cells, whereas more marked effects were observed in the cells treated with the combination of the two compounds. In addition, genistein reversed endothelial growth factor-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the HEp-2 cells, the effect of which were was further increased by joint application with TSA. Treatment of the HEp-2 cells with genistein and TSA led to a significant reduction in the phosphorylation of Akt and activation of its downstream target, and resulted in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ cleavage, increased expression of B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2)-associated X protein and reduced the expression of Bcl-2. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that, with the involvement of TSA, genistein exhibited substantial advantages in inhibiting laryngeal carcinoma cell growth, invasion and EMT, and induced apoptosis, compared with genistein treatment alone, which occurred through the regulation of Akt activation and the apoptotic pathway. PMID:27121018

  13. Vascular effects of phytoestrogens and alternative menopausal hormone therapy in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Gencel, V B; Benjamin, M M; Bahou, S N; Khalil, R A

    2012-02-01

    Phytoestrogens are estrogenic compounds of plant origin classified into different groups including isoflavones, lignans, coumestans and stilbenes. Isoflavones such as genistein and daidzein are the most studied and most potent phytoestrogens, and are found mainly in soy based foods. The effects of phytoestrogens are partly mediated via estrogen receptors (ERs): ERα, ERβ and possibly GPER. The interaction of phytoestrogens with ERs is thought to induce both genomic and non-genomic effects in many tissues including the vasculature. Some phytoestrogens such as genistein have additional non-ER-mediated effects involving signaling pathways such as tyrosine kinase. Experimental studies have shown beneficial effects of phytoestrogens on endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle, and extracellular matrix. Phytoestrogens may also affect other pathophysiologic vascular processes such as lipid profile, angiogenesis, inflammation, tissue damage by reactive oxygen species, and these effects could delay the progression of atherosclerosis. As recent clinical trials showed no vascular benefits or even increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and CV events with conventional menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), phytoestrogens are being considered as alternatives to pharmacologic MHT. Epidemiological studies in the Far East population suggest that dietary intake of phytoestrogens may contribute to the decreased incidence of postmenopausal CVD and thromboembolic events. Also, the WHO-CARDIAC study supported that consumption of high soybean diet is associated with lower mortalities from coronary artery disease. However, as with estrogen, there has been some discrepancy between the experimental studies demonstrating the vascular benefits of phytoestrogens and the data from clinical trials. This is likely because the phytoestrogens clinical trials have been limited in many aspects including the number of participants enrolled, the clinical end points investigated, and the lack of

  14. Protective effect of genistein on radiation-induced intestinal injury in tumor bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiation therapy is the most widely used treatment for cancer, but it causes the side effect of mucositis due to intestinal damage. We examined the protective effect of genistein in tumor-bearing mice after abdominal irradiation by evaluation of apoptosis and intestinal morphological changes. Methods Mouse colon cancer CT26 cells were subcutaneously injected at the flank of BALB/c mice to generate tumors. The tumor-bearing mice were treated with abdominal radiation at 5 and 10 Gy, and with genistein at 200 mg/kg body weight per day for 1 d before radiation. The changes in intestinal histology were evaluated 12 h and 3.5 d after irradiation. To assess the effect of the combination treatment on the cancer growth, the tumor volume was determined at sacrifice before tumor overgrowth occurred. Results Genistein significantly decreased the number of apoptotic nuclei compared with that in the irradiation group 12 h after 5 Gy irradiation. Evaluation of histological changes showed that genistein ameliorated intestinal morphological changes such as decreased crypt survival, villus shortening, and increased length of the basal lamina 3.5 d after 10 Gy irradiation. Moreover, the genistein-treated group exhibited more Ki-67-positive proliferating cells in the jejunum than the irradiated control group, and crypt depths were greater in the genistein-treated group than in the irradiated control group. The mean weight of the CT26 tumors was reduced in the group treated with genistein and radiation compared with the control group. Conclusion Genistein had a protective effect on intestinal damage induced by irradiation and delayed tumor growth. These results suggest that genistein is a useful candidate for preventing radiotherapy-induced intestinal damage in cancer patients. PMID:23672582

  15. Genistein cooperates with the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat to induce cell death in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Among American men, prostate cancer is the most common, non-cutaneous malignancy that accounted for an estimated 241,000 new cases and 34,000 deaths in 2011. Previous studies have suggested that Wnt pathway inhibitory genes are silenced by CpG hypermethylation, and other studies have suggested that genistein can demethylate hypermethylated DNA. Genistein is a soy isoflavone with diverse effects on cellular proliferation, survival, and gene expression that suggest it could be a potential therapeutic agent for prostate cancer. We undertook the present study to investigate the effects of genistein on the epigenome of prostate cancer cells and to discover novel combination approaches of other compounds with genistein that might be of translational utility. Here, we have investigated the effects of genistein on several prostate cancer cell lines, including the ARCaP-E/ARCaP-M model of the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), to analyze effects on their epigenetic state. In addition, we investigated the effects of combined treatment of genistein with the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat on survival in prostate cancer cells. Methods Using whole genome expression profiling and whole genome methylation profiling, we have determined the genome-wide differences in genetic and epigenetic responses to genistein in prostate cancer cells before and after undergoing the EMT. Also, cells were treated with genistein, vorinostat, and combination treatment, where cell death and cell proliferation was determined. Results Contrary to earlier reports, genistein did not have an effect on CpG methylation at 20 μM, but it did affect histone H3K9 acetylation and induced increased expression of histone acetyltransferase 1 (HAT1). In addition, genistein also had differential effects on survival and cooperated with the histone deacteylase inhibitor vorinostat to induce cell death and inhibit proliferation. Conclusion Our results suggest that there are a number of

  16. The effect of zinc and phytoestrogen supplementation on the changes in mineral content of the femur of rats with chemically induced mammary carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Skrajnowska, Dorota; Korczak, Barbara Bobrowska-; Tokarz, Andrzej; Kazimierczuk, Agata; Klepacz, Marta; Makowska, Justyna; Gadzinski, Blazej

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess skeletal effects of zinc or zinc with phytoestrogen (resveratrol or genistein) supplementation in an animal model of rats with DMBA-induced mammary carcinogenesis. The changes in bone parameters such as the length and mass were examined, as well as the changes in concentrations of selected minerals: calcium, magnesium, zinc, iron and phosphorus. Moreover, the investigations focused on finding the differences between the levels of iron and zinc in other tissues: the liver, spleen and serum of the examined rats. Fifty-six female Sprague-Dawley rats, 40 days old, were divided into four groups, regardless of the diets: standard (77mg Zn kg/food), zinc (4.6mg/mL via gavage), zinc (4.6mg/mL) plus resveratrol (0.2mg/kgbw), and zinc (4.6mg/mL) plus genistein (0.2mg/kgbw) for a period from 40 days until 20 weeks of age. The study rats were also treated with 7,12-dimethyl-1,2-benz[a]anthracene (DMBA) to induce mammary carcinogenesis. The applied diet and the advanced mammary cancer did not affect macrometric parameters of the rats' bones, but they strongly affected their mineral content. It was found that mammary cancer, irrespectively of the applied diet, significantly modified the iron level in the femur, liver, spleen and serum of the examined rats. In addition, zinc supplementation significantly lowered the levels of calcium, magnesium and phosphorus in the femur of rats with mammary cancer as compared with respective levels in the control group. So, it was found that additional supplementation with zinc, which is generally considered to be an antioxidant, with the co-existing mammary carcinoma, increased the unfavorable changes as concerns the stability of bone tissue. The appropriate combination of zinc and phytoestrogens (resveratrol or genistein) could help prevent or slow bone loss associated with a range of skeletal disorders in breast cancer. PMID:26302916

  17. ALTERED MAMMARY GLAND DEVELOPMENT IN MALE RATS EXPOSED TO GENISTEIN AND METHOXYCHLOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genistein is a prevalent phytoestrogen whose presence in human and animal foods may affect biological actions of synthetic endocrine active compounds. We have previously reported that in utero and lactational exposure to genistein and the endocrine active pesticide methoxychlor c...

  18. Mammographic breast density and serum phytoestrogen levels.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Sarah J; Sprague, Brian L; Aiello Bowles, Erin J; Hedman, Curtis J; Hemming, Jocelyn; Hampton, John M; Burnside, Elizabeth S; Sisney, Gale A; Buist, Diana S M; Trentham-Dietz, Amy

    2012-08-01

    Some forms of estrogen are associated with breast cancer risk as well as with mammographic density (MD), a strong marker of breast cancer risk. Whether phytoestrogen intake affects breast density, however, remains unclear. We evaluated the association between serum levels of phytoestrogens and MD in postmenopausal women. We enrolled 269 women, ages 55-70 yr, who received a screening mammogram and had no history of postmenopausal hormone use. Subjects completed a survey on diet and factors related to MD and provided a blood sample for analysis of 3 phytoestrogens: genistein, daidzein, and coumestrol. We examined whether mean percent MD was related to serum level of phytoestrogens, adjusting for age and body mass index. Genistein and daidzein levels correlated with self-reported soy consumption. Mean percent MD did not differ across women with different phytoestrogen levels. For example, women with nondetectable genistein levels had mean density of 11.0% [95% confidence intervals (CI) = 9.9-12.4], compared to 10.5% (95% CI = 8.0-13.7) and 11.2% (95% CI = 8.7-14.6) for < and ≥ median detectable levels, respectively. In a population with relatively low soy intake, serum phytoestrogens were not associated with mammographic density. Additional studies are needed to determine effects of higher levels, particularly given patterns of increasing phytoestrogen intake. PMID:22860715

  19. The soy-associated phytoestrogen, genistein, does not protect against alcohol induced osteoporosis in male mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alcohol abuse acts as a risk factor for osteoporosis by increasing osteoclast activity and decreasing osteoblast activity in bone. These effects can be reversed by estradiol. Soy diets are also suggested to have protective effects on bone loss in men and women, as a result of the presence of soy pro...

  20. Genistein inhibits estradiol- and environmental endocrine disruptor-induced growth effects on neuroblastoma cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, JICUI; LI, HUI; ZHU, HAITAO; XIAO, XIANMIN; MA, YANGYANG

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of genistein on human neuroblastoma cell proliferation induced by two common environmental endocrine disruptors, bisphenol A (BPA) and Di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), and to investigate its underlying mechanism. SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cells were treated with E2 (1 ng/ml), BPA (2 μg/ml) or DEHP (100 μM), with or without genistein (12.5 μM) in vitro. The number of viable cells was detected with an absorbance reader after 0, 24, 48 or 72 h treatment. The percentage of cells in different phases, and expression of Akt and its phosphorylation levels were also assessed by flow cytometry and western blot analysis at 72 h, respectively. The BPA and DEHP groups had a 30% higher number of viable cells compared to the non-treated group at 48 h (P<0.001). However, the cell numbers did not increase significantly in the groups with additional treatment with genistein (P>0.05 vs. control) and the same trend was observed at 72 h. The expression of phospho-Akt protein was increased in the groups treated with BPA or DEHP compared to the control group at 72 h (P<0.05), while no significant elevation in the expression of phospho-Akt was observed (P>0.05) in genistein-treated groups. Cells were arrested at the G2/M phase by genistein. Similar effects were observed in the E2 group with or without genistein treatment. Akt protein expression had no significant change among all the groups (P>0.05). In conclusion, estradiol- or environmental endocrine disruptor-induced proliferation of human neuroblastoma cells is effectively abolished by genistein, likely in a cell cycle- and Akt pathway-dependent manner. PMID:23761822

  1. The combined effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and the phytoestrogen genistein on steroid hormone secretion, AhR and ERβ expression and the incidence of apoptosis in granulosa cells of medium porcine follicles.

    PubMed

    Piasecka-Srader, Joanna; Sadowska, Agnieszka; Nynca, Anna; Orlowska, Karina; Jablonska, Monika; Jablonska, Olga; Petroff, Brian K; Ciereszko, Renata E

    2016-02-20

    Low doses of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) used in combination may act in a manner different from that of individual compounds. The objective of the study was to examine in vitro effects of low doses of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD; 100 pM) and genistein (500 nM) on: 1) progesterone (P4) and estradiol (E2) secretion (48 h); 2) dynamic changes in aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mRNA and protein expression (1, 3, 6, 24 and 48 h); 3) dynamic changes in estrogen receptor β (ERβ) mRNA and protein expression (1, 3, 6, 24 and 48 h); and 4) induction of apoptosis in porcine granulosa cells derived from medium follicles (3, 6 and 24 h). TCDD had no effect on P4 or E2 production, but potentiated the inhibitory effect of genistein on P4 production. In contrast to the individual treatments which did not produce any effects, TCDD and genistein administered together decreased ERβ and AhR protein expression in granulosa cells. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of TCDD on AhR mRNA expression was abolished by genistein. The treatments did not induce apoptosis in the cells. In summary, combined effects of low concentrations of TCDD and genistein on follicular function of pigs differed from that of individual compounds. The results presented in the current paper clearly indicate that effects exerted by low doses of EDCs applied in combination must be taken into consideration when studying potential risk effects of EDCs on biological processes. PMID:26568065

  2. Genistein Inhibits Osteoclastic Differentiation of RAW 264.7 Cells via Regulation of ROS Production and Scavenging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Jin-Kyoung; Jang, Hae-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Genistein, a phytoestrogen, has been demonstrated to have a bone-sparing and antiresorptive effect. Genistein can inhibit the osteoclast formation of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced RAW 264.7 cells by preventing the translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), a redox-sensitive factor, to the nucleus. Therefore, the suppressive effect of genistein on the reactive oxygen species (ROS) level during osteoclast differentiation and the mechanism associated with the control of ROS levels by genistein were investigated. The cellular antioxidant capacity and inhibitory effect of genistein were confirmed. The translation and activation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase 1 (Nox1), as well as the disruption of the mitochondrial electron transport chain system were obviously suppressed by genistein in a dose-dependent manner. The induction of phase II antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), was enhanced by genistein. In addition, the translational induction of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) was notably increased by genistein. These results provide that the inhibitory effects of genistein on RANKL-stimulated osteoclast differentiation is likely to be attributed to the control of ROS generation through suppressing the translation and activation of Nox1 and the disruption of the mitochondrial electron transport chain system, as well as ROS scavenging through the Nrf2-mediated induction of phase II antioxidant enzymes, such as SOD1 and HO-1. PMID:24927148

  3. VOLTAGE-DEPENDENT OPENING OF HCN CHANNELS: FACILITATION OR INHIBITION BY THE PHYTOESTROGEN, GENISTEIN, IS DETERMINED BY THE ACTIVATION STATUS OF THE CYCLIC NUCLEOTIDE GATING RING

    PubMed Central

    Rozario, Anjali. O.; Turbendian, Harma K.; Fogle, Keri J.; Olivier, Nelson B.; Tibbs, Gareth R.

    2009-01-01

    Investigation of the mechanistic bases and physiological importance of cAMP regulation of HCN channels has exploited an arginine to glutamate mutation in the nucleotide-binding fold, an approach critically dependent on the mutation selectively lowering the channel’s nucleotide affinity. In apparent conflict with this, in intact Xenopus oocytes, HCN and HCN-RE channels exhibit qualitatively and quantitatively distinct responses to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein – the estrogenic isoflavonoid strongly depolarizes the activation midpoint of HCN1-R538E, but not HCN1 channels (+9.8 mV ± 0.9 versus +2.2 mV ± 0.6) and hyperpolarizes gating of HCN2 (−4.8 mV ± 1.0) but depolarizes gating of HCN2-R591E (+13.2 mV ± 2.1). However, excised patch recording, X-ray crystallography and modeling reveal this is not due to either a fundamental effect of the mutation on channel gating per se or of genistein acting as a mutation-sensitive partial agonist at the cAMP site. Rather, we find that genistein equivalently moves both HCN and HCN-RE channels closer to the open state (rendering the channels inherently easier to open but at a cost of decreasing the coupling energy of cAMP) and that the anomaly reflects a balance of these energetic effects with the isoform specific inhibition of activation by the nucleotide gating ring and relief of this by endogenous cAMP. These findings have specific implications with regard to findings based on HCN-RE channels and kinase antagonists and general implications with respect to interpretation of drug effects in mutant channel backgrounds. PMID:19524546

  4. Genistein attenuates low temperature induced pulmonary hypertension in broiler chicks by modulating endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Gao, Mingyu; Wu, Zhenlong; Guo, Yuming

    2010-12-15

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is characterized by high pulmonary blood pressure, vascular remodeling and right ventricular hypertrophy. In the present study, we investigated whether genistein would prevent the development of low temperature-induced pulmonary hypertension in broilers. Hemodynamic parameters, vascular remodeling, the expression of endothelial nitric oxide and endothelin-1 content in lung tissue were evaluated. The results demonstrated that genistein significantly reduced pulmonary arterial hypertension and suppressed pulmonary arterial vascular remodeling without affecting broilers' performance. The beneficial effects appeared to be mediated by restoring endothelial function especially endothelial nitric oxide and endothelin-1, two critical vasoactive molecules that associated with the development of hypertension. Genistein supplementation might be a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:20854807

  5. A High Concentration of Genistein Induces Cell Death in Human Uterine Leiomyoma Cells by Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Lysandra; Gao, Xioahua; Moore, Alicia B; Yu, Linda; Di, Xudong; Kissling, Grace E; Dixon, Darlene

    2016-01-01

    Genistein, an estrogenic, soy-derived isoflavone, may play a protective role against hormone-related cancers. We have reported that a high concentration of genistein inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in human uterine smooth muscle cells, but not in leiomyoma (fibroid) cells. To better understand the differential cell death responses of normal and tumor cells to a high concentration of genistein, we treated uterine smooth muscle cells and uterine leiomyoma cells with 50 μg/ml of genistein for 72 h and 168 h, and assessed for mediators of apoptosis, cytotoxicity and autophagy. We found that leiomyoma cells had increased protection from apoptosis by expressing an increased ratio of Bcl-2: bak at 72 h and 168 h; however, in smooth muscle cells, the Bcl-2: bak ratio was decreased at 72 h, but significantly rebounded by 168 h. The apoptosis extrinsic factors, Fas ligand and Fas receptor, were highly expressed in uterine smooth muscle cells following genistein treatment at both time points as evidenced by confocal microscopy. This was not seen in the uterine leiomyoma cells; however, cytotoxicity as indicated by elevated lactate dehydrogenase levels was significantly enhanced at 168 h. Increased immunoexpression of an autophagy/autophagosome marker was also observed in the leiomyoma cells, although minimally present in smooth muscle cells at 72 h. Ultrastructurally, there was evidence of autophagic vacuoles in the leiomyoma cells; whereas, the normal smooth muscle cells showed nuclear fragmentation indicative of apoptosis. In summary, our data show differential cell death pathways induced by genistein in tumor and normal uterine smooth muscle cells, and suggest novel cell death pathways that can be targeted for preventive and intervention strategies for inhibiting fibroid tumor cell growth in vivo. PMID:27512718

  6. Genistein as an inducer of tumor cell differentiation : possible mechanisms of action.

    SciTech Connect

    Constantinou, A.; Huberman, E.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    1995-01-01

    Decreased activity of either topoisomerases or tyrosine kinases has been implicated in the differentiation of a number of cell types. It is therefore conceivable that genistein, because of its reported ability to inhibit these activities in vitro, may be an inducer of cellular differentiation. We investigated this possibility in human promyelocytic HL-60 and erythroid K-562 leukemia cells and in human SK-MEL-131 melanoma cells. Our results indicated that genistein, in a dose-dependent manner, inhibited cell multiplication and induced cell differentiation. The maturing HL-60 cells acquired granulocytic and monocytic markers. The differentiating K-562 cells stained positively with benzidine, which indicates the production of hemoglobin, an erythroid marker. Following genistein treatment, maturing SK-MEL-131 melanoma cells formed dendrite-like structures and exhibited increased tyrosinase activity and melanin content. Experiments were designed to identify the molecular mechanism of genistein's action. Data from our laboratory suggest that this isoflavone triggers the pathway that leads to cellular differentiation by stabilizing protein-linked DNA strand breakage. Other possible mechanisms reported in the literature are discussed.

  7. Genistein abrogates G2 arrest induced by curcumin in p53 deficient T47D cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The high cost and low level of cancer survival urge the finding of new drugs having better mechanisms. There is a high trend of patients to be “back to nature” and use natural products as an alternative way to cure cancer. The fact is that some of available anticancer drugs are originated from plants, such as taxane, vincristine, vinblastine, pacitaxel. Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a dietary pigment present in Curcuma longa rizhome is reported to induce cell cycle arrest in some cell lines. Other study reported that genistein isolated from Glycine max seed inhibited phosphorylation of cdk1, gene involved during G2/M transition and thus could function as G2 checkpoint abrogator. The inhibition of cdk1 phosphorylation is one of alternative strategy which could selectively kill cancer cells and potentially be combined with DNA damaging agent such as curcumin. Methods T47D cell line was treated with different concentrations of curcumin and genistein, alone or in combination; added together or with interval time. Flow Cytometry and MTT assay were used to evaluate cell cycle distribution and viability, respectively. The presence of apoptotic cells was determined using acridine orange-ethidium bromide staining. Results In this study curcumin induced G2 arrest on p53 deficient T47D cells at the concentration of 10 μM. Increasing concentration up to 30 μM increased the number of cell death. Whilst genistein alone at low concentration (≤10 μM) induced cell proliferation, addition of genistein (20 μM) 16 h after curcumin resulted in more cell death (89%), 34% higher than that administered at the same time (56%). The combination treatment resulted in apoptotic cell death. Combining curcumin with high dose of genistein (50 μM) induced necrotic cells. Conclusions Genistein increased the death of curcumin treated T47D cells. Appropriate timing of administration and concentration of genistein determine the outcome of treatment and this method

  8. Phytoestrogen Suppresses Efflux of the Diagnostic Marker Protoporphyrin IX in Lung Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hirofumi; Nagakawa, Keisuke; Kobuchi, Hirotsugu; Ogino, Tetsuya; Kondo, Yoichi; Inoue, Keiji; Shuin, Taro; Utsumi, Toshihiko; Utsumi, Kozo; Sasaki, Junzo; Ohuchi, Hideyo

    2016-04-01

    One promising method to visualize cancer cells is based on the detection of the fluorescent photosensitizer protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) synthesized from 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), but this method cannot be used in cancers that exhibit poor PpIX accumulation. PpIX appears to be pumped out of cancer cells by the ABC transporter G2 (ABCG2), which is associated with multidrug resistance. Genistein is a phytoestrogen that appears to competitively inhibit ABCG2 activity. Therefore, we investigated whether genistein can promote PpIX accumulation in human lung carcinoma cells. Here we report that treatment of A549 lung carcinoma cells with genistein or a specific ABCG2 inhibitor promoted ALA-mediated accumulation of PpIX by approximately 2-fold. ABCG2 depletion and overexpression studies further revealed that genistein promoted PpIX accumulation via functional repression of ABCG2. After an extended period of genistein treatment, a significant increase in PpIX accumulation was observed in A549 cells (3.7-fold) and in other cell lines. Systemic preconditioning with genistein in a mouse xenograft model of lung carcinoma resulted in a 1.8-fold increase in accumulated PpIX. Long-term genistein treatment stimulated the expression of genes encoding enzymes involved in PpIX synthesis, such as porphobilinogen deaminase, uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase, and protoporphyrinogen oxidase. Accordingly, the rate of PpIX synthesis was also accelerated by genistein pretreatment. Thus, our results suggest that genistein treatment effectively enhances ALA-induced PpIX accumulation by preventing the ABCG2-mediated efflux of PpIX from lung cancer cells and may represent a promising strategy to improve ALA-based diagnostic approaches in a broader set of malignancies. Cancer Res; 76(7); 1837-46. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26837765

  9. Genistein reduced insulin resistance index through modulating lipid metabolism in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Choi, Joo Sun; Koh, In-Uk; Song, Jihyun

    2012-11-01

    Postmenopausal women are at higher risk for obesity and insulin resistance due to the decline of estrogen, but genistein, a phytoestrogen, may reduce the risks of these diet-related diseases. In this study, we hypothesized that supplemental genistein has beneficial effects on insulin resistance in an ovariectomized rat model by modulating lipid metabolism. Three weeks after a sham surgery (sham) or an ovariectomy (OVX), ovariectomized Sprague-Dawley rats were placed on a diet containing 0 (OVX group) or 0.1% genistein for 4 weeks. The sham rats were fed a high-fat diet containing 0% genistein and served as the control group (sham group). The ovariectomized rats showed increases in body weight and insulin resistance index, but genistein reduced insulin resistance index and the activity of hepatic fatty acid synthetase. Genistein was also associated with increased activity of succinate dehydrogenase and carnitine palmitoyltransferase and the rate of β-oxidation in the fat tissue of rats. The ovariectomized rats given genistein had smaller-sized adipocytes. Using gene-set enrichment analysis (GSEA) of microarray data, we found that a number of gene sets of fatty acid metabolism, insulin resistance, and oxidative stress were differentially expressed by OVX and reversed by genistein. This systemic approach of GSEA enables the identification of such consensus between the gene expression changes and phenotypic changes caused by OVX and genistein supplementation. Genistein treatment could help reduce insulin resistance through the amelioration of OVX-induced metabolic dysfunction, and the GSEA approach may be useful in proposing putative targets related to insulin resistance. PMID:23176795

  10. Perinatal exposure to genistein, a soy phytoestrogen, improves spatial learning and memory but impairs passive avoidance learning and memory in offspring.

    PubMed

    Kohara, Yumi; Kuwahara, Rika; Kawaguchi, Shinichiro; Jojima, Takeshi; Yamashita, Kimihiro

    2014-05-10

    This study investigated the effects of perinatal genistein (GEN) exposure on the central nervous system of rat offspring. Pregnant dams orally received GEN (1 or 10 mg/kg/day) or vehicle (1 ml/kg/day) from gestation day 10 to postnatal day 14. In order to assess the effects of GEN on rat offspring, we used a battery of behavioral tests, including the open-field, elevated plus-maze, MAZE and step-through passive avoidance tests. MAZE test is an appetite-motivation test, and we used this mainly for assessing spatial learning and memory. In the MAZE test, GEN groups exhibited shorter latency from start to goal than the vehicle-treated group in both sexes. On the other hand, performances in the step-through passive avoidance test were non-monotonically inhibited by GEN in both sexes, and a significant difference was observed in low dose of the GEN-treated group compared to the vehicle-treated group in female rats. Furthermore, we found that perinatal exposure to GEN did not significantly alter locomotor activity or emotionality as assessed by the open-field and elevated-plus maze tests. These results suggest that perinatal exposure to GEN improved spatial learning and memory of rat offspring, but impaired their passive avoidance learning and memory. PMID:24637062

  11. Genistein enhances the cisplatin-induced inhibition of cell growth and apoptosis in human malignant melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Shingo; Bito, Toshinori; Ichihashi, Masamitsu; Ueda, Masato

    2003-10-01

    Genistein, a naturally occurring isoflavone found chiefly in soybeans, has been reported to be a potent antitumor agent. Genistein is presumed to exert multiple effects related to the inhibition of cancer growth. Metastatic melanoma is a chemotherapy-refractory neoplasm. The present study was designed to explore the possible activity of genistein to inhibit the aberrant proliferation and to induce apoptosis of human malignant melanoma cells in cooperation with cisplatin treatment. Five human melanoma cell lines were utilized for these experiments. Genistein at physiologic concentrations (20 microM) did not induce apoptosis by itself but did enhance cisplatin-induced apoptosis in all five human melanoma cell lines tested. The enhanced susceptibility among the cell lines was diverse. Changes in the expression of two anti-apoptotic proteins, bcl-2 and bcl-xL, and one pro-apoptotic protein, apoptotic protease activating factor-1 (Apaf-1), were examined. Genistein alone or cisplatin alone generally did not alter bcl-2 expression or bcl-xL expression, but slightly increased Apaf-1 in some cell lines. The combined treatment with genistein and cisplatin significantly reduced bcl-2 and bcl-xL protein and increased Apaf-1 protein expression. These data suggest that genistein therapy may enhance the chemosensitivity of melanoma patients. PMID:12950722

  12. Genistein induces adipogenic differentiation in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and suppresses their osteogenic potential by upregulating PPARγ

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, LI-YAN; XUE, HAO-GANG; CHEN, JI-YING; CHAI, WEI; NI, MING

    2016-01-01

    Genistein is a soy isoflavone that exists in the form of an aglycone. It is the primary active component in soy isoflavone and has a number of biological activities (anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative). However, the specific effect of genistein on human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) remains unclear. In the present study, the mechanism underlying the effect of genistein on the suppression of BMSC adipogenic differentiation and the enhancement of osteogenic potential was investigated using an MTT assay. It was observed that genistein significantly increased BMSC cell proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner (P<0.01). In addition, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that genistein significantly inhibited the expression of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), type I collagen (Col I) and osteocalcin (OC; P<0.01). Furthermore, 20 µm genistein significantly inhibited the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and increased the activity of triglycerides (TGs) increased (P<0.01) as determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Finally, western blotting revealed that BMSC pretreatment with 20 µm genistein significantly increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) protein expression (P<0.01). This suggests that the downregulation of PPARγ may significantly reduce the effect of genistein on cell proliferation, suppress the expression of Runx2, Col I and OC mRNA, and reduce ALP and promote TG activity in BMSCs. Thus, the results of the present study conclude that genistein induces adipogenic differentiation in human BMSCs and suppresses their osteogenic potential by upregulating the expression of PPARγ. In conclusion, genistein may be a promising candidate drug for treatment against osteogenesis. PMID:27168816

  13. Peripheral microvascular vasodilatory response to estradiol and genistein in women with insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wenner, Megan M.; Taylor, Hugh S.; Stachenfeld, Nina S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Estradiol enhances vasodilation in healthy women, but vascular effects of the phytoestrogen genistein are still under investigation. Insulin resistance (IR) compromises microvascular function. We therefore examined the interaction of estradiol, genistein, and IR on microvascular vasodilatory responsiveness. Methods We hypothesized that estradiol and genistein increase microvascular vasodilation in healthy women (control, n=8, 23±2 yr, BMI 25.9±2.9 kg/m2) but not in women with IR (n=7, 20±1 yr, BMI 27.3±3.0 kg/m2). We used the cutaneous circulation as a model of microvascular vasodilatory function. We determined cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) with laser Doppler flowmetry and beat-to-beat blood pressure during local cutaneous heating (42°C) with estradiol or genistein microdialysis perfusions. Because heat induced vasodilation is primarily an NO mediated response, we examined microvascular vasodilation with and without L-NMMA. Results In control women, estradiol enhanced CVC (94.4±2.6 % vs. saline 81.6±4.2 % CVCmax, P<0.05), which was reversed with L-NMMA (80.9±7.8 % CVCmax, P<0.05), but genistein did not affect vasodilation. Neither estradiol nor genistein altered CVC in IR, although L-NMMA attenuated CVC during genistein. Conclusions Our study does not support improved microvascular responsiveness during genistein exposure in healthy young women, and demonstrates that neither estradiol nor genistein improve microvascular vasodilatory responsiveness in women with IR. PMID:25996650

  14. The enhancing effect of genistein on apoptosis induced by trichostatin A in lung cancer cells with wild type p53 genes is associated with upregulation of histone acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tzu-Chin; Lin, Yi-Chin; Chen, Hsiao-Ling; Huang, Pei-Ru; Liu, Shang-Yu; Yeh, Shu-Lan

    2016-02-01

    Genistein has been shown to enhance the antitumor activity of trichostatin A (TSA) in human lung carcinoma A549 cells. However, whether the combined treatment exerts the same effect in other lung cancer cells is unclear. In the present study we first compared the enhancing effect of genistein on the antitumor effect of TSA in ABC-1, NCI-H460 (H460) and A549 cells. Second, we investigated whether the effects of genistein are associated with increased histone/non-histone protein acetylation. We found that the enhancing effect of genistein on cell-growth-arrest in ABC-1 cells (p53 mutant) was less than in A549 and H460 cells. Genistein enhanced TSA induced apoptosis in A549 and H460 cells rather than in ABC-1 cells. After silencing p53 expression in A549 and H460 cells, the enhancing effect of genistein was diminished. In addition, genistein increased TSA-induced histone H3/H4 acetylation in A549 and H460 cells. Genistein also increased p53 acetylation in H460 cells. The inhibitor of acetyltransferase, anacardic acid, diminished the enhancing effect of genistein on all TSA-induced histone/p53 acetylation and apoptosis. Genistein in combination with TSA increased the expression of p300 protein, an acetyltransferase, in A549 and NCI-H460 cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that genistein also enhanced the antitumor effect of genistein in A549-tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, these results suggest that the enhancing effects of genistein on TSA-induced apoptosis in lung cancer cells were p53-dependent and were associated with histone/non-histone protein acetylation. PMID:26768552

  15. Opposite effects of genistein on the regulation of insulin-mediated glucose homeostasis in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Wang, M; Gao, X J; Zhao, W W; Zhao, W J; Jiang, C H; Huang, F; Kou, J P; Liu, B L; Liu, K

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Genistein is an isoflavone phytoestrogen found in a number of plants such as soybeans and there is accumulating evidence that it has beneficial effects on the regulation of glucose homeostasis. In this study we evaluated the effect of genistein on glucose homeostasis and its underlying mechanisms in normal and insulin-resistant conditions. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH To induce insulin resistance, mice or differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with macrophage-derived conditioned medium. A glucose tolerance test was used to investigate the effect of genistein. Insulin signalling activation, glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4) translocation and AMP-activated PK (AMPK) activation were detected by Western blot analysis or elisa. KEY RESULTS Genistein impaired glucose tolerance and attenuated insulin sensitivity in normal mice by inhibiting the insulin-induced phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) at tyrosine residues, leading to inhibition of insulin-mediated GLUT4 translocation in adipocytes. Mac-CM, an inflammatory stimulus induced glucose intolerance accompanied by impaired insulin sensitivity; genistein reversed these changes by restoring the disturbed IRS1 function, leading to an improvement in GLUT4 translocation. In addition, genistein increased AMPK activity under both normal and inflammatory conditions; this was shown to contribute to the anti-inflammatory effect of genistein, which leads to an improvement in insulin signalling and the amelioration of insulin resistance. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Genistein showed opposite effects on insulin sensitivity under normal and inflammatory conditions in adipose tissue and this action was derived from its negative or positive regulation of IRS1 function. Its up-regulation of AMPK activity contributes to the inhibition of inflammation implicated in insulin resistance. PMID:23763311

  16. Genistein prevents ultraviolet B radiation-induced nitrosative skin injury and promotes cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Terra, V A; Souza-Neto, F P; Frade, M A C; Ramalho, L N Z; Andrade, T A M; Pasta, A A C; Conchon, A C; Guedes, F A; Luiz, R C; Cecchini, R; Cecchini, A L

    2015-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) levels increase considerably after 24h of exposure of skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation, which leads to nitrosative skin injury. In addition, increased NO levels after exposure to UVB radiation are associated with inhibition of cell proliferation. Compared to the UV-control group, UV-genistein at 10 mg/kg (UV-GEN10) group showed tissue protection, decreased lipid peroxide and nitrotyrosine formation, and low CAT activity. Furthermore, NO levels and iNOS labeling remained high. In this group, the reduction in lipid peroxides and nitrotyrosine was accompanied by upregulation of cell proliferation factors (Ki67 and PCNA), which indicated that prevention of nitrosative skin injury promoted cell proliferation and DNA repair. Genistein also prevented nitrosative events, inhibited ONOO(-) formation, which leads to tissue protection and cell proliferation. The UV-GEN15 group did not result in a greater protective effect compared to that with UV-GEN10 group. In the UV-GEN15 group, histological examination of the epidermis showed morphological alterations without efficient protection against lipid peroxide formation, as well as inhibition of Ki67 and PCNA, and VEGF labeling, which suggested inhibition of cell proliferation. These results help to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the photoprotective effect of genistein and reveal the importance of UVB radiation-induced nitrosative damage. PMID:25668145

  17. In utero exposure to di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate induces testicular effects in neonatal rats that are antagonized by genistein cotreatment.

    PubMed

    Jones, Steven; Boisvert, Annie; Francois, Sade; Zhang, Liandong; Culty, Martine

    2015-10-01

    Fetal exposure to endocrine disruptors (EDs) is believed to predispose males to reproductive abnormalities. Although males are exposed to combinations of chemicals, few studies have evaluated the effects of ED mixtures at environmentally relevant doses. Our previous work showed that fetal exposure to a mixture of the phytoestrogen genistein (GEN) and the plasticizer di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) induced unique alterations in adult testis. In this follow-up study, we examined Postnatal Day 3 (PND3) and PND6 male offspring exposed from Gestational Day 14 to parturition to corn oil, 10mg/kg GEN, DEHP, or their combination, to gain insight into the early molecular events driving long-term alterations. DEHP stimulated the mRNA and protein expression of the steroidogenic enzyme HSD3B, uniquely at PND3. DEHP also increased the mRNA expression of Nestin, a Leydig progenitor/Sertoli cell marker, and markers of Sertoli cell (Wt1), gonocyte (Plzf, Foxo1), and proliferation (Pcna) at PND3, while these genes were unchanged by the mixture. Redox (Nqo1, Sod2, Sod3, Trx, Gst, Cat) and xenobiotic transporter (Abcb1b, Abcg2) gene expression was also increased by DEHP at PND3, while attenuated when combined with GEN, suggesting the involvement of cellular stress in short-term DEHP effects and a protective effect of GEN. The direct effects of GEN and mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, the principal bioactive metabolite of DEHP, on testis were investigated in PND3 organ cultures, showing a stimulatory effect of 10 μM mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate on basal testosterone production that was normalized by GEN. These effects contrasted with previous reports of androgen suppression and decreased gene expression in perinatal rat testis by high DEHP doses, implying that neonatal effects are not predictive of adult effects. We propose that GEN, through an antioxidant action, normalizes reactive oxygen species-induced neonatal effects of DEHP. The notion that these EDs do not follow classical

  18. Dietary genistein stimulates mammary development in gilts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The possible role of the phytoestrogen, genistein, on prepubertal development of mammary glands, hormonal status and bone resorption was investigated in gilts. Forty-five gilts were fed a control diet containing soya (CTLS, n = 15), a control diet without soya (CTL0, n = 15) or the CTLS diet supplem...

  19. Liver X Receptor alpha Mediated Genistein Induction of Human Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) in Hep G2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yue; Zhang, Shunfen; Zhou, Tianyan; Huang, Chaoqun; McLaughlin, Alicia; Chen, Guangping

    2013-01-01

    Cytosolic sulfotransferases are one of the major families of phase II drug metabolizing enzymes. Sulfotransferase-catalyzed sulfonation regulates hormone activities, metabolizes drugs, detoxifies xenobiotics, and bioactivates carcinogens. Human dehydroepiandrosterone sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) plays important biological roles by sulfating endogenous hydroxysteroids and exogenous xenobiotics. Genistein, mainly existing in soy food products, is a naturally occurring phytoestrogen with both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential. Our previous studies have shown that genistein significantly induces hSULT2A1 in Hep G2 and Caco-2 cells. In this study, we investigated the roles of liver X receptor (LXRα) in the genistein induction of hSULT2A1. LXRs have been shown to induce expression of mouse Sult2a9 and hSULT2A1 gene. Our results demonstrate that LXRα mediates the genistein induction of hSULT2A1, supported by Western blot analysis results, hSULT2A1 promoter driven luciferase reporter gene assay results, and mRNA interference results. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay results demonstrate that genistein increase the recruitment of hLXRα binding to the hSULT2A1 promoter. These results suggest that hLXRα plays an important role in the hSULT2A1 gene regulation. The biological functions of phytoestrogens may partially relate to their induction activity toward hydroxysteroid SULT. PMID:23352501

  20. Effect of Genistein on reproductive parameter and serum nitric oxide levels in morphine-treated mice

    PubMed Central

    Jalili, Cyrus; Ahmadi, Sharareh; Roshankhah, Shiva; Salahshoor, MohammadReza

    2016-01-01

    Background: The predominant phytoestrogen in soy and derived products is the isoflavone Genistein. Genistein has antioxidant properties. Morphine is a main psychoactive chemical in opium that can increase the generation of free radicals and therefore it could adversely affects the spermatogenesis. Objective: The main goal was to investigate whether the Genistein could protect morphine adverse effects on sperm cells viability, count, motility, and testis histology and testosterone hormone and nitric oxide in blood serum. Materials and Methods: In this study, various doses of Genistein (0, 1, 2, and 3 mg/kg) and Genistein plus morphine (0, 1, 2, and 3 mg/kg) were administered interaperitoneally to 48 male mice for 30 consequent days. These mice were randomly assigned to 8 groups (n=6) and sperm parameters (sperm cells viability, count, motility and morphology), testis weight and histology, testosterone hormone (ELISA method), FSH and LH hormones (immunoradiometry) and serum nitric oxide (griess assay) were analyzed and compared. Results: The results indicated that morphine administration significantly decreased testosterone (0.03 ng/mg) LH and FSH level, histological parameters, count, viability (55.3%), morphology and motility of sperm cells (1%), testis weight (0.08 gr) and increase nitric oxide compared to saline group (p=0.00). However, administration of Genistein and Genistein plus morphine significantly boosted motility, morphology, count, viability of sperm cells, seminiferous tubules diameter, germinal thickness, testosterone, LH and FSH while decrease nitric oxide level in all groups compared to morphine group (p<0.025). Conclusion: It seems that Genistein administration could increase the quality of spermatozoa and prevent morphine- induced adverse effects on sperm parameters. PMID:27200423

  1. Mitigation of radiation-induced lung injury by Genistein and EUK-207

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, J; Jelveh, S; Calveley, V; Zaidi, A; Doctrow, SR; Hill, RP

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We examined the effects of genistein and/or Eukarion (EUK)-207 on radiation-induced lung damage and investigated whether treatment for 0–14 weeks (wks) post-irradiation (PI) would mitigate late lung injury. Materials and Methods The lungs of female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were irradiated with 10 Gy. EUK-207 was delivered by infusion and genistein was delivered as a dietary supplement starting immediately after irradiation (PI) and continuing until 14 wks PI. Rats were sacrificed at 0, 4, 8, 14 and 28 wks PI. Breathing rate was monitored and lung fibrosis assessed by lung hydroxyproline content at 28 wks. DNA damage was assessed by micronucleus (MN) assay and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels. The expression of the cytokines Interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, Tumor necrotic factor (TNF)-α and Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and macrophage activation were analysed by immunohistochemistry. Results Increases in breathing rate observed in the irradiated rats were significantly reduced by both drug treatments during the pneumonitis phase and the later fibrosis phase. The drug treatments decreased micronuclei (MN) formation from 4–14 wks but by 28 wks the MN levels had increased again. The 8-OHdG levels were lower in the drug treated animals at all time points. Hydroxyproline content and levels of activated macrophages were decreased at 28 wks in all drug treated rats. The treatments had limited effects on the expression of the cytokines. Conclusion Genistein, and EUK-207 can provide partial mitigation of radiation-induced lung damage out to at least 28 wks PI even after cessation of treatment at 14 wks PI. PMID:21675818

  2. Behavioral changes in fish exposed to phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, Ethan D; Rodriguez, Alison C

    2006-12-01

    We investigated the behavioral effects of exposure to waterborne phytoestrogens in male fighting fish, Betta splendens. Adult fish were exposed to a range of concentrations of genistein, equol, beta-sitosterol, and the positive control 17beta-estradiol. The following behaviors were measured: spontaneous swimming activity, latency to respond to a perceived intruder (mirror reflection), intensity of aggressive response toward a perceived intruder, probability of constructing a nest in the presence of a female, and the size of the nest constructed. We found few changes in spontaneous swimming activity, the latency to respond to the mirror, and nest size, and modest changes in the probability of constructing a nest. There were significant decreases, however, in the intensity of aggressive behavior toward the mirror following exposure to several concentrations, including environmentally relevant ones, of 17beta-estradiol, genistein, and equol. This suggests that phytoestrogen contamination has the potential to significantly affect the behavior of free-living fishes. PMID:16584819

  3. Roles of Dietary Phytoestrogens on the Regulation of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Diverse Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Geum-A.; Hwang, Kyung-A.; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a key role in tumor progression. The cells undergoing EMT upregulate the expression of cell motility-related proteins and show enhanced migration and invasion. The hallmarks of EMT in cancer cells include changed cell morphology and increased metastatic capabilities in cell migration and invasion. Therefore, prevention of EMT is an important tool for the inhibition of tumor metastasis. A novel preventive therapy is needed, such as treatment of natural dietary substances that are nontoxic to normal human cells, but effective in inhibiting cancer cells. Phytoestrogens, such as genistein, resveratrol, kaempferol and 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM), can be raised as possible candidates. They are plant-derived dietary estrogens, which are found in tea, vegetables and fruits, and are known to have various biological efficacies, including chemopreventive activity against cancers. Specifically, these phytoestrogens may induce not only anti-proliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, but also anti-metastasis by inhibiting the EMT process in various cancer cells. There have been several signaling pathways found to be associated with the induction of the EMT process in cancer cells. Phytoestrogens were demonstrated to have chemopreventive effects on cancer metastasis by inhibiting EMT-associated pathways, such as Notch-1 and TGF-beta signaling. As a result, phytoestrogens can inhibit or reverse the EMT process by upregulating the expression of epithelial phenotypes, including E-cadherin, and downregulating the expression of mesenchymal phenotypes, including N-cadherin, Snail, Slug, and vimentin. In this review, we focused on the important roles of phytoestrogens in inhibiting EMT in many types of cancer and suggested phytoestrogens as prominent alternative compounds to chemotherapy. PMID:27231938

  4. Roles of Dietary Phytoestrogens on the Regulation of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Diverse Cancer Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Geum-A; Hwang, Kyung-A; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a key role in tumor progression. The cells undergoing EMT upregulate the expression of cell motility-related proteins and show enhanced migration and invasion. The hallmarks of EMT in cancer cells include changed cell morphology and increased metastatic capabilities in cell migration and invasion. Therefore, prevention of EMT is an important tool for the inhibition of tumor metastasis. A novel preventive therapy is needed, such as treatment of natural dietary substances that are nontoxic to normal human cells, but effective in inhibiting cancer cells. Phytoestrogens, such as genistein, resveratrol, kaempferol and 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM), can be raised as possible candidates. They are plant-derived dietary estrogens, which are found in tea, vegetables and fruits, and are known to have various biological efficacies, including chemopreventive activity against cancers. Specifically, these phytoestrogens may induce not only anti-proliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, but also anti-metastasis by inhibiting the EMT process in various cancer cells. There have been several signaling pathways found to be associated with the induction of the EMT process in cancer cells. Phytoestrogens were demonstrated to have chemopreventive effects on cancer metastasis by inhibiting EMT-associated pathways, such as Notch-1 and TGF-beta signaling. As a result, phytoestrogens can inhibit or reverse the EMT process by upregulating the expression of epithelial phenotypes, including E-cadherin, and downregulating the expression of mesenchymal phenotypes, including N-cadherin, Snail, Slug, and vimentin. In this review, we focused on the important roles of phytoestrogens in inhibiting EMT in many types of cancer and suggested phytoestrogens as prominent alternative compounds to chemotherapy. PMID:27231938

  5. Phytoestrogens and Mycoestrogens Induce Signature Structure Dynamics Changes on Estrogen Receptor α.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueyan; Uzuner, Ugur; Li, Man; Shi, Weibing; Yuan, Joshua S; Dai, Susie Y

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine disrupters include a broad spectrum of chemicals such as industrial chemicals, natural estrogens and androgens, synthetic estrogens and androgens. Phytoestrogens are widely present in diet and food supplements; mycoestrogens are frequently found in grains. As human beings and animals are commonly exposed to phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens in diet and environment, it is important to understand the potential beneficial or hazardous effects of estrogenic compounds. Many bioassays have been established to study the binding of estrogenic compounds with estrogen receptor (ER) and provided rich data in the literature. However, limited assays can offer structure information with regard to the ligand/ER complex. Our current study surveys the global structure dynamics changes for ERα ligand binding domain (LBD) when phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens bind. The assay is based on the structure dynamics information probed by hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and offers a unique viewpoint to elucidate the mechanism how phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens interact with estrogen receptor. The cluster analysis based on the hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX) assay data reveals a unique pattern when phytoestrogens and mycoestrogens bind with ERα LBD compared to that of estradiol and synthetic estrogen modulators. Our study highlights that structure dynamics could play an important role in the structure function relationship when endocrine disrupters interact with estrogen receptors. PMID:27589781

  6. Genistein genotoxicity: Critical considerations of in vitro exposure dose

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Catherine B. King, Audrey A.

    2007-10-01

    The potential health benefits of soy-derived phytoestrogens include their reported utility as anticarcinogens, cardioprotectants and as hormone replacement alternatives in menopause. Although there is increasing popularity of dietary phytoestrogen supplementation and of vegetarian and vegan diets among adolescents and adults, concerns about potential detrimental or other genotoxic effects persist. While a variety of genotoxic effects of phytoestrogens have been reported in vitro, the concentrations at which such effects occurred were often much higher than the physiologically relevant doses achievable by dietary or pharmacologic intake of soy foods or supplements. This review focuses on in vitro studies of the most abundant soy phytoestrogen, genistein, critically examining dose as a crucial determinant of cellular effects. In consideration of levels of dietary genistein uptake and bioavailability we have defined in vitro concentrations of genistein > 5 {mu}M as non-physiological, and thus 'high' doses, in contrast to much of the previous literature. In doing so, many of the often-cited genotoxic effects of genistein, including apoptosis, cell growth inhibition, topoisomerase inhibition and others become less obvious. Recent cellular, epigenetic and microarray studies are beginning to decipher genistein effects that occur at dietarily relevant low concentrations. In toxicology, the well accepted principle of 'the dose defines the poison' applies to many toxicants and can be invoked, as herein, to distinguish genotoxic versus potentially beneficial in vitro effects of natural dietary products such as genistein.

  7. Genistein genotoxicity: critical considerations of in vitro exposure dose.

    PubMed

    Klein, Catherine B; King, Audrey A

    2007-10-01

    The potential health benefits of soy-derived phytoestrogens include their reported utility as anticarcinogens, cardioprotectants and as hormone replacement alternatives in menopause. Although there is increasing popularity of dietary phytoestrogen supplementation and of vegetarian and vegan diets among adolescents and adults, concerns about potential detrimental or other genotoxic effects persist. While a variety of genotoxic effects of phytoestrogens have been reported in vitro, the concentrations at which such effects occurred were often much higher than the physiologically relevant doses achievable by dietary or pharmacologic intake of soy foods or supplements. This review focuses on in vitro studies of the most abundant soy phytoestrogen, genistein, critically examining dose as a crucial determinant of cellular effects. In consideration of levels of dietary genistein uptake and bioavailability we have defined in vitro concentrations of genistein >5 microM as non-physiological, and thus "high" doses, in contrast to much of the previous literature. In doing so, many of the often-cited genotoxic effects of genistein, including apoptosis, cell growth inhibition, topoisomerase inhibition and others become less obvious. Recent cellular, epigenetic and microarray studies are beginning to decipher genistein effects that occur at dietarily relevant low concentrations. In toxicology, the well accepted principle of "the dose defines the poison" applies to many toxicants and can be invoked, as herein, to distinguish genotoxic versus potentially beneficial in vitro effects of natural dietary products such as genistein. PMID:17688899

  8. Coexposure to Phytoestrogens and Bisphenol A Mimics Estrogenic Effects in an Additive Manner

    PubMed Central

    Katchy, Anne; Pinto, Caroline; Williams, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC) are abundant in our environment. A number of EDCs, including bisphenol A (BPA) can bind to the estrogen receptors (ER), ERα and ERβ, and may contribute to estrogen-linked diseases such as breast cancer. Early exposure is of particular concern; many EDCs cross the placenta and infants have measurable levels of, eg, BPA. In addition, infants are frequently fed soy-based formula (SF) that contains phytoestrogens. Effects of combined exposure to xeno- and phytoestrogens are poorly studied. Here, we extensively compared to what extent BPA, genistein, and an extract of infant SF mimic estrogen-induced gene transcription and cell proliferation. We investigated ligand-specific effects on ER activation in HeLa-ERα and ERβ reporter cells; on proliferation, genome-wide gene regulation and non-ER–mediated effects in MCF7 breast cancer cells; and how coexposure influenced these effects. The biological relevance was explored using enrichment analyses of differentially regulated genes and clustering with clinical breast cancer profiles. We demonstrate that coexposure to BPA and genistein, or SF, results in increased functional and transcriptional estrogenic effects. Using statistical modeling, we determine that BPA and phytoestrogens act in an additive manner. The proliferative and transcriptional effects of the tested compounds mimic those of 17β-estradiol, and are abolished by cotreatment with an ER antagonist. Gene expression profiles induced by each compound clustered with poor prognosis breast cancer, indicating that exposure may adversely affect breast cancer prognosis. This study accentuates that coexposure to BPA and soy-based phytoestrogens results in additive estrogenic effects, and may contribute to estrogen-linked diseases, including breast cancer. PMID:24284790

  9. Coexposure to phytoestrogens and bisphenol a mimics estrogenic effects in an additive manner.

    PubMed

    Katchy, Anne; Pinto, Caroline; Jonsson, Philip; Nguyen-Vu, Trang; Pandelova, Marchela; Riu, Anne; Schramm, Karl-Werner; Samarov, Daniel; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Bondesson, Maria; Williams, Cecilia

    2014-03-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC) are abundant in our environment. A number of EDCs, including bisphenol A (BPA) can bind to the estrogen receptors (ER), ERα and ERβ, and may contribute to estrogen-linked diseases such as breast cancer. Early exposure is of particular concern; many EDCs cross the placenta and infants have measurable levels of, eg, BPA. In addition, infants are frequently fed soy-based formula (SF) that contains phytoestrogens. Effects of combined exposure to xeno- and phytoestrogens are poorly studied. Here, we extensively compared to what extent BPA, genistein, and an extract of infant SF mimic estrogen-induced gene transcription and cell proliferation. We investigated ligand-specific effects on ER activation in HeLa-ERα and ERβ reporter cells; on proliferation, genome-wide gene regulation and non-ER-mediated effects in MCF7 breast cancer cells; and how coexposure influenced these effects. The biological relevance was explored using enrichment analyses of differentially regulated genes and clustering with clinical breast cancer profiles. We demonstrate that coexposure to BPA and genistein, or SF, results in increased functional and transcriptional estrogenic effects. Using statistical modeling, we determine that BPA and phytoestrogens act in an additive manner. The proliferative and transcriptional effects of the tested compounds mimic those of 17β-estradiol, and are abolished by cotreatment with an ER antagonist. Gene expression profiles induced by each compound clustered with poor prognosis breast cancer, indicating that exposure may adversely affect breast cancer prognosis. This study accentuates that coexposure to BPA and soy-based phytoestrogens results in additive estrogenic effects, and may contribute to estrogen-linked diseases, including breast cancer. PMID:24284790

  10. Genistein Attenuates Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis and Increases Hepatic PPARγ in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Susutlertpanya, Warinda; Werawatganon, Duangporn; Siriviriyakul, Prasong; Klaikeaw, Naruemon

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) has become a global chronic liver disease, but no effective medicine has been proven to cure it. This study investigated the protective effects of genistein, a phytoestrogen, on NASH and examined whether it has any effect on hepatic PPARγ. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: control group fed ad libitum with standard rat diet, NASH group fed ad libitum with high-fat diet to induce NASH and NASH + Gen8 group and NASH + Gen16 group fed with high-fat diet plus intragastric administration of 8 or 16 mg/kg genistein once daily. After 6 weeks, liver samples were collected to determine MDA, TNF-α, PPARγ, and histopathology. The findings were that levels of hepatic MDA and TNF-α increased in NASH group, but 16 mg/kg genistein reduced these levels significantly. Downregulation of hepatic PPARγ was observed in NASH group, but genistein significantly upregulated the expression of PPARγ in both NASH + Gen groups. The histological appearance of liver in NASH group presented pathological features of steatohepatitis which were diminished in both NASH + Gen groups. The results suggest that genistein attenuates the liver histopathology of NASH with upregulation of hepatic PPARγ, reduction of oxidative stress, and inhibition of inflammatory cytokine. PMID:26246839

  11. Sex hormone modulation of both induction and inhibition of CYP1A by genistein in HepG2/C3A cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yitong; Santillo, Michael F; Flynn, Thomas J; Ferguson, Martine S

    2015-04-01

    Genistein is a widely consumed phytoestrogen in dietary supplements and has been reported to play roles in both cancer prevention and promotion. These conflicting effects may be complicated by sex differences. Cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) participates in carcinogen activation and detoxification, and the enzyme may interact with genistein. Therefore, modulation of CYP1A by a combination of genistein and sex hormones could be responsible for sex differences related to cancer prevention and promotion. In the current study, a human liver cell line, HepG2/C3A, cultured in sex hormone-supplemented media was used to investigate the modulatory effect of genistein on CYP1A gene expression and activity. Genistein exerted both long-term (72 h) induction and short-term (immediate) inhibition of CYP1A activity in HepG2/C3A cells. In the long-term study, CYP1A gene expression and enzyme activity were induced to a greater extent in male hormone-supplemented cells than female ones. In the short-term study, CYP1A activity was inhibited more strongly by genistein in the male hormone-supplemented cells than in the female hormone-supplemented cells. These significant differences suggest that male hormones can modulate the effects of genistein on CYP1A gene expression and activity. PMID:25479735

  12. Genistein inhibits TNF-α-induced endothelial inflammation through the protein kinase pathway A and improves vascular inflammation in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhenquan; Babu, Pon Velayutham Anandh; Si, Hongwei; Nallasamy, Palanisamy; Zhu, Hong; Zhen, Wei; Misra, Hara P; Li, Yunbo; Liu, Dongmin

    2013-10-01

    Genistein, a soy isoflavone, has received wide attention for its potential to improve vascular function, but the mechanism of this effect is unclear. Here, we report that genistein at physiological concentrations (0.1 μM-5 μM) significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced adhesion of monocytes to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, a key event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Genistein also significantly suppressed TNF-α-induced production of adhesion molecules and chemokines such as sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, sE-Selectin, MCP-1 and IL-8, which play key role in the firm adhesion of monocytes to activated endothelial cells (ECs). Genistein at physiologically relevant concentrations didn't significantly induce antioxidant enzyme activities or scavenge free radicals. Further, blocking the estrogen receptors (ERs) in ECs didn't alter the preventive effect of genistein on endothelial inflammation. However, inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) significantly attenuated the inhibitory effects of genistein on TNF-α-induced monocyte adhesion to ECs as well as the production of MCP-1 and IL-8. In animal study, dietary genistein significantly suppressed TNF-α-induced increase in circulating chemokines and adhesion molecules in C57BL/6 mice. Genistein treatment also reduced VCAM-1 and monocytes-derived F4/80-positive macrophages in the aorta of TNF-α-treated mice. In conclusion, genistein protects against TNF-α-induced vascular endothelial inflammation both in vitro and in vivo models. This anti-inflammatory effect of genistein is independent of the ER-mediated signaling machinery or antioxidant activity, but mediated via the PKA signaling pathway. PMID:23587398

  13. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation is not required for genistein-induced FAK-beta-1-integrin complex formation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Kyle, E; Lieberman, R; Crowell, J; Kellof, G; Bergan, R C

    2000-01-01

    It has previously been shown that changes in the activity of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and its binding to beta-1-integrin, accompany genistein-induced adhesion of prostate cells. Consumption of genistein world wide is associated with a lower incidence of metastatic prostate cancer. Early human clinical trials of genistein are under way to evaluate genistein's potential causal role in this regard. Though an important cell adhesion-associated signaling molecule, FAK's role in regulating prostate cell adhesion was not clear. Elucidation of this process would provide important information relating to both biology and potential clinical endpoints. It was hypothesized that FAK activation and complex formation are temporally related in prostate cells, and can thus be separated. Significant activation of FAK was demonstrated when cells adhered to fibronectin, as compared to poly-L-lysine, thus demonstrating that beta-1-integrin plays a significant role in activating FAK. Neither FAK activation, nor FAK-integrin complex formation, required beta-1-integrin ligand. However, disruption of the cellular cytoskeleton by cytochalasin D prevented FAK activation, but did not block genistein-induced complex formation. In the face of a disrupted cytoskeleton, signaling through FAK could not be restored through either integrin cross linking, or re-establishment of tensile forces via attachment to solid matrix. These studies demonstrate that FAK-beta-1-integrin complex formation does not require FAK activation, suggesting that it is an early event in prostate cell adhesion. An intact cytoskeleton is necessary for FAK activation. The functional importance of beta-1-integrin in prostate cells is demonstrated. Current findings support plans to test genistein in prostate cancer. PMID:11315093

  14. Comparison of the effects of melatonin and genistein on radiation-induced nephrotoxicity: Results of an experimental study

    PubMed Central

    CANYILMAZ, EMINE; USLU, GONCA HANEDAN; BAHAT, ZUMRUT; KANDAZ, MUSTAFA; MUNGAN, SEVDEGUL; HACIISLAMOGLU, EMEL; MENTESE, AHMET; YONEY, ADNAN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of melatonin and genistein on radiation-induced nephrotoxicity (RIN). A total of 70 Swiss Albino mice were divided into 7 groups. Five control groups were defined, which were sham irradiation (C, G1), radiation therapy only (RT, G2), melatonin (M, G3), genistein (G, G4) and polyethylene glycol-400 (G5), respectively. The co-treatment groups were the RT plus melatonin (RT+M, G6) and RT plus genistein (RT+G, G7) groups. Irradiation was applied using a cobalt-60 teletherapy machine (80-cm fixed source-to-surface distance, 2.5-cm depth). Melatonin was administered (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection) 30 min before the single dose of irradiation, whereas genistein was administered (200 mg/kg, subcutaneous injection) 1 day before the single dose of irradiation. All the mice were sacrificed 6 months after irradiation. As an end point, the extent of renal tubular atrophy for each mouse was quantified with image analysis of histological sections of the kidney. Tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were also measured in each animal. In the histopathological examination of the mouse kidneys, there was a statistically significant reduction (P<0.05) in the presence of tubular atrophy between the RT+M and RT+G groups and the RT group. There was a statistically significant increase in MDA levels in the irradiated versus sham groups (RT vs. C; P<0.05); however, MDA levels were significantly decreased by co-treatment with melatonin or genistein vs. RT alone (RT+M and RT+G vs. RT; P<0.05). In conclusion, the present experimental study showed that melatonin and genistein supplementation prior to irradiation-protected mice against RIN, which may have therapeutic implications for radiation-induced injuries. PMID:26870332

  15. Liver X receptor alpha mediated genistein induction of human dehydroepiandrosterone sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) in Hep G2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yue; Zhang, Shunfen; Zhou, Tianyan; Huang, Chaoqun; McLaughlin, Alicia; Chen, Guangping

    2013-04-15

    Cytosolic sulfotransferases are one of the major families of phase II drug metabolizing enzymes. Sulfotransferase-catalyzed sulfonation regulates hormone activities, metabolizes drugs, detoxifies xenobiotics, and bioactivates carcinogens. Human dehydroepiandrosterone sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) plays important biological roles by sulfating endogenous hydroxysteroids and exogenous xenobiotics. Genistein, mainly existing in soy food products, is a naturally occurring phytoestrogen with both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential. Our previous studies have shown that genistein significantly induces hSULT2A1 in Hep G2 and Caco-2 cells. In this study, we investigated the roles of liver X receptor (LXRα) in the genistein induction of hSULT2A1. LXRs have been shown to induce expression of mouse Sult2a9 and hSULT2A1 gene. Our results demonstrate that LXRα mediates the genistein induction of hSULT2A1, supported by Western blot analysis results, hSULT2A1 promoter driven luciferase reporter gene assay results, and mRNA interference results. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay results demonstrate that genistein increase the recruitment of hLXRα binding to the hSULT2A1 promoter. These results suggest that hLXRα plays an important role in the hSULT2A1 gene regulation. The biological functions of phytoestrogens may partially relate to their induction activity toward hydroxysteroid SULT. - Highlights: ► Liver X receptor α mediated genistein induction of hSULT2A1 in Hep G2 cells. ► LXRα and RXRα dimerization further activated this induction. ► Western blot results agreed well with luciferase reporter gene assay results. ► LXRs gene silencing significantly decreased hSULT2A1 expression. ► ChIP analysis suggested that genistein enhances hLXRα binding to the hSULT2A1 promoter.

  16. Synergistic effects of dexamethasone and genistein on the expression of Cdk inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1 in human hepatocellular and colorectal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Park, J H; Oh, E J; Choi, Y H; Kang, C D; Kang, H S; Kim, D K; Kang, K I; Yoo, M A

    2001-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid, can induce a G1 arrest, however, genistein, a natural isoflavonoid phytoestrogen, induces a G2/M arrest in the cell cycle progression in various cancer cell lines. A block of cell cycle checkpoint by dexamethasone and genistein correlates with a selective induction of cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1 in a tumor suppressor p53-independent manner and abolishment of Cdk2 phosphorylation. In the present study, the effects of dexamethasone and genistein (both singly and combined) on the expression of p21 in human hepatocellular Hep G2 and colorectal Colo320 HSR carcinoma cells were evaluated. Whereas dexamethasone mildly induced the level of p21 protein, genistein strongly increased the expression of p21 protein in our experimental condition. Both compounds also activated p21 promoter reporter constructs. The combined effects of dexamethasone and genistein on the induction of p21 protein and activation of p21 promoter were synergistic in both cell lines. These findings indicate that dexamethasone and genistein act in a synergistic fashion and have potential for combination chemotherapy for the treatment of liver and colon cancer. PMID:11295047

  17. The phytoestrogen alpha-zearalenol reverses endothelial dysfunction induced by oophorectomy in rats.

    PubMed

    Altavilla, D; Saitta, A; Galeano, M; Squadrito, G; Marino, D; Minutoli, L; Calapai, G; Deodato, B; D'Anna, R; Corrado, F; Caputi, A P; Squadrito, F

    2001-02-01

    It has been shown recently that alpha-zearalenol, a resorcyclic acid lactone, prevents bone loss in a rat model of postmenopausal bone loss. We have therefore investigated the effects of this phytoestrogen on endothelial dysfunction induced by estrogen deficiency in rats. Female mature Sprague-Dawley rats underwent a bilateral oophorectomy (OVX rats). Sham-operated animals (sham OVX rats) were used as controls. Three weeks after surgery, animals were randomized to the following treatments: alpha-zearalenol (1 mg/kg/day, i.m., for 4 weeks), 17beta-estradiol (20 microg/kg/day, i.m., for 4 weeks), or their vehicle (100 microl, i.m., of cottonseed oil). Two other groups of rats were treated with alpha-zearalenol or 17beta-estradiol plus the pure estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182780 (2.5 mg/kg/day, i.m., for 4 weeks). Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), total plasma cholesterol, plasma estradiol, and plasma alpha-zearalenol were studied. We also investigated endothelial-dependent (acetylcholine, 10 nM to 10 microM) and endothelial-independent (sodium nitroprusside, 15 nM to 30 nM) relaxation of aortic rings, as well as N(G)-methyl-L-arginine (L-NMA: 10 to 100 microM)-induced vasoconstriction and calcium-dependent nitric oxide synthase (cNOS) activity in homogenates of lungs taken from both sham OVX rats and OVX rats. Untreated OVX rats had, compared with sham OVX animals, unchanged body weight, MAP, HR, and plasma cholesterol. In contrast oophorectomy reduced plasma estradiol levels (OVX, 2 +/- 0.5 pg/ml; sham OVX, 35 +/- 6 pg/ml), impaired endothelial-dependent relaxation and blunted L-NMA-induced contraction (L-NMA 100 microM: sham OVX, 2.7 +/- 0.3 g/mg tissue; OVX, 1.3 +/- 0.1 g/mg tissue). Moreover OVX rats showed a reduced calcium-dependent NO synthase (cNOS) activity. Treatment with alpha-zearalenol or with 17beta-estradiol reverted the endothelial dysfunction and increased cNOS activity in lung homogenates. These effects were abolished by the

  18. Effects of genistein on cognitive dysfunction and hippocampal synaptic plasticity impairment in an ovariectomized rat kainic acid model of seizure.

    PubMed

    Khodamoradi, Mehdi; Asadi-Shekaari, Majid; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Esmaeilpour, Khadije; Sheibani, Vahid

    2016-09-01

    The major objective of this study was to investigate the probable effects of genistein (one of the most important soy phytoestrogens-SPEs) on seizure-induced cognitive dysfunction, hippocampal early long-term potentiation (E-LTP) impairment and morphological damage to CA1 neurons in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Three weeks after ovariectomy, cannulae were implanted over the left lateral ventricle. After a 7-day recovery period, animals were injected by genistein (0.5 or 5mg/kg) or vehicle during four consecutive days, each 24h. One h after the last treatment, kainic acid (KA) or vehicle was perfused into the left lateral ventricle to induce generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Finally, 7 days later, spatial learning and memory of animals were examined using the Morris water maze (MWM) task, hippocampal E-LTP was assessed using in-vivo field potential recordings and the morphology of hippocampal CA1 area was examined using Fluoro-Jade C staining. KA-induced generalized seizures resulted in spatial learning and memory impairment, E-LTP deficit and CA1 cell injury. Seizure-induced abnormalities improved partially only by the lower dose of genistein (0.5mg/kg). However, genistein at the higher dose (5mg/kg) did not have any beneficial effects. Also, genistein did not affect seizure activity. It is concluded that genistein may have partially preventive effects against seizure-induced cognitive impairment in OVX rats. Also, it seems that such effects of genistein are correlated with its beneficial effects on hippocampal synaptic plasticity and morphology. PMID:27235295

  19. Genistein Sensitizes Bladder Cancer Cells to HCPT Treatment In Vitro and In Vivo via ATM/NF-κB/IKK Pathway-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Chen; Xu, Peng; Shi, Chang Hong; Shi, Jian Guo; Li, Yu Mei; Fu, Qiang; Xue, Wei; Lei, Yong Hua; Gao, Jing Yu; Wang, Juan Ying; Gao, Xiao Ping; Li, Jin Qing; Yuan, Jian Lin; Zhang, Yun Tao

    2013-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the most common malignant urological disease in China. Hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) is a DNA topoisomerase I inhibitor, which has been utilized in chemotherapy for bladder cancer for nearly 40 years. Previous research has demonstrated that the isoflavone, genistein, can sensitize multiple cancer cell lines to HCPT treatment, such as prostate and cervical cancer. In this study, we investigated whether genistein could sensitize bladder cancer cell lines and bladder epithelial cell BDEC cells to HCPT treatment, and investigated the possible underlying molecular mechanisms. Genistein could significantly and dose-dependently sensitize multiple bladder cancer cell lines and BDEC cells to HCPT-induced apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. Genistein and HCPT synergistically inhibited bladder cell growth and proliferation, and induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in TCCSUP bladder cancer cell and BDEC cell. Pretreatment with genistein sensitized BDEC and bladder cancer cell lines to HCPT-induced DNA damage by the synergistic activation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase. Genistein significantly attenuated the ability of HCPT to induce activation of the anti-apoptotic NF-κB pathway both in vitro and in vivo in a bladder cancer xenograft model, and thus counteracted the anti-apoptotic effect of the NF-κB pathway. This study indicates that genistein could act as a promising non-toxic agent to improve efficacy of HCPT bladder cancer chemotherapy. PMID:23365634

  20. Dietary Supplementation of Genistein Alleviates Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis Mediated by a Methionine-Choline-Deficient Diet in db/db Mice.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Na-young; Jeon, Sookyoung; Nam, Yerim; Park, Youn-Jin; Won, Sae Bom; Kwon, Young Hye

    2015-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is a complex disorder which includes simple steatosis, steatohepatitis, fibrosis and ultimately cirrhosis. Previous studies have reported that genistein, a soy phytoestrogen, attenuates steatohepatitis induced in obese and type 2 diabetic models. Here we investigated the effect of dietary genistein supplementation (0.05%) on nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) development induced by a methionine-choline-deficient (MCD) diet in db/db mice. MCD-diet-fed mice exhibited a significantly lower body weight and a higher degree of steatohepatitis with increased oxidative stress, steatosis, inflammation, stellate cell activation, and mild fibrosis. Although genistein did not inhibit hepatic steatosis, we observed that oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and AMP-dependent kinase inactivation were alleviated by genistein. Genistein also down-regulated the augmented gene expressions associated with hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. Therefore, these results suggest that genistein may protect MCD-diet-mediated NASH development by suppressing lipid peroxidation, inflammation, and even liver fibrosis in db/db mice. PMID:25885479

  1. Genistein alleviates lead-induced neurotoxicity in vitro and in vivo: Involvement of multiple signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Su, Peng; Zhang, Jianbin; Wang, Siwang; Aschner, Michael; Cao, Zipeng; Zhao, Fang; Wang, Diya; Chen, Jiangyuan; Luo, Wenjing

    2016-03-01

    Lead (Pb) is a ubiquitous environmental and industrial pollutant. It induces neurotoxicity and cell death by disrupting the pro- and anti-oxidative balance; however, the mechanisms of its toxicity have yet to be fully understood. The soy-derived isoflavonoid, genistein (GEN), was reported to possess neuroprotective and antioxidative properties. The present study investigated the molecular mechanisms of Pb-induced neurotoxicity in vivo and in vitro, addressing the efficacy of GEN in protecting against Pb-induced toxicity. Pb exposure was associated with reduction of cell viability and cell apoptosis, concomitant with reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in vitro, and pre-treatment with GEN markedly ameliorated the Pb-induced oxidative injury by increasing the expression of key antioxidant enzymes and the antioxidant transcription factor, nuclear factor erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Next, PKC-α activation was found after Pb exposure in vitro and pretreatment with GEN attenuated Pb-induced ROS generation by PKC-α inhibition. MAPK-NF-κB activation triggered by Pb was also inhibited by GEN. In summary, our study establishes that GEN alleviates Pb-induced impairment in spatial memory, and reduces cell apoptosis caused by Pb exposure and GEN protects neurons from Pb-induced neurotoxicity by downstream activation of antioxidant and anti-apoptotic pathways via regulation of Nrf2 and MAPK-NF-κB signaling. PMID:26797587

  2. A phytoestrogen diet induces the premature anovulatory syndrome in lactationally exposed female rats.

    PubMed

    Whitten, P L; Lewis, C; Naftolin, F

    1993-11-01

    The effects of a phytoestrogen diet on sexual differentiation were examined in lactationally exposed rat pups. Rat dams were provided a semipurified diet containing the isoflavonoid coumestrol at a concentration (0.01%) previously found to be uterotrophic. Coumestrol treatment did not significantly alter the time of vaginal opening, although vaginal opening did occur at a lighter body weight. By 132 days of age, 83% of coumestrol-treated females exhibited the cornified smears of a persistent estrous state. By contrast, 91% of control animals were cycling regularly at 132 days of age. Estradiol stimulation failed to elicit an LH elevation in the coumestrol-treated animals, suggesting the possibility of neuroendocrine impairments. These findings indicate that the female offspring of mothers fed a low-level phytoestrogen diet during lactation manifest early and nearly universal disruption of cyclicity of the persistent-estrus type. PMID:8286579

  3. Evaluation of the estrogenic effects of legume extracts containing phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Boué, Stephen M; Wiese, Thomas E; Nehls, Suzanne; Burow, Matthew E; Elliott, Steven; Carter-Wientjes, Carol H; Shih, Betty Y; McLachlan, John A; Cleveland, Thomas E

    2003-04-01

    Seven legume extracts containing phytoestrogens were analyzed for estrogenic activity. Methanol extracts were prepared from soybean (Glycine max L.), green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), alfalfa sprout (Medicago sativa L.), mung bean sprout (Vigna radiata L.), kudzu root (Pueraria lobata L.), and red clover blossom and red clover sprout (Trifolium pratense L.). Extracts of kudzu root and red clover blossom showed significant competitive binding to estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta). Estrogenic activity was determined using an estrogen-dependent MCF-7 breast cancer cell proliferation assay. Kudzu root, red clover blossom and sprout, mung bean sprout, and alfalfa sprout extracts displayed increased cell proliferation above levels observed with estradiol. The pure estrogen antagonist, ICI 182,780, suppressed cell proliferation induced by the extracts, suggesting an ER-related signaling pathway was involved. The ER subtype-selective activities of legume extracts were examined using transiently transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) cells. All seven of the extracts exhibited preferential agonist activity toward ERbeta. Using HPLC to collect fractions and MCF-7 cell proliferation, the active components in kudzu root extract were determined to be the isoflavones puerarin, daidzin, genistin, daidzein, and genistein. These results show that several legumes are a source of phytoestrogens with high levels of estrogenic activity. PMID:12670155

  4. Rapid effects of phytoestrogens on human colonic smooth muscle are mediated by oestrogen receptor beta.

    PubMed

    Hogan, A M; Collins, D; Sheehan, K; Zierau, O; Baird, A W; Winter, D C

    2010-05-14

    Epidemiological studies have correlated consumption of dietary phytoestrogens with beneficial effects on colon, breast and prostate cancers. Genomic and non-genomic mechanisms are responsible for anti-carcinogenic effects but, until now, the effect on human colon was assumed to be passive and remote. No direct effect on human colonic smooth muscle has previously been described. Institutional research board approval was granted. Histologically normal colon was obtained from the proximal resection margin of colorectal carcinoma specimens. Circular smooth muscle strips were microdissected and suspended under 1g of tension in organ baths containing oxygenated Krebs solution at 37 degrees C. After an equilibration period, tissues were exposed to diarylpropionitrile (DPN) (ER beta agonist) and 1,3,5-tris(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4-propyl-1H-pyrazole (PPT) (ER alpha agonist) or to the synthetic phytoestrogen compounds genistein (n=8), daidzein (n=8), fisetin (n=8) and quercetin (n=8) in the presence or absence of fulvestrant (oestrogen receptor antagonist). Mechanism of action was investigated by inhibition of downstream pathways. The cholinergic agonist carbachol was used to induce contractile activity. Tension was recorded isometrically. Phytoestrogens inhibit carbachol-induced colonic contractility. In keeping with a non-genomic, rapid onset direct action, the effect was within minutes, reversible and similar to previously described actions of 17 beta oestradiol. No effect was seen in the presence of fulvestrant indicating receptor modulation. While the DPN exerted inhibitory effects, PPT did not. The effect appears to be reliant on a p38/mitogen activated protein kinase mediated induction of nitric oxide production in colonic smooth muscle. The present data set provides the first description of a direct effect of genistein, daidzein, fisetin and quercetin on human colonic smooth muscle. The presence of ER in colonic smooth muscle has been functionally proven and the beta

  5. Prepubertal exposure to genistein alleviates di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate induced testicular oxidative stress in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lian-Dong; Li, He-Cheng; Chong, Tie; Gao, Ming; Yin, Jian; Fu, De-Lai; Deng, Qian; Wang, Zi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is the most widely used plastizer in the world and can suppress testosterone production via activation of oxidative stress. Genistein (GEN) is one of the isoflavones ingredients exhibiting weak estrogenic and potentially antioxidative effects. However, study on reproductive effects following prepubertal multiple endocrine disrupters exposure has been lacking. In this study, DEHP and GEN were administrated to prepubertal male Sprague-Dawley rats by gavage from postnatal day 22 (PND22) to PND35 with vehicle control, GEN at 50 mg/kg body weight (bw)/day (G), DEHP at 50, 150, 450 mg/kg bw/day (D50, D150, D450) and their mixture (G + D50, G + D150, G + D450). On PND90, general morphometry (body weight, AGD, organ weight, and organ coefficient), testicular redox state, and testicular histology were studied. Our results indicated that DEHP could significantly decrease sex organs weight, organ coefficient, and testicular antioxidative ability, which largely depended on the dose of DEHP. However, coadministration of GEN could partially alleviate DEHP-induced reproductive injuries via enhancement of testicular antioxidative enzymes activities, which indicates that GEN has protective effects on DEHP-induced male reproductive system damage after prepubertal exposure and GEN may have promising future in its curative antioxidative role for reproductive disorders caused by other environmental endocrine disruptors. PMID:25530965

  6. Prepubertal Exposure to Genistein Alleviates Di-(2-ethylhexyl) Phthalate Induced Testicular Oxidative Stress in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lian-Dong; Li, He-Cheng; Chong, Tie; Gao, Ming; Yin, Jian; Fu, De-Lai; Deng, Qian; Wang, Zi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is the most widely used plastizer in the world and can suppress testosterone production via activation of oxidative stress. Genistein (GEN) is one of the isoflavones ingredients exhibiting weak estrogenic and potentially antioxidative effects. However, study on reproductive effects following prepubertal multiple endocrine disrupters exposure has been lacking. In this study, DEHP and GEN were administrated to prepubertal male Sprague-Dawley rats by gavage from postnatal day 22 (PND22) to PND35 with vehicle control, GEN at 50 mg/kg body weight (bw)/day (G), DEHP at 50, 150, 450 mg/kg bw/day (D50, D150, D450) and their mixture (G + D50, G + D150, G + D450). On PND90, general morphometry (body weight, AGD, organ weight, and organ coefficient), testicular redox state, and testicular histology were studied. Our results indicated that DEHP could significantly decrease sex organs weight, organ coefficient, and testicular antioxidative ability, which largely depended on the dose of DEHP. However, coadministration of GEN could partially alleviate DEHP-induced reproductive injuries via enhancement of testicular antioxidative enzymes activities, which indicates that GEN has protective effects on DEHP-induced male reproductive system damage after prepubertal exposure and GEN may have promising future in its curative antioxidative role for reproductive disorders caused by other environmental endocrine disruptors. PMID:25530965

  7. Methylation profile and amplification of proto-oncogenes in rat pancreas induced with phytoestrogens

    SciTech Connect

    Lyn-Cook, B.D.; Blann, E.; Bo, J.

    1995-01-01

    Specific gene hypermethylation has been shown in DNA from neonatal rats exposed to the phytoestrogens, coumestrol, and equol. The pancreas is an organ in which estrogen receptors have been shown to be present. Studies have correlated the development of acute pancreatitis with rising levels of human estrogen binding proteins. Neonatal rats were dosed with 10 or 100 {mu}g of coumestrol or equol on postnatal day (PND) 1-10. The animals were sacrificed at Day 15. The pancreas was excised and pancreatic acinar cells isolated for molecular analysis. DNA was isolated from the cells by lysis in TEN-9 buffer supplemented with proteinase K and 0.1% SDS. High molecular weight (HMW) DNA was digested with the methylated DNA specific restriction enzymes, Hpa II and Msp I, for determination of methylation profiles. Both coumestrol and equol at high doses caused hypermethylation of the c-H-ras proto-oncogene. No hypermethylation or hypomethylation was observed in the proto-oncogenes, c-myc or c-fos. Methylation is thought to be an epigenetic mechanism involved in the activation (hypomethylation) or inactivation (hypermethylation) of cellular genes which are known to play a role in carcinogenesis. Epidemiology studies have shown that equol may have anti-carcinogenic effects on some hormone-dependent cancers. Additional studies are needed to further understand the role of phytoestrogens and methylation in relation to pancreatic disorders. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Hypospadias and Maternal Intake of Phytoestrogens

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, Suzan L.; Cogswell, Mary E.; Ma, Chen; Gonzalez-Feliciano, Amparo; Olney, Richard S.; Correa, Adolfo; Shaw, Gary M.

    2013-01-01

    Experimental data indicate that gestational exposures to estrogenic compounds impact risk of hypospadias. We examined whether risk of hypospadias (i.e., a congenital malformation in which the opening of the penile urethra occurs on the ventral side of the penis) was associated with maternal intake of phytoestrogens, given their potential impact on estrogen metabolism. The analysis included data on mothers of 1,250 hypospadias cases and 3,118 controls who delivered their infants from 1997 to 2005 and participated in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, a multistate, population-based, case-control study. After adjustment for several covariates, high intakes of daidzein, genistein, glycetin, secoisolariciresinol, total isoflavones, total lignans, and total phytoestrogens were associated with reduced risks; odds ratios comparing intakes ≥90th percentile with intakes between the 11th and 89th percentiles ranged from 0.6 to 0.8. For example, the odds ratio for total phytoestrogen intake was 0.7 (95% confidence interval: 0.5, 1.0). This study represents the first large-scale analysis of phytoestrogen intake and hypospadias. The observed associations merit investigation in additional populations before firm conclusions can be reached. PMID:23752918

  9. Phytoestrogen Bakuchiol Exhibits In Vitro and In Vivo Anti-breast Cancer Effects by Inducing S Phase Arrest and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Chen, Xueping; Liu, Chi C.; Lee, Lai S.; Man, Cornelia; Cheng, Shuk H.

    2016-01-01

    Phytoestrogen has been proposed as an alternative to hormone replacement therapy, which has been demonstrated to promote a high risk of breast cancer. However, the effect of phytoestrogen on breast cancer development has not been fully understood. Bakuchiol is an active ingredient of a traditional Chinese herbal medicine Fructus Psoraleae, the dried ripe fruit of Psoralea corylifolia L. (Fabaceae). The in vitro and in vivo estrogenic activities and anti-breast cancer effects of bakuchiol have not been well-studied. We found that bakuchiol induced the GFP expression in transgenic medaka (Oryzias melastigma, Tg, Chg:GFP) dose-dependently (0–1 μg/ml), demonstrating its in vivo estrogenic activity. Low dose of bakuchiol (1 μg/ml) induced the cell proliferation and ERα expression in MCF-7 cells, which could be blocked by the anti-estrogen ICI 182780, suggesting the in vitro estrogenic activity of bakuchiol. Our data indicated that high doses of bakuchiol (>2 μg/ml) inhibited breast cancer cell growth, with a stronger anti-proliferative effect than resveratrol, a widely studied analog of bakuchiol. High doses of bakuchiol (4, 7, and 10 μg/ml) were used for the further in vitro anti-breast cancer studies. Bakuchiol induced ERβ expression and suppressed ERα expression in MCF-7 cells. It also induced S phase arrest in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, which could be rescued by caffeine. Knock-down of p21 also marginally rescued S phase arrest in MCF-7 cells. The S phase arrest was accompanied by the upregulation of ATM, P-Cdc2 (Tyr15), Myt1, P-Wee1 (Ser642), p21 and Cyclin B1, suggesting that blocking of Cdc2 activation may play an important role in bakuchiol-induced S phase arrest. Furthermore, bakuchiol induced cell apoptosis and disturbed mitochondrial membrane potential in MCF-7 cells. The bakuchiol-induced apoptosis was associated with increased expression of Caspase family and Bcl-2 family proteins, suggesting that bakuchiol may induce apoptosis via intrinsic

  10. Phytoestrogen Bakuchiol Exhibits In Vitro and In Vivo Anti-breast Cancer Effects by Inducing S Phase Arrest and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Chen, Xueping; Liu, Chi C; Lee, Lai S; Man, Cornelia; Cheng, Shuk H

    2016-01-01

    Phytoestrogen has been proposed as an alternative to hormone replacement therapy, which has been demonstrated to promote a high risk of breast cancer. However, the effect of phytoestrogen on breast cancer development has not been fully understood. Bakuchiol is an active ingredient of a traditional Chinese herbal medicine Fructus Psoraleae, the dried ripe fruit of Psoralea corylifolia L. (Fabaceae). The in vitro and in vivo estrogenic activities and anti-breast cancer effects of bakuchiol have not been well-studied. We found that bakuchiol induced the GFP expression in transgenic medaka (Oryzias melastigma, Tg, Chg:GFP) dose-dependently (0-1 μg/ml), demonstrating its in vivo estrogenic activity. Low dose of bakuchiol (1 μg/ml) induced the cell proliferation and ERα expression in MCF-7 cells, which could be blocked by the anti-estrogen ICI 182780, suggesting the in vitro estrogenic activity of bakuchiol. Our data indicated that high doses of bakuchiol (>2 μg/ml) inhibited breast cancer cell growth, with a stronger anti-proliferative effect than resveratrol, a widely studied analog of bakuchiol. High doses of bakuchiol (4, 7, and 10 μg/ml) were used for the further in vitro anti-breast cancer studies. Bakuchiol induced ERβ expression and suppressed ERα expression in MCF-7 cells. It also induced S phase arrest in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, which could be rescued by caffeine. Knock-down of p21 also marginally rescued S phase arrest in MCF-7 cells. The S phase arrest was accompanied by the upregulation of ATM, P-Cdc2 (Tyr15), Myt1, P-Wee1 (Ser642), p21 and Cyclin B1, suggesting that blocking of Cdc2 activation may play an important role in bakuchiol-induced S phase arrest. Furthermore, bakuchiol induced cell apoptosis and disturbed mitochondrial membrane potential in MCF-7 cells. The bakuchiol-induced apoptosis was associated with increased expression of Caspase family and Bcl-2 family proteins, suggesting that bakuchiol may induce apoptosis via intrinsic

  11. Genistein Induces Deleterious Effects during Its Acute Exposure in Swiss Mice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prabhat; Sharma, Sharad; Kumar Rath, Srikanta

    2014-01-01

    Genistein is a soy derived isoflavone. It has wide variety of therapeutic effects against certain diseases including cancer. Although toxic effects of genistein have been studied, its effect on the gene expression and the reason behind toxicity have not been identified yet. In the present study, genistein was administered to age and body weight matched Swiss mice at the doses of 125, 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg. The biomarkers of hepatotoxicity in serum, liver histology, oxidative stress parameters in tissue homogenates, and global gene expression were examined. Elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels and degenerated liver tissue were observed in 500, and 1000 mg/kg genistein treated groups. Oxidative stress was significant at these doses as considerable increase in lipid peroxidation (LPO) and decrease in total glutathione (GSH) were observed. Gene expression analysis showed 40 differentially expressed genes at twofold change and P < 0.05. Differentially expressed genes were corresponding to different biologically relevant pathways including metabolic and oxidative stress pathways. In 500 mg/kg group, Cyp4a14, Sult1e1, Gadd45g, Cidec, Mycs, and so forth genes were upregulated. These results suggested that the higher dose of genistein can produce several undesirable effects by affecting multiple cellular pathways. PMID:24967385

  12. Phytoestrogens in soy-based infant foods: concentrations, daily intake, and possible biological effects.

    PubMed

    Irvine, C H; Fitzpatrick, M G; Alexander, S L

    1998-03-01

    Exposure to estrogenic compounds may pose a developmental hazard to infants. Soy products, which contain the phytoestrogens, genistein and daidzein, are becoming increasingly popular as infant foods. To begin to evaluate the potential of the phytoestrogens in these products to affect infants, we measured total genistein and daidzein contents of commercially available soy-based infant formulas, infant cereals, dinners, and rusks. We also assayed phytoestrogens in dairy-based formulas and in breast milk from omnivorous or vegetarian mothers. In most cases, the glucoside forms of the phytoestrogens were hydrolyzed before separation by HPLC. Mean (+/-SEM) total genistein and daidzein contents in four soy infant formulas were 87+/-3 and 49+/-2 microg/g, respectively. The phytoestrogen content of cereals varied with brand, with genistein ranging from 3-287 microg/g and daidzein from 2-276 microg/g. By contrast, no phytoestrogens were detected in dairy-based infant formulas or in human breast milk, irrespective of the mother's diet (detection limit = 0.05 microg/ml). When fed according to the manufacturer's instruction, soy formulas provide the infant with a daily dose rate of total isoflavones (i.e., genistein + daidzein) of approximately 3 mg/kg body weight, which is maintained at a fairly constant level between 0-4 months of age. Supplementing the diet of 4-month-old infants with a single daily serving of cereal can increase their isoflavone intake by over 25%, depending on the brand chosen. This rate of isoflavone intake is much greater than that shown in adult humans to alter reproductive hormones. Since the available evidence suggests that infants can digest and absorb dietary phytoestrogens in active forms and since neonates are generally more susceptible than adults to perturbations of the sex steroid milieu, we suggest that it would be highly desirable to study the effects of soy isoflavones on steroid-dependent developmental processes in human babies. PMID

  13. Genistein treatment increases bone mass in obese, hyperglycemic mice

    PubMed Central

    Michelin, Richard M; Al-Nakkash, Layla; Broderick, Tom L; Plochocki, Jeffrey H

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus are associated with elevated risk of limb bone fracture. Incidences of these conditions are on the rise worldwide. Genistein, a phytoestrogen, has been shown by several studies to demonstrate bone-protective properties and may improve bone health in obese type 2 diabetics. Methods In this study, we test the effects of genistein treatment on limb bone and growth plate cartilage histomorphometry in obese, hyperglycemic ob/ob mice. Six-week-old ob/ob mice were divided into control and genistein-treated groups. Genistein-treated mice were fed a diet containing 600 mg genistein/kg for a period of 4 weeks. Cross-sectional geometric and histomorphometric analyses were conducted on tibias. Results Genistein-treated mice remained obese and hyperglycemic. However, histomorphometric comparisons show that genistein-treated mice have greater tibial midshaft diameters and ratios of cortical bone to total tissue area than the controls. Genistein-treated mice also exhibit decreased growth plate thickness of the proximal tibia. Conclusion Our results indicate that genistein treatment affects bone of the tibial midshaft in the ob/ob mouse, independent of improvements in the hyperglycemic state and body weight. PMID:27042131

  14. MATERNAL GENISTEIN ALTERS COAT COLOR AND PROTECTS AVY MOUSE OFFSPRING FROM OBESITY BY MODIFYING THE FETAL EPIGENOME

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genistein, the major phytoestrogen in soy, is linked to diminished female reproductive performance and to cancer chemoprevention and decreased adipose deposition. Dietary genistein may also play a role in the decreased incidence of cancer in Asians compared with Westerners, as well as increased canc...

  15. The presence of monoiodinated derivates of daidzein and genistein in human urine and its effect on thyroid gland function.

    PubMed

    Sosvorová, Lucie; Mikšátková, Petra; Bičíková, Marie; Kaňová, Nataša; Lapčík, Oldřich

    2012-08-01

    Dietary supplements used by women during menopause are usually based on plant extracts containing isoflavonoids, daidzein and genistein. Genistein is a known inhibitor of many enzymes, including thyroid peroxidase (TPO). In the thyroid follicle, genistein acts as its alternate substrate for the formation of genistein iodinated derivatives. The aim of this study was to search for daidzein- and genistein-iodinated derivatives in urine of isoflavonoid-supplemented women. Additionally, selected phytoestrogens, steroid and thyroid hormones before and after three months of phytoestrogen supplementation were estimated. Urinary levels of free phytoestrogen increased significantly after therapy. They ranged between 0.3-1600, 0.6-670 and 0-206 nmol/L for daidzein, genistein and S-equol, respectively. Monoiodinated derivatives of genistein were observed (0-504 pmol/L) in 60% of the investigated samples. Steroid and thyroid hormone levels were within the normal range and were not significantly altered. The presence of monoiodinated derivates in human urine confirmed that genistein and daidzein may enter human thyroid follicles and influence TPO. Since the levels of the free thyroid hormones were not affected, we propose that the use of phytoestrogen dietary supplements is not associated with the development of thyroid-gland disorders in subjects with adequate iodine intake. PMID:22659465

  16. Genistein induces apoptosis and autophagy in human breast MCF-7 cells by modulating the expression of proapoptotic factors and oxidative stress enzymes.

    PubMed

    Prietsch, R F; Monte, L G; da Silva, F A; Beira, F T; Del Pino, F A B; Campos, V F; Collares, T; Pinto, L S; Spanevello, R M; Gamaro, G D; Braganhol, E

    2014-05-01

    Breast cancer is one of the common tumors occurring in woman and despite treatment, the prognostic is poor. Genistein, a soy isoflavone, has been reported to have chemopreventive\\chemotherapeutic potential in multiple tumor types. Here, we investigated the genistein antiproliferative effect in MCF-7 breast cancer, underlying the molecular mechanisms involved in this effect. MCF-7 cancer and CCD1059sK fibroblast cells were treated with estradiol (10 nM) or genistein (0.01-100 μM) for 24, 48, and 72 h and the cell proliferation was investigated by MTT; membrane cell permeability was evaluated by LDH and PI incorporation; apoptosis was investigated by externalization of phosphatidylserine by FACS; and presence of autophagy was detected by LC3A/B immunostaining. The expression of apoptotic proteins and antioxidant enzymes was evaluated by qPCR. The results demonstrate that genistein (100 μM) for 72 h of treatment selectively reduced MCF-7 cell proliferation independent of estrogen receptor activation, while no cytotoxicity was observed in fibroblast cells. Further experiments showed that genistein induced phosphatidylserine externalization and LC3A/B immunopositivity in MCF-7 cells, indicating apoptosis and autophagy cell death. Genistein increased in three times proapoptotic BAX/Bcl-2 ratio and promoted a parallel downregulation of 20 times of antiapoptotic survivin. In addition, genistein promoted a decrease of 5.5, 9.3, and 3.6 times of MnSOD, CuZnSOD, and TrxR mRNA expression, respectively, while the GPx expression was increased by 6.5 times. These results suggest that the antitumor effect of genistein involved the modulation of antioxidant enzyme and apoptotic signaling expression, which resulted in apoptosis and progression of autophagy. PMID:24573886

  17. Phytoestrogens Activate the Estrogen Receptor in HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Lynne A

    2016-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are popular alternatives to estrogen therapy however their effects on hemostasis in postmenopausal women are unknown. This chapter describes a protocol to determine the effect of the phytoestrogens genistein, daidzein and equol, on the expression of key genes from the hemostatic system in human hepatocyte cell models and to determine the role of estrogen receptors in mediating any response seen using in vitro culture systems and Taqman(®) gene expression analysis. PMID:26585156

  18. The OECD program to validate the rat uterotrophic bioassay. Phase 2: dietary phytoestrogen analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Owens, William; Ashby, John; Odum, Jenny; Onyon, Lesley

    2003-01-01

    Many commercial laboratory diets have detectable levels of isoflavones (e.g., phytoestrogens such as genistein [GN]) that have weak estrogenic activity both in vitro and in vivo. During validation studies of the uterotrophic bioassay, diet samples from 20 participating laboratories were collected and analyzed for three major phytoestrogens: GN, daidzein (DN), and coumestrol (CM). Soy phytoestrogens GN and DN were found at total phytoestrogen levels from 100 to 540 microg/g laboratory diet; a forage phytoestrogen, CM, ranged from nondetectable to 4 microg/g laboratory diet. The phytoestrogen levels were compared with both baseline uterine weights of the control groups and with the relative uterine weight increase of groups administered two weak estrogen agonists: bisphenol A (BPA) and nonylphenol (NP). The comparison uses a working assumption of additivity among the phytoestrogens, despite several significant qualifications to this assumption, to estimate total genistein equivalents (TGE). Some evidence was found that phytoestrogen levels in the diet > 325-350 microg/g TGE could diminish the responsiveness of the uterotrophic bioassay to weak agonists. This was especially true for the case of the intact, immature female version of the uterotrophic bioassay, where higher food consumption relative to body weight leads to higher intakes of dietary phytoestrogens versus ovariectomized adults. This dietary level is sufficient in the immature female to approach a biological lowest observable effect level for GN of 40-50 mg/kg/day. These same data, however, show that low to moderate levels of dietary phytoestrogens do not substantially affect the responsiveness of the assay with weak estrogen receptor agonists such as NP and BPA. Therefore, laboratories conducting the uterotrophic bioassay for either research or regulatory purposes may routinely use diets containing levels of phytoestrogens < 325-350 microg/g TGE without impairing the responsiveness of the bioassay. PMID

  19. Biochanin A, a Phytoestrogenic Isoflavone with Selective Inhibition of Phosphodiesterase 4, Suppresses Ovalbumin-Induced Airway Hyperresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Wun-Chang; Lin, Ling-Hung; Shen, Hsin-Yi; Lai, Chi-Yin; Chen, Chien-Ming; Shih, Chung-Hung

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated the potential of biochanin A, a phytoestrogenic isoflavone of red clover (Triflolium pratense), for use in treating asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Biochanin A (100 μmol/kg, orally (p.o.)) significantly attenuated airway resistance (RL), enhanced pause (Penh), and increased lung dynamic compliance (Cdyn) values induced by methacholine (MCh) in sensitized and challenged mice. It also significantly suppressed an increase in the number of total inflammatory cells, neutrophils, and eosinophils, and levels of cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-5, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of the mice. However, it did not influence interferon (IFN)-γ levels. Biochanin A (100 μmol/kg, p.o.) also significantly suppressed the total and ovalbumin (OVA)-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels in the serum and BALF, and enhanced the total IgG2a level in the serum of these mice. The PDE4H/PDE4L value of biochanin A was calculated as >35. Biochanin A did not influence xylazine/ketamine-induced anesthesia. Biochanin A (10~30 μM) significantly reduced cumulative OVA (10~100 μg/mL)-induced contractions in the isolated guinea pig trachealis, suggesting that it inhibits degranulation of mast cells. In conclusion, red clover containing biochanin A has the potential for treating allergic asthma and COPD. PMID:21437195

  20. Suppression of T cell-induced osteoclast formation

    SciTech Connect

    Karieb, Sahar; Fox, Simon W.

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Genistein and coumestrol prevent activated T cell induced osteoclast formation. •Anti-TNF neutralising antibodies prevent the pro-osteoclastic effect of activated T cells. •Phytoestrogens inhibit T cell derived TNF alpha and inflammatory cytokine production. •Phytoestrogens have a broader range of anti-osteoclastic actions than other anti-resorptives. -- Abstract: Inhibition of T cell derived cytokine production could help suppress osteoclast differentiation in inflammatory skeletal disorders. Bisphosphonates are typically prescribed to prevent inflammatory bone loss but are not tolerated by all patients and are associated with an increased risk of osteonecrosis of the jaw. In light of this other anti-resorptives such as phytoestrogens are being considered. However the effect of phytoestrogens on T cell-induced osteoclast formation is unclear. The effect of genistein and coumestrol on activated T cell-induced osteoclastogenesis and cytokine production was therefore examined. Concentrations of genistein and coumestrol (10{sup −7} M) previously shown to directly inhibit osteoclast formation also suppressed the formation of TRAP positive osteoclast induced by con A activated T cells, which was dependent on inhibition of T cell derived TNF-α. While both reduced osteoclast formation their mechanism of action differed. The anti-osteoclastic effect of coumestrol was associated with a dual effect on con A induced T cell proliferation and activation; 10{sup −7} M coumestrol significantly reducing T cell number (0.36) and TNF-α (0.47), IL-1β (0.23) and IL-6 (0.35) expression, whereas genistein (10{sup −7} M) had no effect on T cell number but a more pronounced effect on T cell differentiation reducing expression of TNF-α (0.49), IL-1β (0.52), IL-6 (0.71) and RANKL (0.71). Phytoestrogens therefore prevent the pro-osteoclastic action of T cells suggesting they may have a role in the control of inflammatory bone loss.

  1. Anticancer therapeutic potential of soy isoflavone, genistein.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Mepur H; Muthugounder, Sakunthala; Presser, Naftali; Viswanathan, Subramanian

    2004-01-01

    Genistein (4'5, 7-trihydroxyisoflavone) occurs as a glycoside (genistin) in the plant family Leguminosae, which includes the soybean (Glycine max). A significant correlation between the serum/plasma level of genistein and the incidence of gender-based cancers in Asian, European and American populations suggests that genistein may reduce the risk of tumor formation. Other evidence includes the mechanism of action of genistein in normal and cancer cells. Genistein inhibits protein tyrosine kinase (PTK), which is involved in phosphorylation of tyrosyl residues of membrane-bound receptors leading to signal transduction, and it inhibits topoisomerase II, which participates in DNA replication, transcription and repair. By blocking the activities of PTK, topoisomerase II and matrix metalloprotein (MMP9) and by down-regulating the expression of about 11 genes, including that of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), genistein can arrest cell growth and proliferation, cell cycle at G2/M, invasion and angiogenesis. Furthermore, genistein can alter the expression of gangliosides and other carbohydrate antigens to facilitate their immune recognition. Genistein acts synergistically with drugs such as tamoxifen, cisplatin, 1,3-bis 2-chloroethyl-1-nitrosourea (BCNU), dexamethasone, daunorubicin and tiazofurin, and with bioflavonoid food supplements such as quercetin, green-tea catechins and black-tea thearubigins. Genistein can augment the efficacy of radiation for breast and prostate carcinomas. Because it increases melanin production and tyrosinase activity, genistein can protect melanocytes of the skin of Caucasians from UV-B radiation-induced melanoma. Genistein-induced antigenic alteration has the potential for improving active specific immunotherapy of melanoma and carcinomas. When conjugated to B43 monoclonal antibody, genistein becomes a tool for passive immunotherapy to target B-lineage leukemias that overexpress the target antigen CD19. Genistein is also conjugated

  2. Phytoestrogens: a review of recent findings.

    PubMed

    Stark, Aliza; Madar, Zecharia

    2002-05-01

    Phytoestrogens have been investigated at the epidemiological, clinical and molecular levels to determine their potential health benefits. The two major groups of phytoestrogens, isoflavones and lignans, are abundant in soy products and flax respectively, but are also present in a variety of other foods. It is thought that these estrogen-like compounds may protect against chronic diseases, such as hormone-dependent cancers, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis. Furthermore, phytoestrogens are used as a natural alternative to hormone replacement therapy and to reduce menopausal symptoms. Phytoestrogens have been shown to induce both estrogenic and anti-estrogenic effects but their biological relevance and potency have not been well characterized. In children, consumption of soy-based formulas and soy milk can lead to high levels of exposure to phytoestrogens with only limited data available concerning potential benefits or adverse effects. Phytoestrogens are considered good candidates for use in natural therapies and as chemopreventive agents in adults. Safe and efficacious levels have yet to be established. PMID:12014514

  3. Genistein modulates the expression of NF-κB and MAPK (p-38 and ERK1/2), thereby attenuating D-Galactosamine induced fulminant hepatic failure in Wistar rats

    SciTech Connect

    Ganai, Ajaz A. Khan, Athar A. Malik, Zainul A. Farooqi, Humaira

    2015-03-01

    Genistein is an isoflavanoid abundantly found in soy. It has been found to play an important role in the prevention of various chronic diseases including cancer. In this study, we evaluated potential therapeutic properties of Genistein against D-Galactosamine (D-GalN) induced inflammation and hepatotoxicity in male Wistar rats. Fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) was induced in rats by intraperitoneal injection of D-GalN (700 mg/kgBW). Genistein (5 mg/kgBW/day) was given as pre-treatment for 30 days via intra-gastric route followed by D-GalN (700 mg/kgBW) injection. The hepatoprotective and curative effects of Genistein were evident from a significant decrease in the serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels as well as prevention of histological damage by pre-treatment of Genistein. Genistein pre-treatment significantly inhibited the increased protein levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), thereby reducing nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin-E2 (PGE) levels, respectively. In addition Genistein significantly suppressed the production of D-GalN-induced proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-1β. These inhibitory effects were associated with the suppression of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-ĸB) activation, IKKα/β and Mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation by Genistein in D-GalN-treated animals. In conclusion, our results suggest that Genistein may serve as a potential supplement in the prevention of hepatic and inflammatory diseases. Furthermore Genistein is able to maintain the redox potential and strengthens the antioxidant defense system of a cell. - Highlights: • First study to evaluate hepatoprotective effect of Genistein against D-GalN • Genistein prevents oxidative damage induced by D-GalN. • Genistein blunts iNOS, COX-2, NF-ĸB, IKKα/β and MAPK expression. • Genistein prevents D-GalN induced apoptosis and

  4. Effects of phytoestrogens on growth-related and lipogenic genes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the current study was to determine whether estradiol (E2) or the primary soy phytoestrogens genistein and daidzein regulate expression of growth-related and lipogenic genes in rainbow trout. Juvenile rainbow trout (5 mon, 65.8 ± 1.8 g) received intraperitoneal injections of E2, gen...

  5. Bowman-Birk inhibitor and genistein among soy compounds that synergistically inhibit nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 pathways in lipopolysaccharide-induced macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inflammation has an important role in the development of chronic diseases. In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory properties of eight soybean bioactive compounds using lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages. Genistein, daidzein, mix isoflavone glucosides, saponin A group glyco...

  6. Effects of phytoestrogens on growth-related and lipogenic genes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Cleveland, Beth M; Manor, Meghan L

    2015-04-01

    This study determined whether estradiol (E2) or the phytoestrogens genistein and daidzein regulate expression of growth-related and lipogenic genes in rainbow trout. Juvenile fish (5 mon, 65.8±1.8 g) received intraperitoneal injections of E2, genistein, or daidzein (5 μg/g body weight) or a higher dose of genistein (50 μg/g body weight). Liver and white muscle were harvested 24h post-injection. In liver, expression of vitellogenin (vtg) and estrogen receptor alpha (era1) increased in all treatments and reflected treatment estrogenicity (E2>genistein (50 μg/g)>genistein (5 μg/g)=daidzein (5 μg/g)). Estradiol and genistein (50 μg/g) reduced components of the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis in liver, including increased expression of IGF binding protein-2b1 (igfbp2b1) and reduced igfbp5b1. In liver E2 and genistein (50 μg/g) affected expression of components of the transforming growth factor beta signaling mechanism, reduced expression of ppar and rxr transcription factors, and increased expression of fatty acid synthesis genes srebp1, acly, fas, scd1, and gpat and lipid binding proteins fabp3 and lpl. In muscle E2 and genistein (50 μg/g) increased era1 and erb1 expression and decreased erb2 expression. Other genes responded to phytoestrogens in a manner that suggested regulation by estrogen receptor-independent mechanisms, including increased ghr2, igfbp2a, igfbp4, and igfbp5b1. Expression of muscle regulatory factors pax7 and myod was increased by E2 and genistein. These data indicate that genistein and daidzein affect expression of genes in rainbow trout that regulate physiological mechanisms central to growth and nutrient retention. PMID:25668741

  7. Impact of estradiol, ER subtype specific agonists and genistein on energy homeostasis in a rat model of nutrition induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Weigt, Carmen; Hertrampf, Torsten; Zoth, Nora; Fritzemeier, Karl Heinrich; Diel, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    Estrogens are known to be involved in the control of energy homeostasis. Here we investigated the role of ER alpha and ER beta in a model of nutrition induced obesity. Ovariectomized Wistar rats were fed a high fat diet and received either vehicle, E2, ER subtype selective agonists (Alpha and Beta) or genistein. After 10 weeks, body weight, visceral fat, serum leptin, blood lipids, and in the soleus muscle anabolic markers were determined. Treatment with E2 and Alpha decreased body weight, total cholesterol and VLDL. Visceral fat mass, adipocyte size, and serum leptin were reduced by E2, Alpha and Beta. In the soleus muscle, treatment with E2 and Beta modulated Igf1 and Pax7 gene expression and resulted in larger muscle fibers. Our data indicate that blood lipids are affected via ER alpha, whereas activation of ER beta results in an increase of soleus muscle mass. Adipose tissue homeostasis seems to be affected via both ERs. PMID:22230815

  8. Molecular identification of potential selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) like properties of phytoestrogens in the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7.

    PubMed

    Diel, P; Olff, S; Schmidt, S; Michna, H

    2001-08-01

    Numerous epidemiologic studies revealed that ethnic populations with higher dietary intake of phytoestrogens have the lowest incidence for breast cancer. The molecular mechanisms which may be responsible for this cancer protective action of phytoestrogens are so far only barely characterised. There are some hints that phytoestrogens may act like selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) on the breast. For this reason we have investigated potential SERM-like properties of the phytoestrogens daidzein (Dai), coumestrol (Cou), and genistein (Gen) in the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Effects of these substances on progesterone (PR) and estrogen receptor alpha (ER) mRNA expression and estrogen receptor alpha protein levels were studied in comparison to estradiol (E2) and the synthetic SERMs raloxifene (Ral) and faslodex (ICI 182 780). PR mRNA expression was up-regulated after administration of Cou, whereas treatment with Dai and Gen induced only a faint increase. ER mRNA expression was down-regulated by Cou but not affected by Dai and Gen. The content of ER protein in the breast cancer cells was strongly decreased by Gen, only a faint reduction could be observed following administration of Cou, whereas administration of Dai slightly increases ER protein levels. In summary and in comparison to the effects observed after administration of E2, Ral, and ICI it turned out that Cou shows molecular properties which are very similar to an estrogen receptor agonist like E2, whereas the molecular properties of Gen are comparable to the SERMs ICI and Ral. These results clearly indicate that phytoestrogens differ significantly in regard to their molecular action on breast cancer cells and can be subdivided into distinct functional categories. PMID:11509969

  9. Genistein promotes DNA demethylation of the steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) promoter in endometrial stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matsukura, Hiroshi; Aisaki, Ken-ichi; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Matsushima, Yuko; Kanno, Jun; Muramatsu, Masaaki; Sudo, Katsuko; Sato, Noriko

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Genistein (GEN) is a phytoestrogen found in soy products. {yields} GEN demethylated/unsilenced the steroidogenic factor 1 gene in endometrial tissue. {yields} GEN thus altered mRNA expression in uteri of ovariectomized (OVX) mice. {yields} A high-resolution melting assay was used to screen for epigenetic change. {yields} We isolated an endometrial cell clone that was epigenetically modulated by GEN. -- Abstract: It has recently been demonstrated that genistein (GEN), a phytoestrogen in soy products, is an epigenetic modulator in various types of cells; but its effect on endometrium has not yet been determined. We investigated the effects of GEN on mouse uterine cells, in vivo and in vitro. Oral administration of GEN for 1 week induced mild proliferation of the endometrium in ovariectomized (OVX) mice, which was accompanied by the induction of steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) gene expression. GEN administration induced demethylation of multiple CpG sites in the SF-1 promoter; these sites are extensively methylated and thus silenced in normal endometrium. The GEN-mediated promoter demethylation occurred predominantly on the luminal side, as opposed to myometrium side, indicating that the epigenetic change was mainly shown in regenerated cells. Primary cultures of endometrial stromal cell colonies were screened for GEN-mediated alterations of DNA methylation by a high-resolution melting (HRM) method. One out of 20 colony-forming cell clones showed GEN-induced demethylation of SF-1. This clone exhibited a high proliferation capacity with continuous colony formation activity through multiple serial clonings. We propose that only a portion of endometrial cells are capable of receiving epigenetic modulation by GEN.

  10. Mitigation of radiation-induced lung injury with EUK-207 and genistein: effects in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, J; Jelveh, S; Zaidi, A; Doctrow, S R; Hill, R P

    2013-02-01

    Exposure of civilian populations to radiation due to accident, war or terrorist act is an increasing concern. The lung is one of the more radiosensitive organs that may be affected in people receiving partial-body irradiation and radiation injury in lung is thought to be associated with the development of a prolonged inflammatory response. Here we examined how effectively damage to the lung can be mitigated by administration of drugs initiated at different times after radiation exposure and examined response in adolescent animals for comparison with the young adult animals that we had studied previously. We studied the mitigation efficacy of the isoflavone genistein (50 mg/kg) and the salen-Mn superoxide dismutase-catalase mimetic EUK-207 (8 mg/kg), both of which have been reported to scavenge reactive oxygen species and reduce activity of the NFkB pathway. The drugs were given by subcutaneous injection to 6- to 7-week-old Fisher rats daily starting either immediately or 2 weeks after irradiation with 12 Gy to the whole thorax. The treatment was stopped at 28 weeks post irradiation and the animals were assessed for levels of inflammatory cytokines, activated macrophages, oxidative damage and fibrosis at 48 weeks post irradiation. We demonstrated that both genistein and EUK-207 delayed and suppressed the increased breathing rate associated with pneumonitis. These agents also reduced levels of oxidative damage (50-100%), levels of TGF-β1 expression (75-100%), activated macrophages (20-60%) and fibrosis (60-80%). The adolescent rats developed pneumonitis earlier following irradiation of the lung than did the adult rats leading to greater severe morbidity requiring euthanasia (∼37% in adolescents vs. ∼10% in young adults) but the extent of the mitigation of the damage was similar or slightly greater. PMID:23237541

  11. Liquid chromatographic-photodiode array mass spectrometric analysis of dietary phytoestrogens from human urine and blood.

    PubMed

    Franke, Adrian A; Custer, Laurie J; Wilkens, Lynne R; Le Marchand, Loïc Le; Nomura, Abraham M Y; Goodman, Marc T; Kolonel, Laurence N

    2002-09-25

    Dietary phytoestrogens have been implicated in the prevention of chronic diseases. However, it is uncertain whether the phytoestrogens or the foods associated with phytoestrogens account for the observed effects. We report here a new liquid chromatography photodiode array mass spectrometry (LC-PDA-MS) assay for the determination of nanomolar amounts of the most prominent dietary phytoestrogens (genistein, dihydrogenistein, daidzein, dihydrodaidzein, glycitein, O-desmethylangolensin, hesperetin, naringenin, quercetin, enterodiol, enterolactone) in human plasma or serum and urine. This assay was found to be suitable for the assessment of quercetin exposure in an onion intervention study by measuring urinary quercetin levels. Other successful applications of this assay in clinical and epidemiologic studies validated the developed method and confirmed previous results on the negative association between urinary isoflavone excretion and breast cancer risk. PMID:12270199

  12. A pilot study of phytoestrogen content of soy foods and traditional Chinese medicines for women's health in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Li, Martin; Poon, Peter; Woo, Jean

    2004-05-01

    In view of the possible health benefits of phytoestrogens, a pilot study was carried out to quantitate the phytoestrogen content of soy foods and tea commonly consumed in Hong Kong, and also of traditional Chinese medicinal (TCM) products that are prescribed for menopausal symptoms and diseases relating to the menopause. Assays of daidzein and genistein were carried out using high-performance liquid chromatography, after extraction procedures. The TCM products were found to contain phytoestrogen in quantities comparable with soy products. Moreover, certain types of Chinese tea contained large quantities of phytoestrogens in the leaves, but also yielded comparable quantities in the infusion for drinking. The phytoestrogen content of these TCM may provide a scientific basis for their actions. However, clinical efficacy can only be determined by clinical trials. PMID:15223596

  13. SULFATION OF THE ISOFLAVONES GENISTEIN AND DAIDZEIN IN HUMAN AND RAT LIVER AND GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytoestrogens, in particular the isoflavone aglycones genistein and daidzein, are thought to be the bioactive components of soy. Like estrogens, isoflavones can be sulfur-conjugated. However, although isoflavones in the serum are found largely in the form of glucuronide and sulfur conjugates follow...

  14. Genistein exposure inhibits growth and alters steroidogenesis in adult mouse antral follicles.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shreya; Peretz, Jackye; Pan, Yuan-Xiang; Helferich, William G; Flaws, Jodi A

    2016-02-15

    Genistein is a naturally occurring isoflavone phytoestrogen commonly found in plant products such as soybeans, lentils, and chickpeas. Genistein, like other phytoestrogens, has the potential to mimic, enhance, or impair the estradiol biosynthesis pathway, thereby potentially altering ovarian follicle growth. Previous studies have inconsistently indicated that genistein exposure may alter granulosa cell proliferation and hormone production, but no studies have examined the effects of genistein on intact antral follicles. Thus, this study was designed to test the hypothesis that genistein exposure inhibits follicle growth and steroidogenesis in intact antral follicles. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles isolated from CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO) or genistein (6.0 and 36μM) for 18-96h. Every 24h, follicle diameters were measured to assess growth. At the end of each culture period, the media were pooled to measure hormone levels, and the cultured follicles were collected to measure expression of cell cycle regulators and steroidogenic enzymes. The results indicate that genistein (36μM) inhibits growth of mouse antral follicles. Additionally, genistein (6.0 and 36μM) increases progesterone, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels, but decreases estrone and estradiol levels. The results also indicate that genistein alters the expression of steroidogenic enzymes at 24, 72 and 96h, and the expression of cell cycle regulators at 18h. These data indicate that genistein exposure inhibits antral follicle growth by inhibiting the cell cycle, alters sex steroid hormone levels, and dysregulates steroidogenic enzymes in cultured mouse antral follicles. PMID:26792615

  15. Phytoestrogens in milk: Overestimations caused by contamination of the hydrolytic enzyme used during sample extraction.

    PubMed

    Bláhová, L; Kohoutek, J; Procházková, T; Prudíková, M; Bláha, L

    2016-09-01

    Isoflavones are natural phytoestrogens with antioxidant and endocrine-disrupting potencies. Monitoring of their levels is important to ensure the high quality and safety of food, milk, and dairy products. The efficiency and accuracy of phytoestrogen analyses in complex matrices such as milk depend on the extraction procedure, which often uses hydrolysis by means of the β-glucuronidase/sulfatase enzyme originating from Helix pomatia. The present study reveals that the commercially available hydrolytic enzyme is contaminated by several phytoestrogen isoflavones (genistein, daidzein, formononetin, and biochanin A) and their metabolite equol, as well as flavones (naringenin and apigenin) and coumestrol. We show that the concentrations of daidzein and genistein in the enzyme could have impaired the results of analyses of the main isoflavones in several previously published studies. Of 8 analyzed compounds, only equol was confirmed in the present study and it serves as a reliable marker of phytoestrogens originating from cow feed. Critical reassessment of phytoestrogen concentrations in milk is needed because several previously published studies might have overestimated the concentrations depending on the extraction procedure used. PMID:27394955

  16. Reproductive consequences of exposure to waterborne phytoestrogens in male fighting fish Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Louise M; Brown, Alexandria C; Montgomery, Tracy M; Clotfelter, Ethan D

    2011-04-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant compounds that can act as endocrine disruptors in vertebrates. Biologically active levels of phytoestrogens have been found in aquatic habitats near wood pulp and paper mills, biofuel manufacturing plants, sewage-treatment plants, and agricultural fields. Phytoestrogens are known to cause hormonal and gonadal changes in male fish, but few studies have connected these effects to outcomes relevant to reproductive success. In one experiment, we exposed sexually mature male fighting fish Betta splendens to environmentally relevant (1 μg L(-1)) and pharmacological concentrations (1000 μg L(-1)) of the phytoestrogen genistein as well as to a positive control of waterborne 17β-estradiol (E2; 1 μg L(-1)), and a negative control of untreated water. In a second experiment, we exposed male B. splendens to environmentally relevant concentrations (1 μg L(-1)) of genistein and β-sitosterol singly and in combination as well as to the positive and negative controls. All exposures were 21 days in duration. We measured sex-steroid hormone levels, gonadosomatic index (GSI), sperm concentration and motility, and fertilization success in these fish. We found that exposure to genistein did not affect circulating levels of the androgen 11-ketotestosterone or the estrogen E2 relative to negative-control fish. We also found that neither of the compounds nor their mixture affected GSI, sperm concentration or motility, or fertilization success in exposed fish relative to negative-control fish. However, fish exposed to phytoestrogens showed some evidence of fewer but more motile sperm than fish exposed to the positive control E2. We conclude that sexually mature male B. splendens are relatively immune to reproductive impairments from short-term exposure to waterborne phytoestrogens. PMID:20589370

  17. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric fragmentation study of phytoestrogens as their trimethylsilyl derivatives: Identification in soy milk and wastewater samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferrer, I.; Barber, L.B.; Thurman, E.M.

    2009-01-01

    An analytical method for the identification of eight plant phytoestrogens (biochanin A, coumestrol, daidzein, equol, formononetin, glycitein, genistein and prunetin) in soy products and wastewater samples was developed using gas chromatography coupled with ion trap mass spectrometry (GC/MS-MS). The phytoestrogens were derivatized as their trimethylsilyl ethers with trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS) and N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA). The phytoestrogens were isolated from all samples with liquid-liquid extraction using ethyl acetate. Daidzein-d4 and genistein-d4 labeled standards were used as internal standards before extraction and derivatization. The fragmentation patterns of the phytoestrogens were investigated by isolating and fragmenting the precursor ions in the ion-trap and a typical fragmentation involved the loss of a methyl and a carbonyl group. Two characteristic fragment ions for each analyte were chosen for identification and confirmation. The developed methodology was applied to the identification and confirmation of phytoestrogens in soy milk, in wastewater effluent from a soy-milk processing plant, and in wastewater (influent and effluent) from a treatment plant. Detected concentrations of genistein ranged from 50,000 ??g/L and 2000 ??g/L in soy milk and in wastewater from a soy-plant, respectively, to 20 ??g/L and <1 ??g/L for influent and effluent from a wastewater treatment plant, respectively. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  18. The phytoestrogenic Cyclopia extract, SM6Met, increases median tumor free survival and reduces tumor mass and volume in chemically induced rat mammary gland carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Visser, Koch; Zierau, Oliver; Macejová, Dana; Goerl, Florian; Muders, Michael; Baretton, Gustavo B; Vollmer, Günter; Louw, Ann

    2016-10-01

    SM6Met, a phytoestrogenic extract of Cyclopia subternata indigenous to the Western Cape province of South Africa, displays estrogenic attributes with potential for breast cancer chemoprevention. In this study, we report that SM6Met, in the presence of estradiol, induces a significant cell cycle G0/G1 phase arrest similar to the selective estrogen receptor modulator, tamoxifen. Furthermore, as a proof of concept, in the N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea induced rat mammary gland carcinogenesis model, SM6Met increases tumor latency by 7days and median tumor free survival by 42 days, while decreasing palpable tumor frequency by 32%, tumor mass by 40%, and tumor volume by 53%. Therefore, the current study provides proof of concept that SM6Met has definite potential as a chemopreventative agent against the development and progression of breast cancer. PMID:27142456

  19. Evidence for genistein as a mitochondriotropic molecule.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Marcos Roberto

    2016-07-01

    Genistein (4',5,7-trihydroxyisoflavone; C15H10O5), an isoflavone, has been investigated as an anti-cancer agent due to its ability to trigger cell death (both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways) in different cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, genistein has been viewed as a mitochondriotropic molecule due to the direct effects this isoflavone induces in mitochondria, such as modulation of enzymatic activity of components of the oxidative phosphorylation system. Apoptosis triggering may also be mediated by genistein through activation of the mitochondria-dependent pathway by a mechanism associated with mitochondrial dysfunction (i.e., disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential - MMP, release of cytochrome c, activation of the apoptosome, among others). Efforts have been made in order to elucidate how genistein coordinate these biochemical phenomena. Nonetheless, some areas of the mitochondria-associated research (mitochondrial biogenesis, redox biology of mitochondria, and mitochondria-associated bioenergetic parameters) need to be explored regarding the role of genistein as a mitochondria-targeted agent. This is a pharmacologically relevant issue due to the possibility of using genistein as a mitochondria-targeted drug in cases of cancer, neurodegeneration, cardiovascular, and endocrine disease, for example. The present review aims to describe, compare, and discuss relevant data about the effects of genistein upon mitochondria. PMID:27223841

  20. Bioactivation of Phytoestrogens: Intestinal Bacteria and Health.

    PubMed

    Landete, J M; Arqués, J; Medina, M; Gaya, P; de Las Rivas, B; Muñoz, R

    2016-08-17

    Phytoestrogens are polyphenols similar to human estrogens found in plants or derived from plant precursors. Phytoestrogens are found in high concentration in soya, flaxseed and other seeds, fruits, vegetables, cereals, tea, chocolate, etc. They comprise several classes of chemical compounds (stilbenes, coumestans, isoflavones, ellagitannins, and lignans) which are structurally similar to endogenous estrogens but which can have both estrogenic and antiestrogenic effects. Although epidemiological and experimental evidence indicates that intake of phytoestrogens in foods may be protective against certain chronic diseases, discrepancies have been observed between in vivo and in vitro experiments. The microbial transformations have not been reported so far in stilbenes and coumestans. However, isoflavones, ellagitanins, and lignans are metabolized by intestinal bacteria to produce equol, urolithins, and enterolignans, respectively. Equol, urolithin, and enterolignans are more bioavailable, and have more estrogenic/antiestrogenic and antioxidant activity than their precursors. Moreover, equol, urolithins and enterolignans have anti-inflammatory effects and induce antiproliferative and apoptosis-inducing activities. The transformation of isoflavones, ellagitanins, and lignans by intestinal microbiota is essential to be protective against certain chronic diseases, as cancer, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and menopausal symptoms. Bioavailability, bioactivity, and health effects of dietary phytoestrogens are strongly determined by the intestinal bacteria of each individual. PMID:25848676

  1. Combination therapy with taurine, epigallocatechin gallate and genistein for protection against hepatic fibrosis induced by alcohol in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Lang; Liao, Ming; Zheng, Li; He, Min; Huang, Quanfang; Wei, Ling; Huang, Renbin; Zhang, Shijun; Lin, Xing

    2012-01-01

    This study was to investigate the possibility of enhancing the anti-fibrotic effect by using a combination therapy with taurine, epigallocatechin gallate and genistein in a rat liver fibrosis model induced by alcohol, and to explore its underlying mechanism. Hepatic fibrosis was induced by intragastric administration with various amount of alcohol (5.0-9.5 g/kg) within 24 weeks in rats. The model group received alcohol only, and treatment groups received the corresponding drugs plus alcohol respectively, while the normal control group received an equal volume of saline. The antifibrotic effects of combination therapy were assessed directly by hepatic histology, and indirectly by measurement of serum biochemical markers, the fibrosis markers and related key cytokines/proteins. The results showed that combination therapy could significantly improve the liver function, as indicated by decreasing levels of alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, γ-glutamyltransferase, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α. Moreover, combination therapy could effectively suppress the serum levels of fibrosis markers and hepatic hydroxyproline content, inhibit collagen deposition and reduce the pathological tissue damage. Research on mechanism showed that combination therapy was able to markedly reduce lipid peroxidation and recruit the anti-oxidative defense system, and inhibit the expression of B-cell lymphoma 2, α-smooth muscle actin, transforming growth factor β(1) and small mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 3 proteins. Our results showed that combination therapy is effective in attenuating hepatic injury and fibrosis in the alcohol-induced rat model. The improved efficacy of the combination therapy with its good safety profile could represent a new protective approach for liver fibrosis. PMID:23037169

  2. Soy Isoflavone Genistein-Mediated Downregulation of miR-155 Contributes to the Anticancer Effects of Genistein

    PubMed Central

    de la Parra, Columba; Castillo-Pichardo, Linette; Cruz-Collazo, Ailed; Cubano, Luis; Redis, Roxana; Calin, George A.; Dharmawardhane, Suranganie

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that dietary genistein inhibits mammary tumor growth and metastasis of the highly metastatic MDA-MB-435 cancer cells in immunocompromised mice. The purpose herein was to characterize the role of the novel oncogenic microRNA (miRNA) miR-155 in the anticancer effects of genistein in metastatic breast cancer. The effect of genistein was determined on breast cancer cell viability, apoptosis, and expression of miR-155 and its targets. At low physiologically relevant concentrations, genistein inhibits cell viability and induces apoptosis in metastatic MDA-MB-435 and Hs578t breast cancer cells, without affecting the viability of nonmetastatic MCF-7 breast cancer cells. In parallel with reduced cell viability, miR-155 is downregulated, whereas proapoptotic and anticell proliferative miR-155 targets FOXO3, PTEN, casein kinase, and p27 are upregulated in MDA-MB-435 and Hs578t cells in response to genistein treatment. However, miR-155 levels remain unchanged in response to genistein in the MCF-7 cells. Ectopic expression of miR-155 in MDA-MB-435 and Hs578t cells decreases the effects of genistein on cell viability and abrogates the effects of genistein on apoptosis and expression of proapoptotic genes. Therefore, genistein-mediated downregulation of miR-155 contributes to the anticancer effects of genistein in metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26771440

  3. Time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay of plasma daidzein and genistein.

    PubMed

    Wang, G J; Lapcík, O; Hampl, R; Uehara, M; Al-Maharik, N; Stumpf, K; Mikola, H; Wähälä, K; Adlercreutz, H

    2000-06-01

    We present a method for the determination of the phytoestrogens daidzein and genistein in plasma (serum). These weakly estrogenic isoflavones occur in soybeans and in smaller amounts in some other beans and plants. It has been suggested that they may afford protection against prostate and breast cancer. The method is based on time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay (TR-FIA) using a europium chelate as a label. After synthesis of 4'-O-carboxymethyl-daidzein and 4'-O-carboxymethyl-genistein the compounds are coupled to bovine serum albumin (BSA), then used as antigens to immunize rabbits. The tracers with the europium chelate are synthesized using the same 4'-O-derivative of the isoflavones. After enzymatic hydrolysis and ether extraction the immunoassay is carried out using the VICTOR 1420 multilabel counter (Wallac Oy, Turku, Finland). The antisera cross-reacted to some extent with some isoflavonoids but not with flavonoids. The cross-reactivity seems not to influence the results, which were highly specific for both compounds. The correlation coefficients between the TR-FIA methods and the reference method based on isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were high; r-values were about 0.95-0.99 depending on concentration. The intra-assay coefficients of variation (CV%) for daidzein and genistein at three different concentrations vary 3.2-4.5 and 3.2-4.1, respectively. The inter-assay CVs vary 5.0-6.3 and 4.5-5.3, respectively. The working ranges of the daidzein and genistein assays are 1.0-216 and 1.7-370 nmol/l, respectively. The plasma values (n = 80) of daidzein and genistein are very low in Finnish subjects (mean for daidzein, 3.8+/-6.8 and for genistein, 3.2+/-7.6 nmol/l; median value for daidzein 1.5 and for genistein 1.4 nmol/l). PMID:10802284

  4. Bioactivity of genistein: A review of in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Ganai, Ajaz Ahmad; Farooqi, Humaira

    2015-12-01

    Genistein is a soy derived isoflavanoid compound with multitude of health benefits. This compound is found to be a potent agent in both prophylaxis and treatment of cancer and various other chronic diseases. Ranging from its antioxidant activity to its effect on various cancer types, genistein has been a compound of interest in a number of studies carried out so far. The great interest that has focused on genistein led to the identification of numerous intracellular targets of its action in the live cells. Retardation of atherogenic activity and increasing the antioxidant defense of a cell has been attributed to genistein while as it has also been reported that genistein possesses suppressive effects on both the cell-mediated and humoral components of the adaptive immune system. At the molecular level, genistein reduces the number of developing CD4(+) and CD8(+) thymocytes suggesting a possible mechanism for genistein effects on cell-mediated immunity. Genistein may inhibit cancer progression by inducing apoptosis or inhibiting proliferation. In addition, genistein has its prominent role in preventing the DNA damage. Apolipoprotein B secretion gets reduced when the subjects are administered with genistein. Genistein confers a better protection to ischemic conditions thereby giving a significant cardioprotection. At cellular level adipocyte differentiation is another property of genistein which makes it a better neutraceutical which can reduce the atherogenic condition and hypercholesterolemia. Expression of human endothelial nitric oxide synthase is associated with genistein supplementation. The advantage of using genistein is its multidirectional action and its lesser toxicity. PMID:26653547

  5. Phytoestrogens--a short review.

    PubMed

    Knight, D C; Eden, J A

    1995-11-01

    The wide distribution of plant estrogens or 'phytoestrogens' in cereals, vegetables and medicinal plants raises questions concerning the possible health risks and benefits associated with their consumption. In this article, we provide a synopsis of the literature relating principally to the clinical effects of phytoestrogens on the diseases associated with ageing. The sources, metabolism and properties of the different phytoestrogens are also discussed. The studies included were primarily restricted to those with data pertinent to clinical practice. Our contention is that phytoestrogens are at least part of the reason why vegetarians and Asian populations have a low rate of cancer and heart disease. PMID:8746873

  6. [Influence of the phytoestrogen drug, SoyaVital, on climacteric symptoms].

    PubMed

    Rachev, E; Stamenov, G; Davidkova, N

    2000-01-01

    The results of phytoestrogen drug SoyaVital on the climacteric symptoms are presented. The preparation consists of 35 mg isoflavones with high content of genistein in one capsule. A group of 26 patients having climacteric symptoms have been treated by one capsule per day for a period of 12 weeks. The evaluation of the symptoms by Kuppermann score decreased statistically significant by 30.06%. The authors recommend SoyaVital as an alternative to the hormonal replacement therapy. PMID:11288639

  7. Combinatory effects of phytoestrogens and 17beta-estradiol on proliferation and apoptosis in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Simone; Michna, Horst; Diel, Patrick

    2005-04-01

    Phytoestrogens have been described to be weak estrogens, SERMs or exhibit antiestrogenic properties. However, information about their activity in presence of estrogens is limited. Therefore, we have analysed the dose dependent combinatory activity of the phytoestrogens genistein (Gen), daidzein (Dai) and coumestrol (Cou), and 17beta-estradiol (E2) on cell proliferation and apoptosis induction in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Neither additive nor antagonistic effects on proliferation could be observed, but in contrast all phytoestrogens possessed the ability to inhibit apoptosis in the presence of 17beta-estradiol. In summary, our in vitro results demonstrate that Gen does not exhibit any antiestrogenic properties. The additive growth stimulatory effects of Gen, Dai and Cou in the presence of E2 are not the result of a stimulation of proliferation; these phytoestrogens, at least in MCF-7 cells, could be characterised as inhibitors of apoptosis. PMID:15876409

  8. Effects of genistein on early-stage cutaneous wound healing

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Eunkyo; Lee, Seung Min; Jung, In-Kyung; Lim, Yunsook; Kim, Jung-Hyun

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} We examine the effect of genistein on cutaneous wound healing. {yields} Genistein enhanced wound closure during the early stage of wound healing. {yields} These genistein effects on wound closure were induced by reduction of oxidative stress through increasing antioxidant capacity and modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. -- Abstract: Wound healing occurs in three sequential phases: hemostasis and inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. Inflammation, the earliest phase, is considered a critical period for wound healing because immune cells remove damaged tissues, foreign debris, and remaining dead tissue. Wound healing would be delayed without inflammation, and this phase is affected by antioxidation capacity. Therefore, we hypothesized that genistein, which has an antioxidant effect, might modulate the wound healing process by altering the inflammatory response. After three days of acclimation, mice were divided into three groups: control, 0.025% genistein, and 0.1% genistein. After two weeks of an experimental diet, skin wounds were induced. Wounded skin areas were imaged, and the healing rate calculated. To measure lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme expression and activity, and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, skin and liver tissues were harvested at 12, 24, 48, and 72 h. Genistein did not affect body weight. The rate of wound closure in mice fed genistein was significantly faster than in the control group during the early stage of wound healing, especially in first three days. Cu, Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD expression in wound skin tissue in the 0.1% genistein group was lower than in the control group. However, CAT expression did not differ among groups. We also found that genistein modulated NF-{kappa}B and TNF-{alpha} expression during the early stage of wound healing. The genistein group had significantly lower hepatic lipid peroxidation and higher SOD, CAT, and GPx activities than the control group. These results

  9. Phytoestrogens levels determination in the cord blood from Malaysia rural and urban populations

    SciTech Connect

    Mustafa, A.M. . E-mail: mustafa@ummc.edu.my; Malintan, N.T.; Seelan, S.; Zhan, Z.; Mohamed, Z.; Hassan, J.; Pendek, R.; Hussain, R.; Ito, N.

    2007-07-01

    This study is a result of an analysis of free and conjugated phytoestrogens daidzein, genistein, daidzin, genistin and coumesterol in human cord blood plasma using LCMS. Cord blood was collected from urban and rural populations of Malaysia (n = 300) to establish a simple preliminary database on the levels of the analyzed compounds in the collected samples. The study also aimed to look at the levels of phytoestrogens in babies during birth as this may have a profound effect on the developmental process. The sample clean up was carried out by solid-phase extraction using C18 column and passed through DEAE sephadex gel before analysis by LCMS. The mean concentrations of total phytoestrogens were daidzein (1.4 {+-} 2.9 ng/ml), genistein (3.7 {+-} 2.8 ng/ml), daidzin (3.5 {+-} 3.1 ng/ml), genistin (19.5 {+-} 4.2 ng/ml) and coumesterol (3.3 {+-} 3.3 ng/ml). Distribution of phytoestrogen was found to be higher in samples collected from rural areas compared to that of urban areas.

  10. Phytoestrogens alter the reproductive organ development in the mink (Mustela vison)

    SciTech Connect

    Ryoekkynen, Ari . E-mail: ryokkyne@cc.joensuu.fi; Nieminen, Petteri; Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Pyykoenen, Teija; Asikainen, Juha; Haenninen, Sari; Mononen, Jaakko; Kukkonen, Jussi V.K.

    2005-01-15

    The aim of the present study was to examine the reproductive effects of two perorally applied phytoestrogens, genistein (8 mg/kg/day) and {beta}-sitosterol (50 mg/kg/day), on the mink (Mustela vison) at human dietary exposure levels. Parental generations were exposed over 9 months to these phytoestrogens and their offspring were exposed via gestation and lactation. Parents and their offspring were sampled 21 days after the birth of the kits. Sex hormone levels, sperm quality, organ weights, and development of the kits were examined. The exposed females were heavier than the control females at the 1st postnatal day (PND). The control kits were heavier than the exposed kits from the 1st to the 21st PND. Phytoestrogens did not affect the organ weights of the adult minks, but the relative testicular weight of the exposed kits was higher than in the control kits. The relative prostate weight was higher and the relative uterine weight lower in the {beta}-sitosterol-exposed kits than in the control kits. Moreover, the plasma dihydrotestosterone levels were lower in the genistein-exposed male kits compared to the control male kits. This study could not explain the mechanisms behind these alterations. The results indicate that perinatal phytoestrogen exposures cause alterations in the weight of the reproductive organs of the mink kits.

  11. Modulation of Aromatase by Phytoestrogens

    PubMed Central

    Lephart, Edwin D.

    2015-01-01

    The aromatase enzyme catalyzes the conversion of androgens to estrogens in many human tissues. Estrogens are known to stimulate cellular proliferation associated with certain cancers and protect against adverse symptoms during the peri- and postmenopausal intervals. Phytoestrogens are a group of plant derived naturally occurring compounds that have chemical structures similar to estrogen. Since phytoestrogens are known to be constituents of animal/human food sources, these compounds have received increased research attention. Phytoestrogens may contribute to decreased cancer risk by the inhibition of aromatase enzyme activity and CYP19 gene expression in human tissues. This review covers (a) the aromatase enzyme (historical descriptions on function, activity, and gene characteristics), (b) phytoestrogens in their classifications and applications to human health, and (c) a chronological coverage of aromatase activity modulated by phytoestrogens from the early 1980s to 2015. In general, phytoestrogens act as aromatase inhibitors by (a) decreasing aromatase gene expression, (b) inhibiting the aromatase enzyme itself, or (c) in some cases acting at both levels of regulation. The findings presented herein are consistent with estrogen's impact on health and phytoestrogen's potential as anticancer treatments, but well-controlled, large-scale studies are warranted to determine the effectiveness of phytoestrogens on breast cancer and age-related diseases. PMID:26798508

  12. Exposure to Environmentally Relevant Concentrations of Genistein during Activation Does Not Affect Sperm Motility in the Fighting Fish Betta splendens

    PubMed Central

    Clotfelter, Ethan D.; Gendelman, Hannah K.

    2014-01-01

    Sperm collected from male fighting fish Betta splendens were activated in control water, water containing the ion-channel blocker gadolinium (a putative positive control), or water containing the isoflavone phytoestrogen genistein to determine the effects of acute genistein exposure on male reproductive function. Computer-assisted sperm analysis was used to quantify the proportion of sperm that were motile and the swimming velocity of those sperm. The highest concentration of gadolinium (100 μM) tested was effective at reducing sperm motility and velocity, but neither concentration of genistein tested (3.7 nM or 3.7 μM) significantly affected these sperm parameters. Our findings suggest that acute exposure to waterborne phytoestrogens during activation does not reduce the motility of fish sperm. PMID:24516856

  13. Exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of genistein during activation does not affect sperm motility in the fighting fish Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, Ethan D; Gendelman, Hannah K

    2014-01-01

    Sperm collected from male fighting fish Betta splendens were activated in control water, water containing the ion-channel blocker gadolinium (a putative positive control), or water containing the isoflavone phytoestrogen genistein to determine the effects of acute genistein exposure on male reproductive function. Computer-assisted sperm analysis was used to quantify the proportion of sperm that were motile and the swimming velocity of those sperm. The highest concentration of gadolinium (100 μ M) tested was effective at reducing sperm motility and velocity, but neither concentration of genistein tested (3.7 nM or 3.7 μ M) significantly affected these sperm parameters. Our findings suggest that acute exposure to waterborne phytoestrogens during activation does not reduce the motility of fish sperm. PMID:24516856

  14. Phytoestrogens Impact on Menopausal Symptomatology

    PubMed Central

    Rosic, Semso; Kendic, Sulejman; Rosic, Muhamed

    2013-01-01

    Conflict of interest: none declared. Introduction The balance of endocrine and autocrine activity usually starts to fade after age of 45 years in women. This is particularly true for the imbalance of estrogen and progesterone. This imbalance creates a number of clinical syndromes and disorders. Goal The goal of the study is to determine the effects of phytoestrogens on the psychological, somatic-vegetative and urogenital symptoms of menopause. Material and methods The study included 275 respondents who are more than three in menopause. Respondents were taking commercially available phytoestrogens, in duration of 12 months. Results and Discussion Review of clinical and epidemiological studies showing different results regarding effects of phytoestrogens on menopausal symptoms. In our study there was a significant reduction of somatic-vegetative and psychological symptoms under the influence of phytoestrogens, while urogenital symptomatology was not significantly changed. We recommend the use of phytoestrogens in early postmenopausal women with moderate symptoms. PMID:24082832

  15. Time dependency of uterine effects of naringenin type phytoestrogens in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zierau, Oliver; Kretzschmar, Georg; Möller, Frank; Weigt, Carmen; Vollmer, Günter

    2008-11-01

    Phytoestrogens exhibit significant estrogen agonistic/antagonistic properties in animals and humans. Naturally occurring flavonoids with a naringenin backbone like 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) and 6-(1,1-dimethylallyl)naringenin (6-DMAN) are considered to be some of the most potent phytochemicals activating nuclear receptors. 8-PN is a more potent estrogenic substance while 6-DMAN appears to have a higher antiandrogenic potency, however these are less well characterized compared to other phytoestrogens such as genistein. The aim of this study was to assess the estrogenic properties of 8-PN and 6-DMAN in an ovariectomized in vivo rat model. 8-PN and 6-DMAN were applied at concentrations of 15mg/kgBW. We assessed the uterotrophic response after 7h, 24h and 72h of treatment. In contrast to 8-PN, 6-DMAN did not alter uterine wet weight or the level of expression of proliferation markers at any time point. In contrast to the uterotrophic response, 6-DMAN stimulated uterine mRNA expression of estrogen responsive genes carrying an estrogen response element (ERE) in the ovariectomized rats, but to a lesser extent than E2 and 8-PN. In all treatment regimens, the mRNA expression of estrogen receptors alpha and beta mRNA was measured. In summary, we assessed the time dependent uterine responses and estrogenic activities of 6-DMAN and 8-PN. In contrast to 8-PN which mimicked the E2 induced responses on uterine wet weight and gene expression, 6-DMAN has no uterotrophic effect and only regulated the mRNA expression of genes carrying an ERE. Therefore, 6-DMAN is an exciting candidate molecule for future investigations and potentially a natural occurring selective estrogen receptor modulator. PMID:18775763

  16. Prenylation has a compound specific effect on the estrogenicity of naringenin and genistein.

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Georg; Zierau, Oliver; Wober, Jannette; Tischer, Sandra; Metz, Peter; Vollmer, Günter

    2010-01-01

    A variety of plant derived substances, so-called phytoestrogens (PEs), although structurally not related to steroids, produce effects similar to the mammalian estradiol. However, little is known so far about the structural requirements which determine PE activities. Taking into consideration that prenylation reactions are relatively common in plant secondary metabolism, the activity of a set of three PE derivatives of genistein and naringenin, namely genistein, 8-prenylgenistein (8PG), 6-(1,1-dimethylallyl)genistein (6DMAG), naringenin, 8-prenylnaringenin (8PN) and 6-(1,1-dimethylallyl)naringenin (6DMAN) was compared regarding structure-estrogenicity relationships in three functionally different estrogen receptor assays. Strong estrogenic activities were recorded for 6DMAN and 8PN in all assays used, while the parent compound naringenin showed only very weak estrogenicity. In contrast, in the case of genistein derivatives, only genistein itself exhibited estrogenic activity in a yeast based assay. In MVLN breast cancer cells, a bioluminescent MCF-7-derived cell line, the estrogenic activity of all three genistein derivatives was similar. Studying alkaline phosphatase activity in Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells as an estrogenic response marker revealed a similar pattern of estrogenicity of the genistein derivatives compared to the yeast based assay although a slight estrogenic effect of 6DMAG and 8PG was apparent. In summary, this study demonstrates that prenylation often found in plant secondary metabolism differentially modifies estrogenic properties of PEs depending on the basic structure of the respective PE. PMID:19733663

  17. Rapid analysis of phytoestrogens in human urine by time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay.

    PubMed

    Uehara, M; Lapcík, O; Hampl, R; Al-Maharik, N; Mäkelä, T; Wähälä, K; Mikola, H; Adlercreutz, H

    2000-04-01

    A time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay (TR-FIA), with europium labeled phytoestrogens as tracers, was developed for the quantitative determination of enterolactone, genistein and daidzein in human urine. The aim was to create a method for the screening of large populations in order to assess the possible correlations between the urinary levels and the risk of Western diseases. After the synthesis of the 5'-carboxymethoxy derivative of enterolactone and 4'-O-carboxymethyl derivatives of daidzein and genistein, the respective compound was coupled to bovine serum albumin and then used as an antigen in the immunization of rabbits. The same derivatives of the phytoestrogen were used in preparing the europium tracers. After the enzymatic hydrolysis, the TR-FIA was carried out using the Victor 1420 multilabel counter. The method has sufficient sensitivity to measure the phytoestrogens at concentrations even below 5 nmol/l. The intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation, at three different concentrations, varied from 1.9 to 5.3 and from 2.4 to 9.7, respectively. We measured urinary enterolactone, genistein and daidzein in 215 samples from Finnish healthy women and found that more than 50% of the values ranged between 1 and 7, <0.1 and 0.6 and below 0.6 micromol/24 h, respectively. The TR-FIA method including only a hydrolysis step gave higher values than those measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). However, the assay results by the present method showed strong correlation with those obtained by GC-MS. It is concluded that the TR-FIA is suitable for population screening of urinary phytoestrogens. PMID:10822017

  18. Direct action of genistein on CFTR.

    PubMed

    Weinreich, F; Wood, P G; Riordan, J R; Nagel, G

    1997-08-01

    Human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channels were expressed in oocytes from Xenopus laevis after injection of CFTR cRNA and studied with the two-electrode voltage-clamp and the giant patch techniques. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein alone activated a small chloride current in whole oocytes expressing CFTR and substantially increased the chloride current obtained upon stimulation with forskolin and isobutyl methylxanthine (IBMX). In giant excised patches, genistein was unable to open protein-kinase-A-phosphorylated CFTR channels in the absence of ATP, but increased the ATP-induced CFTR channel currents by a factor of 3.8 +/- 1.7. This genistein-mediated potentiation in excised patches is independent of protein phosphatase activity, as it is readily reversible, even after complete inhibition of protein kinase A activity. Involvement of protein tyrosine kinases also seems unlikely, because this effect of genistein is not antagonized by high concentrations of the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor ortho-vanadate. We, therefore, propose a direct interaction of genistein with CFTR, probably at a nucleotide binding site, which leads to a higher open probability. PMID:9211816

  19. Effects of neonatal treatment with two phytoestrogens on male rat sexual behavior and partner preference.

    PubMed

    Morales-Otal, Adriana; Ferreira-Nuño, Armando; Olayo-Lortia, Jesús; Barrios-González, Javier; Tarragó-Castellanos, Rosario

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this work was to compare the effect of neonatal treatment with the phytoestrogens coumestrol (COU) and genistein (GEN), administered in equimolecular doses, on the sexual behavior and partner preference of male rats. Four groups of male rats were injected daily from day 1 to 5 with 150 µg of GEN, an equivalent amount of COU, 1 µg of β-estradiol 3-benzoato (EB), or olive oil (VEH) (control). A fifth group remained intact. In the GEN group, intromission and ejaculation latencies decreased, whereas ejaculatory frequency increased. Contrasting results were observed in COU males. EB males could not ejaculate and their mount and intromission latencies increased significantly. To determine sexual-partner preferences, a multiple partner preference arena was used and two types of tests were performed, the first one without allowing contact test (CT) with the stimulus animals, followed by a CT. COU and GEN groups did not show preference for any stimulus animal, whereas the EB males preferred the expert male. When CT with the stimulus animals was allowed, GEN-males preferred the receptive female, unlike the COU and EB groups. It is concluded that neonatal treatment with COU and GEN induced opposite effects, the effects of COU being more estrogenic. PMID:27482864

  20. Soy isoflavone genistein modulates cell cycle progression and induces apoptosis in HER-2/neu oncogene expressing human breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Katdare, Meena; Osborne, Michael; Telang, Nitin T

    2002-10-01

    In the multistep progressive pathogenesis of human breast cancer, comedo ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) represents a preinvasive precursor lesion for therapy resistant invasive cancer. Human tissue derived cell culture models exhibiting molecular similarities to clinical DCIS facilitate an important preclinical mechanistic approach for evaluation of preventive efficacy of natural and synthetic chemopreventive compounds. Natural phytochemicals present in fresh fruits, vegetables and grain products are likely to offer protection against cancer. The clinical efficacy of these natural phytochemicals, however, depends on extrapolation, and is therefore equivocal. The present study determined whether the natural soy isoflavone genistein (GEN) inhibited aberrant proliferation in 184-B5/HER cells (a model for human comedo DCIS) and identified possible mechanisms responsible for its efficacy. Human reduction mammoplasty derived HER-2/neu oncogene expressing preneoplastic 184-B5/HER cells represented the experimental system. Flow cytometry and cellular epifluorescence based assays were utilized to quantitate the alterations in cell cycle progression, cellular apoptosis, and in the status of cell cycle regulatory and apoptosis-associated gene product expression. The 184-B5/HER cells exhibited specific immunofluorescence to p185HER, p53, EGFR, but not to ERalpha, thus resembling comedo DCIS. Treatment of 184-B5/HER cells with GEN resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in the viable cell population, increase in the G0/G1:S + G2/M ratio and enhancement of sub G0/G1 (apoptotic population). Exposure to the maximum cytostatic 10 microM dose of GEN down-regulated HER-2/neu mediated signal transduction as evidenced by a 73.9% decrease (p=0.001) in p185HER specific, and a 89.8% decrease (p=0.001) in phosphotyrosine specific immunofluorescence. The increase in G0/G1:S + G2/M ratio in response to the treatment with 10 microM GEN was associated with a 85.5% decrease (p=0.001) in

  1. Modulation of CFTR chloride channels by calyculin A and genistein.

    PubMed

    Yang, I C; Cheng, T H; Wang, F; Price, E M; Hwang, T C

    1997-01-01

    Modulation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel by calyculin A and genistein was studied in Hi-5 insect cells infected with baculovirus containing the wild-type CFTR cDNA. In cell-attached patches, CFTR channel activity was not observed until stimulated by forskolin in 90% of the cells, suggesting a low level of basal adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate activity. Calyculin A, a specific inhibitor of phosphatases 1 and 2A, increased forskolin-induced CFTR activity by 17.2-fold. CFTR channel currents did not deactivate completely after forskolin was withdrawn in the continued presence of calyculin A. Genistein enhanced forskolin-induced CFTR activity by 44.9-fold but could neither activate the CFTR by itself nor prevent complete deactivation on removal of forskolin. Genistein together with calyculin A could adequately prevent deactivation of CFTR currents. Noise analysis of the macroscopic CFTR currents revealed significant differences in the mean current-variance-relationship and the corner frequency of the noise spectra between currents activated by forskolin plus genistein and those activated by forskolin plus calyculin A. Furthermore, genistein enhanced CFTR activity induced by saturating concentrations of forskolin and calyculin A. Our results suggest that genistein and calyculin A modulate the CFTR by different mechanisms and that genistein might inhibit calyculin A-insensitive dephosphorylation of the CFTR. PMID:9038820

  2. Modulation of monoamine neurotransmitters in fighting fish Betta splendens exposed to waterborne phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, Ethan D; McNitt, Meredith M; Carpenter, Russ E; Summers, Cliff H

    2010-12-01

    Endogenous estrogens are known to affect the activity of monoamine neurotransmitters in vertebrate animals, but the effects of exogenous estrogens on neurotransmitters are relatively poorly understood. We exposed sexually mature male fighting fish Betta splendens to environmentally relevant and pharmacological doses of three phytoestrogens that are potential endocrine disruptors in wild fish populations: genistein, equol, and β-sitosterol. We also exposed fish to two doses of the endogenous estrogen 17β-estradiol, which we selected as a positive control because phytoestrogens are putative estrogen mimics. Our results were variable, but the effects were generally modest. Genistein increased dopamine levels in the forebrains of B. splendens at both environmentally relevant and pharmacological doses. The environmentally relevant dose of equol increased dopamine levels in B. splendens forebrains, and the pharmacological dose decreased norepinephrine (forebrain), dopamine (hindbrain), and serotonin (forebrain) levels. The environmentally relevant dose of β-sitosterol decreased norepinephrine and dopamine in the forebrain and hindbrain, respectively. Our results suggest that sources of environmental phytoestrogens, such as runoff or effluent from agricultural fields, wood pulp mills, and sewage treatment plants, have the potential to modulate neurotransmitter activity in free-living fishes in a way that could interfere with normal behavioral processes. PMID:20012186

  3. Pharmacokinetics Interaction between Imatinib and Genistein in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Wang, Li; Xia, Meng-ming; Sun, Wei; Huang, Cheng-ke; Cui, Xiao; Hu, Guo-xin; Lian, Qing-quan; Wang, Zeng-shou

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of orally administered genistein on the pharmacokinetics of imatinib and N-desmethyl imatinib in rats. Twenty-five healthy male SD (Sprague-Dawley) rats were randomly divided into five groups: A group (control group), B group (multiple dose of 100 mg/kg genistein for consecutive 15 days), C group (multiple dose of 50 mg/kg genistein for consecutive 15 days), D group (a single dose of 100 mg/kg genistein), and E group (a single dose of 50 mg/kg genistein). A single dose of imatinib is administered orally 30 min after administration of genistein (100 mg/kg or 50 mg/kg). The pharmacokinetic parameters of imatinib and N-desmethyl imatinib were calculated by DAS 3.0 software. The multiple dose of 100 mg/kg or 50 mg/kg genistein significantly (P < 0.05) decreased the AUC0−t and Cmax of imatinib. AUC0−t and the Cmax of N-desmethyl imatinib were also increased, but without any significant difference. However, the single dose of 100 mg/kg or 50 mg/kg genistein has no effect on the pharmacokinetics of imatinib and N-desmethyl imatinib. Those results indicated that multiple dose of genistein (100 mg/kg or 50 mg/kg) induces the metabolism of imatinib, while single dose of genistein has no effect. PMID:25629045

  4. Acute effects of 17 β-estradiol and genistein on insulin sensitivity and spatial memory in aged ovariectomized female rats.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Ana; González-Pardo, Héctor; Garrido, Pablo; Conejo, Nélida M; Llaneza, Plácido; Díaz, Fernando; Del Rey, Carmen González; González, Celestino

    2010-12-01

    Aging is characterized by decline in metabolic function and insulin resistance, and both seem to be in the basis of neurodegenerative diseases and cognitive dysfunction. Estrogens prevent age-related changes, and phytoestrogens influence learning and memory. Our hypothesis was that estradiol and genistein, using rapid-action mechanisms, are able to modify insulin sensitivity, process of learning, and spatial memory. Young and aged ovariectomized rats received acute treatment with estradiol or genistein. Aged animals were more insulin-resistant than young. In each age, estradiol and genistein-treated animals were less insulin-resistant than the others, except in the case of young animals treated with high doses of genistein. In aged rats, no differences between groups were found in spatial memory test, showing a poor performance in the water maze task. However, young females treated with estradiol or high doses of genistein performed well in spatial memory task like the control group. Only rats treated with high doses of genistein showed an optimal spatial memory similar to the control group. Conversely, acute treatment with high doses of phytoestrogens improved spatial memory consolidation only in young rats, supporting the critical period hypothesis for the beneficial effects of estrogens on memory. Therefore, genistein treatment seems to be suitable treatment in aged rats in order to prevent insulin resistance but not memory decline associated with aging. Acute genistein treatment is not effective to restore insulin resistance associated to the early loss of ovarian function, although it can be useful to improve memory deficits in this condition. PMID:20467821

  5. A Commentary on Phytoestrogens and Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hard, Alison; Edelstein, Sari

    2015-01-01

    On the most basic level, phytoestrogens can be defined as compounds found in plants that exhibit estrogen-like activity in the human body. Phytoestrogens are considered functional foods because of their diverse physiological effects beyond basic nutritional functions. The 2 primary categories of phytoestrogens found in food are lignans and…

  6. Genistein suppresses FLT4 and inhibits human colorectal cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiao; Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Rui; Wang, Jiayin; Zhang, Song; Cai, Xiqiang; Wu, Kaichun; Bergan, Raymond C; Xu, Li; Fan, Daiming

    2015-02-20

    Dietary consumption of genistein, found in soy, has been associated with a potentially protective role in colorectal cancer (CRC) development and progression. Herein we demonstrate that genistein will inhibit human CRC cell invasion and migration, that it does so at non-cytotoxic concentrations and we demonstrate this in multiple human CRC cell lines. After orthotopic implantation of human CRC tumors into mice, oral genistein did not inhibit tumor growth, but did inhibit distant metastasis formation, and was non-toxic to mice. Using a qPCR array, we screened for genistein-induced changes in gene expression, followed by Western blot confirmation, demonstrating that genistein downregulated matrix metalloproteinase 2 and Fms-Related Tyrosine Kinase 4 (FLT4; vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3). After demonstrating that genistein suppressed neo-angiogenesis in mouse tumors, we examined FLT4 expression in primary CRC and adjacent normal colonic tissue from 60 human subjects, demonstrating that increased FLT4 significantly correlates with increased stage and decreased survival. In summary, we demonstrate for the first time that genistein inhibits human CRC metastasis at dietary, non-toxic, doses. FLT4 is identified as a marker of metastatic disease, and as a response marker for small molecule therapeutics that inhibit CRC metastasis. PMID:25605009

  7. Genistein increases glycosaminoglycan levels in mucopolysaccharidosis type I cell models.

    PubMed

    Kingma, Sandra D K; Wagemans, Tom; IJlst, Lodewijk; Wijburg, Frits A; van Vlies, Naomi

    2014-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by diminished degradation of the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) heparan sulfate and dermatan sulfate, which results in the accumulation of these GAGs and subsequent cellular dysfunction. Patients present with a variety of symptoms, including severe skeletal disease. Genistein has been shown previously to inhibit GAG synthesis in MPS fibroblasts, presumably through inhibition of tyrosine kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). To determine the potentials of genistein for the treatment of skeletal disease, MPS I fibroblasts were induced into chondrocytes and osteoblasts and treated with genistein. Surprisingly, whereas tyrosine phosphorylation levels (as a measure for tyrosine kinase inhibition) were decreased in all treated cell lines, there was a 1.3 and 1.6 fold increase in GAG levels in MPS I chondrocytes and fibroblast, respectively (p < 0.05). Sulfate incorporation in treated MPS I fibroblasts was 2.6 fold increased (p < 0.05), indicating increased GAG synthesis despite tyrosine kinase inhibition. This suggests that GAG synthesis is not exclusively regulated through the tyrosine kinase activity of the EGFR. We hypothesize that the differences in outcomes between studies on the effect of genistein in MPS are caused by the different effects of genistein on different growth factor signaling pathways, which regulate GAG synthesis. More studies are needed to elucidate the precise signaling pathways which are affected by genistein and alter GAG metabolism in order to evaluate the therapeutic potential of genistein for MPS patients. PMID:24699889

  8. The Stimulatory Effect of Strontium Ions on Phytoestrogens Content in Glycine max (L.) Merr.

    PubMed

    Wójciak-Kosior, Magdalena; Sowa, Ireneusz; Blicharski, Tomasz; Strzemski, Maciej; Dresler, Sławomir; Szymczak, Grażyna; Wnorowski, Artur; Kocjan, Ryszard; Świeboda, Ryszard

    2016-01-01

    The amount of secondary metabolites in plants can be enhanced or reduced by various external factors. In this study, the effect of strontium ions on the production of phytoestrogens in soybeans was investigated. The plants were treated with Hoagland's solution, modified with Sr(2+) with concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 3.0 mM, and were grown for 14 days in hydroponic cultivation. After harvest, soybean plants were separated into roots and shoots, dried, and pulverized. The plant material was extracted with methanol and hydrolyzed. Phytoestrogens were quantified by HPLC. The significant increase in the concentration of the compounds of interest was observed for all tested concentrations of strontium ions when compared to control. Sr(2+) at a concentration of 2 mM was the strongest elicitor, and the amount of phytoestrogens in plant increased ca. 2.70, 1.92, 3.77 and 2.88-fold, for daidzein, coumestrol, genistein and formononetin, respectively. Moreover, no cytotoxic effects were observed in HepG2 liver cell models after treatment with extracts from 2 mM Sr(2+)-stressed soybean plants when compared to extracts from non-stressed plants. Our results indicate that the addition of strontium ions to the culture media may be used to functionalize soybean plants with enhanced phytoestrogen content. PMID:26784151

  9. 17β-Estradiol and genistein acute treatments improve some cerebral cortex homeostasis aspects deteriorated by aging in female rats.

    PubMed

    Morán, Javier; Garrido, Pablo; Alonso, Ana; Cabello, Estefanía; González, Celestino

    2013-04-01

    Aging is associated with decreased insulin sensitivity and impaired cerebral glucose homeostasis. These changes increase neural sensitivity to metabolic damage contributing to cognitive decline, being the decrease in plasma estrogen following menopause one of the main factors involved in aged females. Phytoestrogens as genistein are structurally similar to 17β-estradiol, bind to estrogen receptors, and can evoke both estrogenic and anti-estrogenic effects. Estrogens and phytoestrogens have neuroprotective potential, but the physiological mechanisms are not fully understood. Young and aged female Wistar rats were ovariectomized and treated acutely with 17β-estradiol (1.4μg/kg body weight), genistein (10 or 40 mg/kg body weight), or vehicle. Cortical expression of glucose transporter-3 (GLUT-3) and -4 (GLUT-4), cytochrome c oxidase (CO), estrogen receptor-α (ERα) and -β (ERβ) was measured by Western blotting. There was an age-related decline in GLUT-4, CO and ERβ levels. Both drugs, estradiol and genistein, were able to reverse GLUT-3 downregulation in the cortex following late ovariectomy. However, genistein was the only treatment able to restore completely GLUT-4 levels in aged rats. In contrast, estradiol was more potent than genistein at increasing CO, a marker of cerebral oxidative metabolism. As regards ER levels, estradiol increased the ERα67 quantity diminished by late ovariectomy, while genistein did the same with the other ERα isoform, ERα46, highlighting drug-specific differences in expression changes for both isoforms. On the other hand, no treatment-related differences were found regarding ERβ levels. Therefore, genistein like estradiol could be suitable treatments against cortical metabolic dysfunction caused by aging. These treatments may hold promise as neuroprotective strategies against diabetes and age-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23419687

  10. Phytoestrogen Biological Actions on Mammalian Reproductive System and Cancer Growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, E; Mu, Qing

    2011-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are a family of diverse polyphenolic compounds derived from nature plant that structurally or functionally mimic circulating estrogen in the mammalian reproductive system. They induce estrogenic and anti-estrogenic effects in the brain-pituitary-gonad axis (a principal endocrine system involving in reproductive regulation) and peripheral reproductive organs. The dichotomy of phytoestrogen-mediated actions elucidates that they play the biological activities via complex mechanisms and belong to various chemical classes. In comparison with their unobvious physiological functions in normal reproductive tissues, there are increasing investigations showing that phytoestrogen induces significant inhibitory effects on the growth of breast and ovarian cancers through different signaling pathways. This review summarized the results of the previous studies regarding principal signaling transductions for mediating the growth of the ovarian and breast cancers. Phytoestrogen potentially modulates the signaling molecules via: (1) blocking the nuclear and membrane estrogen receptors (ER), (2) interfering with the growth factor receptor, (3) inhibiting the G protein-coupled receptor in ER-deficient cells, (4) activating apoptosis and nullifying anti-apoptotic signals. PMID:21617769

  11. Long-term exposure to dietary sources of genistein induces estrogen-independence in the human breast cancer (MCF-7) xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Juan E.; Ju, Young H.; Baker, Chandra; Doerge, Daniel R.; Helferich, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Scope The long-term effect of exposure to relevant dietary levels of genistein (GEN) on estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) human breast cancer (MCF-7) progression after GEN withdrawal in athymic mice xenograft model was studied. Materials and methods Feeding studies were conducted to determine the estrogenic effect of diets on MCF-7 tumor growth: 1) implantation (19 weeks) and withdrawal (6 weeks) of 17β-estradiol (E2); 2) dietary GEN 500 and 750 ppm during treatment/withdrawal for 23/10 and 15/9 weeks, respectively; and, 3) dietary soy protein isolate (SPI) containing GEN 180 ppm for 31/9 weeks of treatment/withdrawal. MCF-7 tumors grew fast in the presence of E2 implantation and abruptly regressed completely after E2 withdrawal. At different rates, dietary GEN alone (500 and 750 ppm) and GEN (180 ppm)-containing SPI stimulated MCF-7 tumor growth. After removal of the stimulus diet, tumors induced by 750 ppm GEN, but not 500 ppm GEN or SPI, regressed completely. The protein expression of epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) was higher in the GEN- and SPI-induced non-regressing (GINR) tumors compared to MCF-7 and E2 controls. Conclusion Long-term consumption of low GEN doses (≤500 ppm) promotes MCF-7 tumor growth and results in GINR tumors with more aggressive and advanced growth phenotypes. PMID:24668689

  12. Neonatal exposure to genistein disrupts ability of female mouse reproductive tract to support preimplantation embryo development and implantation.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, Wendy N; Padilla-Banks, Elizabeth; Goulding, Eugenia H; Lao, Shin-Ping C; Newbold, Retha R; Williams, Carmen J

    2009-03-01

    Female mice treated neonatally with the phytoestrogen genistein (50 mg/kg/day) have multioocyte follicles, lack regular estrous cyclicity, and are infertile even after superovulation. To determine the cause of their infertility, we examined oocyte developmental competence and timing of embryo loss. Eggs obtained by superovulation of genistein-treated or control females were equally capable of being fertilized in vitro and cultured to the blastocyst stage. However, if eggs were fertilized in vivo, retrieved at the pronucleus stage, and cultured, there was a significant reduction in the percentage of embryos from genistein-treated females reaching the blastocyst stage. When these blastocysts were transferred to pseudopregnant recipients, the number of live pups produced was similar to that in controls. Preimplantation embryo development in vivo was examined by flushing embryos from the oviduct and/or uterus. Similar numbers of one-cell and two-cell embryos were obtained from genistein-treated and control females. However, significantly fewer embryos (<50%) were obtained from genistein-treated females on postcoital Days 3 and 4. To determine if neonatal genistein treatment altered the ability of the uterus to support implantation, blastocysts from control donors were transferred to control and genistein-treated pseudopregnant recipients. These experiments demonstrated that genistein-treated females are not capable of supporting normal implantation of control embryos. Taken together, these results suggest that oocytes from mice treated neonatally with genistein are developmentally competent; however, the oviductal environment and the uterus have abnormalities that contribute to the observed reproductive failure. PMID:19005167

  13. Actions of Genistein on Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Channel Gating

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Zeltwanger, Shawn; Yang, Iris C.-H.; Nairn, Angus C.; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that genistein increased cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel activity in the presence of saturating concentrations of forskolin and calyculin A in intact cells. Possible molecular mechanisms for genistein's action include inhibition of tyrosine kinases, inhibition of serine/threonine protein phosphatases, or direct binding of genistein to CFTR. Since genistein inhibits several enzymes that hydrolyze ATP, and ATP hydrolysis is an intrinsic property of CFTR, we examined the effect of genistein on CFTR gating in excised inside-out patches from Hi-5 insect cells and NIH3T3 cells expressing recombinant CFTR. Genistein (50 μM) did not open phosphorylated CFTR channels by itself, but increased the ATP- induced CFTR channel current by approximately twofold. A similar magnitude of enhancement was observed when genistein was applied with PKI, a specific inhibitor of protein kinase A, or vanadate, a tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, suggesting that inhibition of protein phosphatases or tyrosine kinases does not account for genistein's effects. The enhancement of channel current increased with increasing concentrations of genistein and reached a maximum at 35 μM genistein. At higher concentrations of genistein concentration, CFTR channel current decreased, resulting in a bell-shaped dose–response relationship. In the absence of genistein, both open- and closed-time histograms could be fitted with a single exponential function, yielding a mean open time (τO) of 0.302 ± 0.002 s, and a mean closed time (τC) of 0.406 ± 0.003 s. In the presence of 50 μM genistein, the open time histogram could be fitted with a double exponential function with τO1 = 0.429 ± 0.003 s and τO2 = 2.033 ± 0.173 s. Thus, genistein induced a prolonged open state, an effect that mimics that of nonhydrolyzable ATP analogs. Closed time analysis showed that 50 μM genistein caused a prolonged closed state with a time constant of 2.410 ± 0

  14. Synergistic chemoprotective mechanisms of dietary phytoestrogens in a select combination against prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajeev; Verma, Vikas; Jain, Ashish; Jain, Rajeev K; Maikhuri, Jagdamba P; Gupta, Gopal

    2011-08-01

    Combination of dietary phytoestrogens with diverse molecular mechanisms may enhance their anticancer efficacy at physiological concentrations, as evidenced in epidemiological studies. A select combination of three dietary phytoestrogens containing 8.33 μM each of genistein (G), quercetin (Q) and biochanin A (B) was found to be more potent in inhibiting the growth of androgen-responsive prostate cancer cells (LNCaP) as well as DU-145 and PC-3 prostate cancer cells in vitro than either 25 μM of G, B or Q or 12.5+12.5 μM of G+Q, Q+B or G+B. Subsequent mechanistic studies in PC-3 cells indicated that the action of phytoestrogens was mediated both through estrogen receptor (ER)-dependent and ER-independent pathways as potent estrogen antagonist ICI-182780 (ICI, 5 μM) could not completely mask the synergistic anticancer effects, which were sustained appreciably in presence of ICI. G+Q+B combination was significantly more effective than individual compounds or their double combinations in increasing ER-β, bax (mRNA expression); phospho-JNK, bax (protein levels); and in decreasing bcl-2, cyclin E, c-myc (mRNA expression); phospho-AKT, phospho-ERK, bcl-2, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (protein levels) in PC-3 cells. Phytoestrogens also synergistically stimulated caspase-3 activity. Our findings suggest that selectively combining anticancer phytoestrogens could significantly increase the efficacy of individual components resulting in improved efficacy at physiologically achievable concentrations. The combination mechanism of multiple anticancer phytochemicals may be indicative of the potential of some vegetarian diet components to elicit chemopreventive effects against prostate cancer at their physiologically achievable concentrations, in vivo. PMID:21062672

  15. Development of a high-throughput LC/APCI-MS method for the determination of thirteen phytoestrogens including gut microbial metabolites in human urine and serum.

    PubMed

    Wyns, Ciska; Bolca, Selin; De Keukeleire, Denis; Heyerick, Arne

    2010-04-15

    The investigation into the potential usefulness of phytoestrogens in the treatment of menopausal symptoms requires large-scale clinical trials that involve rapid, validated assays for the characterization and quantification of the phytoestrogenic precursors and their metabolites in biological matrices, as large interindividual differences in metabolism and bioavailability have been reported. Consequently, a new sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method (HPLC-MS) for the quantitative determination of thirteen phytoestrogens including their most important gut microbial metabolites (genistein, daidzein, equol, dihydrodaidzein, O-desmethylangolensin, coumestrol, secoisolariciresinol, matairesinol, enterodiol, enterolactone, isoxanthohumol, xanthohumol and 8-prenylnaringenin) in human urine and serum within one single analytical run was developed. The method uses a simple sample preparation procedure consisting of enzymatic deconjugation followed by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) or solid-phase extraction (SPE) for urine or serum, respectively. The phytoestrogens and their metabolites are detected with a single quadrupole mass spectrometer using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), operating both in the positive and the negative mode. This bioanalytical method has been fully validated and proved to allow an accurate and precise quantification of the targeted phytoestrogens and their metabolites covering the lower parts-per-billion range for the measurement of relevant urine and serum levels following ingestion of phytoestrogen-rich dietary supplements. PMID:20299290

  16. Neonatal Phytoestrogen Exposure Alters Oviduct Mucosal Immune Response to Pregnancy and Affects Preimplantation Embryo Development in the Mouse1

    PubMed Central

    Jefferson, Wendy N.; Padilla-Banks, Elizabeth; Phelps, Jazma Y.; Cantor, Amy M.; Williams, Carmen J.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Treatment of neonatal mice with the phytoestrogen genistein (50 mg/kg/day) results in complete female infertility caused in part by preimplantation embryo loss in the oviduct between Days 2 and 3 of pregnancy. We previously demonstrated that oviducts of genistein-treated mice are “posteriorized” as compared to control mouse oviducts because they express numerous genes normally restricted to posterior regions of the female reproductive tract (FRT), the cervix and vagina. We report here that neonatal genistein treatment resulted in substantial changes in oviduct expression of genes important for the FRT mucosal immune response, including immunoglobulins, antimicrobials, and chemokines. Some of the altered immune response genes were chronically altered beginning at the time of neonatal genistein treatment, indicating that these alterations were a result of the posteriorization phenotype. Other alterations in oviduct gene expression were observed only in early pregnancy, immediately after the FRT was exposed to inflammatory or antigenic stimuli from ovulation and mating. The oviduct changes affected development of the surviving embryos by increasing the rate of cleavage and decreasing the trophectoderm-to-inner cell mass cell ratio at the blastocyst stage. We conclude that both altered immune responses to pregnancy and deficits in oviduct support for preimplantation embryo development in the neonatal genistein model are likely to contribute to infertility phenotype. PMID:22553218

  17. Genistein Inhibits Aβ25-35-Induced Synaptic Toxicity and Regulates CaMKII/CREB Pathway in SH-SY5Y Cells.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yuan-Di; Zhang, Dan-Di; Ding, Juan; Yu, Huan-Ling; Yuan, Lin-Hong; Ma, Wei-Wei; Han, Jing; Xiao, Rong

    2016-10-01

    Genistein (Gen), as a functional food in human diet, has shown many beneficial effects on neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). But the neuroprotective mechanism of Gen is not clear. Because synaptic failure is considered as the earliest phase in the pathogenesis of AD, we try to validate our hypothesis that synapse may be one target of Gen on protecting neurons. In this study, SH-SY5Y cells were pre-incubated with or without Gen for 2 h followed by the incubation with Aβ25-35 (25 μmol/L) for another 24 h. Flow cytometry, Western Blots, and RT-PCR analysis were used to test the synaptic factors. The data showed that Gen pre-treatment could reverse the Aβ25-35-induced down-regulation of synaptophysin and postsynaptic marker postsynaptic density-95. In addition, the down-regulation of NR1 and NR2B induced by Aβ25-35 which are subunits of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor also could be antagonized by pre-treatment of Gen. Moreover, the factors of CaMKII/CREB signaling pathway were detected. The results showed that mRNA and protein expressions of (Ca(2+))/calmodulin(CaM), CaMKII/pCaMKII, and CREB/pCREB were significantly down-regulated by Aβ25-35, but they were all restored by the pre-treatment of Gen. Furthermore, Gen also maintained the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration which was disturbed by Aβ25-35. In conclusion, these results suggested that Gen could protect synaptic dysfunction induced by Aβ, and the mechanism might be associated with the regulation of synaptic markers and Ca(2+) level through activating CaM/CaMK/CREB signaling pathway. PMID:26658733

  18. Protective effect of genistein aglycone on the development of osteonecrosis of the femoral head and secondary osteoporosis induced by methylprednisolone in rats.

    PubMed

    Bitto, Alessandra; Polito, Francesca; Burnett, Bruce; Levy, Robert; Di Stefano, Vincenzo; Armbruster, Mary Ann; Marini, Herbert; Minutoli, Letteria; Altavilla, Domenica; Squadrito, Francesco

    2009-06-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC)-induced osteoporosis (GIO) is the most important secondary cause of bone loss. Clinical evidence suggests a role for genistein (GEN) aglycone in the prevention of osteoporosis. We investigated whether GEN could prevent GIO as well as the development of osteonecrosis in the femoral head using an experimental rat model. A total of 28 female Sprague-Dawley rats were used in the study. GIO and osteonecrosis were induced by daily s.c. injections of 30 mg/kg of methylprednisolone (MP; n=7). Another group of animals (MP+GEN; n=7) concomitantly received MP (30 mg/kg per s.c.) and GEN aglycone (5 mg/kg per i.p.) for 60 days. Control animals were administered daily with vehicle (VEH) or GEN (5 mg/kg per i.p.) only. At the beginning and end of the treatment, animals were examined for bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC). After killing, serum was collected to determine bone-alkaline phosphatase (b-ALP), carboxy-terminal collagen crosslink (CTX) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) levels. Femurs were removed and tested for breaking strength and bone histology analyzed for structural quality of the femoral neck. GEN aglycone prevented bone loss as measured by BMD and BMC. Moreover, GEN significantly increased the bone formation markers b-ALP and OPG, reduced the bone resorption marker CTX and statistically maintained comparable strength versus the VEH only group. Finally, histological scoring revealed a protective effect of GEN on bone structure statistically comparable with the VEH control animals. Results suggest that the GEN aglycone might be a preventive treatment for GIO and complications of osteonecrosis with long-term GC treatment. PMID:19332450

  19. Activation of glutathione peroxidase via Nrf1 mediates genistein's protection against oxidative endothelial cell injury

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Montes, Eva; Pollard, Susan E.; Vauzour, David; Jofre-Montseny, Laia; Rota, Cristina; Rimbach, Gerald; Weinberg, Peter D.; Spencer, Jeremy P.E. . E-mail: j.p.e.spencer@reading.ac.uk

    2006-08-04

    Cellular actions of isoflavones may mediate the beneficial health effects associated with high soy consumption. We have investigated protection by genistein and daidzein against oxidative stress-induced endothelial injury. Genistein but not daidzein protected endothelial cells from damage induced by oxidative stress. This protection was accompanied by decreases in intracellular glutathione levels that could be explained by the generation of glutathionyl conjugates of the oxidised genistein metabolite, 5,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyisoflavone. Both isoflavones evoked increased protein expression of {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase-heavy subunit ({gamma}-GCS-HS) and increased cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf2. However, only genistein led to increases in the cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf1 and the increased expression of and activity of glutathione peroxidase. These results suggest that genistein-induced protective effects depend primarily on the activation of glutathione peroxidase mediated by Nrf1 activation, and not on Nrf2 activation or increases in glutathione synthesis.

  20. Comprehensive assessment of hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity in an anaerobic swine waste lagoon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yost, Erin E.; Meyer, Michael T.; Dietze, Julie E.; Meissner, Benjamin M.; Williams, Mike; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the distribution of steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity was thoroughly characterized within the anaerobic waste lagoon of a typical commercial swine sow operation. Three independent rounds of sampling were conducted in June 2009, April 2010, and February 2011. Thirty-seven analytes in lagoon slurry and sludge were assessed using LC/MS-MS, and yeast estrogen screen was used to determine estrogenic activity. Of the hormone analytes, steroidal estrogens were more abundant than androgens or progesterone, with estrone being the predominant estrogen species. Conjugated hormones were detected only at low levels. The isoflavone metabolite equol was by far the predominant phytoestrogen species, with daidzein, genistein, formononetin, and coumestrol present at lower levels. Phytoestrogens were often more abundant than steroidal estrogens, but contributed minimally towards total estrogenic activity. Analytes were significantly elevated in the solid phases of the lagoon; although low observed log KOC values suggest enhanced solubility in the aqueous phase, perhaps due to dissolved or colloidal organic carbon. The association with the solid phase, as well as recalcitrance of analytes to anaerobic degradation, results in a markedly elevated load of analytes and estrogenic activity within lagoon sludge. Overall, findings emphasize the importance of adsorption and transformation processes in governing the fate of these compounds in lagoon waste, which is ultimately used for broadcast application as a fertilizer.

  1. Transport of steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity across a swine lagoon/sprayfield system.

    PubMed

    Yost, Erin E; Meyer, Michael T; Dietze, Julie E; Williams, C Michael; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W

    2014-10-01

    The inflow, transformation, and attenuation of natural steroid hormones and phytoestrogens and estrogenic activity were assessed across the lagoon/sprayfield system of a prototypical commercial swine sow operation. Free and conjugated steroid hormones (estrogens, androgens, and progesterone) were detected in urine and feces of sows across reproductive stages, with progesterone being the most abundant steroid hormone. Excreta also contained phytoestrogens indicative of a soy-based diet, particularly, daidzein, genistein, and equol. During storage in barn pits and the anaerobic lagoon, conjugated hormones dissipated, and androgens and progesterone were attenuated. Estrone and equol persisted along the waste disposal route. Following application of lagoon slurry to agricultural soils, all analytes exhibited attenuation within 2 days. However, analytes including estrone, androstenedione, progesterone, and equol remained detectable in soil at 2 months postapplication. Estrogenic activity in the yeast estrogen screen and T47D-KBluc in vitro bioassays generally tracked well with analyte concentrations. Estrone was found to be the greatest contributor to estrogenic activity across all sample types. This investigation encompasses the most comprehensive suite of natural hormone and phytoestrogen analytes examined to date across a livestock lagoon/sprayfield and provides global insight into the fate of these analytes in this widely used waste management system. PMID:25148584

  2. Comprehensive Assessment of Hormones, Phytoestrogens, and Estrogenic Activity in an Anaerobic Swine Waste Lagoon

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the distribution of steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity was thoroughly characterized within the anaerobic waste lagoon of a typical commercial swine sow operation. Three independent rounds of sampling were conducted in June 2009, April 2010, and February 2011. Thirty-seven analytes in lagoon slurry and sludge were assessed using LC/MS-MS, and yeast estrogen screen was used to determine estrogenic activity. Of the hormone analytes, steroidal estrogens were more abundant than androgens or progesterone, with estrone being the predominant estrogen species. Conjugated hormones were detected only at low levels. The isoflavone metabolite equol was by far the predominant phytoestrogen species, with daidzein, genistein, formononetin, and coumestrol present at lower levels. Phytoestrogens were often more abundant than steroidal estrogens, but contributed minimally toward total estrogenic activity. Analytes were significantly elevated in the solid phases of the lagoon; although low observed log KOC values suggest enhanced solubility in the aqueous phase, perhaps due to dissolved or colloidal organic carbon. The association with the solid phase, as well as recalcitrance of analytes to anaerobic degradation, results in a markedly elevated load of analytes and estrogenic activity within lagoon sludge. Overall, findings emphasize the importance of adsorption and transformation processes in governing the fate of these compounds in lagoon waste, which is ultimately used for broadcast application as a fertilizer. PMID:24144340

  3. [Genistein in chemoprevention and treatment].

    PubMed

    Tarkowski, Michał; Kokocińska, Mirosława; Latocha, Małgorzata

    2013-01-01

    Genistein is a natural compound which occurs in Asian diet, rich in soy products. It has a wide spectrum of activity, expressed both in protecting cells from malignant transformation, reducing proliferation of tumor cells and stimulating apoptosis. In the other hand, genistein also prevents from some of the side effects manifesting in menopausal estrogen deficiency also being a good research object in this field. It has been shown, among others effect of genistein on: the level of free radicals and reactive oxygen species in the body, the metabolism of carcinogenic factors, cell cycle progression, initiation of apoptosis, angiogenesis, inflammatory processes and immune response. To achieve the desired therapeutic effect it is crucial to determine genistein dose titration in order to obtain an appropriate concentration in the tissues of phytohormone and duration of therapy. PMID:23488287

  4. In Utero exposure to genistein enhanced intranasal house dust mite allergen-induced respiratory sensitization in young adult B6C3F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tai L; Meng, Andrew H

    2016-06-24

    Despite many hypothesized benefits of dietary isoflavone genistein (GEN) deriving from soy-based products, questions surrounding GEN's developmental immunotoxic effects are increasing. To understand how in utero GEN exposure may modulate postnatal respiratory sensitization, we conducted a time course study using a common household allergen (house dust mites: HDM; 10μg/mouse) following intranasal instillation, a physiological route of allergen exposure. GEN was administered to dams by gavage from gestational day 14 to parturition at a physiologically relevant dose (20mg/kg bw). Female and male offspring were sensitized with HDM allergens beginning about one month prior to sacrifice followed by challenges with three weekly doses of HDM extracts, and they were euthanized at day 3 following the final HDM exposure at four different time points (postnatal day (PND) 80, 120, 160, and 200). In utero GEN combined with postnatal HDM exposures (GEN+HDM) increased total IgE production in both young female and male B6C3F1 offspring (e.g., PND 80 in females and PND 120 in males). Increased antigen-specific IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b levels were also observed at various time points in both female and male offspring. In addition, increases in macrophage number in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of both female and male GEN+HDM offspring at PND 80 and PND 120, respectively, were observed when compared to the vehicle group. For T cells, an increase over the vehicle in female GEN+HDM offspring was observed at PND 80. Due to similar patterns of increases, it seems likely that GEN+HDM-induced increases in total IgE and macrophages are related. Overall, in utero GEN plus later-life HDM exposures exert increases in total IgE and HDM-specific IgG production as well as macrophage recruitments to the lung in young adult mice. PMID:27113705

  5. Genistein at maximal physiologic serum levels induces G0/G1 arrest in MCF-7 and HB4a cells, but not apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Tsuboy, Marcela S; Marcarini, Juliana C; de Souza, Alecsandra O; de Paula, Natália A; Dorta, Daniel J; Mantovani, Mário S; Ribeiro, Lucia R

    2014-02-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that a balanced diet can contribute to better human health. For this reason, soy-based food and pure isoflavones (pills) are one of the most consumed. The association of this consumption and lower risks of chronic diseases and cancer is well established for the Asian population and has been attracting the attention of people worldwide, especially women at menopause who seek to alleviate the symptoms associated with the lack of estrogen. Despite positive epidemiological data, concerns still exist because of conflicting results found in scientific literature with relation to the role of isoflavones in breast and hormone-related cancers. The aim of our study was to investigate the cytotoxicity, induction of apoptosis, and changes in apoptosis-related genes of maximal physiological serum levels of the isoflavone genistein (Gen) in MCF-7 tumoral cells and in HB4a non-tumoral cells. In addition, induction of cell cycle arrest was also investigated. Only supraphysiological levels of Gen (50 and 100 μM) were cytotoxic to these cell lines. Concentrations of 10 and 25 μM did not induce apoptosis and significant changes in expression of the studied genes. Positive results were found only in cell cycle analysis: G0/G1 delay of MCF-7 cells in both concentrations of Gen and at 25 μM in HB4a cells. It is the first study investigating effects of Gen in the HB4a cell line. Thus, despite the lack of apoptosis induction (generally found with high concentrations), Gen at physiologically relevant serum levels still exerts chemopreventive effects through the modulation of cell cycle. PMID:24325455

  6. Dietary genistein: perinatal mammary cancer prevention, bioavailability and toxicity testing in the rat.

    PubMed

    Fritz, W A; Coward, L; Wang, J; Lamartiniere, C A

    1998-12-01

    Asian women consuming a traditional diet high in soy have a low incidence of breast cancer, yet when they emigrate to the USA the second but not the first generation lose this protection. Accordingly, we hypothesized that early exposure to genistein, a major component of soy, could have a permanent protective effect against breast cancer. Sprague-Dawley CD rats were exposed to genistein from conception to day 21 post-partum in the diet at concentrations of 0, 25 and 250 mg genistein/kg AIN-76A diet. At day 50 post-partum, all animals were treated with 80 mg dimethylbenz[a]anthracene/kg body wt to induce mammary cancers. Dietary genistein resulted in dose-dependent protection against development of mammary tumors (fewer tumors per rat). Analysis of mammary whole mounts showed that 21- and 50-day-old female rats had fewer terminal end buds, terminal ductal structures that were undifferentiated and were most susceptible to carcinogenesis. Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation studies revealed that dietary perinatal genistein resulted in a smaller proliferative compartment for terminal end buds. In rats fed the high genistein dose (250 mg/kg diet) total genistein concentrations in the serum and milk of dams 7 days postpartum were 418+/-198 and 137 pmol/ml, respectively. Total genistein concentrations in stomach milk, serum and mammary glands of 7-day-old offspring were 4439+/-1109 and 726 pmol/ml and 440+/-129 pmol/g, respectively. Total genistein concentrations in the serum and mammary glands of 21-day-old offspring were 1810+/-135 pmol/ml and 370+/-36 pmol/g, respectively. Dietary perinatal genistein did not cause significant toxicity in F0 and F1 females. We conclude that genistein in the diet at 'physiological levels' enhances cell differentiation, resulting in programming of mammary gland cells for reduced susceptibility to mammary cancer, with no observed toxicity to the reproductive tract of F1 females. PMID:9886571

  7. Phytoestrogens and mycotoxins in Iowa streams: an examination of underinvestigated compounds in agricultural basins.

    PubMed

    Kolpin, Dana W; Hoerger, Corinne C; Meyer, Michael T; Wettstein, Felix E; Hubbard, Laura E; Bucheli, Thomas D

    2010-01-01

    This study provides the first broad-scale investigation on the spatial and temporal occurrence of phytoestrogens and mycotoxins in streams in the United States. Fifteen stream sites across Iowa were sampled five times throughout the 2008 growing season to capture a range of climatic and crop-growth conditions. Basin size upstream from sampling sites ranged from 7 km2 to > 836,000 km2. Atrazine (herbicide) also was measured in all samples as a frame-of-reference agriculturally derived contaminant. Target compounds were frequently detected in stream samples: atrazine (100%), formononetin (80%), equol (45%), deoxynivalenol (43%), daidzein (32%), biochanin A (23%), zearalenone (13%), and genistein (11%). The nearly ubiquitous detection of formononetin (isoflavone) suggests a widespread agricultural source, as one would expect with the intense row crop and livestock production present across Iowa. Conversely, the less spatially widespread detections of deoxynivalenol (mycotoxin) suggest a more variable source due to the required combination of proper host and proper temperature and moisture conditions necessary to promote Fusarium spp. infections. Although atrazine concentrations commonly exceeded 100 ng L(-1) (42/75 measurements), only deoxynivalenol (6/56 measurements) had concentrations that occasionally exceeded this level. Temporal patterns in concentrations varied substantially between atrazine, formononetin, and deoxynivalenol, as one would expect for contaminants with different source inputs and processes of formation and degradation. The greatest phytoestrogen and mycotoxin concentrations were observed during spring snowmelt conditions. Phytoestrogens and mycotoxins were detected at all sampling sites regardless of basin size. The ecotoxicological effects from long-term, low-level exposures to phytoestrogens and mycotoxins or complex chemicals mixtures including these compounds that commonly rake place in surface water are poorly understood and have yet to be

  8. Phytoestrogens and mycotoxins in Iowa streams: An examination of underinvestigated compounds in agricultural basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, D.W.; Hoerger, C.C.; Meyer, M.T.; Wettstein, F.E.; Hubbard, L.E.; Bucheli, T.D.

    2010-01-01

    This study provides the first broad-scale investigation on the spatial and temporal occurrence of phytoestrogens and mycotoxins in streams in the United States. Fifteen stream sites across Iowa were sampled five times throughout the 2008 growing season to capture a range of climatic and crop-growth conditions. Basin size upstream from sampling sites ranged from 7 km2 to >836,000 km2. Atrazine (herbicide) also was measured in all samples as a frame-ofreference agriculturally derived contaminant. Target compounds were frequently detected in stream samples: atrazine (100%), formononetin (80%), equol (45%), deoxynivalenol (43%), daidzein (32%), biochanin A (23%), zearalenone (13%), and genistein (11%). Th e nearly ubiquitous detection of formononetin (isoflavone) suggests a widespread agricultural source, as one would expect with the intense row crop and livestock production present across Iowa. Conversely, the less spatially widespread detections of deoxynivalenol (mycotoxin) suggest a more variable source due to the required combination of proper host and proper temperature and moisture conditions necessary to promote Fusarium spp. infections. Although atrazine concentrations commonly exceeded 100 ng L-1 (42/75 measurements), only deoxynivalenol (6/56 measurements) had concentrations that occasionally exceeded this level. Temporal patterns in concentrations varied substantially between atrazine, formononetin, and deoxynivalenol, as one would expect for contaminants with different source inputs and processes of formation and degradation. The greatest phytoestrogen and mycotoxin concentrations were observed during spring snowmelt conditions. Phytoestrogens and mycotoxins were detected at all sampling sites regardless of basin size. The ecotoxicological effects from long-term, low-level exposures to phytoestrogens and mycotoxins or complex chemicals mixtures including these compounds that commonly take place in surface water are poorly understood and have yet to be

  9. Phytoestrogens and mycotoxins in Iowa streams: An examination of underinvestigated compounds in agricultural basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolpin, Dana W.; Hoerger, Corinne C.; Meyer, Michael T.; Wettstein, Felix E.; Hubbard, Laura E.; Bucheli, Thomas D.

    2010-01-01

    This study provides the first broad-scale investigation on the spatial and temporal occurrence of phytoestrogens and mycotoxins in streams in the United States. Fifteen stream sites across Iowa were sampled five times throughout the 2008 growing season to capture a range of climatic and crop-growth conditions. Basin size upstream from sampling sites ranged from 7 km2 to >836,000 km2 Atrazine (herbicide) also was measured in all samples as a frame-of-reference agriculturally derived contaminant. Target compounds were frequently detected in stream samples: atrazine (100%), formononetin (80%), equol (45%), deoxynivalenol (43%), daidzein (32%), biochanin A (23%), zearalenone (13%), and genistein (11%). The nearly ubiquitous detection of formononetin (isoflavone) suggests a widespread agricultural source, as one would expect with the intense row crop and livestock production present across Iowa. Conversely, the less spatially widespread detections of deoxynivalenol (mycotoxin) suggest a more variable source due to the required combination of proper host and proper temperature and moisture conditions necessary to promote Fusarium spp. infections. Although atrazine concentrations commonly exceeded 100 ng L-1 (42/75 measurements), only deoxynivalenol (6/56 measurements) had concentrations that occasionally exceeded this level. Temporal patterns in concentrations varied substantially between atrazine, formononetin, and deoxynivalenol, as one would expect for contaminants with different source inputs and processes of formation and degradation. The greatest phytoestrogen and mycotoxin concentrations were observed during spring snowmelt conditions. Phytoestrogens and mycotoxins were detected at all sampling sites regardless of basin size. The ecotoxicological effects from long-term, low-level exposures to phytoestrogens and mycotoxins or complex chemicals mixtures including these compounds that commonly take place in surface water are poorly understood and have yet to be

  10. Phytoestrogens in postmenopausal indications: A theoretical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Sunita, P.; Pattanayak, S. P.

    2011-01-01

    This review discusses plant-derived compounds with estrogenic activity. The authors rightly emphasize the need for the intake of foods containing phytoestrogens in view of their positive effects on postmenopausal indications. This is particularly significant in the light of the current wave of enthusiasm for vegetarian food, in general, and phytoestrogens, in particular. Phytoestrogens are plant-derived hormone-like diphenolic compounds of dietary origin. These compounds are weakly estrogenic and could play a role in the prevention of other estrogen-related conditions, namely, cardiovascular diseases, menopausal symptoms, postmenopausal osteoporosis, neuroprotective effects, and hormone-dependent cancers (breast and endometrium cancer). PMID:22096317

  11. Exposure to phytoestrogens in the perinatal period affects androgen secretion by testicular Leydig cells in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Akingbemi, Benson T; Braden, Tim D; Kemppainen, Barbara W; Hancock, Karen D; Sherrill, Jessica D; Cook, Sarah J; He, Xiaoying; Supko, Jeffrey G

    2007-09-01

    The use of soy-based products in the diet of infants has raised concerns regarding the reproductive toxicity of genistein and daidzein, the predominant isoflavones in soybeans with estrogenic activity. Time-bred Long-Evans dams were fed diets containing 0, 5, 50, 500, or 1000 ppm of soy isoflavones from gestational d 12 until weaning at d 21 postpartum. Male rats in all groups were fed soy-free diets from postnatal d 21 until 90 d of age. The mean +/- SD concentration of unconjugated (i.e. biologically active) genistein and daidzein in serum from the group of dams maintained on the diet containing the highest amount of isoflavones (1000 ppm) were 17 +/- 27 and 56 +/- 30 nM, respectively, at d 21 postpartum. The concentrations were considerably greater in male offspring (genistein: 73 +/- 46 nM; daidzein: 106 +/- 53 nM). Although steroidogenesis was decreased in individual Leydig cells, male rats from the highest exposure group (1000 ppm diet) exhibited elevated serum levels of the sex steroid hormones androsterone at 21 d (control: 15 +/- 1.5 vs.28 +/- 3.5 ng/ml; P < 0.05) and testosterone at 90 d of age (control: 7.5 +/- 1 vs.17 +/- 2 ng/ml; P < 0.05). Testosterone secretion by immature Leydig cells, isolated from 35-d-old male rats, decreased on exposure to 0.1 nm genistein in vitro (control: 175 +/- 5 vs. 117 +/- 3 ng/10(6) cells per 24 h; P < 0.05), indicative of direct phytoestrogen action. Thus, phytoestrogens have the ability to regulate Leydig cells, and additional studies to assess potential adverse effects of dietary soy-based products on reproductive tract development in neonates are warranted. PMID:17569756

  12. Changes in serum enterolactone, genistein, and daidzein in a dietary intervention study in Finland.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, K; Pietinen, P; Puska, P; Adlercreutz, H

    2000-12-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant-derived compounds that may have cancer-protective properties. The purpose of the study was to see how enterolactone, daidzein, and genistein serum concentrations reflect major changes in the diet of Finnish subjects. Phytoestrogen concentrations were measured by time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay after hydrolysis and extraction in samples from 85 middle-aged subjects who were part of a 12-week dietary intervention study carried out in North Karelia, Finland. In the baseline and the switchback periods, the subjects consumed their habitual Finnish diet, which is high in saturated fat and low in polyunsaturated fat and vegetables. During the 12-week intervention period, the proportion of dietary energy derived from fat was reduced from approximately 39% to 23%, and the consumption of vegetables, fruit, and berries was markedly increased. Enterolactone concentrations were measured during the baseline, intervention, and switchback periods. The median concentration of enterolactone rose from 12.2 to 19.5 nmol/l (P = 0.002) during the low-fat, high-vegetable diet. Daidzein and genistein concentrations were very low and did not change during the intervention. At baseline, 65% of the population had a low serum enterolactone concentration of <15 nmol/l. During the intervention period, this proportion fell to 34%. These major differences in serum enterolactone concentrations suggest that enterolactone may be used as a biomarker of a healthy diet containing plenty of vegetables, fruit, and berries. PMID:11142423

  13. Regulation of Multidrug Resistance Proteins by Genistein in a Hepatocarcinoma Cell Line: Impact on Sorafenib Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Rigalli, Juan Pablo; Ciriaci, Nadia; Arias, Agostina; Ceballos, María Paula; Villanueva, Silvina Stella Maris; Luquita, Marcelo Gabriel; Mottino, Aldo Domingo; Ghanem, Carolina Inés; Catania, Viviana Alicia; Ruiz, María Laura

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most frequent cancer worldwide. Sorafenib is the only drug available that improves the overall survival of HCC patients. P-glycoprotein (P-gp), Multidrug resistance-associated proteins 2 and 3 (MRP2 and 3) and Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) are efflux pumps that play a key role in cancer chemoresistance. Their modulation by dietary compounds may affect the intracellular accumulation and therapeutic efficacy of drugs that are substrates of these transporters. Genistein (GNT) is a phytoestrogen abundant in soybean that exerts its genomic effects through Estrogen-Receptors and Pregnane-X-Receptor (PXR), which are involved in the regulation of the above-mentioned transporters. We evaluated the effect of GNT on the expression and activity of P-gp, MRP2, MRP3 and BCRP in HCC-derived HepG2 cells. GNT (at 1.0 and 10 μM) increased P-gp and MRP2 protein expression and activity, correlating well with an increased resistance to sorafenib cytotoxicity as detected by the methylthiazole tetrazolium (MTT) assay. GNT induced P-gp and MRP2 mRNA expression at 10 but not at 1.0 μM concentration suggesting a different pattern of regulation depending on the concentration. Induction of both transporters by 1.0 μM GNT was prevented by cycloheximide, suggesting translational regulation. Downregulation of expression of the miR-379 by GNT could be associated with translational regulation of MRP2. Silencing of PXR abolished P-gp induction by GNT (at 1.0 and 10 μM) and MRP2 induction by GNT (only at 10 μM), suggesting partial mediation of GNT effects by PXR. Taken together, the data suggest the possibility of nutrient-drug interactions leading to enhanced chemoresistance in HCC when GNT is ingested with soy rich diets or dietary supplements. PMID:25781341

  14. Genistein, a dietary isoflavone, down-regulates the MDM2 oncogene at both transcriptional and posttranslational levels.

    PubMed

    Li, Mao; Zhang, Zhuo; Hill, Donald L; Chen, Xinbin; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2005-09-15

    Although genistein has chemopreventive effects in several human malignancies, including cancers of the breast, colon, and prostate, the mechanisms of action are not fully understood. Herein we report novel mechanisms whereby genistein down-regulates the MDM2 oncogene, perhaps explaining some of its anticancer activities. In a dose- and time-dependent manner, genistein reduced MDM2 protein and mRNA levels in human cell lines of breast, colon, and prostate cancer; primary fibroblasts; and breast epithelial cells. The inhibitory effects were found at both transcriptional and posttranslational levels and were independent of tyrosine kinase pathways. We found that the NFAT transcription site in the region between -132 and +33 in the MDM2 P2 promoter was responsive to genistein. At the posttranslational level, genistein induced ubiquitination of MDM2, which led to its degradation. Additionally, genistein induced apoptosis and G2 arrest and inhibited proliferation in a variety of human cancer cell lines, regardless of p53 status. We further showed that MDM2 overexpression abrogated genistein-induced apoptosis in vitro and that genistein inhibited MDM2 expression and tumor growth in PC3 xenografts. In conclusion, genistein directly down-regulates the MDM2 oncogene, representing a novel mechanism of its action that may have implications for its chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic effects. PMID:16166295

  15. Genistein inhibition of OGD-induced brain neuron death correlates with its modulation of apoptosis, voltage-gated potassium and sodium currents and glutamate signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xue-Ling; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Yu-Xiang; He, Cong-Cong; Tian, Kun; Wang, Hong-Gang; An, Di; Heng, Bin; Liu, Yan-Qiang

    2016-07-25

    In the present study, we established an in vitro model of hypoxic-ischemia via exposing primary neurons of newborn rats to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and observing the effects of genistein, a soybean isoflavone, on hypoxic-ischemic neuron viability, apoptosis, voltage-activated potassium (Kv) and sodium (Nav) currents, and glutamate receptor subunits. The results indicated that OGD exposure reduced the viability and increased the apoptosis of brain neurons. Meanwhile, OGD exposure caused changes in the current-voltage curves and current amplitude values of voltage-activated potassium and sodium currents; OGD exposure also decreased GluR2 expression and increased NR2 expression. However, genistein at least partially reversed the effects caused by OGD. The results suggest that hypoxic-ischemia-caused neuronal apoptosis/death is related to an increase in K(+) efflux, a decrease in Na(+) influx, a down-regulation of GluR2, and an up-regulation of NR2. Genistein may exert some neuroprotective effects via the modulation of Kv and Nav currents and the glutamate signal pathway, mediated by GluR2 and NR2. PMID:27238724

  16. Actions of genistein on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channel gating. Evidence for two binding sites with opposite effects.

    PubMed

    Wang, F; Zeltwanger, S; Yang, I C; Nairn, A C; Hwang, T C

    1998-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that genistein increased cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel activity in the presence of saturating concentrations of forskolin and calyculin A in intact cells. Possible molecular mechanisms for genistein's action include inhibition of tyrosine kinases, inhibition of serine/threonine protein phosphatases, or direct binding of genistein to CFTR. Since genistein inhibits several enzymes that hydrolyze ATP, and ATP hydrolysis is an intrinsic property of CFTR, we examined the effect of genistein on CFTR gating in excised inside-out patches from Hi-5 insect cells and NIH3T3 cells expressing recombinant CFTR. Genistein (50 microM) did not open phosphorylated CFTR channels by itself, but increased the ATP- induced CFTR channel current by approximately twofold. A similar magnitude of enhancement was observed when genistein was applied with PKI, a specific inhibitor of protein kinase A, or vanadate, a tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, suggesting that inhibition of protein phosphatases or tyrosine kinases does not account for genistein's effects. The enhancement of channel current increased with increasing concentrations of genistein and reached a maximum at 35 microM genistein. At higher concentrations of genistein concentration, CFTR channel current decreased, resulting in a bell-shaped dose-response relationship. In the absence of genistein, both open- and closed-time histograms could be fitted with a single exponential function, yielding a mean open time (tauO) of 0.302 +/- 0.002 s, and a mean closed time (tauC) of 0.406 +/- 0.003 s. In the presence of 50 microM genistein, the open time histogram could be fitted with a double exponential function with tauO1 = 0.429 +/- 0. 003 s and tauO2 = 2.033 +/- 0.173 s. Thus, genistein induced a prolonged open state, an effect that mimics that of nonhydrolyzable ATP analogs. Closed time analysis showed that 50 microM genistein caused a prolonged closed state with a time

  17. Effectiveness of phytoestrogens in climacteric medicine.

    PubMed

    Al-Azzawi, Farook; Wahab, May

    2010-09-01

    The increased interest in phytoestrogens in the management of menopausal symptoms followed the publication of the Women's Health Initiative study. A wide-spread perception that these plant-derived compounds are equivalent to estrogen was established. These compounds evolved to fulfill the needs of plant physiological processes and are natural for the plant cells but not natural to the human cell. Epidemiological data suggest a possible protective effect of phytoestrogen if consumed during adolescence, but later on in life this effect is not clear. The utility of phytoestrogen as a "natural and safe" alternative to estrogen in alleviating vasomotor symptoms has failed the test in randomized clinical trials. Because many breast cancer sufferers seek in phytoestrogen a relief of estrogen deficiency symptoms, the possible interaction of such remedies with risk of recurrence of breast cancer or interference with tamoxifen action should not be overlooked. PMID:20840282

  18. Soy and phytoestrogens: possible side effects.

    PubMed

    Jargin, Sergei V

    2014-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are present in certain edible plants being most abundant in soy; they are structurally and functionally analogous to the estrogens. Phytoestrogens have been applied for compensation of hormone deficiency in the menopause. At the same time, soy products are used in infant food and other foodstuffs. Furthermore, soy is applied as animal fodder, so that residual phytoestrogens and their active metabolites such as equol can remain in meat and influence the hormonal balance of the consumers. There have been only singular reports on modified gender-related behavior or feminization in humans in consequence of soy consumption. In animals, the intake of phytoestrogens was reported to impact fertility, sexual development and behavior. Feminizing effects in humans can be subtle and identifiable only statistically in large populations. PMID:25587246

  19. The pros and cons of phytoestrogens

    PubMed Central

    Patisaul, Heather B.; Jefferson, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant derived compounds found in a wide variety of foods, most notably soy. A litany of health benefits including a lowered risk of osteoporosis, heart disease, breast cancer, and menopausal symptoms, are frequently attributed to phytoestrogens but many are also considered endocrine disruptors, indicating that they have the potential to cause adverse health effects as well. Consequently, the question of whether or not phytoestrogens are beneficial or harmful to human health remains unresolved. The answer is likely complex and may depend on age, health status, and even the presence or absence of specific gut microflora. Clarity on this issue is needed because global consumption is rapidly increasing. Phytoestrogens are present in numerous dietary supplements and widely marketed as a natural alternative to estrogen replacement therapy. Soy infant formula now constitutes up to a third of the US market, and soy protein is now added to many processed foods. As weak estrogen agonists/antagonists with molecular and cellular properties similar to synthetic endocrine disruptors such as Bisphenol A (BPA), the phytoestrogens provide a useful model to comprehensively investigate the biological impact of endocrine disruptors in general. This review weighs the evidence for and against the purported health benefits and adverse effects of phytoestrogens. PMID:20347861

  20. Plasma phytoestrogens are not altered by probiotic consumption in postmenopausal women with and without a history of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nettleton, Jennifer A; Greany, Kristin A; Thomas, William; Wangen, Kerry E; Adlercreutz, Herman; Kurzer, Mindy S

    2004-08-01

    Soy phytoestrogens were suggested to reduce the risk of a number of diseases including breast cancer. Given that these compounds are metabolized by bacteria, alteration of intestinal bacteria and enzymes may affect phytoestrogen metabolism. We hypothesized that probiotics, when consumed with soy protein, would increase plasma isoflavones, as well as equol producer frequency, in postmenopausal women. We further hypothesized that these effects would differ between women who have had breast cancer and women who have not. To test these hypotheses, 20 breast cancer survivors and 20 controls completed four 6-wk treatments in a randomized, crossover design: supplementation with soy protein (S) (26.6 +/- 4.5 g protein, 44.4 +/- 7.5 mg isoflavones/d); soy + probiotics (S+P) (10(9) colony-forming units Lactobacillus acidophilus DDS+1 and Bifidobacterium longum, 15-30 mg fructooligosaccharide/d); milk protein (M) (26.6 +/- 4.5 g protein/d); and milk + probiotics (M+P). Plasma phytoestrogen concentrations did not differ between controls and survivors, although genistein tended to be lower in survivors at baseline (P = 0.15), and during soy (P = 0.16) and milk protein (P = 0.16) consumption. As expected, soy consumption increased plasma phytoestrogen concentrations (P < 0.0001). Plasma phytoestrogen concentrations and the number of equol producers did not differ between the S and S+P diets. At the same time, plasma equol concentrations as well as urinary equol excretion in 2 subjects were more than 7-fold different between the 2 diets. These results indicate that this particular probiotic supplement does not generally affect plasma isoflavones, although the large differences between plasma and urinary equol in some subjects suggest that equol producer status may be modifiable in some individuals. PMID:15284389

  1. Genistein stimulates electrogenic Cl- secretion via phosphodiesterase modulation in the mouse jejunum.

    PubMed

    Chao, Pin-Chun; Hamilton, Kirk L

    2009-09-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that genistein stimulated Cl(-) secretion in the mouse jejunum (Baker MJ and Hamilton KL, Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 287: C1636-C1645, 2004); however, the mode of action of genistein still remains unclear. Here, we examined the activation of Cl(-) secretion by the modulation of phosphodiesterases (PDEs) by genistein (75 microM) in the mouse jejunum with the Ussing short-circuit current (I(sc)) technique. Drugs tested included theophylline (10 mM), a nonspecific PDE inhibitor; 8-methoxymethyl-3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (8-MM-IBMX; 100 microM), erythro-9-(2-hydroxyl-3-nonyl)-adenine (EHNA; 40 microM), milrinone (100 microM), and rolipram (40 and 100 microM), which are specific inhibitors of PDE1-PDE4, respectively. Theophylline stimulated a bumetanide-sensitive I(sc), indicative of Cl(-) secretion, and abolished genistein's stimulatory action on I(sc). Neither 8-MM-IBMX nor EHNA altered the basal I(sc) nor did these PDE inhibitors affect the stimulatory action of genistein on the I(sc) of the mouse jejunum. Rolipram had no effect on basal I(sc), but it reduced the genistein-stimulated I(sc) compared with time-matched control tissues. Milrinone stimulated a concentration-dependent increase in I(sc). Bumetanide (10 microM) inhibited 60 +/- 4% of milrinone-induced I(sc). Pretreating tissues with milrinone prevented genistein from stimulating I(sc), and pretreatment with genistein reduced the effect of milrinone on I(sc). H89 (50 microM), a PKA inhibitor, reduced the milrinone-stimulated I(sc). Likewise, H89 reduced the genistein-stimulated I(sc). Here, we demonstrate, for the first time, that genistein activates Cl(-) secretion of the mouse jejunum via inhibition of a PDE3-dependent pathway. PMID:19535515

  2. Neonatal exposure to genistein adversely impacts the ontogeny of hypothalamic kisspeptin signaling pathways and ovarian development in the peripubertal female rat

    PubMed Central

    Losa, Sandra M; Todd, Karina L; Sullivan, Alana W; Cao, Jinyan; Mickens, Jillian A; Patisaul, Heather B

    2010-01-01

    Summary Sentence Neonatal genistein exposure at physiologically relevant levels advances vaginal opening, disrupts ovarian development and defeminizes the ontogeny of kisspeptin signaling pathways in the female rat hypothalamus. Neonatal exposure to estrogenic endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) can advance pubertal onset and induce premature anestrous in female rats. It was recently discovered that hypothalamic kisspeptin (KISS) signaling pathways are sexually dimorphic and regulate both the timing of pubertal onset and estrous cyclicity. Thus we hypothesized that disrupted sex specific ontogeny of KISS signaling pathways might be a mechanism underlying these EDC effects. We first established the sex specific development of KISS gene expression, cell number and neural fiber density across peripuberty in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) and arcuate (ARC), hypothesizing that the sexually dimorphic aspects of KISS signaling would be most vulnerable to EDCs. We next exposed female rats to the phytoestrogen genistein (GEN, 1 or 10 mg/kg bw), estradiol benzoate (EB, 10 μg), or vehicle from post natal day (P) 0–3 via subcutaneous (sc) injection. Animals were sacrificed on either P21, 24, 28, or 33 (n = 5–14 per group at each age). Vaginal opening was significantly advanced by EB and the higher dose of GEN compared to control animals and was accompanied by lower numbers of KISS immunoreactive fibers in the AVPV and ARC. Ovarian morphology was also assessed in all age groups for the presence of multiple oocyte follicles (MOFs). The number of MOFs decreased over time in each group, and none were observed in control animals by P24. MOFs were still present, however, in the EB and 10 mg/kg GEN groups beyond P24 indicating a disruption in the timing of ovarian development. PMID:20951797

  3. Exogenous genistein in late gestation: effects on fetal development and sow and piglet performance.

    PubMed

    Farmer, C; Robertson, P; Xiao, C W; Rehfeldt, C; Kalbe, C

    2016-09-01

    Due to their functional similarity to estradiol, phytoestrogens could prove to be beneficial in late gestating sows. The goal of this study was to determine the impact of providing the phytoestrogen genistein during late pregnancy on the performance of sows and their litters. In total, 56 gilts were equally divided into the two following groups on day 90 of gestation: (1) controls (CTL); and (2) two daily i.m. injections of 220 mg of genistein (GEN). Treatments were carried out until farrowing. Jugular blood samples were collected from 16 gilts/treatment on days 89 and 110 of gestation, and on days 3 and 21 of lactation. Milk samples were also obtained from those sows on day 3 of lactation. A male piglet from 16 CTL and 15 GEN litters was slaughtered at 24 h postpartum and a blood sample was obtained. The liver, heart and visceral organs were weighed and the semitendinosus (ST) muscle was collected and carcass composition was determined. The treatment increased (P0.1) on weight or backfat loss of sows during lactation, milk composition or weights of piglets. The pre-weaning mortality rate of piglets was very low (0.1). However, carcasses from GEN litters contained more fat than those from CTL litters (9.63% v. 8.34%, P0.1). In conclusion, injecting gilts with 440 mg/day of genistein in late gestation increased IGF1 concentrations in gilts and carcass fat in neonatal piglets, but had minimal effect on muscle development of piglets at birth and on the performance of lactating sows and their litters. PMID:26971408

  4. Genistein inhibits rotavirus replication and upregulates AQP4 expression in rotavirus-infected Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haohai; Liao, Dan; Liang, Liping; Song, Lijun; Zhao, Wenchang

    2015-06-01

    Rotavirus (RV) is the primary cause of severe dehydrating gastroenteritis and acute diarrheal disease in infants and young children. Previous studies have revealed that genistein can inhibit the infectivity of enveloped or nonenveloped viruses. Although the biological properties of genistein are well studied, the mechanisms of action underlying their anti-rotavirus properties have not been fully elucidated. Here, we report that genistein significantly inhibits RV-Wa replication in vitro by repressing viral RNA transcripts, and possibly viral protein synthesis. Interestingly, we also found that aquaporin 4 (AQP4) mRNA and protein expression, which was downregulated in RV-infected Caco-2 cells, can be upregulated by genistein in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Further experiments confirmed that genistein triggers CREB phosphorylation through PKA activation and subsequently promotes AQP4 gene transcription. These findings suggest that the pathophysiological mechanism of RV infection involves decreased expression of AQP4 and that genistein may be a useful candidate for developing a new anti-RV strategy by inhibiting rotavirus replication and upregulating AQP4 expression via the cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway. Further studies on the effect of genistein on RV-induced diarrhea are warranted. PMID:25877820

  5. Synergistic action of tiazofurin and genistein in human ovarian carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Weber, G

    1998-01-01

    Tiazofurin, an oncolytic drug, reduces PI kinase activity and arrests chiefly in S phase. Genistein, an inhibitor of PIP kinase, tyrosine kinase, and topoisomerase-II, induces arrest in G2 and/or early M phase in most carcinoma cells. Both tiazofurin and genistein reduce second messenger IP3 concentration in ovarian carcinoma cells. Because genistein and tiazofurin attack different enzymic targets and arrest the cell cycle at different phases, we tested the hypothesis that tiazofurin might be synergistic with genistein. Human ovarian carcinoma OVCAR-5 cells were grown in flasks in monolayers. In growth inhibition assay for tiazofurin and genistein the IC50s were 26 and 18 microM, respectively, and in clonogenic assays the LC50s were 17 and 4 microM, respectively. Various combinations of the two drugs were tested. The best protocol took into consideration that tiazofurin decreased GTP concentration in cells by 50% at 12 h after administration. Tiazofurin (20 microM) and genistein (20 microM) as single agents reduced cell counts to 60% and 50%, respectively. The predicted value, as a sum of the effect of two drugs, would have been 30% of controls. However, genistein added 12 h after tiazofurin decreased cell counts to 8%, showing synergistic action of the two drugs for growth inhibition. Similar results were observed in the clonogenic assays, which also revealed synergistic cytotoxicity. The protocol yielding synergism might be of value in the clinical treatment of human ovarian carcinoma. PMID:9700722

  6. Effects of estradiol and genistein on the insulin signaling pathway in the cerebral cortex of aged female rats.

    PubMed

    Morán, Javier; Garrido, Pablo; Cabello, Estefanía; Alonso, Ana; González, Celestino

    2014-10-01

    Menopause leads to a decrease in estrogen production that increases central insulin resistance, contributing to the development of neurodegenerative diseases. We have evaluated the influence of aging and estradiol or genistein treatments on some key stages of the insulin signaling pathway in the cerebral cortex. Young and aged female Wistar rats were ovariectomized and treated acutely with 17β-estradiol (1.4μg/kg body weight), two doses of genistein (10 or 40mg/kg body weight), or vehicle. The cortical expression of several key insulin signaling pathway components was analyzed by western blotting. Our results showed an age-related deterioration in the interactions between the regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (p85α) and the activated form of insulin receptor substrate 1 (p-IRS1tyr612), as well as between p85α and the 46kDa isoform of the estrogen receptor α (ERα46). Moreover, aging also decreased the translocation of glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4) to the plasma membrane. 17β-Estradiol but not genistein reduced the negative impact of aging on central insulin sensitivity by favoring this GLUT4 translocation, and therefore could be neuroprotective against the associated neurodegenerative diseases. However, protein kinase B (Akt) activation by genistein suggests that other possible mechanisms are involved in the neuroprotective effects of this phytoestrogen during the aging process. PMID:25086228

  7. Genistein supplementation prevents weight gain but promotes oxidative stress and inflammation in the vasculature of female obese ob/ob mice.

    PubMed

    Simperova, Anna; Al-Nakkash, Layla; Faust, James J; Sweazea, Karen L

    2016-08-01

    Obesity, a state of chronic low-grade inflammation, is strongly associated with the development of hypertension and diabetes. Superoxide, a free radical elevated in obese individuals, promotes hypertension through scavenging the endogenous vasodilator nitric oxide. The hypothesis was a genistein-enriched diet would promote weight loss and reduce oxidative stress and inflammation in the vasculature of intact female ob/ob mice. Aortas and mesenteric arteries were isolated from female ob/ob mice fed genistein-free (0mg genistein/kg diet; n=6), standard chow (200-300mg genistein/kg diet; n=11) or genistein-enriched (600mg genistein/kg diet; n=9) diets for 4weeks. Sections of isolated vessels were labeled with the superoxide indicator dihydroethidium and fluorescence was measured by confocal microscopy. Protein expression of the inflammatory marker inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was measured in the perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) surrounding each vessel and plasma concentrations of superoxide dismutase (SOD) were quantified. Genistein-enriched diet promoted less weight gain compared to animals fed standard chow (P=.008). Standard chow promoted increased superoxide in the aorta (P=.030) and mesenteric arteries (P=.024) compared to a diet devoid of genistein. At all tested concentrations, genistein significantly increased iNOS expression in mesenteric artery PVAT (vs. standard chow, P<.001; vs. genistein-enriched, P=.002) and tended to increase iNOS within the aortic PVAT (standard chow, P=.075) compared to the genistein-free group. Plasma SOD activity was significantly downregulated in genistein-enriched animals as compared to those fed a genistein-free diet (P=.028). In summary, although genistein prevents weight gain, it promotes vascular oxidative stress and inflammation in obese ovarian-intact female mice. PMID:27440533

  8. Dietary phytoestrogen intake and mammographic density -- results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Gabriele; Mack, U; von Fournier, D; Linseisen, J

    2005-09-12

    The influence of dietary phytoestrogens provided by Western diets on mammographic density is not well established. Soy and soy products as source of isoflavones were found to be inversely associated with high mammographic density, a marker for breast cancer risk. Another class of phytoestrogens, the lignans, which are more frequent in Western diets, are rarely investigated. Within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort in Heidelberg (EPIC-Heidelberg) we explored the feasibility of mammogram collection and measurement of mammographic density in order to investigate the association between dietary phytoestrogen intake and breast density patterns. Wolfe classification was used to summarize mammographic density. Dietary habits were assessed by means of a validated food frequency questionnaire. - Out of the 505 randomly selected women, 317 (63%) returned the questionnaire and 310 (61.4%) women provided informed consent to collect mammograms. Dietary intake of seven women with dense patterns (DY) was compared with 47 women without dense patterns. A high dietary intake of fibre (p-value = 0.008) and secoisolariciresinol (p-value = 0.043) is inversely associated with non-dense breast patterns. This is also observed for a high dietary intake of soy-products (p-value = 0.004) and, in tendency, genistein (p-value = 0.069). After adjustment for energy intake and age the groups of dense and non-dense mammographic patterns were different regarding the intake of carbohydrate (p = 0.032), soy-products (p = 0.020), fibre (p = 0.046), and secoisolariciresinol (p = 0.027). - Our results suggest an inverse association between dietary lignan intake and breast density, similar to the findings for isoflavones. To our knowledge this is the first report on this association, but due to the risk of chance finding, this has to be confirmed in a study with sufficient statistical power. PMID:16183551

  9. Activation of CFTR by genistein in human airway epithelial cell lines.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Charlotte; Servetnyk, Zhanna; Roomans, Godfried M

    2003-08-29

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by a mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a chloride channel expressed in epithelial cells. The effects of genistein and 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA) on CFTR were studied in three human airway epithelial cell lines expressing wild-type or DeltaF508 CFTR: Calu-3, CFSMEo-, and CFBE41o- cells. The cells were loaded with the fluorescent dye N-(ethoxycarbonylmethyl)-6-methoxyquinolinium bromide (MQAE) and chloride efflux was studied. Forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) induced chloride efflux in Calu-3 cells but not in CF lines. Genistein (2.5-50 microM) alone was able to induce chloride efflux in all cell lines. Genistein did not enhance the effect of forskolin and IBMX. PBA had little or no effect on genistein-induced chloride efflux. The effect of genistein seen at low concentrations makes genistein interesting for possible pharmacological treatment of CF, since it is known that similar concentrations can be obtained in plasma by a soy-rich diet. PMID:12914781

  10. Anti-inflammatory action of γ-irradiated genistein in murine peritoneal macrophage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Nak-Yun; Byun, Eui-Baek; Song, Du-Sup; Jin, Yeung-Bae; Park, Jae-Nam; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Park, Jong-Heum; Song, Beom-Seok; Park, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Ju-Woon; Kim, Jae-Hun

    2014-12-01

    This present study was to examine the cytotoxicity and anti-inflammatory activity of gamma (γ)-irradiated genistein in murine peritoneal macrophage. Inflammation to macrophage was induced by adding the lipopolysaccharide (LPS). γ-Irradiated genistein significantly decreased the cytotoxicity to murine peritoneal macrophage in dose ranges from 5 to 10 μM than that of non-irradiated genistein. Anti-inflammatory activity within the doses less than 2 μM showed that γ-irradiated genistein treatment remarkably reduced the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation by decreasing the nitric oxide (NO) and cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6) production. In a structural analysis through the high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), γ-irradiated genistein showed a new peak production distinguished from main peak of genistein (non-irradiated). Therefore, increase of anti-inflammatory activity may closely mediate with structural changes induced by γ irradiation exposure. Based on the above result, γ-irradiation could be an effective tool for reduction of toxicity and increase of physiological activity of biomolecules.

  11. Biotransformation of the phytoestrogen 8-prenylnaringenin.

    PubMed

    Bartmańska, Agnieszka; Tronina, Tomasz; Huszcza, Ewa

    2010-01-01

    In order to select microorganisms capable of transforming the potent phytoestrogen 8-prenylnaringenin, preliminary screening tests on 30 fungal cultures were performed. No reports concerning successful biotransformation of 8-prenylnaringenin by this class of organisms have been known so far. Fusarium equiseti converted 8-prenylnaringenin into PMID:21138063

  12. Solubilization of genistein by caseinate micellar system.

    PubMed

    Anjani, Gemala; Ohta, Akio; Yasuhara, Kazuma; Asakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the aggregation behavior of caseinate and the solubilization of genistein in aqueous caseinate solution. The critical aggregation concentration (CAC) of caseinate was obtained from the fluorescence intensity of 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS), which was enhanced by ANS-protein interactions and the hydrophobicity of caseinate. The increasing solubility of genistein in caseinate was confirmed by HPLC measurements; above and below the CAC, the genistein/caseinate molar ratio is 1:1 and 10:1, respectively. The latter ratio indicates that more caseinate molecules surround genistein below the CAC. However, the solubility of genistein in caseinate is unaffected by calcium ions. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) shows that casein sub-micelles are similarly structured in the presence and absence of genistein. In AFM phase images, the caseinate sub-micelle is brightened in the presence of genistein, implying that the particle becomes more rigid, probably because genistein attaches to the surface or to the narrow part of the sub-micelle. The diameter of sub-micelle aggregates is two times that of caseinate alone (24 nm versus 12 nm). These results were confirmed by cryo-TEM observations. PMID:24599106

  13. Sex differences in the mechano-energetic effects of genistein on stunned rat and guinea pig hearts.

    PubMed

    Colareda, Germán A; Ragone, María I; Consolini, Alicia E

    2016-01-01

    Although the phytoestrogen genistein (Gen) is considered protective in cardiovascular diseases, its direct effects on stunned hearts after transient ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) are unknown. This report studied the effects of 20 μmol/L Gen on the mechano-calorimetric behaviour during I/R of rat and guinea pig hearts to evaluate the energetics of Ca(2+) homeostasis. Isolated beating hearts were perfused with control Krebs solution inside a calorimeter with or without perfusion of Gen before a transient period of I/R. Left ventricular pressure development (P) and total heat rate (Ht) were continuously measured. At 37°C, Gen did not change post-ischemic contractile recovery (PICR), but it increased the relaxation rate. However, PICR was reduced in hearts of male rats and guinea pigs at 30°C. Total muscle economy (P/Ht) showed the same behaviour as P at each temperature. Inhibition of phosphatases with orthovanadate during Gen perfusion prevented a decrease in PICR in male rat hearts, suggesting that this effect is due to tyrosine kinase inhibition. Reperfusing ischemic hearts with 10 mmol/L caffeine-36 mmol/L Na(+)-Krebs induced contracture dependent on the sarcoreticular Ca(2+) content. Contracture relaxation depends on mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and Gen reduced the relaxation rate. Moreover, Gen prevented the increase in Rhod-2 fluorescence (free [Ca(2+)]m) of rat cardiomyocytes. In guinea pig hearts, Gen maintained ischemic preconditioning, but was reduced by 5-hydroxydecanoate, suggesting the participation of mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent K channels. Results suggest that Gen acts on several mechanisms that regulate myocardial calcium homeostasis and energetics during I/R, which differ in a temperature- and sex-dependent manner. PMID:26452245

  14. Genistein Protects Against Biomarkers of Delayed Lung Sequelae in Mice Surviving High-Dose Total Body Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    DAY, Regina M.; BARSHISHAT-KUPPER, Michal; MOG, Steven R.; MCCART, Elizabeth A.; PRASANNA, P. G. S.; DAVIS, Thomas A.; LANDAUER, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of genistein on 30-day survival and delayed lung injury were examined in C57BL/6J female mice. A single subcutaneous injection of vehicle (PEG-400) or genistein (200 mg/kg) was administered 24 h before total body irradiation (7.75 Gy 60Co, 0.6 Gy/min). Experimental groups were: No treatment + Sham (NC), Vehicle + Sham (VC), Genistein + Sham (GC), Radiation only (NR), Vehicle + Radiation (VR), Genistein + Radiation (GR). Thirty-day survivals after 7.75 Gy were: NR 23%, VR 53%, and GR 92%, indicating significant protection from acute radiation injury by genistein. Genistein also mitigated radiation-induced weight loss on days 13–28 postirradiation. First generation lung fibroblasts were analyzed for micronuclei 24 h postirradiation. Fibroblasts from the lungs of GR-treated mice had significantly reduced micronuclei compared with NR mice. Collagen deposition was examined by histochemical staining. At 90 days postirradiation one half of the untreated and vehicle irradiated mice had focal distributions of small collagen-rich plaques in the lungs, whereas all of the genistein-treated animals had morphologically normal lungs. Radiation reduced the expression of COX-2, transforming growth factor-β receptor (TGFβR) I and II at 90 days after irradiation. Genistein prevented the reduction in TGFβRI. However, by 180 days postirradiation, these proteins normalized in all groups. These results demonstrate that genistein protects against acute radiation-induced mortality in female mice and that GR-treated mice have reduced lung damage compared to NR or VR. These data suggest that genistein is protective against a range of radiation injuries. PMID:18434686

  15. Effect of genistein on basal jejunal chloride secretion in R117H CF mice is sex and route specific

    PubMed Central

    Rayyan, Esa; Polito, Sarah; Leung, Lana; Bhakta, Ashesh; Kang, Jonathan; Willey, Justin; Mansour, Wasim; Drumm, Mitchell L; Al-Nakkash, Layla

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) results from the loss or reduction in function of the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulatory protein) chloride channel. The third most common CFTR mutation seen clinically is R117H. Genistein, a naturally occurring phytoestrogen, is known to stimulate CFTR function in vitro. We aimed to determine whether route of administration of genistein could mediate differential effects in R117H male and female CF mice. Mice were fed (4 weeks) or injected subcutaneously (1 week) with the following: genistein 600 mg/kg diet (600Gd); genistein-free diet (0Gd); genistein injection 600 mg/kg body weight (600Gi); dimethyl sulfoxide control (0Gi). In male R117H mice fed 600Gd, basal short circuit current (Isc) was unchanged. In 600Gd-fed female mice, there was a subgroup that demonstrated a significant increase in basal Isc (53.14±7.92 μA/cm2, n=6, P<0.05) and a subgroup of nonresponders (12.05±6.59 μA/cm2, n=4), compared to 0Gd controls (29.3±6.5 μA/cm2, n=7). In R117H mice injected with 600Gi, basal Isc was unchanged in both male and female mice compared to 0Gi controls. Isc was measured in response to the following: the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin (10 μM, bilateral), bumetanide (100 μM, basolateral) to indicate the Cl− secretory component, and acetazolamide (100 μM, bilateral) to indicate the HCO3− secretory component; however, there was no effect of genistein (diet or injection) on any of these parameters. Jejunal morphology (ie, villi length, number of goblet cells per villus, crypt depth, and number of goblet cells per crypt) in R117H mice suggested no genistein-mediated difference among the groups. Serum levels of genistein were significantly elevated, compared to respective controls, by either 600Gd (equally elevated in males and females) or 600Gi (elevated more in females versus males). These data suggest a sex-dependent increase in basal Isc of R117H mice and that the increase is also specific for route of

  16. Sex-Dependent Effects of Dietary Genistein on Echocardiographic Profile and Cardiac GLUT4 Signaling in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Lana; Martin, Joshua B.; Lawmaster, Todd; Arthur, Kathryn; Broderick, Tom L.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether genistein diet resulted in changes in cardiac function, using echocardiography, and expression of key proteins involved in glucose uptake by the myocardium. Intact male and female C57BL/6J mice (aged 4–6 weeks) were fed either 600 mg genistein/kg diet (600 G) or 0 mg genistein/kg diet (0 G) for 4 weeks. Echocardiography data revealed sex-dependent differences in the absence of genistein: compared to females, hearts from males exhibited increased systolic left ventricle internal dimension (LVIDs), producing a decrease in function, expressed as fractional shortening (FS). Genistein diet also induced echocardiographic changes in function: in female hearts, 600G induced a 1.5-fold (P < 0.05) increase in LVIDs, resulting in a significant decrease in FS and whole heart surface area when compared to controls (fed 0 G). Genistein diet increased cardiac GLUT4 protein expression in both males (1.51-fold, P < 0.05) and females (1.76-fold, P < 0.05). However, no effects on the expression of notable intracellular signaling glucose uptake-regulated proteins were observed. Our data indicate that consumption of genistein diet for 4 weeks induces echocardiographic changes in indices of systolic function in females and has beneficial effects on cardiac GLUT4 protein expression in both males and females. PMID:27471542

  17. Development and In Vitro Evaluation of Vitamin E-Enriched Nanoemulsion Vehicles Loaded with Genistein for Chemoprevention Against UVB-Induced Skin Damage.

    PubMed

    Brownlow, Bill; Nagaraj, Vinay J; Nayel, Amy; Joshi, Megha; Elbayoumi, Tamer

    2015-10-01

    There is a great need for effective protection against cutaneous pathologies arising from chronic exposure to harmful solar UVB radiations. A promising pharmaceutical strategy to improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutic/preventative natural compounds (e.g., soy isoflavone Genistein, Gen) is to enhance their dermal delivery using nanoemulsion (NE) formulations. This report investigates the development of nanoemulsified tocotrienol(T3)-rich fraction of red palm oil (Tocomin®), to yield an optimal NE delivery system for dermal photoprotection (z-average size <150 nm, ζ-potential ≈ -30 mV, polydispersity index < 0.25). Physicochemical characterization and photostability studies indicate NE formulations utilizing surfactant mixture (Smix) of Solutol® HS-15 (SHS15) blended with vitamin E TPGS (TPGS) as cosurfactant was significantly superior to formulations that utilized Lutrol® F68 (LF68) as the cosurfactant. A ratio of 60:40 of SHS15-TPGS-NE was further identified as lead Tocomin® NE topical platform using in vitro pharmaceutical skin reactivity studies that assess cutaneous irritancy and cytotoxicity. Prototype Tocomin® NE loaded with the antiphotocarcinogenic molecule Gen (Gen-Tocomin® NE) showed slow-release profile in both liquid and cream forms. Gen-Tocomin® NE also showed excellent biocompatibility, and provided substantial UVB protection to cultured subcutaneous L929 fibroblasts, indicating the great potential of our Tocomin® NE warranting further prototype development as topical pharmaceutical platform for skin photoprotection applications. PMID:26108889

  18. Inhibitory effect of genistein on mouse colon cancer MC-26 cells involved TGF-{beta}1/Smad pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Zengli . E-mail: zengliy@yahoo.com.cn; Tang Yunan; Hu Dongsheng; Li Juan

    2005-08-05

    TGF-{beta}1/signaling has been shown to be associated with proapoptotic and antimitotic activities in epithelial tissues. Genistein, a major component of soybean isoflavone, has multiple functions resulting in anticancer proliferation. We herein showed that genistein dose-dependently increased TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression in mouse colon cancer MC-26 cells. A mouse monoclonal anti-TGF-{beta}1 neutralizing antibody partially, but not completely, blocked the growth inhibition by genistein. By using adenoviral vector, we demonstrated that Smad7 overexpression attenuated genistein-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis as determined by MTT and apoptosis ELISA. Smad7 overexpression also inhibited upregulation of p21 and caspase-3 activity by geinistein. To further confirm inhibitory effect of genistein in MC-26 cells require TGF-{beta}1/Smad signaling, we employed Western blot and electrophoretic mobility shift assay to detect formation of Smad-DNA complexes and phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3, respectively. Data revealed that genistein induced an evident formation of Smad-DNA complexes and phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3, indicating increased TGF-{beta}1 signaling. Taken together, these findings first provided insights into possible molecular mechanisms of growth inhibition by genistein that required Smad signaling, which could aid in its evaluation for colon tumor prevention.

  19. Gastroschisis and maternal intake of phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Elizabeth L; Ma, Chen; Shaw, Gary M; Carmichael, Suzan L

    2016-08-01

    The prevalence of gastroschisis has increased significantly in the past few decades. The strongest risks have been observed for women <25 years old or of low body mass index, and maternal diet also been proposed to be associated with risk. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the risk of gastroschisis is associated with maternal dietary intake of phytoestrogens. The analysis includes data on mothers of 409 gastroschisis cases and 3,007 controls who delivered their infants from 2005 to 2010 and participated in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, a multistate, population-based, case-control study. Detailed information was obtained from maternal telephone interviews that included a validated food frequency questionnaire. We conducted logistic regression analyses that included each phytoestrogen in its continuous form (to test for linearity) and quadratic form (to test for non-linearity), adjusted for maternal energy intake, age, BMI, race-ethnicity, and smoking in 1st trimester. Logistic regression analysis indicated that biochanin A, formonoetin, and coumestrol had a significant non-linear association with gastroschisis (P-value <0.05 for quadratic term). Lower intakes were associated with increased risk, with somewhat stronger but relatively modest associations at the lower end of the distribution; for example, the ORs for the 10th versus 50th percentiles ranged from 1.1 to 1.2. Associations were not significant for the other phytoestrogens. This study provides some evidence for association with certain phytoestrogens, after adjusting for covariates. The implications of our findings for clinical practice are uncertain pending other studies examining this association. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27232448

  20. Phytoestrogen Metabolism by Adult Human Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Gaya, Pilar; Medina, Margarita; Sánchez-Jiménez, Abel; Landete, José Mᵃ

    2016-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are plant-derived polyphenols with a structure similar to human estrogens. The three main groups of phytoestrogens, isoflavones, ellagitannins, and lignans, are transformed into equol, urolithins, and enterolignans, respectively, by bacteria. These metabolites have more estrogenic/antiestrogenic and antioxidant activities than their precursors, and they are more bioavailable. The aim of this study was to analyze the metabolism of isoflavones, lignans and ellagitannins by gut microbiota, and to study the possible correlation in the metabolism of these three groups of phytoestrogens. In vitro fermentation experiments were performed with feces samples from 14 healthy adult volunteers, and metabolite formation was measured by HPLC-PAD and HPLC-ESI/MS. Only the microbiota of one subject produced equol, while most of them showed production of O-desmethylangolensin (O-DMA). Significant inter-subject differences were observed in the metabolism of dihydrodaidzein and dihydrogenistein, while the glucoside isoflavones and their aglycones showed less variability, except for glycitin. Most subjects produced urolithins M-5 and E. Urolithin D was not detected, while uroltithin B was found in half of the individuals analyzed, and urolithins A and C were detected in two and four subjects, respectively. Enterolactone was found in all subjects, while enterodiol only appeared in five. Isoflavone metabolism could be correlated with the metabolism of lignans and ellagitannins. However, the metabolism of ellagitannins and lignans could not be correlated. This the first study where the metabolism of the three groups together of phytoestrogen, isoflavones, lignans, and ellagitannins by gut microbiota is analyzed. PMID:27517891

  1. Arctigenin, a dietary phytoestrogen, induces apoptosis of estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer cells through the ROS/p38 MAPK pathway and epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chia-Jung; Kuo, Po-Lin; Hsu, Ying-Chan; Huang, Ya-Fang; Tsai, Eing-Mei; Hsu, Ya-Ling

    2014-02-01

    This study investigates the anticancer effect of arctigenin (ATG), a natural lignan product of Arctium lappa L., in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. Results indicate that ATG inhibits MDA-MB-231 cell growth by inducing apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. ATG triggers the mitochondrial caspase-independent pathways, as indicated by changes in Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, resulting in AIF and EndoG nuclear translocation. ATG increased cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by increasing p22(phox)/NADPH oxidase 1 interaction and decreasing glutathione level. ATG clearly increases the activation of p38 MAPK, but not JNK and ERK1/2. Antioxidant EUK-8, a synthetic catalytic superoxide and hydrogen peroxide scavenger, significantly decreases ATG-mediated p38 activation and apoptosis. Blocking p38 with a specific inhibitor suppresses ATG-mediated Bcl-2 downregulation and apoptosis. Moreover, ATG activates ATF-2, a transcription factor activated by p38, and then upregulates histone H3K9 trimethylation in the Bcl-2 gene promoter region, resulting in Bcl-2 downregulation. Taken together, the results demonstrate that ATG induces apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 cells via the ROS/p38 MAPK pathway and epigenetic regulation of Bcl-2 by upregulation of histone H3K9 trimethylation. PMID:24140706

  2. Anticancer effect of genistein on BG-1 ovarian cancer growth induced by 17 β-estradiol or bisphenol A via the suppression of the crosstalk between estrogen receptor alpha and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Kyung-A; Park, Min-Ah; Kang, Nam-Hee; Yi, Bo-Rim; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2013-11-01

    The interaction between estrogen receptor (ER) and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) signaling pathway plays an important role in proliferation of and resistance to endocrine therapy to estrogen dependent cancers. Estrogen (E2) upregulates the expression of components of IGF-1 system and induces the downstream of mitogenic signaling cascades via phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1). In the present study, we evaluated the xenoestrogenic effect of bisphenol A (BPA) and antiproliferative activity of genistein (GEN) in accordance with the influence on this crosstalk. BPA was determined to affect this crosstalk by upregulating mRNA expressions of ERα and IGF-1R and inducing phosphorylation of IRS-1 and Akt in protein level in BG-1 ovarian cancer cells as E2 did. In the mouse model xenografted with BG-1 cells, BPA significantly increased a tumor burden of mice and expressions of ERα, pIRS-1, and cyclin D1 in tumor mass compared to vehicle, indicating that BPA induces ovarian cancer growth by promoting the crosstalk between ER and IGF-1R signals. On the other hand, GEN effectively reversed estrogenicity of BPA by reversing mRNA and protein expressions of ERα, IGF-1R, pIRS-1, and pAkt induced by BPA in cellular model and also significantly decreased tumor growth and in vivo expressions of ERα, pIRS-1, and pAkt in xenografted mouse model. Also, GEN was confirmed to have an antiproliferative effect by inducing apoptotic signaling cascades. Taken together, these results suggest that GEN effectively reversed the increased proliferation of BG-1 ovarian cancer by suppressing the crosstalk between ERα and IGF-1R signaling pathways upregulated by BPA or E2.

  3. Genistein potentiates wild-type and delta F508-CFTR channel activity.

    PubMed

    Hwang, T C; Wang, F; Yang, I C; Reenstra, W W

    1997-09-01

    Effects of genistein on wild-type (wt) and delta F508-cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) were studied in NIH/3T3 cells stably transfected with wt or mutant CFTR cDNA. As measured by I- efflux, half-maximal concentration of agonist (K1/2) for forskolin-dependent activation was greater for delta F508-CFTR than wt-CFTR. Genistein decreased the K1/2 for both forms of the channel and increased the maximal activity of delta F508-CFTR by 3.7-fold. In cell-attached patches, 10 microM forskolin induced minimal delta F508-CFTR activity with characteristic prolonged closed times (estimated time constant, > 30 s). Genistein increased the forskolin-induced macroscopic currents of wt-CFTR and delta F508-CFTR by 3- and 19-fold, respectively. Variance analysis suggested that in the presence of forskolin and genistein the open probabilities (Po) of wt- and delta F508-CFTR were identical. In single-channel studies, at maximal adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) stimulation, genistein increased the Po of wt-CFTR by prolonging the open time, but, at submaximal cAMP stimulation, the Po was increased by prolonging the open time and shortening the closed time. In excised patches with CFTR channels preactivated in the cell-attached mode, genistein increased ATP-dependent wt- and delta F508-CFTR current about twofold by prolonging the open time. Our results thus suggest that phosphorylation-dependent activation of delta F508-CFTR is defective and that genistein corrects this defect at least in part by binding to the CFTR protein. PMID:9316420

  4. Different mechanisms of actions of genistein, quercetin on spontaneous contractions of rabbit duodenum.

    PubMed

    Santos-Fagundes, Diego; Grasa, Laura; Gonzalo, Sergio; Valero, Marta Sofía; Castro, Marta; Arruebo, María Pilar; Plaza, Miguel Ángel; Divina-Murillo, María

    2015-07-01

    Flavonoids are known to relax precontracted intestinal smooth muscle and delay intestinal transit or intestinal peristalsis. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of genistein and quercetin on spontaneous contractions of rabbit duodenum in vitro in an organ bath. Genistein and quercetin (0.1-10µM) reduced the amplitude of spontaneous contractions in the longitudinal and circular smooth muscle of rabbit duodenum, but they did not modify the frequency. Bay K8644 (L-type Ca2+ channel activator), apamin, charybdotoxin, and tetraetylammonium (K+ channel blockers) reverted the inhibition of amplitude of spontaneous contractions induced by genistein in longitudinal and circular smooth muscle. H-89 (protein kinase A inhibitor) antagonized the reduction of the amplitude of spontaneous contractions induced by quercetin in longitudinal and circular smooth muscle of duodenum, while 2,5-dideoxiadenosine (adenylyl cyclase inhibitor) reverted only the reduction of the amplitude in circular smooth muscle. In conclusion, genistein and quercetin reduce the spontaneous contractions in the duodenum by different mechanisms of actions. The effect of genistein would be mediated by Ca2+ and K+ channels, while the effect of quercetin would be mediated by cAMP and protein kinase A. PMID:26140633

  5. Determination of phytoestrogens in dietary supplements by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Clarke, D B; Bailey, V; Lloyd, A S

    2008-05-01

    Labelling data quantifying the exact content of individual phytoestrogen analytes in dietary supplements are generally poor. As these products are commonly used in the management of menopause symptoms, any clinical benefits would be dependent on the exact dosage of isoflavones received. Well-established extraction procedures and updated isotope dilution mass spectrometry liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry detection (LC-MS/MS) have been used to accurately quantify the concentrations of ten common isoflavones in 35 dietary supplement samples on sale in the UK, Canada and Italy. Concentration-specific ionization suppression is described for biochanin A and formononetin. All supplements contained phytoestrogens. The soya isoflavones (genistein, daidzein, glycitein) were present in all products and the majority also contained the red clover isoflavones (biochanin A, formononetin) and some the Kudzu isoflavones (daidzein, puerarin). The content of total isoflavones per dose ranged from <1 to 53 mg. Trace amounts of coumestrol were found in six products. Other less common analytes, the prenylnaringenins (6-prenylnaringenin, 8-prenylnaringenin, 6,8-diprenylnaringenin) were not found in any of the products. Only 14 of 35 supplements were found to deliver more than or equal to 40 mg day(-1) of aglycone isoflavones, a consensus dose value recognized as delivering therapeutic benefit. Eleven did not match label claims. Six delivered less than 10 mg day (-1) of isoflavones. There has been little improvement in the overall quality of industry labelling in the five years since this was last investigated. Consequently, the public, retailers and healthcare professionals should consider using standardized isoflavone supplements, which are supported by analytical measurements. PMID:18478479

  6. A common mechanism for cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein activation by genistein and benzimidazolone analogs.

    PubMed

    Al-Nakkash, L; Hu, S; Li, M; Hwang, T C

    2001-02-01

    We have investigated the mechanism of action of two benzimidazolone analogs (NS004 and NS1619) on DeltaF508-CFTR using both whole-cell and cell-attached patch-clamp techniques and compared their effects with those of genistein. We conclude that benzimidazolone analogs and genistein act through a common mechanism, based on the following evidence: 1) both act only on phosphorylated CFTR, 2) the maximal DeltaF508-CFTR current activated by benzimidazolone analogs is identical to that induced by genistein, 3) benzimidazolone analogs increase the open probability of the forskolin-dependent DeltaF508-CFTR channel activity through an increase of the channel open time and a decrease of the channel closed time (effects indistinct from those reported for genistein), and 4) the prolonged K1250A-CFTR channel open time (in the presence of 10 microM forskolin) is unaffected by benzimidazolone analogs or genistein, supporting the hypothesis that these compounds stabilize the open state by inhibiting ATP hydrolysis at nucleotide binding domain 2 (NBD2). In addition, we demonstrate that NS004 and NS1619 are more potent CFTR activators than genistein (EC(50) values are 87 +/- 14 nM, 472 +/- 88 nM, and 4.4 +/- 0.5 microM, respectively). From our studies with the double mutant DeltaF508/K1250A-CFTR, we conclude that benzimidazolone analogs and genistein rectify the DeltaF508-CFTR prolonged closed time independent of their effects on channel open time, since these agonists enhance DeltaF508/K1250A-CFTR activity by shortening the channel closed time. These studies should pave the way toward understanding the agonist binding sites at a molecular level. PMID:11160632

  7. Genistein inhibits A549 human lung cancer cell proliferation via miR-27a and MET signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Zang, Aimin; Jia, Youchao; Shang, Yanhong; Zhang, Zhuoqi; Ge, Kun; Zhang, Jinchao; Fan, Wufang; Wang, Bei

    2016-01-01

    Genistein is a soybean isoflavone; in its aglycone it has various biological activities. Animal experiments, clinical studies and epidemiological investigations suggest that genistein has preventative and curative functions for a number of diseases, particularly in cancer. The present study explored the potential anti-cancer effect of genistein by observing its role in inhibiting A549 human lung cancer cell proliferation and investigating the possible mechanism. A549 cells were exposed to various concentrations of genistein (0, 10, 25, 50, 100 and 200 µM; dissolved in physiological saline) for 1, 2 and 3 days. Subsequently, the viability of A549 cells was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, cell apoptosis was examined using a flow cytometer, caspase 3/9 activity was measured using commercial kits, reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze the miR-27a expression and western blotting was used to investigate MET protein expression. The results suggested a significant inhibition of A549 cell growth following treatment with genistein in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The current study also indicated that treatment with genistein significantly induces cell apoptosis and promotes caspase-3/9 activation of A549 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Further functional assays revealed that the anti-cancer effect of genistein activated microRNA-27a (miR-27a) expression levels and reduced MET protein expression in A549 cells. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that genistein inhibits A549 human lung cancer cell proliferation. Furthermore, this study reports, for the first time, a correlation between the anti-cancer effect of genistein and miR-27a-mediated MET signaling. PMID:27602162

  8. [Dietary phytoestrogen and its potential benefits in adult human health].

    PubMed

    Garrido, Argelia; de la Maza, María Pía; Valladares, Luis

    2003-11-01

    Human diet contains a series of bioactive vegetal compounds that can improve human health. Among these, there has been a special interest for phytoestrogens. This article reviews the evidence about the potential benefits of phytoestrogens for human health. Forty eight manuscripts were selected for their study design and relevance to human health. The cell growth inhibitory effects of phytoestrogens and their implication in breast cancer are reviewed. Also the effects of these compounds on serum lipid levels and the effectiveness of a phytoestrogen derivate, ipriflavone, on the prevention of osteoporosis are analyzed. Although these compounds have a great potential for improving health, there is still not enough evidence to recommend the routine use of phytoestrogens. PMID:14743696

  9. Genistein stimulates myocardial contractility in guinea pigs by different subcellular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongfang; Zhang, Yingfu; Tian, Zhifeng; Qiu, Xiaoqing; Gu, Jing; Wu, Jinxia

    2008-11-12

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanisms involved in the excitatory effect induced by genistein in isolated guinea pig left ventricular papillary muscles and to determine relationship of genistein action with the tyrosine kinase pathway and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity, the cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate (cAMP) signal system and the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ mobilization. Genistein (1-100 microM) significantly increased contraction of left ventricular papillary muscles from male and female guinea pigs in a concentration-dependent manner and its action had no obvious gender differences. Prior treatment with an L-type Ca2+ channel blocker verapamil hydrochloride, beta-adrenoceptor inhibitors propranolol and atenolol, an inhibitor of Na+-Ca2+ reverse exchanger Kb-r7943 or the blocker of estrogen receptor ICI 182,780 failed to alter the positive inotropic effect induced by genistein in papillary muscles. However, tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, sodium orthovanadate or a potent phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor bpV (phen) could partly but significantly reduce the stimulatory action of genistein. Interestingly, insulin-like growth factor-1, a known PI3K activator could also decrease the stimulatory action of genistein obviously, but the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 had no significant effect on the stimulatory action of genistein. The excitatory effect of genistein was markedly attenuated not only after treatment with an inhibitor of cAMP synthesis Sq 22536, carbachol or an inhibitor of specific protein kinase A H-89, but also after the inhibition of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ mobilization by ruthenium red, ryanodine or the inhibitor of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase thapsigargin. All these results indicate that the excitatory effects of genistein in papillary muscles are due to the inhibition of tyrosine kinase pathway and PI3K activity, thereby locally activating cAMP signal transduction and facilitating intracellular Ca2

  10. Isoflavone content of infant formulas and the metabolic fate of these phytoestrogens in early life.

    PubMed

    Setchell, K D; Zimmer-Nechemias, L; Cai, J; Heubi, J E

    1998-12-01

    Soy-based infant formulas have been in use for >30 y. These formulas are manufactured from soy protein isolates and contain significant amounts of phytoestrogens of the isoflavone class. As determined by HPLC, the isoflavone compositions of commercially available formulas are similar qualitatively and quantitatively and are consistent with the isoflavone composition of soy protein isolates. Genistein, found predominantly in the form of glycosidic conjugates, accounts for >65% of the isoflavones in soy-based formulas. Total isoflavone concentrations of soy-based formulas prepared for infant feeding range from 32 to 47 mg/L, whereas isoflavone concentrations in human breast milk are only 5.6 +/- 4.4 microg/L (mean +/- SD, n = 9). Infants fed soy-based formulas are therefore exposed to 22-45 mg isoflavones/d (6-11 mg x kg body wt(-1) x d(-1)), whereas the intake of these phytoestrogens from human milk is negligible (<0.01 mg/d). The metabolic fate of isoflavones from soy-based infant formula is described. Plasma isoflavone concentrations reported previously for 4-mo-old infants fed soy-based formula were 654-1775 microg/L (mean: 979.7 microg/L: Lancet 1997:350;23-7), significantly higher than plasma concentrations of infants fed either cow-milk formula (mean +/- SD: 9.4 +/- 1.2 microg/L) or human breast milk (4.7 +/- 1.3 microg/L). The high steady state plasma concentration of isoflavones in infants fed soy-based formula is explained by reduced intestinal biotransformation, as evidenced by low or undetectable concentrations of equol and other metabolites, and is maintained by constant daily exposure from frequent feeding. Isoflavones circulate at concentrations that are 13,000-22,000-fold higher than plasma estradiol concentrations in early life. Exposure to these phytoestrogens early in life may have long-term health benefits for hormone-dependent diseases. PMID:9848516

  11. Sensitive high-performance liquid chromatographic method for profiling phytoestrogens using coulometric electrode array detection: application to plasma analysis.

    PubMed

    Nurmi, T; Adlercreutz, H

    1999-10-01

    An HPLC method for profiling 13 phytoestrogens and their metabolites using coulometric electrode array detection was developed. Sensitivity of the method was slightly less than that of our GC-MS method, but significantly higher compared to the HPLC methods using diode-array or UV detection. Detection limits varied from 3.4 (secoisolariciresinol) to 40.3 (genistin) pg on column. Signal linearities ranged from the detection limits to 61 ng on column. Resolution values for the peak pairs varied from 1.1 (O-desmethylangolensin-anhydrosecoisolariciresinol) to 16 (daidzin-genistin). Intra- and interassay retention time variations were negligible and detector response variation was eliminated by frequent calibration. Chromatographic method was applied to plasma analyses and 6 of the 13 compounds were detected. Method accuracy for those six analytes varied from 69% (enterodiol) to 118% (genistein). Intraassay precision CVs ranged from 1.5% (enterolactone, 12.4 nmol/liter) to 14% (genistein, 245 nmol/liter) and interassay precision CVs ranged from 9.9% (daidzein, 67.4 nmol/liter) to 44% (enterodiol, 1.20 nmol/liter). PMID:10527503

  12. Measurement of intact sulfate and glucuronide phytoestrogen conjugates in human urine using isotope dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with [13C(3)]isoflavone internal standards.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Don B; Lloyd, Antony S; Botting, Nigel P; Oldfield, Mark F; Needs, Paul W; Wiseman, Helen

    2002-10-01

    A method has been developed for the analysis of phytoestrogens and their conjugates in human urine using liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). Stable isotopically labeled [13C(3)]daidzein and [13C(3)]genistein were synthesized and used as internal standards for isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Free aglycons and intact glucuronide, sulfate, diglucuronide, disulfate, and mixed sulfoglucuronide conjugates of isoflavones and lignans were observed in naturally incurred urine samples. Sample pretreatment was not necessary, other than addition of internal standards and pH adjustment. Urine was injected directly onto the analytical column. The limits of detection were generally <50ng/ml, precision was generally <10% CV for conjugates. Total hydrolyzed daidzein and genistein were measured against quality assurance urine sample and were accurate to within 12%. The accuracy of conjugate measurement can not be ascertained, as no reference samples are available. The mean sum of daidzein and its conjugates was within 20% of the hydrolyzed value. Concentrations of the free aglycons of up to 22% of genistein and 18% of daidzein were observed. The average pattern was ca. 54% 7-glucuronide, 25% 4(')-glucuronide, 13% monosulfates, 7% free daidzein, 0.9% sulfoglucuronides, 0.4% diglucuronide, and <0.1% disulfate. Selective enzymatic deconjugation with glucuronidase and mixed glucuronidase/sulfatase were used to validate the accuracy of the quantitation of the intact daidzein conjugates. There were no apparent sex differences, or conditioning effects on the conjugation profile of isoflavones after chronic dosing. PMID:12381375

  13. Phytoestrogens and their metabolites in bulk-tank milk: effects of farm management and season.

    PubMed

    Adler, Steffen A; Purup, Stig; Hansen-Møller, Jens; Thuen, Erling; Steinshamn, Håvard

    2015-01-01

    Phytoestrogens have structures similar to endogenous steroids and may induce or inhibit the response of hormone receptors. The objectives of the present study were to compare the effects of long-term vs. short-term grassland management in organic and conventional dairy production systems, compare organic and conventional production systems and assess seasonal variation on phytoestrogen concentrations in bulk-tank milk. The concentrations of phytoestrogens were analyzed in bulk-tank milk sampled three times in two subsequent years from 28 dairy farms: Fourteen organic (ORG) dairy farms with either short-term or long-term grassland management were paired with 14 conventional (CON) farms with respect to grassland management. Grassland management varied in terms of time since establishment. Short-term grassland management (SG) was defined as establishment or reseeding every fourth year or more often, and long-term grassland management (LG) was defined as less frequent establishment or reseeding. The proportion of red clover (Trifolium pretense L.) in the herbage was positively correlated with milk concentrations of the mammalian isoflavone equol. Therefore, organically produced bulk-tank milk contained more equol than conventionally produced milk, and milk from ORG-SG farms had more equol than milk from ORG-LG farms. Milk produced during the indoor-feeding periods had more equol than milk produced during the outdoor feeding period, because pastures contained less red clover than fields intended for silage production. Organically produced milk had also higher concentrations of the mammalian lignan enterolactone, but in contrast to equol, concentrations increased in the outdoor-feeding periods compared to the indoor-feeding periods. There were no indications of fertility problems on ORG-SG farms who had the highest red clover proportions in the herbage. This study shows that production system, grassland management, and season affect milk concentrations of phytoestrogens

  14. Phytoestrogens and Their Metabolites in Bulk-Tank Milk: Effects of Farm Management and Season

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Steffen A.; Purup, Stig; Hansen-Møller, Jens; Thuen, Erling; Steinshamn, Håvard

    2015-01-01

    Phytoestrogens have structures similar to endogenous steroids and may induce or inhibit the response of hormone receptors. The objectives of the present study were to compare the effects of long-term vs. short-term grassland management in organic and conventional dairy production systems, compare organic and conventional production systems and assess seasonal variation on phytoestrogen concentrations in bulk-tank milk. The concentrations of phytoestrogens were analyzed in bulk-tank milk sampled three times in two subsequent years from 28 dairy farms: Fourteen organic (ORG) dairy farms with either short-term or long-term grassland management were paired with 14 conventional (CON) farms with respect to grassland management. Grassland management varied in terms of time since establishment. Short-term grassland management (SG) was defined as establishment or reseeding every fourth year or more often, and long-term grassland management (LG) was defined as less frequent establishment or reseeding. The proportion of red clover (Trifolium pretense L.) in the herbage was positively correlated with milk concentrations of the mammalian isoflavone equol. Therefore, organically produced bulk-tank milk contained more equol than conventionally produced milk, and milk from ORG-SG farms had more equol than milk from ORG-LG farms. Milk produced during the indoor-feeding periods had more equol than milk produced during the outdoor feeding period, because pastures contained less red clover than fields intended for silage production. Organically produced milk had also higher concentrations of the mammalian lignan enterolactone, but in contrast to equol, concentrations increased in the outdoor-feeding periods compared to the indoor-feeding periods. There were no indications of fertility problems on ORG-SG farms who had the highest red clover proportions in the herbage. This study shows that production system, grassland management, and season affect milk concentrations of phytoestrogens

  15. Maternal exposure to bisphenol A and genistein has minimal effect on A(vy)/a offspring coat color but favors birth of agouti over nonagouti mice.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Cheryl S; Sieli, Paizlee T; Warzak, Denise A; Ellersieck, Mark R; Pennington, Kathleen A; Roberts, R Michael

    2013-01-01

    Reports that maternal diet influences coat color in mouse offspring carrying the agouti A(vy) allele have received considerable attention because the range, from pseudoagouti (brown) to yellow, predicts adult health outcomes, especially disposition toward obesity and diabetes, in yellower mice. Bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine-disrupting compound with estrogenic properties, fed to a/a dams harboring A(vy)/a conceptuses has been reported to induce a significant shift toward yellower mice, whereas consumption of either genistein (G) alone or in combination with BPA led to greater numbers of healthy, brown offspring. Groups of C57/B6 a/a females, which are nonagouti, were fed either a phytoestrogen-free control diet or one of six experimental diets: diets 1-3 contained BPA (50 mg, 5 mg, and 50 μg BPA/kg food, respectively); diet 4 contained G (250 mg/kg food); diet 5 contained G plus BPA (250 and 50 mg/kg food, respectively); and diet 6 contained 0.1 μg of ethinyl estradiol (EE)/kg food. Mice were bred to A(vy)/a males over multiple parities. In all, 2,824 pups from 426 litters were born. None of the diets provided any significant differences in relative numbers of brown, yellow, or intermediate coat color A(vy)/a offspring. However, BPA plus G (P < 0.0001) and EE diets (P = 0.005), but not the four others, decreased the percentage of black (a/a) to A(vy)/a offspring from the expected Mendelian ratio of 1:1. Data suggest that A(vy)/a conceptuses, which may possess a so-called "thrifty genotype," are at a competitive advantage over a/a conceptuses in certain uterine environments. PMID:23267115

  16. Is phytoestrogen intake associated with decreased risk of prostate cancer? A systematic review of epidemiological studies based on 17,546 cases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; Wang, K; Chen, L; Yin, B; Song, Y

    2016-07-01

    This study uses current epidemiological data to evaluate whether phytoestrogen intake is associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer. We performed a random-effect meta-analysis of published data retrieved from PubMed, Web of Science, ProQuest, and CNKI, which was supplemented by a manual search of relevant references. Study quality was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Subgroup analysis and meta-regression were performed to explore the source of heterogeneity. Sensitivity analysis was evaluated to assess the stability of the results. Egger's test and funnel plots were used to detect the existence of publication bias. We retrieved 507 papers, and 29 studies were ultimately confirmed as eligible. The meta-analysis showed that phytoestrogen intake was significantly associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer, with an odds ratio (OR) of 0.77 (95% CI 0.66-0.88; I(2)  = 77.6%). The food/nutritional sources that were significantly associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer included soy and soy products, tofu, legumes, daidzein, and genistein. Subgroup analysis indicated that the associations were significant among Asians and Caucasians, but not among Africans. Meta-regression revealed that the pooled OR increased with the number of cases in the studies. The results might be affected by publication bias based on the Eggers' test (p = 0.011) and the asymmetry of the funnel plot. Phytoestrogen intake may reduce the risk of prostate cancer in Asians and Caucasians. Regular intake of food that is rich in phytoestrogens, such as soy/soy products or legumes, should be recommended. PMID:27260185

  17. Inverse association of antioxidant and phytoestrogen nutrient intake with adult glioma in the San Francisco Bay Area: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Tedeschi-Blok, Nicole; Lee, Marion; Sison, Jennette D; Miike, Rei; Wrensch, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence from epidemiologic studies suggest that oxidative stress may play a role in adult glioma. In addition to dietary antioxidants, antioxidant and weak estrogenic properties of dietary phytoestrogens may attenuate oxidative stress. Our hypothesis is that long-term consumption of dietary antioxidants and phytoestrogens such as genistein, daidzein, biochanin A, formononetin, matairesinol, secoisolariciresinol and coumestrol, may reduce the risk of adult glioma. Methods Using unconditional logistic regression models, we compared quartiles of consumption for several specific antioxidants and phytoestrogens among 802 adult glioma cases and 846 controls from two study series from the San Francisco Bay Area Adult Glioma Study, 1991 – 2000, controlling for vitamin supplement usage, age, socioeconomic status, gender, ethnicity and total daily calories. For cases, dietary information was either self-reported or reported by a proxy. For controls, dietary information was self-reported. Gender- and series- specific quartiles of average daily nutrient intake, estimated from food-frequency questionnaires, were computed from controls. Results Significant p-values (trend test) were evaluated using significance levels of either 0.05 or 0.003 (the Bonferroni corrected significance level equivalent to 0.05 adjusting for 16 comparisons). For all cases compared to controls, statistically significant inverse associations were observed for antioxidant index (p < 0.003), carotenoids (alpha- and beta-carotene combined, p < 0.05), daidzein (p = 0.003), matairesinol (p < 0.05), secoisolariciresinol (p < 0.003), and coumestrol (p < 0.003). For self-reported cases compared to controls, statistically significant inverse associations were observed for antioxidant index (p < 0.05) and daidzein (p < 0.05). Conclusion Our results support inverse associations of glioma with higher dietary antioxidant index and with higher intake of certain phytoestrogens, especially

  18. Comparison of the effects of mesquite pod and Leucaena extracts with phytoestrogens on the reproductive physiology and sexual behavior in the male rat.

    PubMed

    Retana-Márquez, S; Juárez-Rojas, L; Hernández, A; Romero, C; López, G; Miranda, L; Guerrero-Aguilera, A; Solano, F; Hernández, E; Chemineau, P; Keller, M; Delgadillo, J A

    2016-10-01

    Mesquite (Prosopis sp.) and Leucaena leucocephala are widespread legumes, widely used to feed several livestock species and as food source for human populations in several countries. Both mesquite and Leucaena contain several phytoestrogens which might have potential estrogenic effects. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of mesquite pod and Leucaena extracts on several aspects of behavior and reproductive physiology of the male rat. The effects of the extracts were compared with those of estradiol (E2) and of two isoflavones: daidzein (DAI) and genistein (GEN). The following treatments were given to groups of intact male rats: vehicle; mesquite pod extract; Leucaena extract; E2; DAI; GEN. The results indicate that mesquite pod and Leucaena extracts disrupt male sexual behavior in a similar way to DAI and GEN, but less than E2. The main disruptor of sexual behavior was E2, however after 40 and 50days of administration, both extracts and phytoestrogens disrupted sexual behavior in a similar way to E2. The extracts also increased testicular germ cell apoptosis, decreased sperm quality, testicular weight, and testosterone levels, as phytoestrogens did, although these effects were less than those caused by estradiol. The number of seminiferous tubules with TUNEL-positive germ cells increased in extracts treated groups in a similar way to phytoestrogens groups, and E2 caused the greatest effect. The number of TUNEL-positive cells per tubule increased only in Leucaena extract and E2 groups, but not in mesquite- and phytoestrogens-treated groups. Spermatocytes and round spermatids were the TUNEL-positive cells observed in all experimental groups. This effect was associated with smaller testicular weights without atrophy in experimental groups compared with control. Testicular atrophy was only observed in estradiol-treated males. Testosterone decreased in males of all experimental groups, compared with control, this androgen was undetectable in E2

  19. Androgens and estrogens prevent rosiglitazone-induced adipogenesis in human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Benvenuti, S; Cellai, I; Luciani, P; Deledda, C; Saccardi, R; Mazzanti, B; Dal Pozzo, S; Serio, M; Peri, A

    2012-04-01

    Thiazolidinediones (TZD), a class of anti-diabetic drugs, determine bone loss and increase fractures particularly in post-menopausal women, thus suggesting a protective role of sex steroids. We have previously demonstrated that the TZD rosiglitazone (RGZ) negatively affects bone mass by inhibiting osteoblastogenesis, yet inducing adipogenesis, in bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). The aim of this study was to determine whether estrogens and androgens are able to revert the effects of RGZ on bone. hMSC express estrogen receptor α and β and the androgen receptor. We found that 17β-estradiol (10 nM), the phytoestrogen genistein (10 nM), testosterone (10 nM) and the non-aromatizable androgens dihydrotestosterone (10 nM) and methyltrienolone (10 nM) effectively counteracted the adipogenic effect of RGZ (1 μM) in hMSC induced to differentiate into adipocytes, as determined by evaluating the expression of the adipogenic marker peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and the percentage of fat cells. Furthermore, when hMSC were induced to differentiate into osteoblasts, all the above-mentioned molecules and also quercetin, another phytoestrogen, significantly reverted the inhibitory effect of RGZ on the expression of the osteogenic marker osteocalcin and decreased the number of fat cells observed after RGZ exposure. Our study represents, to our knowledge, the first demonstration in hMSC that androgens, independently of their aromatization, and estrogens are able to counteract the negative effects of RGZ on bone. Our data, yet preliminary, suggest the possibility to try to prevent the negative effects of TZD on bone, using steroid receptor modulators, such as plant-derived phytoestrogens, which lack evident adverse effects. PMID:21597316

  20. Genistein enhances the effect of trichostatin A on inhibition of A549 cell growth by increasing expression of TNF receptor-1

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Tzu-Chin; Yang, Ying-Chihi; Huang, Pei-Ru; Wen, Yu-Der; Yeh, Shu-Lan

    2012-08-01

    Our previous study has shown that genistein enhances apoptosis in A549 lung cancer cells induced by trichostatin A (TSA). The precise molecular mechanism underlying the effect of genistein, however, remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether genistein enhances the anti-cancer effect of TSA through up-regulation of TNF receptor-1 (TNFR-1) death receptor signaling. We incubated A549 cells with TSA (50 ng/mL) alone or in combination with genistein and then determined the mRNA and protein expression of TNFR-1 as well as the activation of downstream caspases. Genistein at 5 and 10 μM significantly enhanced the TSA-induced decrease in cell number and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The combined treatment significantly increased mRNA and protein expression of TNFR-1 at 6 and 12 h, respectively, compared with that of the control group; while TSA alone had no effect. TSA in combination with 10 μM of genistein increased TNFR-1 mRNA and protein expression by about 70% and 40%, respectively. The underlying mechanism for this effect of genistein may be partly associated with the estrogen receptor pathway. The combined treatment also increased the activation of caspase-3 and ‐10 as well as p53 protein expression in A549 cells. The enhancing effects of genistein on the TSA-induced decrease in cell number and on the expression of caspase-3 in A549 cells were suppressed by silencing TNFR-1 expression. These data demonstrated that the upregulation of TNFR-1 death receptor signaling plays an important role, at least in part, in the enhancing effect of genistein on TSA-induced apoptosis in A549 cells. -- Highlights: ► TSA combined with genistein rather than TSA alone increases the expression of TNFR-1. ► Genistein may exert such an effect partly through estrogen receptor pathway. ► The combined treatment increases the activation of caspase-10 and caspase-3. ► The combined treatment also increases the expression of p53 protein. ► TNFR-1 si

  1. Genistein and Glyceollin Effects on ABCC2 (MRP2) and ABCG2 (BCRP) in Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schexnayder, Chandler; Stratford, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to determine the effects of glyceollins on intestinal ABCC2 (ATP Binding Cassette C2, multidrug resistance protein 2, MRP2) and ABCG2 (ATP Binding Cassette G2, breast cancer resistance protein, BCRP) function using the Caco-2 cell intestinal epithelial cell model. Glyceollins are soy-derived phytoestrogens that demonstrate anti-proliferative activity in several sources of cancer cells. 5 (and 6)-carboxy-2′,7′-dichloroflourescein (CDF) was used as a prototypical MRP2 substrate; whereas BODIPY-prazosin provided an indication of BCRP function. Comparison studies were conducted with genistein. Glyceollins were shown to inhibit MRP2-mediated CDF transport, with activity similar to the MRP2 inhibitor, MK-571. They also demonstrated concentration-dependent inhibition BCRP-mediated efflux of BODIPY-prazosin, with a potency similar to that of the recognized BCRP inhibitor, Ko143. In contrast, genistein did not appear to alter MRP2 activity and even provided a modest increase in BCRP efflux of BODIPY-prazosin. In particular, glyceollin inhibition of these two important intestinal efflux transporters suggests the potential for glyceollin to alter the absorption of other phytochemicals with which it might be co-administered as a dietary supplement, as well as alteration of the absorption of pharmaceuticals that may be administered concomitantly. PMID:26703673

  2. Genistein and Glyceollin Effects on ABCC2 (MRP2) and ABCG2 (BCRP) in Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Schexnayder, Chandler; Stratford, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to determine the effects of glyceollins on intestinal ABCC2 (ATP Binding Cassette C2, multidrug resistance protein 2, MRP2) and ABCG2 (ATP Binding Cassette G2, breast cancer resistance protein, BCRP) function using the Caco-2 cell intestinal epithelial cell model. Glyceollins are soy-derived phytoestrogens that demonstrate anti-proliferative activity in several sources of cancer cells. 5 (and 6)-carboxy-2',7'-dichloroflourescein (CDF) was used as a prototypical MRP2 substrate; whereas BODIPY-prazosin provided an indication of BCRP function. Comparison studies were conducted with genistein. Glyceollins were shown to inhibit MRP2-mediated CDF transport, with activity similar to the MRP2 inhibitor, MK-571. They also demonstrated concentration-dependent inhibition BCRP-mediated efflux of BODIPY-prazosin, with a potency similar to that of the recognized BCRP inhibitor, Ko143. In contrast, genistein did not appear to alter MRP2 activity and even provided a modest increase in BCRP efflux of BODIPY-prazosin. In particular, glyceollin inhibition of these two important intestinal efflux transporters suggests the potential for glyceollin to alter the absorption of other phytochemicals with which it might be co-administered as a dietary supplement, as well as alteration of the absorption of pharmaceuticals that may be administered concomitantly. PMID:26703673

  3. Phytoestrogens and human health effects: weighing up the current evidence.

    PubMed

    Humfrey, C D

    1998-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are naturally occurring plant compounds which have oestrogenic and/or anti-oestrogenic activity. They are present in many human foodstuffs including beans, sprouts, cabbage, spinach, soyabean, grains and hops. The main classes are the isoflavones, coumestans and lignans. This review assesses the evidence that these substances may have adverse and/or beneficial impacts on the risk of several hormone-dependent diseases in humans. Evidence from studies of various animal species has demonstrated that ingestion of high levels of phytoestrogens can produce adverse effects on reproductive endpoints including fertility. Studies in laboratory animals have also shown that exposure to high doses of phytoestrogens during development can adversely affect brain differentiation and reproductive development in rodents, but may also have possible beneficial effects. In humans, there is a lack of information concerning the possible effects of high doses of phytoestrogens in infants and this should be addressed as a matter of priority so that any risks (or benefits) can be established. In adults, no current data exist to suggest that consumption of phytoestrogens at the levels normally encountered in the diet is likely to be harmful. Epidemiological studies suggest that foodstuffs containing phytoestrogens may have a beneficial role in protecting against a number of chronic diseases and conditions. For cancer of the prostate, colon, rectum, stomach and lung, the evidence is most consistent for a protective effect resulting from a high intake of grains, legumes, fruits and vegetables; it is not possible to identify particular food types or components that may be responsible. Dietary intervention studies indicate that in women soya and linseed may have beneficial effects on the risk of breast cancer and may help to alleviate postmenopausal symptoms. For osteoporosis, tentative evidence suggests phytoestrogens may have similar effects in maintaining bone density to those

  4. Quantitative phosphoproteomics reveals genistein as a modulator of cell cycle and DNA damage response pathways in triple-negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    FANG, YI; ZHANG, QIAN; WANG, XIN; YANG, XUE; WANG, XIANGYU; HUANG, ZHEN; JIAO, YUCHEN; WANG, JING

    2016-01-01

    Around one sixth of breast cancer cases are classified as triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), named after the absence of the expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2); however, patients with TNBC suffer from poor clinical outcome and shortage of targeted therapy. Genistein, an estrogenic soy isoflavone, shows anticancer effects in TNBC cells such as inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. However, the underlying mechanism of its anticancer effects is poorly understood and its elucidation can help the development of novel therapeutic strategies for TNBC. In this study, by combining isobaric tag-based TMT labeling with titanium dioxide-based phosphopeptide enrichment, we quantitated 5,445 phosphorylation sites on 2,008 phosphoproteins in the TNBC cell line MDA-MB-231, upon genistein treatment. Our analysis revealed 332 genistein-regulated phosphorylation sites on 226 proteins. Our data show that genistein can regulate several biological processes during the cell cycle, including DNA replication, cohesin complex cleavage, and kinetochore formation. Furthermore, genistein can also activate DNA damage response, including activation of ATR and BRCA1 complex. Overall, our study presents evidence at a phosphoproteomic level that genistein is able to inhibit TNBC cell growth by regulating the cell cycle and DNA damage response in a more complex manner. Our findings help elucidate the mechanisms through which genistein exerts its anticancer effects in TNBC cells. PMID:26783066

  5. Quantitative phosphoproteomics reveals genistein as a modulator of cell cycle and DNA damage response pathways in triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yi; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Xin; Yang, Xue; Wang, Xiangyu; Huang, Zhen; Jiao, Yuchen; Wang, Jing

    2016-03-01

    Around one sixth of breast cancer cases are classified as triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), named after the absence of the expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2); however, patients with TNBC suffer from poor clinical outcome and shortage of targeted therapy. Genistein, an estrogenic soy isoflavone, shows anticancer effects in TNBC cells such as inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. However, the underlying mechanism of its anticancer effects is poorly understood and its elucidation can help the development of novel therapeutic strategies for TNBC. In this study, by combining isobaric tag-based TMT labeling with titanium dioxide-based phosphopeptide enrichment, we quantitated 5,445 phosphorylation sites on 2,008 phosphoproteins in the TNBC cell line MDA-MB-231, upon genistein treatment. Our analysis revealed 332 genistein-regulated phosphorylation sites on 226 proteins. Our data show that genistein can regulate several biological processes during the cell cycle, including DNA replication, cohesin complex cleavage, and kinetochore formation. Furthermore, genistein can also activate DNA damage response, including activation of ATR and BRCA1 complex. Overall, our study presents evidence at a phosphoproteomic level that genistein is able to inhibit TNBC cell growth by regulating the cell cycle and DNA damage response in a more complex manner. Our findings help elucidate the mechanisms through which genistein exerts its anticancer effects in TNBC cells. PMID:26783066

  6. Effects of intracerebroventricular infusion of genistein on gonadotrophin subunit mRNA and immunoreactivity of gonadotrophins and oestrogen receptor-alpha in the pituitary cells of the anoestrous ewe.

    PubMed

    Polkowska, Jolanta; Ridderstråle, Yvonne; Wańkowska, Marta; Romanowicz, Katarzyna; Misztal, Tomasz; Madej, Andrzej

    2004-12-01

    The present study was designed to demonstrate whether genistein, a synthetic phytoestrogen, infused into the third ventricle of the brain could affect the gonadotrophic cells regarding the presence of oestrogen receptor-alpha immunoreactivity and gonadotrophin subunit mRNA hybridising reaction in the ewe. Ewes (n=7), aged 2 years, in early anoestrous season were infused with Ringer-Locke solution (control, n=3) or 10 microg/100 microl/h of genistein (n=4) into the third ventricle over a 5 h period and slaughtered the following morning. Immunoreactivity of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and oestrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha) was determined in the adenohypophysis by immunohistochemistry using antibodies raised against LHbeta, FSHbeta, and ERalpha. Messenger RNA analyses were performed by non-isotope in situ hybridisation using sense and antisense riboprobes produced from beta subunits of LH and FSH cDNA clones. Computer image analysis was used to determine the percent of cells exhibiting immunohistochemical and/or hybridising reaction. It was found that in ewes infused with genistein, the percentage of LH-positive cells and the density of immunoreactive-LHbeta material decreased significantly (Pgenistein infusions had no effect on the immunoreactivity of FSH cells or on the expression of mRNA for FSHbeta. The percentage of ERalpha-positive cells increased significantly after genistein infusions (Pgenistein can stimulate the expression of immunoreactive ERalpha in the pituitary LH-cells but not in FSH-cells and change the endocrine activity of LH-producing cells of anoestral ewes. PMID:15531133

  7. Tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloids mimic direct but not receptor-mediated inhibitory effects of estrogens and phytoestrogens on testicular endocrine function. Possible significance for Leydig cell insufficiency in alcohol addiction

    SciTech Connect

    Stammel, W.; Thomas, H. ); Staib, W.; Kuehn-Velten, W.K. )

    1991-01-01

    Possible effects of various tetrahydroisoquinolines (TIQs) on rat testicular endocrine function were tested in vitro in order to prove whether these compounds may be mediators of the development of Leydig cell insufficiency. TIQ effects on different levels of regulation of testis function were compared in vitro with estrogen effects, since both classes of compounds have structural similarities. Gonadotropin-stimulated testosterone production by testicular Leydig cells was inhibited by tetrahydropapaveroline and isosalsoline, the IC{sub 50} values being comparable to those of estradiol, 2-hydroxyestradiol, and the phytoestrogens, coumestrol and genistein; salsolinol and salsoline were less effective, and salsolidine was ineffective. None of these TIQs interacted significantly with testicular estrogen receptor as analyzed by estradiol displacement. However, tetrahydropapaveroline, isosalsoline and salsolinol competitively inhibited substrate binding to cytochrome P45OXVII, with similar efficiency as the estrogens did; salsoline and salsolidine were again much less effective.

  8. Synaptodendritic recovery following HIV-1 Tat exposure: Neurorestoration by phytoestrogens

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, SJ; Mactutus, CF; Aksenova, MV; Espensen-Sturges, TD; Booze, RM

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 infects the brain and, despite antiretroviral therapy, many infected individuals suffer from HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). HAND is associated with dendritic simplification and synaptic loss. Prevention of synaptodendritic damage may ameliorate or forestall neurocognitive decline in latent HIV-1 infections. The HIV-1 transactivating protein (Tat) is produced during viral latency in the brain and may cause synaptodendritic damage. The present study examined the integrity of the dendritic network after exposure to HIV-1 Tat by labeling filamentous actin (F-actin)-rich structures (puncta) in primary neuronal cultures. After 24 hours of treatment, HIV-1 Tat was associated with the dendritic arbor and produced a significant reduction of F-actin-labeled dendritic puncta as well as loss of dendrites. Pretreatment with either of two plant-derived phytoestrogen compounds (daidzein and liquiritigenin), significantly reduced synaptodendritic damage following HIV-1 Tat treatment. Additionally, 6 days after HIV-1 Tat treatment, treatment with either daidzein or liquiritigenin enhanced recovery, via the estrogen receptor, from HIV-1 Tat-induced synaptodendritic damage. These results suggest that either liquiritigenin or daidzein may not only attenuate acute synaptodendritic injury in HIV-1, but also promote recovery from synaptodendritic damage. PMID:23875777

  9. Identification of a Biphasic Role for Genistein in the Regulation of Prostate Cancer Growth and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    El Touny, Lara H.; Banerjee, Partha P.

    2009-01-01

    Considered a chemopreventive agent, genistein’s ability to modulate the progression of existing prostate cancer (CaP) is not clear. We show here, that the consumption of genistein (250 mg/kg diet) by 12-weeks-old Transgenic Adenocarcinoma Mouse Prostate (TRAMP-FVB) mice harboring prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia lesions until 20 weeks of age induces an aggressive progression of CaP, as evidenced by a 16% increase in the number of well and poorly-differentiated prostates, coinciding with a 70% incidence of pelvic lymph node metastases as opposed to 0 and 10% in 0 and 1000 mg/kg groups, concomitant with elevated osteopontin (OPN) expression in prostates and lymph nodes. Equivalent nanomolar (500 nM) concentrations of genistein recapitulated these effects in human PC3 prostate cancer cells as evidenced by increased proliferation, invasion and MMP-9 activity (∼2-fold), accompanied by an upregulation of OPN expression and secretion, as compared to vehicle-treated cells. A pharmacological dose (50 μM) decreased proliferation, invasion and MMP-9 activity (>2.0-fold) concomitant with OPN reduction. Upon OPN knockdown by shRNA, genistein was no longer effective in upregulating PC3 cell proliferation, invasion and MMP-9 activation, which were significantly reduced in the absence of OPN, highlighting the requirement for OPN in mediating genistein’s effects. Proliferation, invasion and OPN levels were also non-significantly induced by genistein in the presence of ICI 182,780 or Wortmannin, indicating a dependence on PI3K and estrogen signaling. Our results suggest the presence of a biphasic regulation of CaP growth and metastasis by genistein, warranting careful examination of genistein’s effects on hormone-dependent cancers in a chemotherapeutic setting. PMID:19351854

  10. Effects of phytoestrogens on expression of genes regulating growth-related processes in rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytoestrogens are plant-derived isoflavones that activate estrogen receptors. Phytoestrogen content of aquafeeds is increasing due to higher inclusion levels of soy and other legumes rich in these compounds. It is unknown whether phytoestrogens affect growth-related processes in a manner similar...

  11. Bioavailability and Pharmacokinetics of Genistein: Mechanistic Studies on its ADME

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhen; Kulkarni, Kaustubh; Zhu, Wei; Hu, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Genistein, one of the most active natural flavonoids, exerts various biological effects including chemoprevention, antioxidation, antiproliferation and anticancer. More than 30 clinical trials of genistein with various disease indications have been conducted to evaluate its clinical efficacy. Based on many animals and human pharmacokinetic studies, it is well known that the most challenge issue for developing genistein as a chemoprevention agent is the low oral bioavailability, which may be the major reason relating to its ambiguous therapeutic effects and large interindividual variations in clinical trials. In order to better correlate pharmacokinetic to pharmacodynamics results in animals and clinical studies, an in-depth understanding of pharmacokinetic behavior of genistein and its ADME properties are needed. Numerous in vitro/in vivo ADME studies had been conducted to reveal the main factors contributing to the low oral bioavailability of genistein. Therefore, this review focuses on summarizing the most recent progress on mechanistic studies of genistein ADME and provides a systemic view of these processes to explain genistein pharmacokinetic behaviors in vivo. The better understanding of genistein ADME property may lead to development of proper strategy to improve genistein oral bioavailability via mechanism-based approaches. PMID:22583407

  12. Genistein improves spatial learning and memory in male rats with elevated glucose level during memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Kohara, Yumi; Kawaguchi, Shinichiro; Kuwahara, Rika; Uchida, Yutaro; Oku, Yushi; Yamashita, Kimihiro

    2015-03-01

    Cognitive dysfunction due to higher blood glucose level has been reported previously. Genistein (GEN) is a phytoestrogen that we hypothesized might lead to improved memory, despite elevated blood glucose levels at the time of memory consolidation. To investigate this hypothesis, we compared the effects of orally administered GEN on the central nervous system in normal versus glucose-loaded adult male rats. A battery of behavioral assessments was carried out. In the MAZE test, which measured spatial learning and memory, the time of normal rats was shortened by GEN treatment compared to the vehicle group, but only in the early stages of testing. In the glucose-loaded group, GEN treatment improved performance as mazes were advanced. In the open-field test, GEN treatment delayed habituation to the new environment in normal rats, and increased the exploratory behaviors of glucose-loaded rats. There were no significant differences observed for emotionality or fear-motivated learning and memory. Together, these results indicate that GEN treatment improved spatial learning and memory only in the early stages of testing in the normal state, but improved spatial learning and memory when glucose levels increased during memory consolidation. PMID:25481356

  13. [Soy and phytoestrogens consumption and health policy hesitation or certitude].

    PubMed

    Nitzan-Kaluski, Dorit; Stern, Felicia; Kachel, Josefa; Leventhal, Alex

    2002-01-01

    Soy and phytoestrogens are controversial as to their beneficial effects on health and the prevention of disease. To date, dietary recommendations in Israel do not specify a diet rich in soy and phytoestrogens. In order to establish a policy on this issue, we carried out a comprehensive, updated review of the relevant scientific literature. Data on the role of these substances in the primary and secondary prevention of cancer are limited. As yet, there is no conclusive evidence on the efficacy of phytoestrogens and soy in the prevention of osteoporosis. Their effect on fertility in animals and humans is still unclear. There are no data on the long-term risks or benefits of using soy-based formulae in infancy. Therefore, for those who cannot be breast-fed, cow-milk based formulae are recommended. Currently, the most supportive evidence for health benefits of soy can be found in studies on the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:11851111

  14. Cross-species and interassay comparisons of phytoestrogen action.

    PubMed Central

    Whitten, P L; Patisaul, H B

    2001-01-01

    This paper compiles animal and human data on the biologic effects and exposure levels of phytoestrogens in order to identify areas of research in which direct species comparisons can be made. In vitro and in vivo assays of phytoestrogen action and potency are reviewed and compared to actions, dose-response relationships, and estimates of exposure in human subjects. Binding studies show that the isoflavonoid phytoestrogens are high-affinity ligands for estrogen receptors (ERs), especially ER beta, but have lower potency in whole-cell assays, perhaps because of interactions with binding proteins. Many other enzymatic actions require concentrations higher than those normally seen in plasma. In vivo data show that phytoestrogens have a wide range of biologic effects at doses and plasma concentrations seen with normal human diets. Significant in vivoresponses have been observed in animal and human tests for bone, breast, ovary, pituitary, vasculature, prostate, and serum lipids. The doses reported to be biologically active in humans (0.4--10 mg/kg body weight/day) are lower than the doses generally reported to be active in rodents (10--100 mg/kg body weight/day), although some studies have reported rodent responses at lower doses. However, available estimates of bioavailability and peak plasma levels in rodents and humans are more similar. Steroidogenesis and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis appear to be important loci of phytoestrogen actions, but these inferences must be tentative because good dose-response data are not available for many end points. The similarity of reported proliferative and antiproliferative doses illustrates the need for fuller examination of dose-response relationships and multiple end points in assessing phytoestrogen actions. PMID:11250801

  15. Phytoestrogens modulate hepcidin expression by Nrf2: Implications for dietary control of iron absorption

    PubMed Central

    Bayele, Henry K.; Balesaria, Sara; Srai, Surjit K.S.

    2015-01-01

    Hepcidin is a liver-derived antimicrobial peptide that regulates iron absorption and is also an integral part of the acute phase response. In a previous report, we found evidence that this peptide could also be induced by toxic heavy metals and xenobiotics, thus broadening its teleological role as a defensin. However it remained unclear how its sensing of disparate biotic and abiotic stressors might be integrated at the transcriptional level. We hypothesized that its function in cytoprotection may be regulated by NFE2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), the master transcriptional controller of cellular stress defenses. In this report, we show that hepcidin regulation is inextricably linked to the acute stress response through Nrf2 signaling. Nrf2 regulates hepcidin expression from a prototypical antioxidant response element in its promoter, and by synergizing with other basic leucine-zipper transcription factors. We also show that polyphenolic small molecules or phytoestrogens commonly found in fruits and vegetables including the red wine constituent resveratrol can induce hepcidin expression in vitro and post-prandially, with concomitant reductions in circulating iron levels and transferrin saturation by one such polyphenol quercetin. Furthermore, these molecules derepress hepcidin promoter activity when its transcription by Nrf2 is repressed by Keap1. Taken together, the data show that hepcidin is a prototypical antioxidant response or cytoprotective gene within the Nrf2 transcriptional circuitry. The ability of phytoestrogens to modulate hepcidin expression in vivo suggests a novel mechanism by which diet may impact iron homeostasis. PMID:26546695

  16. Phytoestrogens for menopausal bone loss and climacteric symptoms.

    PubMed

    Lagari, Violet S; Levis, Silvina

    2014-01-01

    Women have always looked for non-hormonal options to alleviate menopausal vasomotor symptoms and prevent menopausal bone loss. The use of complementary and alternative medicine for these purposes has particularly increased after the publication of the Women's Health Initiative's results suggesting that there might be more risks than benefits with hormone replacement. Phytoestrogens are plant-derived estrogens that, although less potent than estradiol, bind to the estrogen receptor and can function as estrogen agonists or antagonists. Soy isoflavones extracted from soy are the phytoestrogens most commonly used by menopausal women. Because typical Western diets are low in phytoestrogens and taking into account the general difficulty in changing dietary habits, most clinical trials in Western women have used isoflavone-fortified foods or isoflavone tablets. Although some women might experience a reduction in the frequency or severity of hot flashes, most studies point towards the lack of effectiveness of isoflavones derived from soy or red clover, even in large doses, in the prevention of hot flashes and menopausal bone loss. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Phytoestrogens'. PMID:23246986

  17. Determination of Phytoestrogen Content in Fresh-Cut Legume Forage

    PubMed Central

    Hloucalová, Pavlína; Skládanka, Jiří; Horký, Pavel; Klejdus, Bořivoj; Pelikán, Jan; Knotová, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Phytoestrogens comprise a group of substances negatively influencing the development and function of animal reproductive organs. Their appearance in forage crops can reduce feeding values, cause dietary disorders, and lead to animal health damage. This study evaluated the occurrence of individual phytoestrogens in various species of annual and perennial legumes and their levels in dry forage. It appeared that feeding large amounts of red clover presents a potential risk, but red clover can be replaced with the annual Persian clover, in which markedly lower phytoestrogen levels were detected. Abstract The aim of the study was to determine phytoestrogen content in fresh-cut legume forage. This issue has been much discussed in recent years in connection with the health and safety of feedstuffs and thus livestock health. The experiments were carried out on two experimental plots at Troubsko and Vatín, Czech Republic during June and July in 2015. Samples were collected of the four forage legume species perennial red clover (variety “Amos”), alfalfa (variety “Holyně”), and annuals Persian clover and Alexandrian clover. Forage was sampled twice at regular three to four day intervals leading up to harvest and a third time on the day of harvest. Fresh and wilted material was analyzed using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Higher levels (p < 0.05) of isoflavones biochanin A (3.697 mg·g−1 of dry weight) and formononetin (4.315 mg·g−1 of dry weight) were found in red clover than in other species. The highest isoflavone content was detected in red clover, reaching 1.001% of dry matter (p < 0.05), representing a risk for occurrence of reproduction problems and inhibited secretion of animal estrogen. The phytoestrogen content was particularly increased in wilted forage. Significant isoflavone reduction was observed over three to four day intervals leading up to harvest. PMID:27429009

  18. Topoisomerase poisoning by genistein in the intestine of rats.

    PubMed

    Baechler, Simone A; Soukup, Sebastian T; Molzberger, Almut F; Kulling, Sabine E; Diel, Patrick; Marko, Doris

    2016-01-22

    The isoflavone genistein has been shown to act as topoisomerase II poison in various cell lines. Here, we address the question whether genistein is able to affect topoisomerase II in vivo. Juvenile male Wistar rats received either a single dose of genistein subcutaneously (s.c.; 10 mg/kg BW) or a lifelong isoflavone-rich diet encompassing in utero, lactation phase and 10 days of oral consumption, whereas genistein was mainly taken up as glycosides (25-50 mg/kg BW). The effects on the level of covalent topoisomerase II-DNA-complexes in the duodenum and colon were measured using the "Isolation of in vivo complexes of enzyme to DNA" (ICE)-bioassay. Simultaneously, serum as well as tissue concentrations of genistein and its metabolites were quantified by LC-MS. Genistein (s.c.) significantly increased the amount of covalent topoisomerase IIα and β-DNA complexes in the gut, showing more persistent effects in the colon than in the duodenum. In case of a lifelong dietary isoflavone exposure, no effects on the stabilization of cleavage complexes was observed, except a slight increase of topoisomerase IIα-DNA-complexes in the colon. The differences between the exposure routes might be attributed to the higher serum concentration of the genistein aglycon after subcutaneous treatment probably due to circumvention of first-pass metabolism compared to oral consumption of an isoflavone-rich diet. These data indicate that subcutaneously administrated genistein clearly possesses topoisomerase poisoning properties in vivo, whereas an isoflavone-rich diet containing genistein only caused a slight effect which relevance has to be clarified in further studies. PMID:26723871

  19. BRCA1 and BRCA2 as molecular targets for phytochemicals indole-3-carbinol and genistein in breast and prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Fan, S; Meng, Q; Auborn, K; Carter, T; Rosen, E M

    2006-01-01

    Indole-3-carbinol (I3C) and genistein are naturally occurring chemicals derived from cruciferous vegetables and soy, respectively, with potential cancer prevention activity for hormone-responsive tumours (e.g., breast and prostate cancers). Previously, we showed that I3C induces BRCA1 expression and that both I3C and BRCA1 inhibit oestrogen (E2)-stimulated oestrogen receptor (ER-α) activity in human breast cancer cells. We now report that both I3C and genistein induce the expression of both breast cancer susceptibility genes (BRCA1 and BRCA2) in breast (MCF-7 and T47D) and prostate (DU-145 and LNCaP) cancer cell types, in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. Induction of the BRCA genes occurred at low doses of I3C (20 μM) and genistein (0.5–1.0 μM), suggesting potential relevance to cancer prevention. A combination of I3C and genistein gave greater than expected induction of BRCA expression. Studies using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and BRCA expression vectors suggest that the phytochemical induction of BRCA2 is due, in part, to BRCA1. Functional studies suggest that I3C-mediated cytoxicity is, in part, dependent upon BRCA1 and BRCA2. Inhibition of E2-stimulated ER-α activity by I3C and genistein was dependent upon BRCA1; and inhibition of ligand-inducible androgen receptor (AR) activity by I3C and genistein was partially reversed by BRCA1-siRNA. Finally, we provide evidence suggesting that the phytochemical induction of BRCA1 expression is due, in part, to endoplasmic reticulum stress response signalling. These findings suggest that the BRCA genes are molecular targets for some of the activities of I3C and genistein. PMID:16434996

  20. Prevention of precancerous colonic lesions in rats by soy flakes, soy flour, genistein, and calcium.

    PubMed

    Thiagarajan, D G; Bennink, M R; Bourquin, L D; Kavas, F A

    1998-12-01

    The main purpose of this research was to determine whether diets containing soy products would inhibit the early stages of azoxymethane-induced colon cancer in F344 rats. Additional objectives were to determine whether feeding starch instead of sucrose, feeding additional calcium (0.5% compared with 0.1%), or feeding a low-fiber powdered enteral formula would influence early colon carcinogenesis. Colon cancer was initiated with 2 injections of azoxymethane (15 mg/kg body wt) and a 12-wk dietary treatment period was started 1 wk after the second injection. Precancerous colon lesions were assessed as foci with aberrant crypts (FAC). The mean numbers of FAC were 133 [soy concentrate (low concentration of phytochemicals)], 111 (starch substituted for sucrose), 98 [full-fat soy flakes (whole soybeans)], 87 (defatted soy flour), 77 (0.015% genistein), and 70 (0.5% Ca). The soy flour and full-fat soy flake diets contained 0.049% genistein derivatives (primarily glycosides), but were less effective in inhibiting the formation of FAC than the diet containing 0.015% genistein (as the aglycone). Eating soybeans and soy flour may reduce the early stages of colon cancer. PMID:9848506

  1. Bidirectional regulation of angiogenesis by phytoestrogens through estrogen receptor-mediated signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Xin; Wang, Yu; Lu, Qing; Yang, Ming-Zhu; Fan, Guan-Wei; Karas, Richard H; Gao, Xiu-Mei; Zhu, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Sex hormone estrogen is one of the most active intrinsic angiogenesis regulators; its therapeutic use has been limited due to its carcinogenic potential. Plant-derived phytoestrogens are attractive alternatives, but reports on their angiogenic activities often lack in-depth analysis and sometimes are controversial. Herein, we report a data-mining study with the existing literature, using IPA system to classify and characterize phytoestrogens based on their angiogenic properties and pharmacological consequences. We found that pro-angiogenic phytoestrogens functioned predominantly as cardiovascular protectors whereas anti-angiogenic phytoestrogens played a role in cancer prevention and therapy. This bidirectional regulation were shown to be target-selective and, for the most part, estrogen-receptor-dependent. The transactivation properties of ERα and ERβ by phytoestrogens were examined in the context of angiogenesis-related gene transcription. ERα and ERβ were shown to signal in opposite ways when complexed with the phytoestrogen for bidirectional regulation of angiogenesis. With ERα, phytoestrogen activated or inhibited transcription of some angiogenesis-related genes, resulting in the promotion of angiogenesis, whereas, with ERβ, phytoestrogen regulated transcription of angiogenesis-related genes, resulting in inhibition of angiogenesis. Therefore, the selectivity of phytoestrogen to ERα and ERβ may be critical in the balance of pro- or anti-angiogenesis process. PMID:27114311

  2. Hormonal concentrations and reproductive performance of Holstein heifers fed Trifolium alexandrinum as a phytoestrogenic roughage.

    PubMed

    Hashem, N M; El-Azrak, K M; Sallam, S M A

    2016-07-01

    Effects of phytoestrogen isoflavones in Berseem clover on hormonal balance during early pregnancy and fertility of heifers were studied. Holstein heifers (n=26) were divided into two equal homogenous groups. Heifers in the first group (Clover-fed group) were fed Egyptian clover (Trifolium alexandrinum) as oestrogenic roughage; whereas the heifers in the second group (Silage-fed group) were fed maize silage. Concentrations of four isoflavone aglycones (genistein. Daidzein, biochanin A and formononetein) were determined in the two roughages. Treatment lasted for 20 consecutive weeks (5 months) during which blood samples were collected biweekly for determining the metabolic profile of heifers. Heifers were subjected to oestrous synchronisation using a double prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) based protocol, 14days apart (week 10 and 12), and were artificially inseminated 12h following detection of overt signs of oestrus. Concentrations of serum oestradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) on the day of insemination (Day 0) and on Days 7, 14 and 21 post-insemination (early pregnancy) were determined and P4 to E2 ratio was calculated. Clover had greater total isoflavone content than maize silage. The dominant isoflavone detected in Berseem clover was biochanin A, whereas the least was formononetein. Metabolic profile was not affected (P>0.05) by the type of roughage and was in the same trend in both experimental groups. The overall mean concentration of serum E2 was greater (P<0.05) in the clover-fed group than in the silage-fed group. The overall mean concentration of serum P4 was less (P<0.05) in the clover-fed group than in the silage-fed group. During the period of early pregnancy (from Day 7-21 post-insemination) the concentration of serum P4 increased in the silage-fed group, however, no change was observed in the clover-fed group. The overall mean of P4 to E2 ratio was greater (P<0.001) in the silage-fed group compared with that in the clover-fed group. Heifers fed clover had

  3. Synergistic antioxidant activity of resveratrol with genistein in high-glucose treated Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    CHU, CHISHIH; LU, FUNG-JOU; YEH, RANG-HUI; LI, ZIH-LING; CHEN, CHING-HSEIN

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol (Re), a stilbenoid, is associated with a potential benefit in controlling certain biomarkers in type II diabetes. Genistein (Ge), a phytoestrogen, may act as an antioxidant and thus may diminish damaging effects of free radicals in tissues. In the present study, a potential synergistic antioxidant effect of an Re/Ge combination on high-glucose (HG) incubation in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells was evaluated. Compared with the treatment of Re or Ge alone, the Re/Ge combination synergistically decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and hydroxyl radicals in MDCK cells. This synergistic antioxidant effect correlated with the inhibition of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase expression and an increase in γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase expression. In addition, mitochondrial complex I, NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase and lipoxygenase contributed towards ROS overproduction when the MDCK cells were incubated with HG. In conclusion, the Re/Ge combination synergistically enhanced the antioxidant effect in HG-incubated kidney cells, possibly through an enhanced antioxidant regulation mechanism. The Re/Ge combination may be a potential benefit against oxidative stress in diabetes mellitus. PMID:26998274

  4. Quantification of genistein and genistin in soybeans and soybean products.

    PubMed

    Fukutake, M; Takahashi, M; Ishida, K; Kawamura, H; Sugimura, T; Wakabayashi, K

    1996-05-01

    It has been suggested that the isoflavone, genistein,, may have some role as a chemopreventive agent against cancer in humans. Levels of genistein and its beta-glucoside conjugate, genistin, ingested in soybeans and related bean products by the Japanese were quantified by HPLC, to estimate daily intake of these compounds. Amounts of genistein and genistin in soybeans, soy nuts and soy powder were in the range of 4.6 to 18.2 and 200.6 to 968.1 micrograms/g food, respectively. The values for soy milk and tofu (bean curd) were 1.9 to 13.9 and 94.8 to 137.7 micrograms/g food, respectively. Levels of isoflavones in fermented soybean products, miso (bean paste) and natto (fermented soybeans), were 38.5 to 229.1 micrograms/g food for genistein and 71.7 to 492.8 micrograms/g food for genistin. Thus, the level of genistein in the fermented soybean products was higher than in soy beans and soybean products such as soy milk and tofu. From these observations, it is suggested that the beta-glycosyl bond of genistin is cleaved to produce genistein by microbes during fermentation to yield miso and natto. Soy sauce was also found to contain both isoflavones, but at levels lower than in miso and natto. On the basis of these data for average annual consumption of soybeans and related products, daily intake of genistein and genistin by the Japanese is calculated to be 1.5-4.1 and 6.3-8.3 mg/person, respectively. These levels are much higher than those for Americans or Western Europeans, whose mortality rates for breast, colon and prostate cancers are greater than the Japanese. PMID:8655094

  5. Altered Carcinogenesis and Proteome in Mammary Glands of Rats after Prepubertal Exposures to the Hormonally Active Chemicals Bisphenol A and Genistein123

    PubMed Central

    Betancourt, Angela M.; Wang, Jun; Jenkins, Sarah; Mobley, Jim; Russo, Jose; Lamartiniere, Coral A.

    2012-01-01

    Through our diet, we are exposed to numerous natural and man-made chemicals, including polyphenols with hormone-like properties. The most abundant hormonally active polyphenols are characterized as weak estrogens. These chemicals are hypothesized to interfere with signaling pathways involved in important diseases such as breast cancer, which in most cases is initially estrogen dependent. Two such chemicals are bisphenol A (BPA), a plasticizer, and genistein, a component of soy. In spite of both possessing estrogenic properties, BPA and genistein yield different health outcomes. The exposure of rats during the prepubertal period to BPA increases the susceptibility of adult animals for mammary cancer development, whereas genistein decreases this susceptibility in a chemically induced model. Because both BPA and genistein possess estrogenic properties, it is certainly plausible that additional mechanisms are affected by these chemicals. Hence, it was our goal to investigate at the protein level how exposure to these 2 chemicals can contribute to mammary cancer causation as opposed to cancer chemoprevention. Using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by MS analysis, we identified differentially regulated proteins from the mammary glands of rats prepubertally exposed to BPA and genistein. Following protein identification, we used immunoblotting techniques to validate the identity and regulation of these proteins and to identify downstream signaling proteins. Our studies highlight the importance of proteomics technology in elucidating signaling pathways altered by exposure to hormonally active chemicals and its potential value in identifying biomarkers for mammary cancer. PMID:22649256

  6. Curcumin and genistein additively potentiate G551D-CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ying-Chun; Miki, Haruna; Nakamura, Yumi; Hanyuda, Akiko; Matsuzaki, Yohei; Abe, Yoichiro; Yasui, Masato; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Bompadre, Silvia G.; Sohma, Yoshiro

    2016-01-01

    Background The G551D mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a common cause of cystic fibrosis (CF). G551D-CFTR is characterized by an extremely low open probability despite its normal trafficking to the plasma membrane. Numerous small molecules have been shown to increase the activity of G551D-CFTR presumably by binding to the CFTR protein. Methods We investigated the effect of curcumin, genistein and their combined application on G551D-CFTR activity using the patch clamp technique. Results Curcumin increased G551D-CFTR whole-cell and single-channel currents less than genistein did at their maximally effective concentrations. However, curcumin further increased the channel activity of G551D-CFTR that had been already maximally potentiated by genistein, up to ~50% of the WT-CFTR level. In addition, the combined application of genistein and curcumin over a lower concentration range synergistically rescued the gating defect of G551D-CFTR. Conclusions The additive effects between curcumin and genistein not only support the hypothesis that multiple mechanisms are involved in the action of CFTR potentiators, but also pose pharmaceutical implications in the development of drugs for CF pharmacotherapy. PMID:21441077

  7. Update on genistein and thyroid: an overall message of safety

    PubMed Central

    Marini, Herbert; Polito, Francesca; Adamo, Elena B.; Bitto, Alessandra; Squadrito, Francesco; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    Genistein aglycone, one of the soy isoflavones, has been reported to be beneficial in the treatment of menopausal vasomotor symptoms, osteoporosis, and cardiovascular diseases, as well as in a variety of cancers. However, issues of potential harm on thyroid function resulting from soy isoflavones consumption have been raised. Much of the evidence for the goitrogenic effects of isoflavones is derived from experimental in vitro and in vivo studies. Goitrogenic effects were also noted in infants fed non-iodine-fortified, soy-based formula, a problem that was easily solved with iodine fortification. Recent studies suggest that genistein shows a good profile of safety on the thyroid although definitive conclusions have not reached. The aim of this brief review is to summarize and better clarify the effects of genistein on human thyroid health. PMID:23060856

  8. 8-Prenylnaringenin, inhibits estrogen receptor-alpha mediated cell growth and induces apoptosis in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Brunelli, Elisa; Minassi, Alberto; Appendino, Giovanni; Moro, Laura

    2007-01-01

    The discovery that the hop constituent 8-prenylnaringenin (8PN) shows potent estrogenic activity, higher than that of the known phytoestrogens coumestrol, genistein and daidzein, has spurred an intense activity aimed at elucidating its biological profile and its dietary relevance connected with the consumption of beer. We have investigated if 8PN can induce signal transduction pathways via rapid estrogen receptor (ER) activation. Under conditions of estrogen-dependent growth, treatment of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells with 8PN induced a rapid and transient activation of the MAP kinase Erk-1 and Erk-2, with kinetics similar to those induced by 17beta-estradiol (E2). 8PN could trigger the MAP kinase pathway via dual c-Src kinase activation and association with ERalpha. Co-treatment with the ER antagonist ICI 182,780 blocked each step of this transduction pathway, confirming its ER dependence. However, and in striking contrast with E2, 8PN could not induce the PI3K/Akt pathway, resulting in altered kinetics and levels of cyclin D1 expression. In accordance with these observations, flow cytometric and biochemical analysis showed that 8PN inhibited cell cycle progression and induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. Interference with an ER associated PI3K pathway is proposed as a possible mechanism underlying the inhibition of survival and proliferation of estrogen responsive cells by 8PN. Taken together, our finding show that 8PN is an interesting new chemotype to explore the biology of ERs. PMID:17681752

  9. Determination of Phytoestrogen Content in Fresh-Cut Legume Forage.

    PubMed

    Hloucalová, Pavlína; Skládanka, Jiří; Horký, Pavel; Klejdus, Bořivoj; Pelikán, Jan; Knotová, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine phytoestrogen content in fresh-cut legume forage. This issue has been much discussed in recent years in connection with the health and safety of feedstuffs and thus livestock health. The experiments were carried out on two experimental plots at Troubsko and Vatín, Czech Republic during June and July in 2015. Samples were collected of the four forage legume species perennial red clover (variety "Amos"), alfalfa (variety "Holyně"), and annuals Persian clover and Alexandrian clover. Forage was sampled twice at regular three to four day intervals leading up to harvest and a third time on the day of harvest. Fresh and wilted material was analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Higher levels ( p < 0.05) of isoflavones biochanin A (3.697 mg·g (-1) of dry weight) and formononetin (4.315 mg·g (-1) of dry weight) were found in red clover than in other species. The highest isoflavone content was detected in red clover, reaching 1.001% of dry matter ( p < 0.05), representing a risk for occurrence of reproduction problems and inhibited secretion of animal estrogen. The phytoestrogen content was particularly increased in wilted forage. Significant isoflavone reduction was observed over three to four day intervals leading up to harvest. PMID:27429009

  10. Influence of micronization on improving phytoestrogenic effects of wheat bran.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinghui; Wu, Qinyan; Chen, Hongzhou; Zhuang, Yiqing

    2015-01-01

    The influence of micronization on improving the phytoestrogenic effects of wheat bran was studied. Wheat bran samples were prepared by ball milling, and an animal experiment was carried out by feeding 8-month-old female rats wheat bran. The effect of wheat bran samples on serum estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P) levels of female 8-month-old rats was investigated. The wheat bran with a median diameter of 392.1 μm was micronized to 91.1 and 9.7 μm in median diameter by dry milling and wet milling for 5 hours, respectively. Microscopic observation and X-ray diffraction revealed more potential damage from wet milling than dry milling on the crystal structure of wheat bran granules. Almost all particles were dissolved and there was no obvious crystal peak in the 5-hour wet-milled wheat bran. The serum E2 and P levels of the 8-month-old rats fed wet-milled bran were increased significantly, 2.2 times higher than that of the same aged control group. The experimental results indicated that wet milling could destroy the crystal structure of wheat bran granules and improve the phytoestrogenic effects of wheat bran. PMID:25757396