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Sample records for phytosphingosine induces caspase-8-dependent

  1. N,N-dimethyl phytosphingosine induces caspase-8-dependent cytochrome c release and apoptosis through ROS generation in human leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Byeong Mo; Choi, Yun Jung; Han, Youngsoo; Yun, Yeon-Sook; Hong, Sung Hee

    2009-08-15

    N,N-dimethyl phytosphingosine (DMPS) blocks the conversion of sphingosine to sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) by the enzyme sphingosine kinase (SK). In this study, we elucidated the apoptotic mechanisms of DMPS action on a human leukemia cell line using functional pharmacologic and genetic approaches. First, we demonstrated that DMPS-induced apoptosis is evidenced by nuclear morphological change, distinct internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, and an increased sub-G1 cell population. DMPS treatment led to the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, accompanied by the cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and led to cytochrome c release, depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, and downregulation of the anti-apoptotic members of the bcl-2 family. Ectopic expression of bcl-2 and bcl-xL conferred resistance of HL-60 cells to DMPS-induced cell death, suggesting that DMPS-induced apoptosis occurs predominantly through the activation of the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. We also observed that DMPS activated the caspase-8-Bid-Bax pathway and that the inhibition of caspase-8 by z-IETD-fmk or small interfering RNA suppressed the cleavage of Bid, cytochrome c release, caspase-3 activation, and apoptotic cell death. In addition, cells subjected to DMPS exhibited significantly increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and ROS scavengers, such as quercetin and Tiron, but not N-acetylcysteine (NAC), inhibited DMPS-induced activations of caspase-8, -3 and subsequent apoptotic cell death, indicating the role of ROS in caspase-8-mediated apoptosis. Taken together, these results indicate that caspase-8 acts upstream of caspase-3, and that the caspase-8-mediated mitochondrial pathway is important in DMPS-induced apoptosis. Our results also suggest that ROS are critical regulators of caspase-8-mediated apoptosis in DMPS-treated leukemia cells.

  2. Ofloxacin induces apoptosis in microencapsulated juvenile rabbit chondrocytes by caspase-8-dependent mitochondrial pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng Zhiguo; Cao Xiaojuan; Peng Shuangqing Wang Changyong; Li Qianqian; Wang Yimei; Liu Mifeng

    2008-01-15

    Quinolones (QNs)-induced arthropathy is an important toxic effect in immature animals leading to restriction of their therapeutic use in pediatrics. However, the exact mechanism still remains unclear. Recently, we have demonstrated that ofloxacin, a typical QN, induces apoptosis of alginate microencapsulated juvenile rabbit joint chondrocytes by disturbing the {beta}{sub 1} integrin functions and inactivating the ERK/MAPK signaling pathway. In this study, we extend our initial observations to further elucidate the mechanism(s) of ofloxacin-induced apoptosis by utilizing specific caspase inhibitors. Pretreatment with both caspase-9-specific inhibitor zLEHD-fmk and caspase-8 inhibitor zIETD-fmk attenuated ofloxacin-induced apoptosis and activation of caspase-3 of chondrocyte in a concentration-dependent manner, as determined by fluorescent dye staining, enzyme activity assay and immunoblotting. Furthermore, the activation of caspase-9, -8 and -3 stimulated by ofloxacin was significantly inhibited in the presence of zIETD-fmk while pretreatment with zLEHD-fmk only blocked the activation of caspase-9 and -3. Ofloxacin also stimulated a concentration-dependent translocation of cytochrome c from mitochondria into the cytosol and a decrease of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, which was completely inhibited by zIETD-fmk. In addition, ofloxacin was found to increase the level of Bax, tBid, p53 in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Taken together, The current results indicate that the caspase-8-dependent mitochondrial pathway is primarily involved in the ofloxacin-induced apoptosis of microencapsulated juvenile rabbit joint chondrocytes.

  3. YM155 induces caspase-8 dependent apoptosis through downregulation of survivin and Mcl-1 in human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Weiying; Yoshida, Akira; Ueda, Takanori

    2013-05-24

    Survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family, is highly expressed in various kinds of tumors. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxic mechanism of YM155, a unique small-molecule inhibitor of survivin, in human myelogenous leukemia cells. YM155 potently inhibited the cell growth of HL-60 and U937 cells with the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 0.3 nM and 0.8 nM, respectively. YM155 significantly suppressed the levels of mRNA expression and protein of survivin in HL-60 and U937 cells. In addition, we also found that YM155 down-regulated the level of Mcl-1, another critical anti-apoptotic protein, in both HL-60 and U937 cells. Treatment of HL-60 and U937 cells with YM155 induced apoptosis concomitant with the activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3. Interestingly, we have found that caspase-8 inhibitor Z-IETD-FMK strongly inhibited YM155-induced apoptosis in HL-60 and U937 cells. When cells were pretreated with Z-IETD-FMK, the activation of caspase-3 was completely abolished, suggesting that caspase-8 may be involved in the activation of caspase-3 during YM155-induced apoptosis. We demonstrated for the first time that YM155 induces caspase-8 dependent apoptosis through downregulation of survivin and Mcl-1 in human leukemia cells. PMID:23618862

  4. Atrazine induces endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis of T lymphocytes via the caspase-8-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Jin; Jang, Youngsaeng; Kang, Kwonyoon; Song, Da-Hyun; Kim, Rihyun; Chang, Hee-Won; Lee, Dong Eil; Song, Claire Ka-Eun; Choi, Bongkun; Kang, Min-Ji; Chang, Eun-Ju

    2016-08-01

    Atrazine (ATR) is one of the most commonly applied broad-spectrum herbicides. Although ATR is well known to be a biologically hazardous molecule with potential toxicity in the immune system, the molecular mechanisms responsible for ATR-induced immunotoxicity remain unclear. In this study, we found that the immunotoxic properties of ATR were mediated through the induction of apoptotic changes in T lymphocytes. Mice exposed to ATR for 4 weeks exhibited a significant decrease in the number of spleen CD3(+) T lymphocytes, while CD19(+) B lymphocytes and nonlymphoid cells were unaffected. ATR exposure also led to inhibition of cell growth and induction of apoptosis in human Jurkat T-cells. Importantly, ATR triggered the activation of caspase-3 and the cleavage of caspase-8 and PARP, whereas it did not affect the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria in Jurkat T-cells. In addition, ATR activated the unfolded protein response signaling pathway, as indicated by eIF2α phosphorylation and CHOP induction. Our results demonstrate that ATR elicited an immunotoxic effect by inducing ER stress-induced apoptosis in T-cells, therefore providing evidence for the molecular mechanism by which ATR induces dysregulation of the immune system. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 998-1008, 2016. PMID:25640594

  5. B cell receptor cross-linking triggers a caspase-8-dependent apoptotic pathway that is independent of the death effector domain of Fas-associated death domain protein.

    PubMed

    Besnault, L; Schrantz, N; Auffredou, M T; Leca, G; Bourgeade, M F; Vazquez, A

    2001-07-15

    We have previously reported that B cell receptors, depending on the degree to which they are cross-linked, can promote apoptosis in various human B cell types. In this study, we show that B cell receptors can trigger two apoptotic pathways according to cross-linking and that these pathways control mitochondrial activation in human Burkitt's lymphoma cells. Whereas soluble anti-mu Ab triggers caspase-independent mitochondrial activation, cross-linked anti-mu Ab induces an apoptotic response associated with a caspase-dependent loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. This B cell receptor-mediated caspase-dependent mitochondrial activation is associated with caspase-8 activation. We show here that caspase-8 inhibitors strongly decrease cross-linking-dependent B cell receptor-mediated apoptosis in Burkitt's lymphoma BL41 cells. These inhibitors act upstream from the mitochondria as they prevented the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential observed in B cell receptor-treated BL41 cells. Caspase-8 activation in these cells was also evident from the detection of cleaved fragments of caspase-8 and the cleavage of specific substrates, including Bid. Our data show that cross-linked B cell receptors induced an apoptotic pathway involving sequential caspase-8 activation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Cells expressing a dominant negative mutant of Fas-associated death domain protein were sensitive to cross-linked B cell receptor-induced caspase-8 activation and apoptosis; therefore, this caspase-8 activation was independent of the death effector domain of Fas-associated death domain protein. PMID:11441077

  6. Extracellular Caspase-8 Dependent Apoptosis on HeLa Cancer Cells and MRC-5 Normal Cells by ICD-85 (Venom Derived Peptides)

    PubMed Central

    Zare-Mirakabadi, Abbas; Sarzaeem, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Background Our previous studies revealed an inhibitory effect of ICD-85 (venom derived peptides) on MDA-MB231 and HL-60 cell lines, through induction of apoptosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate apoptosis-induced mechanism on HeLa and MRC-5 cells by ICD-85 through activation of caspase-8. Methods Cell viability, cytosolic enzyme Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) and cell morphology were assessed under unexposed and ICD-85 exposed conditions.Caspase-8 activity was assayed by caspase-8 colorimetric assay Kit. Results The results show that Inhibitory Concentration 50% (IC50) value of ICD-85 for HeLa cells at 24 h was estimated and found to be 25.32±2.15 µg/mL. Furthermore, treatment of HeLa cells with ICD-85 at concentrations of 1.6×10 and 2.6×10 µg/mL did not significantly increase LDH release. Morphological changes in HeLa cells on treatment with ICD-85 compared with untreated HeLa cells consistent with an apoptotic mechanism of cell death, such as cell shrinkage which finally results in the generation of apoptotic bodies. However, when MRC-5 cells were exposed to ICD-85, no significant changes in cell morphology and LDH were observed at concentrations below 2.6×10µg/ml. Also, the apoptosis-induction mechanism by ICD-85 on HeLa cells was found through activation of caspase-8 and the activity of caspase-8 in HeLa cells was 1.5 folds more than its activity on MRC-5 cells. Conclusion Therefore, the apoptosis-induced mechanisms by ICD-85 are through activation of caspase-8 and concerning the least cytotoxic effect on MRC-5 cells, ICD-85 may be used as anticancer compound to inhibit growth of cancer cells. PMID:25352970

  7. Identification of the phytosphingosine metabolic pathway leading to odd-numbered fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Natsuki; Ohno, Yusuke; Yamagata, Maki; Obara, Takashi; Seki, Naoya; Kitamura, Takuya; Naganuma, Tatsuro; Kihara, Akio

    2014-01-01

    The long-chain base phytosphingosine is a component of sphingolipids and exists in yeast, plants and some mammalian tissues. Phytosphingosine is unique in that it possesses an additional hydroxyl group compared with other long-chain bases. However, its metabolism is unknown. Here we show that phytosphingosine is metabolized to odd-numbered fatty acids and is incorporated into glycerophospholipids both in yeast and mammalian cells. Disruption of the yeast gene encoding long-chain base 1-phosphate lyase, which catalyzes the committed step in the metabolism of phytosphingosine to glycerophospholipids, causes an ~40% reduction in the level of phosphatidylcholines that contain a C15 fatty acid. We also find that 2-hydroxypalmitic acid is an intermediate of the phytosphingosine metabolic pathway. Furthermore, we show that the yeast MPO1 gene, whose product belongs to a large, conserved protein family of unknown function, is involved in phytosphingosine metabolism. Our findings provide insights into fatty acid diversity and identify a pathway by which hydroxyl group-containing lipids are metabolized. PMID:25345524

  8. Preparation of anti-Vicinal Amino Alcohols: Asymmetric Synthesis of d-erythro-Sphinganine, (+)-Spisulosine, and d-ribo-Phytosphingosine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Two variations of the Overman rearrangement have been developed for the highly selective synthesis of anti-vicinal amino alcohol natural products. A MOM ether-directed palladium(II)-catalyzed rearrangement of an allylic trichloroacetimidate was used as the key step for the preparation of the protein kinase C inhibitor d-erythro-sphinganine and the antitumor agent (+)-spisulosine, whereas the Overman rearrangement of chiral allylic trichloroacetimidates generated by the asymmetric reduction of an α,β-unsaturated methyl ketone allowed rapid access both to d-ribo-phytosphingosine and l-arabino-phytosphingosine. PMID:23795558

  9. Anti-erosive effects of fluoride and phytosphingosine: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Yönel, Nermin; Bikker, Floris J; Lagerweij, Maxim D; Kleverlaan, Cees J; van Loveren, Cor; Özen, Bugra; Çetiner, Serap; van Strijp, Augustinus J P

    2016-08-01

    A selection of commercially available products containing stannous fluoride (SnF2 )/sodium fluoride (NaF), SnF2 /amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), SnF2 /NaF/ACP, tin (Sn)/fluorine (F)/chitosan were compared with phytosphingosine (PHS) with respect to their anti-erosive properties in vitro. One-hundred and twenty bovine enamel specimens were immersed in the respective product slurries for 2 min, twice daily. The formulations were diluted with either remineralization solution or artificial saliva. After each treatment, an erosive challenge was performed for 10 min, twice daily, using citric acid, pH 3.4. The specimens were stored in remineralization solution or artificial saliva until the next treatment-erosion challenge. After 10 d, tissue loss was determined using profilometry. Enamel softening was determined through surface microhardness measurements. Tissue-loss values (measured in μm and expressed as mean ± SD) for PHS, SnF2 /NaF, SnF2 /ACP, SnF2 /ACP/NaF, and Sn/F/chitosan treatment groups and for the negative-control group, were, respectively, 35.6 ± 2.8, 15.8 ± 1.8, 22.1 ± 2.0, 22.9 ± 1.8, 16.2 ± 1.2, and 51.2 ± 4.4 in the presence of remineralization solution and 31.7 ± 3.3, 15.6 ± 2.9, 16.5 ± 2.7, 16.8 ± 2.1, 13.1 ± 3.0, and 50.7 ± 2.8 in the presence of artificial saliva. There were no significant differences in surface microhardness measurements between the treatment groups. In conclusion, PHS resulted in a significant reduction of tissue loss compared with the negative control, but in comparison, the toothpastes containing Sn(2+) and F(-) ions were significantly more effective compared with PHS. PMID:27342101

  10. Hypoxia remodels the composition of the constituent ceramide species of HexCer and Hex2Cer with phytosphingosine and hydroxy fatty acids in human colon cancer LS174T cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kouji; Tamiya-Koizumi, Keiko; Yamada, Masaki; Murate, Takashi; Kannagi, Reiji; Kyogashima, Mamoru

    2015-11-01

    Oxygen-requiring enzymes, such as Δ4-desaturase (dihydroceramide desaturase), sphingolipid Δ4-desaturase/C-4-hydroxylase, and fatty acid 2-hydroxylase are involved in ceramide synthesis. We prepared free ceramides, sphingomyelins and glycosphingolipids (GSLs) from cancer cells cultivated under conditions of normoxia and hypoxia, and analyzed these compounds using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Human colon cancer LS174T cells were employed because these cells highly express hydroxyl fatty acids and phytosphingosine (t18:0) which are expected to be greatly influenced by changes in oxygen levels. As expected, the populations of dihydro-species of free ceramide and sphingomyelin with C16:0 non-hydroxy fatty acid were elevated, and the populations of HexCers and Hex2Cers, composed of C16:0 or C16:0 hydroxy fatty acid (C16:0h), and sphingosine (d18:1) or t18:0, were decreased under hypoxia. However, appreciable populations of HexCer and Hex2Cer species of C24:0 or C24:0h and t18:0 remained. These results suggest that the individual species of GSLs with fatty acids possessing different alkyl chain lengths, either non-hydroxy fatty acids or hydroxyl fatty acids, may be metabolized individually. PMID:26194060

  11. Polymorphism of ceramide 3. Part 2: a vibrational spectroscopic and X-ray powder diffraction investigation of N-octadecanoyl phytosphingosine and the analogous specifically deuterated d(35) derivative.

    PubMed

    Raudenkolb, Steve; Wartewig, Siegfried; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2003-07-01

    In order to characterize the arrangements of the hydrocarbon chains of ceramide 3, the thermotropic phase behaviour of the ceramides N-octadecanoylphytosphingosine (CER3) and its chain deuterated derivative N-(d(35)-octadecanoyl)phytosphingosine (d(35)CER3) was studied by means of X-ray powder diffraction, FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy. CER3 and d(35)CER3 exhibit an identical thermotropic polymorphism involving three different crystalline phases. The selective deuteration of the fatty acid chain enables to distinguish the sphingoid part from the fatty acid part by means of FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy. It could be shown that both hydrocarbon chains are arranged in different subcells. Temperature dependent Raman measurements elucidate simultaneously the changes in the trans/gauche ratios and the packing of both the hydrocarbon chains of the fatty acid and of the sphingoid part. The phase behaviour of CER3 and d(35)CER3, both dry and hydrated, was investigated. PMID:12818735

  12. Control of Mitochondrial Dynamics by Fas-induced Caspase-8 Activation in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyo Min

    2015-01-01

    Cells undergo apoptosis mainly via two pathways-the mitochondrial pathway and the cytosolic pathway. It has been well documented that activation of the mitochondrial pathway promotes mitochondrial fragmentation and inhibition of mitochondrial fragmentation partly represses cell death. However, the mitochondrial events following activation of the cytosolic pathway are less understood. In this study, we treated Fas-activating antibody and found mitochondrial fragmentation without cell death in hippocampal primary neurons and HT-22 cell lines. Fas antibody treatment, in fact, promoted rapid activation of caspase-8, while executioner caspase-3 activation was not observed. Furthermore, blockage of caspase-8 efficiently prevented Fas antibody-induced mitochondrial fragmentation. These results suggest that the cytosolic pathway induced by death receptor activation promotes caspase-8-dependent mitochondrial fission. PMID:26412971

  13. Retinoids induce Nur77-dependent apoptosis in mouse thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Beáta; Tóth, Katalin; Sarang, Zsolt; Garabuczi, Éva; Szondy, Zsuzsa

    2015-03-01

    Nur77 is a transcription factor, which plays a determinant role in mediating T cell receptor-induced cell death of thymocytes. In addition to regulation of transcription, Nur77 contributes to apoptosis induction by targeting mitochondria, where it can convert Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein into a proapoptotic molecule. Previous studies have demonstrated that retinoids are actively produced in the mouse thymus and can induce a transcription-dependent apoptosis in mouse thymocytes. Here we show that retinoic acids induce the expression of Nur77, and retinoid-induced apoptosis is completely dependent on Nur77, as retinoids were unable to induce apoptosis in Nur77 null thymocytes. In wild-type thymocytes retinoids induced enhanced expression of the apoptosis-related genes FasL, TRAIL, NDG-1, Gpr65 and Bid, all of them in a Nur77-dependent manner. The combined action of these proteins led to Caspase 8-dependent Bid cleavage in the mitochondria. In addition, we could demonstrate the Nur77-dependent induction of STAT1 leading to enhanced Bim expression, and the mitochondrial translocation of Nur77 leading to the exposure of the Bcl-2/BH3 domain. The retinoid-induced apoptosis was dependent on both Caspase 8 and STAT1. Our data together indicate that retinoids induce a Nur77-dependent cell death program in thymocytes activating the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. PMID:25576519

  14. Harmol induces apoptosis by caspase-8 activation independently of Fas/Fas ligand interaction in human lung carcinoma H596 cells.

    PubMed

    Abe, Akihisa; Yamada, Hiroyuki

    2009-06-01

    The beta-carboline alkaloids are naturally existing plant substances. It is known that these alkaloids have a wide spectrum of neuropharmacological, psychopharmacological, and antitumor effects. Therefore, they have been traditionally used in oriental medicine for the treatment of various diseases including cancers and malaria. In this study, harmol and harmalol, which are beta-carboline alkaloids, were examined for their antitumor effect on human lung carcinoma cell lines, and structure-activity relationship was also investigated. H596, H226, and A549 cells were treated with harmol and harmalol, respectively. Apoptosis was induced by harmol only in H596 cells. In contrast, harmalol had negligible cytotoxicity in three cell lines. Harmol induced caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9 activities and caspase-3 activities accompanied by cleavage of poly-(ADP-ribose)-polymerase. Furthermore, harmol treatment decreased the native Bid protein, and induced the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol. The apoptosis induced by harmol was completely inhibited by caspase-8 inhibitor and partially inhibited by caspase-9 inhibitor. The antagonistic antibody ZB4 blocked Fas ligand-induced apoptosis, but had no effect on harmol-induced apoptosis. Harmol had no significant effect on the expression of Fas. In conclusion, our results showed that the harmol could cause apoptosis-inducing effects in human lung H596 cells through caspase-8-dependent pathway but independent of Fas/Fas ligand interaction. PMID:19318910

  15. SMG1 and NIK regulate apoptosis induced by Smac mimetic compounds

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, H H; St Jean, M; Beug, S T; Lejmi-Mrad, R; LaCasse, E; Baird, S D; Stojdl, D F; Screaton, R A; Korneluk, R G

    2011-01-01

    Smac mimetic compounds (SMCs) are experimental small molecules that induce tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)-dependent cancer cell death by targeting the inhibitor of apoptosis proteins. However, many cancer cell lines are resistant to SMC-mediated apoptosis despite the presence of TNFα. To add insight into the mechanism of SMC-resistance, we used functional siRNA-based kinomic and focused chemical screens and identified suppressor of morphogenesis in genitalia-1 (SMG1) and NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK) as novel protective factors. Both SMG1 and NIK prevent SMC-mediated apoptosis likely by maintaining FLICE inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) levels to suppress caspase-8 activation. In SMC-resistant cells, the accumulation of NIK upon SMC treatment enhanced the activity of both the classical and alternative nuclear factor-κB pathways, and increased c-FLIP mRNA levels. In parallel, persistent SMG1 expression in SMC-resistant cells repressed SMC-mediated TNFα-induced JNK activation and c-FLIP levels were sustained. Importantly, SMC-resistance is overcome by depleting NIK and SMG1, which appear to facilitate the downregulation of c-FLIP in response to SMC and TNFα treatment, leading to caspase-8-dependent apoptosis. Collectively, these data show that SMG1 and NIK function as critical repressors of SMC-mediated apoptosis by potentially converging on the regulation of c-FLIP metabolism. PMID:21490678

  16. Sphingoid bases are taken up by Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus and induce ultrastructural damage

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Carol L.; Walters, Katherine S.; Drake, David R.; Blanchette, Derek R.; Dawson, Deborah V.; Brogden, Kim A.; Wertz, Philip W.

    2013-01-01

    Sphingoid bases found in the outer layers of the skin exhibit antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. We investigated the uptake of several sphingoid bases by Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, and assessed subsequent ultrastructural damage. E. coli and S. aureus were incubated with D-sphingosine, dihydrosphingosine, or phytosphingosine at ten times their MIC for 0.5 h and 4 h, respectively, to kill 50% of viable bacteria. Treated bacterial cells were immediately prepared for SEM, TEM, and analyzed for lipid content by QTLC. E. coli and S. aureus treated with sphingoid bases were distorted and their surfaces were concave and rugate. Significant differences were observed in the visual surface area relative to controls for both E. coli and S. aureus when treated with dihydrosphingosine and sphingosine (p<0.0001) but not phytosphingosine. While sphingoid base-treated S. aureus exhibited disruption and loss of cell wall and membrane, E. coli cytoplasmic membranes appeared intact and the outer envelope uncompromised. Both E. coli and S. aureus cells contained unique internal inclusion bodies, likely associated with cell death. QTLC demonstrated extensive uptake of sphingoid bases by the bacteria. Hence, sphingoid bases induce both extracellular and intracellular damage and cause intracellular inclusions that may reflect lipid uptake. PMID:23128426

  17. Mechanisms of andrographolide-induced platelet apoptosis in human platelets: regulatory roles of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway.

    PubMed

    Lien, Li-Ming; Su, Cheng-Chen; Hsu, Wen-Hsien; Lu, Wan-Jung; Chung, Chi-Li; Yen, Ting-Lin; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Lin, Kuan-Hung

    2013-11-01

    Andrographolide, a novel nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibitor, is isolated from the leaves of Andrographis paniculata. Platelet activation is relevant to a variety of coronary heart diseases. Our recent studies revealed that andrographolide possesses potent antiplatelet activity by inhibition of the p38 MAPK/(●) HO-NF-κB-ERK2 cascade. Although platelets are anucleated cells, apoptotic machinery apparatus recently has been found to regulate platelet activation and limit platelet lifespan. Therefore, we further investigated the regulatory effects of andrographolide on platelet apoptotic events. In this study, apoptotic signaling events for caspase-3, -8, and Bid were time (10-60 min)- and dose (25-100 μΜ)-dependently activated by andrographolide in human platelets. Andrographolide could also disrupt mitrochondrial membrane potential. In addition, caspase-8 inhibitor (z-IETD-fmk, 50 μΜ) was found to reverse andrographolide-induced caspase-8 activation, whereas the antagonistic anti-Fas receptor (ZB4, 500 ng/mL) and anti-tumor necrosis factor-R1 (H398, 10 µg/mL) monoclonal antibodies did not. In conclusion, this study for the first time demonstrated that andrographolide might limit platelet lifespan by initiating the caspase-8-dependent extrinsic apoptotic pathway, in spite of no direct evidence that death receptors are involved in this process proved. Overall, the various medicinal properties of andrographolide suggest its potential value in treating patients with thromboembolic disorders. PMID:23292890

  18. Impairment of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase in CD95(APO-1)-induced human T-cell leukemia cell apoptosis mediated by glutathione depletion and generation of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Yin, W; Cheng, W; Shen, W; Shu, L; Zhao, J; Zhang, J; Hua, Z-C

    2007-08-01

    Human T-cell leukemia is a malignant disease that needs various regimens of cytotoxic chemotherapy to overcome drug resistance. Recently, Na(+),K(+)-ATPase has emerged as a potential target for cancer therapy. However, its exact signaling pathway in human T-cell leukemia cell death has not been well defined. In the current study, we found CD95(APO-1) was able to trigger the internalization of plasma membrane Na(+),K(+)-ATPase in Jurkat cells or primary T cells as a mechanism to suppress its activity. This internalization was closely relevant to intracellular glutathione (GSH) depletion in Jurkat cells downstream of Fas-associated death domain protein (FADD) and caspase 8. GSH depletion in Fas L-treated Jurkat cells induced the generation of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), which subsequently increased the serine phosphorylation of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase alpha1 subunit. Exogenous H(2)O(2) even mimicked the effect of Fas L to upregulate the serine phosphorylation of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase alpha1 subunit and suppress Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity. Overall, our results indicate that CD95(APO-1) induces the FADD- and caspase 8-dependent internalization of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase through intracellular GSH loss, and the subsequent generation of H(2)O(2)-mediated serine phosphorylation of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase alpha1 subunit. Taken together, this study presents a novel regulatory mechanism of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase in CD95(APO-1)-mediated human T-leukemia cell apoptosis. PMID:17554377

  19. Dioscin-induced autophagy mitigates cell apoptosis through modulation of PI3K/Akt and ERK and JNK signaling pathways in human lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Tsai, Te-Lung; Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Wang, Chau-Jong; Chiou, Hui-Ling

    2013-11-01

    Our previous study has revealed that dioscin, a compound with anti-inflammatory, lipid-lowering, anticancer and hepatoprotective effects, may induce autophagy in hepatoma cells. Autophagy is a lysosomal degradation pathway that is essential for cell survival and tissue homeostasis. In this study, the role of autophagy and related signaling pathways during dioscin-induced apoptosis in human lung cancer cells was investigated. Results from 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole and annexin-V/PI double-staining assay showed that caspase-3- and caspase-8-dependent, and dose-dependent apoptoses were detected after a 24-h dioscin treatment. Meanwhile, autophagy was detected as early as 12 h after an exposure to low-dose dioscin, as indicated by an up-regulated expression of LC3-II and beclin-1 proteins. Blockade of autophagy with bafilomycin A1 or 3-methyladenine sensitized the A549 and H1299 cells to apoptosis. Treatment of A549 and H1299 cells with dioscin caused a dose-dependent increase in ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 activity, accompanied with a decreased PI3K expression and decreased phosphorylation of Akt and mTOR. Taken together, this study demonstrated for the first time that autophagy occurred earlier than apoptosis during dioscin-induced human lung cancer cell line apoptosis. Dioscin-induced autophagy via ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 pathways may provide a protective mechanism for cell survival against dioscin-induced apoptosis to act as a cytoprotective reaction. PMID:23552851

  20. Restoration of TRAIL-induced apoptosis in a caspase-8-deficient neuroblastoma cell line by stable re-expression of caspase-8.

    PubMed

    Mühlethaler-Mottet, Annick; Balmas, Katia; Auderset, Katya; Joseph, Jean-Marc; Gross, Nicole

    2003-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) selectively induces apoptosis in most tumor cells, a process sometimes potentiated by chemotherapeutic drugs or cycloheximide (CHX). Childhood neuroblastoma (NB) is a clinically and biologically heterogeneous neoplasm whose behavior can be explained by differential regulation of apoptosis. The non-invasive S-type NB cell lines are sensitive to TRAIL, whereas the invasive N-type NB cell lines are resistant. We have reported the silencing of caspase-8 expression in N-type cells as a possible mechanism of death receptor-mediated resistance to apoptosis in NB. The recently observed deregulation of caspase-10 in these cells prompted us to investigate the particular contribution of caspase-8 silencing in the resistance to TRAIL in N-type cells. Stable caspase-8 expression was therefore restored in the IGR-N91 cell line by retroviral infection. The IGR-N91-C8 cells became sensitive to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis, whereas the control vector-infected IGR-N91-M cells remained resistant. Interestingly, the apoptotic response to TRAIL was enhanced by co-treatment of SH-EP and IGR-N91-C8 cells with CHX or with sub-toxic concentration of doxorubicin (DOX) in a caspase-dependent manner, as cells could be protected from death by specific caspase-8 or pan-caspase inhibitors. CHX or DOX was shown to enhance TRAIL-induced caspase-8 activation and loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. In conclusion, restoration of active caspase-8 expression in caspase-8- and caspase-10-deficient IGR-N-91 cell line is necessary and sufficient to fully restore TRAIL-mediated cell death. Moreover, DOX and CHX were able to sensitize NB cell lines to TRAIL-induced apoptosis in a caspase-8-dependent manner by engaging death receptor and mitochondrial signaling pathways. PMID:15033719

  1. FasL-triggered death of Jurkat cells requires caspase 8-induced, ATP-dependent cross-talk between Fas and the purinergic receptor P2X(7).

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Adam; Shoji, Kenji F; Sáez, Juan C; Henríquez, Mauricio; Quest, Andrew F G

    2013-02-01

    Fas ligation via the ligand FasL activates the caspase-8/caspase-3-dependent extrinsic death pathway. In so-called type II cells, an additional mechanism involving tBid-mediated caspase-9 activation is required to efficiently trigger cell death. Other pathways linking FasL-Fas interaction to activation of the intrinsic cell death pathway remain unknown. However, ATP release and subsequent activation of purinergic P2X(7) receptors (P2X(7)Rs) favors cell death in some cells. Here, we evaluated the possibility that ATP release downstream of caspase-8 via pannexin1 hemichannels (Panx1 HCs) and subsequent activation of P2X(7)Rs participate in FasL-stimulated cell death. Indeed, upon FasL stimulation, ATP was released from Jurkat cells in a time- and caspase-8-dependent manner. Fas and Panx1 HCs colocalized and inhibition of the latter, but not connexin hemichannels, reduced FasL-induced ATP release. Extracellular apyrase, which hydrolyzes ATP, reduced FasL-induced death. Also, oxidized-ATP or Brilliant Blue G, two P2X(7)R blockers, reduced FasL-induced caspase-9 activation and cell death. These results represent the first evidence indicating that the two death receptors, Fas and P2X(7)R connect functionally via caspase-8 and Panx1 HC-mediated ATP release to promote caspase-9/caspase-3-dependent cell death in lymphoid cells. Thus, a hitherto unsuspected route was uncovered connecting the extrinsic to the intrinsic pathway to amplify death signals emanating from the Fas receptor in type II cells. PMID:22806078

  2. Bortezomib and SAHA synergistically induce ROS-driven caspase-dependent apoptosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma and block replication of Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Hui, Kwai Fung; Lam, Benjamin H W; Ho, Dona N; Tsao, Sai Wah; Chiang, Alan K S

    2013-05-01

    A novel drug combination of a proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib, and a histone deacetylase inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), was tested in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), both in vitro and in vivo. Dose-response of different concentrations of bortezomib and SAHA on inhibition of cell proliferation of NPC was determined. Mechanisms of apoptosis and effects on lytic cycle activation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) were investigated. Combination of bortezomib and SAHA (bortezomib/SAHA) synergistically induced killing of a panel of NPC cell lines. Pronounced increase in sub-G1, Annexin V-positive, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cell populations were detected after treatment with bortezomib/SAHA when compared with either drug alone. Concomitantly, markedly augmented proteolytic cleavage of PARP, caspase-3, -7, -8, and -9, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and caspase-8-dependent histone acetylation were observed. ROS scavenger, N-acetyl cysteine, diminished the apoptotic effects of bortezomib/SAHA, whereas caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK significantly suppressed the apoptosis without decreasing the generation of ROS. Bortezomib inhibited SAHA's induction of EBV replication and abrogated production of infectious viral particles in NPC cells. Furthermore, bortezomib/SAHA potently induced apoptosis and suppressed the growth of NPC xenografts in nude mice. In conclusion, the novel drug combination of bortezomib and SAHA is highly synergistic in the killing of NPC cells in vitro and in vivo. The major mechanism of cell death is ROS-driven caspase-dependent apoptosis. Bortezomib antagonizes SAHA's activation of EBV lytic cycle in NPC cells. This study provides a strong basis for clinical testing of the combination drug regimen in patients with NPC. PMID:23475956

  3. The necrosome promotes pancreatic oncogenesis via CXCL1 and Mincle-induced immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Lena; Werba, Gregor; Tiwari, Shaun; Giao Ly, Nancy Ngoc; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Avanzi, Antonina; Barilla, Rocky; Daley, Donnele; Greco, Stephanie H; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Pergamo, Matthew; Ochi, Atsuo; Zambirinis, Constantinos P; Pansari, Mridul; Rendon, Mauricio; Tippens, Daniel; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R; Hajdu, Cristina; Engle, Dannielle; Miller, George

    2016-04-14

    Neoplastic pancreatic epithelial cells are believed to die through caspase 8-dependent apoptotic cell death, and chemotherapy is thought to promote tumour apoptosis. Conversely, cancer cells often disrupt apoptosis to survive. Another type of programmed cell death is necroptosis (programmed necrosis), but its role in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is unclear. There are many potential inducers of necroptosis in PDA, including ligation of tumour necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1), CD95, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptors, Toll-like receptors, reactive oxygen species, and chemotherapeutic drugs. Here we report that the principal components of the necrosome, receptor-interacting protein (RIP)1 and RIP3, are highly expressed in PDA and are further upregulated by the chemotherapy drug gemcitabine. Blockade of the necrosome in vitro promoted cancer cell proliferation and induced an aggressive oncogenic phenotype. By contrast, in vivo deletion of RIP3 or inhibition of RIP1 protected against oncogenic progression in mice and was associated with the development of a highly immunogenic myeloid and T cell infiltrate. The immune-suppressive tumour microenvironment associated with intact RIP1/RIP3 signalling depended in part on necroptosis-induced expression of the chemokine attractant CXCL1, and CXCL1 blockade protected against PDA. Moreover, cytoplasmic SAP130 (a subunit of the histone deacetylase complex) was expressed in PDA in a RIP1/RIP3-dependent manner, and Mincle--its cognate receptor--was upregulated in tumour-infiltrating myeloid cells. Ligation of Mincle by SAP130 promoted oncogenesis, whereas deletion of Mincle protected against oncogenesis and phenocopied the immunogenic reprogramming of the tumour microenvironment that was induced by RIP3 deletion. Cellular depletion suggested that whereas inhibitory macrophages promote tumorigenesis in PDA, they lose their immune-suppressive effects when RIP3 or Mincle is deleted. Accordingly, T cells

  4. Sphingoid bases inhibit acid-induced demineralization of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Valentijn-Benz, Marianne; van 't Hof, Wim; Bikker, Floris J; Nazmi, Kamran; Brand, Henk S; Sotres, Javier; Lindh, Liselott; Arnebrant, Thomas; Veerman, Enno C I

    2015-01-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite (HAp), the main constituent of dental enamel, is inherently susceptible to the etching and dissolving action of acids, resulting in tooth decay such as dental caries and dental erosion. Since the prevalence of erosive wear is gradually increasing, there is urgent need for agents that protect the enamel against erosive attacks. In the present study we studied in vitro the anti-erosive effects of a number of sphingolipids and sphingoid bases, which form the backbone of sphingolipids. Pretreatment of HAp discs with sphingosine, phytosphingosine (PHS), PHS phosphate and sphinganine significantly protected these against acid-induced demineralization by 80 ± 17%, 78 ± 17%, 78 ± 7% and 81 ± 8%, respectively (p < 0.001). On the other hand, sphingomyelin, acetyl PHS, octanoyl PHS and stearoyl PHS had no anti-erosive effects. Atomic force measurement revealed that HAp discs treated with PHS were almost completely and homogeneously covered by patches of PHS. This suggests that PHS and other sphingoid bases form layers on the surface of HAp, which act as diffusion barriers against H(+) ions. In principle, these anti-erosive properties make PHS and related sphingosines promising and attractive candidates as ingredients in oral care products. PMID:25300299

  5. Fumonisin- and AAL-Toxin-Induced Disruption of Sphingolipid Metabolism with Accumulation of Free Sphingoid Bases.

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, H. K.; Tanaka, T.; Duke, S. O.; Porter, J. K.; Wray, E. M.; Hodges, L.; Sessions, A. E.; Wang, E.; Merrill, A. H.; Riley, R. T.

    1994-01-01

    Fumonisins (FB) and AAL-toxin are sphingoid-like compounds produced by several species of fungi associated with plant diseases. In animal cells, both fumonisins produced by Fusarium moniliforme and AAL-toxin produced by Alternaria alternata f. sp. lycopersici inhibit ceramide synthesis, an early biochemical event in the animal diseases associated with consumption of F. moniliforme-contaminated corn. In duckweed (Lemna pausicostata Heglem. 6746), tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill), and tobacco callus (Nicotiana tabacum cv Wisconsin), pure FB1 or AAL-toxin caused a marked elevation of phytosphingosine and sphinganine, sphingoid bases normally present in low concentrations. The relative increases were quite different in the three plant systems. Nonetheless, disruption of sphingolipid metabolism was clearly a common feature in plants exposed to FB1 or AAL-toxin. Resistant varieties of tomato (Asc/Asc) were much less sensitive to toxin-induced increases in free sphinganine. Because free sphingoid bases are precursors to plant "ceramides," their accumulation suggests that the primary biochemical lesion is inhibition of de novo ceramide synthesis and reacylation of free sphingoid bases. Thus, in plants the disease symptoms associated with A. alternata and F. moniliforme infection may be due to disruption of sphingolipid metabolism. PMID:12232389

  6. Oral mucosal lipids are antibacterial against Porphyromonas gingivalis, induce ultrastructural damage, and alter bacterial lipid and protein compositions

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Carol L; Walters, Katherine S; Drake, David R; Dawson, Deborah V; Blanchette, Derek R; Brogden, Kim A; Wertz, Philip W

    2013-01-01

    Oral mucosal and salivary lipids exhibit potent antimicrobial activity for a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria; however, little is known about their spectrum of antimicrobial activity or mechanisms of action against oral bacteria. In this study, we examine the activity of two fatty acids and three sphingoid bases against Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important colonizer of the oral cavity implicated in periodontitis. Minimal inhibitory concentrations, minimal bactericidal concentrations, and kill kinetics revealed variable, but potent, activity of oral mucosal and salivary lipids against P. gingivalis, indicating that lipid structure may be an important determinant in lipid mechanisms of activity against bacteria, although specific components of bacterial membranes are also likely important. Electron micrographs showed ultrastructural damage induced by sapienic acid and phytosphingosine and confirmed disruption of the bacterial plasma membrane. This information, coupled with the association of treatment lipids with P. gingivalis lipids revealed via thin layer chromatography, suggests that the plasma membrane is a likely target of lipid antibacterial activity. Utilizing a combination of two-dimensional in-gel electrophoresis and Western blot followed by mass spectroscopy and N-terminus degradation sequencing we also show that treatment with sapienic acid induces upregulation of a set of proteins comprising a unique P. gingivalis stress response, including proteins important in fatty acid biosynthesis, metabolism and energy production, protein processing, cell adhesion and virulence. Prophylactic or therapeutic lipid treatments may be beneficial for intervention of infection by supplementing the natural immune function of endogenous lipids on mucosal surfaces. PMID:23867843

  7. The necroptosis-inducing kinase RIPK3 dampens adipose tissue inflammation and glucose intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Gautheron, Jérémie; Vucur, Mihael; Schneider, Anne T.; Severi, Ilenia; Roderburg, Christoph; Roy, Sanchari; Bartneck, Matthias; Schrammen, Peter; Diaz, Mauricio Berriel; Ehling, Josef; Gremse, Felix; Heymann, Felix; Koppe, Christiane; Lammers, Twan; Kiessling, Fabian; Van Best, Niels; Pabst, Oliver; Courtois, Gilles; Linkermann, Andreas; Krautwald, Stefan; Neumann, Ulf P.; Tacke, Frank; Trautwein, Christian; Green, Douglas R.; Longerich, Thomas; Frey, Norbert; Luedde, Mark; Bluher, Matthias; Herzig, Stephan; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Luedde, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3) mediates necroptosis, a form of programmed cell death that promotes inflammation in various pathological conditions, suggesting that it might be a privileged pharmacological target. However, its function in glucose homeostasis and obesity has been unknown. Here we show that RIPK3 is over expressed in the white adipose tissue (WAT) of obese mice fed with a choline-deficient high-fat diet. Genetic inactivation of Ripk3 promotes increased Caspase-8-dependent adipocyte apoptosis and WAT inflammation, associated with impaired insulin signalling in WAT as the basis for glucose intolerance. Similarly to mice, in visceral WAT of obese humans, RIPK3 is overexpressed and correlates with the body mass index and metabolic serum markers. Together, these findings provide evidence that RIPK3 in WAT maintains tissue homeostasis and suppresses inflammation and adipocyte apoptosis, suggesting that systemic targeting of necroptosis might be associated with the risk of promoting insulin resistance in obese patients. PMID:27323669

  8. The necroptosis-inducing kinase RIPK3 dampens adipose tissue inflammation and glucose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Gautheron, Jérémie; Vucur, Mihael; Schneider, Anne T; Severi, Ilenia; Roderburg, Christoph; Roy, Sanchari; Bartneck, Matthias; Schrammen, Peter; Diaz, Mauricio Berriel; Ehling, Josef; Gremse, Felix; Heymann, Felix; Koppe, Christiane; Lammers, Twan; Kiessling, Fabian; Van Best, Niels; Pabst, Oliver; Courtois, Gilles; Linkermann, Andreas; Krautwald, Stefan; Neumann, Ulf P; Tacke, Frank; Trautwein, Christian; Green, Douglas R; Longerich, Thomas; Frey, Norbert; Luedde, Mark; Bluher, Matthias; Herzig, Stephan; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Luedde, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3) mediates necroptosis, a form of programmed cell death that promotes inflammation in various pathological conditions, suggesting that it might be a privileged pharmacological target. However, its function in glucose homeostasis and obesity has been unknown. Here we show that RIPK3 is over expressed in the white adipose tissue (WAT) of obese mice fed with a choline-deficient high-fat diet. Genetic inactivation of Ripk3 promotes increased Caspase-8-dependent adipocyte apoptosis and WAT inflammation, associated with impaired insulin signalling in WAT as the basis for glucose intolerance. Similarly to mice, in visceral WAT of obese humans, RIPK3 is overexpressed and correlates with the body mass index and metabolic serum markers. Together, these findings provide evidence that RIPK3 in WAT maintains tissue homeostasis and suppresses inflammation and adipocyte apoptosis, suggesting that systemic targeting of necroptosis might be associated with the risk of promoting insulin resistance in obese patients. PMID:27323669

  9. Induced Abortion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Induced Abortion Patient Education FAQs Induced Abortion Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Induced Abortion FAQ043, May 2015 PDF Format Induced ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  10. TRANSCRIPTIONAL ANALYSIS OF THE REPONSE OF NEUROSPORA CRASSA TO PHYTOSHINGOSINE REVEALS LINKS TO MITOCHRONDRIAL FUNCTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Treatment of Neurospora crassa cells with phytosphingosine (PHS) induces programmed cell death (PCD) by an unknown mechanism. To determine the relationship between treatment with PHS and PCD, we determined changes in global gene expression levels in N. crassa during a time course of PHS treatment. M...

  11. Sphingolipids are potential heat stress signals in Saccharomyces.

    PubMed

    Dickson, R C; Nagiec, E E; Skrzypek, M; Tillman, P; Wells, G B; Lester, R L

    1997-11-28

    The ability of organisms to quickly respond to stresses requires the activation of many intracellular signal transduction pathways. The sphingolipid intermediate ceramide is thought to be particularly important for activating and coordinating signaling pathways during mammalian stress responses. Here we present the first evidence that ceramide and other sphingolipid intermediates are signaling molecules in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae heat stress response. Our data show a 2-3-fold transient increase in the concentration of C18-dihydrosphingosine and C18-phytosphingosine, more than a 100-fold transient increase in C20-dihydrosphingosine and C20-phytosphingosine, and a more stable 2-fold increase in ceramide containing C18-phytosphingosine and a 5-fold increase in ceramide containing C20-phytosphingosine following heat stress. Treatment of cells with dihydrosphingosine activates transcription of the TPS2 gene encoding a subunit of trehalose synthase and causes trehalose, a known thermoprotectant, to accumulate. Dihydrosphingosine induces expression of a STRE-LacZ reporter gene, showing that the global stress response element, STRE, found in many yeast promoter sequences can be activated by sphingolipid signals. The TPS2 promoter contains four STREs that may mediate dihydrosphingosine responsiveness. Using genetic and other approaches it should be possible to identify sphingolipid signaling pathways in S. cerevisiae and quantify the importance of each during heat stress. PMID:9374502

  12. p-Cresol mediates autophagic cell death in renal proximal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsin-Hung; Huang, Chiu-Ching; Lin, Tze-Yi; Lin, Ching-Yuang

    2015-04-01

    Higher serum level of p-cresol (PC) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients has been linked with CKD progression. The toxic effect of PC on diverse cells has been reported by prior studies, except for renal tubular cells. Both autophagy and apoptosis contribute to renal tubular cell death, yet evidence of its response to PC is limited and their crosstalk is still unclear. Autophagy is an important cellular process involved in toxin-induced cell death. Renal tubular cell death in tubular injury is thought to be one of the key events causing the progression of CKD. Thus, we treated rat (NRK-52E) and human (HRPTEC) renal proximal tubular cells (RPTC) with PC and found the cell proliferation was significantly decreased. Cell apoptosis was significantly increased and accompanied with the activation of autophagy as evidenced by increases in LC3-II, beclin 1 and Atg 4. We also found an increase of p62 by c-Jun activation. p62 accumulation could mediate the activation of caspase 8-dependent cell apoptosis. Conversely, knockdown of p62 by siRNA of p62 had the opposite effect by arresting LC3-II accumulation and promoting increasing cell viability. We conclude that PC triggered autophagic RPTC death via JNK-mediated p62 accumulation and then activated caspase 8-dependent cell death pathway. PC can be considered as one of the key events causing progression of CKD, which might affect drug disposition in CKD cases. PMID:25668154

  13. Inducing labor

    MedlinePlus

    ... surrounds your baby in the womb. It contains membranes or layers of tissue. One method of inducing ... break the bag of waters" or rupture the membranes. Your health care provider will do a pelvic ...

  14. Dominant negative FADD dissipates the proapoptotic signalosome of the unfolded protein response in diabetic embryopathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Weng, Hongbo; Quon, Michael J; Yu, Jingwen; Wang, Jian-Ying; Hueber, Anne-Odile; Yang, Peixin

    2015-11-15

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and caspase 8-dependent apoptosis are two interlinked causal events in maternal diabetes-induced neural tube defects (NTDs). The inositol-requiring enzyme 1α (IRE1α) signalosome mediates the proapoptotic effect of ER stress. Diabetes increases tumor necrosis factor receptor type 1R-associated death domain (TRADD) expression. Here, we revealed two new unfolded protein response (UPR) regulators, TRADD and Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD). TRADD interacted with both the IRE1α-TRAF2-ASK1 complex and FADD. In vivo overexpression of a FADD dominant negative (FADD-DN) mutant lacking the death effector domain disrupted diabetes-induced IRE1α signalosome and suppressed ER stress and caspase 8-dependent apoptosis, leading to NTD prevention. FADD-DN abrogated ER stress markers and blocked the JNK1/2-ASK1 pathway. Diabetes-induced mitochondrial translocation of proapoptotic Bcl-2 members mitochondrial dysfunction and caspase cleavage were also alleviated by FADD-DN. In vitro TRADD overexpression triggered UPR and ER stress before manifestation of caspase 3 and caspase 8 cleavage and apoptosis. FADD-DN overexpression repressed high glucose- or TRADD overexpression-induced IRE1α phosphorylation, its downstream proapoptotic kinase activation and endonuclease activities, and apoptosis. FADD-DN also attenuated tunicamycin-induced UPR and ER stress. These findings suggest that TRADD participates in the IRE1α signalosome and induces UPR and ER stress and that the association between TRADD and FADD is essential for diabetes- or high glucose-induced UPR and ER stress. PMID:26419589

  15. Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions & Treatments ▸ Conditions Dictionary ▸ Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Share | Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB) « Back to A to Z Listing Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction, (EIB), often known as exercise-induced ...

  16. Genotoxic and cytostatic effects of 6-pentadecyl salicylic anacardic acid in transformed cell lines and peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Alam-Escamilla, David; Estrada-Muñiz, Elizabet; Solís-Villegas, Erik; Elizondo, Guillermo; Vega, Libia

    2015-01-01

    In Mexico, as in many other countries, traditional medicine is used for the treatment of several diseases. In particular, Amphipterygium adstringens infusion is used for gastritis, gastric ulcers, and gastric cancer. Extracts from this tree have microbicidal effects against Helicobacter pylori, an important risk factor for gastric cancer development. Anacardic acids are constituents of A. adstringens, and 6-pentadecyl salicylic acid (6-PSA) is the most abundant. However, there is a lack of information regarding the effects of 6-PSA on cancer cells. Therefore, we investigated whether 6-PSA has differential effects on the induction of genotoxicity, cytostaticity, and apoptosis in normal human peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMCs), bone marrow polychromatic erythrocytes of Balb/c mice, and human transformed cell lines derived from both gastric cancer (AGS cells) and leukaemia (K562 cells). Treatment with 6-PSA (30-150 μM) reduced the viability of AGS and K562 cells together with a moderate, but significant, increase in the frequency of micronucleated cells and the induction of DNA breakage (Comet Assay). Moreover, 6-PSA increased the apoptosis rate in both the AGS and K562 cell lines in a caspase 8-dependent manner. In contrast, neither cytotoxicity nor genotoxicity were observed in PBMCs or bone marrow polychromatic erythrocytes of Balb/c mice after treatment with low doses of 6-PSA (0.2-2.0 mg/Kg). Instead, 6-PSA treatment resulted in the inhibition of PBMC proliferation, which was reversible after the compound was removed. Additionally, 6-PSA treatments (2-20 mg/Kg) increased the frequency of mature polychromatic erythrocytes in the bone marrow, suggesting a possible effect on the differentiation process of immune cells. The present results indicate that 6-PSA induces cytotoxicity and moderate genotoxicity, together with an increase in the apoptosis rate, in a caspase 8-dependent manner in gastric cancer cells. In contrast, a low toxicity was observed when

  17. Drug-induced hypoglycemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000310.htm Drug-induced hypoglycemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Drug-induced hypoglycemia is low blood sugar that results from medication. ...

  18. Flow-induced vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Blevins, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    This book reports on dimensional analysis; ideal fluid models; vortex-induced vibration; galloping and flutter; instability of tube and cylinder arrays; vibrations induced by oscillating flow; vibration induced by turbulence and sound; damping of structures; sound induced by vortex shedding; vibrations of a pipe containing a fluid flow; indices. It covers the analysis of the vibrations of structures exposed to fluid flows; explores applications for offshore platforms and piping; wind-induced vibration of buildings, bridges, and towers; and acoustic and mechanical vibration of heat exchangers, power lines, and process ducting.

  19. Cavitation-resistant inducer

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Charlton; Subbaraman, Maria R.

    1989-01-01

    An improvement in an inducer for a pump wherein the inducer includes a hub, a plurality of radially extending substantially helical blades and a wall member extending about and encompassing an outer periphery of the blades. The improvement comprises forming adjacent pairs of blades and the hub to provide a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow area which cross-sectional flow area decreases from the inlet end of the inducer to a discharge end of the inducer, resulting in increased inducer efficiency improved suction performance, reduced susceptibility to cavitation, reduced susceptibility to hub separation and reduced fabrication costs.

  20. Cavitation-resistant inducer

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, C.; Subbaraman, M.R.

    1989-06-13

    An improvement in an inducer for a pump is disclosed wherein the inducer includes a hub, a plurality of radially extending substantially helical blades and a wall member extending about and encompassing an outer periphery of the blades. The improvement comprises forming adjacent pairs of blades and the hub to provide a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow area which cross-sectional flow area decreases from the inlet end of the inducer to a discharge end of the inducer, resulting in increased inducer efficiency improved suction performance, reduced susceptibility to cavitation, reduced susceptibility to hub separation and reduced fabrication costs. 11 figs.

  1. Induced pluripotency with endogenous and inducible genes

    SciTech Connect

    Duinsbergen, Dirk; Eriksson, Malin; Hoen, Peter A.C. 't; Frisen, Jonas; Mikkers, Harald

    2008-10-15

    The recent discovery that two partly overlapping sets of four genes induce nuclear reprogramming of mouse and even human cells has opened up new possibilities for cell replacement therapies. Although the combination of genes that induce pluripotency differs to some extent, Oct4 and Sox2 appear to be a prerequisite. The introduction of four genes, several of which been linked with cancer, using retroviral approaches is however unlikely to be suitable for future clinical applications. Towards developing a safer reprogramming protocol, we investigated whether cell types that express one of the most critical reprogramming genes endogenously are predisposed to reprogramming. We show here that three of the original four pluripotency transcription factors (Oct4, Klf4 and c-Myc or MYCER{sup TAM}) induced reprogramming of mouse neural stem (NS) cells exploiting endogenous SoxB1 protein levels in these cells. The reprogrammed neural stem cells differentiated into cells of each germ layer in vitro and in vivo, and contributed to mouse development in vivo. Thus a combinatorial approach taking advantage of endogenously expressed genes and inducible transgenes may contribute to the development of improved reprogramming protocols.

  2. Fungicidal activity of truncated analogues of dihydrosphingosine.

    PubMed

    Thevissen, Karin; Hillaert, Ulrik; Meert, Els M K; Chow, Kuen K; Cammue, Bruno P A; Van Calenbergh, Serge; François, Isabelle E J A

    2008-07-01

    The minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC) of dihydrosphingosine (DHS), phytosphingosine (PHS), and five short-chain DHS derivatives was determined for Candida albicans and Candida glabrata. In this respect, a C15- and a C17-homologue of DHS showed a 2- to 10-fold decreased MFC as compared to native DHS (i.e. C18-DHS). DHS derivatives that were active, that is, comprising 12, 15, 17, or 18 carbon atoms, induced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in C. albicans. PMID:18524581

  3. Space Station Induced Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James F. (Editor); Torr, Marsha R. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    This report contains the results of a conference convened May 10-11, 1988, to review plans for monitoring the Space Station induced environment, to recommend primary components of an induced environment monitoring package, and to make recommendations pertaining to suggested modifications of the Space Station External Contamination Control Requirements Document JSC 30426. The contents of this report are divided as Follows: Monitoring Induced Environment - Space Station Work Packages Requirements, Neutral Environment, Photon Emission Environment, Particulate Environment, Surface Deposition/Contamination; and Contamination Control Requirements.

  4. Mania Induced by Opipramol

    PubMed Central

    Firoz, Kazhungil; Khaleel, Asfia; Rajmohan, V; Kumar, Manoj; Raghuram, TM

    2015-01-01

    Antidepressants have propensity to induce manic switch in patients with bipolar disorder. Opipramol is an atypical anxiolytic and antidepressant drug which predominantly acts on sigma receptors. Although structurally resembles tricyclic antidepressant imipramine it does not have inhibitory action on the reuptake of norepinephrine/serotonin and hence it is not presumed to cause manic switch in bipolar depression. Here, we describe a case of mania induced by opipramol, in a patient with bipolar affective disorder who was treated for moderate depressive episode with lithium and opipramol and we discuss neurochemical hypothesis of opipramol-induced mania. PMID:25722522

  5. Mania induced by opipramol.

    PubMed

    Firoz, Kazhungil; Khaleel, Asfia; Rajmohan, V; Kumar, Manoj; Raghuram, Tm

    2015-01-01

    Antidepressants have propensity to induce manic switch in patients with bipolar disorder. Opipramol is an atypical anxiolytic and antidepressant drug which predominantly acts on sigma receptors. Although structurally resembles tricyclic antidepressant imipramine it does not have inhibitory action on the reuptake of norepinephrine/serotonin and hence it is not presumed to cause manic switch in bipolar depression. Here, we describe a case of mania induced by opipramol, in a patient with bipolar affective disorder who was treated for moderate depressive episode with lithium and opipramol and we discuss neurochemical hypothesis of opipramol-induced mania. PMID:25722522

  6. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Noise-Induced Hearing Loss On this page: What is noise-induced hearing ... additional information about NIHL? What is noise-induced hearing loss? Every day, we experience sound in our environment, ...

  7. Vitiligo, drug induced (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this person's face have resulted from drug-induced vitiligo. Loss of melanin, the primary skin pigment, occasionally ... is the case with this individual. The typical vitiligo lesion is flat (macular) and depigmented, but maintains ...

  8. Drug-induced hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... induced hepatitis. Painkillers and fever reducers that contain acetaminophen are a common cause of liver inflammation. These ... problem. However, if you took high doses of acetaminophen , treatment should be started as soon as possible ...

  9. Gasoline-induced mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.L.; Swanson, B.Z. Jr.; Lutins, N.D.

    1980-02-01

    Gasoline-induced mucositis may become more common because of fuel shortages or increased fuel cost. Dentists should, therefore, consider this oral irritant in the differential diagnosis of oral lesions.

  10. Thrombocytopenia - drug induced

    MedlinePlus

    ... and a seizure medicine called valproic acid may lead to this problem. Other medicines that cause drug-induced thrombocytopenia include: Furosemide Gold, used to treat arthritis Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ( ...

  11. Drug-induced hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Toxic hepatitis ... to get liver damage. Some drugs can cause hepatitis with small doses, even if the liver breakdown ... liver. Many different drugs can cause drug-induced hepatitis. Painkillers and fever reducers that contain acetaminophen are ...

  12. Exercise-induced asthma

    MedlinePlus

    Wheezing - exercise-induced; Reactive airway disease - exercise ... Having asthma symptoms when you exercise does not mean you cannot or should not exercise. But be aware of your EIA triggers. Cold or dry air may ...

  13. Drug-induced nightmares.

    PubMed

    2000-12-01

    (1) A wide variety of drugs have been implicated in nightmares, often on inadequate evidence. (2) Recurrent nightmares can be induced by many drugs, and not only agents with psychotropic or neurological effects. PMID:11475499

  14. Vitiligo, drug induced (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... drug-induced vitiligo. Loss of melanin, the primary skin pigment, occasionally occurs as a result of medications, as is the case with this individual. The typical vitiligo lesion is flat (macular) and depigmented, but maintains the normal skin texture.

  15. Ethionamide-induced Pellagra.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Yashashree; Shah, Ira

    2015-08-01

    Pellagra is a disorder characterized by dermatitis, diarrhea, dementia and eventually death, resulting from a deficiency of niacin or its precursor tryptophan. Ethionamide (a second-line antituberculosis agent)-induced pellagra is rarely encountered in clinical practice. Prompt diagnosis and treatment with nicotinamide can prevent life-threatening complications. To date, only three cases have been reported. We report a 13-year-old girl presenting with ethionamide-induced pellagra that resolved after the administration of niacin. PMID:25828829

  16. Isoniazid-induced alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, K. B.; Kumar, V.; Vishvkarma, S.; Shandily, R.

    2011-01-01

    Isoniazid is a safe and very effective antituberculosis drug. Antimitotic agents routinely cause alopecia. Drug-induced alopecia is usually reversible upon withdrawal of the drug. Isoniazid, thiacetazone and ethionamide are the antituberculosis drugs which have been associated with alopecia. Isoniazid-induced alopecia was observed in one case and confirmed by the finding that hair growth resumed when drug removed from the regimen. PMID:21654989

  17. Induced polarization response of microbial induced sulfideprecipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Williams, Kenneth Hurst; Slater, Lee; Hubbard, Susan

    2004-06-04

    A laboratory scale experiment was conducted to examine the use of induced polarization and electrical conductivity to monitor microbial induced sulfide precipitation under anaerobic conditions in sand filled columns. Three columns were fabricated; one for electrical measurements, one for geochemical sampling and a third non-inoculated column was used as a control. A continual upward flow of nutrients and metals in solution was established in each column. Desulfovibrio vulgaris microbes were injected into the middle of the geochemical and electrical columns. Iron and zinc sulfides precipitated along a microbial action front as a result of sulfate reduction due by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. The precipitation front initially developed near the microbial injection location, and subsequently migrated towards the nutrient inlet, as a result of chemotaxis by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. Sampling during and subsequent to the experiment revealed spatiotemporal changes in the biogeochemical measurements associated with microbial sulfate reduction. Conductivity measurements were insensitive to all biogeochemical changes occurred within the column. Changes in the IP response (of up to 14 mrad)were observed to coincide in place and in time with the active microbe respiration/sulfide precipitation front as determined from geochemical sampling. The IP response is correlated with the lactate concentration gradient, an indirect measurement of microbial metabolism, suggesting the potential of IP as a method for monitoring microbial respiration/activity. Post experimental destructive sample analysis and SEM imaging verified the geochemical results and supported our hypothesis that microbe induced sulfide precipitation is directly detectable using electrical methods. Although the processes not fully understood, the IP response appears to be sensitive to this anaerobic microbial precipitation, suggesting a possible novel application for the IP method.

  18. Drug-induced panniculitides.

    PubMed

    Borroni, G; Torti, S; D'Ospina, R M; Pezzini, C

    2014-04-01

    A substantial number of all panniculitides fails to recognize a specific etiology, and that is true also for a relatively frequent type of panniculitis, such as erythema nodosum (EN). Between the recognized causative factors of panniculitides, infectious, physical agents, autoimmune mechanisms and neoplastic disorders are well known. On the contrary, the role of drugs as inducers of panniculitides is marginally considered, and their report limited to anecdotal observations, often without due histopathological support. Since the clinical and histopathological features of drug-induced panniculitides are indistinguishable from those caused by other agents, the causative relationship may be demonstrated by the history of previous drug intake and by clinical improvement after drug discontinuation. We reviewed the currently reported descriptions of drug-induced panniculitis, including a few exemplificative original observations. EN results as the most frequently reported drug-induced panniculitis. Among the causative drugs of EN a variety of medications, with disparate, or even opposite, mechanisms of action are reported, thus limiting the understanding of the pathogenesis. Common causative drugs include oral contraceptives, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiobiotics and leukotriene-modifying agents. Unfortunately, in several cases, the diagnosis of drug-induced EN is done on clinical findings alone. In those cases, the lack of histopathological support does not allow to define a precise clinicopathological correlation on etiologic grounds. Drug-induced lobular and mixed panniculitides, including eosinophilic panniculitis, are even more rarely described. Reported causative agents are glatiramer acetate, interferon beta and heparin (at sites of injections), and systemic steroids, tyrosine kinase inhibitors and BRAF with subcutaneous fat involvement at distance. In view of the recent introduction of new classes of drugs, attention should be paid to disclose their

  19. Radiation-induced gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Gautam; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-induced gliomas represent a relatively rare but well-characterized entity in the neuro-oncologic literature. Extensive retrospective cohort data in pediatric populations after therapeutic intracranial radiation show a clearly increased risk in glioma incidence that is both patient age- and radiation dose/volume-dependent. Data in adults are more limited but show heightened risk in certain groups exposed to radiation. In both populations, there is no evidence linking increased risk associated with routine exposure to diagnostic radiation. At the molecular level, recent studies have found distinct genetic differences between radiation-induced gliomas and their spontaneously-occurring counterparts. Clinically, there is understandable reluctance on the part of clinicians to re-treat patients due to concern for cumulative neurotoxicity. However, available data suggest that aggressive intervention can lead to improved outcomes in patients with radiation-induced gliomas. PMID:19831840

  20. Gravitationally induced quantum transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, A.; Paranjape, M. B.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we calculate the probability for resonantly inducing transitions in quantum states due to time-dependent gravitational perturbations. Contrary to common wisdom, the probability of inducing transitions is not infinitesimally small. We consider a system of ultracold neutrons, which are organized according to the energy levels of the Schrödinger equation in the presence of the Earth's gravitational field. Transitions between energy levels are induced by an oscillating driving force of frequency ω . The driving force is created by oscillating a macroscopic mass in the neighborhood of the system of neutrons. The neutron lifetime is approximately 880 sec while the probability of transitions increases as t2. Hence, the optimal strategy is to drive the system for two lifetimes. The transition amplitude then is of the order of 1.06 ×10-5, and hence with a million ultracold neutrons, one should be able to observe transitions.

  1. Crystalglobulin-Induced Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vinay; El Ters, Mireille; Kashani, Kianoush; Leung, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Crystalline nephropathy refers to renal parenchymal deposition of crystals leading to kidney damage. The most common forms of crystalline nephropathy encountered in renal pathology are nephrocalcinosis and oxalate nephropathy. Less frequent types include urate nephropathy, cystinosis, dihydroxyadeninuria, and drug-induced crystalline nephropathy (e.g., caused by indinavir or triamterene). Monoclonal proteins can also deposit in the kidney as crystals and cause tissue damage. This occurs in conditions such as light chain proximal tubulopathy, crystal-storing histiocytosis, and crystalglobulinemia. The latter is a rare complication of multiple myeloma that results from crystallization of monoclonal proteins in the systemic vasculature, leading to vascular injury, thrombosis, and occlusion. In this report, we describe a case of crystalglobulin-induced nephropathy and discuss its pathophysiology and the differential diagnosis of paraprotein-induced crystalline nephropathy. PMID:25190731

  2. The preclinical evaluation of TIC10/ONC201 as an anti-pancreatic cancer agent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangbo; Wang, Hong; Ran, Lin; Zhang, Zongli; Jiang, Runde

    2016-08-01

    Here we evaluated the potential anti-pancreatic cancer activity by TIC10/ONC201, a first-in-class small-molecule inducer of tumor necrosis (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). The in vitro results showed that TIC10 induced potent cytotoxic and cytostatic activities in several human pancreatic cancer cell lines (Panc-1, Mia-PaCa2, AsPC-1 or L3.6). TIC10 activated both extrinsic (TRAIL-caspase-8-dependent) and endogenous/mitochondrial (caspase-9-dependent) apoptosis pathways in the pancreatic cancer cells. Molecularly, we showed that TIC10 inhibited Akt-Erk activation, yet induced TRAIL expression in pancreatic cancer cells. Significantly, TIC10, at a relatively low concentration, sensitized gemcitabine-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis against pancreatic cancer cells. Further, TIC10 and gemcitabine synergistically inhibited Panc-1 xenograft growth in SCID mice. The combination treatment also significantly improved mice survival. In addition, Akt-Erk in-activation and TRAIL/cleaved-caspase-8 induction were observed in TIC10-treated Panc-1 xenografts. Together, the preclinical results of the study demonstrate the potent anti-pancreatic cancer activity by TIC10, or with gemcitabine. PMID:27233611

  3. Methacholine induced headache.

    PubMed Central

    Carratala, C.; Gea, J. G.; Aguar, M. C.; Grau, S.; Espadaler-Medina, J. M.; Broquetas, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    A lung function technician developed episodes of headache, probably related to the use of methacholine. The headache disappeared with breathing 100% oxygen. Cholinergic agents are known to induce headaches but the mechanism remains unclear. Vascular factors could be implicated. PMID:7660351

  4. Methacholine induced headache.

    PubMed

    Carratala, C; Gea, J G; Aguar, M C; Grau, S; Espadaler-Medina, J M; Broquetas, J M

    1995-03-01

    A lung function technician developed episodes of headache, probably related to the use of methacholine. The headache disappeared with breathing 100% oxygen. Cholinergic agents are known to induce headaches but the mechanism remains unclear. Vascular factors could be implicated. PMID:7660351

  5. DRUG INDUCED CHOLESTASIS

    PubMed Central

    Padda, Manmeet S.; Sanchez, Mayra; Akhtar, Abbasi J.; Boyer, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Recent progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms of bile formation and cholestasis have led to new insights into the pathogenesis of drug induced cholestasis. This review summarizes their variable clinical presentations, examines the, role of transport proteins in hepatic drug clearance and toxicity and addresses the increasing importance of genetic determinants, as well as practical aspects of diagnosis and management. PMID:21480339

  6. Does formaldehyde induce aneuploidy?

    PubMed

    Speit, Günter; Kühner, Stefanie; Linsenmeyer, Regina; Schütz, Petra

    2011-11-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) was tested for a potential aneugenic activity in mammalian cells. We employed tests to discriminate between aneugenic and clastogenic effects in accordance with international guidelines for genotoxicity testing. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus test (CBMNT) in combination with fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) with a pan-centromeric probe was performed with cultured human lymphocytes and the human A549 lung cell line. FA induced micronuclei (MN) in binuclear cells of both cell types under standard in vitro test conditions following the OECD guideline 487. FISH analysis revealed that the vast majority of induced MN were centromere negative, thus indicating a clastogenic effect. A similar result was obtained for MN induced by γ-irradiation, whereas the typical aneugens colcemid (COL) and vincristine (VCR) predominantly induced centromere-positive MN. Furthermore, COL and VCR clearly enhanced the MN frequency in mononuclear lymphocytes in the CBMNT, whereas such an effect was not observed for γ-irradiation and FA. In experiments with the Chinese hamster V79 cell line, the aneugens COL and VCR clearly increased the frequency of tetraploid second division metaphases, whereas FA did not cause such an effect. Altogether, our results confirm the clastogenicity of FA in cultured mammalian cells but exclude a significant aneugenic activity. PMID:21804075

  7. Ethionamide-induced gynecomastia

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Ramakant; George, Jacob; Sharma, Arun K.; chhabra, Naveen; Jangir, Suresh K.; Mishra, Vikas

    2012-01-01

    Gynecomastia is very rare during antituberculosis chemotherapy. We describe a 38-year-old male patient who developed a painful gynecomastia following second-line drug therapy for multidrug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis. Gynecomastia disappeared after stopping the ethionamide. A published literature on antituberculosis-induced gynecomastia is also briefly discussed. PMID:22629101

  8. Irradiation-Induced Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Birtcher, R.C.; Ewing, R.C.; Matzke, Hj.; Meldrum, A.; Newcomer, P.P.; Wang, L.M.; Wang, S.X.; Weber, W.J.

    1999-08-09

    This paper summarizes the results of the studies of the irradiation-induced formation of nanostructures, where the injected interstitials from the source of irradiation are not major components of the nanophase. This phenomena has been observed by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in a number of intermetallic compounds and ceramics during high-energy electron or ion irradiations when the ions completely penetrate through the specimen. Beginning with single crystals, electron or ion irradiation in a certain temperature range may result in nanostructures composed of amorphous domains and nanocrystals with either the original composition and crystal structure or new nanophases formed by decomposition of the target material. The phenomenon has also been observed in natural materials which have suffered irradiation from the decay of constituent radioactive elements and in nuclear reactor fuels which have been irradiated by fission neutrons and other fission products. The mechanisms involved in the process of this nanophase formation are discussed in terms of the evolution of displacement cascades, radiation-induced defect accumulation, radiation-induced segregation and phase decomposition, as well as the competition between irradiation-induced amorphization and recrystallization.

  9. Shrouded inducer pump

    DOEpatents

    Meng, Sen Y.

    1989-01-01

    An improvement in a pump including a shrouded inducer, the improvement comprising first and second sealing means 32,36 which cooperate with a first vortex cell 38 and a series of secondary vortex cells 40 to remove any tangential velocity components from the recirculation flow.

  10. Effects of Induced Astigmatism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, Delwyn G.; Walton, Howard N.

    1968-01-01

    The relationship of astigmatism to reading and the possible detrimental effects it might have on reading were investigated. The greatest incidence of astigmatism was for the with-the-rule type ranging from .50 to 1.00 diopter. This type of astigmatism was induced in 35 seniors from the Los Angeles College of Optometry by placing cylindrical lenses…

  11. Bacteriocin Inducer Peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel peptides produced by bacteriocin-producing bacteria stimulate the production of bacteriocins in vitro. The producer bacteria are cultured in the presence of a novel inducer bacteria and a peptide having a carboxy terminal sequence of VKGLT in order to achieve an increase in bacteriocin produc...

  12. Schedule-Induced Stereotypy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Eric; Howard, Denise

    1992-01-01

    The phenomena of the induction and entrainment of adjunctive behaviors was investigated in 8 people (ages 5-51) with severe or profound mental retardation who exhibited stereotypic behaviors. Seven of the eight demonstrated evidence of schedule-induced stereotypic behavior, whereas five also showed evidence of the entrainment of these behaviors by…

  13. Geomagnetism and Induced Voltage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul-Razzaq, W.; Biller, R. D.

    2010-01-01

    Introductory physics laboratories have seen an influx of "conceptual integrated science" over time in their classrooms with elements of other sciences such as chemistry, biology, Earth science, and astronomy. We describe a laboratory to introduce this development, as it attracts attention to the voltage induced in the human brain as it is…

  14. Drug-induced hyperkalemia.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Chaker; Badreddine, Atef; Fathallah, Neila; Slim, Raoudha; Hmouda, Houssem

    2014-09-01

    Hyperkalemia is a common clinical condition that can be defined as a serum potassium concentration exceeding 5.0 mmol/L. Drug-induced hyperkalemia is the most important cause of increased potassium levels in everyday clinical practice. Drug-induced hyperkalemia may be asymptomatic. However, it may be dramatic and life threatening, posing diagnostic and management problems. A wide range of drugs can cause hyperkalemia by a variety of mechanisms. Drugs can interfere with potassium homoeostasis either by promoting transcellular potassium shift or by impairing renal potassium excretion. Drugs may also increase potassium supply. The reduction in renal potassium excretion due to inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system represents the most important mechanism by which drugs are known to cause hyperkalemia. Medications that alter transmembrane potassium movement include amino acids, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, suxamethonium, and mannitol. Drugs that impair renal potassium excretion are mainly represented by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-II receptor blockers, direct renin inhibitors, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, calcineurin inhibitors, heparin and derivatives, aldosterone antagonists, potassium-sparing diuretics, trimethoprim, and pentamidine. Potassium-containing agents represent another group of medications causing hyperkalemia. Increased awareness of drugs that can induce hyperkalemia, and monitoring and prevention are key elements for reducing the number of hospital admissions, morbidity, and mortality related to drug-induced hyperkalemia. PMID:25047526

  15. Injection-induced earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, William L

    2013-07-12

    Earthquakes in unusual locations have become an important topic of discussion in both North America and Europe, owing to the concern that industrial activity could cause damaging earthquakes. It has long been understood that earthquakes can be induced by impoundment of reservoirs, surface and underground mining, withdrawal of fluids and gas from the subsurface, and injection of fluids into underground formations. Injection-induced earthquakes have, in particular, become a focus of discussion as the application of hydraulic fracturing to tight shale formations is enabling the production of oil and gas from previously unproductive formations. Earthquakes can be induced as part of the process to stimulate the production from tight shale formations, or by disposal of wastewater associated with stimulation and production. Here, I review recent seismic activity that may be associated with industrial activity, with a focus on the disposal of wastewater by injection in deep wells; assess the scientific understanding of induced earthquakes; and discuss the key scientific challenges to be met for assessing this hazard. PMID:23846903

  16. Antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects of proteasome inhibitors and their combination with histone deacetylase inhibitors on leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Ota; Provaznikova, Dana; Marinov, Iuri; Kuzelova, Katerina; Spicka, Ivan

    2009-03-01

    New chemotherapeutic agents are still required to further optimise treatment of leukemia patients. Proteasome inhibition by bortezomib, PR-171 (carfilzomib) and NPI-0052 (salinosporamide A) has been successfully used for the treatment of multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma and is considered also as novel treatment strategy in leukemia. Combination of proteasome inhibitors bortezomib and NPI-0052 induces synergistic anti-multiple myeloma activity both in vitro using multiple myeloma cells and in vivo in a human plasmacytoma xenograft mouse model. Cell death resulting from proteasome inhibition requires caspase activation and increased levels of reactive oxygen species. While bortezomib induces several caspases, NPI-0052 activates predominantly caspase-8-dependent pathway. We studied the effect of bortezomib (10 nM) on DNA synthesis and apoptosis in human acute myeloid cell lines KASUMI-1, ML-1, ML-2 and CTV-1 cells. Bortezomib was potent inhibitor of DNA synthesis in all four types of leukemia cells and induced apoptosis in KASUMI-1, ML-2 and CTV-1 cells but not in ML-1 cells. Other research groups showed that histone deacetylase inhibitors (valproic acid or benzamide derivative MS-275) in combination with NPI-0052 or PR-171 induced greater levels of acute leukemia cell death than in combination with bortezomib. Proteasome inhibition as monotherapy and its combination with many conventional therapies as novel treatment strategies in leukemia are promising. Malignant cells are more sensitive to this treatment than normal hematopoietic cells. PMID:19275578

  17. Exercise-induced purpura.

    PubMed

    Ramelet, Albert-Adrien

    2004-01-01

    Exercise-induced purpura (EIP) occurs on the lower legs after unusual or major muscular activity, as in marathon runners or as after long walks, especially in the mountains in hot weather. In leisure walkers, patients are otherwise healthy females. There is no relation with chronic venous disorder. Erythematous, urticarial or purpuric plaques arise on the lower leg, usually sparing the skin compressed by socks. Symptoms include itch, pain and a burning sensation. Histopathology demonstrates leukocytoclastic vasculitis. The lesions fade after some days, with frequent relapses at further muscular exercises and may be prevented in some cases by compression, intake of venoactive drugs and local application of steroids. EIP is not uncommon, even if very few descriptions have yet been published. It appears to be consecutive to venous stasis induced by an acute failure of the muscle pump of the calf and thermoregulation decompensation, after a prolonged and unusual exercise, such as running or walking in hot weather. PMID:15178910

  18. Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    McCluskey, James; Bourgeois, Marie; Harbison, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity is a persistent allergic contact dermatitides documented in floral workers exposed to Alstroemeria and its cultivars.[1] The causative allergen is tulipalin A, a toxic glycoside named for the tulip bulbs from which it was first isolated.[2] The condition is characterized by fissured acropulpitis, often accompanied by hyperpigmentation, onychorrhexis, and paronychia. More of the volar surface may be affected in sensitized florists. Dermatitis and paronychia are extremely common conditions and diagnostic errors may occur. A thorough patient history, in conjunction with confirmatory patch testing with a bulb sliver and tuliposide A exposure, can prevent misdiagnosis. We report a case of Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity misdiagnosed as an unresolved tinea manuum infection in a patient evaluated for occupational exposure. PMID:25024947

  19. Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, James; Bourgeois, Marie; Harbison, Raymond

    2014-04-01

    Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity is a persistent allergic contact dermatitides documented in floral workers exposed to Alstroemeria and its cultivars.[1] The causative allergen is tulipalin A, a toxic glycoside named for the tulip bulbs from which it was first isolated.[2] The condition is characterized by fissured acropulpitis, often accompanied by hyperpigmentation, onychorrhexis, and paronychia. More of the volar surface may be affected in sensitized florists. Dermatitis and paronychia are extremely common conditions and diagnostic errors may occur. A thorough patient history, in conjunction with confirmatory patch testing with a bulb sliver and tuliposide A exposure, can prevent misdiagnosis. We report a case of Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity misdiagnosed as an unresolved tinea manuum infection in a patient evaluated for occupational exposure. PMID:25024947

  20. Hypoxia-Inducible Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyung Min; Gerecht, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen is vital for the existence of all multicellular organisms, acting as a signaling molecule regulating cellular activities. Specifically, hypoxia, which occurs when the partial pressure of oxygen falls below 5%, plays a pivotal role during development, regeneration, and cancer. Here we report a novel hypoxia-inducible (HI) hydrogel composed of gelatin and ferulic acid that can form hydrogel networks via oxygen consumption in a laccase-mediated reaction. Oxygen levels and gradients within the hydrogels can be accurately controlled and precisely predicted. We demonstrate that HI hydrogels guide vascular morphogenesis in vitro via hypoxia-inducible factors activation of matrix metalloproteinases and promote rapid neovascularization from the host tissue during subcutaneous wound healing. The HI hydrogel is a new class of biomaterials that may prove useful in many applications, ranging from fundamental studies of developmental, regenerative and disease processes through the engineering of healthy and diseased tissue models towards the treatment of hypoxia-regulated disorders. PMID:24909742

  1. Sepsis-induced Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Bermejo, Francisco J; Ruiz-Bailen, Manuel; Gil-Cebrian, Julián; Huertos-Ranchal, María J

    2011-01-01

    Myocardial dysfunction is one of the main predictors of poor outcome in septic patients, with mortality rates next to 70%. During the sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction, both ventricles can dilate and diminish its ejection fraction, having less response to fluid resuscitation and catecholamines, but typically is assumed to be reversible within 7-10 days. In the last 30 years, It´s being subject of substantial research; however no explanation of its etiopathogenesis or effective treatment have been proved yet. The aim of this manuscript is to review on the most relevant aspects of the sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction, discuss its clinical presentation, pathophysiology, etiopathogenesis, diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies proposed in recent years. PMID:22758615

  2. Asthma induced by enkephalin.

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, R D; Bellamy, D; Pyke, D A

    1980-01-01

    A total of 291 diabetics were studied to see whether an asthmatic reaction was associated with facial flushing induced by chlorpropamide and alcohol. Of these patients, 191 reported facial flushing, of whom 12 reported breathlessness as well. Of these 12, five also described wheezing, and respiratory function tests showed them to have asthma. Three of these five patients underwent further tests, which showed that the asthmatic reaction could be prevented by giving disodium cromoglycate and the specific opiate antagonist naloxone. One patient developed wheezing when given an enkephalin analogue with opiate-like activity. Asthma induced by chlorpropamide and alcohol was concluded to be mediated by endogenous peptides with opiate-like activity such as enkephalin. PMID:7357255

  3. Drug-induced Photosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Zuba, Ewelina Bogumiła; Koronowska, Sandra; Osmola-Mańkowska, Agnieszka; Jenerowicz, Dorota

    2016-04-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is considered the main environmental physical hazard to the skin. It is responsible for photoaging, sunburns, carcinogenesis, and photodermatoses, including drug-induced photosensitivity. Drug-induced photosensitivity is an abnormal skin reaction either to sunlight or to artificial light. Drugs may be a cause of photoallergic, phototoxic, and photoaggravated dermatitis. There are numerous medications that can be implicated in these types of reactions. Recently, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have been shown to be a common cause of photosensitivity. As both systemic and topical medications may promote photosensitive reactions, it is important to take into consideration the potential risk of occurrence such reactions, especially in people chronically exposed to ultraviolet radiation. PMID:27149132

  4. Anesthetic-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Norred, Carol L

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this course is to update nurse anesthetists about anesthetic-induced anaphylaxis. This course discusses the pathophysiologic process of anaphylaxis with descriptions of the allergic immune response and the mediators and mechanisms of mast cell activation. The preoperative identification of patients at high risk and the assessment of potential anesthetic triggers of a hypersensitivity and/or allergic reaction are prudent strategies to minimize the risk of anaphylaxis. Other practices recommended for clinicians include suggestions for anesthetic management to decrease threat of an allergic response in high-risk patients. Furthermore, the identification of the severity grade of hypersensitivity reactions and the appropriate treatment of perioperative anaphylaxis is discussed. In addition, postoperative and follow-up interventions, including testing for patients who have had an anesthetic-induced hypersensitivity reaction, are considered. PMID:22586882

  5. Radiation-induced schwannomas

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, A.B.; Reichenthal, E.; Borohov, H.

    1989-06-01

    The histopathology and clinical course of three patients with schwannomas of the brain and high cervical cord after therapeutic irradiation for intracranial malignancy and for ringworm of the scalp are described. Earlier reports in the literature indicated that radiation of the scalp may induce tumors in the head and neck. It is therefore suggested that therapeutic irradiation in these instances was a causative factor in the genesis of these tumors.

  6. Levetiracetam-induced pancytopenia.

    PubMed

    Alzahrani, Talal; Kay, Dana; Alqahtani, Saeed A; Makke, Yamane; Lesky, Linda; Koubeissi, Mohamad Z

    2015-01-01

    Pancytopenia is a rare side effect of levetiracetam (LEV) that is associated with severe morbidity that requires hospitalization. Here, we report a patient with a right temporoparietal tumor who underwent a temporal craniotomy with resection of the mass and was started on LEV for seizure prophylaxis per the neurosurgery local protocol. The patient developed LEV-induced pancytopenia, which was successfully managed by discontinuation of this medication. Our report aims to increase awareness of this rare cause of pancytopenia among clinicians. PMID:26744695

  7. Radiation-induced osteochondromas

    SciTech Connect

    Libshitz, H.I.; Cohen, M.A.

    1982-03-01

    Radiation-induced osteochondromas, either single or multiple, occur more commonly than is generally recognized. The incidence following irradiation for childhood malignancy is approximately 12%. Any open epiphysis is vulnerable. Age at irradiation, time of appearance following therapy, dose and type of radiation, and clinical course in 14 cases are dicussed. Due to growth of the lesion and/or pain, 3 tumors were excised. None revealed malignant degeneration.

  8. [Induced autotetraploid grape mutants].

    PubMed

    Kuliev, V M

    2011-01-01

    The methods of experimental mitotic and meiotic polyploidy in grapes are represented in the article. Results of cytological, histo-anatomical, biomorphological researches of induced autotetraploids are shown. Genetic characteristics, parameters of generative organs, quantitative and structural genome changes were studied. Comparative quantitative changes in the content of chloroplast and mitochondrion DNAs and RNAs in diploids and autotetraploids were defined. Also are shown. The biology-economic evaluation of autotetraploids on comparison with the initial grape variety is represented. PMID:21774401

  9. Fluoroscopy-induced radionecrosis.

    PubMed

    Tchanque-Fossuo, Catherine N; Kamangar, Faranak; Ho, Baran; Chang, Shurong; Dahle, Sara E; Schulman, Joshua M; Isseroff, R Rivkah

    2016-01-01

    Complications from radiation exposure during fluoroscopic guidance of cardiac catheterization may occur. With repeated procedures, the risk for cutaneous injuries increases. Herein, we describe a 59-year-old man with extensive coronary artery disease, who had undergone multiple revascularization procedures and developed a non-healing ulcer on his left inferior scapula. The patient's medical history, physical exam findings, and histopathology gave clues to a case of radiation-induced dermatitis and necrosis. PMID:27617939

  10. Valproate Induced Hyperammonemic Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Muraleedharan, Anupama; Gangadhar, Reneega; Das, Soumitra

    2015-01-01

    Sodium valproate induced hyperammonaemic delirium with normal liver function tests is a relatively uncommon adverse effect. It may be mistaken for psychosis or worsening of mania leading to wrong diagnosis and improper management. Plasma ammonia levels should be monitored in all patients developing altered mental status after receiving valproate therapy. This is a case series of hyperammonaemic delirium due to valproate reported to the Department of Pharmacology from Department of Psychiatry over a period of one year. PMID:26816916

  11. Remotely induced atmospheric lasing

    SciTech Connect

    Sprangle, Phillip; Penano, Joseph; Gordon, Daniel; Hafizi, Bahman; Scully, Marlan

    2011-05-23

    We propose and analyze a remote atmospheric lasing configuration which utilizes a combination of an ultrashort pulse laser to form a plasma filament (seed electrons) by tunneling ionization and a heater pulse which thermalizes the seed electrons. Electrons collisionally excite nitrogen molecules and induce lasing in the ultraviolet. The lasing gain is sufficiently high to reach saturation within the length of the plasma filament. A remotely generated ultraviolet source may have applications for standoff detection of biological and chemical agents.

  12. Polarization induced doped transistor

    DOEpatents

    Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep; Nomoto, Kazuki; Song, Bo; Zhu, Mingda; Hu, Zongyang

    2016-06-07

    A nitride-based field effect transistor (FET) comprises a compositionally graded and polarization induced doped p-layer underlying at least one gate contact and a compositionally graded and doped n-channel underlying a source contact. The n-channel is converted from the p-layer to the n-channel by ion implantation, a buffer underlies the doped p-layer and the n-channel, and a drain underlies the buffer.

  13. Ethanol-induced analgesia

    SciTech Connect

    Pohorecky, L.A.; Shah, P.

    1987-09-07

    The effect of ethanol (ET) on nociceptive sensitivity was evaluated using a new tail deflection response (TDR) method. The IP injection of ET (0.5 - 1.5 g/kg) produced raid dose-dependent analgesia. Near maximal effect (97% decrease in TDR) was produced with the 1.5 g/kg dose of ET ten minutes after injection. At ninety minutes post-injection there was still significant analgesia. Depression of ET-induced nociceptive sensitivity was partially reversed by a 1 mg/kg dose of naloxone. On the other hand, morphine (0.5 or 5.0 mg/kg IP) did not modify ET-induced analgesia, while 3.0 minutes of cold water swim (known to produce non-opioid mediated analgesia) potentiated ET-induced analgesic effect. The 0.5 g/kg dose of ET by itself did not depress motor activity in an open field test, but prevented partially the depression in motor activity produced by cold water swim (CWS). Thus, the potentiation by ET of the depression of the TDR produced by CWS cannot be ascribed to the depressant effects of ET on motor activity. 21 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  14. Allergen-induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cockcroft, Donald W

    2014-01-01

    It was only in the late 19th century that specific allergens, pollen, animal antigens and, later, house dust mite, were identified to cause upper and lower airway disease. Early allergen challenge studies, crudely monitored before measurement of forced expiratory volume in 1 s became widespread in the 1950s, focused on the immediate effects but noted in passing prolonged and/or recurrent asthma symptoms. The late asthmatic response, recurrent bronchoconstriction after spontaneous resolution of the early responses occurring 3 h to 8 h or more postchallenge, has been identified and well characterized over the past 50 years. The associated allergen-induced airway hyper-responsiveness (1977) and allergen-induced airway inflammation (1985) indicate that these late sequelae are important in the mechanism of allergen-induced asthma. Allergens are now recognized to be the most important cause of asthma. A standardized allergen inhalation challenge model has been developed and is proving to be a valuable research tool in the investigation of asthma pathophysiology and of potential new pharmacological agents for the treatment of asthma. PMID:24791256

  15. Sildenafil induced priapism.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, T; Hayakawa, K; Miyaji, K; Ishikawa, H; Hata, M

    1999-11-01

    A 53 year-old Japanese man was referred to our hospital for persistent priapism, which had been induced by 200 mg (usual dose 25-50 mg) of sildenafil citrate (Viagra) three days earlier. He had a history of erectile dysfunction and had undergone penile injection therapy elsewhere; however, he had not used injection therapy this time. He obtained sildenafil personally without a doctor's prescription. He had not taken any other drugs that affect the metabolism of sildenafil, nor did he have any medical complications that might induce priapism. Since needle aspiration and irrigation were ineffective as first line therapy, surgical treatment was indicated to relieve the condition; a incision of tunica albuginea of both corpora cavernosa was made, and vigorous irrigation of saline washed out the blood clots. This is the first case report of priapism induced by sildenafil. Although this drug can be obtained through private commerce, it should be used under professional guidance as its abuse may lead to severe morbidity. PMID:11933312

  16. Glycerol-induced hyperhydration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedesel, Marvin L.; Lyons, Timothy P.; Mcnamara, M. Colleen

    1991-01-01

    Maintenance of euhydration is essential for maximum work performance. Environments which induce hypohydration reduce plasma volume and cardiovascular performance progressively declines as does work capacity. Hyperhydration prior to exposure to dehydrating environments appears to be a potential countermeasure to the debilitating effects of hypohydration. The extravascular fluid space, being the largest fluid compartment in the body, is the most logical space by which significant hyperhydration can be accomplished. Volume and osmotic receptors in the vascular space result in physiological responses which counteract hyperhydration. Our hypothesis is that glycerol-induced hyperhydration (GIH) can accomplish extravascular fluid expansion because of the high solubility of glycerol in lipid and aqueous media. A hypertonic solution of glycerol is rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, results in mild increases in plasma osmolality and is distributed to 65 percent of the body mass. A large volume of water ingested within minutes after glycerol intake results in increased total body water because of the osmotic action and distribution of glycerol. The resulting expanded extravascular fluid space can act as a reservoir to maintain plasma volume during exposure to dehydrating environments. The fluid shifts associated with exposure to microgravity result in increased urine production and is another example of an environment which induces hypohydration. Our goal is to demonstrate that GIH will facilitate maintenance of euhydration and cardiovascular performance during space flight and upon return to a 1 g environment.

  17. Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Briot, Karine; Roux, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis is the most common form of secondary osteoporosis and the first cause in young people. Bone loss and increased rate of fractures occur early after the initiation of corticosteroid therapy, and are then related to dosage and treatment duration. The increase in fracture risk is not fully assessed by bone mineral density measurements, as it is also related to alteration of bone quality and increased risk of falls. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis, a treat-to-target strategy focusing on low disease activity including through the use of low dose of prednisone, is a key determinant of bone loss prevention. Bone loss magnitude is variable and there is no clearly identified predictor of the individual risk of fracture. Prevention or treatment of osteoporosis should be considered in all patients who receive prednisone. Bisphosphonates and the anabolic agent parathyroid hormone (1–34) have shown their efficacy in the treatment of corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis. Recent international guidelines are available and should guide management of corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis, which remains under-diagnosed and under-treated. Duration of antiosteoporotic treatment should be discussed at the individual level, depending on the subject's characteristics and on the underlying inflammation evolution. PMID:26509049

  18. Swimming pool-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Beretta, S; Vivaldo, T; Morelli, M; Carlucci, P; Zuccotti, G V

    2011-01-01

    A 13-year-old elite swimmer presented with wheezing after indoor swimming training. On the basis of her clinical history and the tests performed, exercise-induced asthma and mold-induced asthma were ruled out and a diagnosis of chlorine-induced asthma was made. PMID:21548454

  19. Evidence for a Novel, Caspase-8-Independent, Fas Death Domain-Mediated Apoptotic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Katsanis, Emmanuel

    2004-01-01

    Certain caspase-8 null cell lines demonstrate resistance to Fas-induced apoptosis, indicating that the Fas/FasL apoptotic pathway may be caspase-8-dependent. Some reports, however, have shown that Fas induces cell death independent of caspase-8. Here we provide evidence for an alternative, caspase-8-independent, Fas death domain-mediated apoptotic pathway. Murine 12B1-D1 cells express procaspase-3, -8, and -9, which were activated upon the dimerization of Fas death domain. Bid was cleaved and mitochondrial transmembrane potential was disrupted in this apoptotic process. All apoptotic events were completely blocked by the broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK, but not by other peptide caspase inhibitors. Cyclosporin A (CsA), which inhibits mitochondrial transition pore permeability, blocked neither pore permeability disruption nor caspase activation. However, CsA plus caspase-8 inhibitor blocked all apoptotic events of 12B1-D1 induced by Fas death domain dimerization. Our data therefore suggest that there is a novel, caspase-8-independent, Z-VAD-FMK-inhibitable, apoptotic pathway in 12B1-D1 cells that targets mitochondria directly. PMID:15123887

  20. Inhibition of Histone Deacetylases Permits Lipopolysaccharide-Mediated Secretion of Bioactive IL-1β via a Caspase-1-Independent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Stammler, Dominik; Eigenbrod, Tatjana; Menz, Sarah; Frick, Julia S; Sweet, Matthew J; Shakespear, Melanie R; Jantsch, Jonathan; Siegert, Isabel; Wölfle, Sabine; Langer, Julian D; Oehme, Ina; Schaefer, Liliana; Fischer, Andre; Knievel, Judith; Heeg, Klaus; Dalpke, Alexander H; Bode, Konrad A

    2015-12-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors (HDACi) are clinically approved anticancer drugs that have important immune-modulatory properties. We report the surprising finding that HDACi promote LPS-induced IL-1β processing and secretion in human and murine dendritic cells and murine macrophages. HDACi/LPS-induced IL-1β maturation and secretion kinetics differed completely from those observed upon inflammasome activation. Moreover, this pathway of IL-1β secretion was dependent on caspase-8 but was independent of the inflammasome components NACHT, LRR, and PYD domains-containing protein 3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a carboxyl-terminal caspase-recruitment domain, and caspase-1. Genetic studies excluded HDAC6 and HDAC10 as relevant HDAC targets in this pathway, whereas pharmacological inhibitor studies implicated the involvement of HDAC11. Treatment of mice with HDACi in a dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis model resulted in a strong increase in intestinal IL-1β, confirming that this pathway is also operative in vivo. Thus, in addition to the conventional inflammasome-dependent IL-1β cleavage pathway, dendritic cells and macrophages are capable of generating, secreting, and processing bioactive IL-1β by a novel, caspase-8-dependent mechanism. Given the widespread interest in the therapeutic targeting of IL-1β, as well as the use of HDACi for anti-inflammatory applications, these findings have substantial clinical implications. PMID:26519528

  1. Study of cavitating inducer instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W. E.; Murphy, R.; Reddecliff, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    An analytic and experimental investigation into the causes and mechanisms of cavitating inducer instabilities was conducted. Hydrofoil cascade tests were performed, during which cavity sizes were measured. The measured data were used, along with inducer data and potential flow predictions, to refine an analysis for the prediction of inducer blade suction surface cavitation cavity volume. Cavity volume predictions were incorporated into a linearized system model, and instability predictions for an inducer water test loop were generated. Inducer tests were conducted and instability predictions correlated favorably with measured instability data.

  2. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  3. -induced continental warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamae, Youichi; Watanabe, Masahiro; Kimoto, Masahide; Shiogama, Hideo

    2014-11-01

    In this the second of a two-part study, we examine the physical mechanisms responsible for the increasing contrast of the land-sea surface air temperature (SAT) in summertime over the Far East, as observed in recent decades and revealed in future climate projections obtained from a series of transient warming and sensitivity experiments conducted under the umbrella of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5. On a global perspective, a strengthening of land-sea SAT contrast in the transient warming simulations of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models is attributed to an increase in sea surface temperature (SST). However, in boreal summer, the strengthened contrast over the Far East is reproduced only by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration. In response to SST increase alone, the tropospheric warming over the interior of the mid- to high-latitude continents including Eurasia are weaker than those over the surrounding oceans, leading to a weakening of the land-sea SAT contrast over the Far East. Thus, the increasing contrast and associated change in atmospheric circulation over East Asia is explained by CO2-induced continental warming. The degree of strengthening of the land-sea SAT contrast varies in different transient warming scenarios, but is reproduced through a combination of the CO2-induced positive and SST-induced negative contributions to the land-sea contrast. These results imply that changes of climate patterns over the land-ocean boundary regions are sensitive to future scenarios of CO2 concentration pathways including extreme cases.

  4. Polyglycolic acid induced inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ceonzo, Kathleen; Gaynor, Anne; Shaffer, Lisa; Kojima, Koji; Vacanti, Charles A.; Stahl, Gregory L.

    2005-01-01

    Tissue and organ replacement have quickly outpaced available supply. Tissue bioengineering holds the promise for additional tissue availability. Various scaffolds are currently used, whereas polyglycolic acid (PGA), which is currently used in absorbable sutures and orthopedic pins, provides an excellent support for tissue development. Unfortunately, PGA can induce a local inflammatory response following implantation, so we investigated the molecular mechanism of inflammation in vitro and in vivo. Degraded PGA induced an acute peritonitis, characterized by neutrophil (PMN) infiltration following intraperitoneal injection in mice. Similar observations were observed using the metabolite of PGA, glycolide. Dissolved PGA or glycolide, but not native PGA, activated the classical complement pathway in human sera, as determined by classical complement pathway hemolytic assays, C3a and C5a production, C3 and immunoglobulin deposition. To investigate whether these in vitro observations translated to in vivo findings, we used genetically engineered mice. Intraperitoneal administration of glycolide or dissolved PGA in mice deficient in C1q, factor D, C1q and factor D or C2 and factor B demonstrated significantly reduced PMN infiltration compared to congenic controls (WT). Mice deficient in C6 also demonstrated acute peritonitis. However, treatment of WT or C6 deficient mice with a monoclonal antibody against C5 prevented the inflammatory response. These data suggest that the hydrolysis of PGA to glycolide activates the classical complement pathway. Further, complement is amplified via the alternative pathway and inflammation is induced by C5a generation. Inhibition of C5a may provide a potential therapeutic approach to limit the inflammation associated with PGA derived materials following implantation. PMID:16548688

  5. Fission induced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility of creating a plasma from fission fragments was investigated, as well as the probability of utilizing the energy of these particles to create population inversion leading to laser action. Eventually, it is hoped that the same medium could be used for both fissioning and lasing, thus avoiding inefficiences in converting one form of energy to the other. A central problem in understanding a fission induced plasma is to obtain an accurate model of the electron behavior; some calculations are presented to this end. The calculations are simple, providing a compendium of processes for reference.

  6. [Neuroleptic induced deficit syndrome].

    PubMed

    Szafrański, T

    1995-01-01

    Increasing interest in subjective aspects of therapy and rehabilitation focused the attention of psychiatrists, psychologists and psychopharmacologists on the mental side effects of neuroleptics. For the drug-related impairment of affective, cognitive and social function the name of neuroleptic-induced deficit syndrome (NIDS) is proposed. Patients with NIDS appear to be indifferent to the environmental stimuli, retarded and apathetic. They complain of feeling drugged and drowsy, weird, they suffer from lack of motivation, feel like "zombies". The paper presents description of NIDS and its differentiation from negative and depressive symptoms in schizophrenia and subjective perceiving of extrapyramidal syndromes. PMID:7652089

  7. Bupropion-induced somnambulism.

    PubMed

    Khazaal, Yasser; Krenz, Sonia; Zullino, Daniele Fabio

    2003-09-01

    Whereas there are some case reports of bupropion-induced vivid dreaming and nightmares, until now it has not been associated with somnambulism. A case is reported of a patient treated with bupropion as a smoking cessation medication, who developed somnambulism during nicotine withdrawal. Furthermore, the sleepwalking episodes were associated with eating behaviour. Amnesia was reported for all episodes. As, on one hand,bupropion is a noradrenergic and dopaminergic drug and nicotine withdrawal, on the other hand, is associated with alterations in monoaminergic functions, an interaction at the level of these neurotransmitters is suggested as the underlying mechanism. PMID:13129839

  8. Antioxidant-Induced Stress

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Cleva; Kross, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    Antioxidants are among the most popular health-protecting products, sold worldwide without prescription. Indeed, there are many reports showing the benefits of antioxidants but only a few questioning the possible harmful effects of these “drugs”. The normal balance between antioxidants and free radicals in the body is offset when either of these forces prevails. The available evidence on the harmful effects of antioxidants is analyzed in this review. In summary, a hypothesis is presented that “antioxidant-induced stress” results when antioxidants overwhelm the body’s free radicals. PMID:22408440

  9. Cannabis induced asystole.

    PubMed

    Brancheau, Daniel; Blanco, Jessica; Gholkar, Gunjan; Patel, Brijesh; Machado, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis or marijuana is the most used recreational, and until recently illegal, drug in the United States. Although cannabis has medicinal use, its consumption has been linked to motor vehicle accidents in dose dependent fashion. Marijuana and other cannabinoids produce a multitude of effects on the human body that may result in these motor vehicle accidents. Some of the effects that marijuana has been known to cause include altered sensorium, diminished reflexes, and increased vagal tone. We present a case of cannabis induced asystole from hypervagotonia. PMID:26520167

  10. Cephalexin induced cholestatic jaundice.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Abhinav; Rao, Mana; Jasdanwala, Sarfaraz; Mathur, Ajay; Eng, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Cephalexin is a very commonly prescribed orally administered antibiotic which has many potential side effects. Amongst these cholestatic jaundice has been infrequently reported as an adverse reaction. We present a case of a 57-year-old male who exhibited features of cholestatic jaundice including elevated liver function tests (LFTs) after taking cephalexin and showed improvement on removal of the offending agent. During this time he was symptomatically treated with cholestyramine. Complete resolution of LFTs was seen in four weeks. Cephalexin induced cholestasis is rare and hence requires a high degree of clinical suspicion for prompt diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25180107

  11. Alcohol induced liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, K A; McGee, J O

    1984-01-01

    Alcohol induces a variety of changes in the liver: fatty change, hepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. The histopathological appearances of these conditions are discussed, with special attention to differential diagnosis. Many forms of alcoholic liver disease are associated with Mallory body formation and fibrosis. Mallory bodies are formed, at least in part, from intermediate filaments. Associated changes in intermediate filament organisation in alcoholic liver disease also occur. Their significance in the pathogenesis of hepatocyte death may be related to abnormalities in messenger RNA function. The mechanisms underlying hepatic fibrogenesis are also discussed. Images PMID:6086722

  12. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2003-04-15

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  13. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2005-11-08

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  14. Method for inducing hypothermia

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2008-09-09

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  15. Transient induced drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weihs, D.; Katz, J.

    1986-01-01

    In the present treatment of the calculation of forces on a wing that is suddenly brought into motion at a constant speed, attention is given to the unsteady potential's contribution to the force balance. Total bound vorticity is produced at the initial impulse. The results obtained are independent of wing aspect ratio; as time increases, this effect on the drag force becomes smaller as the vortex emanating from the trailing edge is left behind. The second contributor to induced drag is the spanwise vorticity shedding that results from the spanwise load distribution of three-dimensional wings. This contribution grows with time as the length of the wake grows.

  16. Induced drag of multiplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prandtl, L

    1924-01-01

    The most important part of the resistance or drag of a wing system,the induced drag, can be calculated theoretically, when the distribution of lift on the individual wings is known. The calculation is based upon the assumption that the lift on the wings is distributed along the wing in proportion to the ordinates of a semi-ellipse. Formulas and numerical tables are given for calculating the drag. In this connection, the most favorable arrangements of biplanes and triplanes are discussed and the results are further elucidated by means of numerical examples.

  17. Transient Uncoupling Induces Synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Malte; Mannattil, Manu; Dutta, Debabrata; Chakraborty, Sagar; Timme, Marc

    2015-07-01

    Finding conditions that support synchronization is a fertile and active area of research with applications across multiple disciplines. Here we present and analyze a scheme for synchronizing chaotic dynamical systems by transiently uncoupling them. Specifically, systems coupled only in a fraction of their state space may synchronize even if fully coupled they do not. While for many standard systems coupling strengths need to be bounded to ensure synchrony, transient uncoupling removes this bound and thus enables synchronization in an infinite range of effective coupling strengths. The presented coupling scheme therefore opens up the possibility to induce synchrony in (biological or technical) systems whose parameters are fixed and cannot be modified continuously.

  18. Transient Uncoupling Induces Synchronization.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Malte; Mannattil, Manu; Dutta, Debabrata; Chakraborty, Sagar; Timme, Marc

    2015-07-31

    Finding conditions that support synchronization is a fertile and active area of research with applications across multiple disciplines. Here we present and analyze a scheme for synchronizing chaotic dynamical systems by transiently uncoupling them. Specifically, systems coupled only in a fraction of their state space may synchronize even if fully coupled they do not. While for many standard systems coupling strengths need to be bounded to ensure synchrony, transient uncoupling removes this bound and thus enables synchronization in an infinite range of effective coupling strengths. The presented coupling scheme therefore opens up the possibility to induce synchrony in (biological or technical) systems whose parameters are fixed and cannot be modified continuously. PMID:26274420

  19. Induced superconductivity in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heersche, Hubert B.; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Oostinga, Jeroen B.; Vandersypen, Lieven M. K.; Morpurgo, Alberto F.

    2007-07-01

    Graphene layers, prepared by mechanical exfoliation, were contacted by superconducting electrodes consisting of a titanium-aluminium bilayer. Quantum hall measurements in the normal state confirmed the single layer nature of the graphene samples. Proximity induced supercurrents were observed in all samples, below 1 K. Using a backgate, the Fermi energy could be swept from valence to conduction band via the Charge neutrality point, demonstrating supercurrents carried by holes and electrons, respectively. Interestingly, a finite supercurrent was also observed at the charge neutrality (or Dirac) point, where the density of carrier states vanishes. Our results demonstrate phase coherence in graphene.

  20. Disorder-induced amorphization

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.; Li, Mo

    1997-03-01

    Many crystalline materials undergo a crystalline-to-amorphous (c-a) phase transition when subjected to energetic particle irradiation at low temperatures. By focusing on the mean-square static atomic displacement as a generic measure of chemical and topological disorder, we are led quite naturally to a generalized version of the Lindemann melting criterion as a conceptual framework for a unified thermodynamic approach to solid-state amorphizing transformations. In its simplest form, the generalized Lindemann criterion assumes that the sum of the static and dynamic mean-square atomic displacements is constant along the polymorphous melting curve so that c-a transformations can be understood simply as melting of a critically-disordered crystal at temperatures below the glass transition temperature where the supercooled liquid can persist indefinitely in a configurationally-frozen state. Evidence in support of the generalized Lindemann melting criterion for amorphization is provided by a large variety of experimental observations and by molecular dynamics simulations of heat-induced melting and of defect-induced amorphization of intermetallic compounds.

  1. Statin-induced myopathies.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Michał; Stępień, Karolina M; Tomaszewska, Joanna; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2011-01-01

    Statins are considered to be safe, well tolerated and the most efficient drugs for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, one of the main risk factor for atherosclerosis, and therefore they are frequently prescribed medications. The most severe adverse effect of statins is myotoxicity, in the form of myopathy, myalgia, myositis or rhabdomyolysis. Clinical trials commonly define statin toxicity as myalgia or muscle weakness with creatine kinase (CK) levels greater than 10 times the normal upper limit. Rhabdomyolysis is the most severe adverse effect of statins, which may result in acute renal failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation and death. The exact pathophysiology of statin-induced myopathy is not fully known. Multiple pathophysiological mechanisms may contribute to statin myotoxicity. This review focuses on a number of them. The prevention of statin-related myopathy involves using the lowest statin dose required to achieve therapeutic goals and avoiding polytherapy with drugs known to increase systemic exposure and myopathy risk. Currently, the only effective treatment of statin-induced myopathy is the discontinuation of statin use in patients affected by muscle aches, pains and elevated CK levels. PMID:22001973

  2. Inducible fluorescent speckle microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Paulo; Belsley, Michael; Maiato, Helder

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of cytoskeleton dynamics has benefited from the capacity to generate fluorescent fiducial marks on cytoskeleton components. Here we show that light-induced imprinting of three-dimensional (3D) fluorescent speckles significantly improves speckle signal and contrast relative to classic (random) fluorescent speckle microscopy. We predict theoretically that speckle imprinting using photobleaching is optimal when the laser energy and fluorophore responsivity are related by the golden ratio. This relation, which we confirm experimentally, translates into a 40% remaining signal after speckle imprinting and provides a rule of thumb in selecting the laser power required to optimally prepare the sample for imaging. This inducible speckle imaging (ISI) technique allows 3D speckle microscopy to be performed in readily available libraries of cell lines or primary tissues expressing fluorescent proteins and does not preclude conventional imaging before speckle imaging. As a proof of concept, we use ISI to measure metaphase spindle microtubule poleward flux in primary cells and explore a scaling relation connecting microtubule flux to metaphase duration. PMID:26783303

  3. Cholesterol depletion induces autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jinglei; Ohsaki, Yuki; Tauchi-Sato, Kumi; Fujita, Akikazu; Fujimoto, Toyoshi . E-mail: tfujimot@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2006-12-08

    Autophagy is a mechanism to digest cells' own components, and its importance in many physiological and pathological processes is being recognized. But the molecular mechanism that regulates autophagy is not understood in detail. In the present study, we found that cholesterol depletion induces macroautophagy. The cellular cholesterol in human fibroblasts was depleted either acutely using 5 mM methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin or 10-20 {mu}g/ml nystatin for 1 h, or metabolically by 20 {mu}M mevastatin and 200 {mu}M mevalonolactone along with 10% lipoprotein-deficient serum for 2-3 days. By any of these protocols, marked increase of LC3-II was detected by immunoblotting and by immunofluorescence microscopy, and the increase was more extensive than that caused by amino acid starvation, i.e., incubation in Hanks' solution for several hours. The induction of autophagic vacuoles by cholesterol depletion was also observed in other cell types, and the LC3-positive membranes were often seen as long tubules, >50 {mu}m in length. The increase of LC3-II by methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin was suppressed by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors and was accompanied by dephosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin. By electron microscopy, autophagic vacuoles induced by cholesterol depletion were indistinguishable from those seen after amino acid starvation. These results demonstrate that a decrease in cholesterol activates autophagy by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanism.

  4. Inducible fluorescent speckle microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pereira, António J; Aguiar, Paulo; Belsley, Michael; Maiato, Helder

    2016-01-18

    The understanding of cytoskeleton dynamics has benefited from the capacity to generate fluorescent fiducial marks on cytoskeleton components. Here we show that light-induced imprinting of three-dimensional (3D) fluorescent speckles significantly improves speckle signal and contrast relative to classic (random) fluorescent speckle microscopy. We predict theoretically that speckle imprinting using photobleaching is optimal when the laser energy and fluorophore responsivity are related by the golden ratio. This relation, which we confirm experimentally, translates into a 40% remaining signal after speckle imprinting and provides a rule of thumb in selecting the laser power required to optimally prepare the sample for imaging. This inducible speckle imaging (ISI) technique allows 3D speckle microscopy to be performed in readily available libraries of cell lines or primary tissues expressing fluorescent proteins and does not preclude conventional imaging before speckle imaging. As a proof of concept, we use ISI to measure metaphase spindle microtubule poleward flux in primary cells and explore a scaling relation connecting microtubule flux to metaphase duration. PMID:26783303

  5. Electromagnetically Induced Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xihua; Xiao, Min

    2015-08-01

    Quantum entanglement provides an essential resource for quantum computation, quantum communication, and quantum network. How to conveniently and efficiently produce entanglement between bright light beams presents a challenging task to build realistic quantum information processing networks. Here, we present an efficient and convenient way to realize a novel quantum phenomenon, named electromagnetically induced entanglement, in the conventional Λ-type three-level atomic system driven by a strong pump field and a relatively weak probe field. Nearly perfect entanglement between the two fields can be achieved with a low coherence decay rate between the two lower levels, high pump-field intensity, and large optical depth of the atomic ensemble. The physical origin is quantum coherence between the lower doublet produced by the pump and probe fields, similar to the well-known electromagnetically induced transparency. This method would greatly facilitate the generation of nondegenerate narrow-band continuous-variable entanglement between bright light beams by using only coherent laser fields, and may find potential and broad applications in realistic quantum information processing.

  6. Electromagnetically Induced Entanglement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xihua; Xiao, Min

    2015-01-01

    Quantum entanglement provides an essential resource for quantum computation, quantum communication, and quantum network. How to conveniently and efficiently produce entanglement between bright light beams presents a challenging task to build realistic quantum information processing networks. Here, we present an efficient and convenient way to realize a novel quantum phenomenon, named electromagnetically induced entanglement, in the conventional Λ-type three-level atomic system driven by a strong pump field and a relatively weak probe field. Nearly perfect entanglement between the two fields can be achieved with a low coherence decay rate between the two lower levels, high pump-field intensity, and large optical depth of the atomic ensemble. The physical origin is quantum coherence between the lower doublet produced by the pump and probe fields, similar to the well-known electromagnetically induced transparency. This method would greatly facilitate the generation of nondegenerate narrow-band continuous-variable entanglement between bright light beams by using only coherent laser fields, and may find potential and broad applications in realistic quantum information processing. PMID:26314514

  7. [Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction].

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Katarzyna

    2011-01-01

    Terms exercise-induced asthma (EIA) or exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) are used to describe transient bronchoconstriction occurring during or immediately after vigorous exercise in some subjects. For the diagnosis of EIB it is necessary to show at least 10% decrease in FEV1 from baseline following physical exercise. The prevalence of EIB has been reported to be 12-15% in general population, 10-20% in summer olympic athletes, affecting up to 50-70% of winter athletes (particularly ski runners and skaters). There are two key theories explaining EIB: thermal and osmotic. Differential diagnosis of EIB should include chronic cardio-pulmonary diseases, vocal cord dysfunction, hyperventilation syndrome and poor physical fitness or overtraining. According to the ATS guidelines from 1999 for the diagnosis of EIB a standardized exercise on a treadmill or cycle ergometer test with stable environmental conditions regarding temperature and humidity of inhaled air, should be employed. Other laboratory tests assessing bronchial hyperresponsiveness to indirect stimuli including eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea (EVH), mannitol, hypertonic saline, AMP or measurement of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) are also successfully used. In the prevention of EIB include both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatment. In patients with poorly controlled asthma intensification of anti-inflammatory treatment can decrease the frequency and severity of EIB. Short and long acting beta2-agonists, antileukotriene drugs can be used prior to exercise to prevent EIB. PMID:21190152

  8. [Drug-induced laryngospasm].

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, T; Munakata, K

    1997-02-01

    We report a case of drug-induced laryngospasm due to Chlorpromazine. A drug-induced laryngospasm has not been previously reported in the literature. A 70-year-old male with the proximal end fracture of the femur was scheduled for the operative fixation. He had a past history of alcoholism and had underwent a long-term chlorpromazine therapy for 45 years until admission to our hospital. There have been a few reports on unexplained sudden deaths of patients receiving long-term treatment with chlorpromazine. Caution was therefore needed in general anesthesia, which was thought to be safer than epidural or spinal anesthesia in this case. Accordingly for the preparation of an emergency operation, the central venous catheterization via the internal jugular vein was performed under subcutaneous injection of lidocaine. Severe dyspnea and cyanosis occurred a few minutes after the administration of lidocaine. The specific diagnosis of laryngospasm was made by inspection of the vocal cords. Immediate oral intubation was performed and no complications ensued during and after the operation. This episode strongly suggests that one reason of the unexplained sudden deaths of patients receiving long term treatment with chlorpromazine could be laryngospasm. In conclusion, anesthesiologists should be aware of the possibility of laryngospasm under similar conditions. PMID:9071116

  9. [Radiation-induced neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Kolak, Agnieszka; Starosławska, Elzbieta; Kieszko, Dariusz; Cisek, Paweł; Patyra, Krzysztof Ireneusz; Surdyka, Dariusz; Dobrzyńska-Rutkowska, Aneta; Łopacka-Szatan, Karolina; Burdan, Franciszek

    2013-12-01

    Radiation-induced neuropathy is commonly observed among oncological patients. Radiation can affect the nervous tissue directly or indirectly by inducing vasculopathy or dysfunction of internal organs. Symptoms may be mild and reversible (e.g., pain, nausea, vomiting, fever, drowsiness, fatigue, paresthesia) or life-threatening (cerebral oedema, increased intracranial pressure, seizures). Such complications are clinically divided into peripheral (plexopathies, neuropathies of spinal and cranial nerves) and central neuropathy (myelopathy, encephalopathy, cognitive impairment). The degree of neuronal damages primarily depends on the total and fractional radiation dose and applied therapeutic methods. The conformal and megavoltage radiotherapy seems to be the safeties ones. Diagnostic protocol includes physical examination, imaging (in particular magnetic resonance), electromyography, nerve conduction study and sometimes histological examination. Prevention and early detection of neurological complications are necessary in order to prevent a permanent dysfunction of the nervous system. Presently their treatment is mostly symptomatic, but in same cases a surgical intervention is required. An experimental and clinical data indicates some effectiveness of different neuroprotective agents (e.g. anticoagulants, vitamin E, hyperbaric oxygen, pentoxifylline, bevacizumab, methylphenidate, donepezil), which should be administered before and/or during radiotherapy. PMID:24490474

  10. Induced Seismicity Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S. R.; Jarpe, S.; Harben, P.

    2014-12-01

    There are many seismological aspects associated with monitoring of permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic formations. Many of these include monitoring underground gas migration through detailed tomographic studies of rock properties, integrity of the cap rock and micro seismicity with time. These types of studies require expensive deployments of surface and borehole sensors in the vicinity of the CO2 injection wells. Another problem that may exist in CO2 sequestration fields is the potential for damaging induced seismicity associated with fluid injection into the geologic reservoir. Seismic hazard monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields requires a seismic network over a spatially larger region possibly having stations in remote settings. Expensive observatory-grade seismic systems are not necessary for seismic hazard deployments or small-scale tomographic studies. Hazard monitoring requires accurate location of induced seismicity to magnitude levels only slightly less than that which can be felt at the surface (e.g. magnitude 1), and the frequencies of interest for tomographic analysis are ~1 Hz and greater. We have developed a seismo/acoustic smart sensor system that can achieve the goals necessary for induced seismicity monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields. The unit is inexpensive, lightweight, easy to deploy, can operate remotely under harsh conditions and features 9 channels of recording (currently 3C 4.5 Hz geophone, MEMS accelerometer and microphone). An on-board processor allows for satellite transmission of parameter data to a processing center. Continuous or event-detected data is kept on two removable flash SD cards of up to 64+ Gbytes each. If available, data can be transmitted via cell phone modem or picked up via site visits. Low-power consumption allows for autonomous operation using only a 10 watt solar panel and a gel-cell battery. The system has been successfully tested for long-term (> 6 months) remote operations over a wide range

  11. Drug-Induced Hematologic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Mintzer, David M.; Billet, Shira N.; Chmielewski, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Drugs can induce almost the entire spectrum of hematologic disorders, affecting white cells, red cells, platelets, and the coagulation system. This paper aims to emphasize the broad range of drug-induced hematological syndromes and to highlight some of the newer drugs and syndromes. Methods. Medline literature on drug-induced hematologic syndromes was reviewed. Most reports and reviews focus on individual drugs or cytopenias. Results. Drug-induced syndromes include hemolytic anemias, methemoglobinemia, red cell aplasia, sideroblastic anemia, megaloblastic anemia, polycythemia, aplastic anemia, leukocytosis, neutropenia, eosinophilia, immune thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic syndromes, hypercoagulability, hypoprothrombinemia, circulating anticoagulants, myelodysplasia, and acute leukemia. Some of the classic drugs known to cause hematologic abnormalities have been replaced by newer drugs, including biologics, accompanied by their own syndromes and unintended side effects. Conclusions. Drugs can induce toxicities spanning many hematologic syndromes, mediated by a variety of mechanisms. Physicians need to be alert to the potential for iatrogenic drug-induced hematologic complications. PMID:19960059

  12. Cytokinin activity induced by thidiazuron.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J C; Katterman, F R

    1986-06-01

    The diphenylurea derivative thidiazuron induces a variety of cytokinin responses. Levels above 5 x 10(-9) molar and 4 x 10(-7) molar stimulate maximum soybean callus growth and radish cotyledon expansion, respectively. A wider range of dose response related effects follows thidiazuron induced tobacco plant regeneration. Analysis of soybean callus extracts strongly suggests that thidiazuron treatment creates an accumulation and/or synthesis of purine cytokinins, able to induce the growth, expansion and regeneration, mentioned above. PMID:16664878

  13. Uncertainty-induced quantum nonlocality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shao-xiong; Zhang, Jun; Yu, Chang-shui; Song, He-shan

    2014-01-01

    Based on the skew information, we present a quantity, uncertainty-induced quantum nonlocality (UIN) to measure the quantum correlation. It can be considered as the updated version of the original measurement-induced nonlocality (MIN) preserving the good computability but eliminating the non-contractivity problem. For 2×d-dimensional state, it is shown that UIN can be given by a closed form. In addition, we also investigate the maximal uncertainty-induced nonlocality.

  14. [Radiation-induced cancers].

    PubMed

    Dutrillaux, B

    1998-01-01

    The induction of malignant diseases is one of the most concerning late effects of ionising radiation. A large amount of information has been collected form atomic bomb survivors, patients after therapeutic irradiation, occupational follow-up and accidentally exposed populations. Major uncertainties persist in the (very) low dose range i.e., population and workers radioprotection. A review of the biological mechanisms leading to cancer strongly suggests that the vast majority of radiation-induced malignancies arise as a consequence of recessive mutations of tumour-suppressor genes. These mutations can be unveiled by ageing, this process being possibly furthered by constitutional or acquired genomic instability. The individual risk is likely to be very low, probably because of the usual dose level. However, the magnitude of medical exposure and the reliance of our societies on nuclear industry are so high that irreproachable decision-making processes and standards for practice are inescapable. PMID:9868399

  15. Laser induced nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ledingham, Ken; McCanny, Tom; Graham, Paul; Fang Xiao; Singhal, Ravi; Magill, Joe; Creswell, Alan; Sanderson, David; Allott, Ric; Neely, David; Norreys, Peter; Santala, Marko; Zepf, Matthew; Watts, Ian; Clark, Eugene; Krushelnick, Karl; Tatarakis, Michael; Dangor, Bucker; Machecek, Antonin; Wark, Justin

    1998-12-16

    Dramatic improvements in laser technology since 1984 have revolutionised high power laser technology. Application of chirped-pulse amplification techniques has resulted in laser intensities in excess of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. In the mid to late eighties, C. K. Rhodes and K. Boyer discussed the possibility of shining laser light of this intensity onto solid surfaces and to cause nuclear transitions. In particular, irradiation of a uranium target could induce electro- and photofission in the focal region of the laser. In this paper it is shown that {mu}Ci of {sup 62}Cu can be generated via the ({gamma},n) reaction by a laser with an intensity of about 10{sup 19} Wcm{sup -2}.

  16. [Designer drug induced psychosis].

    PubMed

    Fullajtar, Mate; Ferencz, Csaba

    2012-06-01

    3,4-methylene-dioxy-pyrovalerone (MDPV) is a popular designer drug in Hungary, known as MP4. We present a case of a 34-year-old man, whose first psychotic episode was observed in the presence of MP4 use. The paranoid ideas of reference and the dereistic thinking could be the consequence of drug-induced psychosis. Within 24 hours after the intoxication was over delirium set in. The patient's history included only the use of MP4, use of other kinds of drugs was negated. The drug tests were negative, amphetamine derivates were not detectable in the urine sample. It is most likely that the MP4 pill contained an amount of MDPV less than detectable. In conclusion we suggest that the clinical picture could be the consequence of regular MDPV use. PMID:22710853

  17. Induced seismicity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Segall, P.

    1997-09-18

    The objective of this project has been to develop a fundamental understanding of seismicity associated with energy production. Earthquakes are known to be associated with oil, gas, and geothermal energy production. The intent is to develop physical models that predict when seismicity is likely to occur, and to determine to what extent these earthquakes can be used to infer conditions within energy reservoirs. Early work focused on earthquakes induced by oil and gas extraction. Just completed research has addressed earthquakes within geothermal fields, such as The Geysers in northern California, as well as the interactions of dilatancy, friction, and shear heating, on the generation of earthquakes. The former has involved modeling thermo- and poro-elastic effects of geothermal production and water injection. Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers are used to measure deformation associated with geothermal activity, and these measurements along with seismic data are used to test and constrain thermo-mechanical models.

  18. Induced abortion in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Hull, T H; Sarwono, S W; Widyantoro, N

    1993-01-01

    Induced abortion is one of the most difficult sociomedical problems facing the Indonesian government. While well-known in traditional society, the practice was discouraged by all Indonesian religious groups, and forbidden by the Dutch colonial authorities. Although abortion was technically illegal under the criminal code, a judicial interpretation in the early 1970s permitted medical professionals to offer the procedure so long as they were discreet and careful. The numbers of medical abortions carried out in Indonesia rose dramatically, and there was evidence of matching declines in the incidence of morbidity and mortality caused by dangerous illegal procedures. Medical and community groups campaigned for a more liberal abortion law to protect legal practitioners and stamp out illegal traditional practices. Their efforts appeared to bear fruit in the draft Health Law, but when the law was passed by the legislature in late 1992, the issue was again clouded by contradictions and inconsistencies. PMID:8212094

  19. Trastuzumab-induced cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Guglin, Maya; Cutro, Raymond; Mishkin, Joseph D

    2008-06-01

    Trastuzumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody used for the treatment of advanced breast cancer. It improves survival and increases response to chemotherapy. The major side effect of trastuzumab is cardiotoxicity manifesting as a reduction in left ventricular systolic function, either asymptomatic or with signs and symptoms of heart failure. Although reversible in most cases, cardiotoxicity frequently results in the discontinuation of trastuzumab. The objective of this review is to summarize facts about trastuzumab-induced cardiotoxicity and to highlight the areas of future investigations. We searched PubMed for trials involving trastuzumab used as an adjuvant therapy for breast cancer, including the metastatic breast cancer setting, and focused on cardiotoxicity. PMID:18514938

  20. Discreteness induced extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Renato Vieira; da Silva, Linaena Méricy

    2015-11-01

    Two simple models based on ecological problems are discussed from the point of view of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. It is shown how discrepant may be the results of the models that include spatial distribution with discrete interactions when compared with the continuous analogous models. In the continuous case we have, under certain circumstances, the population explosion. When we take into account the finiteness of the population, we get the opposite result, extinction. We will analyze how these results depend on the dimension d of the space and describe the phenomenon of the "Discreteness Inducing Extinction" (DIE). The results are interpreted in the context of the "paradox of sex", an old problem of evolutionary biology.

  1. Radiation-Induced Bioradicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahorte, Philippe; Mondelaers, Wim

    This chapter represents the second part of a review in which the production and application of radiation-induced radicals in biological matter are discussed. In part one the general aspects of the four stages (physical, physicochemical, chemical and biological) of interaction of radiation with matter in general and biological matter in particular, were discussed. Here an overview is presented of modem technologies and theoretical methods available for studying these radiation effects. The relevance is highlighted of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations with respect to obtaining structural information on bioradicals, and a survey is given of the research studies in this field. We also discuss some basic aspects of modem accelerator technologies which can be used for creating radicals and we conclude with an overview of applications of radiation processing in biology and related fields such as biomedical and environmental engineering, food technology, medicine and pharmacy.

  2. Laser-induced bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, G.D.; Lynch, R.V. III

    1981-01-01

    A project has been initiated to determine the feasibility of developing a complete airborne remote sensing system for rapidly mapping high concentration patches of bioluminescent organisms in the world's oceans. Conceptually, this system would be composed of a laser illuminator to induce bioluminescence and a low light level image intensifier for detection of light. Initial laboratory measurements consisted of using a 2-J flash lamp pulsed optical dye laser to excite bioluminescence in the marine dinoflagellate Pyrocustis lunula at ambient temperature using Rhodamine 6G as the lasing dye (585 nm) and a laser pulse width of 1 microsec. After a latency period of 15-20 msec, the bioluminescence maximum occurred in the blue (480 nm is the wavelength maximum for most dinoflagellate bioluminescence) with the peaking occurring approximately 65 msec after the laser pulse. Planned experiments will investigate the effect of different excitation wavelengths and energies at various temperatures and salinities of the cultures.

  3. Sport-induced lipoma.

    PubMed

    Copcu, E

    2004-04-01

    Lipoma is the most common benign soft tissue tumour in human beings. It can be seen in all parts of the body and occupies the subcutaneous compartment predominantly. The pathogenesis of lipoma is still unknown, but trauma is one of the most implicated etiological factors. We report about two athletes with a very quickly grown lipoma on their right scapular area. One was a professional volleyball player and the other one was a table-tennis player. Both patients were right-handed. To our knowledge, there has been no report on sport-induced lipoma in the literature. We speculate that chronically minor traumas especially to the scapular area, in which fat tissue is located between the bone and the firm skin, may trigger the formation and enlargement of lipoma. PMID:15088241

  4. Gadolinium-Induced Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Todd, Derrick J; Kay, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs), once believed to be safe for patients with renal disease, have been strongly associated with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), a severe systemic fibrosing disorder that predominantly afflicts individuals with advanced renal dysfunction. We provide a historical perspective on the appearance and disappearance of NSF, including its initial recognition as a discrete clinical entity, its association with GBCA exposure, and the data supporting a causative relationship between GBCA exposure and NSF. On the basis of this body of evidence, we propose that the name gadolinium-induced fibrosis (GIF) more accurately reflects the totality of knowledge regarding this disease. Use of high-risk GBCAs, such as formulated gadodiamide, should be avoided in patients with renal disease. Restriction of GBCA use in this population has almost completely eradicated new cases of this debilitating condition. Emerging antifibrotic therapies may be useful for patients who suffer from GIF. PMID:26768242

  5. Baboon syndrome induced by hydroxyzine.

    PubMed

    Akkari, Hayet; Belhadjali, Hichem; Youssef, Monia; Mokni, Sana; Zili, Jamelediine

    2013-05-01

    Hydroxyzine-induced drug eruptions are very rare. We report here a typical case of drug-related Baboon syndrome or symmetrical drug-related intertriginous and flexural exanthema (SDRIFE) which was induced by hydroxyzine in a 60-year-old man. The diagnosis was confirmed by positive patch and oral accidental provocation tests with hydroxyzine. Patch tests and oral provocation tests with cetirizine and levocetirizine were negative. A review of the literature identified only 17 reported cases of hydroxyzine-induced drug eruptions. To the best of our knowledge, we report here the first case of hydroxyzine-induced SDRIFE. PMID:23723506

  6. Baboon Syndrome Induced by Hydroxyzine

    PubMed Central

    Akkari, Hayet; Belhadjali, Hichem; Youssef, Monia; Mokni, Sana; Zili, Jamelediine

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyzine-induced drug eruptions are very rare. We report here a typical case of drug-related Baboon syndrome or symmetrical drug-related intertriginous and flexural exanthema (SDRIFE) which was induced by hydroxyzine in a 60-year-old man. The diagnosis was confirmed by positive patch and oral accidental provocation tests with hydroxyzine. Patch tests and oral provocation tests with cetirizine and levocetirizine were negative. A review of the literature identified only 17 reported cases of hydroxyzine-induced drug eruptions. To the best of our knowledge, we report here the first case of hydroxyzine-induced SDRIFE. PMID:23723506

  7. Bellows flow-induced vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tygielski, P. J.; Smyly, H. M.; Gerlach, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The bellows flow excitation mechanism and results of comprehensive test program are summarized. The analytical model for predicting bellows flow induced stress is refined. The model includes the effects of an upstream elbow, arbitrary geometry, and multiple piles. A refined computer code for predicting flow induced stress is described which allows life prediction if a material S-N diagram is available.

  8. Gadolinium induced recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Blasco-Perrin, H; Glaser, B; Pienkowski, M; Peron, J M; Payen, J L

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a sudden swelling and inflammation of the pancreas. The two most common causes are alcohol use and biliary stones. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis are rare (1.4-2%). In this present study, we present a case of recurrent acute pancreatitis induced by a specific magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) contrast agent called gadobenate dimeglumine. PMID:23395575

  9. Captopril-induced cholestatic jaundice.

    PubMed

    Hagley, M T

    1991-01-01

    I have reported a case of captopril-induced cholestatic jaundice. This drug is being used with increasing frequency, so it is important that physicians recognize this adverse effect. Captopril-induced jaundice resolves after cessation of captopril therapy. PMID:1986415

  10. Laser induced ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liedl, G.; Schuöcker, D.; Geringer, B.; Graf, J.; Klawatsch, D.; Lenz, H. P.; Piock, W. F.; Jetzinger, M.; Kapus, P.

    2007-05-01

    Nowadays, combustion engines and other combustion processes play an overwhelming and important role in everyday life. As a result, ignition of combustion processes is of great importance, too. Usually, ignition of a combustible material is defined in such a way that an ignition initiates a self-sustained reaction which propagates through the inflammable material even in the case that the ignition source has been removed. In most cases, a well defined ignition location and ignition time is of crucial importance. Spark plugs are well suited for such tasks but suffer from some disadvantages, like erosion of electrodes or restricted positioning possibilities. In some cases, ignition of combustible materials by means of high power laser pulses could be beneficial. High power lasers offer several different possibilities to ignite combustible materials, like thermal ignition, resonant ignition or optical breakdown ignition. Since thermal and resonant ignitions are not well suited on the requirements mentioned previously, only optical breakdown ignition will be discussed further. Optical breakdown of a gas within the focal spot of a high power laser allows a very distinct localization of the ignition spot in a combustible material. Since pulse duration is usually in the range of several nanoseconds, requirements on the ignition time are fulfilled easily, too. Laser peak intensities required for such an optical breakdown are in the range of 10 11 W/cm2. The hot plasma which forms during this breakdown initiates the following self-propagating combustion process. It has been shown previously that laser ignition of direct injection engines improves the fuel consumption as well as the exhaust emissions of such engines significantly. The work presented here gives a brief overview on the basics of laser induced ignition. Flame propagation which follows a successful ignition event can be distinguished into two diffrent regimes. Combustion processes within an engine are usually

  11. Discreteness inducing coexistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Renato Vieira

    2013-12-01

    Consider two species that diffuse through space. Consider further that they differ only in initial densities and, possibly, in diffusion constants. Otherwise they are identical. What happens if they compete with each other in the same environment? What is the influence of the discrete nature of the interactions on the final destination? And what are the influence of diffusion and additive fluctuations corresponding to random migration and immigration of individuals? This paper aims to answer these questions for a particular competition model that incorporates intra and interspecific competition between the species. Based on mean field theory, the model has a stationary state dependent on the initial density conditions. We investigate how this initial density dependence is affected by the presence of demographic multiplicative noise and additive noise in space and time. There are three main conclusions: (1) Additive noise favors denser populations at the expense of the less dense, ratifying the competitive exclusion principle. (2) Demographic noise, on the other hand, favors less dense populations at the expense of the denser ones, inducing equal densities at the quasi-stationary state, violating the aforementioned principle. (3) The slower species always suffers the more deleterious effects of statistical fluctuations in a homogeneous medium.

  12. Clofibrate-Induced Antidiuresis

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Arnold M.; Howanitz, Joan; Gemert, Marcia Van; Miller, Myron

    1973-01-01

    Normal subjects and patients with antidiuretic hormone (ADH) deficiency were studied to determine the mechanism of the antidiuretic action of clofibrate. Before clofibrate treatment, the patients' ability to concentrate urine with a standardized dehydration procedure correlated with the amount of ADH which was excreted. During clofibrate administration all six patients with ADH deficiency developed an antidiuresis which was like that of ADH, since there was no change in sodium, potassium, total solute, or creatinine excretion. There was a correlation between the patients' ability to concentrate urine during dehydration and the subsequent response to clofibrate, and the excretion of ADH during dehydration correlated with the excretion of ADH on clofibrate therapy. Clofibrate-induced antidiuresis in these patients was partially overcome by ethanol and by water loading. Clofibrate interfered with the ability of patients and subjects to excrete a water load and prevented the water load from inhibiting ADH excretion in the normal subjects. These studies suggested that clofibrate was acting through endogenous ADH and this thesis was supported by the failure of clofibrate to produce an antidiuresis when injected into rats with total ADH deficiency (Brattleboro strain) although an antidiuresis was produced in water-loaded normal rats. When the drug was injected into Brattleboro rats with exogenous ADH, clofibrate either did not alter or it inhibited the action of the ADH. The data demonstrate that clofibrate has a significant ADH-like action. This action appears to be mediated through the release of endogenous ADH. Images PMID:4685079

  13. Fission-induced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.; Shiu, Y. J.

    1979-01-01

    The possibility of creating a plasma from fission fragments, and to utilize the energy of the particles to create population inversion that would lead to laser action is investigated. An investigation was made of various laser materials which could be used for nuclear-pumped lasing. The most likely candidate for a fissioning material in the gaseous form is uranium hexafluoride - UF6, and experiments were performed to investigate materials that would be compatible with it. One of the central problems in understanding a fission-induced plasma is to obtain a model of the electron behavior, and some preliminary calculations are presented. In particular, the rates of various processes are discussed. A simple intuitive model of the electron energy distribution function is also shown. The results were useful for considering a mathematical model of a nuclear-pumped laser. Next a theoretical model of a (3)He-Ar nuclear-pumped laser is presented. The theory showed good qualitative agreement with the experimental results.

  14. Waterflood-induced fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Dikken, B.J.; Niko, H.

    1987-01-01

    Fracturing occurs quite often in water injection wells, with sometimes unforeseen consequences on waterflood sweep efficiency. One of the causes of fracturing is often the cooling of hot formations by cold injection water. A special version of a thermal reservoir simulator for prototype applications has thus been constructed that is capable of dealing with propagating waterflood-induces hydraulic fractures. With this simulator, fracture propagation and the effect of growing fractures on the sweep efficiency are studied. Infinite fracture conductivity is assumed. The limitation to a very high leak-off fractures justifies disregarding the changes in fracture volume. Fracture growth is calculated using the concept of a critical stress intensity factor. Both poro- and thermo-elastic changes in the horizontal stresses are calculated numerically and their influence on the fracture initiation/propagation is continuously taken into account. In addition, a model of fracture wall impairment because of filter-cake build-up due to poor quality injection water is included. Results are presented for both thermal and isothermal situations. It is observed in isothermal cases that the voidage replacement ratio (volume balance during injection) determined to a great extent the length to which the fracture eventually may grow.

  15. Opioid-induced constipation.

    PubMed

    Gyawali, Bishal; Hayashi, Naomi; Tsukuura, Hiroaki; Honda, Kazunori; Shimokata, Tomoya; Ando, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is a very troublesome, difficult to manage and a nearly universal complication of chronic opioid use to control pain associated with advanced illness. Some studies have reported that OIC is so intolerable in some patients that they skip their opioid medications and bear pain instead of OIC. Laxatives have commonly been used as a prophylaxis and treatment of OIC but they are frequently ineffective because the commonly available laxatives do not target the underlying mechanism of OIC, which is the blockade of peripheral mu-receptors. Recently, there have been a number of advances in the treatment of OIC, which any physician involved with opioid-prescribing discipline should be aware of. This review will update the new options and strategies available for treating OIC along with the relevant clinical trials. Finally, this review also provides a recommendation on the preferred way to approach a patient with OIC in the modern era as well as highlight on the importance of doctor-patient communication in this setting. PMID:26061717

  16. Laxative-induced rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Merante, Alfonso; Gareri, Pietro; Marigliano, Norma Maria; De Fazio, Salvatore; Bonacci, Elvira; Torchia, Carlo; Russo, Gaetano; Lacroce, Pasquale; Lacava, Roberto; Castagna, Alberto; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Ruotolo, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    The present study describes a case of laxative-induced rhabdomyolysis in an elderly patient. An 87-year-old woman was hospitalized for the onset of confusion, tremors, an inability to walk, and a fever that she had been experiencing for 36 hours. She often took high dosages of lactulose and sorbitol syrup as a laxative (about 70 g/day). During her physical examination, the patient was confused, drowsy, and she presented hyposthenia in her upper and lower limbs, symmetric and diffuse moderate hyporeflexia, and her temperature was 37.8°C. Laboratory tests revealed severe hyponatremia with hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, hypochloremia, and metabolic alkalosis. Moreover, rhabdomyolysis markers were found. The correction of hydroelectrolytic imbalances with saline, potassium and sodium chlorure, calcium gluconate was the first treatment. During her hospitalization the patient presented acute delirium, treated with haloperidol and prometazine chloridrate intramuscularly. She was discharged 12 days later, after resolution of symptoms, and normalized laboratory tests. Over-the-counter drugs such as laxatives are usually not considered dangerous; on the other hand, they may cause serum electrolytic imbalance and rhabdomyolysis. A careful monitoring of all the drugs taken by the elderly is one of the most important duties of a physician since drug interactions and their secondary effects may be fatal. PMID:20396636

  17. Undulator induced resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.; Morton, P.; Spencer, J.; Winick, H.

    1983-08-01

    Undulators appear to be nearly ideal radiation sources for use in storage rings because of their high brightness and small perturbation on stored beam characteristics. We consider the effects of higher-order magnetic field errors and show how they increase beam size and may lead to unstable growth of betatron oscillations. We have observed such effects in SPEAR at betatron tunes satisfying the equations: 3nu/sub x/ + nu/sub y/ = 21 and nu/sub x/ + 3nu/sub y/ = 21. The widths of these resonances were measured to be GAMMA = 0.008 +- 0.004. They are clearly visible on the synchrotron light monitors with a very dynamic and characteristic beam blow-up pattern (reminiscent of a Miller beer label). A model is developed which predicts the locations of resonances, their widths and the projected shapes observed on the light monitors. By inducing such high-order coupling resonances one could study such things as the beam distribution in electron rings or possibly turbulent motion in proton rings.

  18. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Brieger, D B; Mak, K H; Kottke-Marchant, K; Topol, E J

    1998-06-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a potentially serious complication of heparin therapy and is being encountered more frequently in patients with cardiovascular disease as use of anticoagulant therapy becomes more widespread. Our understanding of the pathophysiology of this immune-mediated condition has improved in recent years, with heparin-platelet factor 4 complex as the culprit antigen in most patients. New sensitive laboratory assays for the pathogenic antibody are now available and should permit an earlier, more reliable diagnosis, but their optimal application remains to be defined. For patients in whom HIT is diagnosed, immediate discontinuation of heparin infusions and elimination of heparin from all flushes and ports are mandatory. Further management of patients with HIT is problematic at present, as there are no readily available alternative anticoagulant agents in the United States with proven efficacy in acute coronary disease. The direct thrombin inhibitors appear to be the most promising alternatives to heparin, when continued use of heparin is contraindicated, and the results of several multicenter trials evaluating their application in patients with HIT are awaited. PMID:9626819

  19. Dialysis induced hypoxemia.

    PubMed

    Habte, B; Carter, R; Shamebo, M; Veicht, J; Boulton Jones, J M

    1982-09-01

    We investigated the mechanism by which hypoxemia is produced in patients on dialysis by studying changes in neutrophil count, blood gases and pulmonary function in a patient with only trace amounts of circulating C3 associated with Type II mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis and a control group of 6 patients with normal C3 levels during a 4 hour hemodialysis. Fifteen minutes after the start of dialysis the neutrophil count fell to 13% of pre-dialysis values in the control group while it only fell to 71% in the study patient. A further fall to 47% occurred in the patient at 30 minutes. A drop in PaO2 by 15% of initial values occurred at 15 and 30 minutes in the controls and the patient respectively matching the trend of fall in the neutrophil count. PaCO2 fell sharply across the dialysis membrane with reciprocol changes in the dialysis bath. Alveolar oxygen tension showed a significant reduction starting at 15 minutes correlating with the reduction in PaO2. The A-a O2 gradient was not altered significantly. These data strongly suggest that the principal mechanism leading to hypoxemia during dialysis is hypoventilation resulting from CO2 loss into the dialysis bath. Complement mediated pulmonary leucostasis may play a secondary role in inducing a quicker fall in PaO2 in the early part of dialysis. PMID:7140022

  20. Coffee-induced Hypokalaemia

    PubMed Central

    Tajima, Yutaka

    2010-01-01

    Taking an excess amount of caffeine (e.g. overdrinking caffeinated beverages) sometimes causes hypokalaemia. Although the detailed mechanism has not been clarified yet, an increased loss of potassium via the urine stream caused by the diuretic action of caffeine is proposed as one of the possibilities. We report the case of a 50-year-old female outpatient who rapidly developed severe generalized muscle weakness and fatigue. Her symptoms were considered to be principally due to hypokalaemia. Since her blood urea nitrogen concentration decreased greatly, it was suggested that she had massive polyuria due to overhydration (i.e. dilution of her body fluids). Initially, we considered that a urinary tract infection might have caused her illness. However, we found that she was a heavy coffee drinker and had constantly experienced massive diuresis. After a course of oral antibiotics, potassium replacement and stopping coffee (caffeine) ingestion, her symptoms resolved quickly. In conclusion, it was considered that overdrinking coffee (caffeine) induced her hypokalaemia. Probably, loss of potassium via the urine stream with secondary aldosteronism was the main cause of the hypokalaemia. PMID:21769248

  1. Carbimazole-induced agranulocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Anisha; Joseph, Siby; Sidharthan, Neeraj; Murali, Dhanya

    2015-01-01

    A 47 year old lady with hyperthyroidism for past 1½ years was initially on Carbimazole 20 mg orally then changed to 30 mg (during Hysterectomy) but was taking 10 mg for last 1 year. She had intermittent fever with severe B/L bifrontal headache since 3 weeks. Routine investigations showed anaemia, neutropenia, leucopenia and CRP elevation. Peripheral smear showed normocytic normochromic anaemia with Rouleaux formation, leucopenia with 2% atypical cells and mild thrombocytosis. Widal test, RA factor (Rheumatoid factor) test, Ig M (Immunoglobulin M) dengue, Ig M Lepto, TORCH infections (Toxoplasmosis, Other (Syphilis, varicella-zoster, parvovirus B19), Cytomegalovirus and Herpes infections), ANA (Antinuclear antibody) screen cANCA (Cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) and pANCA (Perinuclear Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies) tests were negative. Bone marrow aspiration showed normo to hypercellular marrow with 15% atypical cells and plasma cells. Multiple myeloma workup was done. Carbimazole was withheld. Conclusion: Drug induced agranulocytosis occurs with in 1-2 months of taking the antithyroid medication but onset delayed by 1½ year. De-challenge resulted normalization of blood parameters. PMID:26813922

  2. Tumor-induced osteomalacia

    PubMed Central

    Chong, William H; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Chen, Clara C; Collins, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare and fascinating paraneoplastic syndrome in which patients present with bone pain, fractures, and muscle weakness. The cause is high blood levels of the recently identified phosphate and vitamin D-regulating hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). In TIO, FGF23 is secreted by mesenchymal tumors that are usually benign, but are typically very small and difficult to locate. FGF23 acts primarily at the renal tubule and impairs phosphate reabsorption and 1α-hydroxylation of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, leading to hypophosphatemia and low levels of 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D. A step-wise approach utilizing functional imaging (F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and octreotide scintigraphy) followed by anatomical imaging (computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging), and, if needed, selective venous sampling with measurement of FGF23 is usually successful in locating the tumors. For tumors that cannot be located, medical treatment with phosphate supplements and active vitamin D (calcitriol or alphacalcidiol) is usually successful; however, the medical regimen can be cumbersome and associated with complications. This review summarizes the current understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease and provides guidance in evaluating and treating these patients. Novel imaging modalities and medical treatments, which hold promise for the future, are also reviewed. PMID:21490240

  3. Mononuclear cell secretome protects from experimental autoimmune myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Hoetzenecker, Konrad; Zimmermann, Matthias; Hoetzenecker, Wolfram; Schweiger, Thomas; Kollmann, Dagmar; Mildner, Michael; Hegedus, Balazs; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Hacker, Stefan; Birner, Peter; Gabriel, Christian; Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Blyszczuk, Przemyslaw; Eriksson, Urs; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aims Supernatants of serum-free cultured mononuclear cells (MNC) contain a mix of immunomodulating factors (secretome), which have been shown to attenuate detrimental inflammatory responses following myocardial ischaemia. Inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (iDCM) is a common cause of heart failure in young patients. Experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) is a CD4+ T cell-dependent model, which mirrors important pathogenic aspects of iDCM. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of MNC secretome on myocardial inflammation in the EAM model. Methods and results BALB/c mice were immunized twice with an alpha myosin heavy chain peptide together with Complete Freund adjuvant. Supernatants from mouse mononuclear cells were collected, dialysed, and injected i.p. at Day 0, Day 7, or Day 14, respectively. Myocarditis severity, T cell responses, and autoantibody formation were assessed at Day 21. The impact of MNC secretome on CD4+ T cell function and viability was evaluated using in vitro proliferation and cell viability assays. A single high-dose application of MNC secretome, injected at Day 14 after the first immunization, effectively attenuated myocardial inflammation. Mechanistically, MNC secretome induced caspase-8-dependent apoptosis in autoreactive CD4+ T cells. Conclusion MNC secretome abrogated myocardial inflammation in a CD4+ T cell-dependent animal model of autoimmune myocarditis. This anti-inflammatory effect of MNC secretome suggests a novel and simple potential treatment concept for inflammatory heart diseases. PMID:23321350

  4. Inhibition of A2780 Human Ovarian Carcinoma Cell Proliferation by a Rubus Component, Sanguiin H-6.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dahae; Ko, Hyeonseok; Kim, Young-Joo; Kim, Su-Nam; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Yamabe, Noriko; Kim, Ki Hyun; Kang, Ki Sung; Kim, Hyun Young; Shibamoto, Takayuki

    2016-02-01

    The effects of a red raspberry component, sanguiin H-6 (SH-6), on the induction of apoptosis and the related signaling pathways in A2780 human ovarian carcinoma cells were investigated. SH-6 caused an antiproliferative effect and a severe morphological change resembling that of apoptotic cell death but no effect on the cancer cell cycle arrest. In addition, SH-6 induced an early apoptotic effect and activation of caspases as well as the cleavage of PARP, which is a hallmark of apoptosis. The early apoptotic percentages of A2780 cells exposed to 20 and 40 μM SH-6 were 35.39 and 41.76, respectively. Also, SH-6 caused the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), especially p38, and the increase of truncated p15/BID. These results in the present study suggest that the apoptosis of A2780 human ovarian carcinoma cells by SH-6 is mediated by the MAPK p38 and a caspase-8-dependent BID cleavage pathway. PMID:26725849

  5. Calmodulin antagonists induce platelet apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhicheng; Li, Suping; Shi, Quanwei; Yan, Rong; Liu, Guanglei; Dai, Kesheng

    2010-04-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) antagonists induce apoptosis in various tumor models and inhibit tumor cell invasion and metastasis, thus some of which have been extensively used as anti-cancer agents. In platelets, CaM has been found to bind directly to the cytoplasmic domains of several platelet receptors. Incubation of platelets with CaM antagonists impairs the receptors-related platelet functions. However, it is still unknown whether CaM antagonists induce platelet apoptosis. Here we show that CaM antagonists N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide (W7), tamoxifen (TMX), and trifluoperazine (TFP) induce apoptotic events in human platelets, including depolarization of mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential, caspase-3 activation, and phosphatidylserine exposure. CaM antagonists did not incur platelet activation as detected by P-selectin surface expression and PAC-1 binding. However, ADP-, botrocetin-, and alpha-thrombin-induced platelet aggregation, platelet adhesion and spreading on von Willebrand factor surface were significantly reduced in platelets pre-treated with CaM antagonists. Furthermore, cytosolic Ca(2+) levels were obviously elevated by both W7 and TMX, and membrane-permeable Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM significantly reduced apoptotic events in platelets induced by W7. Therefore, these findings indicate that CaM antagonists induce platelet apoptosis. The elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) levels may be involved in the regulation of CaM antagonists-induced platelet apoptosis. PMID:20172594

  6. Drug-Induced Metabolic Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Amy Quynh Trang; Xu, Li Hao Richie; Moe, Orson W.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis could emerge from diseases disrupting acid-base equilibrium or from drugs that induce similar derangements. Occurrences are usually accompanied by comorbid conditions of drug-induced metabolic acidosis, and clinical outcomes may range from mild to fatal. It is imperative that clinicians not only are fully aware of the list of drugs that may lead to metabolic acidosis but also understand the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. In this review, we categorized drug-induced metabolic acidosis in terms of pathophysiological mechanisms, as well as individual drugs’ characteristics. PMID:26918138

  7. Does stress induce bowel dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Ming; El-Zaatari, Mohamad; Kao, John Y

    2014-08-01

    Psychological stress is known to induce somatic symptoms. Classically, many gut physiological responses to stress are mediated by the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. There is, however, a growing body of evidence of stress-induced corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) release causing bowel dysfunction through multiple pathways, either through the HPA axis, the autonomic nervous systems, or directly on the bowel itself. In addition, recent findings of CRF influencing the composition of gut microbiota lend support for the use of probiotics, antibiotics, and other microbiota-altering agents as potential therapeutic measures in stress-induced bowel dysfunction. PMID:24881644

  8. Seizures induced by playing music.

    PubMed

    Sutherling, W W; Hershman, L M; Miller, J Q; Lee, S I

    1980-09-01

    A 67-year-old organist and minister with diabetes mellitus had stereotyped focal seizures of the left lower face, jaw, and neck. Attacks occurred spontaneously or were induced when he played a specific hymn on the organ. The seizures were not induced by reading, singing, hearing, or playing the hymn silently. The patient had interictal weakness of the left lower face and left side of the tongue. Focal seizures were recorded on an electroencephalogram (EEG) at the right temporofrontal area. This patient illustrates partial seizures induced by playing music. PMID:6775246

  9. Geothermal induced seismicity program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    A plan for a National Geothermal Induced Seismicity Program has been prepared in consultation with a panel of experts from industry, academia, and government. The program calls for baseline seismic monitoring in regions of known future geothermal development, continued seismic monitoring and characterization of earthquakes in zones of geothermal fluid production and injection, modeling of the earthquake-inducing mechanism, and in situ measurement of stresses in the geothermal development. The Geothermal Induced Seismicity Program (GISP) will have as its objectives the evaluation of the seismic hazard, if any, associated with geothermal resource exploitation and the devising of a technology which, when properly utilized, will control or mitigate such hazards.

  10. Drug-Induced Metabolic Acidosis.

    PubMed

    Pham, Amy Quynh Trang; Xu, Li Hao Richie; Moe, Orson W

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis could emerge from diseases disrupting acid-base equilibrium or from drugs that induce similar derangements. Occurrences are usually accompanied by comorbid conditions of drug-induced metabolic acidosis, and clinical outcomes may range from mild to fatal. It is imperative that clinicians not only are fully aware of the list of drugs that may lead to metabolic acidosis but also understand the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. In this review, we categorized drug-induced metabolic acidosis in terms of pathophysiological mechanisms, as well as individual drugs' characteristics. PMID:26918138

  11. Drug-induced visceral angioedema

    PubMed Central

    Thalanayar, Prashanth M.; Ghobrial, Ibrahim; Lubin, Fritz; Karnik, Reena; Bhasin, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Angioedema associated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) is due to the accumulation of bradykinin and its metabolites. Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) produce anti-hypertensive effects by blocking the angiotensin II AT1 receptor action; hence bradykinin-related side effects are not expected. However, we notice the occurrence of ARB-induced angioedema as not a very rare side effect. Visceral drug-induced angioedema has been reported with ACEIs, not with ARBs. This underlying review will help educate readers on the pathophysiology and recent guidelines pertaining to ACEI- and ARB-induced visceral angioedema. PMID:25317271

  12. Drug-Induced Urinary Calculi

    PubMed Central

    Matlaga, Brian R; Shah, Ojas D; Assimos, Dean G

    2003-01-01

    Urinary calculi may be induced by a number of medications used to treat a variety of conditions. These medications may lead to metabolic abnormalities that facilitate the formation of stones. Drugs that induce metabolic calculi include loop diuretics; carbonic anhydrase inhibitors; and laxatives, when abused. Correcting the metabolic abnormality may eliminate or dramatically attenuate stone activity. Urinary calculi can also be induced by medications when the drugs crystallize and become the primary component of the stones. In this case, urinary supersaturation of the agent may promote formation of the calculi. Drugs that induce calculi via this process include magnesium trisilicate; ciprofloxacin; sulfa medications; triamterene; indinavir; and ephedrine, alone or in combination with guaifenesin. When this situation occurs, discontinuation of the medication is usually necessary. PMID:16985842

  13. Drug-induced pulmonary disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... improve. Some drug-induced lung diseases, such as pulmonary fibrosis, may never go away. ... Complications that may develop include: Diffuse interstitial pulmonary fibrosis Hypoxemia (low blood oxygen) Respiratory failure

  14. Fluoxetine-induced pill oesophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Abdul Majid; Shiekh, Abdul Gaffar; Hussain, Waleed M; Miamini, Wail Al; Khoujah, Amer M; Zayyani, Najah R

    2011-01-01

    Pill-induced oesophagitis is well reported in people of all ages (range 3–98 years), with females outnumbering males by 1.5:1. Antibiotic pills, cardiac pills and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and alendronate are the most common culprits. We report a case of fluoxetine-induced pill oesophagitis in a young adult without any underlying pathological abnormalities of the oesophagus. PMID:22693306

  15. Irradiation Induced Creep of Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D; Murty, Prof K.L.; Eapen, Dr. Jacob

    2010-01-01

    The current status of graphite irradiation induced creep strain prediction is reviewed and the major creep models are described. The ability of the models to quantitatively predict the irradiation induced creep strain of graphite is reported. Potential mechanisms of in-crystal creep are reviewed as are mechanisms of pore generation under stress. The case for further experimental work is made and the need for improved creep models across multi-scales is highlighted.

  16. Vection and induced visual motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Ian P.

    1991-12-01

    When exposed to a large moving visual display, a person experiences illusory self motion (vection). Specialized devices were used to investigate the relation between illusory visual motion of stationary objects and illusory self motion induced by motion of a visual scene. In a first set of experiments, two distinct components of induced visual motion were measured: exocentric induced motion which causes a stationary object to appear to move with the self, and egocentric induced motion which causes an object to seem to move relative to the self. Another set of experiments was designed to reveal the extent to which vection depends on the presence of stationary objects in the field of view and to explore what types of relative motion between the moving display and the stationary objects most strongly induce vection. It was observed that when all stationary objects were removed, vection had a long latency and was very weak when it occurred. A third set of experiments was designed to reveal the extent to which illusory body tilt induced by viewing a tilted or rotating scene depends on the motion of a visual stimulus and on the geometrical features of the stimulus. The results reveal the relative contributions of visual polarity and visual motion to illusory body tilt and the extent to which visual stimuli can override conflicting stimuli arising from the otolith organs.

  17. A rapid and transient ROS generation by cadmium triggers apoptosis via caspase-dependent pathway in HepG2 cells and this is inhibited through N-acetylcysteine-mediated catalase upregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Seon-Hee; Lim, Sung-Chul . E-mail: sclim@chosun.ac.kr

    2006-05-01

    Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in cadmium (Cd)-induced hepatotoxicity, the role of ROS in this pathway remains unclear. Therefore, we attempted to determine the molecular mechanisms relevant to Cd-induced cell death in HepG2 cells. Cd was found to induce apoptosis in the HepG2 cells in a time- and dose-dependent fashion, as confirmed by DNA fragmentation analysis and TUNEL staining. In the early stages, both rapid and transient ROS generation triggered apoptosis via Fas activation and subsequent caspase-8-dependent Bid cleavage, as well as by calpain-mediated mitochondrial Bax cleavage. The timing of Bid activation was coincided with the timing at which the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MMP) collapsed as well as the cytochrome c (Cyt c) released into the cytosol. Furthermore, mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore inhibitors, such as cyclosporin A (CsA) and bongkrekic acid (BA), did not block Cd-induced ROS generation, MMP collapse and Cyt c release. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) pretreatment resulted in the complete inhibition of the Cd-induced apoptosis via catalase upregulation and subsequent Fas downregulation. NAC treatment also completely blocked the Cd-induced intracellular ROS generation, MMP collapse and Cyt c release, indicating that Cd-induced mitochondrial dysfunction may be regulated indirectly by ROS-mediated signaling pathway. Taken together, a rapid and transient ROS generation by Cd triggers apoptosis via caspase-dependent pathway and subsequent mitochondrial pathway. NAC inhibits Cd-induced apoptosis through the blocking of ROS generation as well as the catalase upregulation.

  18. Bulgy tadpoles: inducible defense morph.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Osamu; Nishimura, Kinya

    2004-08-01

    Predator induced morphological defenses are marked morphological shifts induced directly by cues associated with a predator. Generally, remote cues, i.e., chemical substances emitted from predators or injured conspecifics, are considered to be ideal signals to induce morphological change in aquatic environments rather than close cues, i.e., close chemical or tactile cues, since chemical substances that can propagate over relatively long distances and persist for a long period may allow organisms to keep safe and to deliberately change their morph. In fact, most organisms adopting an inducible morphological defense utilize remote chemical cues to detect predation risk and to produce morphological defenses. In this paper, we report a unique and functionally well designed inducible morphological defense strategy where the induction process requires close cues from a predator. The tadpoles of Rana pirica exhibited a bulgy bodied morphology when threatened with predation by larval salamanders, Hynobius retardatus, in close proximity. Predation trials and a function experiment showed that the induced bulgy morph is an adaptive defense phenotype against the gape-limited predator larval H. retardatus. Furthermore, R. pirica tadpoles use two adaptive strategies in terms of cost saving, i.e., adjustment of the extent of bulginess according to predation risk and reversibility by actual shrink of bulgy body after removing the predation threat. In general, R. pirica hatch earlier than H. retardatus. In natural ponds, during the early developmental stage R. pirica tadpoles live in close proximity to young H. retardatus larvae. As they grow, the salamanders gradually become serious predators and the predator-prey interaction becomes intimate. After a while, predation, cannibalism and metamorphosis decrease the number of salamanders in the ponds, and the predator-prey interaction weakens. Such a phenology in the predator-prey interaction allows the evolution of a close

  19. Drug-Induced Itch Management.

    PubMed

    Ebata, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    Drugs may cause itching as a concomitant symptom of drug-induced skin reactions or in the form of pruritus without skin lesions. Drug-induced itch is defined as generalized itching without skin lesions, caused by a drug. Itching associated with drug-induced cholestasis is among the common dermatologic adverse events (dAEs) that induce itching. Some drugs such as opioids, antimalarials, and hydroxyethyl starch are known to induce itching without skin lesions. The clinical features and underlying proposed mechanisms of itching caused by these drugs have been specifically investigated. The recent application of targeted anticancer drugs has increased the survival rate of cancer patients. These new agents cause significant dAEs such as acneiform rashes, dry skin, hand-foot syndrome, paronychia, and itching. Itching is a common side effect of epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors. Though not life-threatening, these dAEs have a negative impact on a patient's quality of life, leading to dose reduction and possibly less effective cancer therapy. It is important to provide an effective supportive antipruritic treatment without interruption of the administration of these drugs. This chapter concludes by describing basic measures to be taken for diagnosis and treatment of drug-induced itch. The principle of treatment is discontinuation of suspected causative drugs in general except for anticancer medications. In case itching lasts long after drug withdrawal or the causative drug cannot be stopped, vigorous symptomatic antipruritic treatment and specific therapies for different types of drug-induced itch should be undertaken. PMID:27578085

  20. Phase modulation induced by cooperative effects in electromagnetically induced transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischhaker, Robert; Evers, Joerg; Dey, Tarak N.

    2010-07-15

    We analyze the influence of dipole-dipole interactions in an electromagnetically induced transparency set up for a density at the onset of cooperative effects. To this end, we include mean-field models for the influence of local-field corrections and radiation trapping into our calculation. We show both analytically and numerically that the polarization contribution to the local field strongly modulates the phase of a weak pulse. We give an intuitive explanation for this local-field-induced phase modulation and demonstrate that it distinctively differs from the nonlinear self-phase-modulation that a strong pulse experiences in a Kerr medium.

  1. Clindamycin-induced hypersensitivity reaction.

    PubMed

    Bulloch, Marilyn N; Baccas, Jonathan T; Arnold, Scott

    2016-06-01

    Drug-induced anaphylaxis is an unpredictable adverse reaction. Although it may occur with any medication, antibiotics induce more cases of anaphylaxis than any other medication class with most cases being induced by β-lactam antibiotics. Clindamycin is an antibiotic with good gram-positive and anaerobe coverage which is often used in patients with β-lactam allergies. We report the case of a 46-year-old female who experienced anaphylaxis after a dose of intravenous (IV) clindamycin. Following treatment with methylprednisolone, epinephrine, diphenhydramine, and albuterol, the patient stabilized. The patient's score on the Naranjo's algorithm was 8 (probable); a score of 9 (definite) limited only by absence of drug re-challenge. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a clindamycin-induced anaphylaxis where the patient was not exposed to any other agent that may have triggered the response, the first case in the United States, and only the third documented case in the literature. Clinicians should be aware of the potential for drug-induced anaphylaxis in all medications. PMID:26216470

  2. Flash photography-induced maculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Veugelen, Tim; Coutteel, Carine; Leys, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To report a flash photography-induced maculopathy. Methods: A professional photographer blinded himself accidentally and he consulted 3 days after the event with a scotoma in his dominant left eye. A unilateral acute light-induced maculopathy with hemorrhage was observed. The lesion was studied with colour photography, fluorescein and indocyanin angiography, autofluorescence imaging and repeated optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. Results: At age 43, this professional photographer was blinded by the flash light of his camera and subsequently realized he had a scotoma in his dominant eye. Three days after the event visual acuity (VA) was 20/70 and an acute light-induced maculopathy was noted. Another three days later, VA was 20/50 and the lesions were less prominent. After one month, the photographer still had problems making sharp pictures, VA was 20/25 and a macular scar was observed. During further follow-up, he regained full vision and experienced no professional problems. Conclusions: This case illustrates that the light of flash photography can accidentally hit an eye and induce a light-induced maculopathy.

  3. Static behaviour of induced seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignan, A.

    2015-12-01

    The standard paradigm to describe seismicity induced by fluid injection is to apply nonlinear diffusion dynamics in a poroelastic medium. I show that the spatiotemporal behaviour and rate evolution of induced seismicity can, instead, be expressed by geometric operations on a static stress field produced by volume change at depth. I obtain laws similar in form to the ones derived from poroelasticity while requiring a lower description length. Although fluid flow is known to occur in the ground, it is not pertinent to the behaviour of induced seismicity. The proposed model is equivalent to the static stress model for tectonic foreshocks generated by the Non-Critical Precursory Accelerating Seismicity Theory. This study hence verifies the explanatory power of this theory outside of its original scope.

  4. Psychotropic drug-induced neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Harpreet S; Singh, Ira

    2005-08-01

    Psychotropic medications have been known to cause blood dyscrasias, including neutropenia, and since the advent of clozapine, this side effect is now increasingly being recognized. Almost all the major classes of psychotropic medications have been associated with neutropenia. Operational definitions for blood dyscrasias have allowed us to create an epidemiological database on this rare side effect of psychotropic medications. With increased awareness of drug-induced neutropenia among physicians, methods of early detection and treatment of this side effect have also been the focus of recent literature. Another area of active research has been identifying the risk factors and mechanism of drug-induced neutropenia. This article attempts to synthesize our current understanding of psychotropic drug-induced neutropenia and also provide insights into future research in this realm. PMID:16234875

  5. The surgically induced stress response.

    PubMed

    Finnerty, Celeste C; Mabvuure, Nigel Tapiwa; Ali, Arham; Kozar, Rosemary A; Herndon, David N

    2013-09-01

    The stress response to surgery, critical illness, trauma, and burns encompasses derangements of metabolic and physiological processes that induce perturbations in the inflammatory, acute phase, hormonal, and genomic responses. Hypermetabolism and hypercatabolism result, leading to muscle wasting, impaired immune function and wound healing, organ failure, and death. The surgery-induced stress response is largely similar to that triggered by traumatic injuries; the duration of the stress response, however, varies according to the severity of injury (surgical or traumatic). This spectrum of injuries and insults ranges from small lacerations to severe insults such as large poly-traumatic and burn injuries. Burn injuries provide an extreme model of trauma induced stress responses that can be used to study the long-term effects of a prolonged stress response. Although the stress response to acute trauma evolved to confer improved chances of survival following injury, in modern surgical practice the stress response can be detrimental. PMID:24009246

  6. Persistent nicorandil induced oral ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Healy, C M; Smyth, Y; Flint, S R

    2004-01-01

    Four patients with nicorandil induced ulceration are described, and the literature on the subject is reviewed. Nicorandil induced ulcers are very painful and distressing for patients. Clinically they appear as large, deep, persistent ulcers that have punched out edges. They are poorly responsive to topical steroids and usually require alteration of nicorandil treatment. The ulceration tends to occur at high doses of nicorandil and all four cases reported here were on doses of 40 mg per day or greater. In these situations reduction of nicorandil dose may be sufficient to promote ulcer healing and prevent further recurrence. However, nicorandil induced ulcers have been reported at doses as low as 10 mg daily and complete cessation of nicorandil may be required. PMID:15201264

  7. Drug-induced renal disorders.

    PubMed

    Ghane Shahrbaf, Fatemeh; Assadi, Farahnak

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced nephrotoxicity are more common among infants and young children and in certain clinical situations such as underlying renal dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. Drugs can cause acute renal injury, intrarenal obstruction, interstitial nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and acid-base and fluid electrolytes disorders. Certain drugs can cause alteration in intraglomerular hemodynamics, inflammatory changes in renal tubular cells, leading to acute kidney injury (AKI), tubulointerstitial disease and renal scarring. Drug-induced nephrotoxicity tends to occur more frequently in patients with intravascular volume depletion, diabetes, congestive heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and sepsis. Therefore, early detection of drugs adverse effects is important to prevent progression to end-stage renal disease. Preventive measures requires knowledge of mechanisms of drug-induced nephrotoxicity, understanding patients and drug-related risk factors coupled with therapeutic intervention by correcting risk factors, assessing baseline renal function before initiation of therapy, adjusting the drug dosage and avoiding use of nephrotoxic drug combinations. PMID:26468475

  8. Jet-Induced Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W; Fragile, C; Anninos, P; Murray, S

    2003-12-16

    Jets from radio galaxies can have dramatic effects on the medium through which they propagate. We review observational evidence for jet-induced star formation in low ('FR-I') and high ('FR-II') luminosity radio galaxies, at low and high redshifts respectively. We then discuss numerical simulations which are aimed to explain a jet-induced starburst ('Minkowski's Object') in the nearby FR-I type radio galaxy NGC 541. We conclude that jets can induce star formation in moderately dense (10 cm{sup -3}), warm (10{sup 4} K) gas; that this may be more common in the dense environments of forming, active galaxies; and that this may provide a mechanism for 'positive' feedback from AGN in the galaxy formation process.

  9. Late Onset Clozapine Induced Agranulocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Velayudhan, Rajmohan; Kakkan, Sushil

    2014-01-01

    Agranulocytosis is defined as an absolute neutrophil count less than 100/mm3 in association with infectious disease. The risk of agranulocytosis is 0.38% of all clozapine treated cases and there is a relatively lesser incidence in Indian population. The risk of clozapine-induced agranulocytosis and neutropenia is highest in the first 6 months and higher in the initial 18 months after the onset of treatment. There have been very few reports of neutropenia and agranulocytosis after this period. There have so far been no reports of late onset clozapine induced agranulocytosis has been reported from India. A case of late onset clozapine induced agranulocytosis with possible mechanism of the same is reported. PMID:25336778

  10. Induced abortion and contraception use

    PubMed Central

    du Prey, Beatrice; Talavlikar, Rachel; Mangat, Rupinder; Freiheit, Elizabeth A.; Drummond, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine what proportion of women seeking induced abortion in the Calgary census metropolitan area were immigrants. Design For 2 months, eligible women were asked to complete a questionnaire. Women who refused were asked to provide their country of birth (COB) to assess for selection bias. Setting Two abortion clinics in Calgary, Alta. Participants Women presenting at or less than 15 weeks’ gestational age for induced abortion for maternal indications. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was the proportion of women seeking induced abortion services who were immigrants. Secondary outcomes compared socioeconomic characteristics and contraception use between immigrant and Canadian-born women. Results A total of 752 women either completed a questionnaire (78.6%) or provided their COB (21.4%). Overall, 28.9% of women living in the Calgary census metropolitan area who completed the questionnaire were immigrants, less than the 31.2% background proportion of immigrant women of childbearing age. However, 46.0% of women who provided only COB were immigrants. When these data were combined, 34.2% of women presenting for induced abortion identified as immigrant, a proportion not significantly different from the background proportion (P = .127). Immigrant women presenting for induced abortion tended to be older, more educated, married with children, and have increased parity. They were similar to Canadian-born women in number of previous abortions, income status, and employment status. Conclusion This study suggests that immigrant women in Calgary are not presenting for induced abortion in disproportionately higher numbers, which differs from existing European literature. This is likely owing to differing socioeconomic characteristics among the immigrant women in our study from what have been previously described in the literature (typically lower socioeconomic status). Much still needs to be explored with regard to factors influencing the use of

  11. An induced junction photovoltaic cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Call, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Silicon solar cells operating with induced junctions rather than diffused junctions have been fabricated and tested. Induced junctions were created by forming an inversion layer near the surface of the silicon by supplying a sheet of positive charge above the surface. Measurements of the response of the inversion layer cell to light of different wavelengths indicated it to be more sensitive to the shorter wavelengths of the sun's spectrum than conventional cells. The greater sensitivity occurs because of the shallow junction and the strong electric field at the surface.

  12. Coating-induced wavefront aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiley, Daniel J.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1992-12-01

    The coatings which are used on telescope mirrors and other optical interfaces can have a profound effect on the image quality formed by an optical system. This paper evaluates the defocus and astigmatism which are caused by the s- and p-phase shifts of coatings. These coating-induced wavefront aberrations are usually insignificant, but can, under certain circumstances, overshadow the geometric wavefront aberrations of the system. The wavefront aberrations induced by reflection-enhanced coatings on an f/1.5 Cassegrain telescope are numerically evaluated as an example.

  13. Induced piezoelectricity in isotropic biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, R L

    1976-12-01

    Isotropic material can be made to exhibit piezoelectric effects by the application of a constant electric field. For insulators, the piezoelectric strain constant is proportional to the applied electric field and for semiconductors, an additional out-of-phase component of piezoelectricity is proportional to the electric current density in the sample. The two induced coefficients are proportional to the strain-dependent dielectric constant (depsilon/dS + epsilon) and resistivity (drho/dS - rho), respectively. The latter is more important at frequencies such that rhoepsilonomega less than 1, often the case in biopolymers. Signals from induced piezoelectricity in nature may be larger than those from true piezoelectricity. PMID:990389

  14. Plasma rotation induced by RF

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, V. S.; Chiu, S. C.; Lin-Liu, Y. R. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5698; Omelchenko, Y. A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5698

    1999-09-20

    Plasma rotation has many beneficial effects on tokamak operation including stabilization of MHD and microturbulence to improve the beta limit and confinement. Contrary to present-day tokamaks, neutral beams may not be effective in driving rotation in fusion reactors; hence the investigation of radiofrequency (RF) induced plasma rotation is of great interest and potential importance. This paper reviews the experimental results of RF induced rotation and possible physical mechanisms, suggested by theories, to explain the observations. This subject is only in the infancy of its research and many challenging issues remained to be understood and resolved. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Method for induced polarization logging

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Waxman, M.H.

    1987-04-14

    A method is described for generating a log of the formation phase shift, resistivity and spontaneous potential of an earth formation from data obtained from the earth formation with a multi-electrode induced polarization logging tool. The method comprises obtaining data samples from the formation at measurement points equally spaced in time of the magnitude and phase of the induced voltage and the magnitude and phase of the current supplied by a circuit through a reference resistance R/sub 0/ to a survey current electrode associated with the tool.

  16. Induced radioactivity in LDEF components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Parnell, T. A.; Laird, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    A systematic study of the induced radioactivity of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is being carried out in order to gather information about the low earth orbit radiation environment and its effects on materials. The large mass of the LDEF spacecraft, its stabilized configuration, and long mission duration have presented an opportunity to determine space radiation-induced radioactivities with a precision not possible before. Data presented include preliminary activities for steel and aluminum structural samples, and activation subexperiment foils. Effects seen in the data show a clear indication of the trapped proton anisotropy in the South Atlantic Anomaly and suggest contributions from different sources of external radiation fluxes.

  17. Anaphylaxis induced by lentil inhalation.

    PubMed

    Ayşenur, Kaya; Akan, Ayşegül; Mustafa, Erkoçoğlu; Müge, Toyran; Kocabaş, Can Naci

    2012-06-01

    Anaphylaxis is a rapid onset serious allergic reaction which may be fatal. Foods are the most common allergens leading to anaphylaxis especially for childhood. Most of the food-induced anaphylactic reactions take place after ingestion of the allergic food and only a few cases exist with anaphylactic reactions induced by inhalation of foods such as peanut, soybean and lupine. The case we present is unusual in that an 8 1/2-year-old boy developed anaphylaxis with the inhalation of steam from boiling lentils. PMID:22830298

  18. Key aspects governing induced seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buijze, Loes; Wassing, Brecht; Fokker, Peter

    2013-04-01

    In the past decades numerous examples of earthquakes induced by human-induced changes in subsurface fluid pressures have been reported. This poses a major threat to the future development of some of these operations and calls for an understanding and quantification of the seismicity generated. From geomechanical considerations and insights from laboratory experiments the factors controlling induced seismicity may be grouped into 4 categories; the magnitude of the stress disturbance, the pre-existing stress conditions, the reservoir/fault rock properties and the local geometry. We investigated whether the (relative) contributions of these factors and their influence on magnitudes generated could be recognized by looking at the entire dataset of reported cases of induced seismicity as a whole, and what this might imply for future developments. An extensive database has been built out of over a 160 known cases of induced seismicity worldwide, incorporating the relevant geological, seismological and fluid-related parameters. The cases studied include hydrocarbon depletion and secondary recovery, waste water injection, (enhanced) geothermal systems and hydraulic fracturing with observed magnitudes ranging from less than -1.5 to 7. The parameters taken into account were based on the theoretical background of the mechanisms of induced seismicity and include the injection/depletion-related parameters, (spatial) characteristics of seismicity, lithological properties and the local stress situation. Correlations between the seismic response and the geological/geomechanical characteristics of the various sites were investigated. The injected/depleted volumes and the scale of the activities are major controlling factors on the maximum magnitudes generated. Spatial signatures of seismicity such as the depth and lateral spread of the seismicity were observed to be distinct for different activities, which is useful when considering future operations. Where available the local

  19. Static behaviour of induced seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignan, Arnaud

    2016-04-01

    The standard paradigm to describe seismicity induced by fluid injection is to apply non-linear diffusion dynamics in a poroelastic medium. I show that the spatio-temporal behaviour and rate evolution of induced seismicity can, instead, be expressed by geometric operations on a static stress field produced by volume change at depth. I obtain laws similar in form to the ones derived from poroelasticity while requiring a lower description length. Although fluid flow is known to occur in the ground, it is not pertinent to the geometrical description of the spatio-temporal patterns of induced seismicity. The proposed model is equivalent to the static stress model for tectonic foreshocks generated by the Non-Critical Precursory Accelerating Seismicity Theory. This study hence verifies the explanatory power of this theory outside of its original scope and provides an alternative physical approach to poroelasticity for the modelling of induced seismicity. The applicability of the proposed geometrical approach is illustrated for the case of the 2006, Basel enhanced geothermal system stimulation experiment. Applicability to more problematic cases where the stress field may be spatially heterogeneous is also discussed.

  20. INDUCED SECONDARY COMBUSTION IN WOODSTOVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper provides information useful for woodstove designers concerned with reducing emissions. A dual-chamber woodstove was modified to induce secondary combustion by utilizing an ignition source and forced flow of secondary air. The ignition source was an electric glow plug in...

  1. Adolescents and Exercise Induced Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Pamela; Bickanse, Shanna; Bogenreif, Mike; VanSickle, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    This article defines asthma and exercise induced asthma, and provides information on the triggers, signs, and symptoms of an attack. It also gives treatments for these conditions, along with prevention guidelines on how to handle an attack in the classroom or on the practice field. (Contains 2 tables and 1 figure.)

  2. Photo-induced isotopic fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Charles E.; Yung, Yuk L.

    2000-12-01

    This paper presents a systematic method for the analysis of photo-induced isotopic fractionation. The physical basis for this fractionation mechanism centers on the fact that isotopic substitution alters the energy levels, molecular symmetries, spin statistical weights and other fundamental molecular properties, producing spectroscopic signatures distinguishable from that of the parent isotopomer. These mass-dependent physical properties are identical to those invoked by Urey to explain stable isotope fractionation in chemical systems subject to thermodynamic equilibrium. Photo-induced isotopic fractionation is a completely general phenomenon and should be observable in virtually all gas phase photochemical systems. Water photo-induced isotopic fractionation has been examined in detail using experimental and theoretical data. These results illustrate the salient features of this fractionation mechanism for molecules possessing continuous UV absorption spectra and unit photodissociation quantum yields. Using the photo-induced isotopic fractionation methodology in conjunction with standard photochemical models, we predict substantial deuterium enrichment of water vapor in the planetary atmospheres of Earth and Mars.

  3. Photobiomodulation on alcohol induced dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zheng-Ping; Liu, Timon C.; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Yan-Fang

    2007-05-01

    Alcohol, which is ubiquitous today, is a major health concern. Its use was already relatively high among the youngest respondents, peaked among young adults, and declined in older age groups. Alcohol is causally related to more than 60 different medical conditions. Overall, 4% of the global burden of disease is attributable to alcohol, which accounts for about as much death and disability globally as tobacco and hypertension. Alcohol also promotes the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or interferes with the body's normal defense mechanisms against these compounds through numerous processes, particularly in the liver. Photobiomodulation (PBM) is a cell-specific effect of low intensity monochromatic light or low intensity laser irradiation (LIL) on biological systems. The cellular effects of both alcohol and LIL are ligand-independent so that PBM might rehabilitate alcohol induced dysfunction. The PBM on alcohol induced human neutrophil dysfunction and rat chronic atrophic gastritis, the laser acupuncture on alcohol addiction, and intravascular PBM on alcoholic coma of patients and rats have been observed. The endonasal PBM (EPBM) mediated by Yangming channel, autonomic nervous systems and blood cells is suggested to treat alcohol induced dysfunction in terms of EPBM phenomena, the mechanism of alcohol induced dysfunction and our biological information model of PBM. In our opinion, the therapeutic effects of PBM might also be achieved on alcoholic myopathy.

  4. Noncoercive Inducements in International Conflicts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kriesberg, Louis

    This paper examines noncoercion in international struggles, reviews instances in which positive inducements were combined with or used instead of coercion, and analyzes conditions affecting the utilization and effectiveness of noncoercive means in conducting international relations. Coercion refers to actual and threatened violent and nonviolent…

  5. Foscarnet-induced penile ulceration.

    PubMed

    Torres, T; Fernandes, I; Sanches, M; Selores, M

    2011-01-01

    Foscarnet is used to treat herpes viruses, including drug-resistant cytomegalovirus (CMV) and herpes simplex viruses types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2). There are some reports of intravenous foscarnet-induced penile and vulvar ulceration. The authors report a case of the development of severe penile ulcers after the initiation of intravenous foscarnet therapy. PMID:21879205

  6. Radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the heritable somatic effects of ionizing radiation exposures has relied upon the assumption that radiation-induced lesions were 'fixed' in the DNA prior to the first postirradiation mitosis. Lesion conversion was thought to occur during the initial round of DNA replication or as a consequence of error-prone enzymatic processing of lesions. The standard experimental protocols for the assessment of a variety of radiation-induced endpoints (cell death, specific locus mutations, neoplastic transformation and chromosome aberrations) evaluate these various endpoints at a single snapshot in time. In contrast with the aforementioned approaches, some studies have specifically assessed radiation effects as a function of time following exposure. Evidence has accumulated in support of the hypothesis that radiation exposure induces a persistent destabilization of the genome. This instability has been observed as a delayed expression of lethal mutations, as an enhanced rate of accumulation of non-lethal heritable alterations, and as a progressive intraclonal chromosomal heterogeneity. The genetic controls and biochemical mechanisms underlying radiation-induced genomic instability have not yet been delineated. The aim is to integrate the accumulated evidence that suggests that radiation exposure has a persistent effect on the stability of the mammalian genome.

  7. MECHANISMS OF ARSENICAL INDUCED MALFORMATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our research uses the whole embryo culture system to expose mouse embryos to arsenic at the neurulation stage of development (This stage of development is most susceptible to arsenical-induced defects). This includes studies to assess the distribution of cells in the cell cycle a...

  8. Palatine perforation induced by cocaine.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Rosas, Miguel; Jimenez-Santos, Cecilia Irene; García-González, Claudia Lorena

    2006-05-01

    Worldwide, the use of cocaine has an increased over the years, various secondary effects have been described. Here we present a 48 years old female with a 2-month evolution bucconasal ulcer in the hard palate induced by cocaine usage accompanied by swallow and phonation dysfunctions. Ethiopathogenesis, differential diagnoses and treatment are discussed. PMID:16648760

  9. Adrafinil-induced orofacial dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Thobois, Stéphane; Xie, Jing; Mollion, Helena; Benatru, Isabelle; Broussolle, Emmanuel

    2004-08-01

    We describe the first case of orofacial abnormal movements induced by adrafinil, a vigilance promoting agent of the same pharmacological class as modafinil. The dyskinesias did not spontaneously recover despite adrafinil withdrawal for a 4-month period. They were secondly dramatically improved by tetrabenazine, a presynaptic dopaminergic depleting drug which was introduced after the 4-month adrafinil-free period. PMID:15300665

  10. Rowell's syndrome induced by terbinafine.

    PubMed

    Murad, Aizuri; Shudell, Emma; Mulligan, Niall

    2015-01-01

    Terbinafine, a systemic antifungal commonly prescribed for onychomycosis (fungal infection involving the nails) has been reported to cause various cutaneous adverse effects. We describe an overlap syndrome between cutaneous lupus and erythaema multiforme induced by this medication with a review of other reported cases. PMID:26021384

  11. [Readers' position against induced abortion].

    PubMed

    1981-08-25

    Replies to the request by the Journal of Nursing on readers' positions against induced abortion indicate there is a definite personal position against induced abortion and the assistance in this procedure. Some writers expressed an emotional "no" against induced abortion. Many quoted arguments from the literature, such as a medical dictionary definition as "a premeditated criminally induced abortion." The largest group of writers quoted from the Bible, the tenor always being: "God made man, he made us with his hands; we have no right to make the decision." People with other philosophies also objected. Theosophical viewpoint considers reincarnation and the law of cause and effect (karma). This philosophy holds that induced abortion impedes the appearance of a reincarnated being. The fundamental question in the abortion problem is, "can the fetus be considered a human life?" The German anatomist Professor E. Bleckschmidt points out that from conception there is human life, hence the fertilized cell can only develop into a human being and is not merely a piece of tissue. Professional nursing interpretation is that nursing action directed towards killing of a human being (unborn child) is against the nature and the essence of the nursing profession. A different opinion states that a nurse cares for patients who have decided for the operation. The nurse doesn't judge but respects the individual's decision. Some proabortion viewpoints considered the endangering of the mother's life by the unborn child, and the case of rape. With the arguments against abortion the question arises how to help the woman with unwanted pregnancy. Psychological counseling is emphasized as well as responsible and careful assistance. Referral to the Society for Protection of the Unborn Child (VBOK) is considered as well as other agencies. Further reader comments on this subject are solicited. PMID:6913282

  12. Distinguishing warming-induced drought from drought-induced warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roderick, M. L.; Yin, D.

    2015-12-01

    It is usually observed that temperatures, especially maximum temperatures are higher during drought. A very widely held public perception is that the increase in temperature is a cause of drought. This represents the warming-induced drought scenario. However, the agricultural and hydrologic scientific communities have a very different interpretation with drought being the cause of increasing temperature. In essence, those communities assume the warming is a surface feedback and their interpretation is for drought-induced warming. This is a classic cause-effect problem that has resisted definitive explanation due to the lack of radiative observations at suitable spatial and temporal scales. In this presentation we first summarise the observations and then use theory to untangle the cause-effect relationships that underlie the competing interpretations. We then show how satellite data (CERES, NASA) can be used to disentangle the cause-effect relations.

  13. An inducible offense: carnivore morph tadpoles induced by tadpole carnivory

    PubMed Central

    Levis, Nicholas A; de la Serna Buzón, Sofia; Pfennig, David W

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is commonplace, and plasticity theory predicts that organisms should often evolve mechanisms to detect and respond to environmental cues that accurately predict future environmental conditions. Here, we test this prediction in tadpoles of spadefoot toads, Spea multiplicata. These tadpoles develop into either an omnivore ecomorph, which is a dietary generalist, or a carnivore ecomorph, which specializes on anostracan shrimp and other tadpoles. We investigated a novel proximate cue – ingestion of Scaphiopus tadpoles – and its propensity to produce carnivores by rearing tadpoles on different diets. We found that diets containing tadpoles from the genus Scaphiopus produced more carnivores than diets without Scaphiopus tadpoles. We discuss why Scaphiopus tadpoles are an excellent food source and why it is therefore advantageous for S. multiplicata tadpoles to produce an inducible offense that allows them to better utilize this resource. In general, such inducible offenses provide an excellent setting for investigating the proximate and evolutionary basis of phenotypic plasticity. PMID:25897380

  14. Selective induction of apoptosis through the FADD/caspase-8 pathway by a p53 c-terminal peptide in human pre-malignant and malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yin; Mao, Yuehua; Rosal, Ramon V; Dinnen, Richard D; Williams, Ann C; Brandt-Rauf, Paul W; Fine, Robert L

    2005-05-20

    A p53 C-terminal peptide (aa 361-382, p53p), fused at its C-terminus to the minimal carrier peptide of antennapedia (17 aa, Ant; p53p-Ant), induced rapid apoptosis in human cancer cells, via activation of the Fas pathway. We examined p53p-Ant mechanism of action, toxicity in various human normal, non-malignant, pre-malignant and malignant cancer cells and investigated its biophysical characteristics. p53p-Ant selectively induced cell death in only pre-malignant or malignant cells in a p53-dependent manner and was not toxic to normal and non-malignant cells. p53p-Ant was more toxic to the mutant p53 than wild-type p53 phenotype in H1299 lung cancer cells stably expressing human temperature-sensitive p53 mutant 143Ala. Surface plasmon resonance (BIACORE) analysis demonstrated that this peptide had higher binding affinity to mutant p53 as compared to wild-type p53. p53p-Ant induced-cell death had the classical morphological characteristics of apoptosis and had no features of necrosis. The mechanism of cell death by p53p-Ant was through the FADD/caspase-8-dependent pathway without the involvement of the TRAIL pathway, Bcl-2 family and cell cycle changes. Blocking Fas with antibody did not alter the peptide's effect, suggesting that Fas itself did not interact with the peptide. Transfection with a dominant-negative FADD with a deleted N-terminus inhibited p53p-Ant-induced apoptosis. Its mechanism of action is related to the FADD-induced pathway without restoration of other p53 functions. p53p-Ant is a novel anticancer agent with unique selectivity for human cancer cells and could be useful as a prototype for the development of new anti-cancer agents. PMID:15645452

  15. Fluid injection and induced seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Michael; Verdon, James

    2016-04-01

    The link between fluid injection, or extraction, and induced seismicity has been observed in reservoirs for many decades. In fact spatial mapping of low magnitude events is routinely used to estimate a stimulated reservoir volume. However, the link between subsurface fluid injection and larger felt seismicity is less clear and has attracted recent interest with a dramatic increase in earthquakes associated with the disposal of oilfield waste fluids. In a few cases, hydraulic fracturing has also been linked to induced seismicity. Much can be learned from past case-studies of induced seismicity so that we can better understand the risks posed. Here we examine 12 case examples and consider in particular controls on maximum event size, lateral event distributions, and event depths. Our results suggest that injection volume is a better control on maximum magnitude than past, natural seismicity in a region. This might, however, simply reflect the lack of baseline monitoring and/or long-term seismic records in certain regions. To address this in the UK, the British Geological Survey is leading the deployment of monitoring arrays in prospective shale gas areas in Lancashire and Yorkshire. In most cases, seismicity is generally located in close vicinity to the injection site. However, in some cases, the nearest events are up to 5km from the injection point. This gives an indication of the minimum radius of influence of such fluid injection projects. The most distant events are never more than 20km from the injection point, perhaps implying a maximum radius of influence. Some events are located in the target reservoir, but most occur below the injection depth. In fact, most events lie in the crystalline basement underlying the sedimentary rocks. This suggests that induced seismicity may not pose a leakage risk for fluid migration back to the surface, as it does not impact caprock integrity. A useful application for microseismic data is to try and forecast induced seismicity

  16. Gyromagnetically induced transparency of metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, S Hossein; Khanikaev, Alexander B; Allen, Jeffery; Allen, Monica; Shvets, Gennady

    2014-03-21

    We demonstrate that the presence of a (gyro) magnetic substrate can produce an analog of electromagnetically induced transparency in Fano-resonant metamolecules. The simplest implementation of such gyromagnetically induced transparency (GIT) in a metasurface, comprised of an array of resonant antenna pairs placed on a gyromagnetic substrate and illuminated by a normally incident electromagnetic wave, is analyzed. Time reversal and spatial inversion symmetry breaking introduced by the dc magnetization makes metamolecules bianisotropic. This causes Fano interference between the otherwise uncoupled symmetric and antisymmetric resonances of the metamolecules giving rise to a sharp transmission peak through the otherwise reflective metasurface. We show that, for an oblique wave incidence, one-way GIT can be achieved by the combination of spatial dispersion and gyromagnetic effect. These theoretically predicted phenomena pave the way to nonreciprocal switches and isolators that can be dynamically controlled by electric currents. PMID:24702414

  17. The Surgically Induced Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Finnerty, Celeste C.; Mabvuure, Nigel Tapiwa; Ali, Arham; Kozar, Rosemary A.; Herndon, David N.

    2013-01-01

    The stress response to surgery, critical illness, trauma, and burns encompasses derangements of metabolic and physiological processes which induce perturbations in the inflammatory, acute phase, hormonal, and genomic responses. Hypermetabolism and hypercatabolism result, leading to muscle wasting, impaired immune function and wound healing, organ failure, and death. The surgery-induced stress response is largely similar to that triggered by traumatic injuries; the duration of the stress response, however, varies according to the severity of injury (surgical or traumatic). This spectrum of injuries and insults ranges from small lacerations to severe insults such as large poly-traumatic and burn injuries. Although the stress response to acute trauma evolved to improve chances of survival following injury, in modern surgical practice the stress response can be detrimental. PMID:24009246

  18. Molecular mechanisms of induced pluripotency

    PubMed Central

    Wróblewska, Joanna; Mazurek, Sylwia; Liszewska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Growing knowledge concerning transcriptional control of cellular pluripotency has led to the discovery that the fate of differentiated cells can be reversed, which has resulted in the generation, by means of genetic manipulation, of induced pluripotent stem cells. Overexpression of just four pluripotency-related transcription factors, namely Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc (Yamanaka factors, OKSM), in fibroblasts appears sufficient to produce this new cell type. Currently, we know that these factors induce several changes in genetic program of differentiated cells that can be divided in two general phases: the initial one is stochastic, and the subsequent one is highly hierarchical and organised. This review briefly discusses the molecular events leading to induction of pluripotency in response to forced presence of OKSM factors in somatic cells. We also discuss other reprogramming strategies used thus far as well as the advantages and disadvantages of laboratory approaches towards pluripotency induction in different cell types. PMID:25691818

  19. Coherent-state-induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogyan, A.; Malakyan, Yu.

    2016-04-01

    We examine electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in an ensemble of cold Λ -type atoms induced by a quantum control field in multimode coherent states and compare it with the transparency created by the classical light of the same intensity. We show that the perfect coincidence is achieved only in the case of a single-mode coherent state, whereas the transparency sharply decreases, when the number of the modes exceeds the mean number of control photons in the medium. The origin of the effect is the modification of photon statistics in the control field with increasing the number of the modes that weakens its interaction with atoms resulting in a strong probe absorption. For the same reason, the probe pulse transforms from EIT-based slow light into superluminal propagation caused by the absorption.

  20. Resistance-induced antibiotic substitution.

    PubMed

    Howard, David H

    2004-06-01

    In many cases, physicians prescribe antibiotics without knowing whether an individual patient is infected with a susceptible or resistant pathogen. As the proportion of resistant organisms in a community increases, physicians substitute away from older-inexpensive drugs to newer, more expensive agents as first line therapy. This paper explores the implications of resistance-induced antibiotic substitution for epidemiological models to predict future resistance levels, efforts to measure the health care costs associated with resistance, and policies to improve physicians' antibiotic prescribing decisions. The extent of resistance-induced substitution in outpatient settings is documented using a data set consisting of observations on initial physician office visits for otitis media in the US controlling for new product introductions and price increases, per prescription antibiotic spending increased by 22% between 1980 and 1996, corresponding to a steep increase in resistance levels over the same period. PMID:15185388

  1. Gyromagnetically Induced Transparency of Metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, S. Hossein; Khanikaev, Alexander B.; Allen, Jeffery; Allen, Monica; Shvets, Gennady

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate that the presence of a (gyro) magnetic substrate can produce an analog of electromagnetically induced transparency in Fano-resonant metamolecules. The simplest implementation of such gyromagnetically induced transparency (GIT) in a metasurface, comprised of an array of resonant antenna pairs placed on a gyromagnetic substrate and illuminated by a normally incident electromagnetic wave, is analyzed. Time reversal and spatial inversion symmetry breaking introduced by the dc magnetization makes metamolecules bianisotropic. This causes Fano interference between the otherwise uncoupled symmetric and antisymmetric resonances of the metamolecules giving rise to a sharp transmission peak through the otherwise reflective metasurface. We show that, for an oblique wave incidence, one-way GIT can be achieved by the combination of spatial dispersion and gyromagnetic effect. These theoretically predicted phenomena pave the way to nonreciprocal switches and isolators that can be dynamically controlled by electric currents.

  2. Chlorine-induced cardiopulmonary injury.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, Matthew; Lam, Adam; Svendsen, Erik R; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Matalon, Sadis

    2016-06-01

    Chlorine (Cl2 ) is utilized worldwide for a diverse range of industrial applications, including pulp bleaching, sanitation, and pharmaceutical development. Though Cl2 has widespread use, little is known regarding the mechanisms of toxicity associated with Cl2 exposure, which occurs during industrial accidents or acts of terrorism. Previous instances of Cl2 exposure have led to reported episodes of respiratory distress that result in high morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, studies suggest that acute Cl2 exposure also results in systemic vascular injury and subsequent myocardial contractile dysfunction. Here, we review both lung and cardiac pathology associated with acute Cl2 inhalation and discuss recently published data that suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction underlies the pathogenesis of Cl2 -induced toxicity. Last, we discuss our findings that suggest that upregulation of autophagy protects against Cl2 -induced lung inflammation and can be a potential therapeutic target for ameliorating the toxic effects of Cl2 exposure. PMID:27303906

  3. Severe amiodarone induced pulmonary toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Nacca, Nicholas; Yuhico, Luke S; Pinnamaneni, Sowmya; Szombathy, Tamas

    2012-01-01

    A known complication of Amiodarone therapy is Amiodarone induced Pulmonary Toxicity (APT). Several features of this adverse effect make it difficult to diagnosis and treat. The case of a 63-year-old male with classic radiographic and histologic findings of APT is discussed. Clinical presentation, pathophysiology, diagnostic findings, and treatment strategies are reviewed. The patient was successfully managed with pulse high dose steroid therapy. PMID:23205299

  4. The fluctuation induced Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, W.; Prager, S.C.

    1993-02-01

    The fluctuation induced Hall term, [le][approximately][ovr J] [times] [approximately][ovr B][ge], has been measured in the MST reversed field pinch. The term is of interest as a possible source of current self-generation (dynamo). It is found to be non-negligible, but small in that it can account for less than 25% of the dynamo driven current.

  5. The fluctuation induced Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, W.; Prager, S.C.

    1993-02-01

    The fluctuation induced Hall term, {le}{approximately}{ovr J} {times} {approximately}{ovr B}{ge}, has been measured in the MST reversed field pinch. The term is of interest as a possible source of current self-generation (dynamo). It is found to be non-negligible, but small in that it can account for less than 25% of the dynamo driven current.

  6. [DRESS syndrome induced by ciprofloxacine].

    PubMed

    Sahnoun, Rym; El Aïdli, Sihem; Zaïem, Ahmed; Lakhoua, Ghozlane; Kastalli, Sarrah; Daghfous, Riadh

    2015-04-01

    The Drug rash with hypereosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome, or hypersensitivity syndrome, is a severe drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome. It has been exceptionally described with ciprofloxacin. We report a 47-year-old-woman who developed DRESS syndrome, 2 days after taking ciprofloxacin for a urinary infection. She had a generalized maculopapular rash, severe rhabdomyolysis, liver involvement, renal failure and hypereosinophilia. Clinical symptoms had completely resolved after ciprofloxacin withdrawal. Renal failure has decrease after short corticosteroid treatment. PMID:25680964

  7. Etanercept-induced cystic acne.

    PubMed

    Kashat, Maria; Caretti, Katherine; Kado, Jessica

    2014-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α antagonists are potent biologics used to treat a variety of autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn disease, psoriasis, and psoriatic arthritis. These medications are known to have many side effects (eg, infusion reactions, cytopenia, risk for infection, heart failure); however, only a few cases of acne vulgaris have been associated with the use of these biologics, particularly infliximab and adalimumab. We report a rare case of etanercept-induced cystic acne. PMID:25101341

  8. Flow-induced vibrations-1987

    SciTech Connect

    Au-Yang, M.K.; Chen, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 20 selections. Some of the titles are: Acoustic resonance in heat exchanger tube bundles--Part 1. Physical nature of the phenomenon; Theoretical and experimental studies on heat exchanger U-bend tube bundle vibration characteristics; Experimental model analysis of metallic pipeline conveying fluid; Leakage flow-induced vibration of an eccentric tube-in-tube slip joint; and A study on the vibrations of pipelines caused by internal pulsating flows.

  9. Light-induced liquid crystallinity.

    PubMed

    Kosa, Tamas; Sukhomlinova, Ludmila; Su, Linli; Taheri, Bahman; White, Timothy J; Bunning, Timothy J

    2012-05-17

    Liquid crystals are traditionally classified as thermotropic, lyotropic or polymeric, based on the stimulus that governs the organization and order of the molecular system. The most widely known and applied class of liquid crystals are a subset of thermotropic liquid crystals known as calamitic, in which adding heat can result in phase transitions from or into the nematic, cholesteric and smectic mesophases. Photoresponsive liquid-crystal materials and mixtures can undergo isothermal phase transitions if light affects the order parameter of the system within a mesophase sufficiently. In nearly all previous examinations, light exposure of photoresponsive liquid-crystal materials and mixtures resulted in order-decreasing photo-induced isothermal phase transitions. Under specialized conditions, an increase in order with light exposure has been reported, despite the tendency of the photoresponsive liquid-crystal system to reduce order in the exposed state. A direct, photo-induced transition from the isotropic to the nematic phase has been observed in a mixture of spiropyran molecules and a nematic liquid crystal. Here we report a class of naphthopyran-based materials that exhibit photo-induced conformational changes in molecular structure capable of yielding order-increasing phase transitions. Appropriate functionalization of the naphthopyran molecules leads to an exceedingly large order parameter in the open form, which results in a clear to strongly absorbing dichroic state. The increase in order with light exposure has profound implications in optics, photonics, lasing and displays and will merit further consideration for applications in solar energy harvesting. The large, photo-induced dichroism exhibited by the material system has been long sought in ophthalmic applications such as photochromic and polarized variable transmission sunglasses. PMID:22596158

  10. Cadmium-induced testicular injury

    SciTech Connect

    Siu, Erica R.; Mruk, Dolores D.; Porto, Catarina S.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2009-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental toxicant and an endocrine disruptor in humans and rodents. Several organs (e.g., kidney, liver) are affected by Cd and recent studies have illustrated that the testis is exceedingly sensitive to Cd toxicity. More important, Cd and other toxicants, such as heavy metals (e.g., lead, mercury) and estrogenic-based compounds (e.g., bisphenols) may account for the recent declining fertility in men among developed countries by reducing sperm count and testis function. In this review, we critically discuss recent data in the field that have demonstrated the Cd-induced toxicity to the testis is probably the result of interactions of a complex network of causes. This is likely to involve the disruption of the blood-testis barrier (BTB) via specific signal transduction pathways and signaling molecules, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). We also summarize current studies on factors that confer and/or regulate the testis sensitivity to Cd, such as Cd transporters and metallothioneins, the impact of Cd on the testis as an endocrine disruptor and oxidative stress inducer, and how it may disrupt the Zn{sup 2+} and/or Ca{sup 2+} mediated cellular events. While much work is needed before a unified mechanistic pathway of Cd-induced testicular toxicity emerges, recent studies have helped to identify some of the likely mechanisms and/or events that take place during Cd-induced testis injury. Furthermore, some of the recent studies have shed lights on potential therapeutic or preventive approaches that can be developed in future studies by blocking or minimizing the destructive effects of Cd to testicular function in men.

  11. Cadmium-induced testicular injury.

    PubMed

    Siu, Erica R; Mruk, Dolores D; Porto, Catarina S; Cheng, C Yan

    2009-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental toxicant and an endocrine disruptor in humans and rodents. Several organs (e.g., kidney, liver) are affected by Cd and recent studies have illustrated that the testis is exceedingly sensitive to Cd toxicity. More important, Cd and other toxicants, such as heavy metals (e.g., lead, mercury) and estrogenic-based compounds (e.g., bisphenols) may account for the recent declining fertility in men among developed countries by reducing sperm count and testis function. In this review, we critically discuss recent data in the field that have demonstrated the Cd-induced toxicity to the testis is probably the result of interactions of a complex network of causes. This is likely to involve the disruption of the blood-testis barrier (BTB) via specific signal transduction pathways and signaling molecules, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). We also summarize current studies on factors that confer and/or regulate the testis sensitivity to Cd, such as Cd transporters and metallothioneins, the impact of Cd on the testis as an endocrine disruptor and oxidative stress inducer, and how it may disrupt the Zn(2+) and/or Ca(2+) mediated cellular events. While much work is needed before a unified mechanistic pathway of Cd-induced testicular toxicity emerges, recent studies have helped to identify some of the likely mechanisms and/or events that take place during Cd-induced testis injury. Furthermore, some of the recent studies have shed lights on potential therapeutic or preventive approaches that can be developed in future studies by blocking or minimizing the destructive effects of Cd to testicular function in men. PMID:19236889

  12. Cadmium-induced Testicular Injury*

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Erica R.; Mruk, Dolores D.; Porto, Catarina S.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2009-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental toxicant and an endocrine disruptor in humans. Several organs (e.g., kidney, liver) are affected by Cd and recent studies have illustrated that the testis is exceedingly sensitive to Cd toxicity. More important, Cd and other toxicants, such as heavy metals (e.g., lead, mercury) and estrogenic-based compounds (e.g., bisphenols) may account for the recent declining fertility in men among developed countries by reducing sperm count and testis function. In this review, we critically discuss recent data in the field that have demonstrated the Cd-induced toxicity to the testis is probably the result of interactions of a complex network of causes. This is likely to involve the disruption of the blood-testis barrier (BTB) via specific signal transduction pathways and signaling molecules, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). We also summarize current studies on factors that confer the testis sensitivity to Cd, such as Cd transporters and metallothioneins, and the impact of Cd on the testis as an endocrine disruptor, oxidative stress inducer and how it may disrupt the Zn+2 and/or Ca+2 mediated cellular events. While much work is needed before a unified mechanistic pathway of Cd-induced testicular toxicity is emerged, recent studies have helped to identify some of the likely mechanisms and/or events that take place during Cd-induced testis injury. Furthermore, some of the recent studies have shed lights on potential therapeutic or preventive approaches that can be developed in future studies by blocking or minimizing the destructive effects of Cd to testicular function in men. PMID:19236889

  13. [Environmentally induced (extrinsic) skin aging].

    PubMed

    Krutmann, J; Schikowski, T; Hüls, A; Vierkötter, A; Grether-Beck, S

    2016-02-01

    Chronic exposure to ultraviolet light, particularly as a component of natural sunlight, is a major cause of environmentally induced aging of the skin. In addition, other environmental factors for premature skin aging include longer wavelength radiation in the visible light region and in particular in the shortwave infrared radiation region. Furthermore, particulate and gaseous components of air pollution significantly contribute to the aging process. PMID:26769311

  14. Propulsion Induced Effects Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cappuccio, Gelsomina; Won, Mark; Bencze, Dan

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this milestone is to assess the propulsion/airframe integration characteristics of the Technology Concept Airplane and design variations through computational analysis and experimental subsonic through supersonic wind tunnel testing. The Milestone will generate a comprehensive CFD and wind tunnel data base of the baseline, and design variations. Emphasis will be placed on establishing the propulsion induced effects on the flight performance of the Technology Concept Airplane with all appropriate wind tunnel corrections.

  15. Acoustically-Induced Electrical Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    We have observed electrical signals excited by and moving along with an acoustic pulse propagating in a sandstone sample. Using resonance we are now studying the characteristics of this acousto-electric signal and determining its origin and the controlling physical parameters. Four rock samples with a range of porosities, permeabilities, and mineralogies were chosen: Berea, Boise, and Colton sandstones and Austin Chalk. Pore water salinity was varied from deionized water to sea water. Ag-AgCl electrodes were attached to the sample and were interfaced to a 4-wire electrical resistivity system. Under computer control, the acoustic signals were excited and the electrical response was recorded. We see strong acoustically-induced electrical signals in all samples, with the magnitude of the effect for each rock getting stronger as we move from the 1st to the 3rd harmonics in resonance. Given a particular fluid salinity, each rock has its own distinct sensitivity in the induced electrical effect. For example at the 2nd harmonic, Berea Sandstone produces the largest electrical signal per acoustic power input even though Austin Chalk and Boise Sandstone tend to resonate with much larger amplitudes at the same harmonic. Two effects are potentially responsible for this acoustically-induced electrical response: one the co-seismic seismo-electric effect and the other a strain-induced resistivity change known as the acousto-electric effect. We have designed experimental tests to separate these mechanisms. The tests show that the seismo-electric effect is dominant in our studies. We note that these experiments are in a fluid viscosity dominated seismo-electric regime, leading to a simple interpretation of the signals where the electric potential developed is proportional to the local acceleration of the rock. Toward a test of this theory we have measured the local time-varying acoustic strain in our samples using a laser vibrometer.

  16. Inducible defenses, phenotypic variability and biotic environments.

    PubMed

    Adler, F R; Drew Harvell, C

    1990-12-01

    Defensive morphologies, chemicals and behaviors induced by cues from consumers or competitors have been described in numerous organisms. Much work has focused on the costs of defenses and the actual cues used. Here, we review recent progress in determining the effects of inducible defenses on consumers and the cues implicated in inducing defenses against consumers and competitors, thereby laying the groundwork for studying the implications of inducible defenses for the dynamics of foraging, population size and evolution. PMID:21232402

  17. Efficient treatment of induced dipoles.

    PubMed

    Simmonett, Andrew C; Pickard, Frank C; Shao, Yihan; Cheatham, Thomas E; Brooks, Bernard R

    2015-08-21

    Most existing treatments of induced dipoles in polarizable molecular mechanics force field calculations use either the self-consistent variational method, which is solved iteratively, or the "direct" approximation that is non-iterative as a result of neglecting coupling between induced dipoles. The variational method is usually implemented using assumptions that are only strictly valid under tight convergence of the induced dipoles, which can be computationally demanding to enforce. In this work, we discuss the nature of the errors that result from insufficient convergence and suggest a strategy that avoids such problems. Using perturbation theory to reintroduce the mutual coupling into the direct algorithm, we present a computationally efficient method that combines the precision of the direct approach with the accuracy of the variational approach. By analyzing the convergence of this perturbation series, we derive a simple extrapolation formula that delivers a very accurate approximation to the infinite order solution at the cost of only a few iterations. We refer to the new method as extrapolated perturbation theory. Finally, we draw connections to our previously published permanent multipole algorithm to develop an efficient implementation of the electric field and Thole terms and also derive some necessary, but not sufficient, criteria that force field parameters must obey. PMID:26298123

  18. Rosiglitazone-induced immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojing; Huang, Tao; Sahud, Mervyn A

    2006-05-01

    Rosiglitazone is one of the members in the thiazolidinedione (TZD) class of anti-diabetic agents that have proven efficacy in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes. We studied serum from a patient who developed acute, severe thrombocytopenia after exposure to rosiglitazone maleate (Avandia) and proposed the mechanisms for rosiglitazone-induced thrombocytopenia. Tested by flow cytometry, the patient's serum was positive for rosiglitazone-induced antibody with the binding ratio of 5.93 (mean fluorescence intensity, MFI) in the presence of the patient's serum and rosiglitazone in a final concentration of 0.53 mmol/l. The antibody was found to bind both glycoprotein (GP) IIb-IIIa complex and GP Ib/IX complex by MAIPA assay using five different monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against GP complexes Ib/IX, GPIIb/IIIa or GPIa/IIa. Immunoprecipitation studies showed that both GPIIb/IIIa and GP Ib/IX complex were precipitated by antibody in the presence, but not in the absence of rosiglitazone. These findings provide evidence that immune thrombocytopenia can be caused by sensitivity to the antidiabetic agent rosiglitazone maleate. This report documents the first case of rosiglitazone-induced immune thrombocytopenia. PMID:16702039

  19. UV-induced cutaneous photobiology.

    PubMed

    Beissert, S; Granstein, R D

    1996-12-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) present in sunlight is a major environmental factor capable of affecting human health and well being. The organ primarily affected by UVR is the skin, which is composed of a variety of different cell types. Here, UVR is needed for production of active vitamin D as well as producing undesirable effects such as sunburn, premature cutaneous photoaging, and promoting skin cancer development. Depending on the radiation dose, UVR influences virtually every cutaneous cell type investigated differently. Since the end of the nineteenth century, sun exposure has been known to induce skin cancer, which is now the human malignancy with the most rapidly increasing incidence. In several experimental models, mid-range UVR has been demonstrated to be the major cause of UV-induced cutaneous tumors. The stratospheric ozone layer protecting the terrestrial surface from higher quantum energy solar radiation is being damaged by industrial activities resulting in the possibility of increased UVR exposure in the future. Investigations in the field of experimental dermatology have shown that within the skin an immunosurveillance system exists that may be able to detect incipient neoplasms and to elicit a host responses against it. This article reviews the literature on studies designed to investigate the effects of UVR on cutaneous cellular components, with special focus on the immune system within the skin and the development of UV-induced cancer. PMID:8994803

  20. Chromium-induced kidney disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wedeen, R.P. ); Qian, Lifen )

    1991-05-01

    Kidney disease is often cited as one of the adverse effects of chromium, yet chronic renal disease due to occupational or environmental exposure to chromium has not been reported. Occasional cases of acute tubular necrosis (ATN) following massive absorption of chromate have been described. Chromate-induced ATN has been extensively studied in experimental animals following parenteral administration of large doses of potassium chromate (hexavalent). The chromate is selectively accumulated in the convoluted proximal tubule where necrosis occurs. An adverse long-term effect of low-dose chromium exposure on the kidneys is suggested by reports of low molecular weight (LMW) proteinuria in chromium workers. Excessive urinary excretion of {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin, a specific proximal tubule brush border protein, and retinol-binding protein has been reported among chrome palters and welders. However, LMW proteinuria occurs after a variety of physiologic stresses, is usually reversible, and cannot by itself be considered evidence of chromic renal disease. Chromate-induced ATN and LMW proteinuria in chromium workers, nevertheless, raise the possibility that low-level, long-term exposure may produce persistent renal injury. The absence of evidence of chromate-induced chromic renal disease cannot be interpreted as evidence of the absence of such injury.

  1. Local Anesthetic-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Verlinde, Mark; Hollmann, Markus W.; Stevens, Markus F.; Hermanns, Henning; Werdehausen, Robert; Lirk, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge concerning incidence, risk factors, and mechanisms of perioperative nerve injury, with focus on local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity. Perioperative nerve injury is a complex phenomenon and can be caused by a number of clinical factors. Anesthetic risk factors for perioperative nerve injury include regional block technique, patient risk factors, and local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity. Surgery can lead to nerve damage by use of tourniquets or by direct mechanical stress on nerves, such as traction, transection, compression, contusion, ischemia, and stretching. Current literature suggests that the majority of perioperative nerve injuries are unrelated to regional anesthesia. Besides the blockade of sodium channels which is responsible for the anesthetic effect, systemic local anesthetics can have a positive influence on the inflammatory response and the hemostatic system in the perioperative period. However, next to these beneficial effects, local anesthetics exhibit time and dose-dependent toxicity to a variety of tissues, including nerves. There is equivocal experimental evidence that the toxicity varies among local anesthetics. Even though the precise order of events during local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity is not clear, possible cellular mechanisms have been identified. These include the intrinsic caspase-pathway, PI3K-pathway, and MAPK-pathways. Further research will need to determine whether these pathways are non-specifically activated by local anesthetics, or whether there is a single common precipitating factor. PMID:26959012

  2. Efficient treatment of induced dipoles

    PubMed Central

    Simmonett, Andrew C.; Pickard, Frank C.; Shao, Yihan; Cheatham, Thomas E.; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2015-01-01

    Most existing treatments of induced dipoles in polarizable molecular mechanics force field calculations use either the self-consistent variational method, which is solved iteratively, or the “direct” approximation that is non-iterative as a result of neglecting coupling between induced dipoles. The variational method is usually implemented using assumptions that are only strictly valid under tight convergence of the induced dipoles, which can be computationally demanding to enforce. In this work, we discuss the nature of the errors that result from insufficient convergence and suggest a strategy that avoids such problems. Using perturbation theory to reintroduce the mutual coupling into the direct algorithm, we present a computationally efficient method that combines the precision of the direct approach with the accuracy of the variational approach. By analyzing the convergence of this perturbation series, we derive a simple extrapolation formula that delivers a very accurate approximation to the infinite order solution at the cost of only a few iterations. We refer to the new method as extrapolated perturbation theory. Finally, we draw connections to our previously published permanent multipole algorithm to develop an efficient implementation of the electric field and Thole terms and also derive some necessary, but not sufficient, criteria that force field parameters must obey. PMID:26298123

  3. Local Anesthetic-Induced Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Verlinde, Mark; Hollmann, Markus W; Stevens, Markus F; Hermanns, Henning; Werdehausen, Robert; Lirk, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge concerning incidence, risk factors, and mechanisms of perioperative nerve injury, with focus on local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity. Perioperative nerve injury is a complex phenomenon and can be caused by a number of clinical factors. Anesthetic risk factors for perioperative nerve injury include regional block technique, patient risk factors, and local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity. Surgery can lead to nerve damage by use of tourniquets or by direct mechanical stress on nerves, such as traction, transection, compression, contusion, ischemia, and stretching. Current literature suggests that the majority of perioperative nerve injuries are unrelated to regional anesthesia. Besides the blockade of sodium channels which is responsible for the anesthetic effect, systemic local anesthetics can have a positive influence on the inflammatory response and the hemostatic system in the perioperative period. However, next to these beneficial effects, local anesthetics exhibit time and dose-dependent toxicity to a variety of tissues, including nerves. There is equivocal experimental evidence that the toxicity varies among local anesthetics. Even though the precise order of events during local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity is not clear, possible cellular mechanisms have been identified. These include the intrinsic caspase-pathway, PI3K-pathway, and MAPK-pathways. Further research will need to determine whether these pathways are non-specifically activated by local anesthetics, or whether there is a single common precipitating factor. PMID:26959012

  4. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Fehrenbacher, Jill C

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is common in patients receiving anticancer treatment and can affect survivability and long-term quality of life of the patient following treatment. The symptoms of CIPN primarily include abnormal sensory discrimination of touch, vibration, thermal information, and pain. There is currently a paucity of pharmacological agents to prevent or treat CIPN. The lack of efficacious therapeutics is due, at least in part, to an incomplete understanding of the mechanisms by which chemotherapies alter the sensitivity of sensory neurons. Although the clinical presentation of CIPN can be similar with the various classes of chemotherapeutic agents, there are subtle differences, suggesting that each class of drugs might induce neuropathy via different mechanisms. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed to underlie the development and maintenance of neuropathy; however, most pharmacological agents generated from preclinical experiments have failed to alleviate the symptoms of CIPN in the clinic. Further research is necessary to identify the specific mechanisms by which each class of chemotherapeutics induces neuropathy. PMID:25744683

  5. Induced radioactivity in LDEF components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Parnell, T. A.; Laird, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    The systematics of induced radioactivity on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) were studied in a wide range of materials using low level background facilities for detection of gamma rays. Approx. 400 samples of materials processed from structural parts of the spacecraft, as well as materials from onboard experiments, were analyzed at national facilities. These measurements show the variety of radioisotopes that are produced with half-lives greater than 2 wks, most of which are characteristic of proton induced reactions above 20 MeV. For the higher activity, long lived isotopes, it was possible to map the depth and directional dependences of the activity. Due to the stabilized configuration of the LDEF, the induced radioactivity data clearly show contributions from the anisotropic trapped proton flux in the South Atlantic Anomaly. This effect is discussed, along with evidence for activation by galactic protons and thermal neutrons. The discovery of Be-7 was made on leading side parts of the spacecraft, although this was though not to be related to the in situ production of radioisotopes from external particle fluxes.

  6. Efficient treatment of induced dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmonett, Andrew C.; Pickard, Frank C.; Shao, Yihan; Cheatham, Thomas E.; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2015-08-01

    Most existing treatments of induced dipoles in polarizable molecular mechanics force field calculations use either the self-consistent variational method, which is solved iteratively, or the "direct" approximation that is non-iterative as a result of neglecting coupling between induced dipoles. The variational method is usually implemented using assumptions that are only strictly valid under tight convergence of the induced dipoles, which can be computationally demanding to enforce. In this work, we discuss the nature of the errors that result from insufficient convergence and suggest a strategy that avoids such problems. Using perturbation theory to reintroduce the mutual coupling into the direct algorithm, we present a computationally efficient method that combines the precision of the direct approach with the accuracy of the variational approach. By analyzing the convergence of this perturbation series, we derive a simple extrapolation formula that delivers a very accurate approximation to the infinite order solution at the cost of only a few iterations. We refer to the new method as extrapolated perturbation theory. Finally, we draw connections to our previously published permanent multipole algorithm to develop an efficient implementation of the electric field and Thole terms and also derive some necessary, but not sufficient, criteria that force field parameters must obey.

  7. Field induced gap infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, C. Thomas (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A tunable infrared detector which employs a vanishing band gap semimetal material provided with an induced band gap by a magnetic field to allow intrinsic semiconductor type infrared detection capabilities is disclosed. The semimetal material may thus operate as a semiconductor type detector with a wavelength sensitivity corresponding to the induced band gap in a preferred embodiment of a diode structure. Preferred semimetal materials include Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te, x is less than 0.15, HgCdSe, BiSb, alpha-Sn, HgMgTe, HgMnTe, HgZnTe, HgMnSe, HgMgSe, and HgZnSe. The magnetic field induces a band gap in the semimetal material proportional to the strength of the magnetic field allowing tunable detection cutoff wavelengths. For an applied magnetic field from 5 to 10 tesla, the wavelength detection cutoff will be in the range of 20 to 50 micrometers for Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te alloys with x about 0.15. A similar approach may also be employed to generate infrared energy in a desired band gap and then operating the structure in a light emitting diode or semiconductor laser type of configuration.

  8. Statistical Seismology and Induced Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiampo, K. F.; González, P. J.; Kazemian, J.

    2014-12-01

    While seismicity triggered or induced by natural resources production such as mining or water impoundment in large dams has long been recognized, the recent increase in the unconventional production of oil and gas has been linked to rapid rise in seismicity in many places, including central North America (Ellsworth et al., 2012; Ellsworth, 2013). Worldwide, induced events of M~5 have occurred and, although rare, have resulted in both damage and public concern (Horton, 2012; Keranen et al., 2013). In addition, over the past twenty years, the increase in both number and coverage of seismic stations has resulted in an unprecedented ability to precisely record the magnitude and location of large numbers of small magnitude events. The increase in the number and type of seismic sequences available for detailed study has revealed differences in their statistics that previously difficult to quantify. For example, seismic swarms that produce significant numbers of foreshocks as well as aftershocks have been observed in different tectonic settings, including California, Iceland, and the East Pacific Rise (McGuire et al., 2005; Shearer, 2012; Kazemian et al., 2014). Similarly, smaller events have been observed prior to larger induced events in several occurrences from energy production. The field of statistical seismology has long focused on the question of triggering and the mechanisms responsible (Stein et al., 1992; Hill et al., 1993; Steacy et al., 2005; Parsons, 2005; Main et al., 2006). For example, in most cases the associated stress perturbations are much smaller than the earthquake stress drop, suggesting an inherent sensitivity to relatively small stress changes (Nalbant et al., 2005). Induced seismicity provides the opportunity to investigate triggering and, in particular, the differences between long- and short-range triggering. Here we investigate the statistics of induced seismicity sequences from around the world, including central North America and Spain, and

  9. Direct and indirect inactivation of tumor cell protective catalase by salicylic acid and anthocyanidins reactivates intercellular ROS signaling and allows for synergistic effects.

    PubMed

    Scheit, Katrin; Bauer, Georg

    2015-03-01

    Salicylic acid and anthocyanidins are known as plant-derived antioxidants, but also can provoke paradoxically seeming prooxidant effects in vitro. These prooxidant effects are connected to the potential of salicylic acid and anthocyanidins to induce apoptosis selectively in tumor cells in vitro and to inhibit tumor growth in animal models. Several epidemiological studies have shown that salicylic acid and its prodrug acetylsalicylic acid are tumor-preventive for humans. The mechanism of salicylic acid- and anthocyanidin-dependent antitumor effects has remained enigmatic so far. Extracellular apoptosis-inducing reactive oxygen species signaling through the NO/peroxynitrite and the HOCl signaling pathway specifically induces apoptosis in transformed cells. Tumor cells have acquired resistance against intercellular reactive oxygen species signaling through expression of membrane-associated catalase. Here, we show that salicylic acid and anthocyanidins inactivate tumor cell protective catalase and thus reactive apoptosis-inducing intercellular reactive oxygen species signaling of tumor cells and the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis Salicylic acid inhibits catalase directly through its potential to transform compound I of catalase into the inactive compound II. In contrast, anthocyanidins provoke a complex mechanism for catalase inactivation that is initiated by anthocyanidin-mediated inhibition of NO dioxygenase. This allows the formation of extracellular singlet oxygen through the reaction between H(2)O(2) and peroxynitrite, amplification through a caspase8-dependent step and subsequent singlet oxygen-mediated inactivation of catalase. The combination of salicylic acid and anthocyanidins allows for a remarkable synergistic effect in apoptosis induction. This effect may be potentially useful to elaborate novel therapeutic approaches and crucial for the interpretation of epidemiological results related to the antitumor effects of secondary plant compounds. PMID

  10. Amiodarone-induced thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Danzi, Sara; Klein, Irwin

    2015-05-01

    Amiodarone is an effective medication for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. Originally developed for the treatment of angina, it is now the most frequently prescribed antiarrhythmia drug despite the fact that its use is limited because of potential serious side effects including adverse effects on the thyroid gland and thyroid hormones. Although the mechanisms of action of amiodarone on the thyroid gland and thyroid hormone metabolism are poorly understood, the structural similarity of amiodarone to thyroid hormones, including the presence of iodine moieties on the inner benzene ring, may play a role in causing thyroid dysfunction. Amiodarone-induced thyroid dysfunction includes amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT) and amiodarone-induced hypothyroidism (AIH). The AIT develops more commonly in iodine-deficient areas and AIH in iodine-sufficient areas. The AIT type 1 usually occurs in patients with known or previously undiagnosed thyroid dysfunction or goiter. The AIT type 2 usually occurs in normal thyroid glands and results in destruction of thyroid tissue caused by thyroiditis. This is the result of an intrinsic drug effect from the amiodarone itself. Mixed types are not uncommon. Patients with cardiac disease receiving amiodarone treatment should be monitored for signs of thyroid dysfunction, which often manifest as a reappearance of the underlying cardiac disease state. When monitoring patients, initial tests should include the full battery of thyroid function tests, thyroid-stimulating hormone, thyroxine, triiodothyronine, and antithyroid antibodies. Mixed types of AIT can be challenging both to diagnose and treat and therapy differs depending on the type of AIT. Treatment can include thionamides and/or glucocorticoids. The AIH responds favorably to thyroid hormone replacement therapy. Amiodarone is lipophilic and has a long half-life in the body. Therefore, stopping the amiodarone therapy usually has little short-term benefit. PMID:24067547

  11. Toxin-induced hyperthermic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Rusyniak, Daniel E; Sprague, Jon E

    2005-11-01

    Toxin-induced hyperthermic syndromes are important to consider in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with fever and muscle rigidity. If untreated, toxin-induced hyperthermia may result in fatal hyperthermia with multisystem organ failure. All of these syndromes have at their center the disruption of normal thermogenic mechanisms, resulting in the activation of the hypothalamus and sympathetic nervous systems.The result of this thermogenic dysregulation is excess heat generation combined with impaired heat dissipation. Although many similarities exist among the clinical presentations and pathophysiologies of toxin-induced hyperthermic syndromes, important differences exist among their triggers and treatments. Serotonin syndrome typically occurs within hours of the addition ofa new serotonergic agent or the abuse of stimulants such as MDMA or methamphetamine. Treatment involves discontinuing the offending agent and administering either a central serotonergic antagonist, such as cyproheptadine or chlorpromazine, a benzodiazepine, or a combination of the two. NMS typically occurs over hours to days in a patient taking a neuroleptic agent; its recommended treatment is generally the combination of a central dopamine agonist, bromocriptine or L-dopa, and dantrolene. In those patients in whom it is difficult to differentiate between serotonin and neuroleptic malignant syndromes, the physical examination may be helpful:clonus and hyperreflexia are more suggestive of serotonin syndrome,whereas lead-pipe rigidity is suggestive of NMS. In patients in whom serotonin syndrome and NMS cannot be differentiated, benzodiazepines represent the safest therapeutic option. MH presents rapidly with jaw rigidity, hyperthermia, and hypercarbia. Although it almost always occurs in the setting of surgical anesthesia, cases have occurred in susceptible individuals during exertion. The treatment of MH involves the use of dantrolene. Future improvements in understanding the

  12. High homocysteine induces betaine depletion

    PubMed Central

    Imbard, Apolline; Benoist, Jean-François; Esse, Ruben; Gupta, Sapna; Lebon, Sophie; de Vriese, An S; de Baulny, Helene Ogier; Kruger, Warren; Schiff, Manuel; Blom, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    Betaine is the substrate of the liver- and kidney-specific betaine-homocysteine (Hcy) methyltransferase (BHMT), an alternate pathway for Hcy remethylation. We hypothesized that BHMT is a major pathway for homocysteine removal in cases of hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHcy). Therefore, we measured betaine in plasma and tissues from patients and animal models of HHcy of genetic and acquired cause. Plasma was collected from patients presenting HHcy without any Hcy interfering treatment. Plasma and tissues were collected from rat models of HHcy induced by diet and from a mouse model of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) deficiency. S-adenosyl-methionine (AdoMet), S-adenosyl-homocysteine (AdoHcy), methionine, betaine and dimethylglycine (DMG) were quantified by ESI—LC–MS/MS. mRNA expression was quantified using quantitative real-time (QRT)-PCR. For all patients with diverse causes of HHcy, plasma betaine concentrations were below the normal values of our laboratory. In the diet-induced HHcy rat model, betaine was decreased in all tissues analysed (liver, brain, heart). In the mouse CBS deficiency model, betaine was decreased in plasma, liver, heart and brain, but was conserved in kidney. Surprisingly, BHMT expression and activity was decreased in liver. However, in kidney, BHMT and SLC6A12 expression was increased in CBS-deficient mice. Chronic HHcy, irrespective of its cause, induces betaine depletion in plasma and tissues (liver, brain and heart), indicating a global decrease in the body betaine pool. In kidney, betaine concentrations were not affected, possibly due to overexpression of the betaine transporter SLC6A12 where betaine may be conserved because of its crucial role as an osmolyte. PMID:26182429

  13. Snoring-Induced Vibratory Angioedema

    PubMed Central

    Kalathoor, Ipe

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 70 Final Diagnosis: Snoring induced vibratory angioedema Symptoms: Swelling of tongue • roof of mouth and throat • multiple episodes at night Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Continuous positive airway pressure therapy Specialty: Allergology Objective: Rare disease Background: Vibratory angioedema (VA) is a rare physical urticaria, with symptoms of itching and swelling of the skin or mucosa when it is exposed to vibration. Avoidance of vibration is the best way to manage this condition. This case report will assist physicians to diagnose this rare condition. Here, a previously unpublished potential successful treatment modality is being presented, with good symptom control, along with some photographs taken during an acute attack. A literature review points towards potential undiagnosed cases. Case Report: A 70-year-old woman had multiple emergency department visits for tongue and throat swelling over 3 years. The episodes always happened at night. Detailed history elicited some episodes of itching and swelling of hands when driving as well as significant snoring while sleeping. Physical examination was unremarkable except for morbid obesity. Complement factor 4 and C1esterase inhibitor level were within normal limits. A tentative diagnosis of angioedema induced by oropharyngeal vibration from snoring was made. A sleep study confirmed sleep apnea with severe snoring. After CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) treatment, she had successful symptom control. Conclusions: Snoring-induced VA is very likely an under-diagnosed condition in the community. The typical history is the key to the diagnosis. This condition could be confirmed by vibration test or by the resolution of symptoms with elimination of vibration. Effective symptom control is possible by avoidance of oropharyngeal vibration from snoring with the administration of CPAP therapy, making it a potential novel indication for this condition. PMID:26437464

  14. Drug-induced nail disorders.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    Nail disorders are defined according to their appearance and the part of the nail affected: the nail plate, the tissues that support or hold the nail plate in place, or the lunula. The consequences of most nail disorders are purely cosmetic. Other disorders, such as ingrown nails, inflammation, erythema, abscesses or tumours, cause functional impairment or pain. The appearance of the lesions is rarely indicative of their cause. Possible causes include physiological changes, local disorders or trauma, systemic conditions, toxic substances and drugs. Most drug-induced nail disorders resolve after discontinuation of the drug, although complete resolution sometimes takes several years. Drugs appear to induce nail disorders through a variety of mechanisms. Some drugs affect the nail matrix epithelium, the nail bed or the nail folds. Some alter nail colour. Other drugs induce photosensitivity. Yet others affect the blood supply to the nail unit. Nail abnormalities are common during treatment with certain cytotoxic drugs: taxanes, anthracyclines, fluorouracil, EGFR, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, etc. Some drugs are associated with a risk of serious and painful lesions, such as abscesses. When these disorders affect quality of life, the benefits of withdrawing the drug must be weighed against the severity of the condition being treated and the drug's efficacy, taking into account the harm-benefit balance of other options. Various anti-infective drugs, including tetracyclines, quinolones, clofazimine and zidovudine, cause the nail plate to detach from the nail bed after exposure to light, or cause nail discoloration. Psoralens and retinoids can also have the same effects. PMID:25162091

  15. Sad music induces pleasant emotion.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Ai; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Katahira, Kentaro; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    In general, sad music is thought to cause us to experience sadness, which is considered an unpleasant emotion. As a result, the question arises as to why we listen to sad music if it evokes sadness. One possible answer to this question is that we may actually feel positive emotions when we listen to sad music. This suggestion may appear to be counterintuitive; however, in this study, by dividing musical emotion into perceived emotion and felt emotion, we investigated this potential emotional response to music. We hypothesized that felt and perceived emotion may not actually coincide in this respect: sad music would be perceived as sad, but the experience of listening to sad music would evoke positive emotions. A total of 44 participants listened to musical excerpts and provided data on perceived and felt emotions by rating 62 descriptive words or phrases related to emotions on a scale that ranged from 0 (not at all) to 4 (very much). The results revealed that the sad music was perceived to be more tragic, whereas the actual experiences of the participants listening to the sad music induced them to feel more romantic, more blithe, and less tragic emotions than they actually perceived with respect to the same music. Thus, the participants experienced ambivalent emotions when they listened to the sad music. After considering the possible reasons that listeners were induced to experience emotional ambivalence by the sad music, we concluded that the formulation of a new model would be essential for examining the emotions induced by music and that this new model must entertain the possibility that what we experience when listening to music is vicarious emotion. PMID:23785342

  16. Toxin-induced respiratory distress.

    PubMed

    McKay, Charles A

    2014-02-01

    This article describes the impact of various toxic substances on the airway and pulmonary system. Pulmonary anatomy and physiology provide the basis for understanding the response to toxin-induced injury. Simple asphyxiants displace oxygen from the inspired air. Respiratory irritants include water-soluble and water-insoluble compounds. Several inhaled agents produce direct airway injury, which may be mediated by caustic, thermal, and hydrocarbon exposures. Unique pulmonary toxins and toxicants are discussed, as well as inhaled toxin mixtures. Several inhaled toxins may also impair oxygen transport. The pulmonary system may also provide a mechanism for systemic toxin delivery on respiratory exposure. PMID:24275172

  17. Nilotinib-Induced Keratosis Pilaris

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Wai Mun Sean; Aw, Chen Wee Derrick

    2016-01-01

    Nilotinib is a second-generation Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) that is approved for the treatment of imatinib-resistant chronic myeloid leukaemia expressing the Bcr-Abl mutation. Cutaneous adverse drug reactions occur more frequently in patients using this medication. We present a case of nilotinib-induced keratosis pilaris that did not have accompanying symptoms of alopecia or pruritus. Greater recognition of this association is needed so that appropriate treatment can be instituted to ensure a good oncologic outcome. PMID:27194977

  18. Fluoroquinolone-induced Achilles tendinitis.

    PubMed

    Tam, P K; Ho, Carmen T K

    2014-12-01

    We report a case of Achilles tendinitis after intake of ciprofloxacin for treatment of respiratory tract infection. Fluoroquinolone-induced tendinopathy is an uncommon but increasingly recognised adverse effect of this antibiotic class. Most of the cases occur in the Achilles tendon and may lead to tendon rupture. Possible predisposing risk factors include use of steroid, patients with renal impairment or renal transplant, old age, and being an athlete. The drug should be stopped once this condition is suspected. Symptomatic treatment should be given and orthopaedic referral is desirable if tendon rupture occurs. PMID:25488035

  19. HYPOGLYCEMIA INDUCED BY ANTIDIABETIC SULFONYLUREAS.

    PubMed

    Confederat, Luminiţa; Constantin, Sandra; Lupaşcu, Florentina; Pânzariu, Andreea; Hăncianu, Monica; Profire, Lenuţa

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major health problem due to its increasing prevalence and life-threatening complications. Antidiabetic sulfonylureas represent the first-line drugs in type 2 diabetes even though the most common associated risk is pharmacologically-induced hypoglycemia. In the development of this side effect are involved several factors including the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of the drug, patient age and behavior, hepatic or renal dysfunctions, or other drugs associated with a high risk of interactions. If all these are controlled, the risk-benefit balance can be equal to other oral antidiabetic drugs. PMID:26204670

  20. Auditory hallucinations induced by trazodone

    PubMed Central

    Shiotsuki, Ippei; Terao, Takeshi; Ishii, Nobuyoshi; Hatano, Koji

    2014-01-01

    A 26-year-old female outpatient presenting with a depressive state suffered from auditory hallucinations at night. Her auditory hallucinations did not respond to blonanserin or paliperidone, but partially responded to risperidone. In view of the possibility that her auditory hallucinations began after starting trazodone, trazodone was discontinued, leading to a complete resolution of her auditory hallucinations. Furthermore, even after risperidone was decreased and discontinued, her auditory hallucinations did not recur. These findings suggest that trazodone may induce auditory hallucinations in some susceptible patients. PMID:24700048

  1. Sertraline induced acute mandibular dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Raveendranathan, Dhanya; Rao, Swaminath Gopala

    2015-01-01

    Specific serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been linked with the occurrence of drug-induced parkinsonism, dystonia, dyskinesia, and akathisia. Here, we describe a patient with a diagnosis of emotionally unstable personality disorder and depression who developed severe mandibular dystonia with sertraline in the absence of concurrent prescription of medications, which have potential action on the dopaminergic system. This case highlights the need for clinicians to be aware of this alarming acute adverse effect with sertraline, which is conventionally considered to be well-tolerated and safe. PMID:26752908

  2. Metronidazole-Induced Cerebellar Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Amit; Kanekar, Sangam; Sabat, Shyam; Thamburaj, Krishnamurthy

    2016-01-01

    Metronidazole is a very common antibacterial and antiprotozoal with wide usage across the globe, including the least developed countries. It is generally well-tolerated with a low incidence of serious side-effects. Neurological toxicity is fairly common with this drug, however majority of these are peripheral neuropathy with very few cases of central nervous toxicity reported. We report the imaging findings in two patients with cerebellar dysfunction after Metronidazole usage. Signal changes in the dentate and red nucleus were seen on magnetic resonance imaging in these patients. Most of the cases reported in literature reported similar findings, suggesting high predilection for the dentate nucleus in metronidazole induced encephalopathy. PMID:27127600

  3. Noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    McReynolds, Michael C

    2005-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss is a major hazard in many workplaces and in society. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health estimates that more than 30 million workers (almost 1 in 10) are exposed to unsafe noise levels on the job. Helicopter emergency medical services crews work in an environment in which exposure to aviation noise makes the issue of hearing loss and prevention strategies salient. Applying the Occupational Safety and Health Administration standard for a regulated hearing conservation program through controlling noise exposure will benefit helicopter emergency medical services professionals. PMID:15741953

  4. Stress-induced cervical lesions.

    PubMed

    Braem, M; Lambrechts, P; Vanherle, G

    1992-05-01

    The increasing occurrence of dental lesions at the cervical surfaces requires more knowledge of the causes of the process. Acidic and abrasive mechanisms have clearly been documented as causes but the stress theory by Lee and Eakle is still controversial. This report describes several incidences of possible stress-induced lesions according to the characteristics described by Lee and Eakle. The occurrences of subgingival lesions lend credence to the stress-induction theory by exclusion of other superimposing etiologic factors. With the current concepts, a perceptive approach to the treatment of cervical lesions can be executed. PMID:1527763

  5. Laser Induced Surface Chemical Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinespring, Charter D.; Freedman, Andrew

    1990-02-01

    Studies of the thermal and photon-induced surface chemistry of dimethyl cadmium (DMCd) and dimethyl tellurium (DMTe) on GaAs(100) substrates under ultrahigh vacuum conditions have been performed for substrate temperatures in the range of 123 K to 473 K. Results indicate that extremely efficient conversion of admixtures of DMTe and DMCd to CdTe can be obtained using low power (5 - 10 mJ cm-2) 193 nm laser pulses at substrate temperatures of 123 K. Subsequent annealing at 473 K produces an epitaxial film.

  6. Bathtub vortex induced by instability.

    PubMed

    Mizushima, Jiro; Abe, Kazuki; Yokoyama, Naoto

    2014-10-01

    The driving mechanism and the swirl direction of the bathtub vortex are investigated by the linear stability analysis of the no-vortex flow as well as numerical simulations. We find that only systems having plane symmetries with respect to vertical planes deserve research for the swirl direction. The bathtub vortex appearing in a vessel with a rectangular cross section having a drain hole at the center of the bottom is proved to be induced by instability when the flow rate exceeds a threshold. The Coriolis force is capable of determining the swirl direction to be cyclonic. PMID:25375427

  7. Molecular sequelae of proteasome inhibition in human multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Mitsiades, Nicholas; Mitsiades, Constantine S.; Poulaki, Vassiliki; Chauhan, Dharminder; Fanourakis, Galinos; Gu, Xuesong; Bailey, Charles; Joseph, Marie; Libermann, Towia A.; Treon, Steven P.; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Richardson, Paul G.; Hideshima, Teru; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2002-01-01

    The proteasome inhibitor PS-341 inhibits IκB degradation, prevents NF-κB activation, and induces apoptosis in several types of cancer cells, including chemoresistant multiple myeloma (MM) cells. PS-341 has marked clinical activity even in the setting of relapsed refractory MM. However, PS-341-induced apoptotic cascade(s) are not yet fully defined. By using gene expression profiling, we characterized the molecular sequelae of PS-341 treatment in MM cells and further focused on molecular pathways responsible for the anticancer actions of this promising agent. The transcriptional profile of PS-341-treated cells involved down-regulation of growth/survival signaling pathways, and up-regulation of molecules implicated in proapoptotic cascades (which are both consistent with the proapoptotic effect of proteasome inhibition), as well as up-regulation of heat-shock proteins and ubiquitin/proteasome pathway members (which can correspond to stress responses against proteasome inhibition). Further studies on these pathways showed that PS-341 decreases the levels of several antiapoptotic proteins and triggers a dual apoptotic pathway of mitochondrial cytochrome c release and caspase-9 activation, as well as activation of Jun kinase and a Fas/caspase-8-dependent apoptotic pathway [which is inhibited by a dominant negative (decoy) Fas construct]. Stimulation with IGF-1, as well as overexpression of Bcl-2 or constitutively active Akt in MM cells also modestly attenuates PS-341-induced cell death, whereas inhibitors of the BH3 domain of Bcl-2 family members or the heat-shock protein 90 enhance tumor cell sensitivity to proteasome inhibition. These data provide both insight into the molecular mechanisms of antitumor activity of PS-341 and the rationale for future clinical trials of PS-341, in combination with conventional and novel therapies, to improve patient outcome in MM. PMID:12391322

  8. Drugs induced pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Seferian, Andrei; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Savale, Laurent; Günther, Sven; Tubert-Bitter, Pascale; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disorder characterized by progressive obliteration of the pulmonary microvasculature, resulting in elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and premature death. According to the current classification, PAH can be associated with exposure to certain drugs or toxins, particularly appetite suppressant drugs, such as aminorex, fenfluramine derivatives and benfluorex. These drugs have been confirmed to be risk factors for PAH and were withdrawn from the market. The supposed mechanism is an increase in serotonin levels, which was demonstrated to act as a growth factor for the pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. Amphetamines, phentermine and mazindol were less frequently used but are also considered as possible risk factors for PAH. Dasatinib, a dual Src/Abl kinase inhibitor, used in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukaemia was associated with cases of severe PAH, in part reversible after its withdrawal. Recently several studies raised the potential endothelial dysfunction that could be induced by interferon, and few cases of PAH have been reported with interferon therapy. Other possible risk factors for PAH include: nasal decongestants, like phenylpropanolamine, dietary supplement - L-Tryptophan, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, pergolide and other drugs that could act on 5HT2B receptors. Interestingly, PAH remains a rare complication of these drugs, suggesting possible individual susceptibility and further studies are needed to identify patients at risk of drugs induced PAH. PMID:23972547

  9. Drug-induced weight gain.

    PubMed

    Ness-Abramof, Rosane; Apovian, Caroline M

    2005-01-01

    Drug-induced weight gain is a serious side effect of many commonly used drugs leading to noncompliance with therapy and to exacerbation of comorbid conditions related to obesity. Improved glycemic control achieved by insulin, insulin secretagogues or thiazolidinedione therapy is generally accompanied by weight gain. It is a problematic side effect of therapy due to the known deleterious effect of weight gain on glucose control, increased blood pressure and worsening lipid profile. Weight gain may be lessened or prevented by adherence to diet and exercise or combination therapy with metformin. Weight gain is also common in psychotropic therapy. The atypical antipsychotic drugs (clozapine, olanzepine, risperidone and quetiapine) are known to cause marked weight gain. Antidepressants such as amitriptyline, mirtazapine and some serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) also may promote appreciable weight gain that cannot be explained solely by improvement in depressive symptoms. The same phenomenon is observed with mood stabilizers such as lithium, valproic acid and carbamazepine. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) that promote weight gain include valproate, carbamazepine and gabapentin. Lamotrigine is an AED that is weight-neutral, while topiramate and zonisamide may induce weight loss. PMID:16341287

  10. Drug-induced weight gain.

    PubMed

    Ness-Abramof, Rosane; Apovian, Caroline M

    2005-08-01

    Drug-induced weight gain is a serious side effect of many commonly used drugs leading to noncompliance with therapy and to exacerbation of comorbid conditions related to obesity. Improved glycemic control achieved by insulin, insulin secretagogues or thiazolidinedione therapy is generally accompanied by weight gain. It is a problematic side effect of therapy due to the known deleterious effect of weight gain on glucose control, increased blood pressure and worsening lipid profile. Weight gain may be lessened or prevented by adherence to diet and exercise or combination therapy with metformin. Weight gain is also common in psychotropic therapy. The atypical antipsychotic drugs (clozapine, olanzepine, risperidone and quetiapine) are known to cause marked weight gain. Antidepressants such as amitriptyline, mirtazapine and some serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) also may promote appreciable weight gain that cannot be explained solely by improvement in depressive symptoms. The same phenomenon is observed with mood stabilizers such as lithium, valproic acid and carbamazepine. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) that promote weight gain include valproate, carbamazepine and gabapentin. Lamotrigine is an AED that is weight-neutral, while topiramate and zonisamide may induce weight loss. PMID:16234878

  11. Induced gravity II: grand unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einhorn, Martin B.; Jones, D. R. Timothy

    2016-05-01

    As an illustration of a renormalizable, asymptotically-free model of induced gravity, we consider an SO(10) gauge theory interacting with a real scalar multiplet in the adjoint representation. We show that dimensional transmutation can occur, spontaneously breaking SO(10) to SU(5)⊗U(1), while inducing the Planck mass and a positive cosmological constant, all proportional to the same scale v. All mass ratios are functions of the values of coupling constants at that scale. Below this scale (at which the Big Bang may occur), the model takes the usual form of Einstein-Hilbert gravity in de Sitter space plus calculable corrections. We show that there exist regions of parameter space in which the breaking results in a local minimum of the effective action giving a positive dilaton (mass)2 from two-loop corrections associated with the conformal anomaly. Furthermore, unlike the singlet case we considered previously, some minima lie within the basin of attraction of the ultraviolet fixed point. Moreover, the asymptotic behavior of the coupling constants also lie within the range of convergence of the Euclidean path integral, so there is hope that there will be candidates for sensible vacua. Although open questions remain concerning unitarity of all such renormalizable models of gravity, it is not obvious that, in curved backgrounds such as those considered here, unitarity is violated. In any case, any violation that may remain will be suppressed by inverse powers of the reduced Planck mass.

  12. Amiodarone-induced myxoedema coma.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Syed; Ayoub, Walaa; Hassan, Mona; Wisgerhof, Max

    2014-01-01

    A 62-year-old man was found to have bradycardia, hypothermia and respiratory failure 3 weeks after initiation of amiodarone therapy for atrial fibrillation. Thyroid-stimulating hormone was found to be 168 μIU/mL (nl. 0.3-5 μIU/mL) and free thyroxine (FT4) was <0.2 ng/dL (nl. 0.8-1.8 ng/dL). He received intravenous fluids, vasopressor therapy and stress dose steroids; he was intubated and admitted to the intensive care unit. He received 500 μg of intravenous levothyroxine in the first 18 h of therapy, and 150 µg intravenous daily thereafter. Haemodynamic improvement, along with complete recovery of mental status, occurred after 48 h. Twelve hours after the initiation of therapy, FT4 was 0.96 ng/dL. The patient was maintained on levothyroxine 175 (g POorally daily. A thyroid ultrasound showed diffuse heterogeneity. The 24 hour excretion of iodine was 3657 (mcg (25-756 ( mcg). The only two cases of amiodarone-induced myxoedema coma in the literature report patient death despite supportive therapy and thyroid hormone replacement. This case represents the most thoroughly investigated case of amiodarone-induced myxoedema coma with a history significant for subclinical thyroid disease. PMID:24729111

  13. Wind-induced ground motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderyan, Vahid; Hickey, Craig J.; Raspet, Richard

    2016-02-01

    Wind noise is a problem in seismic surveys and can mask the seismic signals at low frequency. This research investigates ground motions caused by wind pressure and shear stress perturbations on the ground surface. A prediction of the ground displacement spectra using the measured ground properties and predicted pressure and shear stress at the ground surface is developed. Field measurements are conducted at a site having a flat terrain and low ambient seismic noise. Triaxial geophones are deployed at different depths to study the wind-induced ground vibrations as a function of depth and wind velocity. Comparison of the predicted to the measured wind-induced ground displacement spectra shows good agreement for the vertical component but significant underprediction for the horizontal components. To validate the theoretical model, a test experiment is designed to exert controlled normal pressure and shear stress on the ground using a vertical and a horizontal mass-spring apparatus. This experiment verifies the linear elastic rheology and the quasi-static displacements assumptions of the model. The results indicate that the existing surface shear stress models significantly underestimate the wind shear stress at the ground surface and the amplitude of the fluctuation shear stress must be of the same order of magnitude as the normal pressure. Measurement results show that mounting the geophones flush with the ground provides a significant reduction in wind noise on all three components of the geophone. Further reduction in wind noise with depth of burial is small for depths up to 40 cm.

  14. Plasmon-induced artificial photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Kosei; Oshikiri, Tomoya; Shi, Xu; Zhong, Yuqing; Misawa, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    We have successfully developed a plasmon-induced artificial photosynthesis system that uses a gold nanoparticle-loaded oxide semiconductor electrode to produce useful chemical energy as hydrogen and ammonia. The most important feature of this system is that both sides of a strontium titanate single-crystal substrate are used without an electrochemical apparatus. Plasmon-induced water splitting occurred even with a minimum chemical bias of 0.23 V owing to the plasmonic effects based on the efficient oxidation of water and the use of platinum as a co-catalyst for reduction. Photocurrent measurements were performed to determine the electron transfer between the gold nanoparticles and the oxide semiconductor. The efficiency of water oxidation was determined through spectroelectrochemical experiments aimed at elucidating the electron density in the gold nanoparticles. A set-up similar to the water-splitting system was used to synthesize ammonia via nitrogen fixation using ruthenium instead of platinum as a co-catalyst. PMID:26052419

  15. Coffee induces autophagy in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pietrocola, Federico; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Mariño, Guillermo; Vacchelli, Erika; Senovilla, Laura; Chaba, Kariman; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Madeo, Frank; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies and clinical trials revealed that chronic consumption coffee is associated with the inhibition of several metabolic diseases as well as reduction in overall and cause-specific mortality. We show that both natural and decaffeinated brands of coffee similarly rapidly trigger autophagy in mice. One to 4 h after coffee consumption, we observed an increase in autophagic flux in all investigated organs (liver, muscle, heart) in vivo, as indicated by the increased lipidation of LC3B and the reduction of the abundance of the autophagic substrate sequestosome 1 (p62/SQSTM1). These changes were accompanied by the inhibition of the enzymatic activity of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), leading to the reduced phosphorylation of p70S6K, as well as by the global deacetylation of cellular proteins detectable by immunoblot. Immunohistochemical analyses of transgenic mice expressing a GFP–LC3B fusion protein confirmed the coffee-induced relocation of LC3B to autophagosomes, as well as general protein deacetylation. Altogether, these results indicate that coffee triggers 2 phenomena that are also induced by nutrient depletion, namely a reduction of protein acetylation coupled to an increase in autophagy. We speculate that polyphenols contained in coffee promote health by stimulating autophagy. PMID:24769862

  16. Neutrino-induced nuclear excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belusevic, R.

    1995-04-01

    We present an improved, compared to that of Belusevic and Rein, theoretical value of the cross section for the neutrino-induced nuclear excitation of iron. This result is based on a measurement of the photoabsorption cross section on the same nucleus, which can be related to the transverse part of the neutrino cross section via the conserved vector current hypothesis. The longitudinal part is related to the pion absorption cross section through the partial conservation of the axial-vector current, and thus reflects the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry. A general formula for the excitation cross section is derived, which is valid for both low and high incident neutrino energies. When caused by a weak neutral current, this process may play an important role in core-collapse supernovae. It can also be detected using low-temperature techniques with the purpose of cosmological and weak-interaction studies. A new estimate of the cross sections for neutrino-induced nonscaling processes described by Belusevic and Rein is discussed in the context of two experiments using iron targets, but at very different beam energies.

  17. Hydroxycut-induced Liver Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kaswala, DH; Shah, S; Patel, N; Raisoni, S; Swaminathan, S

    2014-01-01

    In the recent era, use of various nutritional supplements is highly encouraged amongst the people of United States. Weight loss supplements are major part of the nutritional supplements and their usage is unregulated in the US. Obesity is a major health concern in the US and Americans spend around $30 billion a year for weight loss supplements. At times, these supplements can be responsible for documented or undocumented adverse drug effects. The health consequences related to these supplements are often overlooked by the general public, even though FDA issues advisories regarding them. One common supplement used for weight loss was Hydroxycut (Iovate Health Sciences Research, Oakville, Ontario, Canada). Hydroxycut was recalled from the market after a FDA warning in May 2009 because of 23 reports of serious health problems ranging from jaundice and elevated liver enzymes to liver damage. 1 This case report adds evidence for Hydroxycut - induced hepatotoxicity. A 27 year old man with right upper quadrant pain and jaundice was found to have elevated liver enzymes and was taking Hydroxycut along with other supplements. Liver biopsy showed drug induced hepatotoxicity. Discontinuation of Hydroxycut dramatically improved liver functions and related symptoms. PMID:24669349

  18. [Autoimmune hepatitis induced by isotretionine].

    PubMed

    Guzman Rojas, Patricia; Gallegos Lopez, Roxana; Ciliotta Chehade, Alessandra; Scavino, Yolanda; Morales, Alejandro; Tagle, Martín

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a teenage patient with the diagnosis of drug induced autoimmune hepatitis. The patient is a 16 years old female, with the past medical history of Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism controlled with levothyroxine, who started treatment with Isotretionin (®Accutane) 20 mg q/12 hours for a total of 3 months for the treatment of severe acne. The physical examination was within normal limits and the results of the laboratory exams are: Baseline values of ALT 28 U/L, AST 28 U/L. Three months later: AST 756 U/L, ALT 1199U/L, alkaline phosphatase 114 U/L, with normal bilirrubin levels throughout the process. The serology studies were negative for all viral hepatitis; ANA titers were positive (1/160) and igG levels were also elevated. A liver biopsy was performed, and was compatible with the diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis. Corticosteroid therapy was started with Prednisone 40 mg per day one week after stopping the treatment with isotretionin, observing an improvement in the laboratory values. We describe this case and review the world literature since there are no reported cases of Isotretinoin-induced autoimmune hepatitis. PMID:27131947

  19. Sildenafil Induced Acute Interstitial Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Burkhart, Ryan; Shah, Nina; Lewin, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is characterized by inflammation of the renal interstitium and usually occurs in a temporal relationship with the medication. We present a case of an Asian male who had nephrotic range proteinuria and presented with acute kidney injury. The patient reported an acute change in physical appearance and symptomatology after the ingestion of a single dose of sildenafil. Renal biopsy was notable for minimal change disease (MCD) with acute and chronic interstitial nephritis. Renal replacement and glucocorticoid therapy were initiated. Renal recovery within six weeks permitted discontinuation of dialysis. AIN superimposed on MCD is a known association of NSAID induced nephropathy. The temporal association and the absence of any new drugs suggest that the AIN was most likely due to the sildenafil. NSAIDs are less likely to have caused the AIN given their remote use. The ease of steroid responsiveness would also suggest another cause as NSAID induced AIN is often steroid resistant. The MCD was most likely idiopathic given the lack of temporal association with a secondary cause. As the number of sildenafil prescriptions increases, more cases of AIN may be identified and physician awareness for this potential drug disease association is necessary. PMID:26491581

  20. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.L.

    1996-08-20

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue. 25 figs.

  1. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Horn, Kevin M.; Doyle, Barney L.

    1996-01-01

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue.

  2. Allergen-induced airway responses.

    PubMed

    Gauvreau, Gail M; El-Gammal, Amani I; O'Byrne, Paul M

    2015-09-01

    Environmental allergens are an important cause of asthma and can contribute to loss of asthma control and exacerbations. Allergen inhalation challenge has been a useful clinical model to examine the mechanisms of allergen-induced airway responses and inflammation. Allergen bronchoconstrictor responses are the early response, which reaches a maximum within 30 min and resolves by 1-3 h, and late responses, when bronchoconstriction recurs after 3-4 h and reaches a maximum over 6-12 h. Late responses are followed by an increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. These responses occur when IgE on mast cells is cross-linked by an allergen, causing degranulation and the release of histamine, neutral proteases and chemotactic factors, and the production of newly formed mediators, such as cysteinyl leukotrienes and prostaglandin D2. Allergen-induced airway inflammation consists of an increase in airway eosinophils, basophils and, less consistently, neutrophils. These responses are mediated by the trafficking and activation of myeloid dendritic cells into the airways, probably as a result of the release of epithelial cell-derived thymic stromal lymphopoietin, and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines from type 2 helper T-cells. Allergen inhalation challenge has also been a widely used model to study potential new therapies for asthma and has an excellent negative predictive value for this purpose. PMID:26206871

  3. Coffee induces autophagy in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pietrocola, Federico; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Mariño, Guillermo; Vacchelli, Erika; Senovilla, Laura; Chaba, Kariman; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Madeo, Frank; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies and clinical trials revealed that chronic consumption coffee is associated with the inhibition of several metabolic diseases as well as reduction in overall and cause-specific mortality. We show that both natural and decaffeinated brands of coffee similarly rapidly trigger autophagy in mice. One to 4 h after coffee consumption, we observed an increase in autophagic flux in all investigated organs (liver, muscle, heart) in vivo, as indicated by the increased lipidation of LC3B and the reduction of the abundance of the autophagic substrate sequestosome 1 (p62/SQSTM1). These changes were accompanied by the inhibition of the enzymatic activity of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), leading to the reduced phosphorylation of p70(S6K), as well as by the global deacetylation of cellular proteins detectable by immunoblot. Immunohistochemical analyses of transgenic mice expressing a GFP-LC3B fusion protein confirmed the coffee-induced relocation of LC3B to autophagosomes, as well as general protein deacetylation. Altogether, these results indicate that coffee triggers 2 phenomena that are also induced by nutrient depletion, namely a reduction of protein acetylation coupled to an increase in autophagy. We speculate that polyphenols contained in coffee promote health by stimulating autophagy. PMID:24769862

  4. Shear-Induced Reactive Gelation.

    PubMed

    Brand, Bastian; Morbidelli, Massimo; Soos, Miroslav

    2015-11-24

    In this work, we describe a method for the production of porous polymer materials in the form of particles characterized by narrow pore size distribution using the principle of shear-induced reactive gelation. Poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) primary particles with diameter ranging from 80 to 200 nm are used as building blocks, which are assembled into fractal-like clusters when exposed to high shear rates generated in a microchannel. It was found that independent of the primary particle size, it is possible to modulate the internal structure of formed fractal-like aggregates having fractal dimension ranging from 2.4 to 2.7 by varying the residence time in the microchannel. Thermally induced postpolymerization was used to increase the mechanical resilience of such formed clusters. Primary particle interpenetration was observed by SEM and confirmed by light scattering resulting in an increase of fractal dimension. Nitrogen sorption measurements and mercury porosimetry confirmed formation of a porous material with surface area ranging from 20 to 40 m(2)/g characterized by porosity of 70% and narrow pore size distribution with an average diameter around 700 nm without the presence of any micropores. The strong perfusive character of the synthesized material was confirmed by the existence of a plateau of the height equivalent to a theoretical plate measured at high reduced velocities using a chromatographic column packed with the synthesized microclusters. PMID:26488233

  5. Inducer Hydrodynamic Load Measurement Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelley, Stephen E.; Zoladz, Thomas F.; Turner, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has demonstrated two measurement devices for sensing and resolving the hydrodynamic loads on fluid machinery. The first - a derivative of the six-component wind tunnel balance - senses the forces and moments on the rotating device through a weakened shaft section instrumented with a series of strain gauges. This rotating balance was designed to directly measure the steady and unsteady hydrodynamic loads on an inducer, thereby defining both the amplitude and frequency content associated with operating in various cavitation modes. The second device - a high frequency response pressure transducer surface mounted on a rotating component - was merely an extension of existing technology for application in water. MSFC has recently completed experimental evaluations of both the rotating balance and surface-mount transducers in a water test loop. The measurement bandwidth of the rotating balance was severely limited by the relative flexibility of the device itself, resulting in an unexpectedly low structural bending mode and invalidating the higher-frequency response data. Despite these limitations, measurements confirmed that the integrated loads on the four-bladed inducer respond to both cavitation intensity and cavitation phenomena. Likewise, the surface-mount pressure transducers were subjected to a range of temperatures and flow conditions in a non-rotating environment to record bias shifts and transfer functions between the transducers and a reference device. The pressure transducer static performance was within manufacturer's specifications and dynamic response accurately followed that of the reference.

  6. Simulations of Cavitating Cryogenic Inducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Dan (Technical Monitor); Hosangadi, Ashvin; Ahuja, Vineet; Ungewitter, Ronald J.

    2004-01-01

    Simulations of cavitating turbopump inducers at their design flow rate are presented. Results over a broad range of Nss, numbers extending from single-phase flow conditions through the critical head break down point are discussed. The flow characteristics and performance of a subscale geometry designed for water testing are compared with the fullscale configuration that employs LOX. In particular, thermal depression effects arising from cavitation in cryogenic fluids are identified and their impact on the suction performance of the inducer quantified. The simulations have been performed using the CRUNCH CFD[R] code that has a generalized multi-element unstructured framework suitable for turbomachinery applications. An advanced multi-phase formulation for cryogenic fluids that models temperature depression and real fluid property variations is employed. The formulation has been extensively validated for both liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen by simulating the experiments of Hord on hydrofoils; excellent estimates of the leading edge temperature and pressure depression were obtained while the comparisons in the cavity closure region were reasonable.

  7. Ventilator-induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; Zhang, Haibo; Slutsky, Arthur S.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that mechanical ventilation can injure the lung, producing an entity known as ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). There are various forms of VILI, including volutrauma (i.e., injury caused by overdistending the lung), atelectrauma (injury due to repeated opening/closing of lung units), and biotrauma (release of mediators that can induce lung injury or aggravate pre-existing injury, potentially leading to multiple organ failure). Experimental data in the pediatric context are in accord with the importance of VILI, and appear to show age-related susceptibility to VILI, although a conclusive link between use of large Vts and mortality has not been demonstrated in this population. The relevance of VILI in the pediatric intensive care unit population is thus unclear. Given the physiological and biological differences in the respiratory systems of infants, children, and adults, it is difficult to directly extrapolate clinical practice from adults to children. This Critical Care Perspective analyzes the relevance of VILI to the pediatric population, and addresses why pediatric patients might be less susceptible than adults to VILI. PMID:25003705

  8. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  9. Prolactin-induced prostate tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Sackmann-Sala, Lucila; Goffin, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    The physiological role of prolactin (PRL) in the prostate gland is not clearly understood. Genetically-modified mouse models that have invalidated actors of the PRL signaling axis failed to identify an essential regulatory function on this tissue. However, a large body of evidence suggests an important role for PRL in prostate tumorigenesis. Mainly through the activation of its downstream target STAT5, PRL can induce growth and survival of prostate cancer cells and tissues in several experimental settings. In the clinic, PRL expression and STAT5 activation in human prostate tumors correlate with disease severity. Available data point to a role of local (autocrine/paracrine) rather than circulating (endocrine) PRL in the induction of disease progression. In mice, transgenic expression of PRL in the prostate leads to enhanced epithelial hyperplasia and dysplasia, with amplification of basal/stem cells which have been recently identified as prostate cancer-initiating cells. Thus, targeting PRL receptor (PRLR)/STAT5 signaling may provide an alternative therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer. Corresponding targeted therapies currently in preclinical development include antagonists or blocking antibodies for the PRLR and small molecule inhibitors directed against the tyrosine kinase JAK2 upstream of STAT5. Present efforts are aimed at validating these therapies for the treatment of prostate cancer, while understanding the mechanisms of disease progression induced by PRL/STAT5. PMID:25472541

  10. Amiodarone-induced myxoedema coma

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Syed; Ayoub, Walaa; Hassan, Mona; Wisgerhof, Max

    2014-01-01

    A 62-year-old man was found to have bradycardia, hypothermia and respiratory failure 3 weeks after initiation of amiodarone therapy for atrial fibrillation. Thyroid-stimulating hormone was found to be 168 μIU/mL (nl. 0.3–5 μIU/mL) and free thyroxine (FT4) was <0.2 ng/dL (nl. 0.8–1.8 ng/dL). He received intravenous fluids, vasopressor therapy and stress dose steroids; he was intubated and admitted to the intensive care unit. He received 500 μg of intravenous levothyroxine in the first 18 h of therapy, and 150 µg intravenous daily thereafter. Haemodynamic improvement, along with complete recovery of mental status, occurred after 48 h. Twelve hours after the initiation of therapy, FT4 was 0.96 ng/dL. The patient was maintained on levothyroxine 175 (g POorally daily. A thyroid ultrasound showed diffuse heterogeneity. The 24 hour excretion of iodine was 3657 (mcg (25–756 ( mcg). The only two cases of amiodarone-induced myxoedema coma in the literature report patient death despite supportive therapy and thyroid hormone replacement. This case represents the most thoroughly investigated case of amiodarone-induced myxoedema coma with a history significant for subclinical thyroid disease. PMID:24729111

  11. Condensation induced water hammer safety

    SciTech Connect

    Gintner, M.A.

    1997-03-10

    Condensation induced water hammer events in piping systems can cause catastrophic steam system failures which can result in equipment damage, personal injury, and even death. As an industry, we have learned to become accustomed to the ''banging'' that we often hear in our steam piping systems, and complacent in our actions to prevent it. It is unfortunate that lives are lost needlessly, as this type of water hammer event is preventable if one only applies some basic principles when operating and maintaining their steam systems. At the U. S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site where I work, there was one such accident that occurred in 1993 which took the life of a former co-worker and friend of mine. Hanford was established as part of the Manhattan Project during World War II. it is a 560 square mile complex located along the banks of the Columbia River in Southeastern Washington State. For almost 45 years, hanford's mission was to produce weapons grade plutonium for our nations defense programs. Today, Hanford no longer produces plutonium, but is focused on site clean-up and economic diversification. Hanford still uses steam for heating and processing activities, utilizing over 20 miles of piping distribution systems similar to those found in industry. Although these aging systems are still sound, they cannot stand up to the extreme pressure pulses developed by a condensation induced water hammer.

  12. Shear induced phase transitions induced in edible fats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzanti, Gianfranco; Welch, Sarah E.; Marangoni, Alejandro G.; Sirota, Eric B.; Idziak, Stefan H. J.

    2003-03-01

    The food industry crystallizes fats under different conditions of temperature and shear to obtain products with desired crystalline phases. Milk fat, palm oil, cocoa butter and chocolate were crystallized from the melt in a temperature controlled Couette cell. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies were conducted to examine the role of shear on the phase transitions seen in edible fats. The shear forces on the crystals induced acceleration of the alpha to beta-prime phase transition with increasing shear rate in milk fat and palm oil. The increase was slow at low shear rates and became very strong above 360 s-1. In cocoa butter the acceleration between beta-prime-III and beta-V phase transition increased until a maximum of at 360 s-1, and then decreased, showing competition between enhanced heat transfer and viscous heat generation.

  13. Drug-induced lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Vedove, Camilla Dalle; Del Giglio, Micol; Schena, Donatella; Girolomoni, Giampiero

    2009-01-01

    Drug-induced lupus erythematosus (DILE) is defined as a lupus-like syndrome temporally related to continuous drug exposure which resolves after discontinuation of the offending drug. There are currently no standard diagnostic criteria for DILE and the pathomechanisms are still unclear. Similarly to idiopathic lupus, DILE can be diveded into systemic (SLE), subacute cutaneous (SCLE) and chronic cutaneous lupus (CCLE). Systemic DILE is characterized by typical lupus-like symptoms including skin signs, usually mild systemic involvement and a typical laboratory profile with positive antinuclear and anti-histone antibodies, while anti-double strand (ds) DNA and anti-extractable nuclear antigens antibodies are rare. High risk drugs include hydralazine, procainamide and isoniazid. Drug-induced SCLE is very similar to idiopathic SCLE in terms of clinical and serologic characteristic, and it is more common than the systemic form of DILE. Drugs associated with SCLE include calcium channel blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, interferons, thiazide diuretics and terbinafine. Drug-induced CCLE is very rarely reported in the literature and usually refers to fluorouracile agents or non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Recently, cases of DILE have been reported with anti-TNFalpha agents. These cases present with disparate clinical features including arthritis/arthralgia, skin rash, serositis, cytopenia and variable laboratory abnormalities. DILE to anti-TNFalpha agents differs in several ways to classic DILE. The incidence of rashes is higher compared to classical systemic DILE. In most cases of classic DILE visceral involvement is rare, whereas several cases of anti-TNFalpha DILE with evidence of renal disease have been reported. Low serum complement levels as well as anti-extractable nuclear antigen antibodies and anti-dsDNA antibodies are rarely present in classic DILE, whereas they are reported in half the cases of anti-TNFalpha DILE; in contrast, anti

  14. Numerical calculation for cavitation flow of inducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, C.; Wang, Y.; Zhu, Z. T.; Xie, S. F.; Zhao, L. F.; Liu, Z. C.

    2015-01-01

    Inducer has significant effect on improving the cavitation characteristic of centrifugal pump. Several inducers were designed and modeled by Pro/E software. The mesh of flow field was done by ICEM and then was imported to ANSYS CFX to analyze the inducer's cavitation characteristic. Effects of the blade number on the performance of an inducer are investigated in the present paper. The inducers were designed on the basis of identical design flow rate and identical pressure elevation at nominal flow rate. The study focuses on the steady behavior of the inducers in cavitating conditions. Evolutions of performance, torque, mass flow rate, and amplitude of radial forces on the shaft according to the inlet pressure are considered. Furthermore, cavitation instabilities are analyzed in the study. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the pressure distribution and vapour volume fraction distribution through numerical simulations using the Navier-stokes solver with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code.

  15. Immunoregulation of passively induced allergic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Willenborg, D O; Sjollema, P; Danta, G

    1986-03-01

    Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) can be readily induced passively by transfer of lymphocytes from neuroantigen immunized rats to naive recipients. This passively induced disease runs an acute, monophasic, self-limiting course, much the same as is usually seen in actively induced diseases. Here we examine the mechanisms regulating passive EAE. We report that splenectomy, thymectomy, and increasing age of recipients, manipulations which have been reported to influence recovery from actively induced EAE, have no effect on passively induced disease. EAE effector cells are not inactivated when transferred into recipients that have been actively sensitized and are beginning their recovery from clinical signs; this being a time when recovery associated suppressor cells are thought to be present. Finally, in the absence of suppressor T cells in both the recipient and in the transfer cell population, recovery from passive EAE still occurs. We conclude that suppressor T cells play no role in regulating passively induced EAE. PMID:2936807

  16. Canagliflozin-Induced Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Jessica; Begum, Tahmina; Smalligan, Roger D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors are relatively new antihyperglycemic agents that lower renal glucose reabsorption. They are used as adjunctive therapy to standard diabetes treatment. Case Report: We present the case of a 62-year-old woman with a past medical history of type 2 diabetes mellitus and sudden-onset diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Use of canagliflozin, a SGLT-2 inhibitor, was determined to be the cause of the DKA. The patient ultimately recovered after 5 days in the intensive care unit. She was changed to long- and short-acting insulins and instructed to avoid canagliflozin. Conclusion: Although SGLT-2 inhibitors are effective at lowering a patient’s hemoglobin A1C, physicians must be aware of the rare but dangerous potential adverse effect of inducing DKA. This article reports an illustrative case and presents a review of the literature.

  17. Regeneration inducers in limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Akira; Mitogawa, Kazumasa; Makanae, Aki

    2015-08-01

    Limb regeneration ability, which can be observed in amphibians, has been investigated as a representative phenomenon of organ regeneration. Recently, an alternative experimental system called the accessory limb model was developed to investigate early regulation of amphibian limb regeneration. The accessory limb model contributed to identification of limb regeneration inducers in urodele amphibians. Furthermore, the accessory limb model may be applied to other species to explore universality of regeneration mechanisms. This review aims to connect the insights recently gained to emboss universality of regeneration mechanisms among species. The defined molecules (BMP7 (or2) + FGF2 + FGF8) can transform skin wound healing to organ (limb) regeneration responses. The same molecules can initiate regeneration responses in some species. PMID:26100345

  18. Broadband cavity electromagnetically induced transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Xiaogang; Wang Yanhua; Zhang Jiepeng; Zhu Yifu

    2011-10-15

    Cavity electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is created in a three-level atomic system confined in a cavity and coupled to a free-space control laser and is manifested as a narrow transmission peak of a probe laser coupled into the cavity mode and tuned to the two-photon Raman resonance with the control laser. Cavity EIT can be observed with a control laser detuned from the atomic transition frequency in a range limited by the vacuum Rabi splitting of two cavity-atom normal modes. This leads to the broadband cavity EIT obtained in the coupled-cavity-atom system with a free-space, broadband control laser. We report an experimental observation of broadband cavity EIT in cold Rb atoms with a frequency-modulated control laser and discuss its application in multichannel and multifrequency light memory.

  19. Tenofovir induced lichenoid drug eruption

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Mrinal; Gupta, Heena; Gupta, Anish

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous adverse reactions are a common complication of anti-retroviral therapy. Tenofovir is a newer anti-retroviral drug belonging to the nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor group. Systemic adverse effects like nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, hepatotoxicity and renal toxicity are common with tenofovir but cutaneous adverse effects are rare. Lichenoid drug eruptions are a common adverse effect seen with a large variety of drugs including antimalarials, antihypertensives, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and diuretics. Lichenoid drug eruption is a rare cutaneous adverse effect of tenofovir with only a single case reported till date. Here, we report a case of tenofovir induced lichenoid drug eruption in a 54-year-old human immunodeficiency virus affected male who presented with generalized lichenoid eruption after 6 weeks of initiation of tenofovir and complete clearance on cessation of the drug. PMID:26229762

  20. Induced Pluripotency for Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Menghua; Chen, Guilai; Hu, Baoyang

    2013-01-01

    The advent of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has revolutionized the concept of cellular reprogramming and potentially will solve the immunological compatibility issues that have so far hindered the application of human pluripotent stem cells in regenerative medicine. Recent findings showed that pluripotency is defined by a state of balanced lineage potency, which can be artificially instated through various procedures, including the conventional Yamanaka strategy. As a type of pluripotent stem cell, iPSCs are subject to the usual concerns over purity of differentiated derivatives and risks of tumor formation when used for cell-based therapy, though they provide certain advantages in translational research, especially in the areas of personalized medicine, disease modeling and drug screening. iPSC-based technology, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and direct lineage conversion each will play distinct roles in specific aspects of translational medicine, and continue yielding surprises for scientists and the public. PMID:24056061

  1. Severe Hypothyroidism-Induced Volvulus.

    PubMed

    Khan, Rafay; Ahmed, Amar; Tulpule, Sunil; Regeti, Kalyani; Sen, Shuvendu; Mathew, Teena

    2015-12-01

    Thyroid disorders have been found to be associated with multiple organ systems and thus have a broad spectrum of presenting symptoms and clinical conditions. Certain aspects of the gastrointestinal (GI) system have yet to be fully understood and documented. Hypothyroidism and even hyperthyroidism have been identified in patients with motility symptoms involving the GI tract. These symptoms can vary and can be a complication of undertreated or undiagnosed condition involving the thyroid. Unfortunately, the mechanism in which these hormones can impact intestinal motility remains poorly understood and not well documented. In this case report, we discuss the presentation of a 71-year-old female with poorly managed hypothyroidism presenting with significant abdominal distention and pain secondary to underlying volvulus formation. By better understanding the complications induced by hypothyroidism, physicians may be able to prevent further life-threatening outcomes with early management and intervention. PMID:26566414

  2. Electromagnetically induced angular Talbot effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Tianhui; Yang, Guojian

    2015-12-01

    The discrete angular spectrum (angular Talbot effect) of a periodic grating illuminated by a suitable spherical wave front has been observed recently (Azaña and Chatellus 2104 Phys. Rev. Lett. 112 213902). In this paper we study the possibility of such a phenomenon being realized with a medium that has no macroperiodic structure itself. Tunable electromagnetically induced grating (EIG) could be such a kind of medium. We obtain an EIG based on the periodically modulated strong susceptibility due to the third-order nonlinear effect generated in a double Λ-type four-level atomic system, and show the angular Talbot effect of an amplitude EIG, as well as a hybrid EIG, as the condition of the discrete phase-modulation shift of the illumination light front is satisfied. EIG parameters are tunable and the EIG-based angular Talbot effect may have the same potential applications as its periodic grating counterpart has.

  3. Drug-Induced Mitochondrial Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, Iain P; Al Shahrani, Mesfer; Wainwright, Luke; Heales, Simon J R

    2016-07-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) and ATP synthase (complex V) play an essential role in cellular energy production by the process of oxidative phosphorylation. In addition to inborn errors of metabolism, as well as secondary causes from disease pathophysiology, an impairment of oxidative phosphorylation can result from drug toxicity. These 'off-target' pharmacological effects can occur from a direct inhibition of MRC enzyme activity, an induction of mitochondrial oxidative stress, an uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation, an impairment of mitochondrial membrane structure or a disruption in the replication of mitochondrial DNA. The purpose of this review is to focus on the off-target mitochondrial toxicity associated with both commonly used pharmacotherapies and a topical 'weight loss' agent. The mechanisms of drug-induced mitochondrial impairment will be discussed together with putative therapeutic strategies to counteract the adverse effects of the pharmacotherapy. PMID:26992920

  4. [Iodine excess induced thyroid dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Egloff, Michael; Philippe, Jacques

    2016-04-20

    The principle sources of iodine overload, amiodarone and radiologic contrast media, are frequently used in modern medicine. The thyroid gland exerts a protective effect against iodine excess by suppressing iodine internalization into the thyrocyte and iodine organification, the Wolff-Chaikoff effect. Insufficiency of this effect or lack of escape from it leads to hypo- or hyperthyroidism respectively. Amiodarone induced thyrotoxicosis is a complex condition marked by two different pathophysiological mechanisms with different treatments. Thyroid metabolism changes after exposure to radiologic contrast media are frequent, but they rarely need to be treated. High risk individuals need to be identifed in order to delay the exam or to monitor thyroid function or apply prophylactic measures in selected cases. PMID:27276725

  5. Phonon-induced topological insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Kush; Garate, Ion

    2014-05-01

    We develop an approximate theory of phonon-induced topological insulation in Dirac materials. In the weak-coupling regime, long-wavelength phonons may favor topological phases in Dirac insulators with direct and narrow band gaps. This phenomenon originates from electron-phonon matrix elements, which change qualitatively under a band inversion. A similar mechanism applies to weak Coulomb interactions and spin-independent disorder; however, the influence of these on band topology is largely independent of temperature. As applications of the theory, we evaluate the temperature dependence of the critical thickness and the critical stoichiometric ratio for the topological transition in CdTe/HgTe quantum wells and in BiTl(S1-δSeδ)2, respectively.

  6. Induced Smith-Purcell radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochkov, D. N.; Artemyev, A. I.; Oganesyan, K. B.; Rostovtsev, Y. V.; Hu, C.-K.

    2010-11-01

    Excitation of induced coherent Smith-Purcell (SP) radiation by relativistic magnetized electron beam in the absence of the resonator is considered within the framework of the dispersion equation. We have found that the dispersion equation for the SP instability is a quadratic equation for frequency. The first-step approximation for solution of the dispersion equation, giving the SP-spectrum of frequency, corresponds to the mirror boundary case, when the electron beam propagates above a plane metal surface (mirror). It was found that the conditions for both the Thompson and the Raman regimes of excitation do not depend on beam current and depend on the height of the beam above the grating surface. The growth rate of the instability in both cases is proportional to the square root of the electron beam current. No feedback is needed to provide the coherent emission.

  7. Fibrinogen induces endothelial cell permeability

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Neetu; Roberts, Andrew M.; Dean, William L.; Tyagi, Suresh C.

    2010-01-01

    Many cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disorders are accompanied by an increased blood content of fibrinogen (Fg), a high molecular weight plasma adhesion protein. Fg is a biomarker of inflammation and its degradation products have been associated with microvascular leakage. We tested the hypothesis that at pathologically high levels, Fg increases endothelial cell (EC) permeability through extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling and by inducing F-actin formation. In cultured ECs, Fg binding to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and to α5β1 integrin, caused phosphorylation of ERK. Subsequently, F-actin formation increased and coincided with formation of gaps between ECs, which corresponded with increased permeability of ECs to albumin. Our data suggest that formation of F-actin and gaps may be the mechanism for increased albumin leakage through the EC monolayer. The present study indicates that elevated un-degraded Fg may be a factor causing microvascular permeability that typically accompanies cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disorders. PMID:17849175

  8. Load-induced inattentional deafness.

    PubMed

    Raveh, Dana; Lavie, Nilli

    2015-02-01

    High perceptual load in a task is known to reduce the visual perception of unattended items (e.g., Lavie, Beck, & Konstantinou, 2014). However, it remains an open question whether perceptual load in one modality (e.g., vision) can affect the detection of stimuli in another modality (e.g., hearing). We report four experiments that establish that high visual perceptual load leads to reduced detection sensitivity in hearing. Participants were requested to detect a tone that was presented during performance of a visual search task of either low or high perceptual load (varied through item similarity). The findings revealed that auditory detection sensitivity was consistently reduced with higher load, and that this effect persisted even when the auditory detection response was made first (before the search response) and when the auditory stimulus was highly expected (50 % present). These findings demonstrate a phenomenon of load-induced deafness and provide evidence for shared attentional capacity across vision and hearing. PMID:25287617

  9. Finnish geomagnetically induced currents project

    SciTech Connect

    Vilianen, A.; Pirjola, R. . Dept. of Geophysics)

    1995-01-01

    This article is a summary of Results of the Finnish Project on Geomagnetically Induced Currents,'' published in Surveys in Geophysics 15:383-408, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Netherlands, 1994. IVO and FMI carried out a 1-year GIC project from June 1991 to May 1992. The time of the project was a little after the sunspot maximum, and the geomagnetic activity was high; there were 34 major or severe magnetic storm days (A[sub k] index at least 50). The main aim was to derive reliable statistics of the occurrences of GICs at different sites of the Finnish 400 and 220 kV power systems. Besides the practical engineering purpose, the project is also geophysically relevant by providing a GIC data set usable for large-scale investigations of auroral ionospheric-magnetospheric processes and of the earth's structure.

  10. Phenytoin-induced Lyell's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lobão, Bárbara; Martins, Claúdio; Sousa, Manuel; Marques, Susana; Pedroso, Ermelinda

    2012-01-01

    Lyell's syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is a rare dermatological disease that causes serious morbidity and mortality. It is most commonly drug induced. The authors report the case of a 57-year-old woman who was admitted to our hospital with severe rash all over the body. She had been previously submitted to brain surgery for total resection of a large meningioma and medicated with phenytoin for seizures prophylaxis. During this treatment, erythematous lesions and blisters were observed first on her face and trunk and then spreading to the entire body. Detachment of the skin, as well as mucous involvement especially of mouth and conjunctiva, was also observed. TEN was diagnosed, and phenytoin was discontinued. Intravenous fluids, systemic steroids and tightened infection control measures were implemented. After 10 days, skin recovery and re-epithelialisation were established, temperature decreased and mucosal complications stabilised. The patient was discharged after 1 month of hospitalisation. PMID:23230258

  11. Texture induced microwave background anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Borrill, Julian; Copeland, Edmund J.; Liddle, Andrew R.; Stebbins, Albert; Veeraraghavan, Shoba

    1994-03-01

    We use numerical simulations to calculate the cosmic microwave background anisotropy induced by the evolution of a global texture field, with special emphasis on individual textures. Both spherically symmetric and general configurations are analyzed, and in the latter case we consider field configurations which exhibit unwinding events and also ones which do not. We compare the results given by evolving the field numerically under both the expanded core (XCORE) and non-linear sigma model (NLSM) approximations with the analytic predictions of the NLSM exact solution for a spherically symmetric self-similar (SSSS) unwinding. We find that the random unwinding configuration spots' typical peak height is 60-75\\% and angular size typically only 10% of those of the SSSS unwinding, and that random configurations without an unwinding event nonetheless may generate indistinguishable hot and cold spots. A brief comparison is made with other work.

  12. Magnetic field induced dynamical chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Somrita; Baura, Alendu; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2013-12-15

    In this article, we have studied the dynamics of a particle having charge in the presence of a magnetic field. The motion of the particle is confined in the x–y plane under a two dimensional nonlinear potential. We have shown that constant magnetic field induced dynamical chaos is possible even for a force which is derived from a simple potential. For a given strength of the magnetic field, initial position, and velocity of the particle, the dynamics may be regular, but it may become chaotic when the field is time dependent. Chaotic dynamics is very often if the field is time dependent. Origin of chaos has been explored using the Hamiltonian function of the dynamics in terms of action and angle variables. Applicability of the present study has been discussed with a few examples.

  13. Radiocontrast-induced renal failure

    SciTech Connect

    Misson, R.T.; Cutler, R.E.

    1985-05-01

    Review of the literature concerning contrast-induced renal dysfunction shows that the currently used agents are remarkably safe with careful patient selection. Clinically apparent kidney failure after their use is essentially nonexistent in those without preexistent renal insufficiency. The incidence rises rapidly in those with azotemia from any cause, however, and diabetic persons with nephropathy are perhaps at special risk. Vigorous volume expansion is possibly effective as a preventive measure and may attenuate adverse effects in those in whom postcontrast dysfunction occurs. New agents are becoming available. It is not yet known if these will prove safer or cost-effective. They have some experimentally demonstrated and theoretical advantages over the presently used agents. 58 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  14. Propylthiouracil-induced autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Paiaulla, Santosh; Venkategowda, Pradeep Marur; Rao, S. Manimala; Balaraju, Banda

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism is a condition characterized by excessive production of thyroid hormones. Propylthiouracil (PTU) is commonly used as first line drug in the management of hyperthyroidism. This is a case report of 24-year-old female, a known case of hyperthyroidism since 4 years, who came with a history of fever and myalgia since 3 days and dyspnea with coughing out of blood since 1 day. Patient was taking PTU (100 mg per day) since 4 years for hyperthyroidism. Patient was immediately intubated for type-II respiratory failure. Diagnosed to be having PTU-induced autoimmune disease. PTU was stopped and treated with methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Clinical features improved over a period of 8 days and discharged home successfully. Having a high suspicion for the onset of autoimmune disease in hyperthyroidism patients who are on PTU therapy and timely treatment with immunosuppressants and supportive care along with the withdrawal of the drug can make a difference in morbidity and mortality. PMID:26321810

  15. The induced magnetosphere of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ness, N. F.; Acuna, M. H.; Behannon, K. W.

    1982-03-01

    No evidence was found for an intrinsic magnetic field, nor for the development of a bow shock wave, as the corotating Saturnian magnetoplasma convected past Titan during the Voyager 1 close encounter of November 12, 1980. The observation of a well-developed, induced bipolar magnetic tail is evidence, however, of a strong electrodynamic interaction. Three thin, current-carrying regions were crossed which correspond to the inbound and outbound tail magnetopause and an imbedded tail neutral sheet. The interaction is unique among those observed to date in the solar system, in that it is intermediate with respect to sonic and Alfvenic Mach numbers by comparison with Titan in the solar wind and Io in the Jovian magnetosphere. The draping of the Saturnian magnetic field around the ionosphere of Titan is suggested by results of the analysis of magnetic field data.

  16. [Drug-induced Cognitive Impairment].

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Moeko; Yamada, Masahito

    2016-04-01

    Elderly people are more likely than young people to develop cognitive impairments associated with medication use. One of the reasons for this is that renal and liver functions are often impaired in elderly people. Dementia and delirium (an acute confused state) are known to be associated with drug toxicity. Anticholinergic medications are common causes of both acute and chronic cognitive impairment. Psychoactive drugs, antidepressants and anticonvulsants can cause dementia and delirium. In addition, non-psychoactive drugs such as histamine H2 receptor antagonists, corticosteroids, NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent), and cardiac medications, may cause acute or chronic cognitive impairment. Early diagnosis and withdrawal of the offending agent are essential for the prevention of drug-induced dementia and delirium. PMID:27056860

  17. Induced activation study of LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Parnell, T. A.; Laird, C. E.

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of the induced radioactivity of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is continuing with extraction of specific activities for various spacecraft materials. Data and results of activation measurements from eight facilities are being collected for interpretation at Eastern Kentucky University and NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center. The major activation mechanism in LDEF components is the proton flux in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). This flux is highly anisotropic, and could be sampled by taking advantage of the gravity-gradient stabilization of the LDEF. The directionally-dependent activation due to these protons was clearly observed in the data from aluminum experiment tray clamps (reaction product Na-22), steel trunnions (reaction product Mn-54 and others) and is also indicated by the presence of a variety of nuclides in other materials. A secondary production mechanism, thermal neutron capture, was observed in cobalt, indium, and tantalum, which are known to have large capture cross sections. Experiments containing samples of these metals and significant amounts of thermalizing low atomic number (Z) material showed clear evidence of enhanced activation of Co-60, In-114m, and Ta-182. Other mechanisms which activate spacecraft material that are not as easily separable from SAA proton activation, such as galactic proton bombardment and secondary production by fast neutrons, are being investigated by comparison to radiation environmental calculations. Deviations from one-dimensional radiation models indicate that these mechanisms are more important at greater shielding depths. The current status of the induced radioactivity measurements as of mid-year 1992 are reviewed. Specific activities for a number of materials which show SAA effects and thermal neutron capture are presented. The results for consistency by combining data from the participating institutions is also examined.

  18. Flow-induced vibration: 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.

    1992-09-01

    A joint program on flow-induced vibration (FIV) as established in July 1988 between Taiwan Power Company (Taipower or TPC) and ANL. The main objectives of the program are to provide a technology transfer program on FIV for Taipower staff and to assist Taipower with various aspects of FIV including evaluation of reports and proposals, review of designs, resolution of design issues, recommendation for design modifications, and selected research studies. During the first two years, the following tasks were accomplished: A technology transfer program on FIV was completed and key Taipower staff members were prepared to handle future problems in the subject area. The modified component cooling water (CCW) heat exchangers were assessed and the basis for a license from the Taiwan Atomic Energy Council (AEC) was established. The seismic reanalysis of Chin Shan spent-fuel racks was assessed and a report was submitted to the Taiwan AEC. Fluid/structure interaction activities were coordinated and provided a list of potential bidders for a fluid transient project and related publications and a recommendation for purchasing technical data on fluid coupling. Flow-induced vibration of tube arrays was reviewed and the needs of Taipower in the area of fluid/structure interaction were identified as were the procedures necessary for Taipower to accomplish its goals. A computer program, ARRAY, was established to compute the added-mass matrices for tube arrays. Taipower expressed interest in extending the joint program so that ANL could provide continuing assistance. The program was extended for several years (May 1, 1991, to June 30, 1994). Work from May 1, 1991, through June 30, 1992, summarized in this report, included technology transfer, assessment of sensing line and valve vibrations, literature survey, and tests on motion-dependent fluid forces acting on tube arrays in crossflow.

  19. Nivolumab-induced thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryota; Fujisawa, Yasuhiro; Maruyama, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Yoshino, Koji; Ohtsuka, Mikio; Fujimoto, Manabu

    2016-06-01

    Nivolumab (ONO-4538) is an anti-programmed death-1 specific monoclonal antibody, which has become a standard treatment for metastatic malignant melanoma. Nivolumab induces autoimmune adverse events, defined as immune-related adverse events. Herein, we report a case of nivolumab-induced thyroid dysfunction in the clinical setting. Fourteen patients were treated with nivolumab at our institute, of which three developed thyroid dysfunction, an incidence higher than previously reported in the initial clinical trials. Interestingly, one patient achieved complete remission; suggesting that in some patients, the occurrence of immune-related adverse events, including thyroid dysfunction, might reflect the drug's antitumour efficacy. No patient died or discontinued nivolumab treatment owing to thyroid dysfunction. Although thyroid dysfunction first appeared to be asymptomatic, two of the three patients developed symptoms related to hypothyroidism soon after, requiring hormone replacement therapy. Another patient developed hyperthyroidism that was initially asymptomatic; the patient subsequently developed myalgia with fever >39.5°C after two additional courses of nivolumab. Treatment with nivolumab was therefore discontinued, and treatment with prednisolone was initiated. Symptoms resolved within a few days, and thyroid function normalized. Thyroid dysfunction is sometimes difficult to diagnose because its symptoms similar to those of many other diseases. In addition, thyroid-related immune-related adverse events may present with unique symptoms such as myalgia with high fever, abruptly worsening patients' quality of life. Consequently, thyroid dysfunction should be considered as a possible immune-related adverse event. Thus, it is important to test for thyroid dysfunction at baseline and before the administration of each nivolumab dose if possible. PMID:27012985

  20. Induced radioactivity from industrial radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lone, M. A.

    1990-12-01

    Analytic expressions are developed for quantitative analysis of radioactivity induced by radiation processing of products with electrons or photons. These expressions provide reasonable estimates of induced activity much faster than Monte Carlo simulations. Analysis of radioactivity from processing of meat with 10 MeV electrons shows an induced activity of less than 10 mBq/(kgkGy) just after irradiation. This is 4 orders of magnitude less than the natural background activity of about 100 Bq/kg found in meat. Five days after processing the induced activity will reduce by a factor of 300.

  1. An evaluation of a hubless inducer and a full flow hydraulic turbine driven inducer boost pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindley, B. K.; Martinson, A. R.

    1971-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the performance of several configurations of hubless inducers with a hydrodynamically similar conventional inducer and to demonstrate the performance of a full flow hydraulic turbine driven inducer boost pump using these inducers. A boost pump of this type consists of an inducer connected to a hydraulic turbine with a high speed rotor located in between. All the flow passes through the inducer, rotor, and hydraulic turbine, then into the main pump. The rotor, which is attached to the main pump shaft, provides the input power to drive the hydraulic turbine which, in turn, drives the inducer. The inducer, rotating at a lower speed, develops the necessary head to prevent rotor cavitation. The rotor speed is consistent with present main engine liquid hydrogen pump designs and the overall boost pump head rise is sufficient to provide adequate main pump suction head. This system would have the potential for operating at lower liquid hydrogen tank pressures.

  2. Enhancement of Glioma Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy Response With Targeted Antibody Therapy Against Death Receptor 5

    SciTech Connect

    Fiveash, John B. Gillespie, G. Yancey; Oliver, Patsy G.; Zhou Tong; Belenky, Michael L.; Buchsbaum, Donald J.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: TRA-8 is an agonistic mouse monoclonal antibody that binds to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) death receptor 5, which induces apoptosis in cancer cells through a caspase-8-dependent mechanism. We investigated the ability of TRA-8 to augment the radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy response of human glioma cells in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Materials: The in vitro cytotoxicity of TRA-8 and temozolomide (Tmz) or RT was examined using adenosine triphosphate-dependent viability and clonogenic survival assays with five glioma cell lines. Death receptor 5 expression was determined by flow cytometry. In vivo studies included subcutaneous and intracranial xenograft models testing various combination treatments, including RT, Tmz, and TRA-8. Results: TRA-8, combined with Tmz or RT, produced enhanced cytotoxicity against five glioma cell lines compared with the use of the individual agents alone. Death receptor 5 upregulation occurred in response to RT. Complete tumor regression in the subcutaneous experiments was the most common in animals that received combination therapy with TRA-8/Tmz/RT. TRA-8 enhanced tumor growth delay in combination with RT or Tmz. TRA-8 alone had limited activity against intracranial tumors. In contrast, the median survival of mice treated with TRA-8/Tmz/RT was significantly greater than the control or TRA-8-alone-treated mice. The median survival of the mice treated with TRA-8/Tmz/RT or chemoradiotherapy only was significantly greater than the control or TRA-8-treated mice. A trend toward improved survival was observed between TRA-8/Tmz/RT-treated and Tmz/RT-treated mice. Conclusions: These preliminary findings support the hypothesis that TRA-8 will augment the RT and chemotherapy response in gliomas. A humanized version of TRA-8 is being evaluated in a Phase II clinical trial.

  3. Sulphasalazine accelerates apoptosis in neutrophils exposed to immune complex: Role of caspase pathway.

    PubMed

    Bertolotto, M; Dallegri, F; Dapino, P; Quercioli, A; Pende, A; Ottonello, L; Montecucco, Fabrizio

    2009-11-01

    1. Neutrophils release several histotoxic molecules that cause tissue injury. Neutrophil apoptosis is a crucial process that governs the persistence of inflammatory disorders and tissue damage. Thus, in the present study, we investigated whether the anti-inflammatory drug sulphasalazine (SSZ) affects neutrophil apoptosis in the presence of insoluble immune complex (IC). 2. Neutrophils were obtained from healthy donors. Neutrophils were resuspended in incubation medium and incubated for 2-12 h with or without 10, 30 or 100 micromol/L SSZ and 25 microg/mL IC. In some experiments, cells were co-incubated with 20 micromol/L Z-IETD-fmk (a caspase 8 inhibitor) or 20 micromol/L Z-LEHD-fmk (a caspase 9 inhibitor). Apoptosis was evaluated morphologically on cytological preparations stained with May-Grünwald-Giemsa as well as by flow cytometry analysis of annexin V and propidium iodide staining. Caspase 3 activity was determined spectrophotometrically. 3. At 100 micromol/L, SSZ significantly accelerated IC-induced neutrophil apoptosis. Treatment of neutrophils with 20 micromol/L of the caspase 8 or 9 inhibitors Z-IETD-fmk or Z-LEHD-fmk, respectively, demonstrated that the SSZ-induced pro-apoptotic effect was mediated by a caspase 8- but not caspase 9-dependent pathway. The caspase 3 activity assay showed that treatment with 100 micromol/L SSZ increased caspase 3 activation. 4. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicate that it is possible that the molecular mechanism underlying SSZ protection against neutrophil-mediated tissue injury inflammatory disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel diseases, involves a caspase 8-dependent pathway. PMID:19473188

  4. Manipulation of Interleukin-1β and Interleukin-18 Production by Yersinia pestis Effectors YopJ and YopM and Redundant Impact on Virulence.

    PubMed

    Ratner, Dmitry; Orning, M Pontus A; Starheim, Kristian K; Marty-Roix, Robyn; Proulx, Megan K; Goguen, Jon D; Lien, Egil

    2016-05-01

    Innate immunity plays a central role in resolving infections by pathogens. Host survival during plague, caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis, is favored by a robust early innate immune response initiated by IL-1β and IL-18. These cytokines are produced by a two-step mechanism involving NF-κB-mediated pro-cytokine production and inflammasome-driven maturation into bioactive inflammatory mediators. Because of the anti-microbial effects induced by IL-1β/IL-18, it may be desirable for pathogens to manipulate their production. Y. pestis type III secretion system effectors YopJ and YopM can interfere with different parts of this process. Both effectors have been reported to influence inflammasome caspase-1 activity; YopJ promotes caspase-8-dependent cell death and caspase-1 cleavage, whereas YopM inhibits caspase-1 activity via an incompletely understood mechanism. However, neither effector appears essential for full virulence in vivo Here we report that the sum of influences by YopJ and YopM on IL-1β/IL-18 release is suppressive. In the absence of YopM, YopJ minimally affects caspase-1 cleavage but suppresses IL-1β, IL-18, and other cytokines and chemokines. Importantly, we find that Y. pestis containing combined deletions of YopJ and YopM induces elevated levels of IL-1β/IL-18 in vitro and in vivo and is significantly attenuated in a mouse model of bubonic plague. The reduced virulence of the YopJ-YopM mutant is dependent on the presence of IL-1β, IL-18, and caspase-1. Thus, we conclude that Y. pestis YopJ and YopM can both exert a tight control of host IL-1β/IL-18 production to benefit the bacteria, resulting in a redundant impact on virulence. PMID:26884330

  5. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidman, Michael D.

    1999-01-01

    This article provides an overview of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), the leading cause of occupationally induced hearing loss in industrialized countries. It discusses causes of NIHL and compelling evidence that reactive oxygen metabolites and cochlear hypoprefusion are responsible for the destruction of cochlear hair cells. Prevention is also…

  6. Dynamically Induced Zeeman Effect in Massless QED

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrer, Efrain J.; Incera, Vivian de la

    2009-02-06

    It is shown that in nonperturbative massless QED an anomalous magnetic moment is dynamically induced by an applied magnetic field. The induced magnetic moment produces a Zeeman splitting for electrons in Landau levels higher than l=0. The expressions for the nonperturbative Lande g factor and Bohr magneton are obtained. Possible applications of this effect are outlined.

  7. Hearing: Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Hearing: Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Hearing: Noise-Induced Hearing Loss The importance of hearing Hearing allows you to ... surround the soft tissue of the inner ear. Hearing loss occurs when the inner ear is damaged. What ...

  8. Mechanisms of Metal-Induced Centrosome Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Amie L.; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to toxic and carcinogenic metals is widespread; however, their mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. One potential mechanism for metal-induced carcinogenicity and toxicity is centrosome amplification. Here, we review the mechanisms for metal-induced centrosome amplification, including arsenic, chromium, mercury and nano-titanium dioxide. PMID:21118148

  9. Topical immunotherapy with diphenylcyclopropenone-induced vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Kutlubay, Zekayi; Engin, Burhan; Songur, Abdullah; Serdaroglu, Server; Tuzun, Yalcin

    2016-08-01

    Topical immunotherapy made by diphenylcyclopropenone (DPCP) is an alternative treatment that can be used safely and efficaciously in recalcitrant alopecia areata patients. DPCP-induced vitiligo is a rare, but documented, unwanted side effect. The real mechanism of DPCP-induced vitiligo is not well known. PMID:26963903

  10. Innovation Inducement Prizes: Connecting Research to Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besharov, Douglas J.; Williams, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    Innovation inducement prizes have been used for centuries. In the United States, a recent federal policy change--the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010--clarified and simplified a path by which all federal agencies can offer innovation inducement prizes, thus intensifying interest in how government agencies can most effectively design…

  11. SEU induced errors observed in microprocessor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Asenek, V.; Underwood, C.; Oldfield, M.; Velazco, R.; Rezgui, S.; Cheynet, P.; Ecoffet, R.

    1998-12-01

    In this paper, the authors present software tools for predicting the rate and nature of observable SEU induced errors in microprocessor systems. These tools are built around a commercial microprocessor simulator and are used to analyze real satellite application systems. Results obtained from simulating the nature of SEU induced errors are shown to correlate with ground-based radiation test data.

  12. Minimal Mimicry: Mere Effector Matching Induces Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparenberg, Peggy; Topolinski, Sascha; Springer, Anne; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Both mimicking and being mimicked induces preference for a target. The present experiments investigate the minimal sufficient conditions for this mimicry-preference link to occur. We argue that mere effector matching between one's own and the other person's movement is sufficient to induce preference, independent of which movement is actually…

  13. Cannabis-induced recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Howaizi, Mehran; Chahine, Mouhamad; Haydar, Fadi; Jemaa, Yassine; Lapoile, Emmanuel

    2012-12-01

    Acute pancreatitis has a large number of causes. Major causes are alcohol and gallstones. Toxic causes, mainly represented by medication-induced pancreatitis account for less than 2% of the cases. Cannabis is an anecdotally reported cause of acute pancreatitis. Six cases have previously been reported. Herein we report a new case of cannabis-induced recurrent acute pancreatitis. PMID:23402090

  14. Cholestasis and pneumonitis induced by gold therapy.

    PubMed

    Farre, J M; Perez, T; Hautefeuille, P; Tonnel, F; Colombel, J F; Duquesnoy, B; Delcambre, B

    1989-12-01

    The authors describe the association of gold salt-induced cholestasis and lymphocytic alveolitis proved by liver biopsy and broncho-alveolar lavage. To our knowledge this is the third case report on the combination of liver disease and pulmonary infiltration induced by gold compounds. PMID:2612124

  15. Religion as Schedule-Induced Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strand, Paul S.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, I argue that a class of religious behaviors exists that is induced, for prepared organisms, by specific stimuli that are experienced according to a response-independent schedule. Like other schedule-induced behaviors, the members of this class serve as minimal units out of which functional behavior may arise. In this way, there…

  16. Induced topological pressure for topological dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Zhitao; Chen, Ercai

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, inspired by the article [J. Jaerisch et al., Stochastics Dyn. 14, 1350016, pp. 1-30 (2014)], we introduce the induced topological pressure for a topological dynamical system. In particular, we prove a variational principle for the induced topological pressure.

  17. Molecular fragmentation induced by a femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmidis, Constantine E.; Ledingham, Kenneth W. D.; Kilic, H. S.; McCanny, T.; Singhal, Raghunandan P.; Smith, D.; Langley, Andrew J.

    1998-07-01

    The 90 femtosecond laser induced fragmentation at 375 nm for a number of different nitro-molecules is compared to that induced by a nanosecond laser at the same wavelength by means of time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The potential of femtosecond laser mass spectrometry for analytical purposes is discussed.

  18. Low speed inducers for cryogenic upper stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Briefing charts are presented, which were used in an oral presentation of the results and recommendations for the design and analysis of low speed hydrogen and oxygen inducers and their drive systems applicable to the space tug. A discussion of the design of the 15K and RL-10 inducers is included.

  19. Inflammation-inducing Factors of Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae, which causes mycoplasmal pneumonia in human, mainly causes pneumonia in children, although it occasionally causes disease in infants and geriatrics. Some pathogenic factors produced by M. pneumoniae, such as hydrogen peroxide and Community-Acquired Respiratory Distress Syndrome (CARDS) toxin have been well studied. However, these factors alone cannot explain this predilection. The low incidence rate of mycoplasmal pneumonia in infants and geriatrics implies that the strong inflammatory responses induced by M. pneumoniae coordinate with the pathogenic factors to induce pneumonia. However, M. pneumoniae lacks a cell wall and does not possess an inflammation-inducing endotoxin, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In M. pneumoniae, lipoproteins were identified as an inflammation-inducing factor. Lipoproteins induce inflammatory responses through Toll-like receptors (TLR) 2. Because Mycoplasma species lack a cell wall and lipoproteins anchored in the membrane are exposed, lipoproteins and TLR2 have been thought to be important for the pathogenesis of M. pneumoniae. However, recent reports suggest that M. pneumoniae also induces inflammatory responses also in a TLR2-independent manner. TLR4 and autophagy are involved in this TLR2-independent inflammation. In addition, the CARDS toxin or M. pneumoniae cytadherence induces inflammatory responses through an intracellular receptor protein complex called the inflammasome. In this review, the inflammation-inducing factors of M. pneumoniae are summarized. PMID:27065977

  20. Drug-Induced Oxidative Stress and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Deavall, Damian G.; Martin, Elizabeth A.; Horner, Judith M.; Roberts, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a byproduct of normal metabolism and have roles in cell signaling and homeostasis. Species include oxygen radicals and reactive nonradicals. Mechanisms exist that regulate cellular levels of ROS, as their reactive nature may otherwise cause damage to key cellular components including DNA, protein, and lipid. When the cellular antioxidant capacity is exceeded, oxidative stress can result. Pleiotropic deleterious effects of oxidative stress are observed in numerous disease states and are also implicated in a variety of drug-induced toxicities. In this paper, we examine the nature of ROS-induced damage on key cellular targets of oxidative stress. We also review evidence implicating ROS in clinically relevant, drug-related side effects including doxorubicin-induced cardiac damage, azidothymidine-induced myopathy, and cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. PMID:22919381

  1. Diet-induced obesity attenuates endotoxin-induced cognitive deficits

    PubMed Central

    Setti, Sharay E.; Littlefield, Alyssa M.; Johnson, Samantha W.; Kohman, Rachel A.

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the immune system can impair cognitive function, particularly on hippocampus dependent tasks. Several factors such as normal aging and prenatal experiences can modify the severity of these cognitive deficits. One additional factor that may modulate the behavioral response to immune activation is obesity. Prior work has shown that obesity alters the activity of the immune system. Whether diet-induced obesity (DIO) influences the cognitive deficits associated with inflammation is currently unknown. The present study explored whether DIO alters the behavioral response to the bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Female C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat (60% fat) or control diet (10% fat) for a total of five months. After consuming their respective diets for four months, mice received an LPS or saline injection and were assessed for alterations in spatial learning. One month later, mice received a second injection of LPS or saline and tissue samples were collected to assess the inflammatory response within the periphery and central nervous system (CNS). Results showed that LPS administration impaired spatial learning in the control diet mice, but had no effect in DIO mice. This lack of a cognitive deficit in the DIO female mice is likely due to a blunted inflammatory response within the brain. While cytokine production within the periphery (i.e., plasma, adipose, and spleen) was similar between the DIO and control mice, the DIO mice failed to show an increase in IL-6 and CD74 in the brain following LPS administration. Collectively, these data indicate that DIO can reduce aspects of the neuroinflammatory response as well as blunt the behavioral reaction to an immune challenge. PMID:25542778

  2. What induces watts in WAT?

    PubMed Central

    Forest, Claude; Joffin, Nolwenn; Jaubert, Anne-Marie; Noirez, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Excess calories stored in white adipose tissue (WAT) could be reduced either through the activation of brown adipose tissue (BAT) or the development of brown-like cells (“beige” or “brite”) in WAT, a process named “browning.” Calorie dissipation in brown and beige adipocytes might rely on the induction of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), which is absent in white fat cells. Any increase in UCP1 is commonly considered as the trademark of energy expenditure. The intracellular events involved in the recruitment process of beige precursors were extensively studied lately, as were the effectors, hormones, cytokines, nutrients and drugs able to modulate the route of browning and theoretically affect fat mass in rodents and in humans. The aim of this review is to update the characterization of the extracellular effectors that induce UCP1 in WAT and potentially provoke calorie dissipation. The potential influence of metabolic cycling in energy expenditure is also questioned. PMID:27386158

  3. Noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Catlin, F I

    1986-03-01

    Hearing loss affects 30 million people in the United States; of these, 21 million are over the age of 65 years. This disorder may have several causes: heredity, noise, aging, and disease. Hearing loss from noise has been recognized for centuries but was generally ignored until some time after the Industrial Revolution. Hearing loss from occupational exposure to hazardous noise was identified as a compensable disability by the United States courts in 1948 to 1959. Development of noisy jet engines and supersonic aircraft created additional claims for personal and property damage in the 1950s and 1960s. These conditions led to legislation for noise control in the form of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 and the Noise Control Act of 1972. Protection of the noise-exposed employee was also an objective of the Hearing Conservation Act of 1971. Subsequent studies have confirmed the benefits of periodic hearing tests for workers exposed to hazardous noise and of otologic evaluation as part of the hearing conservation process. Research studies in laboratory animals, using scanning electron microscopical techniques, have demonstrated that damage to the inner ear and organ of hearing can occur even though subjective (conditioned) response to sound stimuli remains unaffected. Some investigators have employed an epidemiologic approach to identify risk factors and to develop profiles to susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss. The need for joint involvement of workers and employers in the reduction and control of occupational noise hazards is evident. PMID:2938482

  4. Current-Induced Membrane Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, M. B.; van Soestbergen, M.; Mani, A.; Bruus, H.; Biesheuvel, P. M.; Bazant, M. Z.

    2012-09-01

    Possible mechanisms for overlimiting current (OLC) through aqueous ion-exchange membranes (exceeding diffusion limitation) have been debated for half a century. Flows consistent with electro-osmotic instability have recently been observed in microfluidic experiments, but the existing theory neglects chemical effects and remains to be quantitatively tested. Here, we show that charge regulation and water self-ionization can lead to OLC by “current-induced membrane discharge” (CIMD), even in the absence of fluid flow, in ion-exchange membranes much thicker than the local Debye screening length. Salt depletion leads to a large electric field resulting in a local pH shift within the membrane with the effect that the membrane discharges and loses its ion selectivity. Since salt co-ions, H+ ions, and OH- ions contribute to OLC, CIMD interferes with electrodialysis (salt counterion removal) but could be exploited for current-assisted ion exchange and pH control. CIMD also suppresses the extended space charge that leads to electro-osmotic instability, so it should be reconsidered in both models and experiments on OLC.

  5. Current-induced membrane discharge.

    PubMed

    Andersen, M B; van Soestbergen, M; Mani, A; Bruus, H; Biesheuvel, P M; Bazant, M Z

    2012-09-01

    Possible mechanisms for overlimiting current (OLC) through aqueous ion-exchange membranes (exceeding diffusion limitation) have been debated for half a century. Flows consistent with electro-osmotic instability have recently been observed in microfluidic experiments, but the existing theory neglects chemical effects and remains to be quantitatively tested. Here, we show that charge regulation and water self-ionization can lead to OLC by "current-induced membrane discharge" (CIMD), even in the absence of fluid flow, in ion-exchange membranes much thicker than the local Debye screening length. Salt depletion leads to a large electric field resulting in a local pH shift within the membrane with the effect that the membrane discharges and loses its ion selectivity. Since salt co-ions, H(+) ions, and OH(-) ions contribute to OLC, CIMD interferes with electrodialysis (salt counterion removal) but could be exploited for current-assisted ion exchange and pH control. CIMD also suppresses the extended space charge that leads to electro-osmotic instability, so it should be reconsidered in both models and experiments on OLC. PMID:23005334

  6. Piperazine-induced occupational asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmar, L.; Bellander, T.; Bergoeoe, B.; Simonsson, B.G.

    1982-03-01

    Asthmatic reactions were studied among some 130 factory workers who handled amines and other chemicals. Among present employees, we found 15 cases of asthma associated with occupational exposure to chemicals; among former employees there were at least 18. The inducing agent was judged to be piperazine in 29 persons and ethylenediamine (EDA) in three. The asthma was of the late or dual type; immediate reactions alone were to seen. No one had attacks of asthma before employment, and atopic subjects were not preferentially affected. Routine spirometry revealed airway obstruction in fewer than half of the recent cases. Tests of nonspecific bronchial reactivity with methacholine in six subjects with recent asthma showed hyperactivity in five, while tow subjects with earlier asthma did not have hyperactivity. Bronchial provocation tests with piperazine in one subject were positive both in the factory and in the laboratory. The level of piperazine was 1.2 mg/m3 time-weighted average (TWA) in a work place associated with induction of the asthmatic state, and 0.3 mg/m3 in a place connected with attacks in ''sensitized'' subjects.

  7. Noise-induced hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Catlin, F.I.

    1986-03-01

    Hearing loss affects 30 million people in the United States; of these, 21 million are over the age of 65 years. This disorder may have several causes: heredity, noise, aging, and disease. Hearing loss from noise has been recognized for centuries but was generally ignored until some time after the Industrial Revolution. Hearing loss from occupational exposure to hazardous noise was identified as a compensable disability by the United States courts in 1948 to 1959. Development of noisy jet engines and supersonic aircraft created additional claims for personal and property damage in the 1950s and 1960s. These conditions led to legislation for noise control in the form of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 and the Noise Control Act of 1972. Protection of the noise-exposed employee was also an objective of the Hearing Conservation Act of 1971. Subsequent studies have confirmed the benefits of periodic hearing tests for workers exposed to hazardous noise and of otologic evaluation as part of the hearing conservation process. Research studies in laboratory animals, using scanning electron microscopical techniques, have demonstrated that damage to the inner ear and organ of hearing can occur even though subjective (conditioned) response to sound stimuli remains unaffected. Some investigators have employed an epidemiologic approach to identify risk factors and to develop profiles to susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss. The need for joint involvement of workers and employers in the reduction and control of occupational noise hazards is evident. 19 references.

  8. Solitons induced by boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Although soliton phenomena have attracted wide attention since 1965, there are still not enough efforts paid to mixed-boundary - initial-value problems that are important in real physical cases. The main purpose of this thesis is to study carefully the various boundary-induced soliton under different initial conditions. The author states with three sets of nonlinear equations: KdV equations and Boussinesq equations (for water); two-fluid equations for cold-ion plasma. He was interested in four types of problems involved with water solitons: excitation by different time-dependent boundary conditions under different initial conditions; head-on and over-taking collisions; reflection at a wall and the excitation by pure initial conditions. For KdV equations, only cases one and four are conducted. The results from two fully nonlinear KdV and Boussinesq equations are compared, and agree extremely well. The Boussinesq equations permit solition head-on collisions and reflections, studied the first time. The results from take-over collision agree with KdV results. For the ion-acoustic plasma, a set of Boussinesq-type equations was derived from the standard two-fluid equations for the ion-acoustic plasma. It theoretically proves the essential nature of the solitary wave solutions of the cold-ion plasma. The ion acoustic solitons are also obtained by prescribing a potential phi/sub 0/ at one grid point.

  9. Radiation-induced gene responses

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.; Shearin-Jones, P.; Oryhon, J.

    1996-12-31

    In the process of identifying genes that are differentially regulated in cells exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV), we identified a transcript that was repressed following the exposure of cells to a combination of UV and salicylate, a known inhibitor of NF-kappaB. Sequencing this band determined that it has identify to lactate dehydrogenase, and Northern blots confirmed the initial expression pattern. Analysis of the sequence of the LDH 5` region established the presence of NF-kappaB, Sp1, and two Ap-2 elements; two partial AP- 1; one partial RE, and two halves of E-UV elements were also found. Electromobility shift assays were then performed for the AP-1, NF- kappaB, and E-UV elements. These experiments revealed that binding to NF-kappaB was induced by UV but repressed with salicylic acid; UV did not affect AP-1 binding, but salicylic acid inhibited it alone or following UV exposure; and E-UV binding was repressed by UV, and salicylic acid had little effect. Since the binding of no single element correlated with the expression pattern of LDH, it is likely that multiple elements govern UV/salicylate-mediated expression.

  10. Dimethyl ethanolamine-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Vallieres, M; Cockcroft, D W; Taylor, D M; Dolovich, J; Hargreave, F E

    1977-05-01

    Progressively severe sneezing, rhinorrhea, cough, wheezing, and dyspnea developed in a spray-painter, apparently in relation to exposure to a particular spray paint. A monitoring of exposure at work revealed the development of symptoms and a decrease in peak flow rates. Subsequent challenges in the laboratory performed under conditions resembling occupational exposure resulted in dual asthmatic responses on exposure to the whole paint (98 per cent methyl methacrylate emulsion and 2 per cent dimethyl ethanolamine solution) and to dimethyl ethanolamine solution (2 per cent) alone. Water, methyl methacrylate emulsion, and 1,4 dioxane (0.6 per cent) used as a thinner in the dimethyl ethanolamine did not produce a response in the airways. Allergy skin tests with dimethyl ethanolamine and a mixture of dimethyl ethanolamine and human serum albumin were negative. To our knowledge, this is the first report of asthma and/or rhinitis induced specifically by dimethyl ethanolamine. The mechanism of the specific reactivity is not known. PMID:857720

  11. Mantle superplumes induce geomagnetic superchrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Peter; Amit, Hagay

    2015-07-01

    We use polarity reversal systematics from numerical dynamos to quantify the hypothesis that the modulation of geomagnetic reversal frequency, including geomagnetic superchrons, results from changes in core heat flux related to growth and collapse of lower mantle superplumes. We parameterize the reversal frequency sensitivity from numerical dynamos in terms of average core heat flux normalized by the difference between the present-day core heat flux and the core heat flux at geomagnetic superchron onset. A low-order polynomial fit to the 0-300 Ma Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale (GPTS) reveals that a decrease in core heat flux relative to present-day of approximately 30% can account for the Cretaceous Normal Polarity and Kiaman Reverse Polarity Superchrons, whereas the hyper-reversing periods in the Jurassic require a core heat flux equal to or higher than present-day. Possible links between GPTS transitions, large igneous provinces (LIPs), and the two lower mantle superplumes are explored. Lower mantle superplume growth and collapse induce GPTS transitions by increasing and decreasing core heat flux, respectively. Age clusters of major LIPs postdate transitions from hyper-reversing to superchron geodynamo states by 30-60 Myr, suggesting that superchron onset may be contemporaneous with LIP-forming instabilities produced during collapses of lower mantle superplumes.

  12. Static-field-induced states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gets, Artem V.; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.

    2013-01-01

    Considering an electron interacting with an atomic or molecular potential and an external static electric field, one usually focuses on narrow resonances at negative energies originating from the bound states in the absence of the field; we call them tunneling states (TSs). Meanwhile, there also exist relatively broad resonances at positive energies having no counterparts in the absence of the field; we call them static-field-induced states (SFISs). In this paper, the recently developed weak-field asymptotic theory of TSs [O. I. Tolstikhin , Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.84.053423 84, 053423 (2011)] is extended to SFISs. An asymptotic quantization condition defining the energies of SFISs in an arbitrary potential in the three-dimensional case is derived. The parabolic scattering amplitudes appearing in this quantization condition are defined. The theory is illustrated by calculations for the zero-range and Coulomb potentials. The SFISs in these potentials are found and their energies are shown to be in good agreement with the asymptotic results over a wide interval of the values of the field.

  13. [Drug-induced ventricular tachycardia].

    PubMed

    Fauchier, J P; Fauchier, L; Babuty, D; Breuillac, J C; Cosnay, P; Rouesnel, P

    1993-05-01

    Certain drugs can induce ventricular tachycardia (VT) by creating reentry, ventricular after potentials or exaggerating the slope of phase 4. These may or may not be symptomatic, sustained or non-sustained and have variable ECG appearances: monomorphic or polymorphic, bidirectional, torsades de pointes. They risk degenerating into ventricular flutter of fibrillation and have been held responsible for the increased mortality observed unexpectedly in some long-term treatments. The drugs responsible are mainly those used in cardiology, probably due to predisposing circumstances (cardiomegaly, cardiac failure, previous severe ventricular arrhythmias, therapeutic associations, metabolic abnormalities). These include primarily the antiarrhythmic drugs (IA, IC, sotalol and bepridil), digitalis, sympathomimetics and phosphodiesterase inhibitors. These complications may be toxic or idiosyncratic, in patients with or without cardiac disease, and may also occur with other drugs: vasodilators and anti-anginal drugs (lidoflazine, vincamine, fenoxedil), psychotropic agents (phenothiazine and imipramine), antimitotics, antimalarials (chloroquine) or antibiotics (erythromycin, pentamidine). The prognosis is severe and the treatment is often difficult which makes prevention, helped by repeated surface ECG (or Holter monitoring), very important with careful assessment of patients at risk. PMID:8267504

  14. Buoyancy-Induced, Columnar Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Mark; Glezer, Ari

    2015-11-01

    Free buoyancy-induced, columnar vortices (dust devils) that are driven by thermal instabilities of ground-heated, stratified air in areas with sufficient insolation convert the potential energy of low-grade heat in the surface air layer into a vortex flow with significant kinetic energy. A variant of the naturally-occurring vortex is deliberately triggered and anchored within an azimuthal array of vertical, stator-like flow vanes that form an open-top enclosure and impart tangential momentum to the radially entrained air. This flow may be exploited for power generation by coupling the vortex to a vertical-axis turbine. The fundamental mechanisms associated with the formation, evolution, and dynamics of an anchored, buoyancy-driven columnar vortex within such a facility are investigated experimentally using a heated ground plane. Specific emphasis is placed on the manipulation of the vortex formation and structure and the dependence of the vorticity production and sustainment mechanisms on the thermal resources and characteristic scales of the anchoring flow vanes using stereo-PIV. It is shown that manipulation of the formation and advection of vorticity concentrations within the enclosure can be exploited for increasing the available kinetic energy. Supported by ARPA-E.

  15. Hyskon-induced pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Mangar, D

    1993-12-01

    Hyskon (32 percent dextran-70) (Hyskon Division, Pharmacia) is used during hysteroscopy to help visualization of the uterine surfaces. Pulmonary edema of an uncertain cause has occurred in many patients. Because this study could not be conducted in humans, we determined if Hyskon caused cardiogenic or non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema in a dog model. Dogs were randomly assigned to receive an infusion of Hyskon or whole blood to sustain left ventricular end-diastolic pressure between 20 and 23 millimeters of mercury for 60 minutes. In dogs receiving blood, there was no protein in the bronchoalveolar lavage before or after blood was given. In the Hyskon group, there was no protein in the bronchoalveolar lavage before Hyskon and 0.6 +/- 1.4 milligrams per deciliter (range of 0.1 to 3.7 milligram per deciliter) after Hyskon. The ratio of bronchoalveolar lavage protein to plasma protein after Hyskon was 8.0 +/- 18.0 percent compared with zero percent in the blood group. Hyskon altered pulmonary microvascular membrane permeability, causing alveolar flooding with plasma proteins and possibly accounting for the deterioration of oxygenation and pulmonary compliance seen in patients. These results suggest a significant noncardiogenic component of Hyskon induced pulmonary edema. PMID:7505487

  16. Olanzapine-induced eosinophilic pleuritis.

    PubMed

    Evison, Matthew; Holme, Jayne; Alaloul, Mohamed; Doran, Helen; Bishop, Paul; Booton, Richard; Chaudhry, Nauman

    2015-01-01

    An elderly patient, with a history of depression with psychosis, presented with breathlessness, a right exudative pleural effusion and a peripheral eosinophilia. The pleural fluid was eosinophil-rich (10% of leucocytes). Olanzapine therapy had been commenced 12 months previously. There was a family history of TB and the patient was of African origin. A full diagnostic work-up ensued including computed tomography of the thorax and local anaesthetic thoracoscopy. The pleura was unremarkable on CT and displayed bland smooth thickening at visual inspection during thoracoscopy. Pleural biopsies demonstrated chronic inflammation with eosinophils but no evidence of granulomatous inflammation or malignancy. Pleural tissue culture did not yield mycobacteria. A diagnosis of olanzapine-induced eosinophilic pleuritis was suspected and the pleural disease resolved with withdrawal of olanzapine. Eosinophilic pleural fluid is not a marker of non-malignant aetiology and eosinophilic pleural effusions require a careful and systematic diagnostic work-up. This is the second case report to identify olanzapine as a causative agent in eosinophilic pleural effusion. PMID:26029571

  17. Radiation induced estane polymer crosslinking

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, M.; Foster, P.

    1997-12-01

    The exposure of polymeric materials to radiation has been known to induce the effects of crosslinking and degradation. The crosslinking phenomena comes about when two long chain polymers become linked together by a primary bond that extends the chain and increases the viscosity, molecular weight and the elastic modules of the polymer. This process has been observed in relatively short periods of time with fairly high doses of radiation, on the order of several megarads/hour. This paper address low dose exposure over long periods of time to determine what the radiation effects are on the polymeric binder material in PBX 9501. An experimental sample of binder material without explosives will be placed into a thermal and radiation field produced from a W-48 put mod 0. Another sample will be placed in a thermal environment without the radiation. The following is the test plan that was submitted to the Pantex process. The data presented here will be from the first few weeks of exposure and this test will be continued over the next few years. Subsequent data will hopefully be presented in the next compatibility and aging conference.

  18. [Psychological consequences of induced abortion].

    PubMed

    Schleiss, L; Mygind, K A; Borre, R V; Petersson, B H

    1997-06-01

    One hundred and thirty consecutive women were interviewed about the development of psychological symptoms related to induced abortion two days before and four months after the abortion. Sixty-one (47%) participated in the second interview. Of the 61 women, 52% were psychologically influenced before the abortion to an extent which indicated severe crisis or actual psychiatric illness. Four months after the abortion 13 of these women were still psychologically affected. Furthermore, five women who were not affected before the abortion had developed psychological problems. Among ten of these women (16%) the physiological problems could only be related to the circumstance in connection with the abortion. For a number of women (30%) the abortion had a negative influence on their relationships and their sex lives, whereas other claimed that their relationship had become closer because of their reactions towards the abortions. In spite of these conditions all women indicated that their decision about the abortion had been the correct one under the given circumstances. PMID:9206861

  19. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Fan; Barbi, Joseph; Pardoll, Drew M.

    2012-01-01

    Naïve T cells activated by antigen-presenting cells (APC) can be differentiated into at least four major types of T-helper (TH) cells: TH1, TH2, TH17 and inducible regulatory T cells (iTreg) based on their unique cytokine production profiles and characteristic functions.1 TH1 produce interferon-γ (IFNγ) and are important for protective immune responses to intracellular viral, bacterial and parasitic infection. TH2 cells produce interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5, IL-23 and are critical for controlling extracellular parasites such as helminthes. TH17 cells are responsible for expelling extracellular bacteria and fungi through secretion of IL-17a, IL-17f and IL-22.2 These cells however are perhaps better known for their propensity to drive autoimmune responses. Tregs including naturally occurring regulatory T cells (nTreg) play important roles in the suppressive control of both innate and adaptive immunity in vivo.3,4 PMID:22754770

  20. Methylphenidate Actively Induces Emergence from General Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Solt, Ken; Cotten, Joseph F.; Cimenser, Aylin; Wong, Kin F.K.; Chemali, Jessica J.; Brown, Emery N.

    2011-01-01

    Background Although accumulating evidence suggests that arousal pathways in the brain play important roles in emergence from general anesthesia, the roles of monoaminergic arousal circuits are unclear. In this study we tested the hypothesis that methylphenidate (an inhibitor of dopamine and norepinephrine transporters) induces emergence from isoflurane anesthesia. Methods Using adult rats we tested the effect of methylphenidate IV on time to emergence from isoflurane anesthesia. We then performed experiments to test separately for methylphenidate-induced changes in arousal and changes in minute ventilation. A dose-response study was performed to test for methylphenidate–induced restoration of righting during continuous isoflurane anesthesia. Surface electroencephalogram recordings were performed to observe neurophysiological changes. Plethysmography recordings and arterial blood gas analysis were performed to assess methylphenidate-induced changes in respiratory function. Droperidol IV was administered to test for inhibition of methylphenidate's actions. Results Methylphenidate decreased median time to emergence from 280 to 91 s. The median difference in time to emergence without compared to with methylphenidate was 200 [155, 331] s (median, [95% confidence interval]). During continuous inhalation of isoflurane, methylphenidate induced return of righting in a dose-dependent manner, induced a shift in electroencephalogram power from delta to theta, and induced an increase in minute ventilation. Administration of droperidol (0.5 mg/kg IV) prior to methylphenidate (5 mg/kg IV) largely inhibited methylphenidate-induced emergence behavior, electroencephalogram changes, and changes in minute ventilation. Conclusions Methylphenidate actively induces emergence from isoflurane anesthesia by increasing arousal and respiratory drive, possibly through activation of dopaminergic and adrenergic arousal circuits. Our findings suggest that methylphenidate may be clinically

  1. Minocycline suppresses morphine-induced respiratory depression, suppresses morphine-induced reward, and enhances systemic morphine-induced analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Mark R.; Northcutt, Alexis L.; Chao, Lindsey W.; Kearney, Jeffrey J.; Zhang, Yingning; Berkelhammer, Debra L.; Loram, Lisa C.; Rozeske, Robert R.; Bland, Sondra T.; Maier, Steven F.; Gleeson, Todd T.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2008-01-01

    Recent data suggest that opioids can activate immune-like cells of the central nervous system (glia). This opioid-induced glial activation is associated with decreased analgesia, owing to the release of proinflammatory mediators. Here we examine in rats whether the putative microglial inhibitor, minocycline, may affect morphine-induced respiratory depression and/or morphine-induced reward (conditioned place preference). Systemic co-administration of minocycline significantly attenuated morphine-induced reductions in tidal volume, minute volume, inspiratory force and expiratory force, but did not affect morphine-induced reductions in respiratory rate. Minocycline attenuation of respiratory depression was also paralleled with significant attenuation by minocycline of morphine-induced reductions in blood oxygen saturation. Minocycline also attenuated morphine conditioned place preference. Minocycline did not simply reduce all actions of morphine, as morphine analgesia was significantly potentiated by minocycline co-administration. Lastly, morphine dose-dependently increased cyclooxygenase-1 gene expression in a rat microglial cell line, an effect that was dose-dependently blocked by minocycline. Together, these data support that morphine can directly activate microglia in a minocycline-suppressible manner and suggest a pivotal role for minocycline-sensitive processes in the mechanisms of morphine-induced respiration depression, reward, and pain modulation. PMID:18706994

  2. Vibration-Induced Droplet Atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. K.; James, A.; Vukasinovic, B.; Glezer, A.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal management is critical to a number of technologies used in a microgravity environment and in Earth-based systems. Examples include electronic cooling, power generation systems, metal forming and extrusion, and HVAC (heating, venting, and air conditioning) systems. One technique that can deliver the large heat fluxes required for many of these technologies is two-phase heat transfer. This type of heat transfer is seen in the boiling or evaporation of a liquid and in the condensation of a vapor. Such processes provide very large heat fluxes with small temperature differences. Our research program is directed toward the development of a new, two-phase heat transfer cell for use in a microgravity environment. In this paper, we consider the main technology used in this cell, a novel technique for the atomization of a liquid called vibration-induced droplet atomization. In this process, a small liquid droplet is placed on a thin metal diaphragm that is made to vibrate by an attached piezoelectric transducer. The vibration induces capillary waves on the free surface of the droplet that grow in amplitude and then begin to eject small secondary droplets from the wave crests. In some situations, this ejection process develops so rapidly that the entire droplet seems to burst into a small cloud of atomized droplets that move away from the diaphragm at speeds of up to 50 cm/s. By incorporating this process into a heat transfer cell, the active atomization and transport of the small liquid droplets could provide a large heat flux capability for the device. Experimental results are presented that document the behavior of the diaphragm and the droplet during the course of a typical bursting event. In addition, a simple mathematical model is presented that qualitatively reproduces all of the essential features we have seen in a burst event. From these two investigations, we have shown that delayed droplet bursting results when the system passes through a resonance

  3. Research on cavitation characteristic of inducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, N.; Wang, L. Q.; Y Kong, F.; Wu, D. Z.

    2013-12-01

    The inducer has significant effect on improving the cavitation characteristic of a centrifugal pump. The fact which can not be neglected is that the inducer itself is a kind of axial pump. Research on inducer's cavitation characteristic is very important. Several inducers were designed and modeled by Pro/E software. The mesh of flow field was done by ICEM and imported to ANSYS CFX to analyze the inducer's cavitation characteristic. The relationship between cavity length and head breakdown was discussed. With the decrease of NPSH, there is a slight increase in the head just prior to the decrease associated with head breakdown. This conclusion coincides with experimental results. The influence of backflow eddy on the inducer's cavitation characteristic was analyzed, and the change of backflow eddy in the process of cavitation was illustrated. It can be concluded that the correlation between the inducer head breakdown and the relative cavity length is very close which agrees well with the theoretical and experimental results. As the inlet pressure is decreased, inception almost always occurs in the tip vortex generated by the corner where the leading edge meets the tip. And backflow vortex gradually disappears in the process of cavitation.

  4. Bubble-Induced Cave Collapse

    PubMed Central

    Girihagama, Lakshika; Nof, Doron; Hancock, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Conventional wisdom among cave divers is that submerged caves in aquifers, such as in Florida or the Yucatan, are unstable due to their ever-growing size from limestone dissolution in water. Cave divers occasionally noted partial cave collapses occurring while they were in the cave, attributing this to their unintentional (and frowned upon) physical contact with the cave walls or the aforementioned “natural” instability of the cave. Here, we suggest that these cave collapses do not necessarily result from cave instability or contacts with walls, but rather from divers bubbles rising to the ceiling and reducing the buoyancy acting on isolated ceiling rocks. Using familiar theories for the strength of flat and arched (un-cracked) beams, we first show that the flat ceiling of a submerged limestone cave can have a horizontal expanse of 63 meters. This is much broader than that of most submerged Florida caves (~ 10 m). Similarly, we show that an arched cave roof can have a still larger expanse of 240 meters, again implying that Florida caves are structurally stable. Using familiar bubble dynamics, fluid dynamics of bubble-induced flows, and accustomed diving practices, we show that a group of 1-3 divers submerged below a loosely connected ceiling rock will quickly trigger it to fall causing a “collapse”. We then present a set of qualitative laboratory experiments illustrating such a collapse in a circular laboratory cave (i.e., a cave with a circular cross section), with concave and convex ceilings. In these experiments, a metal ball represented the rock (attached to the cave ceiling with a magnet), and the bubbles were produced using a syringe located at the cave floor. PMID:25849088

  5. Bubble-induced cave collapse.

    PubMed

    Girihagama, Lakshika; Nof, Doron; Hancock, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    Conventional wisdom among cave divers is that submerged caves in aquifers, such as in Florida or the Yucatan, are unstable due to their ever-growing size from limestone dissolution in water. Cave divers occasionally noted partial cave collapses occurring while they were in the cave, attributing this to their unintentional (and frowned upon) physical contact with the cave walls or the aforementioned "natural" instability of the cave. Here, we suggest that these cave collapses do not necessarily result from cave instability or contacts with walls, but rather from divers bubbles rising to the ceiling and reducing the buoyancy acting on isolated ceiling rocks. Using familiar theories for the strength of flat and arched (un-cracked) beams, we first show that the flat ceiling of a submerged limestone cave can have a horizontal expanse of 63 meters. This is much broader than that of most submerged Florida caves (~ 10 m). Similarly, we show that an arched cave roof can have a still larger expanse of 240 meters, again implying that Florida caves are structurally stable. Using familiar bubble dynamics, fluid dynamics of bubble-induced flows, and accustomed diving practices, we show that a group of 1-3 divers submerged below a loosely connected ceiling rock will quickly trigger it to fall causing a "collapse". We then present a set of qualitative laboratory experiments illustrating such a collapse in a circular laboratory cave (i.e., a cave with a circular cross section), with concave and convex ceilings. In these experiments, a metal ball represented the rock (attached to the cave ceiling with a magnet), and the bubbles were produced using a syringe located at the cave floor. PMID:25849088

  6. Noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Sliwinska-Kowalska, Mariola; Davis, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) still remains a problem in developed countries, despite reduced occupational noise exposure, strict standards for hearing protection and extensive public health awareness campaigns. Therefore NIHL continues to be the focus of noise research activities. This paper summarizes progress achieved recently in our knowledge of NIHL. It includes papers published between the years 2008-2011 (in English), which were identified by a literature search of accessible medical and other relevant databases. A substantial part of this research has been concerned with the risk of NIHL in the entertainment sector, particularly in professional, orchestral musicians. There are also constant concerns regarding noise exposure and hearing risk in "hard to control" occupations, such as farming and construction work. Although occupational noise has decreased since the early 1980s, the number of young people subject to social noise exposure has tripled. If the exposure limits from the Noise at Work Regulations are applied, discotheque music, rock concerts, as well as music from personal music players are associated with the risk of hearing loss in teenagers and young adults. Several recent research studies have increased the understanding of the pathomechanisms of acoustic trauma, the genetics of NIHL, as well as possible dietary and pharmacologic otoprotection in acoustic trauma. The results of these studies are very promising and offer grounds to expect that targeted therapies might help prevent the loss of sensory hair cells and protect the hearing of noise-exposed individuals. These studies emphasize the need to launch an improved noise exposure policy for hearing protection along with developing more efficient norms of NIHL risk assessment. PMID:23257577

  7. Mitochondrial Rejuvenation After Induced Pluripotency

    PubMed Central

    Tjong, Jonathan; Alcasid, Nathan; Perkins, Guy A.; Goissis, Marcelo D.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Perez, Gloria I.; Cibelli, Jose B.

    2010-01-01

    Background As stem cells of the early embryo mature and differentiate into all tissues, the mitochondrial complement undergoes dramatic functional improvement. Mitochondrial activity is low to minimize generation of DNA-damaging reactive oxygen species during pre-implantation development and increases following implantation and differentiation to meet higher metabolic demands. It has recently been reported that when the stem cell type known as induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs) are re-differentiated for several weeks in vitro, the mitochondrial complement progressively re-acquires properties approximating input fibroblasts, suggesting that despite the observation that IPSC conversion “resets” some parameters of cellular aging such as telomere length, it may have little impact on other age-affected cellular systems such as mitochondria in IPSC-derived cells. Methodology/Principal Findings We have examined the properties of mitochondria in two fibroblast lines, corresponding IPSCs, and fibroblasts re-derived from IPSCs using biochemical methods and electron microscopy, and found a dramatic improvement in the quality and function of the mitochondrial complement of the re-derived fibroblasts compared to input fibroblasts. This observation likely stems from two aspects of our experimental design: 1) that the input cell lines used were of advanced cellular age and contained an inefficient mitochondrial complement, and 2) the re-derived fibroblasts were produced using an extensive differentiation regimen that may more closely mimic the degree of growth and maturation found in a developing mammal. Conclusions/Significance These results — coupled with earlier data from our laboratory — suggest that IPSC conversion not only resets the “biological clock”, but can also rejuvenate the energetic capacity of derived cells. PMID:21124794

  8. Continental subduction induced tremor activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, H. J.; Chen, K. H.; Ide, S.; Mouyen, M.; Byrne, T. B.

    2015-12-01

    Southern Central Range of Taiwan, a place where deep-seated tectonic tremors (a proxy of slow slip) and earthquake swarms are closely located in space and highly correlated in time, provides rare opportunity towards the understanding of physical mechanisms governing different style of slip. To identify tremor events, we used the identification scheme similar to Ide et al. (2015) but applied slightly different techniques: (1) Higher waveform cross-correlation coefficient (>0.6) (2) careful visual inspection for excluding local earthquakes and short-lasted event (duration < 60 s) (3) Signal to noise ratio higher than 1.2 and lower than 30 (4) No spatio-temporal clustering technique used. During the study period of 2007-2012, we identified 2320 tremor events with duration ranging from 60 s to 1550 s. They are located underneath southern Central Range, forming a NS-striking and SE-dipping pipe-like structure at a depth of 20-40 km. The up-dip extension of this tremor structure reaches an aseismic zone under the western flank of Central Range at shallow depths, where is an area characterized by high heat flow, low Vp and Vs anomaly. Such seismic gap was explained by the buoyancy induced crust detachment during continental subduction of Eurasian Plate. This detachment may open a new channel for hot and ductile material ascending to shallow depth, producing high temperatures along the way. This provides a common mechanism for down-dip tremor and up-dip shallow seismic gap along the same eastern dipping channel. In addition, the tremor events are found to be mostly occurred in high tides and exhibit higher correlation with tide data from west coast of Taiwan. This may again imply the association between tremor activity and subduction of Eurasian Plate.

  9. Self-induced polarization anisoplanatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breckinridge, James B.

    2013-09-01

    This paper suggests that the astronomical science data recorded with low F# telescopes for applications requiring a known point spread function shape and those applications requiring instrument polarization calibration may be compromised unless the effects of vector wave propagation are properly modeled and compensated. Exoplanet coronagraphy requires "matched filter" masks and explicit designs for the real and imaginary parts for the mask transmittance. Three aberration sources dominate image quality in astronomical optical systems: amplitude, phase and polarization. Classical ray-trace aberration analysis used today by optical engineers is inadequate to model image formation in modern low F# highperformance astronomical telescopes. We show here that a complex (real and imaginary) vector wave model is required for high performance, large aperture, very wide-field, low F# systems. Self-induced polarization anisoplanatism (SIPA) reduces system image quality, decreases contrast and limits the ability of image processing techniques to restore images. This paper provides a unique analysis of the image formation process to identify measurements sensitive to SIPA. Both the real part and the imaginary part of the vector complex wave needs to be traced through the entire optical system, including each mirror surface, optical filter, and all masks. Only at the focal plane is the modulus squared taken to obtain an estimate of the measured intensity. This paper also discusses the concept of the polarization conjugate filter, suggested by the author to correct telescope/instrument corrupted phase and amplitude and thus mitigate6, in part the effects of phase and amplitude errors introduced by reflections of incoherent white-light from metal coatings.

  10. [Drug induced eosinophilic pleural effusion].

    PubMed

    Vasilescu, Raluca

    2014-01-01

    The hypersensitivity reactions induced by drugs, some widely used, like central nervous system medication, can have various presentations. The lung is a frequent target for such events. We present the case of 40-year-old male patient, non-smoker, with infant encephalopaty, seizures since age of 6 with polimorphic crisis (mainly absences), with anticonvulsivant treatment since 2011 (carbamazepine, sodium valproate, levetiracetam), with no respiratory medical history. Current symptoms started two weeks before, with chest pain, dry cough. He received no antibiotics. Chest X-ray and thoracic CT scan (27 June 2013) showed a left pleral effusion. Left exploratory thoracocentesis extracted 20 ml reddish pleural fluid: eosinophilic exsudate (60%) with normal adenosin deaminase. He also presents moderate blood eosinophilia (13.7%-1780/mm3). Pulmonary infarction with secondary pleurisy, thoracic trauma, acute pancreatitis with secondary pleurisy were excluded. No Loeffler transient infiltrates were documented, serology for Toxocara is IgG positive (historical) and not significant for current episode, no symptoms suggestive for toxocarosis (characteristic to young children, patient had no liver enlargement etc.), no hidatidosis or trichinelosis were found. As an exclusion diagnosis, a hypersensitivity reaction to anticonvulsivant medication was considered (mentioned in literature) carbamazepine and sodium valproate (even if medication was taken for a longer time), with blood and pleural eosinophilia. Together with the neurologist, the mentioned drugs were stopped and he was started on lamotrigine 2 tb/day and levetiracetam 1 tb/day, well tolerated, no absences were noticed. Total remission of blood eosinophilia and partial remission of pleural effusion were noticed. Subsequent follow-ups confirm favourable evolution, with healing of pleurisy and normal blood cell count, which are stable at 7 months after changing anticonvulsivant treatment. PMID:25241560

  11. Spiderweb deformation induced by electrostatically charged insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Jimenez, Victor Manuel; Dudley, Robert

    2013-07-01

    Capture success of spider webs has been associated with their microstructure, ornamentation, and wind-induced vibrations. Indirect evidence suggests that statically charged objects can attract silk thread, but web deformations induced by charged insects have not yet been described. Here, we show under laboratory conditions that electrostatically charged honeybees, green bottle flies, fruit flies, aphids, and also water drops falling near webs of cross-spiders (Araneus diadematus) induce rapid thread deformation that enhances the likelihood of physical contact, and thus of prey capture.

  12. [Study on diabetes-induced cognitive impairment].

    PubMed

    Bian, Zhijie; Lu, Chengbiao; Luo, Jianping; Cui, Dong; Li, Xiaoli

    2013-08-01

    The diabetes-induced cognitive impairment complications have serious effects on the patients' lives, and there is an enormous and financial burden on patients, their families and society as a whole. This review investigates the current research status of diabetes-induced cognitive impairment from different view points including molecular, models, clinics and electrophysiology. The relationship between diabetes and cognitive function and developments of research are hereby summarized. And finally, future issues of diabetes-induced cognitive impairments are pointed out, and the effective rehabilitation methods should be considered. PMID:24059075

  13. Prevention of chemotherapy-induced ovarian damage.

    PubMed

    Roness, Hadassa; Kashi, Oren; Meirow, Dror

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the impact of cytotoxic drugs on the ovary have opened up new directions for the protection of the ovary from chemotherapy-induced damage. These advances have spurred the investigation of pharmacological agents to prevent ovarian damage at the time of treatment. Prevention of ovarian damage and follicle loss would provide significant advantages over existing fertility preservation techniques. This manuscript reviews new methods for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced ovarian damage, including agents that act on the PI3K/PTEN/Akt follicle activation pathway, apoptotic pathways, the vascular system, and other potential methods of reducing chemotherapy-induced ovotoxicity. PMID:26677788

  14. Flow induced force of labyrinth seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwatsubo, T.; Motooka, N.; Kawai, R.

    1982-01-01

    Flow induced instability force due to a labyrinth seal is analyzed. An approximate solution is given for the partial differential equation representing the flow in labyrinth seal and it is compared with the finite difference method in order to verify the accuracy of both methods. The effects of difference of inlet and outlet pressures of the seal, deflection of pressure and mass flow from the steady state, rotor diameter, seal clearance, seal interval and seal number on the flow induced force of the seal are investigated and it is known that some of these factors are very influential on the flow induced force.

  15. Spiderweb deformation induced by electrostatically charged insects

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Jimenez, Victor Manuel; Dudley, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Capture success of spider webs has been associated with their microstructure, ornamentation, and wind-induced vibrations. Indirect evidence suggests that statically charged objects can attract silk thread, but web deformations induced by charged insects have not yet been described. Here, we show under laboratory conditions that electrostatically charged honeybees, green bottle flies, fruit flies, aphids, and also water drops falling near webs of cross-spiders (Araneus diadematus) induce rapid thread deformation that enhances the likelihood of physical contact, and thus of prey capture. PMID:23828093

  16. Observation of density-induced tunneling.

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, Ole; Meinert, Florian; Mark, Manfred J; Nägerl, Hanns-Christoph; Lühmann, Dirk-Sören

    2014-11-01

    We study the dynamics of bosonic atoms in a tilted one-dimensional optical lattice and report on the first direct observation of density-induced tunneling. We show that the interaction affects the time evolution of the doublon oscillation via density-induced tunneling and pinpoint its density and interaction dependence. The experimental data for different lattice depths are in good agreement with our theoretical model. Furthermore, resonances caused by second-order tunneling processes are studied, where the density-induced tunneling breaks the symmetric behavior for attractive and repulsive interactions predicted by the Hubbard model. PMID:25415904

  17. Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Eric Bryant

    1995-01-01

    Laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) is a new technique for remote nonintrusive measurement of thermophysical gas properties. LITA involves forming, via opto-acoustic effects, grating-shaped perturbations of gas properties by the use of intersecting beams from a short-pulse laser. A third beam scatters coherently into a signal beam off the perturbation grating via acousto-optical effects. The evolution of the gas perturbations modulates the scattered signal beam. Accurate values of the sound speed, transport properties, and composition of the gas can be extracted by analyzing the signal beam. An analytical expression for the spectrum, absolute magnitude, and time history of the LITA signal is derived. The optoacoustic effects of thermalization and electrostriction are treated. Finite beam-diameter, beam-duration, and thermalization-rate effects are included in the analysis. The expression accurately models experimental signals over a wide range of gas conditions. Experimental tests using LITA have been conducted on pure and NO_2-seeded air and helium at pressures ranging from {~ }0.1 kPa-14 MPa. Carbon dioxide has been explored near its liquid-vapor critical point. Accuracies of 0.1% in sound speed measurements have been achieved in these tests. Accuracies of {~}1% have been achieved in measurements of thermal diffusivity, although beam misalignment effects have typically degraded this accuracy by a factor of {~} 10-20. Using LITA, susceptibility spectra have been taken of approximately a femtogram of NO_2 . The effects of fluid motion and turbulence have been explored. LITA velocimetry has been demonstrated, in which the Doppler shift of light scattered from a flowing fluid is measured. LITA velocimetry requires no particle seeding, has a coherent signal beam, and can be applied to pulsed flows. LITA has also been applied to measure single-shot |chi^{(1) }|^2 or "Rayleigh scattering" spectra of a gas by the use of a technique of wavelength -division multiplexing

  18. Laser-induced thermal acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Eric B.

    Laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) is a new technique for remote nonintrusive measurement of thermophysical gas properties. LITA involves forming, via opto-acoustic effects, grating-shaped perturbations of gas properties using intersecting beams from a short-pulse laser. A third beam scatters coherently into a signal beam off the perturbation grating via acousto-optical effects. The evolution of the gas perturbations modulates the scattered signal beam. Accurate values of the sound speed, transport properties, and composition of the gas can be extracted by analyzing the signal beam.An analytical expression for the spectrum, absolute magnitude, and time history of the LITA signal is derived. The optoacoustic effects of thermalization and electrostriction are treated. Finite beam-diameter, beam-duration, and thermalization-rate effects are included in the analysis. The expression accurately models experimental signals over a wide range of gas conditions.Experimental tests using LITA have been conducted on pure and [...]-seeded air and helium at pressures ranging from ~0.1 kPa-14 MPa. Carbon dioxide has been explored near its liquid-vapor critical point. Accuracies of 0.1% in sound speed measurements have been achieved in these tests. Accuracies of ~1% have been achieved in measurements of thermal diffusivity, although beam misalignment effects have typically degraded this accuracy by a factor of ~10-20. Using LITA, susceptibility spectra have been taken of approximately a femtogram of [...]. The effects of fluid motion and turbulence have been explored. LITA velocimetry has been demonstrated, in which the Doppler shift of light scattered from a flowing fluid is measured. LITA velocimetry requires no particle seeding, has a coherent signal beam, and can be applied to pulsed flows. LITA has also been applied to measure single-shot [...] or "Rayleigh scattering" spectra of a gas using a technique of wavelength-division multiplexing, called multiplex LITA. The LITA

  19. Drug Induced Hearing Loss: What Is Ototoxicity?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Drug-Induced Hearing Loss What Is Ototoxicity? Past Issues / Spring 2016 Table ... of patients taking these drugs." "Antibiotics Caused My Hearing Loss..." Gulab Lalwani Photo Courtesy of: Gulab Lalwani When ...

  20. Electromagnetically induced absorption via incoherent collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xihua; Sheng Jiteng; Xiao Min

    2011-10-15

    We conduct theoretical studies on electromagnetically induced absorption via incoherent collisions in an inhomogeneously broadened ladder-type three-level system with the density-matrix approach. The effects of the collision-induced coherence decay rates as well as the probe laser field intensity on the probe field absorption are examined. It is shown that with the increase of the collisional decay rates in a moderate range, a narrow dip due to electromagnetically induced transparency superimposed on the Doppler-broadened absorption background can be turned into a narrow peak under the conditions that the probe field intensity is not very weak as compared to the pump field, which results from the enhancement of constructive interference and suppression of destructive interference between one-photon and multiphoton transition pathways. The physical origin of the collision-assisted electromagnetically induced absorption is analyzed with a power-series solution of the density-matrix equations.

  1. Induced Transparency and Absorption in Coupled Microresonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hongrok

    2004-01-01

    We review the conditions for the occurrence of coherence phenomena in passive coupled optical microresonators. We derive the effective steady-state response and determine conditions for induced transparency and absorption in these systems.

  2. On the Minimum Induced Drag of Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the minimum induced drag of wings. The topics include: 1) The History of Spanload Development of the optimum spanload Winglets and their implications; 2) Horten Sailplanes; and 3) Flight Mechanics & Adverse yaw.

  3. Autophagy in light-induced retinal damage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Perusek, Lindsay; Maeda, Akiko

    2016-03-01

    Vision is reliant upon converting photon signals to electrical information which is interpreted by the brain and therefore allowing us to receive information about our surroundings. However, when exposed to excessive light, photoreceptors and other types of cells in the retina can undergo light-induced cell death, termed light-induced retinal damage. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding molecular events in the retina after excessive light exposure and mechanisms of light-induced retinal damage. We also introduce works which investigate potential roles of autophagy, an essential cellular mechanism required for maintaining homeostasis under stress conditions, in the illuminated retina and animal models of light-induced retinal damage. PMID:26325327

  4. Bioelectromagnetic effects measurements - SAR and induced current.

    PubMed

    Dlugosz, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    The paper discusses several theoretical and practical aspects of the application of currents flowing through the body of a radiotelephone operator and Specific Absorption Rate (SAR). SAR is known as the physical quantity which is a perfect solution for biological experiments. Unfortunately, SAR cannot be measured directly. Contrary to SAR, which is limited to the penetration depth, a current induced in a point of a body is measurable in any other point of the body. The main objective of this paper is to show that the current induced in a human body when using a radiotelephone or mobile phone is significant and should be analyzed as widely as SAR is. Computer simulations of a human's hand with a radiotelephone were made. Experiments were also conducted. The results of the experiments show that induced current is also as important as SAR and it cannot be omitted in bioelectromagnetic experiments. In biomedical studies both parameters: induced current and SAR play a major role. PMID:25585976

  5. Charge Induced by Displacement of an Ion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spokas, John J.

    1978-01-01

    Tries to clarify and explain some inaccuracies that appeared in a recent article dealing with a current induced in an external circuit due to charges moving within a device, an ionization chamber of planar geometry, in the circuit. (GA)

  6. Sotalol-induced torsade de pointes

    PubMed Central

    Kontopoulos, A.; Manoudis, F.; Filindris, A.; Metaxas, P.

    1981-01-01

    The authors report a case of torsade de pointes atypical ventricular tachycardia in a patient with chronic renal failure and hypertension treated with sotalol hydrochloride which they believe induced the arrhythmia. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:7301675

  7. [Induced abortion--a historical outline].

    PubMed

    Glenc, F

    1974-11-11

    An historical review of the use of induced abortion is presented, beginning with early eras. The Chinese were the 1st to record the practice of induced abortion, with this operation being administered to royal concubines recorded at 500-515 B.C. Induced abortion was not used in ancient Greece, either for criminal or ethical reason. However, the ancient Greeks did utilize compulsory abortion for serious economic indications, as a means of controlling natural growth. Greek medical, gyneoclogigcal instruments for adminsitering abortions were described by Hippocrates. The Greek moral attitudes on abortion were largely adopted by the Romans, which were later altered by the appearance of Christianity and new ethical ideas. These ideas dominated European attitudes, along with the Church of Rome, limiting induced abortion to cases where the life of the mother was threatened. This attitude has existed until the present century, when these moral ideas are being challanged seriously for the 1st time in modern history. PMID:4610534

  8. Radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid

    SciTech Connect

    Griem, K.L.; Robb, P.K.; Caldarelli, D.D.; Templeton, A.C. )

    1989-08-01

    A 23-year-old white man presented with a thyroid mass 12 years after receiving high-dose radiotherapy for a T2 and N1 lymphoepithelioma of the nasopharynx. Following subtotal thyroidectomy, a histopathologic examination revealed liposarcoma of the thyroid gland. The relationship between sarcomas and irradiation is described and Cahan and colleagues' criteria for radiation-induced sarcomas are reviewed. To our knowledge, we are presenting the first such case of a radiation-induced sarcoma of the thyroid gland.

  9. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia in essential thrombocytosis.

    PubMed

    Murawaki, Ayumi; Nakayasu, Hiroyuki; Doi, Mitsuru; Suzuki-Kinoshita, Kaori; Asai, Yasumasa; Omura, Hiromi; Nakashima, Kenji

    2012-11-01

    We report a 67-year-old woman with essential thrombocytosis who developed cerebral infarction and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia during treatment for the cerebral infarction. She developed additional cerebral infarcts, acute femoral artery occlusion, and thrombophlebitis of her lower extremities. She was successfully treated with argatroban. This is the first report of a patient with essential thrombocytosis who developed heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and serious conditions, which included multiple thromboembolisms and coagulation disorders mimicking disseminated intravascular coagulation. PMID:22425438

  10. Induced gravity from curvature density preserving diffeomorphisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Ichiro

    2016-08-01

    We construct not only an induced gravity model with restricted diffeomorphisms, that is, transverse diffeomorphisms that preserve the curvature density, but also with full diffeomorphisms. By solving the equations of motion, it turns out that these models produce Einstein's equations with a certain Newton constant in addition to the constraint for the curvature density. In the limit of the infinite Newton constant, the models give rise to induced gravity. Moreover, we discuss cosmological solutions on the basis of the gravitational models at hand.

  11. A case of trimebutine-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Suh-Young; Kim, Mi-Yeong; Kang, Sung-Yoon; Song, Woo-Jung; Kang, Hye-Ryun

    2011-12-01

    Trimebutine maleate [2-dimethylamino-2-phenylbutyl 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid] has been demonstrated to be active for relieving abdominal pain and it is widely used for patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Adverse drug reactions are mostly mild and well-tolerated. To our knowledge, only two cases of trimebutine induced hypersensitivity have been reported, and both were delayed type reactions. Here, we report the first case of trimebutine maleate-induced anaphylaxis. PMID:22113162

  12. Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis and Osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Glucocorticoid administration is the most common cause of secondary osteoporosis and the leading cause of nontraumatic osteonecrosis. In patients receiving long-term therapy, glucocorticoids induce fractures in 30 to 50% and osteonecrosis in 9 to 40%. This article reviews glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis and osteonecrosis addressing the risk factors, pathogenesis, evaluation, treatment, and uncertainties in the clinical management of these disorders. PMID:22877431

  13. Novel C Induced Structures on Si(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, M.; Häberle, P.

    2003-12-01

    We report thermally induced roughness at the nanometer scale, formed in the process of obtaining the (7×7) reconstruction on Si(111). C contamination seems to be the precursor in the formation of the different structures associated to this roughness. The large scale rearrangements, observed after the SiO2 high temperature induced desorption, show various shapes, namely: pyramids, raspberry shapes and tori.

  14. Means for controlling aerodynamically induced twist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elber, W. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A control mechanism which provides active compensation for aerodynamically induced twist deformation of high aspect ratio wings consists of a torque tube, internal to each wing and rigidly attached near the tip of each wing, which is moved by an actuator located in the aircraft fuselage. As changes in the aerodynamic loads on the wings occur the torque tube is rotated to compensate for the induced wing twist.

  15. Medium-induced multi-photon radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hao; Salgado, Carlos A.; Tywoniuk, Konrad

    2011-01-01

    We study the spectrum of multi-photon radiation off a fast quark in medium in the BDMPS/ASW approach. We reproduce the medium-induced one-photon radiation spectrum in dipole approximation, and go on to calculate the two-photon radiation in the Molière limit. We find that in this limit the LPM effect holds for medium-induced two-photon ladder emission.

  16. Paliperidone Induced Hypoglycemia by Increasing Insulin Secretion.

    PubMed

    Omi, Tsubasa; Riku, Keisen; Fukumoto, Motoyuki; Kanai, Koji; Omura, Yumi; Takada, Hiromune; Matunaga, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 41-year-old woman with schizophrenia who developed persistent hypoglycemia following paliperidone administration. After discontinuing paliperidone, the hypoglycemia resolved, but symptoms of diabetes emerged. Therefore, it appears that the hypoglycemia induced by paliperidone may mask symptoms of diabetes. Paliperidone may induce hypoglycemia by increasing insulin secretion. This report could help elucidate the relationship between atypical antipsychotics and glucose metabolism. PMID:27478670

  17. Paliperidone Induced Hypoglycemia by Increasing Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Riku, Keisen; Fukumoto, Motoyuki; Kanai, Koji; Omura, Yumi; Matunaga, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 41-year-old woman with schizophrenia who developed persistent hypoglycemia following paliperidone administration. After discontinuing paliperidone, the hypoglycemia resolved, but symptoms of diabetes emerged. Therefore, it appears that the hypoglycemia induced by paliperidone may mask symptoms of diabetes. Paliperidone may induce hypoglycemia by increasing insulin secretion. This report could help elucidate the relationship between atypical antipsychotics and glucose metabolism. PMID:27478670

  18. Field-induced confined states in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Moriyama, Satoshi; Morita, Yoshifumi; Watanabe, Eiichiro; Tsuya, Daiju

    2014-02-03

    We report an approach to confine the carriers in single-layer graphene, which leads to quantum devices with field-induced quantum confinement. We demonstrated that the Coulomb-blockade effect evolves under a uniform magnetic field perpendicular to the graphene device. Our experimental results show that field-induced quantum dots are realized in graphene, and a quantum confinement-deconfinement transition is switched by the magnetic field.

  19. Induced murine models of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuan; Zeumer, Leilani; Reeves, Westley H; Morel, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    Induced mouse models of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have been developed to complement the spontaneous models. This chapter describes the methods used in the pristane-induced model and the chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) model, both of which have been extensively used. We will also outline the specific mechanisms of systemic autoimmunity that can be best characterized using each of these models. PMID:24497358

  20. Electromagnetically induced classical and quantum Lau effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Tianhui; Yang, Guojian; Xiong, Jun; Xu, Deqin

    2016-07-01

    We present two schemes of Lau effect for an object, an electromagnetically induced grating generated based on the electromagnetically induced effect. The Lau interference pattern is detected either directly in the way of the traditional Lau effect measurement with a classical thermal light being the imaging light, or indirectly and nonlocally in the way of two-photon coincidence measurement with a pair of entangled photons being the imaging light.

  1. An observation of proton-induced latchup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Donald K.; Coss, James R.; Watson, R. K.; Schwartz, Harvey R.; Pease, Ronald L.

    1992-01-01

    Proton-induced latchup in a CMOS microprocessor known to have a very low heavy-ion-induced latchup threshold LET was observed. The latchup cross section vs. proton energy for three different bias conditions is displayed. Average measures of latchup current within an 11-ms window following the onset of latchup are provided, as a function of bias and incident proton energy. These data can be interpreted in terms of the present understanding of SEE phenomena.

  2. How does relativity affect magnetically induced currents?

    PubMed

    Berger, R J F; Repisky, M; Komorovsky, S

    2015-09-21

    Magnetically induced probability currents in molecules are studied in relativistic theory. Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) enhances the curvature and gives rise to a previously unobserved current cusp in AuH or small bulge-like distortions in HgH2 at the proton positions. The origin of this curvature is magnetically induced spin-density arising from SOC in the relativistic description. PMID:26243659

  3. Radiation-induced neoplasms of the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, P.P.; Good, R.R.; Skultety, F.M.; Leibrock, L.G.; Severson, G.S.

    1987-04-01

    The histopathology of two patients with radiation-induced neoplasms of the brain following therapeutic irradiation for intracranial malignancies is described. The second neoplasms were an atypical meningioma and a polymorphous cell sarcoma, respectively. They occurred 12 and 23 years after irradiation (4000 rad), within the original field of irradiation. In both cases, the radiation-induced tumors were histologically distinct from the initial medulloblastomas. Both patients were retreated with local irradiation using permanent implantation of radioactive iodine-125 seeds.

  4. Inducer Design to Avoid Cavitation Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Donghyuk; Watanabe, Toshifumi; Yonezawa, Koichi; Horiguchi, Hironori; Kawata, Yutaka; Tsujimoto, Yoshinobu

    2010-06-01

    Three inducers were designed to avoid cavitation instabilities. This was accomplished by avoiding the interaction of tip cavity with the leading edge of the opposing blade. The first one applied extremely larger leading edge sweep, the second and third ones applied smaller incidence angle by reducing the inlet blade angle or increasing the design flow rate, respectively. The inducer with larger design flow rate has larger outlet blade angle to obtain sufficient pressure rise. The inducer with larger sweep could suppress the cavitation instabilities in wide ranges of cavitation number and flow rate, owing to weaker tip leakage vortex cavity with stronger disturbance by backflow vortices. The inducer with larger outlet blade angle could avoid the cavitation instabilities at higher flow rates owing to the extension of the tip cavity along the suction surface of the blade. The inducer with smaller inlet blade angle could avoid the cavitation instabilities at the flow rates larger than the design flow coefficient, owing to the occurrence of the cavity first in the blade passage and its extension upstream. The cavity shape and suction performance were reasonably simulated by three dimensional CFD computations under the steady cavitating condition, except for the backflow vortex cavity. The difference in the growth of cavity for each inducer is explained from the difference of the pressure distribution on the suction side of the blades.

  5. UV-induced immunosuppression in the balance.

    PubMed

    de Gruijl, Frank R

    2008-01-01

    Around 1980, experiments with hairless mice showed us that UV-induced actinic keratoses (AK) and ensuing skin carcinomas did not arise independently: the rate of occurrence in one skin area was increased considerably if AKs had already been induced separately in another distant skin area, i.e. a systemic effect. The ground laying work of Margaret Kripke in the 1970s provided a fitting explanation: UV-induced immunosuppression and tolerance toward the UV-induced tumors. From Kripke's work a new discipline arose: "Photoimmunology." Enormous strides were made in exploring and expanding the effects from UV carcinogenesis to infectious diseases, and in elucidating the mechanisms involved. Stemming from concerns about a depletion of the ozone layer and the general impact of ambient UV radiation, the groups I worked in and closely collaborated with explored the anticipated adverse effects of UV-induced immunosuppression on healthy individuals. An important turning point was brought about in 1992 when the group of Kevin Cooper reported that immunosuppression could be induced by UV exposure in virtually all human subjects tested, suggesting that this is a normal and sound physiological reaction to UV exposure. This reaction could actually protect us from illicit immune responses against our UV-exposed skin, such as observed in idiopathic polymorphic light eruption. This premise has fruitfully rekindled the research on this common "sun allergy," affecting to widely varying degrees about one in five Europeans with indoor professions. PMID:18173695

  6. Method for inducing saprolegniasis in channel catfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howe, G.E.; Rach, J.J.; Olson, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    A method was developed to uniformly and systematically induce saprolegniasis in channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus. Three different methods for inducing saprolegniasis were evaluated in waters containing known zoospore concentrations of Saprolegnia parasitica (1) low-temperature shock to induce immunosuppression: (2) physical abrasion stress; and (3) a combination of both low temperature shock and abrasion stress. Low-temperature shock or abrasion stress alone were not effective for inducing saprolegniasis. Only 10% of fish stressed by low-temperature shock alone became infected. No fish receiving abrasion stress treatments alone became infected even though these fish were subject to significant abrasion and dewatering stress. A combination of low-temperature and abrasion stress, however, was sufficient to induce saprolegniasis in 100% of fish tested and resulted in 90% mortality. No fish became infected in the positive control group (exposed to zoospores of S. Parasitica without stress) or in the negative control group. The combined-stress method should enable researchers to induce saprolegniasis in channel catfish at will to study its pathogenesis or to test the efficacy of candidate antifungal treatments. In conducting efficacy studies, therapeutic treatments must begin immediately when the first signs of saprolegniasis are observed because the disease progresses quickly and is deadly.

  7. Dexrazoxane exacerbates doxorubicin-induced testicular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Levi, Mattan; Tzabari, Moran; Savion, Naphtali; Stemmer, Salomon M; Shalgi, Ruth; Ben-Aharon, Irit

    2015-10-01

    Infertility induced by anti-cancer treatments pose a major concern for cancer survivors. Doxorubicin (DXR) has been previously shown to exert toxic effects on the testicular germinal epithelium. Based upon the cardioprotective traits of dexrazoxane (DEX), we studied its potential effect in reducing DXR-induced testicular toxicity. Male mice were injected with 5  mg/kg DXR, 100  mg/kg DEX, combination of both or saline (control) and sacrificed either 1, 3 or 6 months later. Testes were excised and further processed. Glutathione and apoptosis assays were performed to determine oxidative stress. Immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy were used to study the effects of the drugs on testicular histology and on spermatogonial reserve. DXR and the combined treatment induced a striking decline in testicular weight. DEX prevented DXR-induced oxidative stress, but enhanced DXR-induced apoptosis within the testes. Furthermore, the combined treatment depleted the spermatogonial reserve after 1 month, with impaired recovery at 3 and 6 months post-treatment. This resulted in compromised sperm parameters, testicular and epididymal weights as well as significantly reduced sperm motility, all of which were more severe than those observed in DXR-treated mice. The activity of DEX in the testis may differ from its activity in cardiomyocytes. Adding DEX to DXR exacerbates DXR-induced testicular toxicity. PMID:26329125

  8. Cardiomyocyte death in doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Wei; Shi, Jianjian; Li, Yuan-Jian; Wei, Lei

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Doxorubicin (DOX) is one of the most widely used and successful antitumor drugs, but its cumulative and dose-dependent cardiac toxicity has been the major concern of oncologists in cancer therapeutic practice for decades. With the increasing population of cancer survivals, there is a growing need to develop preventive strategies and effective therapies against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, in particular, the late onset cardiomyopathy. Although intensive investigations on the DOX-induced cardiotoxicity have been continued for decades, the underlying mechanisms responsible for DOX-induced cardiotoxicity have not been completely elucidated. A rapidly expanding body of evidence supports that cardiomyocyte death by apoptosis and necrosis is a primary mechanism of DOX-induced cardiomyopathy and other types of cell death, such as autophagy and senescence/aging, may participate in this process. In this review, we will focus on the current understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying DOX-induced cardiomyocyte death, including the major primary mechanism of excess production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other recently discovered ROS-independent mechanisms. Different sensitivity to DOX-induced cell death signals between adult and young cardiomyocytes will also be discussed. PMID:19866340

  9. Analog of microwave-induced resistance oscillations induced in GaAs heterostructures by terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, T.; Dmitriev, I. A.; Kozlov, D. A.; Schneider, M.; Jentzsch, B.; Kvon, Z. D.; Olbrich, P.; Bel'kov, V. V.; Bayer, A.; Schuh, D.; Bougeard, D.; Kuczmik, T.; Oltscher, M.; Weiss, D.; Ganichev, S. D.

    2016-08-01

    We report on the study of terahertz radiation-induced MIRO-like oscillations of magnetoresistivity in GaAs heterostructures. Our experiments provide an answer on two most intriguing questions—effect of radiation helicity and the role of the edges—yielding crucial information for an understanding of the MIRO (microwave-induced resistance oscillations) origin. Moreover, we demonstrate that the range of materials exhibiting radiation-induced magneto-oscillations can be largely extended by using high-frequency radiation.

  10. Stanniocalcin-1 inhibits thrombin-induced signaling and protects from bleomycin-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Luping; Zhang, Lin; Ju, Huiming; Li, Qingtian; Pan, Jenny Szu-Chin; Al-Lawati, Zahraa; Sheikh-Hamad, David

    2015-01-01

    Thrombin-induced and proteinase-activated receptor 1 (PAR1)-mediated signaling increases ROS production, activates ERK, and promotes inflammation and fibroblast proliferation in bleomycin-induced lung injury. Stanniocalcin-1 (STC1) activates anti-oxidant pathways, inhibits inflammation and provides cytoprotection; hence, we hypothesized that STC1 will inhibit thrombin/PAR1 signaling and protect from bleomycin-induced pneumonitis. We determined thrombin level and activity, thrombin-induced PAR-1-mediated signaling, superoxide generation and lung pathology after intra-tracheal administration of bleomycin to WT and STC1 Tg mice. Lungs of bleomycin-treated WT mice display: severe pneumonitis; increased generation of superoxide; vascular leak; increased thrombin protein abundance and activity; activation of ERK; greater cytokine/chemokine release and infiltration with T-cells and macrophages. Lungs of STC1 Tg mice displayed none of the above changes. Mechanistic analysis in cultured pulmonary epithelial cells (A549) suggests that STC1 inhibits thrombin-induced and PAR1-mediated ERK activation through suppression of superoxide. In conclusion, STC1 blunts bleomycin-induced rise in thrombin protein and activity, diminishes thrombin-induced signaling through PAR1 to ERK, and inhibits bleomycin-induced pneumonitis. Moreover, our study identifies a new set of cytokines/chemokines, which play a role in the pathogenesis of bleomycin-induced lung injury. These findings broaden the array of potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of lung diseases characterized by thrombin activation, oxidant stress and inflammation. PMID:26640170

  11. Drug-Induced Hyperglycaemia and Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fathallah, Neila; Slim, Raoudha; Larif, Sofien; Hmouda, Houssem; Ben Salem, Chaker

    2015-12-01

    Drug-induced hyperglycaemia and diabetes is a global issue. It may be a serious problem, as it increases the risk of microvascular and macrovascular complications, infections, metabolic coma and even death. Drugs may induce hyperglycaemia through a variety of mechanisms, including alterations in insulin secretion and sensitivity, direct cytotoxic effects on pancreatic cells and increases in glucose production. Antihypertensive drugs are not equally implicated in increasing serum glucose levels. Glycaemic adverse events occur more frequently with thiazide diuretics and with certain beta-blocking agents than with calcium-channel blockers and inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system. Lipid-modifying agents may also induce hyperglycaemia, and the diabetogenic effect seems to differ between the different types and daily doses of statins. Nicotinic acid may also alter glycaemic control. Among the anti-infectives, severe life-threatening events have been reported with fluoroquinolones, especially when high doses are used. Protease inhibitors and, to a lesser extent, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors have been reported to induce alterations in glucose metabolism. Pentamidine-induced hyperglycaemia seems to be related to direct dysfunction in pancreatic cells. Phenytoin and valproic acid may also induce hyperglycaemia. The mechanisms of second-generation antipsychotic-associated hyperglycaemia, diabetes mellitus and ketoacidosis are complex and are mainly due to insulin resistance. Antidepressant agents with high daily doses seem to be more frequently associated with an increased risk of diabetes. Ketoacidosis may occur in patients receiving beta-adrenergic stimulants, and theophylline may also induce hyperglycaemia. Steroid diabetes is more frequently associated with high doses of glucocorticoids. Some chemotherapeutic agents carry a higher risk of hyperglycaemia, and calcineurin inhibitor-induced hyperglycaemia is mainly due to a decrease in insulin secretion

  12. Mastication-induced vertigo and nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Ho; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Ji-Soo; Koo, Ja-Won; Oh, Seo Won; Kim, Dong-Uk; Kim, Joon-Tae; Welgampola, Miriam; Deriu, Franca

    2014-03-01

    Even though trigeminovestibular connections are well established in animals, mastication-induced dizziness has been described only as a vascular steal phenomenon in humans. We determined induction or modulation of nystagmus in two index patients with mastication-induced vertigo, 12 normal controls, and 52 additional patients with peripheral (n = 38, 26 with vestibular neuritis/labyrinthitis and 12 with Meniere's disease) or central (n = 14, 11 with Wallenberg syndrome, two with cerebellar infarction, and one with pontine infarction) vestibulopathy during their acute or compensated phase. Both index patients developed mastication-induced vertigo after near complete resolution of the spontaneous vertigo from presumed acute unilateral peripheral vestibulopathy. The nystagmus and vertigo gradually built up during mastication and dissipated slowly after cessation of mastication. Brain MRI and cerebral angiography were normal in these patients. Mastication did not induce nystagmus in normal controls. However, mastication induced nystagmus in five (24 %) of the 21 patients without spontaneous nystagmus (SN) but with a previous history of a vestibular syndrome, and either increased (21/31, 68 %) or decreased (7/31, 23 %) the SN in almost all the patients (28/31, 90 %) with SN. Mastication may induce significant vertigo and nystagmus in patients with a prior history of acute vestibulopathy. The induction or modulation of nystagmus by mastication in both peripheral and central vestibulopathies supports trigeminal modulation of the vestibular system in human. The gradual build-up and dissipation suggest a role of the velocity storage mechanism in the generation of mastication-induced vertigo and nystagmus. PMID:24379040

  13. Induced Seismicity Potential of Energy Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitzman, Murray

    2013-03-01

    Earthquakes attributable to human activities-``induced seismic events''-have received heightened public attention in the United States over the past several years. Upon request from the U.S. Congress and the Department of Energy, the National Research Council was asked to assemble a committee of experts to examine the scale, scope, and consequences of seismicity induced during fluid injection and withdrawal associated with geothermal energy development, oil and gas development, and carbon capture and storage (CCS). The committee's report, publicly released in June 2012, indicates that induced seismicity associated with fluid injection or withdrawal is caused in most cases by change in pore fluid pressure and/or change in stress in the subsurface in the presence of faults with specific properties and orientations and a critical state of stress in the rocks. The factor that appears to have the most direct consequence in regard to induced seismicity is the net fluid balance (total balance of fluid introduced into or removed from the subsurface). Energy technology projects that are designed to maintain a balance between the amount of fluid being injected and withdrawn, such as most oil and gas development projects, appear to produce fewer seismic events than projects that do not maintain fluid balance. Major findings from the study include: (1) as presently implemented, the process of hydraulic fracturing for shale gas recovery does not pose a high risk for inducing felt seismic events; (2) injection for disposal of waste water derived from energy technologies does pose some risk for induced seismicity, but very few events have been documented over the past several decades relative to the large number of disposal wells in operation; and (3) CCS, due to the large net volumes of injected fluids suggested for future large-scale carbon storage projects, may have potential for inducing larger seismic events.

  14. Induced Sputum Proteome in Health and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Gharib, Sina A.; Nguyen, Elizabeth V.; Lai, Ying; Plampin, Jessica D.; Goodlett, David R.; Hallstrand, Teal S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Asthma is a heterogeneous disease characterized by abnormal airway pathophysiology and susceptibility to different stimuli, as exemplified by a subset of individuals with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB). Induced sputum provides a noninvasive method to sample airway biofluids that are enriched in proteins. Objective We hypothesized that novel mechanisms in the pathogenesis of asthma may be revealed by studying the patterns of protein expression in induced sputum. Methods We used shotgun proteomics to analyze induced sputum from 5 normal individuals and 10 asthmatics, including 5 with EIB. Differential protein expression between asthmatics, asthma subphenotypes and control subjects was determined using spectral counting and computational methods. Results Using Gene Ontology analysis, we defined the functional landscape of induced sputum proteome and applied network analysis to construct a protein interaction map for this airway compartment. Shotgun proteomics analysis identified a number of proteins whose differential enrichment or depletion robustly distinguishedasthmatics from normal controls, and captured the effects of exercise on induced sputum proteome. Functional and network analysis identified key processes, including proteolytic activity that are known contributors to airway remodeling. Importantly, this approach highlighted previously unrecognized roles for differentially expressed proteins in pathways implicated in asthma, such as modulation of phospholipase A2 by secretoglobin, a putative role for S100A8/9 in human asthma, and selective upregulation of complement 3a in response to exercise in asthmatics. Conclusion Computationally-intensive analysis of induced sputum proteome is a powerful approach to understand the pathophysiology of asthma and a promising methodology to investigate other diseases of the airways. PMID:21906793

  15. Neuroinflammation in overnutrition-induced diseases.

    PubMed

    Cai, Dongsheng

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation is a biological response mounted by the immune system against dangerous assaults that threaten the integrity and normal physiology of an organism. During the past decades, cross-disciplinary research from immunology and endocrinology has much broadened this knowledge by demonstrating that chronic conditions of nutritional excess constitute an independent category of inflammatory activators, and the resulting chronic and low-grade inflammation is an important characteristic of overnutrition-induced diseases. A large body of research has demonstrated that these diseases are pathogenically associated with the local, negative actions of inflammation in peripheral tissues predominantly including the liver, muscle, and fat. In this research background, more recent research has advanced to a new level, with the important discoveries showing that overnutrition-induced inflammation occurs in the brain and thus plays a broad and leadership role in overnutrition-induced diseases. While much more research establishments are expected in this emerging and quickly expanding research, the appreciated understandings have been mainly based on proinflammatory IKKβ/NF-κB pathway and related molecules in the hypothalamus. In this chapter, the author focuses on describing IKKβ/NF-κB-induced neural inflammation in the context of overnutrition-induced metabolic inflammation and especially the central roles of this neural inflammation in the development of a spectrum of overnutrition-related diseases. PMID:23374717

  16. Olanzapine-induced restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mangsuo; Geng, Tongchao; Qiao, Liyan; Zhang, Mingjie; Shi, Jie; Huang, Fangjie; Lin, Xianzhong; Wang, Jing; Zuo, Huancong

    2014-09-01

    Only nine patients with olanzapine-induced restless legs syndrome (RLS) have been reported in the literature to our knowledge. We describe two patients with olanzapine-induced RLS treated at our hospital and review the nine reported patients. There were five women and six men aged between 28 and 62 years in the overall group. RLS symptoms emerged at olanzapine doses between 2.5 and 20mg. The symptoms improved in all patients when the dose was reduced and immediately disappeared when the medication was stopped. International Restless Legs Scale (IRLS) scores ranged from 10 to 35. Three patients had a family history of idiopathic RLS. Supplemental drugs were administered to control RLS symptoms in five patients. Ropinirole was effective in one patient, while two patients did not respond to the drug. Propoxyphene effectively relieved symptoms in one patient who did not respond to ropinirole or clonazepam. RLS symptoms did not recur following substitution of other antipsychotic drugs for olanzapine. In conclusion, olanzapine can induce RLS, particularly in patients with a family history of idiopathic RLS. More than half of the patients experienced severe to very severe symptoms. A dose-dependent relationship was observed between olanzapine and RLS symptoms. A gradual increase in dose may prevent olanzapine-induced RLS. The optimal treatment for olanzapine-induced RLS is discontinuation of olanzapine. PMID:24874697

  17. Phenotype Standardization for Drug Induced Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Ravindra L; Awdishu, Linda; Davenport, Andrew; Murray, Patrick; Macedo, Etienne; Cerda, Jorge; Chakaravarthi, Raj; Holden, Arthur; Goldstein, Stuart L.

    2015-01-01

    Drug induced kidney disease is a frequent cause of renal dysfunction; however, there are no standards to identify and characterize the spectrum of these disorders. We convened a panel of international, adult and pediatric, nephrologists and pharmacists to develop standardized phenotypes for drug induced kidney disease as part of the phenotype standardization project initiated by the International Serious Adverse Events Consortium. We propose four phenotypes of drug induced kidney disease based on clinical presentation: acute kidney injury, glomerular, tubular and nephrolithiasis, along with primary and secondary clinical criteria to support the phenotype definition, and a time course based on the KDIGO/AKIN definitions of acute kidney injury, acute kidney disease and chronic kidney disease. Establishing causality in drug induced kidney disease is challenging and requires knowledge of the biological plausibility for the specific drug, mechanism of injury, time course and assessment of competing risk factors. These phenotypes provide a consistent framework for clinicians, investigators, industry and regulatory agencies to evaluate drug nephrotoxicity across various settings. We believe that this is first step to recognizing drug induced kidney disease and developing strategies to prevent and manage this condition. PMID:25853333

  18. Inducing cellular senescence using defined genetic elements.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Opitz, Oliver G

    2007-01-01

    Cellular senescence is generally defined as an irreversible state of G1 cell cycle arrest in which cells are refractory to growth factor stimulation. Cellular senescence can be induced through several different mechanisms. Primary mammalian cells display a finite life span, suggesting a mechanism that counts cell divisions. Those cells initially proliferate but eventually enter a state of permanent growth arrest, called replicative senescence. Erosion of telomeric DNA has emerged as a key factor in replicative senescence, which is antagonized during cell immortalization. Nevertheless, besides telomere shortening, there are other mechanisms inducing a growth arrest similar to the replicative senescencent phenotype. Oncogenic or mitogenic signals as well as DNA damage can induce such a phenotype of cellular senescence. All forms of cellular senescence share common signaling pathways and morphological features. Thereby, p53 seems to be essential for the senescence response. Many of these senescence inducing mechanisms can be experimentally recapitulated by the introduction of defined genetic elements. Replicative senescence due to telomere shortening can, for example, be induced by a dominant negative version of telomerase, premature senescence by the overexpression of oncogenic ras, or p16. PMID:17634581

  19. Nutritional Interventions for Cancer-induced Cachexia

    PubMed Central

    Gullett, Norleena P.; Mazurak, Vera; Hebbar, Gautam; Ziegler, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer-induced cachexia remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in cancer treatment. Cancer research and development continues at an aggressive pace and yet a degree of cancer-induced cachexia is experienced by up to 80% of advanced stage cancer patients. Unfortunately, there are no established treatment regimens for this condition. Weight loss and fatigue consistently appear in patient oncologic histories and progress notes. However, few oncologists fully understand the pathologic mechanisms causing cachexia resulting in well-meaning advice to increase caloric intake with minimal results. Our goal is to describe the pathologic basis of cancer-induced cachexia and to detail accompanying metabolic derangements. Understanding the causes of cachexia sheds light on the subsequent need for multi-modality therapy including clinical intervention with specialized nutrition support, drug therapy, lifestyle and diet changes. In addition to nutrition support modalities, practicing oncologists may prescribe medical therapies designed to increase body weight and lean body mass, including megestrol acetate, tetrahydrocannibinol, oxandrolone, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. A variety of experimental therapies are also being investigated for cancer-induced cachexia including tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors and ghrelin infusions. We review the available data to support nutrition-oriented interventions in cancer-induced cachexia, including omega-3 fatty acids, amino-acid loading/protein supplementation, parenteral and enteral nutrition support, and food-derived compounds such as curcumin, reservatrol, and pomegranate. PMID:21420558

  20. On the Minimum Induced Drag of Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2010-01-01

    Of all the types of drag, induced drag is associated with the creation and generation of lift over wings. Induced drag is directly driven by the span load that the aircraft is flying at. The tools by which to calculate and predict induced drag we use were created by Ludwig Prandtl in 1903. Within a decade after Prandtl created a tool for calculating induced drag, Prandtl and his students had optimized the problem to solve the minimum induced drag for a wing of a given span, formalized and written about in 1920. This solution is quoted in textbooks extensively today. Prandtl did not stop with this first solution, and came to a dramatically different solution in 1932. Subsequent development of this 1932 solution solves several aeronautics design difficulties simultaneously, including maximum performance, minimum structure, minimum drag loss due to control input, and solution to adverse yaw without a vertical tail. This presentation lists that solution by Prandtl, and the refinements by Horten, Jones, Kline, Viswanathan, and Whitcomb

  1. On the Minimum Induced Drag of Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2011-01-01

    Of all the types of drag, induced drag is associated with the creation and generation of lift over wings. Induced drag is directly driven by the span load that the aircraft is flying at. The tools by which to calculate and predict induced drag we use were created by Ludwig Prandtl in 1903. Within a decade after Prandtl created a tool for calculating induced drag, Prandtl and his students had optimized the problem to solve the minimum induced drag for a wing of a given span, formalized and written about in 1920. This solution is quoted in textbooks extensively today. Prandtl did not stop with this first solution, and came to a dramatically different solution in 1932. Subsequent development of this 1932 solution solves several aeronautics design difficulties simultaneously, including maximum performance, minimum structure, minimum drag loss due to control input, and solution to adverse yaw without a vertical tail. This presentation lists that solution by Prandtl, and the refinements by Horten, Jones, Kline, Viswanathan, and Whitcomb.

  2. Abortion induced with methotrexate and misoprostol.

    PubMed Central

    Wiebe, E R

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the outcome and side effects of a new drug protocol to induce abortion. DESIGN: Case series. SETTING: An urban primary care practice. PATIENTS: One hundred consecutive patients who requested elective termination of pregnancies of less than 8 weeks' gestation. INTERVENTION: Subjects received methotrexate (50 mg/m2 body surface area, administered intramuscularly) and, 3 days afterward, misoprostol (800 micrograms, given vaginally). OUTCOME MEASURES: Number of abortions induced within 24 hours and within 10 days of misoprostol administration, number of surgical aspirations conducted because of incomplete abortion, mean amount of bleeding and pain and the number of women who, if faced with the same situation, said they would again choose a drug-induced abortion over a surgical one. RESULTS: Abortion occurred within 24 hours of misoprostol administration among 48 women and within 10 days among 69 women. In total, 89 women had an abortion without surgical aspiration. Of these women, 71 said they would choose a drug-induced abortion if faced with the choice again. CONCLUSION: Abortion induced with methotrexate and misoprostol appears to be a feasible alternative to surgical abortion and deserves further study. PMID:8548705

  3. Lysosomal destabilization in p53-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xi-Ming; Li, Wei; Dalen, Helge; Lotem, Joseph; Kama, Rachel; Sachs, Leo; Brunk, Ulf T.

    2002-01-01

    The tumor suppressor wild-type p53 can induce apoptosis. M1-t-p53 myeloid leukemic cells have a temperature-sensitive p53 protein that changes its conformation to wild-type p53 after transfer from 37°C to 32°C. We have now found that these cells showed an early lysosomal rupture after transfer to 32°C. Mitochondrial damage, including decreased membrane potential and release of cytochrome c, and the appearance of apoptotic cells occurred later. Lysosomal rupture, mitochondrial damage, and apoptosis were all inhibited by the cytokine IL-6. Some other compounds can also inhibit apoptosis induced by p53. The protease inhibitor N-tosyl-l-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone inhibited the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome c release, the Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin inhibited only cytochrome c release, and the antioxidant butylated hydroxyanisole inhibited only the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. In contrast to IL-6, these other compounds that inhibited some of the later occurring mitochondrial damage did not inhibit the earlier p53-induced lysosomal damage. The results indicate that apoptosis is induced by p53 through a lysosomal-mitochondrial pathway that is initiated by lysosomal destabilization, and that this pathway can be dissected by using different apoptosis inhibitors. These findings on the induction of p53-induced lysosomal destabilization can also help to formulate new therapies for diseases with apoptotic disorders. PMID:11959917

  4. Insulin-Inducible SMILE Inhibits Hepatic Gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Min; Seo, Woo-Young; Han, Hye-Sook; Oh, Kyoung-Jin; Lee, Yong-Soo; Kim, Don-Kyu; Choi, Seri; Choi, Byeong Hun; Harris, Robert A; Lee, Chul-Ho; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2016-01-01

    The role of a glucagon/cAMP-dependent protein kinase-inducible coactivator PGC-1α signaling pathway is well characterized in hepatic gluconeogenesis. However, an opposing protein kinase B (PKB)/Akt-inducible corepressor signaling pathway is unknown. A previous report has demonstrated that small heterodimer partner-interacting leucine zipper protein (SMILE) regulates the nuclear receptors and transcriptional factors that control hepatic gluconeogenesis. Here, we show that hepatic SMILE expression was induced by feeding in normal mice but not in db/db and high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice. Interestingly, SMILE expression was induced by insulin in mouse primary hepatocyte and liver. Hepatic SMILE expression was not altered by refeeding in liver-specific insulin receptor knockout (LIRKO) or PKB β-deficient (PKBβ(-/-)) mice. At the molecular level, SMILE inhibited hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-mediated transcriptional activity via direct competition with PGC-1α. Moreover, ablation of SMILE augmented gluconeogenesis and increased blood glucose levels in mice. Conversely, overexpression of SMILE reduced hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression and ameliorated hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in db/db and HFD-fed mice. Therefore, SMILE is an insulin-inducible corepressor that suppresses hepatic gluconeogenesis. Small molecules that enhance SMILE expression would have potential for treating hyperglycemia in diabetes. PMID:26340929

  5. Drug-Induced Acute Pancreatitis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Mark R.; Hall, Oliver Morgan; Kaye, Adam M.; Kaye, Alan David

    2015-01-01

    Background The majority of drug-induced pancreatitis cases are mild to moderate in severity, but severe and even fatal cases can occur. Management of drug-induced pancreatitis requires withdrawal of the offending agent and supportive care. Methods This review focuses on differential diagnosis, clinical presentation, drug-mediated effects, treatments, and mechanisms of pancreatitis, with an emphasis on drug-induced pancreatitis. Results Although only a minority of cases associated with acute pancreatitis are linked to drugs, clinical presentation and mechanisms of injury to the pancreas are not well understood by clinicians in terms of individual drug effects in the mediation or modulation of injury to the pancreas. In recent years, a large number of commonly prescribed medications has been linked to drug-induced pancreatitis pathogenesis. Although mechanisms are proposed, the exact cause of injury is either not well understood or controversial. Conclusion Future investigation into the mechanisms of pancreatitis and an appreciation by clinicians of the drugs commonly linked to the condition will help establish earlier diagnosis and quicker cessation of offending drugs in the treatment of drug-induced acute pancreatitis. PMID:25829880

  6. Lipopolysaccharide potentiates hyperthermia-induced seizures

    PubMed Central

    Eun, Baik-Lin; Abraham, Jayne; Mlsna, Lauren; Kim, Min Jung; Koh, Sookyong

    2015-01-01

    Background Prolonged febrile seizures (FS) have both acute and long-lasting effects on the developing brain. Because FS are often associated with peripheral infection, we aimed to develop a preclinical model of FS that simulates fever and immune activation in order to facilitate the implementation of targeted therapy after prolonged FS in young children. Methods The innate immune activator lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was administered to postnatal day 14 rat (200 μg/kg) and mouse (100 μg/kg) pups 2–2.5 h prior to hyperthermic seizures (HT) induced by hair dryer or heat lamp. To determine whether simulation of infection enhances neuronal excitability, latency to seizure onset, threshold temperature and total number of seizures were quantified. Behavioral seizures were correlated with electroencephalographic changes in rat pups. Seizure-induced proinflammatory cytokine production was assessed in blood samples at various time points after HT. Seizure-induced microglia activation in the hippocampus was quantified using Cx3cr1GFP/+ mice. Results Lipopolysaccharide priming increased susceptibility of rats and mice to hyperthemic seizures and enhanced seizure-induced proinflammatory cytokine production and microglial activation. Conclusions Peripheral inflammation appears to work synergistically with hyperthermia to potentiate seizures and to exacerbate seizure-induced immune responses. By simulating fever, a regulated increase in body temperature from an immune challenge, we developed a more clinically relevant animal model of prolonged FS. PMID:26357586

  7. [Drug-induced acute kidney injury].

    PubMed

    Derungs, Adrian

    2015-12-01

    Due to their physiological function, the kidneys are exposed to high concentrations of numerous drugs and their metabolites, making them vulnerable to drug-related injuries. This article provides an overview of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in nephrotoxicity, the most common nephrotoxic drugs, and the risk factors for the occurrence of drug-induced acute kidney injuries. NSAIDs, diuretics, ACE inhibitors, and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs} are the most frequent prerenal causes of an acute elevation in creatinine levels. Primary vascular damage arises from thrombotic microangiopathy (e. g. due to cic/osporin, tacrolimus, muromonab-CD3, mitomycin C, quinine, ticlopidine, clopidogrel}. Anticoagulants and thrombolytic medications lead to secondary blood vessel damage by cholesterol emboli, embolism of thrombus material into the periphery or bleeding. Tubulopathies can be observed on treatment with ifosfamide and cisplatin (rarely with cyclophosphamide or carboplatin), aminoglycosides, vancomycin, and radiocontrast agents. Immunological mechanisms underlie interstitial nephritides, which are induced by drugs in about 85% of cases. In drug-induced glomerulopathies;- renal biopsy allows closer identification of the triggering medication. Drug-induced systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE} represents a special form of immune complex glomerulonephritis and can be triggered by procainamide, hydralazine, isoniazid, methyldopa, quinidine, chlorpromazine, and propylthiouracil. Crystal-induced kidney injury is caused by precipitation of drugs (e. g. aciclovir, sulfonamide antibiotics, methotrexate, indinavir) in the renal tubules and the urine-conducting organs with consecutive obstruction thereof. PMID:26654816

  8. Neutron induced bystander effect among zebrafish embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. Y. P.; Kong, E. Y.; Kobayashi, A.; Suya, N.; Uchihori, Y.; Cheng, S. H.; Konishi, T.; Yu, K. N.

    2015-12-01

    The present paper reported the first-ever observation of neutron induced bystander effect (NIBE) using zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos as the in vivo model. The neutron exposure in the present work was provided by the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. Two different strategies were employed to induce NIBE, namely, through directly partnering and through medium transfer. Both results agreed with a neutron-dose window (20-50 mGy) which could induce NIBE. The lower dose limit corresponded to the threshold amount of neutron-induced damages to trigger significant bystander signals, while the upper limit corresponded to the onset of gamma-ray hormesis which could mitigate the neutron-induced damages and thereby suppress the bystander signals. Failures to observe NIBE in previous studies were due to using neutron doses outside the dose-window. Strategies to enhance the chance of observing NIBE included (1) use of a mono-energetic high-energy (e.g., between 100 keV and 2 MeV) neutron source, and (2) use of a neutron source with a small gamma-ray contamination. It appeared that the NASBEE facility used in the present study fulfilled both conditions, and was thus ideal for triggering NIBE.

  9. Shock-induced defects in bulk materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, G.T.

    1998-03-01

    In this paper examples of the shock-induced defects produced during shock compression which correlate with microstructure/mechanical property changes induced in materials due to shock prestraining are discussed. The characteristics of the shock impulse(peak shock pressure, pulse duration, and rarefaction rate) imparted to the material under investigation and the shock-induced defects produced in numerous metals and alloys are compared with their deformation behavior at ordinary rates of deformation. Examples of the range of defects observed in shock-recovered metals and alloys, include: dislocations, deformation twins, point defects, and residual metastable remnants from pressure-induced phase transformations. Results concerning the influence of interstitial content on the propensity of {omega}-phase formation and its structure in high-purity and A-7O Ti are presented. The influence of shock-wave deformation on the phase stability and substructure evolution of high-purity (low-interstitial) titanium and A-7O (3,700 ppm oxygen) titanium were probed utilizing real-time velocity interferometry (VISAR) and soft shock-recovery techniques. Suppression of the {alpha}-{omega} pressure-induced phase transformation in A-70 Ti, containing a high interstitial oxygen content, is seen to simultaneously correspond with the suppression of deformation twinning.

  10. The quality of high pressure-induced and heat-induced yuzu marmalade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwada, Hiroko; Jibu, Yuri; Teramoto, Ai; Fuchigami, Michiko

    2010-12-01

    Yuzu is a typical Japanese citrus with a desirable smell. The objectives of this study are to establish a process for pressure-induced marmalade (without both heating or the addition of pectin) and compare it with heat-induced marmalade. Sliced peel (flavedo) was soaked in 2% citric acid solution (pH 2.0). Albedo, endocarp and juice sacs were homogenized with 0.3% citric acid solution (pH 2.5). After soaking for 24 h, these were mixed and 50% or 60% sucrose of the total weight was added, then pressurized at 500 MPa or boiled (process A). Process B: all processing was done at pH 2.7. Peel of high pressure-induced marmalade maintained a natural color. Flavedo in heat-induced marmalade was softer than that of pressure-induced marmalade. There was no difference in viscosity between heat-induced and high pressure-induced marmalade. High pressure-induced marmalade with 50% sugar was preferred by a sensory test because fresh flavor and color were maintained.

  11. Diffuse Hair Loss Induced by Sertraline Use

    PubMed Central

    Kıvrak, Yüksel; Yağcı, İbrahim; Üstündağ, Mehmet Fatih; Özcan, Halil

    2015-01-01

    Hair loss is a rare side effect of psychotropic drugs. The most related drug class with this side effect is the mood stabilizers. Studies reporting the sertraline-induced alopecia are limited in number. Sertraline is a potent antidepressant which inhibits the serotonin reuptake from the presynaptic terminals selectively. The reason for hair loss could not be elucidated completely. Psychotropic drugs are usually considered to lead to hair loss through influencing the telogen phase of hair follicle. This paper reports a 21-year-old male with diffuse hair loss induced by sertraline use and improved by quitting the drug. To the best of our knowledge, there are no other case reports on sertraline-induced alopecia within 2 weeks. PMID:26457219

  12. Magnetomechanically induced long period fiber gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Causado-Buelvas, Jesus D.; Gomez-Cardona, Nelson D.; Torres, Pedro

    2008-04-15

    In this work, we report a simple, flexible method to create long period fiber gratings mechanically by controlling the repulsion/attraction force between two magnets that pressing a plate with a periodic array of small glass cylinders to a short length of optical fiber. Via the photoelastic effect, the pressure points induce the required periodic refractive index modulation to create the LPFG. We found that the induced device exhibits spectral characteristics similar to those of other types of LPFG. As the optical properties of LPFGs are directly related to the nature of the applied perturbations, we show, to our knowledge for the frrst time, how is the evolution of birefringence effects in mechanically induced LPFGs.

  13. Surfactant-induced hydrogen production in cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Famiglietti, M.; Luisi, P.L. ); Hochkoeppler, A. . Dept. di Biologia)

    1993-10-01

    Addition of Tween 85 to aqueous suspensions of Anabaena variabilis induced photosynthetic evolution of hydrogen over a time span of several weeks: as much as 148 nmol H[sub 2]/h [center dot] mg dry weight was produced in the first week by a suspension containing 4.2 mg dry weight of cells and 77 mM Tween 85. The chemical structure of Tween 85 was a necessary prerequisite for inducing hydrogen production, as compounds such as Tween 20, 60, and 80 had a quite different effect. There was a coupling between photosynthetic oxygen evolution and hydrogen evolution: Hydrogen evolution started to be effective only when oxygen evolution subdued. The presence of heterocysts in A. variabilis was also required for the Tween-induced hydrogen production. Based on these observations, possible mechanisms for the photosynthetic effect of Tween 85 are advanced and discussed.

  14. Modelling of electron beam induced nanowire attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitzer, Lucas A.; Speich, Claudia; Schäfer, David; Erni, Daniel; Prost, Werner; Tegude, Franz J.; Benson, Niels; Schmechel, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Scanning electron microscope (SEM) induced nanowire (NW) attraction or bundling is a well known effect, which is mainly ascribed to structural or material dependent properties. However, there have also been recent reports of electron beam induced nanowire bending by SEM imaging, which is not fully explained by the current models, especially when considering the electro-dynamic interaction between NWs. In this article, we contribute to the understanding of this phenomenon, by introducing an electro-dynamic model based on capacitor and Lorentz force interaction, where the active NW bending is stimulated by an electromagnetic force between individual wires. The model includes geometrical, electrical, and mechanical NW parameters, as well as the influence of the electron beam source parameters and is validated using in-situ observations of electron beam induced GaAs nanowire (NW) bending by SEM imaging.

  15. Development of autophagy inducers in clinical medicine

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Beth; Packer, Milton; Codogno, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Defects in autophagy have been linked to a wide range of medical illnesses, including cancer as well as infectious, neurodegenerative, inflammatory, and metabolic diseases. These observations have led to the hypothesis that autophagy inducers may prevent or treat certain clinical conditions. Lifestyle and nutritional factors, such as exercise and caloric restriction, may exert their known health benefits through the autophagy pathway. Several currently available FDA-approved drugs have been shown to enhance autophagy, and this autophagy-enhancing action may be repurposed for use in novel clinical indications. The development of new drugs that are designed to be more selective inducers of autophagy function in target organs is expected to maximize clinical benefits while minimizing toxicity. This Review summarizes the rationale and current approaches for developing autophagy inducers in medicine, the factors to be considered in defining disease targets for such therapy, and the potential benefits of such treatment for human health. PMID:25654546

  16. Gyromagnetically-induced transparency for ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tsun-Hsu

    2016-04-01

    The magnetic permeability is generally a second-rank tensor for an anisotropic medium. By considering a dc bias magnetic field and an ac circularly polarized wave, a generalized permeability can be derived. The formula for the generalized permeability explains why most dielectrics, paramagnetic and diamagnetic materials, and even metals have a relative permeability close to unity. For ferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic materials, the permeability strongly depends on the applied magnetic field and the polarizations of the electromagnetic waves. This work discusses how a circularly polarized wave interacts with the magnetic dipole moment being induced by and precessing around the applied dc bias field. The gyromagnetic resonance between the wave and the induced dipole allows us to find a condition where the incident wave can propagate through the medium without reflection. This explains the mysterious effect of gyromagnetically induced transparency.

  17. Area scalable optically induced photorefractive photonic microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Wentao; Xue, Yan Ling; Jiang, Dongdong

    2016-07-01

    A convenient approach to fabricate area scalable two-dimensional photonic microstructures was experimentally demonstrated by multi-face optical wedges. The approach is quite compact and stable without complex optical alignment equipment. Large-area square lattice microstructures are optically induced inside an iron-doped lithium niobate photorefractive crystal. The induced large-area microstructures are analyzed and verified by plane wave guiding, Brillouin-zone spectroscopy, angle-dependent transmission spectrum, and lateral Bragg reflection patterns. The method can be easily extended to generate other more complex area scalable photonic microstructures, such as quasicrystal lattices, by designing the multi-face optical wedge appropriately. The induced area scalable photonic microstructures can be fixed or erased even re-recorded in the photorefractive crystal, which suggests potential applications in micro-nano photonic devices.

  18. Electron and positron induced processes. POSMOL 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limão-Vieira, Paulo; Campeanu, Radu; Hoshino, Masamitsu; Ingólfsson, Oddur; Mason, Nigel; Nagashima, Yasuyuki; Tanuma, Hajime

    2014-09-01

    POSMOL 2013, the international meeting on electron and positron induced processes comprising the XVII International Workshop on Low-Energy Positron and Positronium Physics and the XVIII International Symposium on Electron-Molecule Collisions and Swarms, was held at Kanazawa Bunka Hall, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan, from 19-21 July 2013. The XVII Workshop encompassed all aspects of positron, positronium and antiproton interactions with electrons, atoms, molecules and solid surfaces, and topics related to these, whereas the XVIII Symposium encompassed all aspects of electron interactions with molecules in both gaseous and condensed phases. Particular topics include studies of electron interactions with biomolecules, electron induced surface chemistry and the study of plasma processes. Recent research on the study of electron swarms was also highlighted. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Electron and Positron Induced Processes", edited by Michael Brunger, Radu Campeanu, Masamitsu Hoshino, Oddur Ingólfsson, Paulo Limão-Vieira, Nigel Mason, Yasuyuki Nagashima and Hajime Tanuma.

  19. Nonviral Methods for Inducing Pluripotency to Cells

    PubMed Central

    O'Doherty, Ryan; Wang, Wenxin

    2013-01-01

    The concept of inducing pluripotency to adult somatic cells by introducing reprogramming factors to them is one that has recently emerged, gained widespread acclaim and garnered much attention among the scientific community. The idea that cells can be reprogrammed, and are not unidirectionally defined opens many avenues for study. With their clear potential for use in the clinic, these reprogrammed cells stand to have a huge impact in regenerative medicine. This realization did not occur overnight but is, however, the product of many decades worth of advancements in researching this area. It was a combination of such research that led to the development of induced pluripotent stem cells as we know it today. This review delivers a brief insight in to the roots of iPS research and focuses on succinctly describing current nonviral methods of inducing pluripotency using plasmid vectors, small molecules and chemicals, and RNAs. PMID:23841088

  20. Non-steroidal drug-induced glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Razeghinejad, M R; Pro, M J; Katz, L J

    2011-01-01

    Numerous systemically used drugs are involved in drug-induced glaucoma. Most reported cases of non-steroidal drug-induced glaucoma are closed-angle glaucoma (CAG). Indeed, many routinely used drugs that have sympathomimetic or parasympatholytic properties can cause pupillary block CAG in individuals with narrow iridocorneal angle. The resulting acute glaucoma occurs much more commonly unilaterally and only rarely bilaterally. CAG secondary to sulfa drugs is a bilateral non-pupillary block type and is due to forward movement of iris–lens diaphragm, which occurs in individuals with narrow or open iridocorneal angle. A few agents, including antineoplastics, may induce open-angle glaucoma. In conclusion, the majority of cases with glaucoma secondary to non-steroidal medications are of the pupillary block closed-angle type and preventable if the at-risk patients are recognized and treated prophylactically. PMID:21637303

  1. Hyperuricemia-induced inflammasome and kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Isaka, Yoshitaka; Takabatake, Yoshitsugu; Takahashi, Atsushi; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Yoshimori, Tamotsu

    2016-06-01

    Classically, urate nephropathy has been postulated to cause kidney disease by depositing intraluminal crystal in the collecting duct. Recently, molecular mechanisms of inflammasome have been investigated. Urate-induced inflammasome pathway is comprised of urate crystal uptake into intracellular lysosomes and subsequent lysosomal rupture with mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which activates the NLRP3 inflammasome. Against the lysosomal rupture and mitochondrial ROS production, autophagy acts to protect proximal tubular cells by isolating them from expanding the inflammation. In addition, increased cellular urate, directly or indirectly via xanthine oxidase-induced oxidative stress, may be associated with inflammasome. In addition to the traditional therapy against hyperuricemia, management of urate-induced inflammasome or augmentation of autophagy may offer the new effective therapies. PMID:25829326

  2. Chemical basis of inflammation-induced carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Hiroshi; Tatemichi, Masayuki; Sawa, Tomohiro

    2003-09-01

    Chronic inflammation induced by biological, chemical, and physical factors has been associated with increased risk of human cancer at various sites. Inflammation activates a variety of inflammatory cells, which induce and activate several oxidant-generating enzymes such as NADPH oxidase, inducible nitric oxide synthase, myeloperoxidase, and eosinophil peroxidase. These enzymes produce high concentrations of diverse free radicals and oxidants including superoxide anion, nitric oxide, nitroxyl, nitrogen dioxide, hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorous acid, and hypobromous acid, which react with each other to generate other more potent reactive oxygen and nitrogen species such as peroxynitrite. These species can damage DNA, RNA, lipids, and proteins by nitration, oxidation, chlorination, and bromination reactions, leading to increased mutations and altered functions of enzymes and proteins (e.g., activation of oncogene products and/or inhibition of tumor-suppressor proteins) and thus contributing to the multistage carcinogenesis process. Appropriate treatment of inflammation should be explored further for chemoprevention of human cancers. PMID:12921773

  3. Sepsis-Induced Osteoblast Ablation Causes Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Terashima, Asuka; Okamoto, Kazuo; Nakashima, Tomoki; Akira, Shizuo; Ikuta, Koichi; Takayanagi, Hiroshi

    2016-06-21

    Sepsis is a host inflammatory response to severe infection associated with high mortality that is caused by lymphopenia-associated immunodeficiency. However, it is unknown how lymphopenia persists after the accelerated lymphocyte apoptosis subsides. Here we show that sepsis rapidly ablated osteoblasts, which reduced the number of common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs). Osteoblast ablation or inducible deletion of interleukin-7 (IL-7) in osteoblasts recapitulated the lymphopenic phenotype together with a lower CLP number without affecting hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Pharmacological activation of osteoblasts improved sepsis-induced lymphopenia. This study demonstrates a reciprocal interaction between the immune and bone systems, in which acute inflammation induces a defect in bone cells resulting in lymphopenia-associated immunodeficiency, indicating that bone cells comprise a therapeutic target in certain life-threatening immune reactions. PMID:27317262

  4. Mechanically Induced Multicolor Change of Luminescent Materials.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiyong; Wang, Zhijian; Teng, Mingjun; Xu, Zejun; Jia, Xinru

    2015-06-22

    Mechanofluorochromic or piezochromic fluorescence chemistry involves the switching and tuning of the luminescent properties of solid-state materials induced by exogenous forces, such as grinding, shearing, compression, tension, and so forth. Up until now, most reported mechanochromic systems, including liquid crystals, organic molecules, organometallic compounds, polymers, and dye-doped polymers, have displayed reversible two-color changes, which arise from either supramolecular or chemical structure transformations. However, fluorescent materials that undergo mechanically induced multicolor changes remain rare; this Minireview is focused on such materials. Topics are categorized according to the different applied forces that are required to induce the multicolor change, including mechanical control of either the supramolecular structures or the chemical structures, and mechanical control of both the supramolecular structures and chemical structures. PMID:25965783

  5. Bile acids in radiation-induced diarrhea

    SciTech Connect

    Arlow, F.L.; Dekovich, A.A.; Priest, R.J.; Beher, W.T.

    1987-10-01

    Radiation-induced bowel disease manifested by debilitating diarrhea is an unfortunate consequence of therapeutic irradiation for pelvic malignancies. Although the mechanism for this diarrhea is not well understood, many believe it is the result of damage to small bowel mucosa and subsequent bile acid malabsorption. Excess amounts of bile acids, especially the dihydroxy components, are known to induce water and electrolyte secretion and increase bowel motility. We have directly measured individual and total bile acids in the stool samples of 11 patients with radiation-induced diarrhea and have found bile acids elevated two to six times normal in eight of them. Our patients with diarrhea and increased bile acids in their stools had prompt improvement when given cholestyramine. They had fewer stools and returned to a more normal life-style.

  6. How are osteoclasts induced to resorb bone?

    PubMed

    Chambers, T J; Fuller, K

    2011-12-01

    Although much is known about how osteoclasts are formed, we know little about how they are activated, or how they recognize bone as the substrate appropriate for resorption. Bone mineral is considered to be essential to this recognition process, but a "mineral receptor" has never been identified. Recently, we found that resorptive behavior, as judged by the formation of ruffled borders and actin rings, occurs on ordinary tissue culture substrates if they are first coated with vitronectin. Similarly, vitronectin-coated substrates induce osteoclasts to secrete tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and to form podosome belts, and to make resorption trails in the protein that coat the substrate. The same applies to bone mineral, which only induces resorptive behavior if coated with vitronectin. In contrast, fibronectin has none of these effects, despite inducing adhesion and spreading. It appears that osteoclasts recognize bone as the substrate appropriate for resorption through the high affinity of vitronectin-receptor ligands for bone mineral. PMID:22172032

  7. Religion as Schedule-Induced Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Paul S

    2009-01-01

    In this article, I argue that a class of religious behaviors exists that is induced, for prepared organisms, by specific stimuli that are experienced according to a response-independent schedule. Like other schedule-induced behaviors, the members of this class serve as minimal units out of which functional behavior may arise. In this way, there exist two classes of religious behavior: nonoperant schedule-induced behaviors and operant behaviors. This dichotomy is consistent with the distinction insisted upon by religious scholars and philosophers between “graceful” and “effortful” religious behaviors. Embracing the distinction allows an explanation of many aspects of religious experience and behavior that have been overlooked or disregarded by other scientific approaches to religion. PMID:22478521

  8. An entropy method for induced drag minimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, George C.

    1989-01-01

    A fundamentally new approach to the aircraft minimum induced drag problem is presented. The method, a 'viscous lifting line', is based on the minimum entropy production principle and does not require the planar wake assumption. An approximate, closed form solution is obtained for several wing configurations including a comparison of wing extension, winglets, and in-plane wing sweep, with and without a constraint on wing-root bending moment. Like the classical lifting-line theory, this theory predicts that induced drag is proportional to the square of the lift coefficient and inversely proportioinal to the wing aspect ratio. Unlike the classical theory, it predicts that induced drag is Reynolds number dependent and that the optimum spanwise circulation distribution is non-elliptic.

  9. Sunlight-Induced Coloration of Silk.

    PubMed

    Yao, Ya; Tang, Bin; Chen, Wu; Sun, Lu; Wang, Xungai

    2016-12-01

    Silk fabrics were colored by gold nanoparticles (NPs) that were in situ synthesized through the induction of sunlight. Owing to the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of gold NPs, the treated silk fabrics presented vivid colors. The photo-induced synthesis of gold NPs was also realized on wet silk through adsorbing gold ions out of solution, which provides a water-saving coloration method for textiles. Besides, the patterning of silk was feasible using this simple sunlight-induced coloration approach. The key factors of coloration including gold ion concentration, pH value, and irradiation time were investigated. Moreover, it was demonstrated that either ultraviolet (UV) light or visible light could induce the generation of gold NPs on silk fabrics. The silk fabrics with gold NPs exhibited high light resistance including great UV-blocking property and excellent fastness to sunlight. PMID:27297220

  10. HIV transcription is induced in dying cells

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Schreck, S. |; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1996-02-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires functional p53, which is not present in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. Doses which caused over 99% cell killing induced HIV-LTR transcription maximally, demonstrating that cells that will go on to die by 14 days are the cells expressing HIV-LTR-CAT.

  11. Sunlight-Induced Coloration of Silk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Ya; Tang, Bin; Chen, Wu; Sun, Lu; Wang, Xungai

    2016-06-01

    Silk fabrics were colored by gold nanoparticles (NPs) that were in situ synthesized through the induction of sunlight. Owing to the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of gold NPs, the treated silk fabrics presented vivid colors. The photo-induced synthesis of gold NPs was also realized on wet silk through adsorbing gold ions out of solution, which provides a water-saving coloration method for textiles. Besides, the patterning of silk was feasible using this simple sunlight-induced coloration approach. The key factors of coloration including gold ion concentration, pH value, and irradiation time were investigated. Moreover, it was demonstrated that either ultraviolet (UV) light or visible light could induce the generation of gold NPs on silk fabrics. The silk fabrics with gold NPs exhibited high light resistance including great UV-blocking property and excellent fastness to sunlight.

  12. Exercise-induced asthma: an overview.

    PubMed

    Cummiskey, J

    2001-10-01

    Asthmatic attack in exercise-induced asthma is brought about by hyperventilation (not necessarily to exercise), cold air, and low humidity of the air breathed. The effects are an increase in airway resistance, damage to bronchial mucosa, and an increase in bronchovascular permeability. The mechanism of these changes is the release of mediators such as histamine, leukotrienes, nitric oxide, sensory neuropeptides, the inhibition of neuronal activity, and bronchovascular permeability. The cause of asthma and exercise-induced asthma is unknown. It is probably an abnormality of vascular control in the peribronchium and/or an alteration in local adrenergic function. The importance of exercise-induced asthma definition and the use of stimulants in sport and antidoping in sport are discussed. PMID:11678516

  13. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-induced aseptic meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Wambulwa, Charles; Bwayo, Salome; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O.; Lombardo, Fredric

    2005-01-01

    We present a 46-year-old African-American man with AIDS who was admitted on two different occasions within three weeks for signs and symptoms of meningitis after using trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX). TMP/SMX is primarily used for the treatment of pneumocystis carinii pneumonia prophylaxis in AIDS patients. Drug-induced aseptic meningitis (DIAM) is commonly seen with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS), antibiotics (with TMP/SMX being the most frequently implicated), intravenous immunoglobulins and OKT3 antibodies. However, the implication of TMP/SMX inducing aseptic meningitis has been underreported to FDA/MEDWATCH program. This might be due to the fact that it has also been used to treat bacterial meningitis from organisms like Listeria monocytogenes, which is a common pathogen in the elderly and in infants. We reviewed the literature in an attempt to characterize the pattern and predictors of TMP/SMX-induced aseptic meningitis. PMID:16396068

  14. Nonviral methods for inducing pluripotency to cells.

    PubMed

    O'Doherty, Ryan; Greiser, Udo; Wang, Wenxin

    2013-01-01

    The concept of inducing pluripotency to adult somatic cells by introducing reprogramming factors to them is one that has recently emerged, gained widespread acclaim and garnered much attention among the scientific community. The idea that cells can be reprogrammed, and are not unidirectionally defined opens many avenues for study. With their clear potential for use in the clinic, these reprogrammed cells stand to have a huge impact in regenerative medicine. This realization did not occur overnight but is, however, the product of many decades worth of advancements in researching this area. It was a combination of such research that led to the development of induced pluripotent stem cells as we know it today. This review delivers a brief insight in to the roots of iPS research and focuses on succinctly describing current nonviral methods of inducing pluripotency using plasmid vectors, small molecules and chemicals, and RNAs. PMID:23841088

  15. Hydroxylated PBDEs induce developmental arrest in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Usenko, Crystal Y. Hopkins, David C.; Trumble, Stephen J. Bruce, Erica D.

    2012-07-01

    The ubiquitous spread of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) has led to concerns regarding the metabolites of these congeners, in particular hydroxylated PBDEs. There are limited studies regarding the biological interactions of these chemicals, yet there is some concern they may be more toxic than their parent compounds. In this study three hydroxylated PBDEs were assessed for toxicity in embryonic zebrafish: 3-OH-BDE 47, 5-OH-BDE 47, and 6-OH-BDE 47. All three congeners induced developmental arrest in a concentration-dependent manner; however, 6-OH-BDE 47 induced adverse effects at lower concentrations than the other congeners. Furthermore, all three induced cell death; however apoptosis was not observed. In short-term exposures (24–28 hours post fertilization), all hydroxylated PBDEs generated oxidative stress in the region corresponding to the cell death at 5 and 10 ppm. To further investigate the short-term effects that may be responsible for the developmental arrest observed in this study, gene regulation was assessed for embryos exposed to 0.625 ppm 6-OH-BDE 47 from 24 to 28 hpf. Genes involved in stress response, thyroid hormone regulation, and neurodevelopment were significantly upregulated compared to controls; however, genes related to oxidative stress were either unaffected or downregulated. This study suggests that hydroxylated PBDEs disrupt development, and may induce oxidative stress and potentially disrupt the cholinergic system and thyroid hormone homeostasis. -- Highlights: ► OH-PBDEs induce developmental arrest in a concentration-dependent manner. ► Hydroxyl group location influences biological interaction. ► OH-PBDEs induce oxidative stress. ► Thyroid hormone gene regulation was disrupted following exposure. ► To our knowledge, this is the first whole organism study of OH-PBDE toxicity.

  16. Mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities

    PubMed Central

    Vichaya, Elisabeth G.; Chiu, Gabriel S.; Krukowski, Karen; Lacourt, Tamara E.; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Dantzer, Robert; Heijnen, Cobi J.; Walker, Adam K.

    2015-01-01

    While chemotherapeutic agents have yielded relative success in the treatment of cancer, patients are often plagued with unwanted and even debilitating side-effects from the treatment which can lead to dose reduction or even cessation of treatment. Common side effects (symptoms) of chemotherapy include (i) cognitive deficiencies such as problems with attention, memory and executive functioning; (ii) fatigue and motivational deficit; and (iii) neuropathy. These symptoms often develop during treatment but can remain even after cessation of chemotherapy, severely impacting long-term quality of life. Little is known about the underlying mechanisms responsible for the development of these behavioral toxicities, however, neuroinflammation is widely considered to be one of the major mechanisms responsible for chemotherapy-induced symptoms. Here, we critically assess what is known in regards to the role of neuroinflammation in chemotherapy-induced symptoms. We also argue that, based on the available evidence, neuroinflammation is unlikely the only mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities. We evaluate two other putative candidate mechanisms. To this end we discuss the mediating role of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) activated in response to chemotherapy-induced cellular damage. We also review the literature with respect to possible alternative mechanisms such as a chemotherapy-induced change in the bioenergetic status of the tissue involving changes in mitochondrial function in relation to chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie the emergence of fatigue, neuropathy, and cognitive difficulties is vital to better treatment and long-term survival of cancer patients. PMID:25954147

  17. [Quantification of radiation-induced genetic risk].

    PubMed

    Ehling, U H

    1987-05-01

    Associated with technical advances of our civilization is a radiation- and chemically-induced increase in the germ cell mutation rate in man. This would result in an increase in the frequency of genetic diseases and would be detrimental to future generations. It is the duty of our generation to keep this risk as low as possible. The estimation of the radiation-induced genetic risk of human populations is based on the extrapolation of results from animal experiments. Radiation-induced mutations are stochastic events. The probability of the event depends on the dose; the degree of the damage does not. The different methods to estimate the radiation-induced genetic risk will be discussed. The accuracy of the predicted results will be evaluated by a comparison with the observed incidence of dominant mutations in offspring born to radiation exposed survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings. These methods will be used to predict the genetic damage from the fallout of the reactor accident at Chernobyl. For the exposure dose we used the upper limits of the mean effective life time equivalent dose from the fallout values in the Munich region. According to the direct method for the risk estimation we will expect for each 100 to 500 spontaneous dominant mutations one radiation-induced mutation in the first generation. With the indirect method we estimate a ratio of 100 dominant spontaneous mutations to one radiation-induced dominant mutation. The possibilities and the limitations of the different methods to estimate the genetic risk will be discussed. The discrepancy between the high safety standards for radiation protection and the low level of knowledge for the toxicological evaluation of chemical mutagens will be emphasized. PMID:3589954

  18. Sex ratios at birth after induced abortion

    PubMed Central

    Urquia, Marcelo L.; Moineddin, Rahim; Jha, Prabhat; O’Campo, Patricia J.; McKenzie, Kwame; Glazier, Richard H.; Henry, David A.; Ray, Joel G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Skewed male:female ratios at birth have been observed among certain immigrant groups. Data on abortion practices that might help to explain these findings are lacking. Methods: We examined 1 220 933 births to women with up to 3 consecutive singleton live births between 1993 and 2012 in Ontario. Records of live births, and induced and spontaneous abortions were linked to Canadian immigration records. We determined associations of male:female infant ratios with maternal birthplace, sex of the previous living sibling(s) and prior spontaneous or induced abortions. Results: Male:female infant ratios did not appreciably depart from the normal range among Canadian-born women and most women born outside of Canada, irrespective of the sex of previous children or the characteristics of prior abortions. However, among infants of women who immigrated from India and had previously given birth to 2 girls, the overall male:female ratio was 1.96 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.75–2.21) for the third live birth. The male:female infant ratio after 2 girls was 1.77 (95% CI 1.26–2.47) times higher if the current birth was preceded by 1 induced abortion, 2.38 (95% CI 1.44–3.94) times higher if preceded by 2 or more induced abortions and 3.88 (95% CI 2.02–7.50) times higher if the induced abortion was performed at 15 weeks or more gestation relative to no preceding abortion. Spontaneous abortions were not associated with male-biased sex ratios in subsequent births. Interpretation: High male:female ratios observed among infants born to women who immigrated from India are associated with induced abortions, especially in the second trimester of pregnancy. PMID:27067818

  19. Amoxicillin/Clavulanic Acid-Induced Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Aline; Azar, Marina; Khoueiry, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and Objective: Drug-induced thrombocytopenia is a common adverse effect reported in the literature. Typically patients present with a low platelet count with signs and symptoms ranging from bruising to bleeding, and major organ damage. Penicillin-induced thrombocytopenia previously reported in the literature is explained primarily through the hapten-dependent antibody process. The goal of this report is to present a case of an amoxicillin/clavulanic acid-induced thrombocytopenia. Case Presentation: A 23-year-old male presented to the emergency department with bruises on his arms and legs after completing a full course of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid of 625 mg twice a day for 5 days for tonsillitis. After several tests, the patient was diagnosed with thrombocytopenia induced by amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. The patient was treated with a corticosteroids taper regimen for 3 weeks. He was discharged after 3 days of inpatient treatment with instructions to avoid physical activity for 2 weeks. Two weeks post discharge, the follow-up showed that the platelet count had increased. Discussion: Penicillin-induced thrombocytopenia has been previously reported in the inpatient setting where bleeding was observed. However, the patient in this case report presented with bruises on his arms and legs. The diagnosis was made by the process of elimination; not all possible tests were conducted. The patient was prescribed corticosteroids that are not indicated for drug-induced thrombocytopenia. The Naranjo scale showed that this is a probable adverse event of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. Conclusion: This is a unique case where amoxicillin/clavulanic acid was reported to be a probable cause of thrombocytopenia in an outpatient setting without signs of bleeding and without concomitant medications. PMID:25477568

  20. Understanding Radiotherapy-Induced Second Cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, David

    2007-03-01

    There is increasing concern regarding radiation-related second-cancer risks in long-term radiotherapy survivors, and a corresponding need to be able to predict cancer risks at high radiation doses. While cancer risks at moderately low radiation doses are reasonably understood from A-bomb survivor studies, there is much more uncertainty at the high doses used in radiotherapy. It has generally been assumed that cancer induction decreases rapidly at high doses due to cell killing. However, most recent studies of radiation-induced second cancers in the lung and breast, covering a very wide range of doses, contradict this assumption. A likely resolution of this disagreement comes from considering cellular repopulation during and after radiation exposure. Repopulation / proliferation with a significant number radiation-induced pre-malignant cells, tends to counteract the effect of cell killing, and keeps the induced cancer risks higher at high doses. We describe and apply a biologically based, minimally parameterized model of dose-dependent cancer risks, incorporating carcinogenic effects, cell killing and, additionally, proliferation / repopulation effects. The situation is somewhat different for radiation-induced leukemia, as repopulation via the blood stream tends to be with cells that originated father away from the treatment volume than is the case for solid second cancers, thus containing a smaller proportion of radiation-damaged cells. The model predictions agree well with recent data on second cancer risks, both for radiation-induced solid cancers and for radiation-induced leukemias. Incorporating repopulation effects provides both a mechanistic understanding of cancer risks at high doses, as well as providing a practical methodology for predicting, and therefore potentially minimizing, cancer risks in organs exposed to high radiation doses during radiotherapy.

  1. Mechanisms of lysophosphatidylcholine-induced hepatocyte lipoapoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kakisaka, Keisuke; Cazanave, Sophie C.; Fingas, Christian D.; Guicciardi, Maria E.; Bronk, Steven F.; Werneburg, Nathan W.; Mott, Justin L.

    2012-01-01

    Isolated hepatocytes undergo lipoapoptosis, a feature of hepatic lipotoxicity, on treatment with saturated free fatty acids (FFA) such as palmitate (PA). However, it is unknown if palmitate is directly toxic to hepatocytes or if its toxicity is indirect via the generation of lipid metabolites such as lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). PA-mediated hepatocyte lipoapoptosis is associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) activation, and a JNK-dependent upregulation of the potent proapoptotic BH3-only protein PUMA (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis). Our aim was to determine which of these mechanisms of lipotoxicity are activated by PA-derived LPC. We employed Huh-7 cells and isolated murine and human primary hepatocytes. Intracellular LPC concentrations increase linearly as a function of the exogenous, extracellular PA, stearate, or LPC concentration. Incubation of Huh-7 cells or primary hepatocytes with LPC induced cell death by apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Substituting LPC for PA resulted in caspase-dependent cell death that was accompanied by activating phosphorylation of JNK with c-Jun phosphorylation and an increase in PUMA expression. LPC also induced ER stress as manifest by eIF2α phosphorylation and CAAT/enhancer binding homologous protein (CHOP) induction. LPC cytotoxicity was attenuated by pharmacological inhibition of JNK or glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3). Similarly, short-hairpin RNA (shRNA)-targeted knockdown of CHOP protected Huh-7 cells against LPC-induced toxicity. The LPC-induced PUMA upregulation was prevented by JNK inhibition or shRNA-targeted knockdown of CHOP. Finally, genetic deficiency of PUMA rendered murine hepatocytes resistant to LPC-induced apoptosis. We concluded that LPC-induced lipoapoptosis is dependent on mechanisms largely indistinguishable from PA. These data suggest that FFA-mediated cytotoxicity is indirect via the generation of the toxic metabolite, LPC. PMID:21995961

  2. Neutrino induced muons in Soudan 2.

    SciTech Connect

    DeMuth, D. M.; Soudan 2 Collaboration

    1999-06-23

    The neutrino-induced muon rate underground has been measured at Soudan 2. To discriminate from the intense background of atmospheric muons we consider only the through-going muons which originate from horizontal direction ({minus}0.14 < cos{theta} < 0.14). We calculate the horizontal, neutrino-induced muon rate at Soudan 2 from an exposure of 1.23 x 10{sup 8} s as {Phi}{sub {nu}{mu}} = (3.45 {+-} 0.52 {+-} 0.61) x 10{sup {minus}13} (cm{sup 2} sr s){sup {minus}1}.

  3. Noise-induced hearing impairment and handicap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A permanent, noise-induced hearing loss has doubly harmful effect on speech communications. First, the elevation in the threshold of hearing means that many speech sounds are too weak to be heard, and second, very intense speech sounds may appear to be distorted. The whole question of the impact of noise-induced hearing loss upon the impairments and handicaps experienced by people with such hearing losses was somewhat controversial partly because of the economic aspects of related practical noise control and workmen's compensation.

  4. Laser-induced caesium-137 decay

    SciTech Connect

    Barmina, E V; Simakin, A V; Shafeev, G A

    2014-08-31

    Experimental data are presented on the laser-induced beta decay of caesium-137. We demonstrate that the exposure of a gold target to a copper vapour laser beam (wavelengths of 510.6 and 578.2 nm, pulse duration of 15 ns) for 2 h in an aqueous solution of a caesium-137 salt reduces the caesium-137 activity by 70%, as assessed from the gamma activity of the daughter nucleus {sup 137m}Ba, and discuss potential applications of laser-induced caesium-137 decay in radioactive waste disposal. (letters)

  5. Minimum induced drag configurations with jet interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, J. L.; Lan, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    A theoretical method is presented for determining the optimum camber shape and twist distribution for the minimum induced drag in the wing-alone case without prescribing the span loading shape. The same method was applied to find the corresponding minimum induced drag configuration with the upper-surface-blowing jet. Lan's quasi-vortex-lattice method and his wing-jet interaction theory was used. Comparison of the predicted results with another theoretical method shows good agreement for configurations without the flowing jet. More applicable experimental data with blowing jets are needed to establish the accuracy of the theory.

  6. Mestastable State Population in Laser Induced Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwong, V. H. S.; Kyriakides, C.; Ward, W. K.

    2006-01-01

    Laser induced plasma has been used as a source of neutrals and ions in the study of astrophysical plasmas. The purity of state of this source is essential in the determination of collision parameters such as the charge transfer rate coefficients between ions and neutrals. We will show that the temperature of the laser induced plasma is a rapidly decreasing function of time. The temperature is initially high but cools off rapidly through collisions with the expanding plasma electrons as the plasma recombines and streams into the vacuum. This rapid expansion of the plasma, similar to a supersonic jet, drastically lowers the internal energy of the neutrals and ions.

  7. Pustular psoriasis and drug-induced pustulosis.

    PubMed

    Serra, D; Gonçalo, M; Mariano, A; Figueiredo, A

    2011-04-01

    We report the case of a 65-year-old female patient that has suffered several flares of exanthematous pustulosis, some of them attributable to pustular psoriasis and others that were drug-induced, resembling acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis. In particular, we describe two severe flares that were induced by ciprofloxacin. Patch tests yielded positive results to ciprofloxacin and to other quinolones and reproduced the original lesional pattern both clinically and histologically. We discuss the diagnostic challenge that exanthematous pustulosis represents and the value of patch testing in this setting, as a helpful tool to assess drug participation in these eruptions. PMID:21505400

  8. Two-photon induced polymer nanomovement.

    PubMed

    Ishitobi, Hidekazu; Shoji, Satoru; Hiramatsu, Tsunemi; Sun, Hong-Bo; Sekkat, Zouheir; Kawata, Satoshi

    2008-09-01

    We present the first report of two-photon induced plastic surface deformation in solid polymer films. Exposure of azo polymer films, which absorb in the visible range (lambda(max) = 480 nm), to intense 920 nm irradiation leads to polarization dependent photofluidic polymer nanomovement caused by photoselective two-photon trans <-->cis isomerization. The deformations were induced by a gradient of light intensity; and strongly depend on the wavelength and the polarization direction of the incident laser light and the position of the focused spot with respect to the plane of the polymer film. PMID:18773020

  9. Inducing and Quantifying Clostridium difficile Spore Formation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Aimee; Fimlaid, Kelly A; Pishdadian, Keyan

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-positive nosocomial pathogen Clostridium difficile induces sporulation during growth in the gastrointestinal tract. Sporulation is necessary for this obligate anaerobe to form metabolically dormant spores that can resist antibiotic treatment, survive exit from the mammalian host, and transmit C. difficile infections. In this chapter, we describe a method for inducing C. difficile sporulation in vitro. This method can be used to study sporulation and maximize spore purification yields for a number of C. difficile strain backgrounds. We also describe procedures for visualizing spore formation using phase-contrast microscopy and for quantifying the efficiency of sporulation using heat resistance as a measure of functional spore formation. PMID:27507338

  10. X-ray-induced water vaporization

    SciTech Connect

    Weon, B. M.; Lee, J. S.; Je, J. H.; Fezzaa, K.

    2011-09-15

    We present quantitative evidence for x-ray-induced water vaporization: water is vaporized at a rate of 5.5 pL/s with the 1-A-wavelength x-ray irradiation of {approx}0.1 photons per A{sup 2}; moreover, water vapor is reversibly condensed during pauses in irradiation. This result fundamentally suggests that photoionization induces vaporization. This phenomenon is attributed to surface-tension reduction by ionization and would be universally important in radiological and electrohydrodynamic situations.

  11. Luminescence-induced photorefractive spatial solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, E.; Alonzo, M.; Devaux, F.; Toncelli, A.; Argiolas, N.; Bazzan, M.; Sada, C.; Chauvet, M.

    2010-03-01

    We report the observation of spatial confinement of a pump beam into a photorefractive solitonic channel induced by luminescence [luminescence induced spatial soliton (LISS)]. Trapped beams have been obtained in erbium doped lithium niobate crystals at concentrations as high as 0.7 mol % of erbium. By pumping at 980 nm, erbium ions emit photons at 550 nm by two-step absorption, wavelength which can be absorbed by lithium niobate and originates the photorefractive effect. The luminescence at 550 nm generates at the same time the solitonic channel and the background illumination reaching a steady-state soliton regime.

  12. Edge Singularity in “INDUCED QCD”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matytsin, Andrei; Migdal, Alexander A.

    The behavior of the master field in “induced QCD” near the edge of its support is studied. An extended scaling domain, where the shape of the master field is a universal function, is found. This function is determined explicitly for the case of dimensions close to 1, and the D-1 expansion is constructed. The problem of the meson spectrum corresponding to this solution is analyzed. As a by-product of these calculations, a new, explicit equation for the meson spectrum in induced QCD with a general potential is derived.

  13. Microbiologically induced deterioration of concrete - A Review

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shiping; Jiang, Zhenglong; Liu, Hao; Zhou, Dongsheng; Sanchez-Silva, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    Microbiologically induced deterioration (MID) causes corrosion of concrete by producing acids (including organic and inorganic acids) that degrade concrete components and thus compromise the integrity of sewer pipelines and other structures, creating significant problems worldwide. Understanding of the fundamental corrosion process and the causal agents will help us develop an appropriate strategy to minimize the costs in repairs. This review presents how microorganisms induce the deterioration of concrete, including the organisms involved and their colonization and succession on concrete, the microbial deterioration mechanism, the approaches of studying MID and safeguards against concrete biodeterioration. In addition, the uninvestigated research area of MID is also proposed. PMID:24688488

  14. Vulvar Skin Atrophy Induced by Topical Glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Elisabeth; Groben, Pamela; Eanes, Alisa; Iyer, Priya; Ugoeke, Joseph; Zolnoun, Denniz

    2011-01-01

    Steroid induced skin atrophy is the most frequent and perhaps most important cutaneous side effect of topical glucocorticoid therapy. To date, it has not been described in vulvar skin. We describe a patient with significant vulvar skin atrophy following prolonged steroid application to treat vulvar dermatitis. The extensive atrophy in the perineum resulted in secondary ‘webbing’ and partial obstruction of genital hiatus and superimposed dyspareunia. Prolonged topical steroids may result in atrophic changes in vulvar skin. Therefore, further research in clinical correlates of steroid-induced atrophy in the vulvar region is warranted. PMID:22594868

  15. Drug-induced hair colour changes.

    PubMed

    Bublin, J G; Thompson, D F

    1992-10-01

    Drug-induced hair colour changes are not a common adverse effect from medications. A wide variety of drugs have been implicated in causing hair colour changes but very few have data to support a true relationship. Of the drugs reported, chloroquine and cancer chemotherapeutic agents have the best evidence to support an association. Other drugs, such as p-aminobenzoic acid, calcium pantothenate, anthralin, chinoform, mephenesin, minoxidil, propofol, valproic acid, and verapamil await confirmatory data. Drug-induced causes should be considered in any patient with unexplained hair colour changes. PMID:1464633

  16. Fluconazole-Induced Type 1 Kounis Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Singh Mahal, Hardeep

    2016-01-01

    The administration of fluconazole is commonly used in both inpatient and outpatient settings for the management of candidiasis infection. Although it is associated with a relatively safe side effect profile, some patients experience adverse effects associated with increased morbidity. We describe 1 such patient, a 42-year-old woman with a history of severe eczema who developed fluconazole-induced type 1 Kounis syndrome. Review of literature indicates that this as the first case reported of fluconazole-induced type 1 Kounis syndrome. PMID:26938747

  17. [An update on glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Krasselt, Marco; Baerwald, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis is the most common cause of secondary osteoporosis. Moreover, it is the most common reason for an osteoporosis among young adults. The clinical use of oral glucocorticoids increases the fracture incidence already within three months after starting the therapy. There does not seem to be a lower threshold: even doses as low as 2,5 mg of prednisone equivalent increase the risk of fractures. Adequate diagnostic and therapy are able to significantly reduce the resulting fracture risk. This article will discuss the pathophysiology of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis and give a summary of the current recommendations including the recently updated German guidelines. PMID:26939107

  18. Flow-induced oscillation of free reeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchak, Peter; Bush, John

    2009-11-01

    We present an investigation of the mechanism by which air flow induces oscillation in free reeds, which produce sound in several musical instruments. In this system, a thin strip of metal is clamped at one end to the top of a plate above a slot large enough for it to pass through. This geometry allows a uniform flow to induce and sustain large-amplitude oscillations of the reed. We investigate experimentally the conditions under which oscillation occurs and formulate a theoretical model, informed by the work of St. Hilaire et al. [JFM, 1971], to explain our observations.

  19. The Marquis de Sade and induced abortion.

    PubMed

    Farr, A D

    1980-03-01

    In 1795 the Marquis de Sade published his La Philosophic dans le boudoir, in which he proposed the use of induced abortion for social reasons and as a means of population control. It is from this time that medical and social acceptance of abortion can be dated, although previously the subject had not been discussed in public in modern times. It is suggested that it was largely due to de Sade's writing that induced abortion received the impetus which resulted in its subsequent spread in western society. PMID:6990001

  20. Sevoflurane-induced pica in female rats.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kouichi; Yamamoto, Emiri; Sugimoto, Toru; Sagakami, Takuya; Yamatodani, Atsushi

    2016-05-01

    We examined the effects of volatile anesthetics on pica, which can be used to assess nausea and vomiting in rats. We found that inhalation anesthesia with sevoflurane significantly induced pica in female but not male rats. Among the female rats, young rats (8 weeks old) were more susceptible to its induction than adult rats (20 weeks old) with ovariectomy or sham-surgery. Anti-emetic drugs that are used to prevent postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) inhibited the pica. These results suggest that sevoflurane-induced pica in young female rats has the potential to be an animal model of PONV in humans. PMID:27156008

  1. Retrieval-Induced versus Context-Induced Forgetting: Does Retrieval-Induced Forgetting Depend on Context Shifts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soares, Julia S.; Polack, Cody W.; Miller, Ralph R.

    2016-01-01

    Retrieval-induced forgetting (RIF) is the observation that retrieval of target information causes forgetting of related nontarget information. A number of accounts of this phenomenon have been proposed, including a context-shift-based account (Jonker, Seli, & Macleod, 2013). This account proposes that RIF occurs as a result of the context…

  2. Hyperthermia restores apoptosis induced by death receptors through aggregation-induced c-FLIP cytosolic depletion.

    PubMed

    Morlé, A; Garrido, C; Micheau, O

    2015-01-01

    TRAIL is involved in immune tumor surveillance and is considered a promising anti-cancer agent owing to its limited side effects on healthy cells. However, some cancer cells display resistance, or become resistant to TRAIL-induced cell death. Hyperthermia can enhance sensitivity to TRAIL-induced cell death in various resistant cancer cell lines, including lung, breast, colon or prostate carcinomas. Mild heat shock treatment has been proposed to restore Fas ligand or TRAIL-induced apoptosis through c-FLIP degradation or the mitochondrial pathway. We demonstrate here that neither the mitochondria nor c-FLIP degradation are required for TRAIL-induced cell death restoration during hyperthermia. Our data provide evidence that insolubilization of c-FLIP, alone, is sufficient to enhance apoptosis induced by death receptors. Hyperthermia induced c-FLIP depletion from the cytosolic fraction, without apparent degradation, thereby preventing c-FLIP recruitment to the TRAIL DISC and allowing efficient caspase-8 cleavage and apoptosis. Hyperthermia-induced c-FLIP depletion was independent of c-FLIP DED2 FL chain assembly motif or ubiquitination-mediated c-FLIP degradation, as assessed using c-FLIP point mutants on lysine 167 and 195 or threonine 166, a phosphorylation site known to regulate ubiquitination of c-FLIP. Rather, c-FLIP depletion was associated with aggregation, because addition of glycerol not only prevented the loss of c-FLIP from the cytosol but also enabled c-FLIP recruitment within the TRAIL DISC, thus inhibiting TRAIL-induced apoptosis during hyperthermia. Altogether our results demonstrate that c-FLIP is a thermosensitive protein whose targeting by hyperthermia allows restoration of apoptosis induced by TNF ligands, including TRAIL. Our findings suggest that combining TRAIL agonists with whole-body or localized hyperthermia may be an interesting approach in cancer therapy. PMID:25675293

  3. Retrieval-Induced Forgetting: A Developmental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Ruth M.; Keating, Sam; Patel, Rina

    2004-01-01

    Two studies examined the possibility of retrieval-induced forgetting by 7-year-olds. Children heard a story while viewing pictures of events mentioned in the story, each highlighting objects drawn from two distinct semantic categories (e.g. animals and food). Over the next several days, children were asked the same yes/no questions about half the…

  4. INDUCED AND SPONTANEOUS NEOPLASIA IN ZEBRAFISH.

    EPA Science Inventory

    To address the potential of zebrafish as a cancer model, it is important to determine the susceptibility of zebrafish to tumors, and to compare zebrafish tumors with human tumors. To determine whether the commonly-used germ line mutagen, ethylnitrosourea (ENU) induces tumors, we ...

  5. Toroidal Alfven eigenmode-induced ripple trapping

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.; Fredrickson, E.; Darrow, D.; Zarnstorff, M.; Wilson, R.; Zweben, S.; Hill, K.; Chen, Y.; Fu, G.

    1995-08-01

    Toroidal Alfven eigenmodes are shown to be capable of inducing ripple trapping of high-energy particles in tokamaks, causing intense localized particle loss. The effect has been observed in TFTR [R. Hawryluk, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion {bold 33}, 1509 (1991)]. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  6. Bradykinin-induced proinflammatory signaling mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, Sakuji; Ishida, Shuji; Gute, Dean C; Korthuis, Ronald J

    2002-12-01

    Intravital microscopic techniques were used to examine the mechanisms underlying bradykinin-induced leukocyte/endothelial cell adhesive interactions (LECA) and venular protein leakage (VPL) in single postcapillary venules of the rat mesentery. The effects of bradykinin superfusion to increase LECA and VPL were prevented by coincident topical application of either a bradykinin-B(2) receptor antagonist, a cell-permeant superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic or antioxidant, or inhibitors of cytochrome P-450 epoxygenase (CYPE) or protein kinase C (PKC) but not by concomitant treatment with either SOD, a mast cell stabilizer, or inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase, xanthine oxidase, NADPH oxidase, or platelet-activating factor. Immunoneutralizing P-selectin or intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) completely prevented bradykinin-induced leukocyte adhesion and emigration but did not affect VPL. On the other hand, stabilization of F-actin with phalloidin prevented bradykinin-induced leukocyte emigration and VPL but did not alter leukocyte adhesion. These data indicate that bradykinin induces LECA in rat mesenteric venules via a B(2)-receptor-initiated, CYPE-, oxidant- and PKC-mediated, P-selectin- and ICAM-1-dependent mechanism. Bradykinin also produced VPL, an effect that was initiated by stimulation of B(2) receptors and involved CYPE and PKC activation, oxidant generation, and cytoskeletal reorganization but was independent of leukocyte adherence and emigration. PMID:12388246

  7. Exopolysaccharide from Trichoderma pseudokoningii induces macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guodong; Zhu, Lei; Yu, Bo; Chen, Ke; Liu, Bo; Liu, Jun; Qin, Guozheng; Liu, Chunyan; Liu, Huixia; Chen, Kaoshan

    2016-09-20

    In this study, we evaluated the immunomodulatory activity of an exopolysaccharide (EPS) derived from Trichoderma pseudokoningii and investigated the molecular mechanism of EPS-mediated activation of macrophages. Results revealed that EPS could significantly induce the production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β and enhance phagocytic activity in RAW 264.7 cells. Immunofluorescence staining indicated that EPS promoted the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 subunit. Western blot analysis showed that EPS increased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein, the degradation of IκB-α and the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Furthermore, pretreatment of RAW 264.7 cells with specific inhibitors of NF-κB and MAPKs significantly attenuated EPS-induced TNF-α and IL-1β production. EPS also induced the inhibition of cytokine secretion by special antibodies against Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and Dectin-1. These data suggest that EPS from Trichoderma pseudokoningii activates RAW 264.7 cells through NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways via TLR4 and Dectin-1. PMID:27261736

  8. Radiation abolishes inducer binding to lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Gillard, Nathalie; Spotheim-Maurizot, Mélanie; Charlier, Michel

    2005-04-01

    The lactose operon functions under the control of the repressor-operator system. Binding of the repressor to the operator prevents the expression of the structural genes. This interaction can be destroyed by the binding of an inducer to the repressor. If ionizing radiations damage the partners, a dramatic dysfunction of the regulation system may be expected. We showed previously that gamma irradiation hinders repressor-operator binding through protein damage. Here we show that irradiation of the repressor abolishes the binding of the gratuitous inducer isopropyl-1-beta-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) to the repressor. The observed lack of release of the repressor from the complex results from the loss of the ability of the inducer to bind to the repressor due to the destruction of the IPTG binding site. Fluorescence measurements show that both tryptophan residues located in or near the IPTG binding site are damaged. Since tryptophan damage is strongly correlated with the loss of IPTG binding ability, we conclude that it plays a critical role in the effect. A model was built that takes into account the kinetic analysis of damage production and the observed protection of its binding site by IPTG. This model satisfactorily accounts for the experimental results and allows us to understand the radiation-induced effects. PMID:15799700

  9. Pharmacodynamics of drug-induced weight gain.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, S. K.; Kaur, Gurpreet

    2001-08-01

    Body weight gain during treatment with drugs for any kind of disease may represent improvement of the disease itself. However, sometimes these drug-induced alterations of the body's appetite-regulating mechanisms result in excessive weight gain, thus jeopardizing compliance with prescribed medication. A number of drugs are capable of changing body weight as an adverse consequence of their therapeutic effect. Included in this category are the psychotropic drugs such as antipsychotics, antidepressants and mood stabilizers. Antipsychotics are well-known culprits of weight gain. The low-potency (e.g., chlorpromazine and thioridazine) and atypical agents (e.g., clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine and risperidone) are most often associated with weight gain. Antidepressants such as tricyclic antidepressants and monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors are most often associated with significant weight gain. The tertiary tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline is thought to induce the most weight gain. Mood stabilizers such as lithium carbonate, valproic acid and carbamazepine also induce weight gain in a considerable number of patients. Treatment with corticosteroids is associated with dose-dependent body weight gain in many patients and corticosteroid-induced obesity aggravates other corticosteroid-associated health risks. Insulin therapy in diabetic patients usually increases body weight. Finally, sulfonylurea derivatives, antineoplastic agents used for the treatment of breast cancer and several drugs used in migraine prophylaxis may cause body weight gain as well. (c) 2001 Prous Science. All rights reserved. PMID:12743638

  10. Transfer-induced fission of superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Zubov, A. S.; Sargsyan, V. V.; Scheid, W.

    2010-07-15

    Possibilities of transfer-induced fission of new isotopes of superheavy nuclei with charge numbers 103-108 are studied for the first time in the reactions {sup 48}Ca+{sup 244,246,248}Cm at energies near the corresponding Coulomb barriers. The predicted cross sections are found to be measurable with the detection of three-body final states.

  11. Sotalol-induced bradycardia reversed by glucagon.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, C. M.; Daya, M. R.

    1995-01-01

    Glucagon is considered the drug of choice for treating bradycardia and hypotension encountered during beta-blocker poisoning. Its potential usefulness in reversing adverse effects encountered during therapeutic dosing with beta-blockers has not been well characterized. We present a case of sotalol-induced bradycardia reversed by glucagon. PMID:7787496

  12. ALLYLISOPROPYLACETAMIDE INDUCES RAT HEPATIC ORNITHINE DECARBOXYLASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In rat liver, allylisopropylacetamide (AIA) treatment strongly induced (25-fold) the activity of rat hepatic ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). y either the oral or the subcutaneous routes, AIA produced a long-lasting induction (30 to 4O hours) of hepatic ODC activity. hree analogs o...

  13. Induced Abortion: An Ethical Conundrum for Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millner, Vaughn S.; Hanks, Robert B.

    2002-01-01

    Induced abortion is one of the most controversial moral issues in American culture, but counselor value struggles regarding abortion are seldom addressed in counseling literature. This article considers the conflictual nature of the ethical principles of autonomy, fidelity, justice, beneficence, and nonmaleficence as they can occur within the…

  14. Cyclosporine A-Induced Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Craig; Campbell, Eric; McMorrow, Tara; Ryan, Michael P.

    2005-01-01

    Cyclosporine A, which has been the foremost immunosuppressive agent since the early 1980’s, significantly improves the success of organ transplantation. However, common complications of cyclosporine A therapy, such as severe renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis, limit the drug’s clinical use. Although the exact mechanisms driving cyclosporine A-induced tubulointerstitial fibrosis remain elusive, we hypothesized that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) may play a major role. We investigated this in vitro by treating human proximal tubular cells with cyclosporine A. Morphological changes were observed after cyclosporine A treatment, including cell elongation (with a large degree of detachment), cytoskeletal rearrangement, and junctional disruption. In addition, expression of the myofibroblast-specific marker α-smooth muscle actin was detected in treated cells. These observations are consistent with events described during EMT. Using Affymetrix gene microarrays, we identified 128 genes that were differentially regulated in renal tubular cells after cyclosporine A treatment, including known profibrotic factors, oncogenes, and transcriptional regulators. Cyclosporine A induced a dose-dependent increase in transforming growth factor-β secretion from proximal tubular cells. Subsequent functional studies revealed that protein kinase C-β isoforms play a key role in cyclosporine A-induced effects. These findings provide novel insights into cyclosporine A-induced renal fibrosis and the molecular mechanisms underlying EMT, events that may be relevant in other disease states. PMID:16049326

  15. Temperature memory of the induced magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetcfinski, V. S.; Tunyi, I.

    2012-04-01

    Methods of higher harmonics applied to study the effects associated with the induced magnetic anisotropy (IMA) of ferro- and ferrimagnetic materials are considered. Physical processes causing the anisotropy and small value of these effects are analyzed. It is demonstrated that the IMA can remember the pressure at which it was formed.

  16. Diabetic Cardiovascular Disease Induced by Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kayama, Yosuke; Raaz, Uwe; Jagger, Ann; Adam, Matti; Schellinger, Isabel N.; Sakamoto, Masaya; Suzuki, Hirofumi; Toyama, Kensuke; Spin, Joshua M.; Tsao, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). DM can lead to multiple cardiovascular complications, including coronary artery disease (CAD), cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure (HF). HF represents one of the most common causes of death in patients with DM and results from DM-induced CAD and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Oxidative stress is closely associated with the pathogenesis of DM and results from overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS overproduction is associated with hyperglycemia and metabolic disorders, such as impaired antioxidant function in conjunction with impaired antioxidant activity. Long-term exposure to oxidative stress in DM induces chronic inflammation and fibrosis in a range of tissues, leading to formation and progression of disease states in these tissues. Indeed, markers for oxidative stress are overexpressed in patients with DM, suggesting that increased ROS may be primarily responsible for the development of diabetic complications. Therefore, an understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms mediated by oxidative stress is crucial to the prevention and treatment of diabetes-induced CVD. The current review focuses on the relationship between diabetes-induced CVD and oxidative stress, while highlighting the latest insights into this relationship from findings on diabetic heart and vascular disease. PMID:26512646

  17. Treatment of drug-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsien-Yi; Albertson, Timothy E; Olson, Kent R

    2016-03-01

    Seizures are a common complication of drug intoxication, and up to 9% of status epilepticus cases are caused by a drug or poison. While the specific drugs associated with drug-induced seizures may vary by geography and change over time, common reported causes include antidepressants, stimulants and antihistamines. Seizures occur generally as a result of inadequate inhibitory influences (e.g., gamma aminobutyric acid, GABA) or excessive excitatory stimulation (e.g. glutamate) although many other neurotransmitters play a role. Most drug-induced seizures are self-limited. However, status epilepticus occurs in up to 10% of cases. Prolonged or recurrent seizures can lead to serious complications and require vigorous supportive care and anticonvulsant drugs. Benzodiazepines are generally accepted as the first line anticonvulsant therapy for drug-induced seizures. If benzodiazepines fail to halt seizures promptly, second line drugs include barbiturates and propofol. If isoniazid poisoning is a possibility, pyridoxine is given. Continuous infusion of one or more anticonvulsants may be required in refractory status epilepticus. There is no role for phenytoin in the treatment of drug-induced seizures. The potential role of ketamine and levetiracetam is promising but not established. PMID:26174744

  18. NEUROPEPTIDE MODULATION OF CHEMICALLY INDUCED SKIN IRRITATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was designed to demonstrate that the early symptoms of chemically-induced skin irritation are neurally mediated. everal approaches were used to affect nerve transmission in adult Balb/c female mice. hese included general anesthesia (i.e., sodium pentobarbital), systemi...

  19. Sodium nitroprusside induces apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qian; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2013-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by a slowly progressing degradation of the matrix and destruction of articular cartilage. Apoptosis of chondrocyte is accounted for the mechanism of OA. Nitric oxide (NO), as a stimulus, has been shown to induce chondrocyte apoptosis by activating the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), increasing the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and the level of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), inhibiting the proteoglycan synthesis and type II collagen expression. In this study, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was administered to be the NO donor to explore the mechanism of NO-induced apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes obtained from six weeks old New Zealand rabbits. CCK-8 assay revealed the inhibitory effect of SNP on cell viability. We used flow cytometry (FCM) to assess the form of cell death by Annexin-V/propidium iodide (PI) double staining, and evaluate the change of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). We found that the SNP induced chondrocyte apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner and an observable reduction of ΔΨm. In conclusion, our findings indicate that SNP induces apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes via a mitochondria-mediated pathway.

  20. Study Of Laser-Induced Copolymerization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, Gilda A.; Meador, Willard E.; Chang, C. Ken

    1993-01-01

    Report describes experiments on photopolymerization of styrene/maleic anhydride copolymer published as part of Laser Polymerization Program at NASA Langley Research Center. Presents basic study of copolymerization of styrene and maleic anhydride under laser-induced initiation and polymerization. Helps to clarify different theories on such initiation and represents significant advances in understanding of basic processes.